Microscopy ListServer Archives  


File Requested = 0011.txt
Retrival Software Version=NJZ07060908

From: Erdem Yasar :      yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 15:09:15 +0200 (EET)
Subject: SEM,TEM Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a functional JSM 5600 SEM and JEM3010 TEM available. If
you have an interest please call or email me. Thank you.


**********************************
**********************************
** Research.Asst.ERDEM YASAR **
** University of Kirikkale **
** Department of Physics **
** TEM LABORATORY **
** 71450 KIRIKKALE/TURKEY **
** erdem.yasar-at-physics.org **
** yasar-at-science.ankara.edu.tr **
** yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr **
**********************************
**********************************








From daemon Wed Nov 1 11:47:06 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 04:54:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: Frozen sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My amateur results with a microtome have been less than satisfactory.
Embedding in paraffin has been tire some and not very successful.
Sectioning raw or fix material has only worked on a very limited range of
things.

I picked up an old A0 Microtome and a new knife that I believed used
CO2 as a coolant. I can get CO2 but it is a hassle and I have to build
a stage and delivery system for it since the stage is missing.

I am planning on building a simpler stage using copper on an insulating
base and use propane or 1,1,1,2,tetrafloroethane. The tests I have done
with tetrafloroethane look very promising. It reaches -62 f and is very
easy to use. It is normally used to chill parts on circuit boards when
looking for problems. It comes in a spray can with a plastic tube.

Modifying a propane torch is also an easy solution. I have worked with
propane all my life and I am well aware of the dangers. Having to go
outside to use it is one of the main reasons for using the
tetrafloroethane.

My questions are: Will spraying the sample directly with the coolant
cause more damage to the sample than freezing indirectly through the
stage?
If so can I just use a larger sample and trim away the damaged area? Are
there any better readily available coolants?

Thanks
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00








From daemon Wed Nov 1 12:02:00 2000



From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson :      dsoren-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 11:05:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Help for EM of cultured hippocampal cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Xinran,

Perhaps the membranes are leaching out during the dehydration and
infiltration. Try a rapid dehydration, such as, two minutes each in 50,
70, 95, and one change of 100% EtOH. Then infiltrate in 3:1 EtOH:Epon for
ten minutes, 1:1 for 10 minutes, 1:3 for twenty minutes, full strength
Epon for thirty minutes, change to fresh full strength Epon and
polymerize. Glutaraldehyde fix for only one hour, maximum, and that is
longer than actually needed for cell monolayers. Stick with your en bloc
staining method prior to dehydration. Also, perhaps thicker sections,
like 70 nm, would increase your contrast.
Good luck!

Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
(734)763-1170
dsoren-at-umich.edu

On Tue, 31 Oct 2000, Xinran Liu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We currently doing some EM work on rat cultured hippocampal cells.
} The purpose of this experiment is to visualize individual synaptic vesicles
} by transmission electron microscopy. The problem we had is that the
} resolution/contrast is not high enough to distinguish the synaptic vesicles.
}
} The following is what we did, cells were cultured on coverslips, they were
} fixed in situ in 2% glutaraldehyde for 1 hr to 24 hrs, postfixed with 1%
} OsO4 for 1 hour, and en bloc stained with 2% aqueous uranyl acetate for 30
} min. dehydrated in ethanol and embedded in Polybed812. 40-50 nm sections
} were stained by 5% uranyl acetate and lead citrate prior to EM observation.
}
} I would appreciate it very much if someone would provide suggestions on
} section staining or cell processing.
}
} Xinran
}
} ********************************************
} Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
} Center for Basic Neuroscience
} The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
} 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., NA4.214A
} Dallas, TX 75390-9111
} Phone: (214) 648-1830
} Fax: (214) 648-1801
} E-mail: xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu
}
}



From daemon Wed Nov 1 12:15:18 2000



From: John Sutliff :      sutliff-at-hkltechnology.com
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 22:25:18 -0500
Subject: Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Xinran Liu wrote:

} We currently doing some EM work on rat cultured hippocampal cells.
} The purpose of this experiment is to visualize individual synaptic vesicles
} by transmission electron microscopy. The problem we had is that the
} resolution/contrast is not high enough to distinguish the synaptic vesicles.
}
} The following is what we did, cells were cultured on coverslips, they were
} fixed in situ in 2% glutaraldehyde for 1 hr to 24 hrs, postfixed with 1%
} OsO4 for 1 hour, and en bloc stained with 2% aqueous uranyl acetate for 30
} min. dehydrated in ethanol and embedded in Polybed812. 40-50 nm sections
} were stained by 5% uranyl acetate and lead citrate prior to EM observation.
}
} I would appreciate it very much if someone would provide suggestions on
} section staining or cell processing.
}
} Xinran
}
} ********************************************
} Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
} Center for Basic Neuroscience
} The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
} 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., NA4.214A
} Dallas, TX 75390-9111
} Phone: (214) 648-1830
} Fax: (214) 648-1801
} E-mail: xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu

Sounds like your sections are too thin for adequate (for your needs)
contrast. Thinner sections are not automatically "better". Try cutting pale gold
sections and see if that helps.
ALSO, check the alignment and stigmation of your microscope. You may need a
different size condernser aperature and/or a different size objective aperature.
All of these can affect contrast and resolution.

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From root Wed Nov 1 13:57:03 2000
Return-Path: {Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Received: (from daemon-at-localhost)
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id NAA08322
for dist-Microscopy; Wed, 1 Nov 2000 13:34:55 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id NAA08319
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Wed, 1 Nov 2000 13:34:24 -0600 (CST)
Received: from rhea.king.ac.uk (rhea.king.ac.uk [141.241.2.9])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id NAA08312
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ; Wed, 1 Nov 2000 13:34:13 -0600 (CST)


Dear Cameron,

Thank you very much for your reply (I had a week off and found it
just now) - it was the only reply I have received.

The letter was written and signed by our Senior Technician and
when we sent it, it bounced back, obviously because his name is
not on the list. Therefore we added in the second posting that the
responses should be forwarded to my address - I did not intend to
deprive the microscopy community of the replies and am quite
happy to post this again for all to see - especially your helpful reply.

Thank you very much - if that saves our aging TEM it would make
me very happy.

Regards
Claudia




} From: Cameron Hind {Cameron_Hind-at-baxter.com}


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

HKL Technology, a global leader in electron diffraction systems for scanning
electron microscopes, announces an opening in its North American
headquarters in Burnt Hills, New York. Burnt Hills is located in Saratoga
County, in New York’s Capital District, centrally located about 3 hours from
New York City, Boston, and Montreal. HKL Technology is a small, high
technology firm growing in a competitive market. The company is currently
seeking an individual with advanced skills and experience in materials
characterization, which must include scanning electron microscopy and
electron or x-ray diffraction, to take responsibility for our applications
lab. A masters or doctoral degree in physics, materials science, or
geological science is required. Candidates should have positive experience
in teaching others, as training new and existing users is a vital role for
this position. A successful candidate will be gregarious and confident, and
must enjoy traveling. If you are interested in this position, send e-mail
to sutliff-at-hkltechnology.com providing your full name, current address, and
the contact information of two references. Resumes should be sent by
regular mail to the address below.

John A. Sutliff
HKL Technology, Inc.
P.O. Box 179 (801 Saratoga Road)
Burnt Hills, NY 12027
sutliff-at-hkltechnology.com
www.hkltechnology.com
TEL:(518)384-0101
FAX:(518)384-0281



From daemon Thu Nov 2 07:58:56 2000



From: Robert McDonald :      robert-at-starav.geology.gla.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 08:51:35 +0000
Subject: Leo S360 4QBSD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anyone know about Semper & Sprynt Boards and can help?
(Send replies to Richard Hunton {Hunton-at-Cardiff.ac.uk} , not
me!)




Hi Folks:

I'm fairly new to this business so I hope that you'll forgive what might
seem to be a 'dumb' question.

I am currently using a LEO / Cambridge S360 SEM with a 4QBSD.
My problem is that when I use probe currents of greater than about 18nA I
get what looks like a reflection of the four diode quadrants of the
detector superimposed on the backscattered image.

This appears (pretty much) independant of the working distance and
magnification. The SE image *does* have a dark spot on the picture where
the centre of the 'reflected' quadrant ghost appears.

I *would* like to be able operate at much higher probe currents than this
if possible. I am using 20 kV and I even changed the filament (you always
hope, don't you?).

Any help would be most gratefully recieved.

Robert


Robert McDonald
SEM & EPMA Laboratories
Department of Geography - Division of Earth Sciences
Gregory Building
Lilybank Gardens
Glasgow University
Glasgow G12 8QQ
Scotland

Tel 0141 330 5505 (SEM lab)
or 0141 330 5442 (Microprobe Lab)
fax 0141 330 4817


From daemon Thu Nov 2 08:15:24 2000



From: Melissa Troost :      m-troost-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 08:09:54 -0600
Subject: job listing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Specimen Preparation Engineer
Northwestern University

The Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC) at Northwestern University
has an immediate opening for a specimen preparation expert. EPIC is a part
of the world renowned Materials Research Center (MRC) and the Department of
Materials Science & Engineering at Northwestern.
The EPIC facility serves over 120 users in all aspects of Scanning and
Transmission Electron Microscopy. The role of the specimen preparation
engineer is to assist users with their specimen preparation needs, including
instruction in TEM and SEM sample preparation using IBT, FIB, PIPS,
electropolishing, ultramicrotomy, cutting/grinding/polishing, vacuum
evaporation etc.
All microscopes in EPIC are under full service contract. Thus, the duties
include training students/users, development of specialized techniques and
applications, minor maintenance, record keeping and billing.
A BS or technical degree in physical/biological sciences is required. The
candidate must have hands-on experience in all aspects of specimen
preparation as well as considerable familiarity with digital acquisition,
processing and computer assisted techniques. All levels of experience will
be considered. Compensation will be commensurate with experience and
qualifications.
Send cover letter, resume and three references to:
Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid, Director EPIC
Materials Science & Engineering
Northwestern University, 3013A MLSB
Evanston, IL 60208
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu
Fax: (847) 491-7820
http://epic.ms.nwu.edu/epic/index.htm

Northwestern University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.





From daemon Thu Nov 2 08:35:15 2000



From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 02 Nov 2000 09:31:35 -0500
Subject: Re: Help for EM of cultured hippocampal cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


It is possible to use an osmium-potassium ferrocyanide fix to enhance membranes (see Karnovsky, 1971, Russell and Burguet, 1977). However, the downside is potential bleaching of ribosomes. I would be interested in hearing from others as to their experience with this type of tissue preparation.
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057

On Wednesday, November 1, 2000, Geoff McAuliffe {mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU} wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Nov 2 09:01:25 2000



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 10:01:12 -0500
Subject: RMC microtome service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id IAA00554
for dist-Microscopy; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 08:56:05 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id IAA00551
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 08:55:35 -0600 (CST)
Received: from dogwood.botany.uga.edu (dogwood.botany.uga.edu [128.192.26.2])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id IAA00544
for {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 08:55:24 -0600 (CST)
Received: from [128.192.26.25] (bot2625.botany.uga.edu [128.192.26.25])
by dogwood.botany.uga.edu (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id JAA18891
for {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com} ; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 09:54:31 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: {200011021454.JAA18891-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Hi all,
I need to find someone to work on a RMC 6000-XL ultramicrotome. The machine
has lots of internal vibration on the up/retracted stroke but it is stable
in the cutting stroke...it will cut a section then shake the dookey out of
it so that it is impossible to form a ribbon. The machine is on an
anti-vibration table.
any help would be greatly appreciated.
thanks much,
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Thu Nov 2 10:06:30 2000



From: Jo Dee Fish :      jofish-at-burnham-inst.org
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 08:01:22 -0800
Subject: Re: Help for EM of cultured hippocampal cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Xinran,
I en bloc stain my cell cultures in 2% UA in 70% EtOH. I leave them in the 4
degree refrigerator overnight, at least 16 hours. The rest of my processing
sounds comparable to yours. This seems to give good contrast. I haven't worked
with hippocampal cell cultures, though, so don't now how it would work on them.
Good luck,
Jo Dee

Xinran Liu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We currently doing some EM work on rat cultured hippocampal cells.
} The purpose of this experiment is to visualize individual synaptic vesicles
} by transmission electron microscopy. The problem we had is that the
} resolution/contrast is not high enough to distinguish the synaptic vesicles.
}
} The following is what we did, cells were cultured on coverslips, they were
} fixed in situ in 2% glutaraldehyde for 1 hr to 24 hrs, postfixed with 1%
} OsO4 for 1 hour, and en bloc stained with 2% aqueous uranyl acetate for 30
} min. dehydrated in ethanol and embedded in Polybed812. 40-50 nm sections
} were stained by 5% uranyl acetate and lead citrate prior to EM observation.
}
} I would appreciate it very much if someone would provide suggestions on
} section staining or cell processing.
}
} Xinran
}
} ********************************************
} Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
} Center for Basic Neuroscience
} The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
} 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., NA4.214A
} Dallas, TX 75390-9111
} Phone: (214) 648-1830
} Fax: (214) 648-1801
} E-mail: xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu

--
Jo Dee Fish
Coordinator of Electron Microscopy
Cell Analysis Facility
The Burnham Institute
10901 N. Torrey Pines Rd.
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858)646-3100 ext. 3620




From daemon Thu Nov 2 12:39:14 2000



From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-leland.Stanford.EDU
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 10:29:27 -0800
Subject: Re: Help for EM of cultured hippocampal cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I routinely prepare hippocampal neurons grown on glass coverslips for
thin section EM using microwave fixation. I fix for 16 seconds (8 on-20
off-8 on) on ice with chilled fixative (2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M
cacodylate buffer). For secondary fixation, I fix 16 seconds on ice with
chilled 1-2% osmium tetroxide in 0.1M cacodylate buffer containing 0.8%
potassium ferricyanide. I let this sit for 5 mins before proceeding with
30 seconds of 5% en bloc uranyl acetate. Let the dish sit for 30 mins.
Proceed with microwave dehydration (10 seconds each ethanol change, 3 times
100%) and infiltration (5 mins each). I cut 70 nm thin sections (pale
gold/silver) and stain with 5% aqueous UA for 15-30 mins. followed by 3
mins. with lead citrate (made fresh each time).
In regards to Xinran Liu's problem, there could be several factors. The
fixation time is too long- 20 minutes of bench fixation is adequate. Are
you putting sections on formvar? This could reduce contrast. Also, make
thicker sections (60-70nm). Thirdly, check your uranyl acetate. I was
using old UA that had expired and was useless. A new bottle made enormous
difference. Freshly made stains help a lot, particularly for cell cultures
that have low contrast. You should be able to see synaptic vesicles no
problem.
If these things don't help, the problem could be with the health of your
cultures. Synaptic vesicles are the first to go in sick cultures. So make
sure the cultures are healthy and save yourself a lot of time and effort!
Good luck.

JoAnn Buchanan
Molecular and Cellular Physiology
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305
650-723-5856


From daemon Thu Nov 2 12:58:34 2000



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 13:50:58 -0500
Subject: RE: RMC microtome service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dookey? I haven't come across that one yet up here in the Great White
North. Just in case you missed it, RMC announced not too long ago that they
had 're-emerged' from the hiatus caused by Ventana getting out of the EM
products business. They are alive and well in Tucson and could likely
point you in the direction of someone in your area. Contact info:

Al Coritz
Sales & Service Manager
RMC-Boeckeler Instruments
4650 S. Butterfield Dr.
Tucson, AZ 85714
Voice: 520-745-0001
Cell: 520-465-3598
Fax: 520-745-0004
Email:Al-at-Boeckeler.com
Website:RMCProducts.com

Hope you find someone suitable, eh? (That's Canuck-talk).

Tom Malis
Group Leader - Characterization
Materials Technology Laboratory
Natural Resources Canada (Govt. of Canada)
568 Booth St., Ottawa, Canada
ph. 613-992-2310
FAX 613-992-8735
email: malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca



} ----------
} From:
} beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu[SMTP:beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu]
} Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 10:01 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RMC microtome service
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi all,
} I need to find someone to work on a RMC 6000-XL ultramicrotome. The
} machine
} has lots of internal vibration on the up/retracted stroke but it is stable
} in the cutting stroke...it will cut a section then shake the dookey out of
} it so that it is impossible to form a ribbon. The machine is on an
} anti-vibration table.
} any help would be greatly appreciated.
} thanks much,
} Beth
}
} **************************************
} Beth Richardson
} EM Lab Coordinator
} Botany Department
} University of Georgia
} Athens, GA 30602
}
} Phone - (706) 542-1790
} FAX - (706) 542-1805
} Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
}
} "Between the two evils,
} I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
} **************************************
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Nov 2 14:01:21 2000



From: Prof. Vinayak Dravid :      v-dravid-at-nwu.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 14:03:13 -0600
Subject: Two TEM Postdoc Positions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{html}
{font face="Arial, Helvetica"} POSITION OPEN # 1 of 2 {br}
{br}
Postdoctoral Scholar/Research Associate {br}
{br}
Cryo-Electron Microscopy of Soft and Hybrid Nanostructures {br}
{br}
Northwestern University {br}
Materials Science & Engineering, Evanston, IL {br}
{br}
A postdoctoral scholar/research associate position is immediately
available at Northwestern University in the area of advanced Analytical
Cryo-TEM of soft and hybrid nanostructured materials. {br}
This project is being supervised by Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid, and concerns
with analysis of nanoscale structure, assembly/organization and chemistry
of advanced soft and hybrid nanostructures (such as patterned DNA/Lipids,
nanoparticle-DNA assemblies and nanoparticle-Lipid complexes etc..) using
Analytical TEM and Cryo-EM techniques. This is a part of extensive
cross-disciplinary and collaborative activities in nanotechnology at
Northwestern. As a result, the candidate would have ample opportunity to
learn diverse aspects of nanotechnology, from soft nanolithography to
dynamic measurements, while contributing to Cryo-TEM analysis of soft and
hybrid nanostructures. {br}
Northwestern’s electron probe instrumentation center (EPIC:
{a href="http://epic.ms.nwu.edu/" eudora="autourl"} http://epic.ms.nwu.edu {/a} )
is well equipped with several modern SEMs, TEMs and extensive specimen
preparation equipment ranging from focused ion beam (FIB) to
cryo-transfer with LN2 and LHe stages. One of the cold FEG TEMs (Hitachi
HF-2000) will soon be equipped with a Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) which
will be extensively utilized in 2-D mapping of element- and bonding
specific spectral signatures in soft and hybrid nanostructures. {br}
The position requires a PhD in physical/biological sciences/engineering.
Considerable hands-on experience in cryo-preparation techniques (e.g.
freeze fracture/drying, ultramicrotomy) for soft/hybrid specimen is
required. Experience in analytical and cryo-TEM techniques and
computation/simulations is necessary. Prior knowledge of imaging
filter/spectral imaging is desirable but not mandatory. {br}
The position is available immediately for at least two years with
possibility for extension for additional years upon mutual agreement.
{br}
Salary and compensation would commensurate with experience, in the range:
$ 30,000-$40,000 per year. {br}
Please forward resume with three names of references to: {br}
Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid {br}
Materials Science & Engineering {br}
Director, Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC) {br}
2225 N. Campus Drive, 1133 MLSF {br}
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA {br}
Ph.: (847) 467-1363, Fax: (847) 491-7820 {br}
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu {br}
URL:
{/font} {a href="http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu/" eudora="autourl"} {font face="Arial, Helvetica" color="#0000FF"} {u} http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu {br}
{br}
{br}
{/a} {/font} {/u} {font face="Arial, Helvetica"} POSITION OPEN # 2 of 2 {br}
{br}
Postdoctoral Scholar/Research Associate {br}
{br}
Analytical TEM and Electron Holography of Nanostructured Materials {br}
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, {u} USA {br}
{br}
{/u} A postdoctoral scholar/research associate position is immediately
available at Northwestern University in the area of advanced Analytical
TEM of nanostructured materials. {br}
This project is being supervised by Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid, and concerns
with analysis of nanoscale chemistry, structure and electrostatic fields
at interfaces and junctions in advanced nanostructures (nanocrystals,
nanotubes, thin film interfaces) using analytical TEM and holography
techniques. This is a part of extensive cross-disciplinary and
collaborative activities in nanotechnology at Northwestern. As a result,
the candidate would have ample opportunity to learn diverse aspects of
nanotechnology, from soft nanolithography to dynamic property
measurements while contributing to TEM analysis of nanostructures. {br}
Northwestern’s electron probe instrumentation center (EPIC:
{a href="http://epic.ms.nwu.edu/" eudora="autourl"} http://epic.ms.nwu.edu {/a} )
is well equipped with several modern SEMs, TEMs and extensive specimen
preparation equipment ranging including a focused ion beam (FIB) system.
One of the cold FEG TEMs (Hitachi HF-2000) will soon be equipped with a
Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) which will be utilized in 2-D mapping of
element- and bonding specific spectral signatures in nanostructures.
{br}
The position requires a PhD in physical sciences/engineering.
Considerable hands-on experience in advanced TEM techniques such as
HRTEM, EDS/EELS, CBED and computation/simulations is required. Experience
in electron holography is desirable but not mandatory. {br}
The position is available immediately for two years with possibility for
extension upon mutual agreement. {br}
Salary and compensation would commensurate with experience, in the range:
$ 30,000-$40,000 per year. {br}
Please forward resume with three names of references to: {br}
Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid {br}
Materials Science & Engineering {br}
Director, Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC) {br}
2225 N. Campus Drive, 1133 MLSF {br}
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA {br}
Ph.: (847) 467-1363, Fax: (847) 491-7820 {br}
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu {br}
URL:
{/font} {a href="http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu/" eudora="autourl"} {font face="Arial, Helvetica" color="#0000FF"} {u} http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu {br}
{br}
{br}
{br}
{/a} {/font} {/u} {br}
{div} ******************************************************* {/div}
{div} (Vinayak P. Dravid) {/div}
{div} Materials Science & Engineering {/div}
{div} Director, Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC) {/div}
{div} 2225 N. Campus Drive, 1133 MLSF {/div}
{div} Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA {/div}
{div} Ph.: (847) 467-1363, Fax: (847) 491-7820 {/div}
{div} E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu {/div}
{br}
{div} {a href="http://nuinfo.nwu.edu/materials/faculty/vpd.html" EUDORA=AUTOURL} http://nuinfo.nwu.edu/materials/faculty/vpd.html {/a}
{/div}
{div} or {/div}
{div} {a href="http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu/" EUDORA=AUTOURL} http://vpd.ms.nwu.edu {/a} {/div}
*******************************************************
{/html}



From daemon Thu Nov 2 14:24:26 2000



From: Bruce Cutler :      bcutler-at-eureka.idl.ukans.edu
Date: 2 Nov 2000 14:19:20 -0600
Subject: SEM Schottky vs. cold FE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


We are in the preliminary throes of writing a grant proposal for a new SEM. This
scope will have the following characteristics: EDX, cathodoluminescence, beam
etching, BS, "conventional" SEM use, possibly variable pressure.
Questions
1. What are the advantages/disadvantages of Schottky over cold FE.
2. I have personally dealt with conventional filament replacement (W), I gather
that FE emitter replacement is much more involved than W filament replacement.
What are practicalities of FE (thermal or cold) emitter replacement with respect
to who performs the work and the cost of the emitter.
3. Is there any reason that variable pressure will preclude the use of the scope
for beam etching.
Thanks to all
Bruce
Bruce Cutler
Director, Microscopy & Electronic Imaging Lab
University of Kansas




From daemon Thu Nov 2 14:30:31 2000



From: Daniel L Flatoff :      dflatoff-at-stu.madison.tec.wi.us
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 20:27:39 GMT
Subject: TEM prep of DLC coating on steel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id OAA01294
for dist-Microscopy; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 14:30:06 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id OAA01284
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 14:29:35 -0600 (CST)
Received: from mail (madison.tec.wi.us [198.150.15.232])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id OAA01274
for {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} ; Thu, 2 Nov 2000 14:29:08 -0600 (CST)
Message-Id: {200011022029.OAA01274-at-ultra5.microscopy.com}
Received: from stu.madison.tec.wi.us
(nimsstu1.madison.tec.wi.us [198.150.15.195])
by mail; Thu, 02 Nov 2000 14:27:37 -0600
Received: from dflatoff [198.150.245.87] by stu.madison.tec.wi.us
with Novell Internet Messaging System Web Client; Thu, 02 Nov 2000 14:27:39


Greetings All,
I would like to request guidance on protocols for
preparing TEM cross section to view the interface between
diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on a steel substrate
which has been preimplanted to increase the adhesion of the
coating. Any assistance with be greatly appreciated.



Daniel L. Flatoff




From daemon Thu Nov 2 14:30:31 2000



From: Daniel L Flatoff :      dflatoff-at-stu.madison.tec.wi.us
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 20:27:39 GMT
Subject: TEM prep of DLC coating on steel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings All,
I would like to request guidance on protocols for
preparing TEM cross section to view the interface between
diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on a steel substrate
which has been preimplanted to increase the adhesion of the
coating. Any assistance with be greatly appreciated.



Daniel L. Flatoff




From daemon Thu Nov 2 16:15:27 2000



From: The Working Boy :      brmjg-at-TTU.EDU
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 16:09:11 -0600
Subject: Journals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the early to mid-90s, our library, due to budget constraints at the
time, let our subscriptions to microscopy journals lapse. We are now in the
position to resubscibe to a number of journals. Could I get advice on which
journals microscopists feel are the most useful. This includes journals in
both the biolgical and physical sciences, applied research electron
microscopy, as well as techniques oriented periodicals. Thanks for your
input.

Mark J. Grimson
Electron Microscopy Facility
Dept. of Biology, MS 3131
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas 79409

(806)742-2704
brmjg-at-ttu.edu




From daemon Thu Nov 2 17:02:13 2000



From: Kellin Defiel :      kellind-at-exploratorium.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 14:49:11 -0800
Subject: Exploratorium Seeks Microscope Interface Designer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MICROSCOPE INTERFACE DESIGNER -
Public Imaging Facility
Fixed-term Position

The Exploratorium is a museum dedicated to the public understanding of
science, art, and human perception. Founded in 1969 by Frank Oppenheimer,
it has pioneered the role of museums as active teaching centers with
original programming based on an interactive approach to learning. It
serves as an interdisciplinary resource for schools, universities,
scientists, and artists, as well as for the public.

SUMMARY
The Microscope Interface Designer will provide technical expertise to a
three-year project to develop a microscopic imaging facility for the
public, including museum visitors, students, teachers and Internet users,
to view a variety of living specimens via video and the Internet. The
facility will utilize the highest quality optics and state-of-the-art
microscopic techniques and provide a unique experience for the general
public to interact with the technology and tools used by biomedical
researchers. The project will require extensive inter-organizational and
external collaborations with research facilities, equipment and software
companies, teachers and curriculum developers, and media technology
developers. The Microscope Interface Designer will work collaboratively
with the Exploratorium's Life Sciences staff and report to the Life
Sciences Area Manager.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
· Design and develop approaches for presentation of living specimens to the
public in an accessible and comprehensible manner
· Work collaboratively with the Visitor Research & Evaluation Department to
incorporate visitor feedback in the development process
· Design and develop hardware and software interface systems to enable
public to easily use laboratory grade microscopes
· Work closely with technical experts at equipment and software companies
to develop design and technical options that enhance the project's success
· Design and oversee fabrication of all necessary technical hardware for
visitor interfaces with microscopes
· Work collaboratively with software developers to implement software designs
· Maintain and operate microscopes during the development phase

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
· MS degree in biological sciences with a focus in microscopy, Ph.D. desirable
· Minimum 3 years experience with microscopic imaging techniques
· Demonstrated experience in working with biological specimens of various
sorts, particularly living tissue preparations
· Familiarity with a variety of tissue culturing techniques
· Familiarity with device control and software interfaces for computers
· Proven ability to solve technical design problems
· Ability to work collaboratively as well as independently

HOW TO APPLY: This is a three-year, fixed-term, exempt, union position
which pays $788.63/week. This position starts as soon as possible and ends
on or before September 30, 2003. Please apply to:
Dept. LS-3L
Exploratorium, 3601 Lyon Street, San Francisco, CA 94123
Fax: (415) 561-0370
E-Mail: resume-at-exploratorium.edu (attachments not accepted)
No phone calls, please
The Exploratorium is committed to a diverse workforce

See our web site at www.exploratorium.edu

Kellin Defiel
Human Resources
Exploratorium
San Francisco, CA 94123
kellind-at-exploratorium.edu
(415) 561-0337


From daemon Thu Nov 2 17:06:25 2000



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 17:01:25 -0600
Subject: SEM needs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello colleagues,

Does anyone out there have a 40 kV/LaB6 EHT power supply box (aka Wallace
unit) for a Cambridge 250 Mark 2 that they're willing to donate, sell, or
lend for diagnostics? Or even just the mains inverter board? My users are
stacked in a holding pattern and we'd all be grateful for some help!

Many thanks,
Dee


***************************************************************
Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 914/365-8640
F: 914/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
http://www.discovery.com/area/science/micro/micro1.html
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)




From daemon Thu Nov 2 17:16:44 2000



From: adam.boyes-at-virgin.net ()
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 17:11:05 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Moving Cells in Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor

================================================================
Email: adam.boyes-at-virgin.net
Name: Adam Boyes
School: Horndean Sixth Form

Question: When looking at plant cells containing chloroplasts through a
microscope, why is it that they move around the edges of the cell clockwise
and counterclockwise in adjacent cells?


---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Thu Nov 2 17:46:23 2000



From: =?utf-8?B?V2FsY2ssIFNjb3R0IEQu?= :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 18:41:12 -0500
Subject: =?utf-8?B?UkU6IFRFTSBwcmVwIG9mIERMQyBjb2F0aW5nIG9uIHN0ZWVs?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I assume that you do not have access to a FIB.

What kind of steel? If you have a heat treated hard steel such as 440C or
M50, you are in for a lot of trouble. When you thin these down, the
internal stresses can bend the sample like crazy. You are best off doing a
cross section using the slotted-D approach. If your sample is magnetic, an
added benefit is that it minimizes the amount of magnetic material in the
sample. Slot a rod that fits into a 3mm OD tube. I used 304SS tubing and
rods from Small Parts Catalog. You must thin the sample to where they don't
curl. Cut them down to fit in the slot and epoxy them in. Cut your samples
so that the blade cuts perpendicular to the normal of the layers, i.e. along
the direction of the slot. You should be able to dimple and ion mill
normally. By normally, I mean low angle. The carbon resists ion milling.
You might need to use a gas mixture. We had a little paper in the MRS
Sample Prep IV, Vol 480, that showed a comparison of Ar, Ne, Ne/O2 or Ar/O2
to help with the carbon. Another option is to put water vapor into the ion
mill while you are milling with a leak valve.




-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Daniel L Flatoff [mailto:dflatoff-at-stu.madison.tec.wi.us]
} Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 3:28 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM prep of DLC coating on steel
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListse} rver/FAQ.html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Greetings All,
} I would like to request guidance on protocols for
} preparing TEM cross section to view the interface between
} diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on a steel substrate
} which has been preimplanted to increase the adhesion of the
} coating. Any assistance with be greatly appreciated.
}
}
}
} Daniel L. Flatoff
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Nov 2 19:02:56 2000



From: E. J. McKenzie :      elizm-at-pdx.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Nov 2000 16:50:21 -0800
Subject: technics ion mill

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everyone,

haven't received a response from my last message so I'll send it again:
does anyone know who supports and supplies parts for the Technics Micro Ion
Mill? (ours was made 1976)

cheers
Liz McKenzie

*******************************************************
Geomicrobiology and Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Room S9 Cramer Hall
1721 SW Broadway
Portland State University
Portland
OR97201

ph:503 725 3362
fax:503 725 3025

*******************************************************

It is possible that your car engine is driven by psycho-kinetic energy.
But if it looks like a petrol engine and smells like a petrol engine, a
sensible working hypothesis is that it is a petrol engine.

*******************************************************



From daemon Thu Nov 2 21:49:16 2000



From: EBMet-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 22:43:33 EST
Subject: Preparation of solder joint cross-sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would appreciate any procedures or references concerning preparation of
solder joints for microelectronic applications. The solders that I am
concerned with are high Pb, Pb-Sn-Ag and Au-Sn. Thanks.

Elliot Brown


From daemon Fri Nov 3 08:39:21 2000



From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 09:33:11 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM Schottky vs. cold FE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The advantages/disadvantages of cold vs. Schottky FE guns lie at the
extremes of performance. Cold FE will give you better ultimate image
resolution (roughly 1.5 vs. 2.5 nm, depending on manufacturer, of course)
and will give you noticably better images at low voltage (1kV or so).
Schottky will give you much higher currents at larger spot sizes (for x-ray
mapping or back-scatter diffraction pattern acquisition, for example) and
much better medium-term (tens of minutes to a few hours) beam current
stability, if that is important to you. It is also not necessary to flash
the tip periodically in a Schottky gun. For most other SEM needs, either
form will work wonderfully for you.

We have one of each, and we do not notice any difference in the maintenance
needs between them. Don't worry about tip replacements. Our cold FE is
nearly 6 years old and is still running with the original tip, as is our
Schottky, which is over three years old. I don't think this is a function
of vendor - it is my impression that microscopes from other vendors have
similar records. The tip replacement is performed by the service
engineers, and depending on your service contract, may be included in that.
It takes about 3 days (I am told!) on either instrument.

It is much more important to be clear about your microscopy needs. You say
in your posting "possibly variable pressure" ... there is a big difference
between the ESEM of FEI/Philips and the variable pressure designs of other
manufacturers, so you need to be clear about how important this factor is
to you. What structures will you need to examine by "conventional" SEM,
how important is high-speed x-ray mapping, etc. etc. etc. By asking these
kinds of questions the right microscope will eventually become clear to
you. Don't worry about the mechanics of the gun - they all work fine.

All in my humble opinion, of course!!

Tony Garratt-Reed.



At 02:19 PM 11/02/2000 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6478
**




From daemon Fri Nov 3 08:42:41 2000



From: Norm Olson :      nho-at-bilbo.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Nov 00 09:39:19 -0500
Subject: Fwd: Re: Freeze-plunge device availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


{Subject: Re: Freeze-plunge device availability
{From: Dennis C. Winkler, DCWinkler-at-aol.com

{Last month you posted a query about the availability of freeze-plunge
devices.

{I am interested in the responses you received. I didn't find them
{posted on the listserver or on your web site. Would you mind sharing
{them?

I have not had a chance to post them yet but here is the information. I
received
one response and I knew of one other vendor.

1) BAL-TEC Plunge Freezing System TFD 010
Contact Johnny Hagen at 603-622-5011 for the details.
They have a single picture on their website www.bal-tec.com
List price for the system is $8674

2) This summer at MSA I saw that Gatan had a system.
Our sales person is Paul Miller, 724-779-2501
Their website is www.gatan.com but I saw no information on this system
there the last time I looked.
List price ~$20,000 (ball park figure)

The two systems do quite different things. The Bal-tec system is
designed to keep the cryogens at the proper temperature and it has a
pneumatic cylinder plunging arm. The Gatan system has an enclosed
chamber around the sample to maintain humidity and you program in how
long you want to do wicking before you plunge. You can do single sided
or double sided wicking and it looks like it has a fair amount of
flexibility for doing different types of plunge experiments.

As usual... the disclaimer is that I am not receiving kickbacks from
either company on this.

Norm Olson

*******************************************
Norm Olson
Senior Research Electron Microscopist
Department of Biological Sciences
Lilly Hall of Life Sciences
Purdue University
West Lafayette, IN 47907

Phone: 765-494-5643
FAX: 765-496-1189
email: nho-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu
http://bilbo.bio.purdue.edu/~nho/index.htm
http://bilbo.bio.purdue.edu/~baker/

*******************************************



From daemon Fri Nov 3 09:11:11 2000



From: anderron-at-us.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2000 10:07:06 -0500
Subject: Re: Preparation of solder joint cross-sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id JAA01667
for dist-Microscopy; Fri, 3 Nov 2000 09:09:03 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id JAA01663
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Fri, 3 Nov 2000 09:08:33 -0600 (CST)
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id JAA01656
for {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Fri, 3 Nov 2000 09:08:03 -0600 (CST)
Received: from northrelay02.pok.ibm.com (northrelay02.pok.ibm.com [9.117.200.22])
by e4.ny.us.ibm.com (8.9.3/8.9.3) with ESMTP id KAA203496;
Fri, 3 Nov 2000 10:06:38 -0500
Received: from d01ml065.pok.ibm.com (d01ml065.pok.ibm.com [9.117.250.65])
by northrelay02.pok.ibm.com (8.8.8m3/NCO v4.95) with ESMTP id KAA24862;
Fri, 3 Nov 2000 10:06:15 -0500
Importance: Normal



We tripod polish with some modification to the procedure:
You can't use water to polish the specimen, we use propylene glycol from a
squeeze bottle when actually polishing the solder;
The thin solder section is mechanically weak, we mount on a Mo grid with a
small aperture size prior to second side polishing;
Use low-angle ion milling to keep the solder from melting and to minimize
element-selective milling in the ion mill if you have to ion mill the
specimen.
Use a cold stage in the TEM or restrict the beam heating.

Good luck,

Ron



Ron Anderson, IBM, Hopewell Jct., New York, USA. anderron-at-us.ibm.com

IBM Analytical Services; http://www.chips.ibm.com/services/asg



From daemon Fri Nov 3 10:28:59 2000



From: Carrie Golash :      cdg126-at-psu.edu
Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2000 11:22:45 -0500
Subject: Fwd: Troubleshooting oocyte sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



}
} Hello all -
}
} I've written to the list in the past regarding embedding of bovine
} oocytes and I wish to express thanks to all of the helpful suggestions that
} I received.
}
} I'm still having a coupld of problems, though, so I'm again seeking
} advice. I am fixing oocytes in gluteraldehyde and then embedding them in
} agarose. I am using 1% low melting point agarose, creating a bubble into
} which I place my oocytes and then sealing the bubble with 0.5% agarose. I
} then trim the agarose into a 1 mm^2 chip and dehydrate through a series of
} ethanol steps, including staining with eosin to help visualize the eggs.
} Finally, I clear in xylenes and embed the chip in a paraffin block.
}
} My problem is twofold: 1) following sectioning and rehydration,
} when I
} look at the agarose sections, I can certainly see oocytes (they stain
} specifically for an anti-ZP antibody)and they're consistent in placement
} among consequent sections, but frankly they're horribly ugly. The zona is
} "wrinkled", and the eggs look like they've undergone an osmotic trauma. 2)
} The agarose sections seem to frequently fold or rip and I'm not quite sure
} at what stage of the process that this is occuring - I feel when placing
} the sections into the waterbath or retrieving them on slides (treated with
} HistoPrep) they seem fine. Is it possible the folding is occuring during
} the deparaffination/rehydration, maybe because the agarose sections don't
} stick well to the slides?
}
} Any help in this matter is greatly appreciated! Thanks!
}
} --Carrie

Carrie Golash
John O. Almquist Research Center
Penn State University
University Park, PA 16802
W: (814) 865-5896
H: (814) 692-7926
http://www.das.psu.edu/dbrc/dbrc.htm


From daemon Fri Nov 3 10:40:15 2000



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2000 08:36:46 -0800 (PST)
Subject: instruction manuals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
Anyone know if they have manuals for a FC4D Reichert cryounit
attachment for a Cryo ultramicrotome? Please contact me personally if
so.

Gordon.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793




From daemon Fri Nov 3 10:48:27 2000



From: simon watkins :      swatkins+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 11:35:23 -0500
Subject: automated immunohistochemistry rigs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Folks, heres a new thread.... We are curious about how well automated
ICC/IHC machines work
How easy are they to use?
How flexible are the programs?
How much time do they save?
Can you program sophisticated multicolor protocols?
(of course the inflammatory question) which is the best machine?
Whats the reagent usage like?
etc

Looking forward to hearing from you all
Simon


---------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRC Path
Associate Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
BSTS 225
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
Tel:412-648-3051
Fax:412-648-8330
http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
-----------------------------------



From daemon Fri Nov 3 12:07:45 2000



From: NPGSlithography-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2000 13:01:58 EST
Subject: Re: SEM Schottky vs. cold FE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Bruce,

In the past, cold FE sources gave the best resolution, however, Schottky
(thermal) FE sources have improved significantly over the years. Since the
"resolution" specifications provided by the SEM vendors cannot always be
compared directly, it is best to use your own samples and observe the imaging
capabilities of each SEM for yourself. Such demos are common before the sale
of FE SEMs.

A difference between cold FE and Schottky FE sources that is not subjective
is the stability of the beam current. Cold FE sources will typically have
frequent spikes and/or jumps of the beam current on the order of +/-3% or
more. Readings of the beam current taken just seconds apart may show changes
on this order, and over 1 hour intervals changes of +/-10% or more are not
unusual. In contrast, the FE sources are exceptionally stable with total
noise and drift of less than 1%/hour. (I've measured ~1% drift over 12 hours
in one case.)

If you are concerned about beam current noise and drift, it may be helpful to
request a graph of beam current vs. time showing the typical performance of
the SEM in question. (But be wary of chart recording traces that may have a
slow time constant which will hide fast changes in the beam current!)

Note that for imaging, such noise/drift in the beam is not generally an
issue, because the cold FE SEMs dynamically adjust the brightness displayed
on the imaging screen to compensate for the changes in the actual beam
current. In effect, the beam intensity on the specimen is still changing,
but the displayed image does not show it.

If you need high beam currents, the Schottky source will typically give much
more current than a cold FE source.

Regarding replacement of the FE source, that is generally done under the SEM
service contract. The price I have heard for the FE source itself is ~$20k
US, although I'm sure others can give more exact numbers. The SEM vendors
themselves will be the best source of information regarding pricing.

Variable pressure SEMs will typically have a "high vacuum" mode for
conventional viewing. However, a variable pressure SEM may have an extra
aperture to support the differential pumping in the column that may limit the
lowest magnification, even in non-VP mode.

I hope this helps.

Joe
_________________________________________
Joe Nabity, Ph.D.
JC Nabity Lithography Systems
E-Beam Lithography using Commercial SEMs & STEMs
PO Box 5354, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA
Voice: (406) 587-0848
FAX: (406) 586-9514
E-mail: info-at-jcnabity.com
Web: www.jcnabity.com

In a message dated 11/2/2000 7:04:37 PM Mountain Standard Time,
bcutler-at-eureka.idl.ukans.edu writes:

} We are in the preliminary throes of writing a grant proposal for a new SEM.
} This
} scope will have the following characteristics: EDX, cathodoluminescence,
} beam
} etching, BS, "conventional" SEM use, possibly variable pressure.
} Questions
} 1. What are the advantages/disadvantages of Schottky over cold FE.
} 2. I have personally dealt with conventional filament replacement (W), I
} gather
} that FE emitter replacement is much more involved than W filament
} replacement.
} What are practicalities of FE (thermal or cold) emitter replacement with
} respect
} to who performs the work and the cost of the emitter.
} 3. Is there any reason that variable pressure will preclude the use of the
} scope
} for beam etching.
} Thanks to all
} Bruce
} Bruce Cutler
} Director, Microscopy & Electronic Imaging Lab
} University of Kansas
}




From daemon Sat Nov 4 05:14:22 2000



From: richard black :      m02jmy00-at-cwcom.net
Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2000 10:52:03 +0000
Subject: Preparation of solder joint cross-sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was involved in preparation, and microscopy, of lead solders for some
time at my last job, and if you wish to contact me I will be able to put
you in touch with the group that I was working with.



From daemon Sun Nov 5 07:58:33 2000



From: Mendes, Maria :      mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca
Date: Sun, 5 Nov 2000 07:33:31 -0600
Subject: SPURR will be discontinued?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello I would like to subscribe to your service, please let me know if there
is any service charge.
Please pass on my problem to your subscribers.
I am a research lab that does a lot of hard tissue processing, I as well as
our EM departments have been using SPURR as our plastic of choice. I have
been recently told by my supplier (Marivac) that in six months one of the
components of SPURR will be discontinued. The component is ERL
(Vinylcyclohexene Dioxide). I would like to know if others are using SPURR
and if so have they encountered the same problem. Please forward your
information to mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca.
Thank-you in advance for any help offered.

Maria




From daemon Sun Nov 5 10:10:55 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Sun, 5 Nov 2000 09:57:26 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Listserver Archives Updated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

The on-line Monthly Listserver Archives and Search Engine have been updated
and are now current through Oct 2000

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Cheers
Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



From daemon Mon Nov 6 01:21:17 2000



From: Tim Akinbo :      takinbo-at-onebox.com
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 08:11:44 +0100
Subject: Re: Low Frequency Surface Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings.
I am a final student of the department of Electrical Electronics,
Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
I am doing a project titled "Low-Frequency Surface Microscopy". My
supervisor wants me to use an electric field-probe to detect changes in
the capacitance of the surface as cracks, boundaries, etc. are
encountered. I would be very grateful if you can send me any
information on the topic.

My e-mail address is: femi_adeluyi-at-yahoo.com and my address is:
Olufemi Adeluyi
Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Obafemi Awolowo University,
Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Thanking you in anticipation.



From daemon Mon Nov 6 01:52:27 2000



From: erich-at-ento.csiro.au (Eric Hines)
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 18:46:04 +1100
Subject: SEM, forensic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
We have been asked to visualize the manufacturers stamped numbers on a
rifle which have been removed by grinding. So far secondary and backscatter
images don't tell us much.
We are told that the metal under the stamping is compressed for a
significant depth. Any ideas on how to image this compressed metal.
Cheers,
Eric Hines
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Entomology
Canberra OZ




From daemon Mon Nov 6 04:18:29 2000



From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 11:05:00 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: SEM, forensic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi,

you can use the macro etching techniques and macro photography;
more details in the book
Vander Voort - Metallography, Principles and practise, McGraw-Hill

best regards

KJ Huebner

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl} :-)

On Mon, 6 Nov 2000, Eric Hines wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} We have been asked to visualize the manufacturers stamped numbers on a
} rifle which have been removed by grinding. So far secondary and backscatter
} images don't tell us much.
} We are told that the metal under the stamping is compressed for a
} significant depth. Any ideas on how to image this compressed metal.
} Cheers,
} Eric Hines
} Microscopy Centre
} CSIRO Entomology
} Canberra OZ
}
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Nov 6 07:20:12 2000



From: Platek, Frank :      FPLATEK-at-ora.fda.gov
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 06:26:27 -0500
Subject: SEM Visualization of Restored Serial Numbers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Eric,

As promised, the only reference for SEM visualization of damaged serial
numbers in gun metal I was able to quickly find was "Visualization of a
Restored Serial Number Using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)" by Amy
Mongan of Forensic Analytical Specialties. The article was published as a
case report in the Journal of Forensic Sciences [J Forensic Sci
1996;41(6):1074-1076].
There are more than likely other references but I do not have them
immediately available.

Good luck!

S. Frank Platek, M.S.
Forensic Chemistry Center
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
6751 Steger Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45237-3097
(513) 679-2700 X254
(513) 679-2761 FAX
fplatek-at-ora.fda.gov

Disclaimer: Opinions/recommendations stated are solely mine and do not
necessarily represent those of the US Food and Drug Administration or any
other Federal Agency.




From daemon Mon Nov 6 07:24:20 2000



From: Co2clean-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 08:20:18 EST
Subject: Re: SEM, forensic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is a special etch that "highlights" the stampings, forget SEM methods.
I do not recall the exact mix, but Police forensics lab know it. I believe
it is a mild form of aqua reiga with one added item but forgot. I consulted
to a forensics lab and did it once and we got a few digits off an engine
block.

Good luck

Robert Sherman
Applied Surface Technologies
www.co2clean.com


}
} Dear all,
} We have been asked to visualize the manufacturers stamped numbers on a
} rifle which have been removed by grinding. So far secondary and backscatter
} images don't tell us much.
} We are told that the metal under the stamping is compressed for a
} significant depth. Any ideas on how to image this compressed metal.
} Cheers,
} Eric Hines
} Microscopy Centre
} CSIRO Entomology
} Canberra OZ


From daemon Mon Nov 6 07:47:39 2000



From: Purdy, Sam :      SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 07:42:02 -0600
Subject: Eric Hiness/ rifle barrel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric:

Some forensic scientists have been successful in detecting stamped
serial numbers by etching the part in a solution of 5 -10% HNO3 in water or
alcohol for 10 to20 seconds. The disturbed metal will etch more darkly than
the surrounding metal.

Best regards and good luck,

Sam Purdy
Tecnical Center
National Steel Corp.
Trenton MI
spurdy-at-nationalsteel.com




From daemon Mon Nov 6 08:21:39 2000



From: Pam Marcum :      pmarcum-at-polysciences.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 09:13:39 -0500
Subject: automated immunohistochemistry rigs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The immuno units available are becoming many and varied. However, the main
consideration is flexibility of the unit and secondarily cost of the
reagents. Dako and Cytlologix are the most reliable and flexible available
for routine and special procedures. I believe both can be programmed for
dual staining or to separate protocols can be used on tissue for the result.
These units allow you to choose your reagents, antibodies and procedures.
The Ventana is an excellent unit with one huge drawback you are forced to
use their secondaries and limited on primaries to some extent. The cost is
very high for the reagents to run the unit. I am a histologist who also
does EM and can speak from experience of working with the units in the field
as an observer and user. Pam Marcum

-----Original Message-----
} From: simon watkins [mailto:swatkins+-at-pitt.edu]
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2000 11:35 AM
To: microscopy


Folks, heres a new thread.... We are curious about how well automated
ICC/IHC machines work
How easy are they to use?
How flexible are the programs?
How much time do they save?
Can you program sophisticated multicolor protocols?
(of course the inflammatory question) which is the best machine?
Whats the reagent usage like?
etc

Looking forward to hearing from you all
Simon


---------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRC Path
Associate Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
BSTS 225
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
Tel:412-648-3051
Fax:412-648-8330
http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
-----------------------------------




From daemon Mon Nov 6 08:48:08 2000



From: Pam Marcum :      pmarcum-at-polysciences.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 09:44:02 -0500
Subject: SPURR will be discontinued?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Maria,
We are not discontinuing Spurr's at Polysciences. We do have ERL and the
other components available now and in the future.

Pamela A Marcum
Histology/Microscopy
Product Development Manager
Polysciences, Inc.
400 Valley Road
Warrington, PA 19876
Phone: 800-523-2575  Ext 167
Fax: 215-343-0214
E-Mail: pmarcum-at-polysciences.com {mailto:pmarcum-at-polysciences.com}


-----Original Message-----
} From: Mendes, Maria [mailto:mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca]
Sent: Sunday, November 05, 2000 8:34 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello I would like to subscribe to your service, please let me know if there
is any service charge.
Please pass on my problem to your subscribers.
I am a research lab that does a lot of hard tissue processing, I as well as
our EM departments have been using SPURR as our plastic of choice. I have
been recently told by my supplier (Marivac) that in six months one of the
components of SPURR will be discontinued. The component is ERL
(Vinylcyclohexene Dioxide). I would like to know if others are using SPURR
and if so have they encountered the same problem. Please forward your
information to mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca.
Thank-you in advance for any help offered.

Maria





From daemon Mon Nov 6 11:14:00 2000



From: William H Roberts :      William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 11:47:14 -0500
Subject: SEM, forensic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric,

It has been many years since I worked in a Crime Lab, but the technique
that we used to raise serial numbers on guns did not involve the SEM at
all. First, we polished the surface where the serial number had been
ground off using successively finer grades of sandpaper. When we had
achieved a highly polished appearance to the surface we then brushed the
area with a dilute solution of nitric acid using a cotton tipped swab.
This was done very carefully, inspecting the surface after each wipe with
the swab using a collimated light beam held at a shallow angle with respect
to the surface. The numbers will appear due to the fact, as you mentioned,
they are compressed more than the surrounding metal and therefore are
etched at a different rate. When the numbers are visible, the surface is
flushed with water and a non-volatile liquid like glycerine is applied to
keep the surface wet until the numbers can be recorded and photographed. A
hand lens or a stereomicroscope were the only microscopical tools
necessary. I know that this description is sketchy, but it should give you
a starting point. Also, keep in mind that if the person who was trying to
remove the serial number knew his business, he (or she) may have ground
deeply enough to obliterate any trace of the number and no method will
restore it.

Regards, Bill Roberts




erich-at-ento.csiro.au (Eric Hines) on 11/06/2000 02:46:04 AM

To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc: (bcc: William H Roberts/US/FILM/DPT)

Dear all,
We have been asked to visualize the manufacturers stamped numbers on a
rifle which have been removed by grinding. So far secondary and backscatter
images don't tell us much.
We are told that the metal under the stamping is compressed for a
significant depth. Any ideas on how to image this compressed metal.
Cheers,
Eric Hines
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Entomology
Canberra OZ








From daemon Mon Nov 6 11:16:57 2000



From: werner-at-rosharon.wireline.slb.com (Andrew Werner)
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 11:14:13 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM, forensic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric,

Light optical metallographic techniques, rather than electron optical,
might serve you in this case.

If you polish the region - removing as little material as possible, but
through 6 micron diamond anyway - and etch with 2% nital (2% nitric acid in
alcohol) - you ought to reveal the underlying numbers. Other people may
suggest more effective etchants for this purpose; nital is just a general
purpose old standby.

Regards,
Andrew T. Werner
Shaped Charge Research - Metallurgy Laboratory
Schlumberger Reservoir Completions Technology Center
14910 Airline Road, Rosharon, TX 77583-1590
Voice (281) 285-5272 Fax (281) 285-5273

"We shoot the hippopotamus
with bullets made of platinum
'cause if we used the leaden ones
his hide would surely flatten 'em"
- Author Unknown

At 06:46 PM 11/06/2000 +1100, Eric Hines wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Nov 6 12:30:46 2000



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 10:27:02 -0800
Subject: SEM: cathodo-luminescence references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



One of my users has just asked me for references regarding the
technique of acquiring electron induced color CL images by obtaining
RGB channels via red-blue-green filters. One of those procedures we
have simply been taking for granted, but now want to acknowledge
earlier work, especially with respect to geologic materials and
quartz.

cheerios, =shAf= :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Mon Nov 6 13:47:25 2000



From: Chris Baker :      chris-at-collegewafer.com
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 14:43:30 -0800
Subject: Ultrathin Si, GaAs, SOI, InP, Ge, GaN, 12" Si & Glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Visit http://www.collegewafer.com for your free quote, or call (800) 713-9375
or Fax (888)-832-0340!!! E-mail us at chris-at-collegewafer.com

1"-12" Si Wafers Prime and Test wafers available We have 4" SOI
in stock!

Need super clean Si? We have that too! And 12" Glass wafers to boot!

All Ultrathin Si wafers polished two sides with TTV { 3 microns for (MEMS) Applications.
4"N(100) 1-10 ohm-cm 10-100 microns polished two sides in Si!

Si, GaAs reclaim. We take take the hazard out of your GaAs hazardous waste!

Other Wafers IN STOCK & READY to SHIP Si, GaAs, Ge, InP, InAs, InSb, GaSb, GaN,
SoS in 1"-8"
diameters.

Customer supplied GaAs or Ge can be reclaimed or repolished.

Equipment:
Used Vacuum Deposition Equipment,Evaporation Systems, CHA/Ion Tech Milling, Balzers
BAK760
Visit us for details!

NEW!
We now provide wafer stripping/cleaning,regrowing and more!

To remove yourself from this list, please visit http://www.collegewafer.com/contact_us/Remove/remove.html

Also visit http://www.thecoveredcall.com learn to pick winning stocks using he
CANSLIM method of investing with a covered call twist!

ssf



From daemon Mon Nov 6 13:58:57 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 13:58:20 -0600
Subject: Re: Low Frequency Surface Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



If you can submerge the specimen under a liquid it will greatly enhance
the captive effects from 3 or so for most fluids to 70 for water due to
the dielectric properties of the liquid.

I have no idea if this is possible but if it is you can get a great deal
of improvement in resolution in differences in height. Cracks in
particular would be highlighted.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00
} From: "Tim Akinbo" {takinbo-at-onebox.com}
}
} Greetings.
} I am a final student of the department of Electrical Electronics,
} Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
} I am doing a project titled "Low-Frequency Surface Microscopy". My
} supervisor wants me to use an electric field-probe to detect changes in
} the capacitance of the surface as cracks, boundaries, etc. are
} encountered. I would be very grateful if you can send me any
} information on the topic.
}
} My e-mail address is: femi_adeluyi-at-yahoo.com and my address is:
} Olufemi Adeluyi
} Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
} Obafemi Awolowo University,
} Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
}
} Thanking you in anticipation.
}
}




From daemon Mon Nov 6 16:08:50 2000



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 17:02:15 -0500
Subject: ERL 4221

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Maria Mendes wrote:
==========================================
I am a research lab that does a lot of hard tissue processing, I as well
as our EM departments have been using SPURR as our plastic of choice. I
have
been recently told by my supplier (Marivac) that in six months one of the
components of SPURR will be discontinued. The component is ERL
(Vinylcyclohexene Dioxide). I would like to know if others are using SPURR
and if so have they encountered the same problem. Please forward your
information to mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca.
=========================================
This posting generated some worried communcations with customers asking
about the continued availability of ERL 4221 (Vinylcyclohexene Dioxide).

The manufacturer reports to us no plans to discontinue ERL 4221 and there
seems to be enough in the distribution pipelines to last some years into the
future. ERL 4221 is currently available from SPI Supplies as I suspect it
is available also from the other major suppliers of chemicals to the
microscopy world.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================





From daemon Mon Nov 6 16:22:37 2000



From: James Roberts :      James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 14:17:24 -0800
Subject: Re: Eric Hiness/ rifle barrel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Depending upon the steel the receiver is made from a Fry's or Modified Fry's reagent (a cupric Chloride in HCl solution) works much better than the HNO3 but both alternated works still better. As I said in a previous post on this the NASA publication has quite a good rundown on all of the appropriate solutions. Hatcher, Jury and Weller a less detailed but acceptable section on it. The details of how to prepare the metal is as important as the solutions chosen if it is to work. Drop me a note and I'll write the procedure up if you can't find the NASA publication.

Jim Roberts

James L. Roberts
Firearm and Toolmark Examiner
Ventura Co. Sheriff's Lab
(805) 654-2308
James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us

} } } "Purdy, Sam" {SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com} 11/06/00 05:42AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Eric:

Some forensic scientists have been successful in detecting stamped
serial numbers by etching the part in a solution of 5 -10% HNO3 in water or
alcohol for 10 to20 seconds. The disturbed metal will etch more darkly than
the surrounding metal.

Best regards and good luck,

Sam Purdy
Tecnical Center
National Steel Corp.
Trenton MI
spurdy-at-nationalsteel.com








From daemon Mon Nov 6 16:39:13 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 17:33:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Confocal Technical Position Open (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Experienced Confocal Microscopy/Electron Microscopy Technologist to work
in Research Laboratory of Department of Pathology


The person we seek will be responsible for organization of a new facility
that includes a confocal microscope and an electron microscope. The
position includes overall management of the microscopy facility, user
training, and user supervision. Requirements for the position include
experience with light and transmission electron microscopy. This
individual will oversee all aspects of specimen accession and processing,
operation of the microscopes, photography, record keeping, and
supervision of a technician. Knowledge of EM, biology, and pathology, as
well as photographic procedures is required. The individual will work
with only minimum supervision.

Position Requirements

Experience with confocal and digital imaging techniques, microinjection,
visualization of living cells containing fluorescent probes,
photobleaching, and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Minimum of five years experience working in an electron microscopy
laboratory with hands-on experience in tissue processing, dark room
photography, and operation and maintenance of electron microscope.

Two years experience working on electron microscopy of human tissue
specimens with knowledge of histology and pathology.

Excellent interpersonal and organizational skills are essential.

BachelorUs degree in science desirable.

Desirable Experience

Expertise in training in the operation of confocal microscope systems is
a distinct advantage.

Familiarity with light microscopy methods, immunofluorescent staining,
use of fluorescent probes for physiologic measurements and the general
principles of cell biological research are critical. Significant facility
with computers is desired.

Responsibilities

Serve as the technical manager of the facility and be responsible for the
operation and maintenance of the confocal and EM microscope facility.

Perform routine transmission EM, including tissue processing,
ultramicrotomy, and examination; do preventative maintenance on the
equipment; maintain the lab, order supplies, schedule instruments, and
oversee billing.

Image analysis at the light, confocal and electron microscopic levels and
preparation of micrographs for publication.


Send resume to:
Suzanne Mirra, M.D., Chair
Department of Pathology
Box 25
SUNY-Brooklyn
450 Clarkson Av.
Brooklyn, NY 11203-2098

-----------------
Submitted by
Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265




From daemon Mon Nov 6 16:43:05 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 17:35:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Histotechnologist Position Open (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Experienced Histotechnologist to work in Neuropathology Research
Laboratory of Department of Pathology

The person we seek will be responsible for maintaining a neuropathology
research laboratory in the Department of Pathology at SUNY Downstate
Medical Center. Knowledge of immunohistochemistry, special stains, and
histopathology is required. Previous experience in handling central
nervous system tissue preferred. The individual will work with only
minimum supervision.

Position Requirements

Minimum of five years experience working in a laboratory with hands-on
experience in tissue processing, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry,
and operation of a light microscope. Experience with technical aspects of
neuropathology and performing special stains including silver
(Bielschowsky) and myelin stains.

Two years experience working on immunohistochemistry of CNS tissue
specimens with knowledge of immunoreagents and experimental protocols.

BachelorUs degree in science desirable.

Laboratory skills including communications, ability to comply with safety
and laboratory regulations, maintenance of laboratory equipment and
resources, operation of computers and office equipment.

Advanced computer skills (word processing and database management) essential.

Desirable Experience

Confocal microscopy desirable.

Salary commensurate with experience


Responsibilities

Purchasing supplies and equipment, budget reports, laboratory maintenance
and brain banking.

Will operate all microscopic, photographic and computer equipment, and
keep accurate records of all laboratory experiments and procedures. Light
and fluorescent microscopy; tissue processing for paraffin embedding,
sectioning and slide stainer for immunohistochemical procedures; computer
imaging (PhotoShop); general photography; and library and web searches

Familiarity with computer software for keeping records, report
preparation and table/figure construction using Microsoft Office software
(Word, Excel, PowerPoint) as well as Endnote and Adobe PhotoShop.

Send resume to:

Suzanne Mirra, M.D., Chair
Department of Pathology
Box 25
SUNY-Brooklyn
450 Clarkson Av.
Brooklyn, NY 11203-2098

-------------------
Submitted by
Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265




From daemon Mon Nov 6 16:49:05 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 17:36:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: EM Tech Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Experienced Electron Microscopy Technologist to work in Research
Laboratory of Department of Pathology


The person we seek will be responsible for the overall operation of the
EM laboratory in the Department of Pathology at SUNY Downstate Medical
Center. This individual will oversee all aspects of specimen accession
and processing, operation of the microscope, photography, record keeping,
and supervision of a technician. Knowledge of EM, biology, and pathology,
as well as photographic procedures is required. The individual will work
with only minimum supervision.

Position Requirements

Minimum of five years experience working in an electron microscopy
laboratory with hands-on experience in tissue processing, dark room
photography, and operation and maintenance of electron microscope.

Two years experience working on electron microscopy of human tissue
specimens with knowledge of histology and pathology.

BachelorUs degree in science desirable.

Laboratory management skills including effective written/verbal
communication skills to interact with a diverse group, ability to comply
with safety and laboratory regulations, maintenance of laboratory
equipment and resources, and operation of computers and office equipment.

Desirable Experience

Previous experience in confocal microscopy highly desirable.

Previous experience in performing immunocytochemical staining and
advanced computer skills usage (e.g. image analysis) is also desirable.

Salary commensurate with experience

Responsibilities

Maintain electron microscope in operating condition. Process clinical and
research tissues for "thick" and "thin" sectioning. Darkroom management
of photographic printing.


Send resume to:
Suzanne Mirra, M.D., Chair
Department of Pathology
Box 25
SUNY-Brooklyn
450 Clarkson Av.
Brooklyn, NY 11203-2098

-----------------
Submitted by:
Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265




From daemon Mon Nov 6 18:10:54 2000



From: Kun Li :      k-li-at-mailcityasia.com
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 07:58:22 +0800
Subject: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

We are going to install a curtain for sound absorption in our TEM Lab. Is there any special curtain for this purpose?

Regards,

Kun Li


Get your FREE Email at http://www.mailcityasia.com


From daemon Mon Nov 6 18:31:05 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 18:29:09 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In many of the microscope rooms here at ANL. we
use a product called SONEX by illbruck (http://www.illbruck.com). It is both fire
rated and works reasonably well. Log into the TPM WWW site
(http://tpm.amc.anl.gov) and you can see it . It is an acoustic foam panel which
glues to the walls of the lab. The only problem is that being a foam
product it tends to easily tear/rip if it is hit by objects.

Nestor




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


==================================================================
Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
Materials Science Division
Building 212
Argonne National Lab
9700 S. Cass Ave
Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
==================================================================
TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
==================================================================

The box said "This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
So I bought a G3 Mac !

==================================================================




From daemon Mon Nov 6 19:54:42 2000



From: Kalman Rubinson :      kr4-at-is2.nyu.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 20:51:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Kun Li wrote:

} We are going to install a curtain for sound absorption
} in our TEM Lab. Is there any special curtain for this
} purpose?

What sort of noise? For mid- to high-frequencies, a heavy
fabric drape, interlined with an absorbent material, will do
a pretty good job. For low frequencies, no curtain will do
as you need a membrane with a seal.

Kal



From daemon Mon Nov 6 20:37:48 2000



From: Kalman Rubinson :      kr4-at-is2.nyu.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 21:35:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Mon, 6 Nov 2000, Nestor J. Zaluzec wrote:
} In many of the microscope rooms here at ANL. we
} use a product called SONEX by illbruck (http://www.illbruck.com). It is both fire
} rated and works reasonably well. Log into the TPM WWW site
} (http://tpm.amc.anl.gov) and you can see it . It is an acoustic foam panel which
} glues to the walls of the lab. The only problem is that being a foam
} product it tends to easily tear/rip if it is hit by objects.

This will do nothing to keep sound out. It will absorb
high frequencies within the room.

Better sites for information and materials are Acoustic
Sciences Corporation and Auralex.

Kal





From daemon Mon Nov 6 20:40:45 2000



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Mar=EDa?= Alejandra Maine :      amaine-at-fiqus.unl.edu.ar
Date: Mon, 6 Nov 2000 20:38:38 -0600
Subject: suggestions for SEM/aquatic plants/fish

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello everyone,
I was wondering if anyone had suggestions on a
protocol for the fixation of either aquatic plant tissue or fish tissue
to be viewed in the SEM. My interest is to study the sorption mechanisms of
heavy metals (Cr, Cd and Pb) by aquatic plants and the bioaccumulation in
fishes.
I have no experience on SEM, so any information will be very usefull for me.
Thanks,
Regards!

Alejandra Maine




From daemon Mon Nov 6 23:14:13 2000



From: Corazon D. Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Nov 2000 23:04:40 -0500
Subject: fluorescence of collagen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,
I would appreciate any suggestions or comments on how to suppress
fluorescence of collagen in frozen sections that have been subjected to
indirect immunofluorescence using Alexa conjugated antibodies. I have used
normal goat and normal horse serum to block non-specific staining as well
as 4 % fish gelatin but the collagen glows brightly every time. the
samples were fixed in cold acetone before blocking. Incubation with sodium
borohydride did not reduce fluorescence.

Thanks,

Cora Bucana
Corazon D. Bucana, Ph.D.
Dept. Cancer Biology
UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Blvd, Box 173
Houston, Texas 77030
Phone: 713-792-8106
FAX 713-792-8747


From daemon Tue Nov 7 02:09:10 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 07:57:54 -0000
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kal
could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
lab.
Chris

} For low frequencies, no curtain will do
} as you need a membrane with a seal.
}
} Kal
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Tue Nov 7 03:09:15 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 03:06:25 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Nestor

I have found that if I keep some scraps around after the original
installation of almost anything you can mix up a little glue wiht it and
make a passable fix. Some times you have to do a little painting and make
a creative dirty spot.

You will always be able to see it but no one else will.

If you are worried about getting the texture right use cheap wall paper
paste and you can wash it out if you don't like it but it has enough water
resistance to resist minor spills.

Test it where it won't show first.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00
}
} In many of the microscope rooms here at ANL. we
} use a product called SONEX by illbruck (http://www.illbruck.com). It is
both fire
} rated and works reasonably well. Log into the TPM WWW site
} (http://tpm.amc.anl.gov) and you can see it . It is an acoustic foam
panel which
} glues to the walls of the lab. The only problem is that being a foam
} product it tends to easily tear/rip if it is hit by objects.
}
} Nestor
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Dear Listers,
} }
} } We are going to install a curtain for sound absorption in our TEM Lab.
Is there any special curtain for this purpose?
} }
} } Regards,
} }
} } Kun Li
} }
} }
} } Get your FREE Email at http://www.mailcityasia.com
}
}
} ==================================================================
} Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
} Materials Science Division
} Building 212
} Argonne National Lab
} 9700 S. Cass Ave
} Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
} Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
} Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} ==================================================================
} TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
} MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
} ==================================================================
}
} The box said "This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
} So I bought a G3 Mac !
}
} ==================================================================
}
}
}




From daemon Tue Nov 7 05:03:07 2000



From: Bart De Pauw :      Bart.DePauw-at-rug.ac.be
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 11:57:42 +0100
Subject: SEM - Apoptotic cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello listers,

We are experimenting with apoptose. Now, we want to view apoptotic cells
under the SEM. Has anyone ideas what technique, solutions,....we have
to use ? The sample is canine ovary.

Thx.

Bart De Pauw
Ghent University
Faculty of Veterinary medicine
Department Morphology
Salisburylaan 133
9820 Merelbeke
Belgium



From daemon Tue Nov 7 07:48:30 2000



From: Kim Riddle :      riddle-at-bio.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 09:08:47 -0500
Subject: job listing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Senior Biological Scientist: Florida USPS grade 28 BS/MS level

Description of Duties: Works with the Coordinator of Research
Programs/Services in the management of the day-to-day activities of the
Biological Science Imaging Resource, a campus wide imaging laboratory. This
facility is responsible for assisting faculty and students in the
preparation of biological images for research, publication and instruction.
The Senior Biological Scientist works closely with the Coordinator to
identify facility needs, establish priorities and develop policies within
the laboratory as well as instruct users in the operation of the electron
and light, including confocal microscopes. The incumbent must stay abreast
of research standards and practices to maintain quality control and advise
users on appropriate protocols. Knowledge in the use of MetaMorph,
MetaFluor, Photoshop and PowerPoint along with MAC and PC platforms is a
plus.

Contact Kim Riddle, 119 Bio Unit I, Department of Biological Science,
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4370, riddle-at-bio.fsu.edu
850.644.6519
Imaging Resource web page http://bio.fsu.edu/~taylor/imaging
On-line applications available at http://personnel.fsu.edu/emply/homepage.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Kimberly A. Riddle
Florida State University tel: 850.644.6519
Biological Science Imaging Resource
119 Bio Unit I, 4370 fax: 850.644.0481
Tallahassee, FL 32306 riddle-at-bio.fsu.edu
http://bio.fsu.edu/~taylor/imaging
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



From daemon Tue Nov 7 07:48:30 2000



From: Yi Liu :      yliu-at-unlserve.unl.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 07:43:30 -0600
Subject: Position for a visiting scholar in HRTEM image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleague:

The Center for Materials Research and Analysis (CMRA) at the
University of Nebraska at Lincoln has a matching fund in connection with a
NSF award for a person to work with Prof. Y. Liu and his co-PIs on image
processing of high resolution electron micrographs. The method developed
will be applied to the TEM characterization of various nanostructured
materials, such as TiN coatings, nanowires, super-conducting materials,
recording media and permanent magnets. The initial appointment will be one
year and can be renewed the second year, depending upon progress and
availability of funding. Computer skills, knowledge of Fourier transform
and image processing are required.
Interested persons should email a letter of interest, resume and
three persons of references to yliu-at-unlserve.unl.edu--
*******************************************************************
Yi Liu
Department of Mechanical Eng. and CMRA
104 N Walter Scott Engineering Center
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0656
Tel. (402) 472-7759 (Office)
Tel. (402) 472-8762 (EM lab)
Fax (402) 472-1465
Email: yliu-at-unlserve.unl.edu
*******************************************************************




From daemon Tue Nov 7 09:14:33 2000



From: Kalman Rubinson :      kr4-at-is2.nyu.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 10:05:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Chris Jeffree wrote:

} could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
} how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
} I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
} controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
} frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
} lab.

Assuming that you want to keep external noise out, you need
to block the window since the glass transmits a lot.
Hanging drapes, of any kind, will be most effective at
higher frequencies where they can absorb energy transmitted
by the glass.

If you can seal over the window with a membrane that will
absorb at low frequencies (and you must seal it for it to
be effective at low frequencies), take a look at SheetBlok
at http://www.auralex.com/. This is effective down into the
range of about 100Hz. Alternatively, you can brick up the
window.

Kal



From daemon Tue Nov 7 09:17:32 2000



From: Larry Allard :      l2a-at-ornl.gov
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 07:55:26 -0500
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kun Li:

We also use Sonex foam products in most of our laboratories, but are
now looking at purchasing an "enclosure" to put around a noisy water
chiller. A company called Sound Seal (www.soundseal.com) makes such
enclosures (at *very* reasonable prices), and has fabric curtains and
panels for sound absorption purposes. Check them out...

Larry





} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

865-574-4981
865-576-5413 Fax
allardlfjr-at-ornl.gov


From daemon Tue Nov 7 10:11:58 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 10:07:53 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You might need to expand a bit on your goal. It seems that you are
indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that hard
to believe. Pumps, maybe. All these sources would depend on their manner of
coupling to the scope. I don't think that speech would be that effectively
coupled to be a problem.

Have you tried collecting some images where part of the image has the
source present and part does not? I would think you could even shut down
your rotary pumps for long enough to determine their influence on imaging.
Take appropriate precautions.

Like the previous discussion on mu metal shielding, it seems that you might
want to isolate the problem better and/or try some cheap and crude
solutions before investing the bigger bucks.

FWIW,
Warren Straszheim

At 07:57 AM 11/7/2000 +0000, you wrote:

} Kal
} could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
} how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
} I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
} controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
} frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
} lab.
} Chris
}
} } For low frequencies, no curtain will do
} } as you need a membrane with a seal.
} }
} } Kal
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Dr Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} Biological Sciences EM Facility
} Daniel Rutherford Building
} King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
} Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
} FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563



From daemon Tue Nov 7 10:34:07 2000



From: Robert Palmer :      rjpalmer-at-dir.nidcr.nih.gov
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 11:35:58 -0500
Subject: 3d recon and measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am interested in acquiring software for 3D image reconstruction and
measurement (distance/volume) in 3D space. What is the current state of
the market in this area? I am familiar with only one company that provides
such a package (Vital Images: VoxelView), but I bet there are others. No
need to evangelize - just let me know what other products I should examine.
Money is not a big obstacle, I do not want to write code myself (I want a
turnkey solution), and I do not require image acquisition or 2D analysis
features.
Thanks for the input.
Robert J. Palmer Jr., Ph.D.
Natl Inst Dental Craniofacial Res - Natl Insts Health
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch
Bldg 30, Room 308
30 Convent Drive
Bethesda MD 20892
ph 301-594-0025
fax 301-402-0396


From daemon Tue Nov 7 12:41:16 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 08:37:19 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Speech can indeed be a problem with FESEMs. In the case of our instrument,
the shrouding around the ion pumps behind the column was acting as a drum,
transmitting speech particularly well. I removed the shrouding and the
problem was eliminated. Plus now the scope looks much more interesting
and impresses visitors! In newer models from the same company the
shrouding is now perforated to minimize the problem.

} You might need to expand a bit on your goal. It seems that you are
} indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that hard
} to believe. Pumps, maybe. All these sources would depend on their manner of
} coupling to the scope. I don't think that speech would be that effectively
} coupled to be a problem.

Aloha,
Tina

Mid-80s F, sunny with tropical breezes

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Nov 7 14:10:05 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 19:59:28 -0000
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes I am indicating exactly that. Certain frequencies of the human
voice at normal conversational amplitudes are picked up by FESEM
columns and can induce saw-tooth edges on sharp-edged features
(such as gold crystals on carbon) at magnifications in the x100k
region. Trust me on this. It is a real problem. If one is contemplating
high resolution work with an FESEM a hushed environment is
essential.

Chris

} It seems that you are
} indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that hard
} to believe. Pumps, maybe. All these sources would depend on their manner of
} coupling to the scope. I don't think that speech would be that effectively
} coupled to be a problem.
}
} Have you tried collecting some images where part of the image has the
} source present and part does not? I would think you could even shut down
} your rotary pumps for long enough to determine their influence on imaging.
} Take appropriate precautions.
}
} Like the previous discussion on mu metal shielding, it seems that you might
} want to isolate the problem better and/or try some cheap and crude
} solutions before investing the bigger bucks.
}
} FWIW,
} Warren Straszheim
}
} At 07:57 AM 11/7/2000 +0000, you wrote:
}
} } Kal
} } could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
} } how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
} } I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
} } controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
} } frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
} } lab.
} } Chris
} }
} } } For low frequencies, no curtain will do
} } } as you need a membrane with a seal.
} } }
} } } Kal
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } Dr Chris Jeffree
} } University of Edinburgh
} } Biological Sciences EM Facility
} } Daniel Rutherford Building
} } King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
} } Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
} } FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Tue Nov 7 14:27:36 2000



From: Marek Malecki :      mmm-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 12:27:05 -0800
Subject: Pfeiffer's no-oil vacuum pumps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have 2 Pfeiffer's no-oil vacuum pumps for 8m3/min to offer . They have
only 50hours of work. The original price the last year was $6400. Any offer
negotiable.
Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D.
Director and Principal Investigator

Molecular Imaging Laboratories
University of California, San Diego

address: 1500 Suite Bonner Hall, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA92093-0368
phone - office: 8588223373
phone - cell: 8583443347
fax: 8588223715
e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
pager: 8586161420
e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
e.pager: 1620024619-at-alphapage.airtouch.com
www site: http://mil.ucsd.edu/
ftp site: mil.ucsd.edu




From daemon Tue Nov 7 14:57:52 2000



From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 15:48:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Warren E Straszheim:
}
} You might need to expand a bit on your goal. It seems that you are
} indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that hard
} to believe.

Dear Warren,
I still remember Ken Downing demonstrating that his IVEM
image would vibrate whenever one talked at the microscope--in fact,
at a DOE site visit, the head of the team, a Dr. Happer, seemed
singularly unimpressed until he was shown that clapping in the
IVEM room would cause the image to vibrate. He was apparently
quite amused, and the site visit went well after that. The IVEM
was known for a time as the "Happer clapper".
Yours,
Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY


From daemon Tue Nov 7 15:06:37 2000



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 15:02:33 -0600
Subject: RE: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I have to back Chris up on this. We have often seen voice-induced vibration
in our FESEM. No talking during high-mag, high-res work.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Yes I am indicating exactly that. Certain frequencies of the human
voice at normal conversational amplitudes are picked up by FESEM
columns and can induce saw-tooth edges on sharp-edged features
(such as gold crystals on carbon) at magnifications in the x100k
region. Trust me on this. It is a real problem. If one is contemplating
high resolution work with an FESEM a hushed environment is
essential.

Chris

} It seems that you are
} indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that
hard
} to believe. Pumps, maybe. All these sources would depend on their manner
of
} coupling to the scope. I don't think that speech would be that effectively

} coupled to be a problem.
}
} Have you tried collecting some images where part of the image has the
} source present and part does not? I would think you could even shut down
} your rotary pumps for long enough to determine their influence on imaging.

} Take appropriate precautions.
}
} Like the previous discussion on mu metal shielding, it seems that you
might
} want to isolate the problem better and/or try some cheap and crude
} solutions before investing the bigger bucks.
}
} FWIW,
} Warren Straszheim
}
} At 07:57 AM 11/7/2000 +0000, you wrote:
}
} } Kal
} } could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
} } how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
} } I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
} } controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
} } frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
} } lab.
} } Chris
} }
} } } For low frequencies, no curtain will do
} } } as you need a membrane with a seal.
} } }
} } } Kal
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } Dr Chris Jeffree
} } University of Edinburgh
} } Biological Sciences EM Facility
} } Daniel Rutherford Building
} } King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
} } Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
} } FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Tue Nov 7 16:08:00 2000



From: Kalman Rubinson :      kr4-at-is2.nyu.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 17:03:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Chris Jeffree wrote:

} Yes I am indicating exactly that. Certain frequencies of the human
} voice at normal conversational amplitudes are picked up by FESEM
} columns and can induce saw-tooth edges on sharp-edged features
} (such as gold crystals on carbon) at magnifications in the x100k
} region. Trust me on this. It is a real problem. If one is contemplating
} high resolution work with an FESEM a hushed environment is
} essential.

OK. Where are these voices? In the room? If not, the
issue is to keep them out. Perhaps you should contact a
number of the specialist firms and consult with them via
their websites. I have gotten very useful advice and
information without (or prior to) purchase of sound
treatment materials.

Kal

} } It seems that you are
} } indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that hard
} } to believe. Pumps, maybe. All these sources would depend on their manner of
} } coupling to the scope. I don't think that speech would be that effectively
} } coupled to be a problem.
} }
} } Have you tried collecting some images where part of the image has the
} } source present and part does not? I would think you could even shut down
} } your rotary pumps for long enough to determine their influence on imaging.
} } Take appropriate precautions.
} }
} } Like the previous discussion on mu metal shielding, it seems that you might
} } want to isolate the problem better and/or try some cheap and crude
} } solutions before investing the bigger bucks.
} }
} } FWIW,
} } Warren Straszheim
} }
} } At 07:57 AM 11/7/2000 +0000, you wrote:
} }
} } } Kal
} } } could you expand on this a little? What type of membrane, arranged
} } } how?, etc. What range of frequencies can be controlled this way?
} } } I am looking for a relatively straightforward and inexpensive way of
} } } controlling particularly the low end of the spectrum of acoustic
} } } frequencies (generated by human voice, RVPs, etc.) in an FESEM
} } } lab.
} } } Chris
} } }
} } } } For low frequencies, no curtain will do
} } } } as you need a membrane with a seal.
} } } }
} } } } Kal
} } } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } } Dr Chris Jeffree
} } } University of Edinburgh
} } } Biological Sciences EM Facility
} } } Daniel Rutherford Building
} } } King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
} } } Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
} } } FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563
} }
} }
}
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Dr Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} Biological Sciences EM Facility
} Daniel Rutherford Building
} King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
} Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
} FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563
}
} Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
} Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
} Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
} FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}





From daemon Tue Nov 7 17:06:20 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 16:57:40 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Well, I guess I learned something today. I usually show operators that loud
noises will show up as low energy noise in the EDS spectra. I had no idea
that it also affected the images that much. We do not do that much work
above 10 kx. I will have to bear that in mind the next time we venture into
that realm and turn down the 1812 Overture in the background. I may have to
quiet our pumps down too.

Warren

At 07:59 PM 11/7/2000 +0000, you wrote:
} Yes I am indicating exactly that. Certain frequencies of the human
} voice at normal conversational amplitudes are picked up by FESEM
} columns and can induce saw-tooth edges on sharp-edged features
} (such as gold crystals on carbon) at magnifications in the x100k
} region. Trust me on this. It is a real problem. If one is contemplating
} high resolution work with an FESEM a hushed environment is
} essential.
}
} Chris



From daemon Tue Nov 7 17:12:04 2000



From: Jaap Brink :      brink-at-tiger.3dem.bioch.bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 17:09:41 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Kalman Rubinson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Chris Jeffree wrote:
}
} } Yes I am indicating exactly that. Certain frequencies of the human
} } voice at normal conversational amplitudes are picked up by FESEM
} } columns and can induce saw-tooth edges on sharp-edged features
} } (such as gold crystals on carbon) at magnifications in the x100k
} } region. Trust me on this. It is a real problem. If one is contemplating
} } high resolution work with an FESEM a hushed environment is
} } essential.
}
} OK. Where are these voices? In the room? If not, the
} issue is to keep them out. Perhaps you should contact a
} number of the specialist firms and consult with them via
} their websites. I have gotten very useful advice and
} information without (or prior to) purchase of sound
} treatment materials.
}
} Kal
}
(snip)

I'd like to jump into this one by adding my $0.02. I'm familiair with Ken
Downing's results related to vibrations. We tried it ourselves as well
and microphonics are indeed a very real problem when one does HR work. The
effects are indeed very clearly visible on the TV screen at high (} =
100kx) mag. Ken (together with Bob Glaeser) and we (perhaps others
have done something similar) have taken this a step further and
constructed boxes made of styrofoam that fit around the cryo-holder (side
entry types). The idea was to keep microphonics away from the holder
including those created by us talking or on the phone or listening to a
radio, but also those originating from pumps, ventilation and/or air
conditioning systems.

Jaap

-- --
Jaap Brink, Ph.D., Biochemistry, One Baylor Plaza, Baylor College of
Medicine, Rm. N420 Alkek Building, Houston, TX 77030
Phone: (713)798-6989 -- Fax: (713)796-9438 -- Email: jbrink-at-bcm.tmc.edu
URL : http://ncmi.bioch.bcm.tmc.edu/~brink



From daemon Tue Nov 7 18:41:46 2000



From: Dave Audette :      deaudette-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 16:36:34 -0800 (PST)
Subject: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello listers,

I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
department is reluctant to place this on the network
which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
product which will replace the Unix box/software and
utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?

TIA,

Dave Audette
OSRAM Sylvania
71 Cherry Hill Drive
Beverly, MA 01915
david.audette-at-sylvania.com



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
http://shopping.yahoo.com/


From daemon Tue Nov 7 19:23:53 2000



From: Bruce Cutler :      bcutler-at-eureka.idl.ukans.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 19:20:56 -0600
Subject: Schottky vs. cold FESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks to all who responded to my questions.
Bruce
Bruce Cutler
Director, Microscopy & Electronic Imaging Laboratory
University of Kansas




From daemon Tue Nov 7 20:32:18 2000



From: Thearith H. Ung :      tung-at-qdots.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 18:25:37 -0800
Subject: TEM CCD Camera/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi Everybody,

Does anybody know of any used CCD camera and EDS in good condition that are
up for sail? I would like to purchase these to use on a used JEOL 200CX TEM.

Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Thearith

_________________________

Thearith Ung, Ph.D.
Quantum Dot Corporation
26136 Research Road
Hayward CA 94545
Tel: +1-510-887-8775 (x4125)
Fax:+1-510-783-9729
www.qdots.com



From daemon Tue Nov 7 20:57:32 2000



From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 21:51:45 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} department is reluctant to place this on the network
} which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?

Your IT department is over simplifying the cost. They most likey
think it's only 1 or 2k to get a WinOS computer. They are very wrong.

Cost is really going to be from ~10k to ~20k to replace the Voyager
depending if you go with a Noran (Quest) replacement or some other like us.
You will be able to keep the detector (although maybe a preamp change) but
everything else is replaced. Also you will have to learn new EDS software
(your time at two to three weeks). In addition, all your old data and
analysis might or might not be movable to the new EDS system (how much is
your data worth).

Tell your managment that your IT department needs to to support you
rather than you supporting them, after all, what is the function of the TI
department. The Voyager is a plain UNIX box, if no one in the IT department
understands UNIX enough to network it, they are pretty sorry.
If that does not work, then tell then you will be glad to replace
the UNIX with a WinOS equivalent provided they pony up the funds. Also
remind managment that you will get no real work done while you learn the
new software. Add the fact that previous data results might be forever lost
to access.
Let them figure that the IT deparment is going to cost the company
10-20k plus the cost of your time because they can't seem to do their job
which is to support the computing needs of the workers.
Bottom line is that it's going to cost the company 40-60k direct
and indirect costs however if you can't move the data, then it could cost
the company big time if they need to access it in the future. Now what is
really more cost efficient?

Sorry for the rant, but it really bugs me when IT departments
operate in such a priesthood fashion, we run into it all the time with our
MacOS products so much that we came out with WinOS products for those that
have to have WinOS because of stupid IT restrictions.

Scott
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 ext 13 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com



From daemon Tue Nov 7 23:29:27 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 07 Nov 2000 21:24:00 -0800
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Huh? What PCs? If they are all DOS-based, I can identify
with their concerns. If the PCs are running client TCP/IP,
the addition of the Sun should be trivial.

How are LAN IPs assigned? If there is a LAN NAT
server, then just assign the Sun a within-scope IP address.
If it is DHCP, just do it.

I don't see what the big deal is. Except....I'll venture
to say that the PC jockeys have no Unix experience.
That would be a good reason to keep the Sun away
from the PC LAN.

gg


At 04:36 PM 11/7/00, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Nov 8 01:54:05 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 13:52:06 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "Scott D. Davilla" {davilla-at-4pi.com}
}
} } I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} } UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} } 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} } department is reluctant to place this on the network
} } which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} } more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} } product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} } utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} } etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?
===========
Just tell them you can't get fries wiht that and do their job. And don't
hold your breath. If you ask around there may be a couple working wiht
Linux and they can figure it out.

Just borrow some one with unix experiance to set it up from another
department for a favor to be anouced later and let the IT department spin
on it. If they are windows based the box will weld it's self shut by
molecular defusion before they take the time to figure out unix.

Hiring a consultant is a reasonable soluting if a college is near. Once it
is set up it can be maintained from any place in the world. Unless you are
adding stuff a couple of hours a month will do the job.

The best answer is some one in the shop learn to do it. It will take some
time but it will pay off in he long run.

Good luck You need it.
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Nov 8 02:07:23 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 14:06:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "William Tivol" {tivol-at-wadsworth.org}
}
} Warren E Straszheim:
} }
} } You might need to expand a bit on your goal. It seems that you are
} } indicating that human speech is degrading your resolution. I find that
hard
} } to believe.
}
} Dear Warren,
} I still remember Ken Downing demonstrating that his IVEM
} image would vibrate whenever one talked at the microscope--in fact,
} at a DOE site visit, the head of the team, a Dr. Happer, seemed
} singularly unimpressed until he was shown that clapping in the
} IVEM room would cause the image to vibrate. He was apparently
} quite amused, and the site visit went well after that. The IVEM
} was known for a time as the "Happer clapper".

Noise is a problem of inches. The best solution is a corn field 5 miles
from any where in a 10 foot basment on a still night and a active noise
canceler makes it better. We put our insterments in buildings with people
and macinery. I was testing a simple load cell with a 12 bid A/D
converter. It was no trick to measure a car drive by 30 yards away a truck
100 yards a way a fellow walking by in the hall. And a load cell with a 12
bit a/d converter is not a very sensitive insterment.

There are good solutions down to 4 or 5 Hz below that you have trouble.
Floating it on an air table gets x and y but not z. floating it in liqid
work until you get a resonate situation. Active cancelation works the best
and costs the most. The things tried on this list sows that it is a
difficult problem.

You live or die by the contact with your coustomers so you lab has to be
near them. That usualy means near traffic and a lot of people. and a lot
of vibration and noise. Call your favirate noise reduction vendor and say
fixit I have this much money or go to you customers hat in hand and get
what it takes to do it right.

Good luck
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Nov 8 02:08:54 2000



From: Richard :      richard.langford-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 08:05:47 -0000
Subject: Re: 3d recon and measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Robert

The following web page gives a detailed list of software for 3-D
reconstruction.

http://biocomp.stanford.edu/3dreconstruction/index.html

Regards

Richard
--------------------------------------------------------------
Richard M Langford

Department of Materials, University of Oxford
Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK

Tel: +44 (0)1865 273734, Fax: +44 (0)1865 273789
email: richard.langford-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Nov 8 03:46:37 2000



From: Tim E. Harper :      tim-at-cmp-cientifica.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 10:43:00 +0100
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I had the same system when I worked with ESA.
I don't remember much difficulty with SunOS 5.3. We just gave it a name & IP
address on our LAN, checked a few boxes in the set-up screen & off we went.
I don't think we even needed to call in the IT people.

If your IT people can set up a DOS box, they can set up SunOs 5.3. Should be
a 5-10 minute job, longer if they have to RTFM.

Regards

Tim


*****************************************************************
Tim E. Harper Managing Director
CMP Cientifica s.l.
Space & NanoTechnology Division
Phone +34 91 640 71 85 Fax +34 91 640 71 86
http://www.cmp-cientifica.com/

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2000 6:24 AM
To: Dave Audette
Cc: MSA listserver


Huh? What PCs? If they are all DOS-based, I can identify
with their concerns. If the PCs are running client TCP/IP,
the addition of the Sun should be trivial.

How are LAN IPs assigned? If there is a LAN NAT
server, then just assign the Sun a within-scope IP address.
If it is DHCP, just do it.

I don't see what the big deal is. Except....I'll venture
to say that the PC jockeys have no Unix experience.
That would be a good reason to keep the Sun away
from the PC LAN.

gg


At 04:36 PM 11/7/00, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From daemon Wed Nov 8 08:03:37 2000



From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 05:33:22 -0800
Subject: change of email address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please change my email address from "earlw-at-pacbell.net" to
"eweltmer-at-home.com"

Thank You,

Earl Weltmer
Scanservice Corp.
(714) 573-9158



From daemon Wed Nov 8 08:03:42 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2000 19:57:32 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
}
} Huh? What PCs? If they are all DOS-based, I can identify
} with their concerns. If the PCs are running client TCP/IP,
} the addition of the Sun should be trivial.
}
} How are LAN IPs assigned? If there is a LAN NAT
} server, then just assign the Sun a within-scope IP address.
} If it is DHCP, just do it.
}
} I don't see what the big deal is. Except....I'll venture
} to say that the PC jockeys have no Unix experience.
} That would be a good reason to keep the Sun away
} from the PC LAN.

No it is a good reason to keep it away from the people runing the LAN. The
Lan it's self doesn't care what is hooked to it. The fool that trys to
hook it up has a lot to do wiht it. Back up everything before the come and
after they leave. So you can go back to a working state not connected to
the lan.

I can't get Unix jocks for my own projects good luck on yours. And one is
my son.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Nov 8 09:18:51 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 08:56:23 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would echo the sentiments you have already received. It seems like your
IT folks just have no experience with UNIX. (But neither do I.) It would
take them some time to learn it, even if they are willing.

It absolutely should be a trivial matter to put a Unix box on a TCP/IP
network, and that is all you should need. If they are thinking that they
have to run Novell or some other protocol on your Unix system, that could
be a very difficult prospect. But that is not what you would want. All you
need is TCP/IP and Unix is where TCP/IP got its start.

I would suggest that you get the rules for setting up an additional PC node
on the network. Let them give you an IP number and name or tell you that
your net runs a DHCP server to hand out IP numbers. Hey, you could even
give them an old, dummy PC and say hook this up to the net and call it such
and so. Then you could have someone who does know Unix and Windows come in,
look over the setup, transfer the setting to the Unix box, and dispose of
the dummy PC.

In other words, it really should not be that tough. I bet you have someone
around that could do it. That is the way I helped another lab on campus get
their PDP-based Kevex EDS system onto the net. I had already done it with
ours.

Good luck.

Warren S.

At 04:36 PM 11/7/2000 -0800, you wrote:
} Hello listers,
}
} I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} department is reluctant to place this on the network
} which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?
}
} TIA,
}
} Dave Audette
} OSRAM Sylvania
} 71 Cherry Hill Drive
} Beverly, MA 01915
} david.audette-at-sylvania.com
}
}
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do You Yahoo!?
} Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
} http://shopping.yahoo.com/



From daemon Wed Nov 8 09:22:39 2000



From: Arthur Day :      ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 02:17:19 +1100
Subject: Subject: RE: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dave,

Our experience is exactly the same as Tim's. Ask your IT guys what it
is that is peculiar about your network that precludes being able to
run a unix box on it. We followed instructions provided by some user
friendly unix experts and set up our Voyagers on the network
ourselves. I've got the notes on how to do it and could send them to
you if you want. The instructions are pretty straightforward,ie the
commands to use to get to the setup screen, optional files to create
and edit if you want additional networking functions, and so on.

Maybe best if you can persuade the IT guys to assign you with a
permanent IP address. From there you shouldn't really need them for
anything else. Any other site specific info that you need should be
obtainable by looking at the network setup of any PCs (or Macs!)
running nearby.

Maybe it's a 15 minute job to do once, 5 minutes if you can avoid the damn FM.

Regards,
Arthur

}
} I had the same system when I worked with ESA.
} I don't remember much difficulty with SunOS 5.3. We just gave it a name & IP
} address on our LAN, checked a few boxes in the set-up screen & off we went.
} I don't think we even needed to call in the IT people.
}
} If your IT people can set up a DOS box, they can set up SunOs 5.3. Should be
} a 5-10 minute job, longer if they have to RTFM.
}
} Regards
}
} Tim
}
}
} *****************************************************************
} Tim E. Harper Managing Director
} CMP Cientifica s.l.
} Space & NanoTechnology Division
} Phone +34 91 640 71 85 Fax +34 91 640 71 86
} http://www.cmp-cientifica.com/
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2000 6:24 AM
} To: Dave Audette
} Cc: MSA listserver
} Subject: Re: EDS networking
}
} At 04:36 PM 11/7/00, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hello listers,
} }
} } I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} } UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} } 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} } department is reluctant to place this on the network
} } which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} } more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} } product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} } utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} } etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?
} }
} } TIA,
} }
} } Dave Audette
} } OSRAM Sylvania
} } 71 Cherry Hill Drive
} } Beverly, MA 01915
} } david.audette-at-sylvania.com
} }
} }
} }
} } __________________________________________________
} } Do You Yahoo!?
} } Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
} } http://shopping.yahoo.com/

Arthur Day, Electron Microscope Unit Phone: 61-2-9717-3457
Ansto Materials Division Fax: 61-2-9543-7179
PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Email: ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Australia www: http://www.ansto.gov.au/


From daemon Wed Nov 8 09:45:15 2000



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 09:33:05 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 04:36 PM 11/7/00 -0800, Dave Audette wrote:
} I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} department is reluctant to place this on the network
} which is all PC based.

If you can find anyone there adept in Unix, they would be able
to install Samba, a networking package that will make your
box look like every other PC in the office in terms of
file sharing and printing. You can see their drives or
they can see yours.

http://us1.samba.org/samba/samba.html is the start, and
http://us5.samba.org/samba/ftp/Binary_Packages/solaris/Sparc/
has binaries or source code for your platform.

- John



From daemon Wed Nov 8 11:54:05 2000



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 09:48:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Without much information on the networking setup for your lab/company, it
shouldn't be that difficult to add it to the existing windows network.
You could do it with or without your IT department.

If you have a network line, install a switch/hub, add in your Sun computer
to the network, setup its configuration, and you should be able to do
simple file transfers via ftp. You could also see if Samba is available
for your Sun OS, and then share files more easily.

More information about the network configuration that exists for your
company would be needed to give more precise suggestions.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Tue, 7 Nov 2000, Dave Audette wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello listers,
}
} I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} department is reluctant to place this on the network
} which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?
}
} TIA,
}
} Dave Audette
} OSRAM Sylvania
} 71 Cherry Hill Drive
} Beverly, MA 01915
} david.audette-at-sylvania.com
}
}
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do You Yahoo!?
} Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
} http://shopping.yahoo.com/
}
}



From daemon Wed Nov 8 12:04:41 2000



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 13:01:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html







Dear Gordon,

Noise is a problem of inches.

And Hertz. Our HVEM column is very sensitive to 20 Hz, but almost
completely insensitive to frequencies a few Hz away on either side. Once you
have someone sit at the scope and watch the image as a sound generator is swept
through a range of frequencies, you will know what to be concerned about, and
then you can get the appropriate shielding.

The best solution is a corn field 5 miles
from any where in a 10 foot basment on a still night and a active noise
canceler makes it better.

If you build it, will they come? ;-)

We put our insterments in buildings with people
and macinery. I was testing a simple load cell with a 12 bid A/D
converter. It was no trick to measure a car drive by 30 yards away a truck
100 yards a way a fellow walking by in the hall. And a load cell with a 12
bit a/d converter is not a very sensitive insterment.

There are good solutions down to 4 or 5 Hz below that you have trouble.
Floating it on an air table gets x and y but not z. floating it in liqid
work until you get a resonate situation. Active cancelation works the best
and costs the most. The things tried on this list sows that it is a
difficult problem.

There is no free lunch. Floating the instrument renders it sensitive to
sound in the room, and mounting it solidly to the floor makes transmission
through the ground a problem. If the soil mechanics are such that the
frequencies transmitted to the instrument are not those to which it is
sensitive, but the sound emitted by the pumps is at the sensitive frequencies,
it can be better to bolt the instrument to the floor. As you said, an
environment completely free of vibration is best, and active cancellation is
good.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From daemon Wed Nov 8 14:14:52 2000



From: csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 17:07:47 +0300
Subject: change of email address

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please change my email address from "csedax-at-arcride.edu.ar" to
"csedax-at-ceride.gov.ar"
Thank You,

Prof. Nora Pratta
CERIDE - CONICET
Guemes 3450 - (3000)
Santa Fe, ARGENTINA


From daemon Wed Nov 8 14:36:06 2000



From: Daniel L Flatoff :      dflatoff-at-stu.madison.tec.wi.us
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 20:31:38 GMT
Subject: TEM sample prep of steel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to say thanks to all for the information
provided on preparing TEM cross sections of DLC thin films
on steel. Also I would like to note that I do have access
a FIB tool at Madison Area Technical College, so anyone who
has any info on specialized techniques for the TEM prep of
DLC thin films using the FIB would greatly be appreciated.
Again, thanks to all


Daniel L. Flatoff
student
Madison Area Technical College





From daemon Wed Nov 8 15:05:56 2000



From: Jesse Rodrigues :      Jesse_Rodrigues-at-kopin.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 16:01:39 -0500
Subject: ISO calibration of an SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi,

Does anyone have any experience with instituting ISO compliance of SEM's?
How do you keep your SEM calibrated and how often are calibrations
performed? What type of support does your mfg. offer?

Any information would be helpful.

Thank you,

Jesse Rodrigues
Kopin Corporation
695 Myles Standish Blvd.
Taunton, MA 02780




From daemon Wed Nov 8 15:14:46 2000



From: Thearith H. Ung :      tung-at-qdots.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 13:08:38 -0800
Subject: TEM CCD Camera/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi all,

Thank you to those who replied and let me know that their cameras and EDS
systems are available for sale. I forgot to ask also what are some of the
best vendors that sell CCD cameras and EDS systems? This information will be
valuable in helping me to apply for grants to purchase these instruments.

Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Thearith
_________________________

Thearith Ung, Ph.D.
Quantum Dot Corporation
26136 Research Road
Hayward CA 94545
Tel: +1-510-887-8775 (x4125)
Fax:+1-510-783-9729
www.qdots.com



From daemon Wed Nov 8 15:35:32 2000



From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 16:30:14 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 04:36 PM 11/7/2000 -0800, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} From Dave's posting, we can't tell. Before he starts any battles with his
IT department, he needs to learn (by his own research or with the help of
an advocate) what the reasons are for the IT advice. Maybe he already
knows this and didn't include it in his message (but I suspect not, for
why would he have posted his message). Without this knowledge, though, the
various responses (excepting Scott's) that have been made are not really
very helpful.

I know I'm on a soapbox here, and in any forum like this, a major degree
of *caveat emptor* has to apply. It is certainly true that, if the
OSRAM/Sylvania network is TCP/IP, then the UNIX box is easily networked.
If not, though, then Dave will have been misguided, rather than helped, by
the responses he has received.

Tony.



} Hello listers,
}
} I operate a Noran Voyager 3.3 EDS system, which is a
} UNIX based system and operates on a Sun Sparc Station
} 5 with SunOS 5.3. The problem is the local IT
} department is reluctant to place this on the network
} which is all PC based. The IT staff feels it would be
} more cost efficient use of their time, if I found any
} product which will replace the Unix box/software and
} utilize the present hardware (detector, amplifiers,
} etc.). Anyone have any experience with this?
}
} TIA,
}
} Dave Audette
} OSRAM Sylvania
} 71 Cherry Hill Drive
} Beverly, MA 01915
} david.audette-at-sylvania.com
}
}
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do You Yahoo!?
} Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
} http://shopping.yahoo.com/
}

** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6478
**




From daemon Wed Nov 8 16:47:32 2000



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 17:40:52 -0500
Subject: RE: ISO calibration of an SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are QS9000 certified which is the automotive equivalent to ISO.
Basically, it really is up to you how often you want to do it. We have some
instruments set up for twice a year and some on an annual basis. Basically,
the ISO is a paper work tracking system that insures that you do what you
say you do in your SOP's or in our case, SLP's (System Level Procedures).
You decide what you want to do and stick to it. You write the
specifications that you need to follow and document them. A suggestion,
don't write them too stringent. You can use the ISO process to insure that
your instrumentation is maintained properly. For example if you write a
specification that your EDS detector should have a particular energy
resolution for an element and if it is out, that the detector is repaired,
then your company has no options, it must have it repaired or have it taken
out of service. However, you should be careful in writing your procedures
if you don't want it out of service. For example, you don't want the
normal resolution degradation in performance with lifetime of a detector
shutting you down.

We have the manufacturer's or our 3rd party's service engineers verify the
calibration as part of the annual or semi-annual PM visit on our service
contracts on all our scanning instruments. On our TEM, I just do the annual
calibration verification myself and record it. If I do anything that
requires a new calibration before the year is up, I just put the new
calibration data in the records book. It doesn't hurt to do it more often.
It is a real pain if you find out that it was out of calibration and you
were sending data to customers. Then you have to contact them all and tell
them that their results were done while it was not in calibration.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Jesse Rodrigues [mailto:Jesse_Rodrigues-at-kopin.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2000 4:02 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: ISO calibration of an SEM
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListse} rver/FAQ.html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Does anyone have any experience with instituting ISO
} compliance of SEM's?
} How do you keep your SEM calibrated and how often are calibrations
} performed? What type of support does your mfg. offer?
}
} Any information would be helpful.
}
} Thank you,
}
} Jesse Rodrigues
} Kopin Corporation
} 695 Myles Standish Blvd.
} Taunton, MA 02780
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Nov 8 18:04:10 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 15:55:55 -0800
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
A test I have heard of for the acoustic resonence frequency of your TEM
sample holder and stage is the "whistle test". While looking at a sample
with good high res. detail through the binocular eyepieces, mag. 100,000 to
200,000 X, whistle starting low and going up. You should see a frequency in
there where the sample vibrates. Never move or speak while taking a high
res. photo.
At 01:01 PM 11/8/00 -0500, you wrote:
} Dear Gordon,
}
} Noise is a problem of inches.
}
} And Hertz. Our HVEM column is very sensitive to 20 Hz, but almost
} completely insensitive to frequencies a few Hz away on either side. Once you
} have someone sit at the scope and watch the image as a sound generator is swept
} through a range of frequencies, you will know what to be concerned about, and
} then you can get the appropriate shielding.
}
} The best solution is a corn field 5 miles
} from any where in a 10 foot basment on a still night and a active noise
} canceler makes it better.
}
} If you build it, will they come? ;-)
}
} We put our insterments in buildings with people
} and macinery. I was testing a simple load cell with a 12 bid A/D
} converter. It was no trick to measure a car drive by 30 yards away a truck
} 100 yards a way a fellow walking by in the hall. And a load cell with a 12
} bit a/d converter is not a very sensitive insterment.
}
} There are good solutions down to 4 or 5 Hz below that you have trouble.
} Floating it on an air table gets x and y but not z. floating it in liqid
} work until you get a resonate situation. Active cancelation works the best
} and costs the most. The things tried on this list sows that it is a
} difficult problem.
}
} There is no free lunch. Floating the instrument renders it sensitive to
} sound in the room, and mounting it solidly to the floor makes transmission
} through the ground a problem. If the soil mechanics are such that the
} frequencies transmitted to the instrument are not those to which it is
} sensitive, but the sound emitted by the pumps is at the sensitive frequencies,
} it can be better to bolt the instrument to the floor. As you said, an
} environment completely free of vibration is best, and active cancellation is
} good.
} Yours,
}
} Bill Tivol
} Wadsworth Center
} Albany NY
} (518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us
}
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Nov 8 18:07:00 2000



From: Eric Steel :      eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 19:03:35 -0500
Subject: Post Doctoral Positions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{html}
The National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) has many Post
Doctoral Positions open. These are offered competitively through the
National Research Council (NRC).  Within
microscopy/microanalysis/surface analysis research areas we have many
possible openings described at the NRC web sites listed below.  The
Microanalysis Research and Analytical Microscopy Groups at NIST have
about twenty full time scientists specializing in the measurement methods
in our extensive facilities including SEMs (FEG, EPMA, Environmental,=85),
AEMs (FEG/LaB6 TEM/STEM/EDS/EELS), Auger probes, SIMS/TOF-SIMS,
MicroXRD/XRF, MicroRaman/IR, Synchrotron beam-line with grazing incidence
XPS, etc.   We research new and improved measurement methods
and we apply these methods to challenging analytical problems in
semiconductor and optoelectronic technology, materials science,
environmental and earth science, etc. {br}
{br}
If you have research ideas that would be related to the analytical
approaches below and are looking for a Post Doc opportunity, please
contact me. {br}
{br}
The NIST/NRC program offers a two-year Post Doc at an annual salary of
$50,000 with an additional $5,500 for research expenses. The applications
are {b} due to the NRC by Jan 15, 2001 {/b} . This includes a brief proposal
and several recommendations. {br}
{br}
{b} A candidate must be a U.S. citizen and start work (with their PhD in
hand) at NIST between July 1, 2001 and Feb 1, 2002. {/b} So, this is the
perfect opportunity for those that are graduating this spring through
next fall and others that have received their degree within the last five
years. Please note that NIST/NRC only competes Post Doc positions once a
year, unlike some other institutions. {br}
{br}
{b} General NIST-NRC Post Doc Information {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/vwLabInformation/03AF8E43C706150B8=
52567FB004AB8E8?OpenDocument"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/vwLabInformation/03AF8E=
43C706150B852567FB004AB8E8?OpenDocument {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} Specific areas of interest: {br}
{br}
{b} Chemical Imaging {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/5273986D8FFE74B18525691F00=
60BD9F?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/5273986D8FFE74B=
18525691F0060BD9F?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Field Emission Analytical Electron Microscopy/Nanoscale
Compositional Mapping {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/65DE73654E7869028525691F00=
60A463?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/65DE73654E78690=
28525691F0060A463?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Electron-Probe Microanalysis/Scanning Electron
Microscopy {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/F704FABB051A2EE48525691F00=
60A4B5?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/F704FABB051A2EE=
48525691F0060A4B5?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Microchemistry in the Environmental Scanning Electron
Microscope {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/944FC47A85E417348525691F00=
60C301?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/944FC47A85E4173=
48525691F0060C301?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Microbeam Mass Spectrometry {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/623A17BC37343CDC8525691F00=
60A44D?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/623A17BC37343CD=
C8525691F0060A44D?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Nanoscale Crystallographic Analysis and Compound
Identification by Diffraction Methods {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/39166A04610797758525691F00=
60C316?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/39166A046107977=
58525691F0060C316?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Optical Probe Microanalysis (Raman, IR Microprobes, and
NSOM) {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/78E3849178AC6C718525691F00=
60A43A?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/78E3849178AC6C7=
18525691F0060A43A?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Submicroscopic Chemical and Physical Characterization of
Materials and Particles {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/9C8BD7F79A5AAACE8525691F00=
60A4A1?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/9C8BD7F79A5AAAC=
E8525691F0060A4A1?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Surface Microanalysis by Combined Auger Electron and X-Ray
Emission Spectroscopies {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/9ACCD2318EE9230F8525691F00=
60B7E6?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/9ACCD2318EE9230=
F8525691F0060B7E6?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} X-Ray Investigations of Thin Films, Surfaces, and
Interfaces {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/362CD137E15600568525691F00=
60A4D5?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/362CD137E156005=
68525691F0060A4D5?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Instrument Performance Standards for Raman
Spectroscopy {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/5E60A8DDDF3EB7DE8525691F00=
60BF12?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/5E60A8DDDF3EB7D=
E8525691F0060BF12?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {b} Quantitative Surface Analysis by Electron=20
Spectroscopy {br}
{/b} {font size=3D1 color=3D"#0000FF"} {u} {a=
href=3D"http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/D0188B23B4CC87B78525691F00=
60BD89?OpenDocument&50~NIST"=
eudora=3D"autourl"} http://www4.nas.edu/osep/rap.nsf/ByTitle/D0188B23B4CC87B=
78525691F0060BD89?OpenDocument&50~NIST {/a} {br}
{br}
{/font} {/u} {br}
{br}
{div} Eric B. Steel,
Leader           &nbs=
p;  
{x-tab}      {/x-tab} e-mail:=20
eric.steel-at-nist.gov {/div}
{div} Microanalysis Research
Group       
{x-tab}      {/x-tab} Office: 301-975-3902 {/div}
{div} N.I.S.T.          &nb=
sp;            &=
nbsp;   
{x-tab}      {/x-tab} {x-tab}      =
    {/x-tab} FAX: 
301-417-1321 {/div}
{div} 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8371 {/div}
{div} Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371 {/div}
{a href=3D"http://www.nist.gov/cstl/div837/837.02/"=
EUDORA=3DAUTOURL} http://www.nist.gov/cstl/div837/837.02/ {/a}
{/html}



From daemon Wed Nov 8 19:20:51 2000



From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 03:58:31 +0300
Subject: Re: Leo S360 4QBSD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Robert!

I seem you went to reflective mode of work. Sometimes it happens when
charge does not flow from sample for some reasons. In this case you
can see in backscattered electrons the image of the detector at
polepiece (and some halves or quadrants will change contrast depending
on what mode you choose), and in secondary electrons - all specimen
chamber from inside.
This effect can be used for example for testing of BSE signal path.

Advises:
1. Test the electrical path between the sample and microscope case (if
you have absorbed current amplifier or meter the resistance may be
large).
2. Check this effect on metal test sample.
2. Sputter non-metal sample by conductive film.
3. Work in low vacuum mode if you have it.

Hope it helps.
Regards

Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Co. Ltd., Moscow, Russia.


} ---------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America



From daemon Wed Nov 8 19:25:44 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 17:18:18 -0800
Subject: Re: ISO calibration of an SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


That is a good question and I'm sure, one which will generate
a high degree of variability of responses.

My (un-named) FESEM company does calibrations based on
when the preventive maintenance (PM) routines are performed.
These are supposed to be done at six month intervals. Actually,
they get done only if I have a hard failure of the system and
then when that problem is fixed, a PM is done....if there is time
to do it.

In reality, I can do the key measurements myself to ensure
that the SEM is in spec. Gun brightness, image symmetry, mag
accuracy, etc.

I suppose that it depends on how much you want or need the
maker to do the calibration versus what you can do or are
allowed to do yourself.

gg



At 01:01 PM 11/8/00, you wrote:

} Hi,
}
} Does anyone have any experience with instituting ISO compliance of SEM's?
} How do you keep your SEM calibrated and how often are calibrations
} performed? What type of support does your mfg. offer?
}
} Any information would be helpful.
}
} Thank you,
}
} Jesse Rodrigues
} Kopin Corporation
} 695 Myles Standish Blvd.
} Taunton, MA 02780



From daemon Wed Nov 8 20:04:37 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 08:02:20 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



from: "Anthony Garratt-Reed" {tonygr-at-mit.edu}
} Despite what many respondants to this message have said/implied, it is
} entirely possible that Dave's IT department does know what it is talking
} about. A Department/Plant network need not be implemented using TCP/IP,
} and if it is all PC-based, and doesn't require routing, then NetBEUI
might
} be a sensible choice. IPX/SPX (Novell) networking, or even Lantastic or
} another proprietary system may alternatively be in use.

Then let them build a gateway to put the Unix box on what ever they have.
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Nov 8 21:47:43 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2000 08:44:04 -0600
Subject: Re: Sound absorption curtain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "William F. Tivol" {wft03-at-health.state.ny.us}
,
}
Dear Bill,

} Noise is a problem of inches.

How true and the solution is often found by Edisonian iteration.
}
} And Hertz. Our HVEM column is very sensitive to 20 Hz, but almost
} completely insensitive to frequencies a few Hz away on either side.
Once you
} have someone sit at the scope and watch the image as a sound generator
is swept
} through a range of frequencies, you will know what to be concerned
about, and
} then you can get the appropriate shielding.
========
Have you tried to find what is resonate at 20 Hz and do somting to break
it up. That is high enough you might have a small chance of doing
something about it.
}
} The best solution is a corn field 5 miles
} from any where in a 10 foot basement on a still night and a active noise
} canceler makes it better.
}
} If you build it, will they come? ;-)
}
We really do a lot of radio frequency noise testing in remote fields.
Motorola has a 3 million dollar RF test chamber to test and certify some
wireless devices for noise output on the receiving frequency. The company
that owns the net work has a particular cornfield in Iowa they use for the
same tests for considerably less money. John Deere tests the computers on
their tractors for noise output and immunity by driving them out in the
middle of a field using battery operated test instruments.

I built some sensors used on Ag machinery. It is the quietest environment
I have ever seen The only noise was from the alternator on the diesel
engine and the computers. NO 60 or 120 CPS noise at all.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00





From daemon Thu Nov 9 00:14:10 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 22:04:48 -0800
Subject: Re: EDS networking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 06:02 AM 11/8/00, you wrote:

} from: "Anthony Garratt-Reed" {tonygr-at-mit.edu}
} Despite what many respondants to this message have said/implied, it is
} entirely possible that Dave's IT department does know what it is talking
} about. A Department/Plant network need not be implemented using TCP/IP,
} and if it is all PC-based, and doesn't require routing, then NetBEUI
} might be a sensible choice. IPX/SPX (Novell) networking, or even
} Lantastic or
} another proprietary system may alternatively be in use.
}
} Then let them build a gateway to put the Unix box on what ever they have.
} Gordon
} Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
} Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
} 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00

I guess that I just don't see what the big deal is here. Get a static
IP, agreed-upon host name and set the Unix box up.

If the system is on a LAN, I don't see why routing is an issue.
That will/should be transparent as long as the main router is
set at the default gateway. If a bridge is involved, I can see
that things might be more complicated--but not insurmountable.

Unix/Linux to PCs and Macs are done all the time. No big deal.
My own LAN is exactly like this. Mac G4/400, 3 P-3/800,
SGI O2, SGI Indigo 2, Sun Ultra 5, P2-400 Linux. All on
10BaseT running TCP/IP. PCs use Microsoft TCP/IP
client. Mac runs DAVE. SGI runs IRIX 6.5. Sun runs
SunOS/Solaris.

I simply do not see the big deal here. The key is to get a
static IP on the branch LAN, know the gateway IP, and
provide DNS IPs. That ought to do it.

gg



From daemon Thu Nov 9 04:16:14 2000



From: Robert McDonald :      robert-at-starav.geology.gla.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2000 10:25:28 +0000
Subject: Thanks to all Re; 4QBSD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Just a quick "Thanks" to all those who took the time to answer my 4QBSD
problem without laughing at my limited knowledge :-)

Robert



From daemon Thu Nov 9 04:57:42 2000



From: David Cockayne :      david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 10:47:58 -0000
Subject: Fw: Monte Carlo simulation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





I am in need of a Monte Carlo electron scattering programme (with or without
EDS) for SEM scattering simulations. Is there one for downloading for a PC,
freeware or otherwise?

David Cockayne
Department of Materials
University of Oxford
Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3PH
England

tele +44 01865 273654
fax +44 01865 283329

email david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk




From daemon Thu Nov 9 07:40:44 2000



From: David Cockayne :      david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 07:35:08 -0600
Subject: Monte Carlo simulation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am in need of a Monte Carlo electron scattering programme (with or without
EDS). Is there one for downloading for a PC, freeware or otherwise?




Professor David Cockayne FRS
Department of Materials
University of Oxford
Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3PH
England

tele +44 01865 273654
fax +44 01865 283329

email david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk




From daemon Thu Nov 9 07:46:51 2000



From: Ladd Research :      sales-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2000 08:42:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Spurr will be discontinued?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Maria,

Union Carbide is the manufacturer of ERL 4206, which is a component of
of the Spurr Kit. They have discontinued the production of ERL 4206, but
they do supply ERL 4221 which does not have the low viscosity of the ERL
4206.
We continue to have ERL 4206 and Spurr Kits in stock and we are
confident that we will have an ideal substitute for this product very
shortly.

John Arnott
We continue
--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

web site http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955


Mendes, Maria wrote:

} Hello I would like to subscribe to your service, please let me know if there
} is any service charge.
} Please pass on my problem to your subscribers.
} I am a research lab that does a lot of hard tissue processing, I as well as
} our EM departments have been using SPURR as our plastic of choice. I have
} been recently told by my supplier (Marivac) that in six months one of the
} components of SPURR will be discontinued. The component is ERL
} (Vinylcyclohexene Dioxide). I would like to know if others are using SPURR
} and if so have they encountered the same problem. Please forward your
} information to mmendes-at-mtsinai.on.ca.
} Thank-you in advance for any help offered.
}
} Maria


--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

web site http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955


From daemon Thu Nov 9 07:57:36 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 07:53:01 -0600
Subject: Re: Fw: Monte Carlo simulation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


David

There are some OLD programs in the ANL Software library archives....

ftp://www.amc.anl.gov/AMC-3/ANLSoftwareLibrary/


for example here are some of David Joy's early versions of MC programs

ftp://www.amc.anl.gov/AMC-3/ANLSoftwareLibrary/3-MASLIB/MONTCARL/
ftp://www.amc.anl.gov/AMC-3/ANLSoftwareLibrary/2-EMMPDL/Xeds/Dcjaemmc/

but I would suggest that you also go to the CASINO WWW site at the
University of Sherbrooke

http://www.gme.usherb.ca/casino


Cheers....

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From daemon Thu Nov 9 09:07:18 2000



From: =?utf-8?B?V2FsY2ssIFNjb3R0IEQu?= :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 09:56:14 -0500
Subject: =?utf-8?B?UkU6IFRFTSBzYW1wbGUgcHJlcCBvZiBzdGVlbA==?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I just visited with Lucille Giannuzzi at Univ. Central Florida where she
taught me a few things about FIB. I did ask her about carbon. She told me
that they have a water injector to help with carbon films such as resists on
semiconductors. Based on my experiences with DLC films, I suspect that you
will need to use that to get reactive etching going to cut through the DLC.
You will probably need to cut the samples normally, but you will also will
need to watch out for channeling affects. Again, I learned more about this
from Lucille.

I'm not the expert here. You might consider contacting one.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--




} -----Original Message-----
} From: Daniel L Flatoff [mailto:dflatoff-at-stu.madison.tec.wi.us]
} Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2000 3:32 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM sample prep of steel
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListse} rver/FAQ.html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} I would like to say thanks to all for the information
} provided on preparing TEM cross sections of DLC thin films
} on steel. Also I would like to note that I do have access
} a FIB tool at Madison Area Technical College, so anyone who
} has any info on specialized techniques for the TEM prep of
} DLC thin films using the FIB would greatly be appreciated.
} Again, thanks to all
}
}
} Daniel L. Flatoff
} student
} Madison Area Technical College
}
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Nov 9 09:46:28 2000



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Thu, 09 Nov 2000 09:36:07 -0600
Subject: Another digital camera twist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



The other day while on a consulting job that entailed
photographing a set of ceramic tiles in a range of colors,
I discovered an interesting quirk of at least this
Olympus C-2500L digital camera. I suspect that other
consumer/prosumer cameras would suffer the same fate.

There were four tiles ranging from, say, very light purple
to dark purple. We'd put them on a black velvet background.
We had tremendous trouble getting a accurate color. The two
light tiles would be too bright and washed-out, and the two
dark tiles would be too dark and not quite right. For that
matter, the black wasn't black.

I recalled an article I'd read about the custom chips
in this Olympus camera, and how it was much more an active
system than just a CCD pixel bucket. It tries to make a
nice picture based on what it saw.

My hypothesis was to add other objects to the scene - sure
enough, after adding a few other colorful objects at the
margins of the frame, the appearance of the tiles changed
dramatically for the better. Now they were a range.
It's as if it needs a sacrificial white and black and
other colors in order to produce a decent image.

Certainly this has implications for microscope use of
today's digital cameras. I don't see a way to turn
off this feature, at least on this camera.

- John



From daemon Thu Nov 9 10:13:09 2000



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 10:03:34 -0600
Subject: digitizing tablet software MAC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
Does anyone know of software that will run a digitizing
tablet for the macintosh? I am thinking of something like "sigmascan"
which runs on the PC. We just need to measure lengths and angles,
nothing to fancy.

Thanks for the help.
Tobias Baskin
--
_ ____ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ University of Missouri
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO USA
/ / / \ \ \ 65211-7400
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ voice: 573-882-0173
fax: 573-882-0123


From daemon Thu Nov 9 11:23:58 2000



From: David Cockayne :      david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 17:11:08 -0000
Subject: Monte Carlo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all those who sent me advice re a source of Monte Carlo simulations MANY
THANKS.

There were so many, PLEASE, NO MORE

And if I don't thank personally all those who replied, please accept my
thanks here.



David Cockayne



From daemon Thu Nov 9 12:40:43 2000



From: Jennifer Palmer :      jpalmer-at-cvmbs.colostate.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 11:33:32 -0700 (Mountain Standard Time)
Subject: t-BGE dehydration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have references and recommendations(or caveats)for
dehydration of tissue using tBGE? We routinely prep (testis and
ovary) with PO through Epon812 and want something less toxic that
still gives good ultrastructure.

====================================
Jennifer Palmer
ARBL
Colorado State Univ
Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1683 , USA
voice:(970)491-1770
fax:(970)491-3557

jpalmer-at-cvmbs.colostate.edu
====================================



From daemon Thu Nov 9 12:43:55 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 9 Nov 2000 12:40:35 -0600
Subject: Re: digitizing tablet software MAC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tobias

Why not just simply digitize the image and then
use NIH Image to measure distances and angles, this
will produce a nicely documented measurement as
you'll have the image, and all the numerical values
stored.

I do this all the time. Of course, it presumes
that you have a digitized image to start with.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


==================================================================
Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
Materials Science Division
Building 212
Argonne National Lab
9700 S. Cass Ave
Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
==================================================================
TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
==================================================================

The box said "This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
So I bought a G3 Mac !

==================================================================




From daemon Thu Nov 9 13:17:10 2000



From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 09 Nov 2000 16:43:30 -0500
Subject: TEM calibration sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Dear List,

Does anyone know a good reference for the origin of the top-bottom effect? TIA.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From root Thu Nov 9 15:52:53 2000
Return-Path: {Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Received: (from daemon-at-localhost)
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id PAA15526
for dist-Microscopy; Thu, 9 Nov 2000 15:44:58 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id PAA15523
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Thu, 9 Nov 2000 15:44:28 -0600 (CST)
Received: from scribe.cc.purdue.edu (scribe.cc.purdue.edu [128.210.11.6])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id PAA15516
for {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Thu, 9 Nov 2000 15:44:17 -0600 (CST)
Received: from [128.210.121.38] by scribe.cc.purdue.edu for microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com; Thu, 9 Nov 2000 16:43:25 -0500

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi all,
I am looking for a sample to calibrate magnifications of a TEM from 50,000X up. I have used catalase in the past. However the periodicity of catalase is ~8.7nm. That is too large for my present purposes as I am looking at structures in the 2-4nm range and want to reduce the margin of error in the measurements as much as possible. I would also like a sample that is easy to used by inexperienced microscopists in the hopes of encouraging more users to calibrate instrument magnification on a regular basis. It also needs to be relatively in expensive so the loss of a grid is not a catastrophy.
I would like a standard that would have ~1.0nm lattice. I thought I had found the perfect sample in copper phthalocyanine which has a spacing in this range. Unfortunately the only source of a grid with this crystal has discontinued carrying it. I am back to square one. My options are to prepare my own grid but need advise on how to crystallize the copper phthalocyanine (available from Sigma in powder form) or find another crystalline lattice in this size range.
I would appreciate suggestions for alternative crystals and/or methods for making the copper phthalocyanine crystals to use for this purpose.
Thanks in advance.
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057



From daemon Fri Nov 10 02:11:40 2000



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 08:10:12 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TEM calibration sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id CAA00984
for dist-Microscopy; Fri, 10 Nov 2000 02:04:46 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id CAA00981
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Fri, 10 Nov 2000 02:04:16 -0600 (CST)
Received: from oxmail.ox.ac.uk (oxmail1.ox.ac.uk [129.67.1.1])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id CAA00974
for {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com} ; Fri, 10 Nov 2000 02:04:04 -0600 (CST)
Received: from heraldgate1.oucs.ox.ac.uk
([163.1.2.49] helo=frontend1.herald.ox.ac.uk ident=exim)
by oxmail.ox.ac.uk with esmtp (Exim 3.12 #3)
id 13u99U-0006OA-00
for microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com; Fri, 10 Nov 2000 08:03:12 +0000
Received: from doole.materials.ox.ac.uk ([163.1.65.184])
by frontend1.herald.ox.ac.uk with smtp (Exim 2.02 #1)
id 13u99V-0000Uv-00
for microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com; Fri, 10 Nov 2000 08:03:13 +0000


Hi Debbie,

What about crocidolite 0.9nm (020) and 0.45nm (021)
spacings. It's a long time since I used it but it is still
in catalogues and cheap (Agar Scientific at £7 sterling
each and probably others).

Good luck,
Ron

On 09 Nov 2000 16:43:30 -0500 Debby Sherman
{sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi all,
} I am looking for a sample to calibrate magnifications of a TEM from 50,000X up. I have used catalase in the past. However the periodicity of catalase is ~8.7nm. That is too large for my present purposes as I am looking at structures in the 2-4nm range and want to reduce the margin of error in the measurements as much as possible. I would also like a sample that is easy to used by inexperienced microscopists in the hopes of encouraging more users to calibrate instrument magnification on a regular basis. It also needs to be relatively in expensive so the loss of a grid is not a catastrophy.
} I would like a standard that would have ~1.0nm lattice. I thought I had found the perfect sample in copper phthalocyanine which has a spacing in this range. Unfortunately the only source of a grid with this crystal has discontinued carrying it. I am back to square one. My options are to prepare my own grid but need advise on how to crystallize the copper phthalocyanine (available from Sigma in powder form) or find another crystalline lattice in this size range.
} I would appreciate suggestions for alternative crystals and/or methods for making the copper phthalocyanine crystals to use for this purpose.
} Thanks in advance.
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
} 1057 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk



From daemon Fri Nov 10 07:03:30 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 04:58:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: t-BGE dehydration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jennifer:

I have routinely used an ethanol series straight into Epon (or its various
replacement incarnations) for over 20 years now, with never any poor
embedding issues. Truly dry EtOH is miscible with the epons, but requires
throrough mixing and additional graded steps. For standard tissues blocks,
try 3x in 100% EtOH, followed by 2:1 EtOH:epon, 1:1 EtOH:epon 1:2 EtOH:epon,
and at least 2 more pure epon prior to embedding. The 3 EtOH:epon steps
should be at least 45 min each (1 have used up to 1 hr for dense tissues)
and the pure epon steps can be 30 to 60 min each. I can't speak to the
t-BGE issue, but I developed a skin sensitivity to PO a long time ago, and
worked out the EtOH method to avoid the PO (I originally used acetone for
the dehydration, but had a problem maintaining dry acetone--molecular sieves
work but they can introduce particulate contaminants). Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Thu, 9 Nov 2000 11:33:32 -0700 (Mountain Standard Time), Jennifer Palmer
wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Does anyone have references and recommendations(or caveats)for
} dehydration of tissue using tBGE? We routinely prep (testis and
} ovary) with PO through Epon812 and want something less toxic that
} still gives good ultrastructure.
}
} ====================================
} Jennifer Palmer
} ARBL
} Colorado State Univ
} Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1683 , USA
} voice:(970)491-1770
} fax:(970)491-3557
}
} jpalmer-at-cvmbs.colostate.edu
} ====================================
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Say Bye to Slow Internet!
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Fri Nov 10 07:59:31 2000



From: mallamaci-at-goodyear.com
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 07:55:00 -0600
Subject: Top-bottom effect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




w.r.t. double diffraction this effect is covered nicely on pages 278-279 of
Williams and Carter "Transmission Electron Microscopy."





"William F. Tivol" {wft03-at-health.state.ny.us} on 11/09/2000 02:11:26 PM

To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:




Dear List,

Does anyone know a good reference for the origin of the top-bottom effect?
TIA.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From daemon Fri Nov 10 08:00:38 2000



From: walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 07:57:02 -0600
Subject: RE:TEM calibration sample@microscopy.com

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I have discussed John McCaffrey's Mag-I-Cal sample at length in the past.
You can contact South Bay Technology, Electron Microscopy Sciences, or SPI.
I believe all of them have it described on their web sites. It will do
exactly what you want it for and then some.

Try it you'll like it.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Debby Sherman [mailto:sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu]
} Sent: Thursday, November 09, 2000 4:44 PM
} To: message to: MSA list
} Subject: TEM calibration sample
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListse} rver/FAQ.html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi all,
} I am looking for a sample to calibrate magnifications of a
} TEM from 50,000X up. I have used catalase in the past.
} However the periodicity of catalase is ~8.7nm. That is too
} large for my present purposes as I am looking at structures
} in the 2-4nm range and want to reduce the margin of error in
} the measurements as much as possible. I would also like a
} sample that is easy to used by inexperienced microscopists in
} the hopes of encouraging more users to calibrate instrument
} magnification on a regular basis. It also needs to be
} relatively in expensive so the loss of a grid is not a catastrophy.
} I would like a standard that would have ~1.0nm lattice.
} I thought I had found the perfect sample in copper
} phthalocyanine which has a spacing in this range.
} Unfortunately the only source of a grid with this crystal has
} discontinued carrying it. I am back to square one. My
} options are to prepare my own grid but need advise on how to
} crystallize the copper phthalocyanine (available from Sigma
} in powder form) or find another crystalline lattice in this
} size range.
} I would appreciate suggestions for alternative crystals
} and/or methods for making the copper phthalocyanine crystals
} to use for this purpose.
} Thanks in advance.
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
}
} Purdue University E-mail:
} sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
} 1057 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057
}
}




From daemon Fri Nov 10 08:02:01 2000



From: Norman_C_Miller-at-res.raytheon.com
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 07:57:59 -0600
Subject: used scanning auger available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have a Physical Electronics 570 used Auger/ESCA/SIMS surface analysis
instrument that we must part with. We used this primarily as a scanning Auger,
but also did XPS and some SIMS. This instrument is in working order and has
been
under a service contract until recently. All offers or inquiries are welcome.

Carl Miller




From daemon Fri Nov 10 09:32:07 2000



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 07:24:24 -0800
Subject: RE: Another digital camera twist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John writes ...

} ...
} I discovered an interesting quirk of at least this
} Olympus C-2500L digital camera. I suspect that other
} consumer/prosumer cameras would suffer the same fate.
}
} There were four tiles ranging from, say, very light purple
} to dark purple. We'd put them on a black velvet background.
} We had tremendous trouble getting a accurate color. ...
}
} ...
}
} My hypothesis was to add other objects to the scene - sure
} enough, after adding a few other colorful objects at the
} margins of the frame, the appearance of the tiles changed
} dramatically for the better. ...
}
} Certainly this has implications for microscope use of
} today's digital cameras. I don't see a way to turn
} off this feature, at least on this camera.

Could the camera be mis-judging the "white balance"??
On my camera I can disable "automatic", and force
"incandescent", "fluorescent", "daylight", etc.

cheerios, =shAf= :o)
{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Fri Nov 10 11:37:18 2000



From: David Cockayne :      david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 17:24:45 -0000
Subject: Monte Carlo Summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I recently requested, on this site, advice on programmes for Monte Carlo
simulations of electron scattering. I have been asked by Nestor to
summarise them, to save others asking the same question (and clogging the
site). Here is a summary of many replies I received. I have not accessed
many of them, and pass them on without comment.

David C


1 www.gme.usherb.cs/casino - Gauvin's comprehensive programme


2 site allowing
to do online simulations as well as the possibility of
as well as the possibility of
downloading the program for SEM (and TEM) scattering simulations.
http://callisto.my.mtu.edu/soft/mc/ss_java.html
http://callisto.my.mtu.edu/soft/mc/ (this address for downloading)


3 ftp://www.amc.anl.gov/AMC-3/ANLSoftwareLibrary/3-MASLIB/MONTCARL/

4 www.gme.usherb.cs/casino


5 www.evex.com/evexmontecarlo.exe


6 Try Cnet (www.cnet.com) and enter Monte Carlo into the "search" box. A
page will come up with a list of downloadable programs divided into
purchaseable programs and freeware. No idea whether any of them works as
I haven't tried any. I'm just familiar with Cnet as a source of
downloable software.

7 Try Electron Flight Simulator by Small World, (500)447-3340


email david.cockayne-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk



From daemon Fri Nov 10 15:27:59 2000



From: Kim DeRuyter :      fnksd1-at-uaf.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 12:19:37 -0900
Subject: $ for Ion Milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopists,
A researcher here at the University of Alaska is interested in paying to
have some thin sections made from her silicate glass samples. Are there
any labs out there that will contract to do ion milling? She is not on the
list so please reply to Jessica Faust, her E-mail address is
faust-at-gi.alaska.edu
Thanks once again.
Kim DeRuyter



From daemon Fri Nov 10 16:43:41 2000



From: Jorg Wiezorek :      wiezorek+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 17:38:15 -0500
Subject: Opening- postdoc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


University of Pittsburgh
Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Postdoctoral Research Position in
Transmission Electron Microscopy


An additional vacancy for a POSTDOCTORAL POSITION has become available in
the area of transmission electron microscopy of thin film data storage
media as part of a collaborative research program between Professors J.M.
Wiezorek and W.A. Soffa, Department of Materials Science and Engineering of
the University of Pittsburgh, and the Seagate Technology. Candidates should
hold a Ph.D. in Materials Science, Physics or a related discipline and must
have extensive hands-on experience in a broad range of imaging, diffraction
and analytical transmission electron microscopy characterization
techniques, as well as with sample preparation methods. Demonstrated
expertise in the preparation of thin film samples suitable for
high-resolution TEM characterization in plan-view and cross-section is
highly desirable. A basic knowledge of magnetism in materials and
experience in instrument development and/or computer image
processing/simulation would be beneficial. The appointment is for one year
in the first instance and is available from December 2000. Applications
from under-represented groups, including minorities, women and people with
disabilities are encouraged.

Interested candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including publication
list, and the names of three referees with postal addresses, telephone
numbers and E-mail addresses to: Prof. J.M. Wiezorek, Department of
Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 848 Benedum
Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
Email: wiezorek+-at-pitt.edu



From daemon Fri Nov 10 16:43:44 2000



From: Jorg Wiezorek :      wiezorek+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 17:38:25 -0500
Subject: Technician Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Research Specialist Position

The Microcharacterization laboratory in the Department of Materials Science
and Engineering of the University of Pittsburgh has an opening for a
full-time technician in a multiple user facility. The facility's main
instrumentation consists of two Xpert XRD, an XL30FEGSEM with EDS, BSE and
EBSD, and two JEOL TEM's. The successful applicant will have a minimum of a
Bachelor¹s degree and 3 years experience working with scanning electron
microscopes and X-ray diffraction instruments. Responsibilities will
include daily operation and maintenance of the SEM and XRD instrumentation
including the training of users (including students), specimen preparation
and documentation of experimental data. The successful applicant must
demonstrate the necessary organizational, management and communication
skills to efficiently operate in an academic multi-user environment.
Applicants should submit a cover letter describing their experience with
different instrumentation, a resume and contact information for three
references. Salary will be commensurate with the candidate¹s experience.

Resumes should be sent to;
Professor G. H. Meier, Interim Chair
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
848 Benedum Hall
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15261

The University of Pittsburgh is an equal opportunity and affirmative action
employer.



From daemon Fri Nov 10 17:02:59 2000



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 16:58:01 -0600
Subject: RE: Another digital camera twist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 07:24 AM 11/10/00 -0800, michael shaffer wrote:
} Could the camera be mis-judging the "white balance"??
} On my camera I can disable "automatic", and force
} "incandescent", "fluorescent", "daylight", etc.

No, I'd already preset and locked the color temperature
against a white card in the same environment. These other
color adjustments were beyond simple white balance problems.

- John



From daemon Fri Nov 10 17:40:06 2000



From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 18:35:05 -0500
Subject: Scheduling Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I know that this has been posted before but I lost the link. Does anyone
have a recommendation for WEB scheduling software. Thanks.
______________________________
Roberto Garcia
NCSU/Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Campus Box 7531 Room 318 EGRC
1010 Main Campus Dr.
Raleigh NC 27695-7531
P: (919) 515-8628
F: (919) 515-6965
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/asm



From daemon Fri Nov 10 18:08:39 2000



From: Douglas Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Fri, 10 Nov 2000 16:05:16 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



This might be of use to those of you wanting to convert
your older stereo and compound microscopes to digital
imaging capability. We recently explored the possibilities
of mounting a Nikon CoolPix 990 (CCD=3.34 million pixels) to
our 14 year old Zeiss stereoscope and Standard microscopes.
Neither has a "C" mount, which is what the Nikon adapter
fits onto. There were several very expensive (} $1,500)
possible solutions, but the most satisfying was one
proposed by Spectra Tech (716-265-4320; e-mail Michael
Specht {mspecht-at-frontiernet.net} ). For about $250, they
were able to provide an adapter which screws directly into
the camera and fits either in the ocular tube or phototube
of the microscopes. Adapters can be purchased for
different tube diameters. Contact them for further
information if interested.

I have no financial interest.

Doug

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Research Facilities
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97201
phone: 503-221-3434
FAX: 503-412-6894 (9-5 PST)
e-mail: DRK-at-shcc.org








From daemon Sat Nov 11 07:43:18 2000



From: femi_adeluyi-at-yahoo.com ()
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2000 07:36:08 -0600
Subject: low frequency surface microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Email: femi_adeluyi-at-yahoo.com
Name: Adeluyi Olufemi
School: Obafemi AwolowoUniversity, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Question: I am working on a final year project titled "low frequency
surface microscopy". My project supervisor wants me to use a probe that
consists of a concentric cylinder with a pin in between. This is to
concentrate the field on the surface
to be scanned. With the occurence of cracks, boundaries, etc. on the
surface, the electric field and hence the capacitance is expected to
change. The reflected voltage in the bridge circuit implementation gives a
reflection of the surface characteristic.

My questions go thus (sorry for the preambles):
1. How do I design a probe that can help me to achieve this( what materials
should be used, what is the expected capacitance value, what are the
relevant equations)
2. At what frequencies can this function properly
3. Can you let me into the theory of this method and other similar methods?
4. Can you refer me to some links and/or send some reference materials to me?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Sat Nov 11 07:43:19 2000



From: Sujitha Thavapalachandran :      sujitha24-at-yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2000 07:32:00 -0600
Subject: Can I please get some info?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear EMU staff,

At the moment, i am doing a physics assignment for my
HSC assessment on the following topic:

"Compare the resolving powers of light and electrom
microscopes and assess the impact of their
development".

I you could help by sending some information, I would
be very grateful. Thank you.

Sujitha



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one Place.
http://shopping.yahoo.com/




From daemon Sun Nov 12 20:13:03 2000



From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 17:57:31 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Doug,
does this adapter have a relay lens? What zoom to you use and is there
any vignetting of the field?


I'm buying adapters for a 990 right now.

Regards,
Glen



On Fri, 10 Nov 2000, Douglas Keene wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} This might be of use to those of you wanting to convert
} your older stereo and compound microscopes to digital
} imaging capability. We recently explored the possibilities
} of mounting a Nikon CoolPix 990 (CCD=3.34 million pixels) to
} our 14 year old Zeiss stereoscope and Standard microscopes.
} Neither has a "C" mount, which is what the Nikon adapter
} fits onto. There were several very expensive (} $1,500)
} possible solutions, but the most satisfying was one
} proposed by Spectra Tech (716-265-4320; e-mail Michael
} Specht {mspecht-at-frontiernet.net} ). For about $250, they
} were able to provide an adapter which screws directly into
} the camera and fits either in the ocular tube or phototube
} of the microscopes. Adapters can be purchased for
} different tube diameters. Contact them for further
} information if interested.
}
} I have no financial interest.
}
} Doug
}
} ----------------------
} Douglas R. Keene
} Associate Investigator
} Shriners Hospital Research Facilities
} 3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
} Portland, Oregon 97201
} phone: 503-221-3434
} FAX: 503-412-6894 (9-5 PST)
} e-mail: DRK-at-shcc.org
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Sun Nov 12 23:52:16 2000



From: Joan Clark :      j.clark-at-zoology.unimelb.edu.au
Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 23:45:57 -0600
Subject: Soft epon-araldite blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have some epon-araldite blocks to section with tiny wallaby embryos
embedded in. Unfortunately the blocks are very soft and the one micron
sections are sticky and very hard to pick up does anyone have a solution
please as I am getting very frustated
Thanks in anticipation
Joan Clark




From daemon Sun Nov 12 23:52:28 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 12 Nov 2000 20:08:57 -0800
Subject: Re: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Depending on the 'scope, it may have an intermediate
lens/optics unit. I am using the CP 990 on Axioskop
and Olympus and the common adapter unit has a
lens.

gg



At 05:57 PM 11/12/00, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Nov 13 00:58:07 2000



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 19:59:43 GMT+1200
Subject: JEOL 840 Optical Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, listers

Can anyone advise what voltage and polarity should be applied to the
BNC plug on the short co-axial cable labelled "OM1" which issues from
the flange of the JEOL OM on an 840?

It's something to do with an electron deflector or collector.

tia

rtch


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Mon Nov 13 05:04:42 2000



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 11:00:02 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Soft epon-araldite blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have read here that you can put the blocks back in the
oven at a higher temperature. Why not try this with an
unwanted portion of a block?

Dave


On Sun, 12 Nov 2000 23:45:57 -0600 Joan Clark
{j.clark-at-zoology.unimelb.edu.au} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have some epon-araldite blocks to section with tiny wallaby embryos
} embedded in. Unfortunately the blocks are very soft and the one micron
} sections are sticky and very hard to pick up does anyone have a solution
} please as I am getting very frustated
} Thanks in anticipation
} Joan Clark
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Mon Nov 13 06:25:17 2000



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 22:21:20 +1000
Subject: RE: Soft epon-araldite blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try placing the blocks back in the oven at anything up to 100C for several
hours, or even overnight.
Remember that the blocks harden after removal from the oven for up to two
hours; not just the couple of minutes it takes to physically cool.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Monday, November 13, 2000 3:46 PM, Joan Clark
[SMTP:j.clark-at-zoology.unimelb.edu.au] wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have some epon-araldite blocks to section with tiny wallaby embryos
} embedded in. Unfortunately the blocks are very soft and the one micron
} sections are sticky and very hard to pick up does anyone have a solution
} please as I am getting very frustated
} Thanks in anticipation
} Joan Clark
}
}



From daemon Mon Nov 13 09:46:18 2000



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 07:39:50 -0800
Subject: RE: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Doug writes ...

} This might be of use to those of you wanting to convert
} your older stereo and compound microscopes to digital
} imaging capability. We recently explored the possibilities
} of mounting a Nikon CoolPix 990 (CCD=3.34 million pixels) to
} our 14 year old Zeiss stereoscope and Standard microscopes.
} Neither has a "C" mount, which is what the Nikon adapter
} fits onto. There were several very expensive (} $1,500)
} possible solutions, but the most satisfying was one
} proposed by Spectra Tech ... For about $250, they
} were able to provide an adapter which screws directly into
} the camera and fits either in the ocular tube or phototube
} of the microscopes. Adapters can be purchased for
} different tube diameters. ...

When you say your were "satisfied", what features/characteristics
would you care to mention? Did the amount of field-of-view vary? How
much of the field were you able to capture?
(If satisfaction essentially boils down to price/quality, a similarly
priced and quality eyepiece adapter is also available from Optem
International {www.optemintl.com} ... however, I am testing their
C-mount adapter).

cheerios, =shAf= :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Mon Nov 13 10:16:13 2000



From: Russell E. Cook :      recook-at-anl.gov
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 10:12:23 -0600
Subject: Re: Scheduling Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've been looking at some of these sites lately for web-based calendars. I
don't necessarily recommend any of them. You'll see that each has
shortcomings.

1. http://www.webevent.com (Can be run on all sorts of operating systems.
Commercial software. Lower prices for non-profit institutions.)

2. http://srv.emunit.unsw.edu.au (Excellent, although it is probably only
for Windows servers. Some accounting capabilities. Not commercial
software. About $500 US.)

3. http://www.webprog.com/appoint/freetest.html (About $60 US. Requires a
Windows server. Basic.)

4. http://cmmserv.mrl.uiuc.edu/calendar (UserNumber = 2399, password =
DEMO, instrument = Zeiss DSM-960) (Windows server required.)
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I know that this has been posted before but I lost the link. Does anyone
} have a recommendation for WEB scheduling software. Thanks.
} ______________________________
} Roberto Garcia
} NCSU/Analytical Instrumentation Facility
} Campus Box 7531 Room 318 EGRC
} 1010 Main Campus Dr.
} Raleigh NC 27695-7531
} P: (919) 515-8628
} F: (919) 515-6965
} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
} http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif
} http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/asm


----------------------------------------------------------------------
Russell E. Cook, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Center
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division, Building 212
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439-4838
(630)252-7194
FAX: (630)252-4289
recook-at-anl.gov




From daemon Mon Nov 13 10:26:55 2000



From: John Basgen :      basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 10:23:03 -0600
Subject: Skin Biopsies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To those doing EM on skin biopsies:

We have been asked to embed some human skin biopsies for electron microscopy.
We used our routine protocol for processing kidney biopsies which includes
glutaraldehyde fixation, dehydration through ethanol and acetone and embeddment
in PolyBed 812. Our protocol resulted in good embeddment all the layers of the
skin except for the stratum corneum where there were numberous holes in the
PolyBed. Is it possible to get good embeddment of this keratinized zone?

Thanks for any suggestion,

John

John M. Basgen
Department of Pediatrics
University of Minnesota
Mayo Mail Code 491
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
USA
Phone: 612-625-7979
FAX: 612-626-2791
E-mail: basgen-at-tc.umn.edu



From daemon Mon Nov 13 15:39:45 2000



From: Hyres, James W. :      jwhyres-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 15:29:07 -0600
Subject: RE: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have experience with the 990 under low light conditions? We
normally shoot brightfield on our inverted metallograph, but there is the
occasional need for darkfield and DIC.

Thanks in advance,
Jim Hyres

-----Original Message-----
} From: michael shaffer [mailto:epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu]
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2000 10:40 AM
To: DRK-at-shcc.org; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Doug writes ...

} This might be of use to those of you wanting to convert
} your older stereo and compound microscopes to digital
} imaging capability. We recently explored the possibilities
} of mounting a Nikon CoolPix 990 (CCD=3.34 million pixels) to
} our 14 year old Zeiss stereoscope and Standard microscopes.
} Neither has a "C" mount, which is what the Nikon adapter
} fits onto. There were several very expensive (} $1,500)
} possible solutions, but the most satisfying was one
} proposed by Spectra Tech ... For about $250, they
} were able to provide an adapter which screws directly into
} the camera and fits either in the ocular tube or phototube
} of the microscopes. Adapters can be purchased for
} different tube diameters. ...

When you say your were "satisfied", what features/characteristics
would you care to mention? Did the amount of field-of-view vary? How
much of the field were you able to capture?
(If satisfaction essentially boils down to price/quality, a
similarly
priced and quality eyepiece adapter is also available from Optem
International {www.optemintl.com} ... however, I am testing their
C-mount adapter).

cheerios, =shAf= :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Mon Nov 13 15:39:51 2000



From: Jim Mabon :      mabon-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 15:36:08 -0600
Subject: Need Manuals etc. for Kevex 770 XRF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for manuals for a Kevex 770 XRF. In particular
we would be interested in copies of the circuit diagrams and
documentation for the XRF unit and the Detector/Pulse
Processor/ADC interface. The Kevex DELTA computer
and software is not really of interest, since we would like to
change it to a PC platform.

Also, any suggestions of other listservers, etc. to look would
be appreciated.

Thanks in Advance,
Jim Mabon

__________________________________________
James C. Mabon, Ph.D.
Research Electron Microscopist
Materials Research Laboratory
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
104 S. Goodwin Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
http://ntweb.mrl.uiuc.edu/cmm
__________________________________________




From daemon Mon Nov 13 17:36:51 2000



From: Bob Wise :      wise-at-vaxa.cis.uwosh.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 17:30:07 -0500
Subject: Color scanning EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


OK, I'll bite. What the heck is color scanning EM, as referenced in the
title of the following article?

TIA

Bob

Histochemistry of food tissue by colour scanning electron microscopy
Mitsuhiko Yamada, Masako Nishimura, Takeo Suzuki, Shigeru Kawamata, Eisaku
Oho, and Toshiaki Kimura, pp. 503-507. Journal of Electron Microscopy vol
49(3)

Robert R. Wise, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Plant Physiology
Department of Biology and Microbiology
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Oshkosh, WI 54901
tele: (920) 424-3404
fax: (920) 424-1101
wise-at-uwosh.edu
http://www.uwosh.edu/departments/biology/wise/wise.html


From daemon Mon Nov 13 18:56:15 2000



From: Ron Veil :      veilcs-at-juno.com
Date: Mon, 13 Nov 2000 16:49:00 -0800
Subject: looking for an IGP for a Philips TEM410

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am interested in finding an IGP for a Philips (T)EM410 that can be
rebuilt / refurbished. Anybody got one lying around?

TIA
Ron Veil

Veil Electron Instrument Lab Customer Services
Tel: (209) 521-3332
FAX: (209) 521-3033
e-mail: veilcs-at-earthlink.net
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


From daemon Mon Nov 13 20:40:03 2000



From: Trevor Sewell :      sewell-at-uctvms.uct.ac.za
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 03:34:01 +0200
Subject: Re: Scheduling Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have recently experimented with
www.ezbook.com

It is entirely web based and hosted on their
server. It has some useful features.

Trevor






From daemon Mon Nov 13 22:58:11 2000



From: mark.talbot-at-studentmail.newcastle.edu.au (MARK TALBOT)
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 15:50:08 +1100 (EST)
Subject: SEM: removal of cytoplasm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everyone,

I am interested in removing the cytoplasm from plant cells for viewing cell
walls by SEM. the cells are epidermal cells of bean cotyledons, and I was
wanting a simple and rapid method to get rid of the cytoplasm which doesn't
harm the cell wall.

Also, I was wondering if anyone knew of an SEM image analysis program that
can count things, do nearest-neighbour analysis, density measurements and
so on. The things I want to measure are quite variable in shape and size,
so it might be a little difficult.

Thanks for your time.

Mark Talbot




From daemon Tue Nov 14 07:57:02 2000



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 08:54:12 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM: removal of cytoplasm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Mark,
We use a commercially available washing powder called Ariel (Procter and
Gamble) to remove the cytoplasm. Use a 5% (w/v) aqueous solution - it
contains a Bacillus subtilis derived protease.
References:
Honegger, R. 1985. Scanning electron microscopy of the fungus-plant
interface: a simple preparative technique. Trans Br. Mycol. Soc. 84:
530-533.

Mims et al. 1989. Ultrastructure of the haustorium of the peanut late leaf
spot fungus Cerosporidium personatum. Can. J. Bot. 67: 1198-1202.

It worked quite well for us...good luck,
Beth

} Hi everyone,
}
} I am interested in removing the cytoplasm from plant cells for viewing cell
} walls by SEM. the cells are epidermal cells of bean cotyledons, and I was
} wanting a simple and rapid method to get rid of the cytoplasm which doesn't
} harm the cell wall.

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Tue Nov 14 10:26:15 2000



From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-mail.jhmi.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 11:06:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Skin Biopsies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,
Here is a protocol from Pierre Coloumbe's lab (thanks Stacy)
for embedding pieces of skin, see how it compares to yours

Fix in 2% GA, 1% PF, 0.1M sodium cacodylate (caco) pH 7.2 overnight 4 degrees

3-4 washes same buffer 5 min ea

Post-fix 1% OsO4/0.1 M caco 1-1.5 hr room temp

2 washes 0.1 M caco

3-4 washes ddh20 5 min ea

50% ETOH (tissue can be stored 4 degrees)

Dehydration:

50% ETOH 5 min
70% " "
90% " "
95% " "

2 changes 100% (unopened bottle 200 proof) 10 min ea

3 changes 100% propylene oxide (do not let tissue contact air, keep submerged
at all times!!!) 10 min ea

1:1 propylene oxide:Epon with catalyst 3-5 hrs

1:2 " " " " " " overnight shake

Fresh change Epon with cataylyst, shake all day, transfer tissue into
new vials changing Epon and shake overnight

Fresh Epon with cataylyst, rubber mold embed, cure 60-65 degrees for 3-4
days until hard.

Good Luck,

Michael Delannoy
Johns Hopins School of Medicine
Microscopy Facility




From daemon Tue Nov 14 10:41:05 2000



From: Reinhard Windoffer :      windoff-at-mail.uni-mainz.de
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 17:37:37 +0100
Subject: TILL PHOTONICS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


hello,
for life cell microscopy of fp-tagged cells we consider to buy a TILL
PHOTONICS imaging system in combination with a Olympus microscope. We
would appreciate any comments on this system or possible alternatives.
Beside single channel recording we are also interested in multiple color
imaging including FRET. We would like to hear comments on general system
performance, usability, flexibility, support, and problems with the
system.


Reinhard Windoffer


--
Dr. Reinhard Windoffer phone ++49-(0)6131 39 23720
Universitaet Mainz fax ++49-(0)6131 39 23719
Anatomisches Institut internet windoff-at-mail.uni-mainz.de
Becherweg 13 www.uni-mainz.de/windoff
D-55099 Mainz




From daemon Tue Nov 14 11:38:06 2000



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 09:30:14 -0800
Subject: RE: Nikon Cool-Pix adaptor for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



James writes ...

} Does anyone have experience with the 990 under low light
} conditions? We normally shoot brightfield on our
} inverted metallograph, but there is the
} occasional need for darkfield and DIC.
} ...

With ISO senstivity selectable (100,200,400), and manual maximum
aperture and a manual selectable shutter up to 8sec (including bulb),
should allow anything you can "see" thru the eyepieces. But I do
suspect an increase in noise as you approach the limits, and you might
want a trinoc head which can throw 100% of the light at the camera.

cheerios, =shAf= :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/



From daemon Tue Nov 14 14:39:09 2000



From: Michael Jarnik :      M_Jarnik-at-fccc.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 15:32:08 -0500
Subject: EM technician position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Job Opening

Electron Microscopy Facility at Fox Chase Cancer Center is seeking a
motivated individual for a Technician/Research Assistant position.

Required qualifications: B.S. or M.S. in biology, 2+ years of experience
in biological electron microscopy.

Responsibilities include sample preparation and electron microscopy
(TEM/SEM), dark room work, computer image processing, report
preparation. The great variability of work due to collaborations with
large number of laboratories provides exceptional opportunity for
professional growth.

We offer a competitive salary commensurate with experience, an excellent
benefit package (health/dental insurance, pension plan, paid vacation)
and a very friendly working environment.

For confidential consideration, please send a CV including a statement
of experience to:

Dr. Michael Jarnik
Fox Chase Cancer Center
EM Facility
7701 Burholme Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111
e-mail: m_jarnik-at-fccc.edu





From daemon Tue Nov 14 15:19:08 2000



From: John Hardy :      jhardy-at-coh.org
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 11:26:18 -0800
Subject: LKB Ultrotome parts?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We are looking for a replacement belt for the control unit of an LKB
Ultrotome III 8800. Any ideas what-so-ever? It's only 25+ yrs old! Thanks
in advance.

John Hardy
City of Hope Medical Center
Duarte, CA
(626) 301-8265

jhardy-at-coh.org




From daemon Tue Nov 14 16:02:47 2000



From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 16:58:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: LKB Ultrotome parts?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If you have a mechanical/instrument shop at your institution, ask the
gurus there for belt material. All you need to be careful of is matching
the diameter of the new belt with the old one. I've done this in the past
and it works really well. If there is no shop, go to a trusted
hardware/parts store with the old belt and ask for a similar replacement.

Giant rubber bands do not work......(but it was worth a try!)

Tamara Howard
CSHL


On Tue, 14 Nov 2000, John Hardy wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} We are looking for a replacement belt for the control unit of an LKB
} Ultrotome III 8800. Any ideas what-so-ever? It's only 25+ yrs old! Thanks
} in advance.
}
} John Hardy
} City of Hope Medical Center
} Duarte, CA
} (626) 301-8265
}
} jhardy-at-coh.org
}
}
}
}




From daemon Tue Nov 14 18:46:11 2000



From: Norman_C_Miller-at-res.raytheon.com
Date: Tue, 14 Nov 2000 18:40:56 -0600
Subject: used scanning acoustic microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All,

We have a ten year old Panametrics Hyscan scanning acoustic microscope that we
must part with. This includes an old computer, controller, scan drive, and
tank.
Does anyone have an interest in the system or part of it?

Carl Miller




From daemon Wed Nov 15 01:11:59 2000



From: Emma Bonino :      emmabonino-at-elezioniradicali.org
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 01:32:10 +0100
Subject: Un "sondaggio" e 7 buone azioni...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Salve, sono Emma Bonino, e le propongo un "sondaggio" e 7 iniziative online.
Grazie e buona... azione!

Quali alleanze per le elezioni politiche ?
"SONDAGGIO":
http://www.radicali.it/action/sondaggio/

Azioni online:

ABORTO E CONTRACCEZIONE
Per introdurre in Italia pillola abortiva RU486
http://www.radicali.it/action/ru486/

FREE SOFTWARE
Petizione europea contro la brevettabilita' del software
http://www.radicali.it/action/freesoft/

LEGALIZZAZIONE DROGHE
Sostegno a Pannella e ai radicali sotto processo per disobbedienza civile
http://www.radicali.it/action/legalize/

FIRMA DIGITALE E VOTO ELETTRONICO
Richiesta al Governo per la legalita' delle elezioni politiche
http://www.radicali.it/action/digital/

CONTRO LA TELEVISIONE DI STATO
Per abolire la concessione unica radiotelevisiva
http://www.radicali.it/action/rai/

CONTRO IL SINDACATO DI STATO
Per l'abolizione del sistema di rinnovo automatico dell'iscrizione sindacale
http://www.radicali.it/action/sindacato/

LIBERALIZZAZIONE TELECOMUNICAZIONI
Per l'abolizione del canone Telecom
http://www.radicali.it/action/telecom/

Su questi ed altri temi si confronteranno tra pochi giorni anche le liste
delle elezioni radicali online.
Per partecipare e votare, clicca qui :
http://www.radicali.it/action/register

***
PS Questa email e stata inviata nel rispetto della legge sulla privacy; se
desidera maggiori informazioni o se intende cancellarsi, puo cliccare qui:
http://www.radicali.it/action/privacy/





From daemon Wed Nov 15 04:53:24 2000



From: Emma Bonino :      emmabonino-at-elezioniradicali.org
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 01:32:10 +0100
Subject: Un "sondaggio" e 7 buone azioni...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Salve, sono Emma Bonino, e le propongo un "sondaggio" e 7 iniziative online.
Grazie e buona... azione!

Quali alleanze per le elezioni politiche ?
"SONDAGGIO":
http://www.radicali.it/action/sondaggio/

Azioni online:

ABORTO E CONTRACCEZIONE
Per introdurre in Italia pillola abortiva RU486
http://www.radicali.it/action/ru486/

FREE SOFTWARE
Petizione europea contro la brevettabilita' del software
http://www.radicali.it/action/freesoft/

LEGALIZZAZIONE DROGHE
Sostegno a Pannella e ai radicali sotto processo per disobbedienza civile
http://www.radicali.it/action/legalize/

FIRMA DIGITALE E VOTO ELETTRONICO
Richiesta al Governo per la legalita' delle elezioni politiche
http://www.radicali.it/action/digital/

CONTRO LA TELEVISIONE DI STATO
Per abolire la concessione unica radiotelevisiva
http://www.radicali.it/action/rai/

CONTRO IL SINDACATO DI STATO
Per l'abolizione del sistema di rinnovo automatico dell'iscrizione sindacale
http://www.radicali.it/action/sindacato/

LIBERALIZZAZIONE TELECOMUNICAZIONI
Per l'abolizione del canone Telecom
http://www.radicali.it/action/telecom/

Su questi ed altri temi si confronteranno tra pochi giorni anche le liste
delle elezioni radicali online.
Per partecipare e votare, clicca qui :
http://www.radicali.it/action/register

***
PS Questa email e stata inviata nel rispetto della legge sulla privacy; se
desidera maggiori informazioni o se intende cancellarsi, puo cliccare qui:
http://www.radicali.it/action/privacy/





From daemon Wed Nov 15 07:03:10 2000



From: Gunnar Kopstad :      gunnar.kopstad-at-medisin.ntnu.no
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 13:57:34 +0100
Subject: EDX Kevex 7000 spare parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello.

We still have a Kevex 7000 system connected to a LSI11/23 computer. Now,
we have problem with booting the computer when the analyser is connected to
the PDP-bus. We think, but we don't know, if we ahve a problem with the
Kevex Q23 board,which interfaces the analyser to the bus.
However, do anybody have other suggestions? Or even better, is there a Q23
board out there?

Ypurs Sincererly Gunnar Kopstad


Vennlig Hilsen
dr.ing Gunnar Kopstad
overingeniør Avd f Patologi, Rit

tlf. 73 86 86 56, tlf. privat 72 88 79 58
pers.s. 967 75 026


From daemon Wed Nov 15 07:29:02 2000



From: Emma Bonino :      emmabonino-at-elezioniradicali.org
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 01:32:10 +0100
Subject: Un "sondaggio" e 7 buone azioni...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Salve, sono Emma Bonino, e le propongo un "sondaggio" e 7 iniziative online.
Grazie e buona... azione!

Quali alleanze per le elezioni politiche ?
"SONDAGGIO":
http://www.radicali.it/action/sondaggio/

Azioni online:

ABORTO E CONTRACCEZIONE
Per introdurre in Italia pillola abortiva RU486
http://www.radicali.it/action/ru486/

FREE SOFTWARE
Petizione europea contro la brevettabilita' del software
http://www.radicali.it/action/freesoft/

LEGALIZZAZIONE DROGHE
Sostegno a Pannella e ai radicali sotto processo per disobbedienza civile
http://www.radicali.it/action/legalize/

FIRMA DIGITALE E VOTO ELETTRONICO
Richiesta al Governo per la legalita' delle elezioni politiche
http://www.radicali.it/action/digital/

CONTRO LA TELEVISIONE DI STATO
Per abolire la concessione unica radiotelevisiva
http://www.radicali.it/action/rai/

CONTRO IL SINDACATO DI STATO
Per l'abolizione del sistema di rinnovo automatico dell'iscrizione sindacale
http://www.radicali.it/action/sindacato/

LIBERALIZZAZIONE TELECOMUNICAZIONI
Per l'abolizione del canone Telecom
http://www.radicali.it/action/telecom/

Su questi ed altri temi si confronteranno tra pochi giorni anche le liste
delle elezioni radicali online.
Per partecipare e votare, clicca qui :
http://www.radicali.it/action/register

***
PS Questa email e stata inviata nel rispetto della legge sulla privacy; se
desidera maggiori informazioni o se intende cancellarsi, puo cliccare qui:
http://www.radicali.it/action/privacy/





From daemon Wed Nov 15 07:38:43 2000



From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: Tuesday, November 14, 2000 8:57 PM
Subject: Fwd: TEM calibration sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Carol,
Thanks for the post. Since I want the grid for calibration, not resolution, I needed something with a lattice which was visible at magnifications from about 50,000X up. I may have found a couple of possiblilities. Esbestos fiber grids with 1.3nm periodicity are available commercially. Also Ted Pella has arranged to obtain Cu-phthalocyanine grids (which had been in their catalog but were discontinued) with a 1.0nm periodicity. I think that either or both of these should do the trick.
Debby


--------------------------------------







From daemon Wed Nov 15 08:15:50 2000



From: George_Munzing-at-ENGELHARD.COM
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 09:09:32 -0500
Subject: LKB Ultrotome parts?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You may want to check with the following:

Microscopical Optical Consulting (MOC) Inc.
Helmut Patzig
P.O Box 586
Valley Cottage, NY 10989
(914) 268-6450
MOCLeica-at-aol.com

They had picked up the Leica service and were able to help with my old LKB
system.

Good Luck!


George R. Munzing Jr
Strategic Technologies Group
Engelhard Corporation
25 Middlesex/Essex Tpk.
Iselin, NJ 08830
(732) 205-7030












"John Hardy" {jhardy-at-coh.org} on 11/14/2000 02:26:18 PM

To: "Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:



We are looking for a replacement belt for the control unit of an LKB
Ultrotome III 8800. Any ideas what-so-ever? It's only 25+ yrs old! Thanks
in advance.

John Hardy
City of Hope Medical Center
Duarte, CA
(626) 301-8265

jhardy-at-coh.org








From daemon Wed Nov 15 08:54:49 2000



From: Ryna B. Marinenko :      ryna.marinenko-at-nist.gov
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 09:55:23 -0500
Subject: MAS Special Topics Workshop at NIST

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





MAS SPECIAL TOPICS WORKSHOP
Dale Newbury and Ryna Marinenko

The NIST Microanalysis Research Group and the Microbeam Analysis Society
will co-sponsor an MAS Special Topics Workshop, "Understanding the Accuracy
Barrier in Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis and the Role of
Standards," that will be held at NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland October
15-18, 2001. This event is part of the 2001 celebration of the NIST
Centennial. The limited attendance workshop will deal with the
experimental and theoretical factors that currently limit the accuracy of
quantitative results to approximately 2% relative. The topics will
include sample and instrument parameters, counting statistics, correction
procedures, individual matrix correction parameters, etc. In addition, one
or more sessions will be specifically devoted to discussions on
microanalysis standards. Invited speakers will be expected to provide a
short (6 pages, maximum) manuscript of their paper at the time of the
meeting. These manuscripts will be subsequently published in a monograph.
The intent of the meeting and monograph is to provide detailed information
on accuracy limits and on acceptable standards procedures in quantitative
microprobe analysis that is presently not readily available in the
literature.

Below is a proposed outline of presentations. Please feel free to suggest
possible speakers (don't be afraid to call your own number!) and additional
topics. We don't expect to be able to address all significant topics, but
rather hope to initiate an ongoing dialogue that will be addressed by
periodic special workshops on this topic.

We are now preparing a list of invited speakers, and we are actively
soliciting volunteers who would like to be considered to present a talk,
especially on microanalysis standards. Not all types or groups of
microanalysis standards have been considered in this list below. We would
like to cover as much of the periodic table as possible.

In addition, if you are simply interested in attending the meeting, please
send your name, address, telephone number, email, and FAX to receive future
information.


Factors that play a significant role in the 2% relative accuracy barrier
… Experimental factors
… Instrument stability: how good is it really?
… Electron beam performance
… WDS peak reproducibility
… EDS performance
… The role of the specimen
… Preparation issues
… Stability (beam damage)
… Charging
… Spectral processing
… Peak deconvolution in WDS
… Extracting intensities from EDS spectra (peak overlaps)
… Quantitative matrix corrections
… How well do matrix correction schemes work on data outside their native
databases?
… What is missing? Where is research needed? Who will do it?


Standards in Quantitative EPMA
… Procedures for Preparation of Bulk Standards specimens for Quantitative EPMA
… Sources, Characterization, and Validation of Standard Materials
… Commercial, private, institutional sources
… Composition, Microheterogeneity, Stability, etc.
… Traceability, certification, intercomparisons, round robins
… Industry/Technology Specific Standards
… Mineralogy and Geology - sources of standard specimens and preparation
procedures
… Pure Element and Oxide Standards
… Useful Stoichiometric Compounds - crystalline, amorphous, sintered
… Sulphides, selenides, and tellurides
… Rare Earth Elements
… Halides
… Alkali Earth Elements
… Low-atomic number elements, C, N, B, Be
… Glass standards

Contact:
dale.newbury-at-nist.gov, (301)975-3921, FAX: (301)417-1321
ryna.marinenko-at-nist.gov, (301)975-3901, FAX: (301)417-1321
Ryna B. Marinenko
NIST
100 Bureau Drive; Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371
Tele: (301)975-3901
FAX: (301)417-1321
email: ryna.marinenko-at-nist.gov


From daemon Wed Nov 15 10:51:05 2000



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 10:43:24 -0600
Subject: Parts for LKB ultramicrotomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My last contact information for LKB belts and service is:

Norm Woodside for belts at about $50 apiece. Fax: 410-744-8522.

Pat Capogrosi for service. Telephone: 410-744-1580.

This information is over a year old, but worth a try. Also, the drive belts
can be almost duplicated by belts that cost about $8-10 each, if you have a
good machine or instrument repair shop with comprehensive belt catalogs.
Here are some specs you can try:

Belt thickness: 0.5mm.
Outer circumference: 18cm.
Width: 5mm.
Number of teeth: 39.
Size of teeth: 1mm by 5mm.
Height of teeth: 2mm.
(Thanks to Preston Stogsdill for this information.)

I've never been able to find one that EXACTLY fits, but I've gotten close
enough that the microtomes work fine, if you don't mind a little "bump" as
you turn the knob to raise and lower the specimen arm. The problem is
finding the exact number of teeth. The bump doesn't translate into choppy
cuts, but you might feel it in the knob itself.

Hope this helps.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/





From daemon Wed Nov 15 13:04:15 2000



From: kszaruba1-at-mmm.com
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 12:58:51 -0600
Subject: Re: Skin Biopsies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi John,

Here is a protocol I developed over a few years of trying to examine stratum
corneum (it was based of course on published protocols and suggestions from this
listserve -- nothing novel). The only big differences between this and Michael
Delannoy's reply are the extended dehydration and infiltration times, along with
the use of ruthenium tetroxide. I found the latter to be a must if you are
interested in preserving the intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum. Also
I found the use of a dermatome led to increased splitting off of the outermost
layers of corneocytes, so simply excising small pieces of skin was better.
Hope this helps,

Karen Zaruba
3M Company, St. Paul, MN
kszaruba1-at-mmm.com

Preparation of Skin for TEM examination of Stratum Corneum

At necropsy, excise the skin with a minimum of stretching or force.
Pin out skin in containers of half-strength Karnovsky?s fixative, which is 2%
glutaraldehyde + 2% paraformaldehyde in cacodylate Buffer (0.15M sodium
cacodylate, pH 7.4, with 0.1 M sucrose). After about 1 hr. the outer tissue
should be trimmed away. The central areas should be divided into final
embedding sizes (1 x 1 x 3 mm) by cutting over a piece of dental wax using a
Personna razor blade.
Continue fixation for a total of 2-12 hr., then wash in buffer 3 x 5 min.
Post-fix in 1% osmium tetroxide in buffer for 30 min. Wash in buffer without
sucrose 2 x 5 min., then briefly in distilled water.
Post-fix in 0.2% ruthenium tetroxide (with or w/o 0.25% potassium
ferricyanide) in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer without sucrose for time indicated.
Rinse in buffer or distilled water, 3 x 5 min. (Use buffer if being held
overnight at this stage.) Note: RuO4 reacts violently with filter paper and
alcohols. Also reacts with benzene rings and organics.
Dehydrate in ethanol series, 25-35 min. each step from 30% through 95%, then 3
x 20 min. in 100%.
Incubate in tert-Butyl Glycidyl Ether, 2 x 30 min.
Infiltrate in a mixture of 2 parts t-BGE to 1 part Spurr?s resin for 1-2 hrs.
Then follow with 1 part t-BGE to 2 parts Spurr?s resin overnight.
Continue to infiltrate in Spurr?s resin alone, 3 changes over 6-8 hrs.
Embed in fresh resin in flat molds, orienting to allow cross-sectioning of the
epidermis. Polymerize at approximately 58 C for 1-3 days.
To visualize lipid lamellae, do not post-stain. For best contrast of
desmosomes and cellular detail, post-stain with standard Tannin/Uranyl Acetate
stain followed by Reynold?s Lead Citrate.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
John Basgen wrote:

To those doing EM on skin biopsies:

We have been asked to embed some human skin biopsies for electron microscopy.
We used our routine protocol for processing kidney biopsies which includes
glutaraldehyde fixation, dehydration through ethanol and acetone and embeddment
in PolyBed 812. Our protocol resulted in good embeddment all the layers of the
skin except for the stratum corneum where there were numberous holes in the
PolyBed. Is it possible to get good embeddment of this keratinized zone?

Thanks for any suggestion,

John

John M. Basgen
Department of Pediatrics
University of Minnesota
Mayo Mail Code 491
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
USA
Phone: 612-625-7979
FAX: 612-626-2791
E-mail: basgen-at-tc.umn.edu





From daemon Wed Nov 15 13:29:40 2000



From: kszaruba1-at-mmm.com
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 13:26:22 -0600
Subject: ESEM Biohazards?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hello fellow microscopists,

As part of a hazard review on our new ESEM, many questions were raised regarding
the observation of biohazards. We won't be looking at actual human pathogens
(although maybe others do?? CDC/NIH??). However, just looking at unfixed human
skin puts us under the Class 2 category. Also we'll be observing non-pathogenic
(opportunisitic) bacteria. Here are the questions:

Are there conditions inside the ESEM that would favor the creation of an
aerosol from the sample?
Assuming any of the sample becomes detached/airborn inside the chamber, would
pumping down to higher vacuum prior to opening the door remove them (seems
logical that it would)?
How do you dispose of pump oil containing microbes/biohazards? Would
anything capable of infecting humans even survive in pump oil? (Remember
we're talking about viruses as well as bacteria here).
Finally, would the chamber walls, etc. need to be decontaminated
periodically?

If anyone has gone through this sort of safety review and generated a protocol,
we'd love to benefit from your hard work!! Otherwise we'd appreciate any
suggestions/opinions.

Thanks as always,
Karen Zaruba
3M Company, St. Paul, MN
kszaruba1-at-mmm.com





From daemon Wed Nov 15 14:19:04 2000



From: S. Kuehner :      kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 12:13:46 -0800 (PST)
Subject: beam overlaps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi-
We are analyzing experimental charges of magnetite + ilmenite in a
glass of rhyolitic composition. The problem we have run into is that the
ilmenite grains are very small and thin, typicaly {10um in length, such
that nearly all ilmenite analyses overlap the glass. My question is: Does
anyone have any experience/know-how/ideas that would help in calculating
the composition of the ilmenite from an analysis that is from a mixture of
ilmenite + glass.

Analyses are with a JEOL 733 microprobe at 15kV and 5nA. We have
not yet tried a lower kV that would potentially reduce the beam
penitration depth. Our method of recalculation thus far has been to
adjust the final analysis for density differences between glass and
ilmenite following the method of Warren (LPSC ?1997). The fraction of
glass is then subtracted from the analysis based on the amount of Sio2
(all SiO2 in the glass, no SiO2 in the ilmenite). We then adjust the
result by noting that the ZAF correction applied to the original analysis
is a function of the amount of glass overlap and extrapolate this
relationship for each element in ilmenite back to a ZAF at 0% Sio2.

TEM EDS is a last resort as the sample would have to be mined out
of a polished microprobe mount.

************************************************
### Free the Psoas ###
**************

Dr. Scott Kuehner kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Dept. of Geological Sciences ph.206-543-8393
Box 351310 Fax 206-616-6873
The University of Washington
Seattle, Washington 98195-1310
************************************************

On Wed, 15 Nov 2000 kszaruba1-at-mmm.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Hello fellow microscopists,
}
} As part of a hazard review on our new ESEM, many questions were raised regarding
} the observation of biohazards. We won't be looking at actual human pathogens
} (although maybe others do?? CDC/NIH??). However, just looking at unfixed human
} skin puts us under the Class 2 category. Also we'll be observing non-pathogenic
} (opportunisitic) bacteria. Here are the questions:
}
} Are there conditions inside the ESEM that would favor the creation of an
} aerosol from the sample?
} Assuming any of the sample becomes detached/airborn inside the chamber, would
} pumping down to higher vacuum prior to opening the door remove them (seems
} logical that it would)?
} How do you dispose of pump oil containing microbes/biohazards? Would
} anything capable of infecting humans even survive in pump oil? (Remember
} we're talking about viruses as well as bacteria here).
} Finally, would the chamber walls, etc. need to be decontaminated
} periodically?
}
} If anyone has gone through this sort of safety review and generated a protocol,
} we'd love to benefit from your hard work!! Otherwise we'd appreciate any
} suggestions/opinions.
}
} Thanks as always,
} Karen Zaruba
} 3M Company, St. Paul, MN
} kszaruba1-at-mmm.com
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Nov 15 14:56:04 2000



From: Yuhui_Xu :      Yuhui_Xu-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2000 15:50:03 -0500
Subject: Darkroom Paper printer, tissue processor etc.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleges:

We are in the market for buying a automated tissue processor for electron
microscopy and a paper printer for the dark room. I will appreciate any
recommendations for certain makes and models.

Thank you in advance for any help!
Regards,


Yuhui

Yuhui Xu, MD,PhD
EM Core, NHLBI, NIH



From daemon Thu Nov 16 03:30:05 2000



From: Gudrun.Hugelshofer-at-rdke.nestle.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 10:19:17 +0100
Subject: LM-Protein stain in vapour form

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

Does anyone know if there is a protein stain you can apply in vapour form in
order not to change the structure of very delicat samples when using liquids
(as for e.g. starch and fat)?

Thanks for your help. Gudrun

Gudrun Hugelshofer
Nestlé Product Technology Centre Kemptthal, CH-8310 Kemptthal
Tel: ++41 (0)52 354 06 76 Fax: ++41 (0)52 354 07 14
E-mail: gudrun.hugelshofer-at-rdke.nestle.com





From daemon Thu Nov 16 06:27:14 2000



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 08:21:36 -0400
Subject: Re: ESEM Biohazards?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We've had an ESEM for about 7 years now, but we've never looked at anything
remotely human in origin in it. However, I think I have a pretty good idea
of what conditions are really like in the chamber of an ESEM, so I'll
contribute my (fairly uneducated) guesses/impressions.
Here goes:

} Are there conditions inside the ESEM that would favor the creation of
an
aerosol from the sample?

Don't think so - unless your sample was easily evaporated...

Assuming any of the sample becomes detached/airborn inside the chamber,
would pumping down to higher vacuum prior to opening the door remove them
(seems logical that it would)?

You're right....that does seem logical...

} How do you dispose of pump oil containing microbes/biohazards? Would
} anything capable of infecting humans even survive in pump oil?
(Remember
} we're talking about viruses as well as bacteria here).

Being at an oceanographic institute, there are these really big blue vats
out on the dock, put there to receive waste oil from our ships. When I
change the oil in our rotary pumps, that's where it goes. I kind of doubt
that any human pathogens could live in pump oil (but that's a real
guess....)

} Finally, would the chamber walls, etc. need to be decontaminated
} periodically?
}
Probably not, but if it was deemed necessary, I suppose a rinse with some
kind of antiseptic wouldn't be a bad idea - as long as you kept the fluids
away from the stage electrics :-)

Good luck with the new ESEM - they're pretty nice, well-built instruments.

Frank Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Thu Nov 16 06:48:22 2000



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 12:45:35 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: ESEM Biohazards?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For safety reasons we fix human cell cultures and catheters
before examination in our ESEM. Unfixed human and animal
cells suffer beam damage in tungsten filament ESEMs so we
do not feel we are missing out. It would be nice to look
at the catheter biofilms unfixed but we plumped for a
safety first approach.

Dave


On Wed, 15 Nov 2000 13:26:22 -0600
"kszaruba1-at-mmm.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Hello fellow microscopists,
}
} As part of a hazard review on our new ESEM, many questions were raised regarding
} the observation of biohazards. We won't be looking at actual human pathogens
} (although maybe others do?? CDC/NIH??). However, just looking at unfixed human
} skin puts us under the Class 2 category. Also we'll be observing non-pathogenic
} (opportunisitic) bacteria. Here are the questions:
}
} Are there conditions inside the ESEM that would favor the creation of an
} aerosol from the sample?
} Assuming any of the sample becomes detached/airborn inside the chamber, would
} pumping down to higher vacuum prior to opening the door remove them (seems
} logical that it would)?
} How do you dispose of pump oil containing microbes/biohazards? Would
} anything capable of infecting humans even survive in pump oil? (Remember
} we're talking about viruses as well as bacteria here).
} Finally, would the chamber walls, etc. need to be decontaminated
} periodically?
}
} If anyone has gone through this sort of safety review and generated a protocol,
} we'd love to benefit from your hard work!! Otherwise we'd appreciate any
} suggestions/opinions.
}
} Thanks as always,
} Karen Zaruba
} 3M Company, St. Paul, MN
} kszaruba1-at-mmm.com
}
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Thu Nov 16 08:12:45 2000



From: Gregory Mulhollan :      mulhollan-at-spec.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 08:06:24 -0600
Subject: Diode array detector (Tracor Northern 6100)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopy folks,
Anyone out there have any info on the Tracor-Northern 6100 diode array
detector as used in the TN spectrophotometers? Feel free to point me to
another list that is more appropriate for this question if you know of one.
Thanks,
Greg M.
--
Gregory Mulhollan, Ph.D.
Extreme Devices Inc.
101 West 6th Street
Suite 200
Austin, TX 78701
(512)479-7740 x2231 voice
(512)479-7750 fax
mulhollan-at-extremedevices.com



From daemon Thu Nov 16 08:47:03 2000



From: O. O. Ilori :      sojilori-at-oauife.edu.ng
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 15:46:31 +0100 (WAT)
Subject: SEM training

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Guys,
I am looking for a place,an institute or something where I can be
trained to operate an SEM. Any suggestions?
Thanks.

Mr. O. O. ILORI
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONIC/ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
OBAFEMI AWOLOWO UNIVERSITY,
ILE-IFE, OSUN STATE
NIGERIA.

email: sojilori-at-oauife.edu.ng




From daemon Thu Nov 16 09:59:41 2000



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 07:54:22 -0800
Subject: RE: beam overlaps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott writes ...

} We are analyzing experimental charges of magnetite +
} ilmenite in a glass of rhyolitic composition.
} The problem we have run into is that the
} ilmenite grains are very small ... My question is:
} Does anyone have any experience/know-how/ideas
} that would help in calculating the composition of the
} ilmenite from an analysis that is from a mixture of
} ilmenite + glass.
}
} ...

This will indeed be a problem ... not only do x-rays generated
outside the ilmente reach the detectors, but they also travel through
different compositions on their way to the spectrometers which are
located differently relative to the ilmenites orientation in the
glass. One spectro may measure Fe largely absorbed by the ilmenite,
and another may measure Ti largely absorbed by glass. You would have
to model each based on simplistic assumptions which may be
unjustified.

cheerios, =shAf= :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Thu Nov 16 10:40:23 2000



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 11:37:09 -0500
Subject: Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is a position for an EM technician at the Electron Microscopy Core
lab of the Biotechnology Program at the University of Florida in
Gainesville. The laboratory is mostly a fee-for-service lab serving the
needs of biological, biomedical and agricultural scientists at the
university. Applicants must be skilled in the preparation of biological
samples for both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Experience
with both PC and Mac as well as website management is
desirable. Experience with digital imaging and fluorescence microscopy
also a plus.
This is a full time, permanent position with standard benefits of State of
Florida employees.

For further details, reply to this message or contact Greg Erdos at the
number below.



Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Ph. 352-392-1295 Fax: 352-846-0251


From daemon Thu Nov 16 10:40:35 2000



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 11:38:02 -0500
Subject: Re: LM-Protein stain in vapour form

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




} Does anyone know if there is a protein stain you can apply in vapour form in
} order not to change the structure of very delicat samples when using liquids
} (as for e.g. starch and fat)?

} Thanks for your help. Gudrun

Dear Gudrun,
I don't know what you intend to do, LM, EM, or other, but I once used a
stain to detect peptides on chromatography paper (it was a long time ago). 1)
Place the protein specimen in an enclosed box in a well-ventillated hood. 2)
Mix equimolar solutions of HCl and KMnO4 (in the hood, of course), place the
beaker containing the mix in the box alongside the specimen, and seal the box.
The Cl-atoms generated will react with the peptide bonds to produce
chloropeptides. 3) Add iodide (I added KI solution, but HI or ICl would
probably work.). Instead of the last step, you could add anything which reacts
with the chloropeptides and gives a signal which can be detected by whatever
type of microscopy you want to use. This stain is extremely sensitive, because
it can label each peptide bond, so a 100-residue protein can have 100 labels
attached. Good luck; please let me know if this technique works for you.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From daemon Thu Nov 16 10:42:52 2000



From: William H Roberts :      William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 10:54:00 -0500
Subject: beam overlaps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott,

I don't have any specific experience with the analytes and the matrix that
you reference, but have you tried using backscattered electron imaging?
There's a difference of a little over six in the average atomic number of
ilemite and magnetite with an even greater difference between the ilemite
and the volcanic glass matrix, so atomic number contrast should be no
problem. Most EDX systems offer routines for measuring phase area based on
atomic number contrast which is fairly easily translated into volume
concentration. You should have no problem with overlap using backscattered
electrons as opposed to x-rays. In addition, with the help of an image
analysis package, you can get size, shape, orientation and other
information at the same time. Just a thought.

Bill




"S. Kuehner" {kuehner-at-u.washington.edu} on 11/15/2000 03:13:46 PM

To: "kszaruba1-at-mmm.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com (bcc: William H Roberts/US/FILM/DPT)


Hi-
We are analyzing experimental charges of magnetite + ilmenite in a
glass of rhyolitic composition. The problem we have run into is that the
ilmenite grains are very small and thin, typicaly {10um in length, such
that nearly all ilmenite analyses overlap the glass. My question is: Does
anyone have any experience/know-how/ideas that would help in calculating
the composition of the ilmenite from an analysis that is from a mixture of
ilmenite + glass.
Analyses are with a JEOL 733 microprobe at 15kV and 5nA. We have
not yet tried a lower kV that would potentially reduce the beam
penitration depth. Our method of recalculation thus far has been to
adjust the final analysis for density differences between glass and
ilmenite following the method of Warren (LPSC ?1997). The fraction of
glass is then subtracted from the analysis based on the amount of Sio2
(all SiO2 in the glass, no SiO2 in the ilmenite). We then adjust the
result by noting that the ZAF correction applied to the original analysis
is a function of the amount of glass overlap and extrapolate this
relationship for each element in ilmenite back to a ZAF at 0% Sio2.
TEM EDS is a last resort as the sample would have to be mined out
of a polished microprobe mount.
************************************************
### Free the Psoas ###
**************
Dr. Scott Kuehner kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Dept. of Geological Sciences ph.206-543-8393
Box 351310 Fax 206-616-6873
The University of Washington
Seattle, Washington 98195-1310
************************************************





From daemon Thu Nov 16 10:46:00 2000



From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 11:45:39 -0500
Subject: service for x-ray diffractometer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listfolk,

This is slightly off the EM mark, but still in the ballpark for this List...

We recently received a donated xray diffractometer for which we need service
and installation assistance. Does anyone know of a local rep or contact
info??

It is a Philips APD 3720 Automated Power Diffraction System with a Philips
XRG 3100 X-Ray Generator, vintage ca. mid-80's.

Thanks, all.

Ann Hein Lehman

----------------
Ann Hein Lehman
EM Facility Manager
Trinity College
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
f. 860-297-2538
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
w. http://www.trincoll.edu/~alehman


From daemon Thu Nov 16 11:12:19 2000



From: William McManus :      billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 10:08:04 -0700
Subject: SEM training

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I realize that you are pretty far away, but we offer an electron
microscopy course here at USU, each spring semester, which includes a
large segment on SEM.

William McManus
Supervisor
Electron Microscopy Facility
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT 84322-5305

billEMac-at-cc.usu.edu
435-797-1920


-----Original Message-----
} From: O. O. Ilori [mailto:sojilori-at-oauife.edu.ng]
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2000 7:47 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello Guys,
I am looking for a place,an institute or something where I can be
trained to operate an SEM. Any suggestions?
Thanks.

Mr. O. O. ILORI
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONIC/ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
OBAFEMI AWOLOWO UNIVERSITY,
ILE-IFE, OSUN STATE
NIGERIA.

email: sojilori-at-oauife.edu.ng




From daemon Thu Nov 16 12:46:14 2000



From: William H Roberts :      William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 13:12:14 -0500
Subject: beam overlaps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott,

I don't have any specific experience with the analytes and the matrix that
you reference, but have you tried using backscattered electron imaging?
There's a difference of a little over eleven in the average atomic number
of ilmenite and magnetite with an even greater difference between the
ilmenite and the volcanic glass matrix, so atomic number contrast should be
no problem. Most EDX systems offer routines for measuring phase area based
on atomic number contrast which is fairly easily translated into volume
concentration. You should have no problem with overlap using backscattered
electrons as opposed to x-rays. In addition, with the help of an image
analysis package, you can get size, shape, orientation and other
information at the same time. Just a thought.

Bill




"S. Kuehner" {kuehner-at-u.washington.edu} on 11/15/2000 03:13:46 PM

To: "kszaruba1-at-mmm.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com (bcc: William H Roberts/US/FILM/DPT)


Hi-
We are analyzing experimental charges of magnetite + ilmenite in a
glass of rhyolitic composition. The problem we have run into is that the
ilmenite grains are very small and thin, typicaly {10um in length, such
that nearly all ilmenite analyses overlap the glass. My question is: Does
anyone have any experience/know-how/ideas that would help in calculating
the composition of the ilmenite from an analysis that is from a mixture of
ilmenite + glass.
Analyses are with a JEOL 733 microprobe at 15kV and 5nA. We have
not yet tried a lower kV that would potentially reduce the beam
penitration depth. Our method of recalculation thus far has been to
adjust the final analysis for density differences between glass and
ilmenite following the method of Warren (LPSC ?1997). The fraction of
glass is then subtracted from the analysis based on the amount of Sio2
(all SiO2 in the glass, no SiO2 in the ilmenite). We then adjust the
result by noting that the ZAF correction applied to the original analysis
is a function of the amount of glass overlap and extrapolate this
relationship for each element in ilmenite back to a ZAF at 0% Sio2.
TEM EDS is a last resort as the sample would have to be mined out
of a polished microprobe mount.
************************************************
### Free the Psoas ###
**************
Dr. Scott Kuehner kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Dept. of Geological Sciences ph.206-543-8393
Box 351310 Fax 206-616-6873
The University of Washington
Seattle, Washington 98195-1310
************************************************





From daemon Thu Nov 16 13:33:01 2000



From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson :      dsoren-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 14:30:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: collagen stain for Epon embedded tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,

Does anyone know of a way to stain for collagen in Epon embedded cardiac
muscle for viewing by light microscopy?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Dotty

Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
dsoren-at-umich.edu
(734)763-1170



From daemon Thu Nov 16 14:21:42 2000



From: kszaruba1-at-mmm.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 14:16:34 -0600
Subject: Re: collagen stain for Epon embedded tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Dotty,

Of course immunolabeling might work. I've had success with collagen types III
and IV in Epon and Spurr's resin, definitely not processed with immuno in mind.

On the other hand if you just want something simple to help highlight the
collagen a little, I've seen Methyl Green staining collagen more than other
components in skin cross sections.

Good luck,
Karen

---------------------------------------
Hello all,

Does anyone know of a way to stain for collagen in Epon embedded cardiac
muscle for viewing by light microscopy?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Dotty

Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
dsoren-at-umich.edu
(734)763-1170




From daemon Thu Nov 16 15:44:23 2000



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 16:35:28 -0500
Subject: FIB'ing and more in FL in March

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Come join us at the joint meetings of Florida Microscopy Society, FL AVS,
and Surface Science 2001

March 12-16, 2001

University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

THERE IS NO REGISTRATION FEE TO ATTEND THE MEETING (but please register at
http://natasha.eng.usf.edu/gilbert/avs/anouncement/registrationform.html so
we get an accurate head count for meals)

- An FIB afternoon session followed by:

- An early evenning session devoted to an FIB workshop and users group
meeting (open to all users of FIBs and all FIB manufacturers)

- There will be 2 FIB-related short courses
one on theory (see www.vacuum.org for fees and information)
FIB will be included in a comprehensive TEM specimen preparation
course March 14-16, 2001
(contact lag-at-mail.ucf.edu)

To submit an abstract for the meeting or for more information follow the FL
local affiliates link to FL from: www.microscopy.org

or contact Lucille Giannuzzi, lag-at-mail.ucf.edu


*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone (407) 275-4354,5,6
fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Thu Nov 16 15:47:58 2000



From: William H Roberts :      William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 16:37:55 -0500
Subject: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

Does anyone have an experience that they would like to share involving the
SVMicro digital camera by Sound Vision? I'm hoping to learn anything at
all, from delivery, support, service, image quality, product reliability,
etc. Thanks in advance.

Bill Roberts




From daemon Thu Nov 16 17:13:09 2000



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 18:07:20 -0500
Subject: RE: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera anybody want to trade?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have one. It is about two years old. It can provide good images, but it
is tough to work with and you have to work too hard to get a good image.
The TWAIN software that I have is tough to set up the contrast, brightness,
and exposure. The person to whom I gave this camera didn't like it, gave up
and went back to film. I then traded him my Pixera camera for the SVMicro
and he was much happier. I don't know if the software on the SVMicro has
improved or not.

We don't do really critical work with either microscope that these are put
on and we usually don't do color.

I would trade the SVMicro for another El Cheapo Pixera for the ease of use.



Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--

-----Original Message-----
From: William H Roberts [mailto:William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2000 4:38 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera


---------------------------------------------------------------
---------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserv er/FAQ.html



---------------------------------------------------------------
--------.


Dear Listers,

Does anyone have an experience that they would like to share
involving the
SVMicro digital camera by Sound Vision? I'm hoping to learn
anything at
all, from delivery, support, service, image quality, product
reliability,
etc. Thanks in advance.

Bill Roberts





From daemon Thu Nov 16 19:50:55 2000



From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 19:39:38 -0600
Subject: RE: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera anybody want to trade?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a SVMicro attached to an old Zeiss Ultraphot. We do not do anything
critical with it; just BF/DF and DIC at medium mags on materials samples. I
would say it works quite well. We use the Photoshop interface for the Mac;
the interface is quite easy to work with. One caveat, the sensor is quite
large (~25mm) so you need good transfer optics to get a good image over the
whole sensor.
At the time (~2yrs bp), the performance to price ratio was very high. The
whole package was around $1100. I do not know how it compares now.
Just my $0.02.


Ray D. Twesten, PhD.
Center for Microanalysis of Materials
Seitz Materials Research Laboratory
104 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801
+1 217 244-6177 (Fax -2278)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Walck, Scott D. [mailto:walck-at-ppg.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2000 5:07 PM
To: 'William H Roberts'
Cc: 'Microscopy'


We have one. It is about two years old. It can provide good images, but it
is tough to work with and you have to work too hard to get a good image.
The TWAIN software that I have is tough to set up the contrast, brightness,
and exposure. The person to whom I gave this camera didn't like it, gave up
and went back to film. I then traded him my Pixera camera for the SVMicro
and he was much happier. I don't know if the software on the SVMicro has
improved or not.

We don't do really critical work with either microscope that these are put
on and we usually don't do color.

I would trade the SVMicro for another El Cheapo Pixera for the ease of use.



Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--

-----Original Message-----
From: William H Roberts [mailto:William.H.Roberts-at-usa.dupont.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2000 4:38 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera


---------------------------------------------------------------
---------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserv er/FAQ.html



---------------------------------------------------------------
--------.


Dear Listers,

Does anyone have an experience that they would like to share
involving the
SVMicro digital camera by Sound Vision? I'm hoping to learn
anything at
all, from delivery, support, service, image quality, product
reliability,
etc. Thanks in advance.

Bill Roberts






From daemon Fri Nov 17 09:17:50 2000



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 10:09:42 -0500
Subject: Casio digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
We are looking for opinions or reviews on the the Casio QV 3000 digital
camera, with a 340 MB microdrive and macro focusing down to 6 cm.
any help would be greatly appreciated.
thanks,
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Fri Nov 17 09:52:26 2000



From: Marek Malecki :      mmm-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 00:19:10 -0800
Subject: Automatic sample processors for EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would appreciate comments and suggestions on automatic sample processors
for EM. Vendors welcome.
Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D.
Director and Principal Investigator

Molecular Imaging Laboratories
University of California, San Diego

address: 1500 Suite Bonner Hall, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA92093-0368
phone - office: 8588223373
phone - cell: 8583443347
fax: 8588223715
e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
pager: 8586161420
e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
e.pager: 1620024619-at-alphapage.airtouch.com
www site: http://mil.ucsd.edu/
ftp site: mil1.ucsd.edu




From daemon Fri Nov 17 11:10:14 2000



From: Awbrey, Donald :      DonaldAwbrey-at-texashealth.org
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 10:27:29 -0600
Subject: TEM stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Dear TEM netters,

Is there any other stain reagents, other than UA and LC, that are
used in TEM? If so, do they have comparable results, are they
ETOH or water based, what are there disposal precautions, and what
are their staining protocols.

Any information will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.



Donald G. Awbrey, HT(ASCP) QIHC
Electron Microscopy / Image Analysis
DonaldAwbrey-at-TexasHealth.org
donaldawbrey-at-hotmail.com
(817)-878-5647




From daemon Fri Nov 17 12:57:30 2000



From: Della Miller :      della-at-vacuum.org
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 11:07:40 -0600
Subject: AVS/Microscopy Joint Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am in the process of publishing a brochure that advertises the AVS short
courses and symposium in Florida. Since this is joint meeting would it be
possible to rent/exchange a mailing list from the Society for this purpose.
The meeting is March 2001.

Della

_____________________________

Della Miller
AVS West
1265 El Camino Real, Ste. 109
Santa Clara CA 95050

Phone: 408-246-3600
Fax: 408-246-7700
E-mail: della-at-vacuum.org
Web: www.vacuum.org



From daemon Fri Nov 17 13:29:16 2000



From: Dunlap, Jonathan C. :      Jonathan.Dunlap-at-sylvania.com
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 14:24:30 -0500
Subject: Edwards E306A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All:

I have walked into a laboratory that has had an Edwards E306A Vacuum Coater
purchased in 1991. It has been used very rarely since, and by no one
presently working in the laboratory. The instruction manuals help to pump
down the system and get it ready for the application, but I have yet to get
the carbon source deposited on the sample we are trying to coat for SEM
analysis (I can get the carbon rods glowing, but nothing else happens).

I am wondering if anyone out there has this system and knows how to operate
it with the carbon evaporation source. Any help to what I could be doing
wrong, or not doing at all would be appreciated. Also perhaps if I could
call someone who has this system and they could walk me though the steps
would be great.

- Jonathan

(I have contacted the manufacturer and they have not made this coater in
years so know little about it as well)


From daemon Fri Nov 17 13:59:00 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 11:36:15 -0800
Subject: Re: Casio digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would recommend that you check out

www.dejanews.com

and do an ALL groups, all history search for "casio 3000."
I did this and found 800 hits. Most are as expected
in the rec.photo.digital usenet forum. I did not
immediately see any threads regarding its use on
a microscope. So, this may or may not be of
value to you.

gary g.


At 07:09 AM 11/17/00, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Nov 17 14:49:58 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 15:46:52 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 10:27 AM -0600 11/17/00, Awbrey, Donald wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_______________________________________________________

Dear Donald,

Yes there are other TEM stains, although UrAc and Lead Citrate are by far
the most commonly used. You can also use Bismuth in lieu of lead. Kits
are commercially available and come with instructions. Its a similar
protocol to that used for Pb, but with concetration and time differences.
For a comprehensive review, you can refer to Vol. 5 Part I: Staining
Methods for Sectioned Material. by PR Lewis and DP Knight in the
"Practical Methods on Electron Microscopy series edited by Audrey Glauert.
This covers general as well as cytochemical methods.

Lee


Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175




From daemon Fri Nov 17 20:38:15 2000



From: christopher :      egon-at-eclipse.net
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 21:45:24 -0500
Subject: LKB Ultamicrotome III problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I came across a used Blazers Electon Beam Evaroration unit with a 552 gun
BAF 300 Freeze Etch unit BAE 300 Coating unit 300, Crystal thin film
monitor QSG 202, dual rotary vane vacuum pumps and what appears to be all
documentation. .

The unit was removed from a working lab but it was not decommissioned by
experienced professionals. It did appear to be carefully taken down. I
think it was taken for a decommissioned lab because many their notes on
procedures are included

It is for sale by a friend of mine who I won't plug on the list. But it
looks like it might be a good deal for some one that need a set up like
this and he is not very proud of it. I don't normally do this but I hate
to see something that appears to be this good go for scrap. Even though I
would like to have the vacuum chamber.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From root Fri Nov 17 20:59:40 2000
Return-Path: {Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Received: (from daemon-at-localhost)
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id UAA16208
for dist-Microscopy; Fri, 17 Nov 2000 20:42:07 -0600 (CST)
Received: from no_more_spam.com (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id UAA16205
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Fri, 17 Nov 2000 20:41:36 -0600 (CST)
Received: from mail.eclipse.net (mail.eclipse.net [207.207.192.13])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id UAA16198
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Fri, 17 Nov 2000 20:41:25 -0600 (CST)
Received: from chris.dev.null (nwt1-01-160.dial.nwt.eclipse.net [207.207.231.160])
by mail.eclipse.net (8.9.1a/8.9.1) with ESMTP id VAA26478
for {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} ; Fri, 17 Nov 2000 21:40:26 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: {5.0.1.4.2.20001117213926.01946c00-at-mail.eclipse.net}
X-Sender: egon-at-mail.eclipse.net
X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Version 5.0.1


Good Evening, all:

We have an old LKB Ultramicrotome III (series 8800) that has developed a
problem in the past few weeks. Apparently the cantilever arm is not going
down far enough on the cutting stroke to activate the kickback on the knife
holder, resulting in wet blocks nearly every stroke. Needless to say, this
is a huge pain in the butt. We're kind of fond of the old machine, so we're
interested in fixing it.
My question is: does anyone know if there is an adjustment to change at
what point the relay for the knife holder kicks in? Or, is there some way
to get the arm to travel farther down?
Thanks much!


-Chris

(Sorry....I don't have a fancy title yet...I'm still just a student!)



From daemon Sun Nov 19 06:23:00 2000



From: oftzi-at-Ladymail.cz
Date: Sat, 18 Nov 2000 15:14:08 -0400
Subject: Tired of the 40 X 40 Plan? 26724

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tired of the 40 X 40 X 40 Plan? You know:

Work 40 hours per week for someone else for 40 years, then receive a 40% reduction in pay!

Is working for a "boss" too demeaning and unrewarding?

Are you sick of depending on a job with too little pay and too many hours with no personal reward and even less future?

If you're determined to retire in the next 2 - 5 years with enough income to have REAL Financial Independence and Freedom, and are not afraid to work for it, I can help you.

I am looking for people with a Good Work Ethic and extraordinary Desire to Earn at Least $10,000 per Month Working From Home!

NO SPECIAL SKILLS OR EXPERIENCE REQUIRED. We will give you all the training and personal support you will need to ensure your success!

This LEGITIMATE HOME-BASED INCOME OPPORTUNITY can put you back in Control of your Time, Your Finances, and Your Life!

If you've tried other opportunities in the past that have failed to live up to their promises, THIS IS DIFFERENT THAN ANYTHING ELSE YOU'VE SEEN!

THIS IS NOT A GET-RICH-QUICK SCHEME!

YOUR FINANCIAL PAST DOES NOT HAVE TO BE YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE!

CALL ONLY IF YOU ARE SERIOUS!

1-800-533-9350 (Free, 24 hour, 2 minute recorded message)

DON'T GO TO SLEEP WITHOUT LISTENING TO THIS!

"All our dreams can come true - if we have the courage to pursue them" - Walt Disney



To be removed from future mailings, send an email to: qwertyax5-at-yahoo.com and type "Remove" in the subject line.


From daemon Sun Nov 19 11:12:22 2000



From: Gregory Mulhollan :      mulhollan-at-spec.com
Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2000 11:02:39 -0600
Subject: Diode array detector (Tracor Northern 6100)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi folks,
Anyone out there have any info on the Tracor-Northern 6100 diode array
detector as used in the TN spectrophotometers? Feel free to point me to
another list that is more appropriate for this question if you know of one.
Thanks,
Greg M.
--
Gregory Mulhollan, Ph.D.
Extreme Devices Inc.
101 West 6th Street
Suite 200
Austin, TX 78701
(512)479-7740 x2231 voice
(512)479-7750 fax
mulhollan-at-extremedevices.com




From daemon Sun Nov 19 11:16:13 2000



From: Lou Solebello :      microls1297-at-mindspring.com
Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2000 11:08:05 -0600
Subject: Microscopists in the state of Virginia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For microscopists in the state of Virginia. Please contact Lou
Solebello at microls1297-at-mindspring.com if you are interested in getting
involved, or would attend regular meetings held in Richmond. I would like
to start up a Virginia Microscopical Society if there is enough interest
to do so. Professionals, hobbyists, teachers all welcome. Let me know if
you are interested, and what types of activities and presentations you
would like to see. Lou Solebello




From daemon Sun Nov 19 11:16:16 2000



From: Missy Josephson :      josepem-at-vetmed.auburn.edu
Date: Sun, 19 Nov 2000 11:08:25 -0600
Subject: Leitz objectives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,
I've inherited an old (1970s?) Leitz Orthoplan microscope in great need of
a cleaning and possibly some new objectives. Can anyone give advice on who
can help me rehabilitate it? I'm in the Atlanta-Birmingham-Montgomery
(Alabama) area.
Thanks
Missy Josephson

Eleanor M. Josephson, D.V.M., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology
College of Veterinary Medicine
111 Greene Hall
Auburn University, AL 36849-5518
Ph. (334) 844-5423
FAX (334) 844-4542
josepem-at-vetmed.auburn.edu




From daemon Mon Nov 20 00:36:20 2000



From: Robin Cross :      r.cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 08:26:41 +0200
Subject: Re: LKB Ultamicrotome III problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Chris

} We have an old LKB Ultramicrotome III (series 8800) that has
} developed a problem in the past few weeks.
} My question is: does anyone know if there is an adjustment to change
} at what point the relay for the knife holder kicks in?

Yes, there is and I have the relevant LKB service note somewhere.
I'll be happy to fax it to you if you email me a fax number that will
reach you.

Regards

Rob


Robin H Cross
Director : EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
R.Cross-at-ru.ac.za
tel: +27 46 603 8168 - fax: +27 46 622 4377
http://www.ru.ac.za/emu/index.htm

** remember that ICEM-15 in 2002 is in Durban, South Africa **


From daemon Mon Nov 20 03:19:23 2000



From: Erdem Yasar :      yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 11:08:28 +0200 (EET)
Subject: ABOUT JSM5600 SEM AND JEM3010 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sir/Madam ,
JEM3010 was manufactured in 1999.it has got 1.500.000x mag and digital
camera system JSM5600 has got 300.000xmag and EDS system.
we have two kind of chose for prices. If we study together (I mean we
preapare a paper together), we reseach samples without any price. On the
other hand we get approximately 30$ per each sample. But if you have many
samples we can make a discount.
Thanks for your interests..
I am waiting for your emails

**********************************
**********************************
** Research.Asst.ERDEM YASAR **
** University of Kirikkale **
** Department of Physics **
** TEM LABORATORY **
** 71450 KIRIKKALE/TURKEY **
** erdem.yasar-at-physics.org **
** yasar-at-science.ankara.edu.tr **
** yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr **
**********************************
**********************************








From daemon Mon Nov 20 03:19:23 2000



From: Per =?iso-8859-1?Q?Hörstedt?= :      per.horstedt-at-pathol.umu.se
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 10:09:43 +0100
Subject: Re: Casio digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Beth,
I'm using the Casio QV 3000 privately and I'm very satisfied with it. High
resolution, light sensitive CCD, easy to use functions and easily
understandable menus. Nearly all my images are correctly exposed, and the
macro setting works great, with really high resolution. It uses standard
batteries, or as I do rechargeables, that can be bought everywhere.
The camera body is slightly larger than most of the competitors, but this
makes it so much easier to hold with a steady grip.
All this together with the possibility of storing 244 images at high
resolution with the 340 mB drive makes it one of the best choices. The
Photoloader software package is easy to work with and makes the handling
of your images in the PC fast and well arranged. I'm using a Lexar card
reader, and image transfer to my PC is really fast, although USB usage is
even faster.
The only disadvantage I´ve found is that the software does not save images
in TIFF- format, only JPEG.
It's a good alternative to my Hasselblad and a lot easier to carry around
outdoors.
Now, you did not state what you need it for, ordinary photography is as you
can see OK, but I think it would be hard to get adaptors to use it, for
example, as a microscope camera .




Yours sincerely

Per Hörstedt
Department of Medical Biosciences
Pathology
Unit for Electron Microscopy
University of Umeå
S-90187 Umeå
Sweden

phone int-46-90-7851541
fax int-46-90-7851215



From daemon Mon Nov 20 03:43:09 2000



From: David Vowles :      djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:37:38 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Edwards E306A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jonathan,

We have two Edwards 306 coaters in our lab. As with all carbon rod based
evaporators you will need to experiment with the spring pressure holding
the rods together. Too much pressure and the rods will glow and not arc
properly (most likely the situation you described) or, too little pressure
and the arc will cease prematurely.
On the 306 coaters the spring pressure is adjusted by lengthening or
shortening the carbon rods - first loosen the clamping collars and slide
the rods through.

Hope this is some help.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 1223 334325
Fax: +44 1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk

On Fri, 17 Nov 2000, Dunlap, Jonathan C. wrote:

} I have walked into a laboratory that has had an Edwards E306A Vacuum Coater
} purchased in 1991. It has been used very rarely since, and by no one
} presently working in the laboratory. The instruction manuals help to pump
} down the system and get it ready for the application, but I have yet to get
} the carbon source deposited on the sample we are trying to coat for SEM
} analysis (I can get the carbon rods glowing, but nothing else happens).



From daemon Mon Nov 20 03:45:38 2000



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:32:38 +0000
Subject: Re: LKB Ultamicrotome III problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Christopher

there are two possibilities that spring to mind:
1. you've probably checked this but if the cutting range is set too high the arm
might not fall far enough to engage the retract mechanism.
2. something in the retract circuit may have blown. It happened once on an LKBI and
the engineer found a blown capacitor. I assume that there must be a fairly big
current activating the electromagnet.

Have you watched the cutting cycle through the binoculars? Does it appear to try to
move at the bottom of the cutting stroke or make a clicking noise? How far below the
mid knife position does the specimen arm travel (it should be several millimetres)?

Good luck

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

christopher wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Good Evening, all:
}
} We have an old LKB Ultramicrotome III (series 8800) that has developed a
} problem in the past few weeks. Apparently the cantilever arm is not going
} down far enough on the cutting stroke to activate the kickback on the knife
} holder, resulting in wet blocks nearly every stroke. Needless to say, this
} is a huge pain in the butt. We're kind of fond of the old machine, so we're
} interested in fixing it.
} My question is: does anyone know if there is an adjustment to change at
} what point the relay for the knife holder kicks in? Or, is there some way
} to get the arm to travel farther down?
} Thanks much!
}
} -Chris
}
} (Sorry....I don't have a fancy title yet...I'm still just a student!)



From daemon Mon Nov 20 05:59:24 2000



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 11:52:18 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TEM stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We used to use 1%KMNO4 in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5 instead
of UA. We stained for 5min. It is supposed to be good for
membranes. We flushed it down the sink.

Dave


On Fri, 17 Nov 2000 10:27:29 -0600 "Awbrey, Donald"
{DonaldAwbrey-at-texashealth.org} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Dear TEM netters,
}
} Is there any other stain reagents, other than UA and LC, that are
} used in TEM? If so, do they have comparable results, are they
} ETOH or water based, what are there disposal precautions, and what
} are their staining protocols.
}
} Any information will be appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
}
}
} Donald G. Awbrey, HT(ASCP) QIHC
} Electron Microscopy / Image Analysis
} DonaldAwbrey-at-TexasHealth.org
} donaldawbrey-at-hotmail.com
} (817)-878-5647
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Mon Nov 20 07:20:17 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 04:59:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Automatic sample processors for EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mareck:

I have responded to these queries before, so here goes again. The unit I
have used for years is the Lynx Tissue Processor (currently available from
EM Sciences). The original unit I purchased (from the manufacturer) was
marvelous. A second unit (purchased when Leica was marketing it) took over
5 years to get it into reliable working condition. My guess is that EMS
will provide a reliable product. The only other unit I know of is sold by
RMC (recently cycled through Ventana and now Boekeler -- Tucson, AZ) that is
an updated version of the old LKB design. I know of very happy users for
this product, but I honestly do not know the current status under the new
owners. I have attempted to get a demo of the RMC device, but RMC never
followed through, and the last incarnations have occurred so quickly that I
still can't provide a personal comparison.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Fri, 17 Nov 2000 00:19:10 -0800, Marek Malecki wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I would appreciate comments and suggestions on automatic sample
processors
} for EM. Vendors welcome.
} Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D.
} Director and Principal Investigator
}
} Molecular Imaging Laboratories
} University of California, San Diego
}
} address: 1500 Suite Bonner Hall, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla,
CA92093-0368
} phone - office: 8588223373
} phone - cell: 8583443347
} fax: 8588223715
} e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
} pager: 8586161420
} e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
} e.pager: 1620024619-at-alphapage.airtouch.com
} www site: http://mil.ucsd.edu/
} ftp site: mil1.ucsd.edu
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Mon Nov 20 07:25:41 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 05:12:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donald:

In addition to the Glauert series, there are the Hayat books (one
specifically on stains, and volume one of the EM series -- both may be out
of print now, but they are all available through interlibrary loan) and any
of the basic biological TEM books also should cover (at least mentioning)
stains other than UrAc and Pb Citrate. Bismuth is the only one I have used,
and it is really a bear to work with. Potassium permanganate has also been
used as have lanthanum, phosphotungstic acid and ruthenium. The Hayat book
is "Stains and Cytochemical Methods", Plenum Press, 1993. The other one is
"Principles and Techniques of Electron Microscopy; Biological Appications,
Volume I". Wiley has a huge volume on EM methods (it is a loose-leaf beast
that comes with updates--or it used to) that includes all of these methods
as well.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Fri, 17 Nov 2000 10:27:29 -0600, Awbrey, Donald wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Dear TEM netters,
}
} Is there any other stain reagents, other than UA and LC, that are
} used in TEM? If so, do they have comparable results, are they
} ETOH or water based, what are there disposal precautions, and what
} are their staining protocols.
}
} Any information will be appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
}
}
} Donald G. Awbrey, HT(ASCP) QIHC
} Electron Microscopy / Image Analysis
} DonaldAwbrey-at-TexasHealth.org
} donaldawbrey-at-hotmail.com
} (817)-878-5647
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Mon Nov 20 07:34:46 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 05:26:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Edwards E306A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jonathan:
Don't feel all alone. I purchased a 306A about 16 years ago when Edwards
was manufacturing and marketing the units. Even then, they didn't seem to
know all that much about the units. I had problems with the main valve, and
got less than no help. I don't think I EVER got a decent coat of carbon out
of the unit. I did manage to melt down a set of carbon rod holders and
burned out a transformer, but it never did provide a decent carbon coat. It
did provide a good metal (read, gold, for SEM) coat, and I had purchased it
because of access to electrodes and the great rotary table provided with it.
However, I eventually went back to the old reliable Denton for everything
but the gold coating, and then managed to get a sputter coater, so the 306A
was left standing, abandoned. Justice at last.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Fri, 17 Nov 2000 14:24:30 -0500, Dunlap, Jonathan C. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello All:
}
} I have walked into a laboratory that has had an Edwards E306A Vacuum
Coater
} purchased in 1991. It has been used very rarely since, and by no one
} presently working in the laboratory. The instruction manuals help to
pump
} down the system and get it ready for the application, but I have yet to
get
} the carbon source deposited on the sample we are trying to coat for SEM
} analysis (I can get the carbon rods glowing, but nothing else happens).
}
} I am wondering if anyone out there has this system and knows how to
operate
} it with the carbon evaporation source. Any help to what I could be doing
} wrong, or not doing at all would be appreciated. Also perhaps if I could
} call someone who has this system and they could walk me though the steps
} would be great.
}
} - Jonathan
}
} (I have contacted the manufacturer and they have not made this coater in
} years so know little about it as well)
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Mon Nov 20 07:51:21 2000



From: Gilles Grondin :      ggrond01-at-courrier.usherb.ca
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 08:39:26 -0500
Subject: Mitochondrial antibodies..

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are looking for antibodies to mitochondrial proteins , for a
immunocytochemical study on the effect of parasites in the development of
youngs birds . Does anyone or company have mitochondrial antibodies ?

Thank you very much .

Gilles Grondin

ggrond01-at-courrier.usherb.ca



From daemon Mon Nov 20 08:35:19 2000



From: Al Coritz :      al-at-boeckeler.com
Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2000 16:59:42 -0700
Subject: Casio digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All:

Beth...I have owned the Casio QV-3000 since April 2000. I think it a
totally awesome for Macro work. A picture is worth a 1000 words...please go
to my online photo album and look for yourself. Some of the pictures have a
reference scale in them.

http://communities.msn.com/CactusCritters

Best,

Al Coritz
Sales & Service Manager
RMC-Boeckeler Instruments
4650 S. Butterfield Dr.
Tucson, AZ 85714
Voice: 520-745-0001
Cell: 520-465-3598
Fax: 520-745-0004
Email:Al-at-Boeckeler.com
Website:RMCProducts.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Beth Richardson [mailto:beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu]
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2000 8:10 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,
We are looking for opinions or reviews on the the Casio QV 3000 digital
camera, with a 340 MB microdrive and macro focusing down to 6 cm.
any help would be greatly appreciated.
thanks,
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************





From daemon Mon Nov 20 08:42:01 2000



From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:36:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Mitochondrial antibodies..

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've used one to mitochondrial hsp70 from Affinity BioReagents that works
well. Their number is: (800) 278-2424. The catalogue number for the
antibody is MA3-028. In our hands it works in human and mouse
cells....never tried it on birds or inverts.

The other option would be to use one of the MitoTracker dyes from
Molecular probes.

No financial interest in either company, unfortunately!

Tamara Howard
CSHL

On Mon, 20 Nov 2000, Gilles Grondin wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We are looking for antibodies to mitochondrial proteins , for a
} immunocytochemical study on the effect of parasites in the development of
} youngs birds . Does anyone or company have mitochondrial antibodies ?
}
} Thank you very much .
}
} Gilles Grondin
}
} ggrond01-at-courrier.usherb.ca
}
}
}




From daemon Mon Nov 20 08:45:12 2000



From: Timothy Schneider :      Timothy.Schneider-at-Mail.TJU.EDU
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:33:34 -0500
Subject: ALTERNATIVE POST STAIN

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is for the person asking about alternative post stains. Instead of
using lead after uranyl acetate I have been very happy with bismuth (I have
been looking at various biological samples embedded in Spurrs).

STOCK SOLUTION: In 10ml of DH2O add 0.2g of NaOh, 400mg of sodium tartrate,
and 200mg of bismuth subnitrate. Shake until dissolved and store up to 2
weeks in the refrigerator.

WORKING SOLUTION: add 20 micro liters of stock to 1ml of DH2O and float the
grids on 50 micro liter drops of this for 5 minutes and rinse with H2O.

Good Luck, Tim

Timothy G. Schneider
Director of Electron Microscopy
Department of Pathology
Room 229 Jefferson Hall
Thomas Jefferson University
1020 Locust St.
Philadelphia Pa. 19107
215-503-4798 work
610-613-8170 cellular
timothy.schneider-at-mail.tju.edu



From daemon Mon Nov 20 08:57:33 2000



From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:51:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Film dryers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Years ago I worked in a lab that had a small forced (and filtered) film
dryer (with heater). It was just large enough to hold two racks of TEM
negatives. I cannot find one in any of the catalogues. I can only find
film dryers for 35 mm roll film. Could anyone please recommend a source
of a similar dryer? (Vendors, please feel free to respond directly to
me).

Thanks,

Don

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718





From daemon Mon Nov 20 09:36:32 2000



From: Kelloes, Cathy L :      KELLOECL-at-bp.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:28:17 -0600
Subject: SEM-Image system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am trying to find out information on a good imaging system(photographic
only) that could be attached to my SEM, which is an older ABT-55. I do not
have the funds to buy a newer microscope, so I would appreciate any input
you all have. The cost of Polaroid film is extremely expensive, so I am
trying to find a system that I could send digital images through the e-mail
and/or print them instead of using this costly film. Thank you in advance.

Cathy Kelloes
Microscopy Technician
bp Fabrics & Fibers Unit
260 The Bluffs
Austell, GA. 30168
(770) 941-1711, Ext. 3255




From daemon Mon Nov 20 09:38:18 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 10:35:34 -0500
Subject: Re: help for a HS student

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Listers,

My friend's son is writing a report on oxytocin and called me to ask if I
had or could find any images of it. Its the typical "call X, s/he is a
scientist" type referal.
Does anyone out there have any images, or does anyone know of a good web
site I can send him to? I assume that polarization optics images of the
crystalized molecule would be pretty, but anything would be more than he
currently has.

Please respond to me off-list, and I will forward the info to him.

TIA,
Lee

Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175




From daemon Mon Nov 20 10:50:31 2000



From: Peggy Sherwood :      sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 11:45:34 -0500
Subject: NESM Annual December Symposium-Dec. 1st

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all:

The 34th Annual NESM (New England Society for Microscopy) Symposium
will be held at the Newton Marriott, Newton, Massachusetts on Friday,
December 1st from Noon to 9:30 pm.

The meeting will consist of 2 sessions.
SESSION I (1-2:30 pm) will focus on Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy.
Speakers will include Barbara Foster-"Bridging the
Microscopy-Spectroscopy Chasm", John Reffner-"Resolving Molecular
Chemistry with FT-IR Microspectroscopy" and Patrick Treado-"Chemical
Imaging: A Powerful Tool for Molecular Microscopy".

A Poster Session/Contest will then run concurrent with the coffee break (2:30-
3:15 pm) (details below).

SESSION II (3:15-4:45 pm) will focus on Genechip Technology. Speakers for that
session will include: Eiman H. Al-Mutari-"The Human Genome Study: cDNA Micro-
arrays and Signal Amplification", Joseph Paulauskis-"Microarray Technologies:
Promise and Problems", and Steven Lott-"Microarray Technology: Changing the
Face of Functional Genomics".

The annual business meeting/election of new officers will convene at 5:00 pm,
followed by a Cocktail Hour (6-7 pm) and dinner (7-8 pm). The after
dinner speaker will be Paul Hlava, MAS Tour Speaker, from Sandia
National Labs whose
talk will be: "Causes of Color in Minerals and Gemstones".

The DEADLINE for advance registration (and dinner reservations) is Friday,
November 24th. Payment must accompany advance registration form if you wish to
have dinner. The choices for dinner are: herbed crusted chicken, swordfish,
and vegetarian (please choose one). Please contact Mary McCann,
Treasurer, at (617) 484-7865 or by email: mccanns-at-tiac.net for
further information. Send registration forms WITH payment to NESM,
c/o Mary McCann, 161 Claflin Street, Belmont, MA 02478.
(Registration will be held at the meeting from 12Noon-1pm, but will
NOT include dinner).

Poster abstracts should be sent to: Christopher Santeufemio,
Biological Director at: 57 Bancroft Street, Pepperell, MA 01463 by
November 24th. Any questions, contact Chris at (978) 433-8031 or by
email: csanteufemio-at-epion.com.
Prizes will be awarded for Best Poster, Second and Third Place.

We hope to see you there at this most interesting meeting!

Peggy Sherwood
Corresponding Secretary, NESM

--
Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu


From daemon Mon Nov 20 13:02:31 2000



From: Paula Sicurello :      patpxs-at-gwumc.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 14:01:54 -0500
Subject: I'm hooked on you...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there my esteemed listers,

I've been asked to do some TEM on hookworms. I've never even seen a hookworm before, let alone do EM on one. I've heard that they're tough customers when it comes to fixation.

Does anybody out there have a protocol that is fairly simple but results in good utlrastructural preservation?

Drop me a line if you do.

I'm sinking without your help.


Paula :-)
patpxs-at-gwumc.edu





From daemon Mon Nov 20 13:23:21 2000



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 14:20:26 -0500
Subject: RE: Film dryers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is a company called California Stainless that made film dryers that
some of the EM supply houses sold. I bought one from them a number of years
ago. Sorry that I don't have the contact info, but I'm sure that this is
just what you want.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
From: Donald Lovett [mailto:lovett-at-tcnj.edu]
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2000 9:51 AM
To: Microscopy.lst
Subject: Film dryers


---------------------------------------------------------------
---------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserv er/FAQ.html



---------------------------------------------------------------
--------.



Years ago I worked in a lab that had a small forced (and filtered) film
dryer (with heater). It was just large enough to hold two racks of TEM
negatives. I cannot find one in any of the catalogues. I can
only find
film dryers for 35 mm roll film. Could anyone please
recommend a source
of a similar dryer? (Vendors, please feel free to respond directly to
me).

Thanks,

Don

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718






From daemon Mon Nov 20 14:42:56 2000



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 20:37:17 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: ALTERNATIVE POST STAIN

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just curious - why do you use bismuth?

Dave


On Mon, 20 Nov 2000 09:33:34 -0500 Timothy Schneider
{Timothy.Schneider-at-Mail.TJU.EDU} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} This is for the person asking about alternative post stains. Instead of
} using lead after uranyl acetate I have been very happy with bismuth (I have
} been looking at various biological samples embedded in Spurrs).
}
} STOCK SOLUTION: In 10ml of DH2O add 0.2g of NaOh, 400mg of sodium tartrate,
} and 200mg of bismuth subnitrate. Shake until dissolved and store up to 2
} weeks in the refrigerator.
}
} WORKING SOLUTION: add 20 micro liters of stock to 1ml of DH2O and float the
} grids on 50 micro liter drops of this for 5 minutes and rinse with H2O.
}
} Good Luck, Tim
}
} Timothy G. Schneider
} Director of Electron Microscopy
} Department of Pathology
} Room 229 Jefferson Hall
} Thomas Jefferson University
} 1020 Locust St.
} Philadelphia Pa. 19107
} 215-503-4798 work
} 610-613-8170 cellular
} timothy.schneider-at-mail.tju.edu
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Mon Nov 20 15:23:41 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 13:14:59 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM-Image system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


See if an active or passive digital control & capture
unit would work on your SEM. Soft Imaging makes
ADDA which does active and passive very nicely.
There are others which do active and some which
only do passive. I prefer active. But if your system
can't be adapted to active, perhaps it will support
passive. If not, maybe active.

Several of the suppliers are on this list. Perhaps they
will contact you. I use ADDA and like it very much.
It is actually more than just SEM image capture.
I use it to capture chamber TV camera video and
SEM TV scan images as well as up to 4096x4096 pixel
active scan SEM image files (TIFF).

gary


At 07:28 AM 11/20/00, you wrote:

} Hi,
}
} I am trying to find out information on a good imaging system(photographic
} only) that could be attached to my SEM, which is an older ABT-55. I do not
} have the funds to buy a newer microscope, so I would appreciate any input
} you all have. The cost of Polaroid film is extremely expensive, so I am
} trying to find a system that I could send digital images through the e-mail
} and/or print them instead of using this costly film. Thank you in advance.
}
} Cathy Kelloes
} Microscopy Technician
} bp Fabrics & Fibers Unit
} 260 The Bluffs
} Austell, GA. 30168
} (770) 941-1711, Ext. 3255



From daemon Mon Nov 20 17:15:27 2000



From: Al Coritz :      al-at-boeckeler.com
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 16:09:59 -0700
Subject: Re: Automatic sample processors for EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Everyone:

The RMC "EMP 5160" EM tissue processor is available through Boeckeler
Instruments as is the entire RMC Instrument catalog. For more information
visit our website: www.rmcproducts.com

Al Coritz
Sales & Service Manager
RMC-Boeckeler Instruments
4650 S. Butterfield Dr.
Tucson, AZ 85714
Voice: 520-745-0001
Cell: 520-465-3598
Fax: 520-745-0004
Email:Al-at-Boeckeler.com
Website:RMCProducts.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Roger Moretz [mailto:rcmoretz-at-excite.com]
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2000 6:00 AM
To: Marek Malecki; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Mareck:

I have responded to these queries before, so here goes again. The unit I
have used for years is the Lynx Tissue Processor (currently available from
EM Sciences). The original unit I purchased (from the manufacturer) was
marvelous. A second unit (purchased when Leica was marketing it) took over
5 years to get it into reliable working condition. My guess is that EMS
will provide a reliable product. The only other unit I know of is sold by
RMC (recently cycled through Ventana and now Boekeler -- Tucson, AZ) that is
an updated version of the old LKB design. I know of very happy users for
this product, but I honestly do not know the current status under the new
owners. I have attempted to get a demo of the RMC device, but RMC never
followed through, and the last incarnations have occurred so quickly that I
still can't provide a personal comparison.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Fri, 17 Nov 2000 00:19:10 -0800, Marek Malecki wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I would appreciate comments and suggestions on automatic sample
processors
} for EM. Vendors welcome.
} Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D.
} Director and Principal Investigator
}
} Molecular Imaging Laboratories
} University of California, San Diego
}
} address: 1500 Suite Bonner Hall, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla,
CA92093-0368
} phone - office: 8588223373
} phone - cell: 8583443347
} fax: 8588223715
} e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
} pager: 8586161420
} e.mail: mmm-at-ucsd.edu
} e.pager: 1620024619-at-alphapage.airtouch.com
} www site: http://mil.ucsd.edu/
} ftp site: mil1.ucsd.edu
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Mon Nov 20 18:19:28 2000



From: Awbrey, Donald :      DonaldAwbrey-at-texashealth.org
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 18:13:25 -0600
Subject: Re:Thanks for info on TEM stains

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear TEM netters,

Thanks again for all of the responses. They were very
informative.

We primarily perform TEM on renal biopsies particularly
the Bowman's capsule and glomerulus. The main ultra-
structure we concentrate on is the basement membranes of
the glomerulus. Less frequently we perform TEM on tumor
tissues. This is done in a clinical setting.

Any other information out there in the "Netter Land" will
be appreciated.

Thanks Again,


Donald G. Awbrey, HT(ASCP) QIHC
Electron Microscopy / Image Analysis
DonaldAwbrey-at-TexasHealth.org
donaldawbrey-at-hotmail.com
(817)-878-5647




From daemon Mon Nov 20 19:02:37 2000



From: Thor Bostrom :      t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 10:56:48 +1100
Subject: Re: SVMicro Digital Microscope Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 16:37 16/11/00 -0500, you wrote:
} Dear Listers,
} Does anyone have an experience that they would like to share involving the
} SVMicro digital camera by Sound Vision? I'm hoping to learn anything at
} all, from delivery, support, service, image quality, product reliability,
} etc. Thanks in advance.
} Bill Roberts


We have an SVMicro attached to a Nikon Labophot-Pol petrographic
microscope, with a Nikon 1x relay lens in the adaptor. We also use it with
a Zeiss Jenaval. Alternatively you can just screw a lens on it and point it
at something (with a tripod, preferably). The camera runs off a SCSI card
in a PC.

Our experience is that the Twain interface software is a little tricky to
use, and it's difficult for new users to get good images until you have
done some tweaking. You usually need to turn the illumination down a bit,
or use a neutral density filter. The colour balance needs to be corrected
-- I use a neutral density filter as the specimen to set the neutral gray
balance -- but a pale blue filter may also work. The images tend to be very
contrasty unless you set the gamma level (the middle triangle on the
intensity histogram) a long way to the left. Adjusting the levels tends to
be very touchy, as compared to say Photoshop. However once you get the
exposure time right you can get very nice RGB images, at a true pixel
resolution of about 1000x800.


Thor Bostrom
Analytical EM Facility
Faculty of Science
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
PO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001
AUSTRALIA



From daemon Tue Nov 21 02:29:00 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-pml.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 08:15:29 +0000
Subject: Re: I'm hooked on you...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Paula

I may have a copy of a paper somewhere which advocated hot fixatives
for nematodes because t worked better than room temp/cold fixatives.
Purely on penetration? Getting through the cuticle? Come back if
you're still desperate - I think it is in my cellar somewhere at
home!

Keith Ryan
PLymouth, UK


From daemon Tue Nov 21 04:25:02 2000



From: Thor Bostrom :      t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 16:42:07 +1100
Subject: Crystallites in glass ceramic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



A colleague here is trying to determine the presence and size of
microcrystallites in a glass ceramic. It is an alkali-lime borosilicate
glass, which appears to be amorphous by XRD. However it has a translucent
appearance which suggests that it may contain microcrystallites or some
other defects, though these are not evident by optical microscopy.

The suggestions so far are: (a) light etching of a polished surface,
followed by examination in a FESEM; or (b) preparation of an ion beam
thinned sample for TEM.

We would welcome any other suggestions. For example, would EBSD work? And
if we tried (a), is there a suitable etchant (dilute HF?) for this material?


With thanks,

Thor Bostrom
Analytical EM Facility
Faculty of Science
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
PO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001
AUSTRALIA
Email: t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Dr Thor Bostrom
Ext. 2351
Analytical EM Facility,
Faculty of Science, QUT
t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=



From daemon Tue Nov 21 06:27:28 2000



From: Johan Hazekamp :      Johan.Hazekamp-at-unilever.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:24:32 +0100
Subject: TEM/SEM: Tracer elements in Lowicryl

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

Does anyone have suggestions how to add a label/element to Lowicryl HM20.
We would like to differentiate/locate the Lowicryl in some porous structures
using EDX.

thanks,

Johan Hazekamp

**************************************************
Johan Hazekamp
Central Analytical Science
Unilever Research Vlaardingen
P.O. Box 114, 3130 AC Vlaardingen
The Netherlands
Tel.: (31) 10-4605530
Fax: (31) 10 4605671
Email: Johan.Hazekamp-at-unilever.com



From daemon Tue Nov 21 08:14:14 2000



From: Ronald Anderson :      anderron-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 08:59:49 -0500
Subject: Crystallites in glass ceramic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



TEM examination is best and would allow identification of the crystallites.
Ion milling silicates is potentially a problem. I'd suggest choosing a
method that doesn't involve much, if any, ion milling, such as cleaving,
crushing, or tripod polishing.

Ron Anderson, IBM, Hopewell Jct., New York, USA. anderron-at-us.ibm.com
IBM Analytical Services; http://www.chips.ibm.com/services/asg


Thor Bostrom {t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au} on 11/21/2000 12:42:07 AM

To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:



A colleague here is trying to determine the presence and size of
microcrystallites in a glass ceramic. It is an alkali-lime borosilicate
glass, which appears to be amorphous by XRD. However it has a translucent
appearance which suggests that it may contain microcrystallites or some
other defects, though these are not evident by optical microscopy.

The suggestions so far are: (a) light etching of a polished surface,
followed by examination in a FESEM; or (b) preparation of an ion beam
thinned sample for TEM.

We would welcome any other suggestions. For example, would EBSD work? And
if we tried (a), is there a suitable etchant (dilute HF?) for this
material?


With thanks,

Thor Bostrom
Analytical EM Facility
Faculty of Science
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
PO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001
AUSTRALIA
Email: t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Dr Thor Bostrom
Ext. 2351
Analytical EM Facility,
Faculty of Science, QUT
t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=







From daemon Tue Nov 21 08:22:43 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 08:14:25 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM/SEM: Tracer elements in Lowicryl

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the early 1980s, we followed someone's suggestion to dissolve Iodoform
in epoxy resin to raise its average atomic number to provide contrast with
coal particles. It also provided elemental contrast.

It worked with epoxy; it setup just fine. But I am not sure how it would
work Lowicryl. It does list a number of precautions listed on the MSDS.

At 11:24 AM 11/21/2000 +0100, you wrote:

} Dear All,
}
} Does anyone have suggestions how to add a label/element to Lowicryl HM20.
} We would like to differentiate/locate the Lowicryl in some porous structures
} using EDX.
}
} thanks,
}
} Johan Hazekamp
}
} **************************************************
} Johan Hazekamp
} Central Analytical Science
} Unilever Research Vlaardingen
} P.O. Box 114, 3130 AC Vlaardingen
} The Netherlands
} Tel.: (31) 10-4605530
} Fax: (31) 10 4605671
} Email: Johan.Hazekamp-at-unilever.com
}



From daemon Tue Nov 21 08:24:25 2000



From: dzhao :      dzhao-at-biol.sc.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 09:34:31 -0500
Subject: Re: Crystallites in glass ceramic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Johan
Polysciences http://www.polysciences.com/ list barium
methacrylate, lead methacrylate and lead acrylate, all of which can
be used to impart x-ray / electron opacity to acrylic polymers. I
don't know how you would formulate Lowicryl to take advantage of
this, but it looks like a possible starting point. I would be very
interested to know of specific formulations for using these
compounds in EM grade embedding, because I have a related
application.

Best wishes
Chris

Date sent: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:24:32 +0100
} From: "Johan Hazekamp" {Johan.Hazekamp-at-unilever.com}


Microcrystallites can be identified using back scattered electron image on
a polished surface of the sample. If the microcrystallites are big enough,
e.g., a few microns or larger, its chemical composition can be determined
on a polished surface using electron microprobe. In some cases, the shapes
and chemical composition of the phase will be enough to determine whether
the phase is crystalline.

At 04:42 PM 11/21/00 +1100, Thor Bostrom wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Nov 21 09:43:42 2000



From: Kelloes, Cathy L :      KELLOECL-at-bp.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 09:31:34 -0600
Subject: SEM Image System-Thank You

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To everyone who sent me information on SEM image systems, I want to tell you
how much I appreciate it. I have received so many good suggestions and
references that I now will be able to make a more knowledgeable decision.
Once again, thank you so much.

Cathy Kelloes
Microscopy Technician
bp Fabrics & Fibers Unit
260 The Bluffs
Austell, GA. 30168
(770) 941-1711, Ext. 3255




From daemon Tue Nov 21 09:51:48 2000



From: Stephen Wood :      stephenwood-at-meridiansci.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 10:50:18 -0500
Subject: Zeiss EM109 Specimen Holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All

I was wondering if anyone can help me find a tiltable and rotatable specimen
cartridge for a Zeiss EM 109 TEM.
Vendors quite welcome!

Thanks very much for your help

Kindest Regards


Stephen Wood
Meridian Scientific Services Inc.
Ottawa Canada
Tel: 613-836-6749
Fax: 613-836-5880
e-Fax:413-460-3007
e-mail: stephenwood-at-meridiansci.com
web site: http://meridiansci.com/






From daemon Tue Nov 21 12:08:29 2000



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:59:23 -0600
Subject: effect of pH on osmication??

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Any one have a reference on the effect of pH on the osmication
reaction? My attempts at a literature search on this topic have not
been much success. Happy Thanksgiving.

--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Tue Nov 21 12:11:46 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 10:07:10 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM-Image system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Cathy,
You may find that Quartz PCI, sold by Hitachi Instruments, is most suitable
for passively capturing images from an older SEM. You get an image that is
very close to the Poaroid image, stored on the computer in your choice of 18
different formats. Visit them at: www.quartzimaging.com.
At 09:28 AM 11/20/00 -0600, you wrote:
}
} Hi,
}
} I am trying to find out information on a good imaging system(photographic
} only) that could be attached to my SEM, which is an older ABT-55. I do not
} have the funds to buy a newer microscope, so I would appreciate any input
} you all have. The cost of Polaroid film is extremely expensive, so I am
} trying to find a system that I could send digital images through the e-mail
} and/or print them instead of using this costly film. Thank you in advance.
}
} Cathy Kelloes
} Microscopy Technician
} bp Fabrics & Fibers Unit
} 260 The Bluffs
} Austell, GA. 30168
} (770) 941-1711, Ext. 3255

Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Nov 21 12:24:39 2000



From: Adriana Pinheiro Martinelli Rodriguez :      adriana-at-cena.usp.br
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 16:19:45 -300
Subject: Hello from Brazil...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Cathy:

I saw your messages in the microscopy list and was so happy to "hear" from you. I don't know if you'll remember me, I used to be a student at the Hort Department with Dr. Hazel Wetzstein and took both EM courses at the EM center in Athens.

I'm back in Brazil since 1994 and I've been back to Athens a few times after that. I visited most of the people I've known and missed seeing you there. I knew you're in Atlanta from Dr. Farmer.

How are things going with you? Do you still have horses? I see you are still working with EM, which is good!

Well, whenever you have a chance, let me know how things are going. I'm going to the US in December January and will spend some time in Athens and also will visit some friends in Atlanta. Maybe I'll have a chance to meet you again.

Take care, regards,

Adriana

Adriana P. M. Rodriguez
Laboratório de Biotecnologia Vegetal
CENA, Universidade de São Paulo
adriana-at-cena.usp.br




From daemon Tue Nov 21 13:25:06 2000



From: OCONNELL-at-ltu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 14:19:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Sem: Need manuals for an ISI-SS40

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Being new to this system, I don't know how this is going to work.
However, I purchased an ISI-SS40 a few year ago, but I did't get
any manuals with it. It appears to work ok, but there are a lot
of questions. If anynoe



Knows where I can get manuals for this
particular instrument I would greatly appreciate hearing from you.
You may e-mail me at oconnell-at-ltu.edu or call 734-668-3309and I
will get back with you.

Thank You

Dick O'Connell


From daemon Tue Nov 21 13:47:31 2000



From: Russell E. Cook :      recook-at-anl.gov
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 13:45:09 -0600
Subject: Re: Crystallites in glass ceramic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I don't see how examination in a FESEM will be helpful.
I doubt that EBSD will work because of the volume required to produce a
pattern.
I think that TEM is the only way to get the information.
..Russ Cook
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} A colleague here is trying to determine the presence and size of
} microcrystallites in a glass ceramic. It is an alkali-lime borosilicate
} glass, which appears to be amorphous by XRD. However it has a translucent
} appearance which suggests that it may contain microcrystallites or some
} other defects, though these are not evident by optical microscopy.
}
} The suggestions so far are: (a) light etching of a polished surface,
} followed by examination in a FESEM; or (b) preparation of an ion beam
} thinned sample for TEM.
}
} We would welcome any other suggestions. For example, would EBSD work? And
} if we tried (a), is there a suitable etchant (dilute HF?) for this material?
}
}
} With thanks,
}
} Thor Bostrom
} Analytical EM Facility
} Faculty of Science
} Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
} PO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001
} AUSTRALIA
} Email: t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
}
} =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
} Dr Thor Bostrom
} Ext. 2351
} Analytical EM Facility,
} Faculty of Science, QUT
} t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------


----------------------------------------------------------------------
Russell E. Cook, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Center
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division, Building 212
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439-4838
(630)252-7194
FAX: (630)252-4289
recook-at-anl.gov




From daemon Tue Nov 21 14:06:33 2000



From: treese :      treese-at-marinebio.mbl.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 15:08:22 -0800
Subject: Gatan rotation/tilt holder for Philips CM120 needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We need another specimen holder for a Philips /FEI CM 120. Gatan
made a perfect holder with ±60 tilt & 360° of rotation. I am not
looking for a cryoholder. Hope someone has one of these Gatan gems
on their shelf that they would like to sell to us. thanks...Tom
Reese, NIH


From daemon Tue Nov 21 14:11:02 2000



From: A.G.Cullis :      A.G.Cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 20:08:17 -0000
Subject: MSMXII Conference: Final Call for Papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Royal Microscopical Society

12th International Conference on

MICROSCOPY OF SEMICONDUCTING MATERIALS

25-29 March 2001, University of Oxford, UK

************************************************
Final Call for Papers
************************************************

This international conference will focus on the latest developments
in the study of the structural and electrical properties of
semiconductors by the application of transmission and scanning
electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and X-ray
techniques.

The state-of-the-art in all important subject areas will be
addressed, including the characterisation of bulk and thin film
as-grown materials, the study of lattice defect and impurity
behaviour and the investigation of advanced semiconductor
processing procedures.

Special conference sessions will concentrate on recent
developments in high-resolution imaging and analytical electron
microscopy, advances in SEM and SPM applications, the
characteristics of epitaxial layers (including III-V nitrides),
quantum wells, wires and dots, the effects of device processing
treatments (including, especially, advanced silicon technology) and
metal-semiconductor contacts and silicides. Prominent invited
speakers will introduce each topic area.

The Proceedings of the conference will be published and the final
call for papers has now been issued. Abstracts (deadline 1
DECEMBER 2000) should be submitted by E-mail to:
jenny-at-rms.org.uk

Full conference information (with the invited speaker listing, etc)
can be found at the conference Web site
http://www.rms.org.uk/currentevents2.htm#MSMXII

The conference Chairmen are Prof Tony Cullis
(a.g.cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk) and Dr John Hutchison
(john.hutchison-at-materials.ox.ac.uk) who may be contacted with
any general enquiries.

************************************************


From daemon Tue Nov 21 14:16:09 2000



From: A.G.Cullis :      A.G.Cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 20:13:51 -0000
Subject: MSMXII Conference: Final Call for Papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Royal Microscopical Society

12th International Conference on

MICROSCOPY OF SEMICONDUCTING MATERIALS

25-29 March 2001, University of Oxford, UK

************************************************
Final Call for Papers
************************************************

This international conference will focus on the latest developments
in the study of the structural and electrical properties of
semiconductors by the application of transmission and scanning
electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and X-ray
techniques.

The state-of-the-art in all important subject areas will be
addressed, including the characterisation of bulk and thin film
as-grown materials, the study of lattice defect and impurity
behaviour and the investigation of advanced semiconductor
processing procedures.

Special conference sessions will concentrate on recent
developments in high-resolution imaging and analytical electron
microscopy, advances in SEM and SPM applications, the
characteristics of epitaxial layers (including III-V nitrides),
quantum wells, wires and dots, the effects of device processing
treatments (including, especially, advanced silicon technology) and
metal-semiconductor contacts and silicides. Prominent invited
speakers will introduce each topic area.

The Proceedings of the conference will be published and the final
call for papers has now been issued. Abstracts (deadline 1
DECEMBER 2000) should be submitted by E-mail to:
jenny-at-rms.org.uk

Full conference information (with the invited speaker listing, etc)
can be found at the conference Web site
http://www.rms.org.uk/currentevents2.htm#MSMXII

The conference Chairmen are Prof Tony Cullis
(a.g.cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk) and Dr John Hutchison
(john.hutchison-at-materials.ox.ac.uk) who may be contacted with
any general enquiries.

************************************************


From daemon Tue Nov 21 16:22:29 2000



From: Michael Coviello :      coviello-at-mae.uta.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 16:26:10 -0600
Subject: TEM-looking for a annealing holder that fits a JEOL 100CX/200CX/1200EX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Y'all:
We're looking to buy or trade for an annealing holder for a
100CX/200CX/1200 EX TEM's (fits all of these and probably others). We
hope someone has one that they haven't used in years and would like to
get some money out of it Please let us know.
Regards,
Mike Coviello
Lab Manager
UT Arlington
817 272-5496



From daemon Tue Nov 21 17:59:48 2000



From: Awbrey, Donald :      DonaldAwbrey-at-texashealth.org
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 17:53:38 -0600
Subject: TEM: Carboy's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear TEM Netters:

Does anyone have information about a supplier of amber
colored carboy containers. We need these carboys to be
about 1-2 gallon in size. They need to made of a plastic
polymer that is resistant to hazardous chemicals. They are
to be used to store stock film processing fluids. Any info
would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.


Donald G. Awbrey, HT(ASCP) QIHC
Electron Microscopy / Image Analysis
DonaldAwbrey-at-TexasHealth.org
donaldawbrey-at-hotmail.com
(817)-878-5647




From daemon Wed Nov 22 00:54:23 2000



From: COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 01:43:20 EST
Subject: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope before?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ahoy fellow enthusiasts!
Has anyone out there used a comparison microscope before?
I got a bridge unit and dropped it on top of 2 AO 10 scopes, there seems to
me a knob on the front that does nothing. I get one scope in once side of
the field and the image from the other scope on the other side.....

I suspect the knob makes them overlap (like we have seen on the police
shows but it does not seem to move the image.
when they compare bullets...)

any input?

thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC





From daemon Wed Nov 22 07:05:20 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 04:53:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: effect of pH on osmication??

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tom:

The original volume of Hayat's Principles & Techniques of Electron
Microscopy (vol. 1), now long out of print, discusses this in chapter 1. He
references a paper by Trump and Ericsson (Lab Invest 14:1245, 1965) as a
primary reference. In fact, if you were to review Ben Trump's literature,
you would find a wealth of information on the role of pH, osmolarity,
fixative concentrations and types, etc. Most of this has been summarized by
Hayat in various volumes and in the Glauert series. A quick on-line search
at PubMed will give you enough references to bury you! However, using
interlibrary loan you should be able to at least get the Glauert series,
altho' I think that precious few libraries (including most EM labs) have the
Hayat books. Although I can't lay my hands on a lot of books right now, I
would also have thought that any basic book on TEM would cover your
question, so if you have access to any of the recent books, check out the
chapter on fixatives and fixation.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept. of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals

On Tue, 21 Nov 2000 11:59:23 -0600, Tom Phillips wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Any one have a reference on the effect of pH on the osmication
} reaction? My attempts at a literature search on this topic have not
} been much success. Happy Thanksgiving.
}
} --
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Wed Nov 22 08:20:32 2000



From: Bemporad, Edoardo :      e.bemporad-at-materials10.dimi.uniroma3.it
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 08:09:34 -0600
Subject: TEM glueing samples; selective solvants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi everybody,
hope someone can help me:
I need to stick each other two pieces of coated metallic samples to make a
XTEM observation; then I need to stick them (already together bonded!) on
the lapping tool in order to thin them. I have tried to use superglue
(cyanoacrylic glue) for the first operation and thermoplastic glue for the
second. Unfortunately I haven't found nothing to dissolve the thermoplastic
but the superglue.


Does anyone can suggest me two different glue that can be suitable and can
be dissolved selectively?


Thank you in advance, Edoardo.



Dr. Eng. Edoardo Bemporad, Ph. D.
Assistant Professor of Materials Science
University of Rome "Roma Tre" (Italy)
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Industriale
(Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering)
Via Vasca Navale 79 - 00146 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 06 5517.3293
Fax: +39 06 5517.3256
LIME Lab Tel: +39 06 5517.3200
LIME Web Site: http//materials.dimi.uniroma3.it/lime
E-Mail:bemporad-at-uniroma3.it






From daemon Wed Nov 22 10:10:45 2000



From: john david whitaker :      jwhitake-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 08:05:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM glueing samples; selective solvants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I do XTEM of metal films, and have found Gatan's G-1 epoxy
to be effective in creating the "sandwich". I use crystal
bond low-melting wax to bond the sandwich to the polishing
stub for thinning. The former is resistant to most solvents;
the latter dissolves readily in acetone.

I also hear that M-bond 610 adhesive is good for gluing the
halves of the sandwich together, though I have not tried
this brand.

Good luck!

John




From daemon Wed Nov 22 10:28:19 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 11:25:34 -0500
Subject: TEM glueing samples; selective solvants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Edoardo:

The material you should use to stick the pieces together is Epotek 353ND
which is produced by Epoxy Technology. You can find information on the
product on their website at www.epotek.com/optical.html. Their distributor
in Italy is:

Anna Giallo
Kontek Comatel S.P.A.
Via Rio Vallone #5
20050 Mezzago. Milan
Italy

Tel: 39 039 6883300
Fax: 39 039 6883210
Email: kontek-at-cemb.it
http://www.kontek-comatel.com

The acetone soluble wax that you can use it our QuickStick 135. This comes
in a package with 20 small sticks and is ideal for this application. I
hope this helps!

Best regards-

David
Writing at 9:09:28 AM on 11/22/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by "Bemporad, Edoardo"
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




Hi everybody,
hope someone can help me:
I need to stick each other two pieces of coated metallic samples to make a
XTEM observation; then I need to stick them (already together bonded!) on
the lapping tool in order to thin them. I have tried to use superglue
(cyanoacrylic glue) for the first operation and thermoplastic glue for the
second. Unfortunately I haven't found nothing to dissolve the thermoplastic
but the superglue.


Does anyone can suggest me two different glue that can be suitable and can
be dissolved selectively?


Thank you in advance, Edoardo.



Dr. Eng. Edoardo Bemporad, Ph. D.
Assistant Professor of Materials Science
University of Rome "Roma Tre" (Italy)
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Industriale
(Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering)
Via Vasca Navale 79 - 00146 Rome, Italy
Tel: +39 06 5517.3293
Fax: +39 06 5517.3256
LIME Lab Tel: +39 06 5517.3200
LIME Web Site: http//materials.dimi.uniroma3.it/lime
E-Mail:bemporad-at-uniroma3.it



{


From daemon Wed Nov 22 10:44:01 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 08:40:51 -0800
Subject: Re: Crystallites in glass ceramic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Thor,
EBSP might work, if the micro-crystallites are larger than the e-beam size.
The specimen preparation is the same as for rocks for EBSP: polish down to
0.01 micron or Syton (colloidal silica) level. Best to ask someone who has
done it. Try the web sites of HKL (www.channel.dk) or TSL.
At 04:42 PM 11/21/00 +1100, you wrote:
}
} A colleague here is trying to determine the presence and size of
} microcrystallites in a glass ceramic. It is an alkali-lime borosilicate
} glass, which appears to be amorphous by XRD. However it has a translucent
} appearance which suggests that it may contain microcrystallites or some
} other defects, though these are not evident by optical microscopy.
}
} The suggestions so far are: (a) light etching of a polished surface,
} followed by examination in a FESEM; or (b) preparation of an ion beam
} thinned sample for TEM.
}
} We would welcome any other suggestions. For example, would EBSD work? And
} if we tried (a), is there a suitable etchant (dilute HF?) for this material?
}
}
} With thanks,
}
} Thor Bostrom

Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Nov 22 10:56:33 2000



From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 16:53:46 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Radiography and acoustic microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,
I am looking at real-time X-ray radiography systems and scanning acoustic microscopes for evaluation of solder bonds in optoelectronic packages. If anyone knows of suppliers of such systems - or even better has one they like (or don't), I would really like to hear from you. This includes manufacturers too - I'm not sure I have a comprehensive list yet.

Many thanks indeed,

Richard

==============================================================
Richard Beanland,
Structural Analysis Lab,
Caswell Technology,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ

e-mail richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Tel. +44 1327 356363
Fax. +44 1327 356398
==============================================================
"The information contained in this message is legally privileged and confidential information intended for the eyes of the individual or entity named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please notify us immediately by telephone.
Caswell Technology is the trading name of Marconi Caswell Limited. Registered in London No. 3694360 Registered Office: One Bruton Street London W1X 8AQ. Holding Company: Marconi plc."






From daemon Wed Nov 22 11:35:03 2000



From: James Roberts :      James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 09:29:45 -0800
Subject: Re: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It depends on who's bridge you have. The two most common are the Leitz and the AO design. An AO type would say AO, Reichart or Leica on the manufactures logo depending on how new or old it is. Cambidge decided to use the Leica name on both once they owned both designs so the Leitz could also say Leica. There are other designs but these two make up probably more than 90% of all comparison bridges. I haven't worked with any of the others in over 20 years and then only a bit.

The knob in the center of the front makes it sound more likely to be an AO type. If it is, that knob should move the center prism set so that with it turned fully clock-wise you would see all of the left scope and turned fully counter-clock-wise you would see all of the right scope. With the knob centered you would see half of each field. In some other position you would see a smaller part of one field and a larger part of the other. If it is an AO style bridge it sounds to me as if the rack and gear might be damaged so the prism is not moving. The thin dividing line you see between the two fields should move as you turn the knob to give you a smaller percentage of one field and a larger percentage of the other. This lets us compare the pattern of stria over a length of the toolmark, a bullet comparison is a type of toolmark comparison. Side by side comparison is much more useful in Firearm and toolmark comparison than overlapping fields are.

If it is a Leitz design some do not let you move the dividing line off center but have other knobs that overlap the two fields or let you view just one. These bench top Leitz bridges don't have a knob in the center of the front so this probably isn't what you have.

In modern bridges the bridges that attach to separate scopes are designed for hair and fiber comparisons and the like. Bullet ("Universal Forensic") scopes have the objectives attached into the bridges in scopes that have been built since well before I entered the field over a 1/4 century ago. They are designed for much lower power and much longer working distances. The bridges for hair and fiber comparison scopes (yes they can be used for all manor of comparison but in forensic science labs that is their primary job and the way they are usually refereed to) are quite similar to bullet scope bridge designs but are designed to be attached to separate scopes that are basically conventional compound microscopes with sub-stage lighting.

If you tell me more about the bridge you are trying to use I may be able to tell you more that can help you set it up and see if it is working properly. AO then Reichart and now Leica have always said that users should not open up bridges to try repairs, as prism alignment is critical and easily disturbed. Rebuilds are available basically only at the factory, no one else has the alignment equipment to do it right. When other places have told me they could rebuild one I found that their version of a rebuild amounted to a real good cleaning job not prism replacement or realignment. If you do have an AO type and the knob is not moving the rack the center prism is on you may need such a rebuild. I did have a knob set screw come loose on an old one quite a number of years ago. I got away with going inside and tightening it up but I would not recommend it to anyone else as these are expensive pieces of equipment and rebuilds are several thousand dollars (around 12K to 15K last time I checked several years ago).

Jim


James L. Roberts
Firearm and Toolmark Examiner
Ventura Co. Sheriff's Lab
(805) 654-2308
James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us

} } } {"COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} 11/21/00 10:43PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Ahoy fellow enthusiasts!
Has anyone out there used a comparison microscope before?
I got a bridge unit and dropped it on top of 2 AO 10 scopes, there seems to
me a knob on the front that does nothing. I get one scope in once side of
the field and the image from the other scope on the other side.....

I suspect the knob makes them overlap (like we have seen on the police
shows but it does not seem to move the image.
when they compare bullets...)

any input?

thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC








From daemon Wed Nov 22 11:52:39 2000



From: James Roberts :      James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 09:48:38 -0800
Subject: Re: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Well I guess I should read the subject line as well as the body of the note and I would have seen that it was an AO bridge. Sorry for the info on the Leitz design. As indicated in my earlier message the knob should move the prism set so that you see part of one field and part of the other and what percentage of each is determined by the position of the knob. In the AO they do not "overlap."

If the knob is not moving the prism set you may have a loose set screw or you may need a bridge rebuild. Again I would not recommend going into the bridge yourself as alignment of the left, right and center prism is critical.
Jim

James L. Roberts
Firearm and Toolmark Examiner
Ventura Co. Sheriff's Lab
(805) 654-2308
James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us

} } } {"COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} 11/21/00 10:43PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Ahoy fellow enthusiasts!
Has anyone out there used a comparison microscope before?
I got a bridge unit and dropped it on top of 2 AO 10 scopes, there seems to
me a knob on the front that does nothing. I get one scope in once side of
the field and the image from the other scope on the other side.....

I suspect the knob makes them overlap (like we have seen on the police
shows but it does not seem to move the image.
when they compare bullets...)

any input?

thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC









From daemon Wed Nov 22 13:03:16 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 16:24:58 -0800
Subject: SEM resolution calibration methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mary,

I have been waiting for a response from your technical support concerning
mapping . Can you have them call me.

Thank you
Larry Howard




} From: "Mary Mager" {mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca}
To: "Kelloes, Cathy L" {KELLOECL-at-bp.com}
Cc: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2000 1:07 PM


NIST used to offer a SEM calibration standard SRM-2069.
I don't see this any longer. If one needs to calibrate or
qualify a SEM's resolution at 250A or better, what is
an appropriate method?

I've used Au on C "standards" but these are more
qualitative than quantitative. The question is how to
make a quantitative measurement of SEM resolution?

Vendor responses are welcome.

Thanks,
gary g.



From daemon Wed Nov 22 19:22:36 2000



From: Dave Audette :      deaudette-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 17:17:13 -0800 (PST)
Subject: UNIX based EDS system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


List Members,

Earlier this month I requested information to help
network an EDS system, which is a UNIX based system
and operates on a Sun Sparc Station 5 with SunOS 5.3.
I really appreciate all the info people have sent me
and I wanted to let you know that the system has been
placed on the network (TCPIP). The local IT people
suggested I use an outside expert, so we did arrange
for an ex-Sun employee to come in and do the job. It
did take, as one suggested, 15 minutes to place the
Sun on the network, but it did take another hour to
(re)write some missing files (not his exact words),
which allows someone on the pc network (me) to be able
to ftp or take files from the Sun and bring to the pc
environment. It was worth the work as we don't have
to scan in the data for our reports etc. So the
process does work and is pretty simple, but later I
may explore some of the Windows programs suggested to
facilitate these file transfers in a drag and drop
style.

Thanks again,

Dave Audette
david.audette-at-sylvania.com


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Shopping - Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products.
http://shopping.yahoo.com/


From daemon Wed Nov 22 20:34:08 2000



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 18:29:26 -0800
Subject: Re: Does Mary Mager work for Quartz PCI or University of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Looking at her return address:

mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca

suggests to me that she is with the University of British Columbia,
Canada and not part of Quartz/Hitachi. Are you having trouble
with her or Quartz/Hitachi?

gary g.


At 10:58 AM 11/22/00, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Nov 23 03:41:16 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 09:27:52 -0000
Subject: Re: SEM resolution calibration methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary
I agree with you that an objective test is hard to come by and that
an industry-standard approach is lacking. I make the following
observations, for what they're worth:

There is no straightforward way of making a specimen that tests the
resolution of all SEMs, under all operating conditions and for all
specimen types. Gold on carbon is the best choice if that is what
you look at for a living. If you look at fine carbon structures on
carbon it's a poor test of practical resolution, although it may
indicate the general health of the instrument.

Makers differ in their approaches to resolution testing. Most employ
gold on carbon, but sometimes gold on magnetic tape or dendritic
crystalline gold or silver is preferred. Some measure the smallest
particles visible, others measure the smallest gaps between larger
particles. One practical difficulty in the former approach is that the
particles need to be most abundant in a size range close to the
dimensions you want to test for. SEM resolutions span at least an
order of magnitude from {0.5nm for in-lens fegsem to } 5nm for
tungsten sem, making production of a single universal specimen
difficult. At the limits of FEGSEM resolution, ~1nm, suitably small
gold particles on carbon or mag tape can be as rare as hen's teeth.
Another issue is that at the limit of an instrument's resolution the
image of a small particle has a bell-shaped gaussian distribution of
signal, fading imperceptibly into the background. The problem here
is to determine where the edges of the feature are located. Pixel
size is relevant here. If the feature is only two or three pixels wide,
typical of a x100k image at 1kx1k pixels, then pixel size has a
dominant effect on the measured size increments - ten pixels wide
or more begins to yield an approximation to continuous data, so the
image size must be large or the magnification high. The standard
test of resolution in microanalysis, where peaks are again
approximately normal curves, is to measure peak width at half
height, and one can approximate this approach in measuring a gold
particle by expanding the image contrast until local background is 0
and max signal is 255, setting the threshold to 127 and measuring
mean feret diameter of the feature. I think you'll find that if you
apply this type of criterion you will get a more conservative estimate
of resolution than is claimed by the manufacturer.

A variant of gold on carbon which we have tried is to deposit 1
nanometre gold colloid onto formvar/carbon, with 10nm gold to
provide something to focus on. This is a specimen that can be
characterised by TEM before examination in the SEM, so you can
determine what the actual particle size distribution is (difficult to do
that with gold on mag tape). FEGSEMs can "see" the 1nm gold
particles because there is strong signal against low background, but
as in light microscopy, where 25nm colloidal gold is readily seen
under reflected illumination, may image them to a larger diameter.
This larger diameter, measured using peak width at half height, thus
constitutes an estimate of instrument resolving power. Another
approach in principle (harder in practice) is to create perfectly
square, perfectly nanometre-sharp square edges in a perfectly
smooth surface of the element of your choice - silicon e.g., or a
layer of another element deposited thereon - and to measure the
peak width at half height of the edge transition.

Finally, theoretically it is possiible objectively to determine the
limiting dimensions recorded in any image by looking at its fourier
power spectrum. Biomolecular structure people regularly report
such data for TEM images, so presumably the technology is
availalble. Any observations on where, how, and the limitations of
applying it to sem resolution measurment would be gratefully
received.

Best wishes
Chris

} NIST used to offer a SEM calibration standard SRM-2069.
} I don't see this any longer. If one needs to calibrate or
} qualify a SEM's resolution at 250A or better, what is
} an appropriate method?
}
} I've used Au on C "standards" but these are more
} qualitative than quantitative. The question is how to
} make a quantitative measurement of SEM resolution?
}
} Vendor responses are welcome.
}
} Thanks,
} gary g.
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Thu Nov 23 03:41:16 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 09:23:57 -0000
Subject: Re: SEM resolution calibration methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary
I agree with you that an objective test is hard to come by and that
an industry-standard approach is lacking. I make the following
observations, for what they're worth:

There is no straightforward way of making a specimen that tests the
resolution of all SEMs, under all operating conditions and for all
specimen types. Gold on carbon is the best choice if that is what
you look at for a living. If you look at fine carbon structures on
carbon it's a poor test of practical resolution, although it may
indicate the general health of the instrument.

Makers differ in their approaches to resolution testing. Most employ
gold on carbon, but sometimes gold on magnetic tape or dendritic
crystalline gold or silver is preferred. Some measure the smallest
particles visible, others measure the smallest gaps between larger
particles. One practical difficulty in the former approach is that the
particles need to be most abundant in a size range close to the
dimensions you want to test for. SEM resolutions span at least an
order of magnitude from {0.5nm for in-lens fegsem to } 5nm for
tungsten sem, making production of a single universal specimen
difficult. At the limits of FEGSEM resolution, ~1nm, suitably small
gold particles on carbon or mag tape can be as rare as hen's teeth.
Another issue is that at the limit of an instrument's resolution the
image of a small particle has a bell-shaped gaussian distribution of
signal, fading imperceptibly into the background. The problem here
is to determine where the edges of the feature are located. Pixel
size is relevant here. If the feature is only two or three pixels wide,
typical of a x100k image at 1kx1k pixels, then pixel size has a
dominant effect on the measured size increments - ten pixels wide
or more begins to yield an approximation to continuous data, so the
image size must be large or the magnification high. The standard
test of resolution in microanalysis, where peaks are again
approximately normal curves, is to measure peak width at half
height, and one can approximate this approach in measuring a gold
particle by expanding the image contrast until local background is 0
and max signal is 255, setting the threshold to 127 and measuring
mean feret diameter of the feature. I think you'll find that if you
apply this type of criterion you will get a more conservative estimate
of resolution than is claimed by the manufacturer.

A variant of gold on carbon which we have tried is to deposit 1
nanometre gold colloid onto formvar/carbon, with 10nm gold to
provide something to focus on. This is a specimen that can be
characterised by TEM before examination in the SEM, so you can
determine what the actual particle size distribution is (difficult to do
that with gold on mag tape). FEGSEMs can "see" the 1nm gold
particles because there is strong signal against low background, but
as in light microscopy, where 25nm colloidal gold is readily seen
under reflected illumination, may image them to a larger diameter.
This larger diameter, measured using peak width at half height, thus
constitutes an estimate of instrument resolving power. Another
approach in principle (harder in practice) is to create perfectly
square, perfectly nanometre-sharp square edges in a perfectly
smooth surface of the element of your choice - silicon e.g., or a
layer of another element deposited thereon - and to measure the
peak width at half height of the edge transition.

Finally, theoretically it is possiible objectively to determine the
limiting dimensions recorded in any image by looking at its fourier
power spectrum. Biomolecular structure people regularly report
such data for TEM images, so presumably the technology is
availalble. Any observations on where, how, and the limitations of
applying it to sem resolution measurment would be gratefully
received.

Best wishes
Chris

} NIST used to offer a SEM calibration standard SRM-2069.
} I don't see this any longer. If one needs to calibrate or
} qualify a SEM's resolution at 250A or better, what is
} an appropriate method?
}
} I've used Au on C "standards" but these are more
} qualitative than quantitative. The question is how to
} make a quantitative measurement of SEM resolution?
}
} Vendor responses are welcome.
}
} Thanks,
} gary g.
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Thu Nov 23 03:43:33 2000



From: Aviles, Phil :      paviles-at-dps.state.nm.us
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 16:53:48 -0700
Subject: RE: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope before?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The knob on the front will not affect the image, just move across the field
to expose a portion or all of either the right or left image. This is used
in searching the surface areas of bullets or tool marks in forensic
comparisons. You're doing it right so far. Have fun.

Phil Aviles
Forensic Microanalyst

} -----Original Message-----
} From: "COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} [SMTP:"COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, November 21, 2000 11:43 PM
} To: MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope
} before?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Ahoy fellow enthusiasts!
} Has anyone out there used a comparison microscope before?
} I got a bridge unit and dropped it on top of 2 AO 10 scopes, there seems
} to
} me a knob on the front that does nothing. I get one scope in once side of
} the field and the image from the other scope on the other side.....
}
} I suspect the knob makes them overlap (like we have seen on the police
} shows but it does not seem to move the image.
} when they compare bullets...)
}
} any input?
}
} thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Nov 23 07:10:25 2000



From: Richard M Langford :      richard.langford-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 13:03:30 -0000
Subject: FIB User List

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

A discussion list has been set up for focused ion beam users.

The subscribing /archive page is at:

http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/FIB-USERS.html

Regards

Richard

--------------------------------------------------------------
Richard M Langford

Department of Materials, University of Oxford
Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK

Tel: +44 (0)1865 273734, Fax: +44 (0)1865 273789
email: richard.langford-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk




From daemon Thu Nov 23 11:00:28 2000



From: Lhconsulting-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 11:50:51 EST
Subject: Re: Does Mary Mager work for Quartz PCI or University of British Columbia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you for the clarification, but im still confused, your business card
states that you are the EDX Product Development person. then would you be
able to answer my questions? Why is it I cant get an answer about
imaging/elemental mapping. ( See attached email)

Larry Howard


In a message dated 11/22/00 11:04:36 PM Eastern Standard Time,
mmager-at-qrtz.com writes:

{ { Dear Larry,

I'm sorry if our technical support team did not respond to your request for
information on our mapping option. The passive, full position-tagged mapping
option is just now finished and the team is working very hard to get the
information out to all the customers that requested it. I will be happy to
phone you and answer any questions that you may have, if you will send me
your
phone number by return e-mail.

In answer to the subject of your e-mail, I work as a microscopist for the
University of British Columbia and conduct any correspondance with the MSA
Listserver in that capacity. I am also
an EDX technical consultant for the X-ray Division of Quartz Imaging Corp. I
have little to do with the Quartz PCI product except as a user and friend of
the owner of Quartz.At 01:58 PM 11/22/00 -0500, you wrote:
} Mary,
}
} I have been waiting for a response from your technical support concerning
} mapping . Can you have them call me.
}
} Thank you
} Larry Howard

Best regards,
Mary


Mary Mager
EDX Product Specialist
Quartz Imaging Corp.
810 - 1112 West Pender Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6E 3X5
tel: 604-488-3911
fax: 604-488-3922
e-mail: mmager-at-qrtz.com
--------------------

Dear Larry,

I'm sorry if our technical support team did not respond to your request for
information on our mapping option. The passive, full position-tagged mapping
option is just now finished and the team is working very hard to get the
information out to all the customers that requested it. I will be happy to
phone you and answer any questions that you may have, if youwill send me your
phone number by return e-mail.

In answer to the subject of your e-mail, I work as a microscopist for the
University of British Columbia and conduct any correspondance with theMSA
Listserver in that capacity. I am also
an EDX technical consultant for the X-ray Division of Quartz Imaging Corp. I
have little to do with the Quartz PCI product except as a userand friend of
the owner of Quartz.At 01:58 PM 11/22/00 -0500, youwrote:
} Mary,
}
} I have been waiting for a response from your technical supportconcerning
} mapping . Can you have them call me.
}
} Thank you
} Larry Howard

Best regards,
Mary


Mary Mager
EDX Product Specialist
Quartz Imaging Corp.
810 - 1112 West Pender Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6E 3X5
tel: 604-488-3911
fax: 604-488-3922
e-mail: mmager-at-qrtz.com


----------------------- Headers --------------------------------
Return-Path: {mmager-at-qrtz.com}
Received: from rly-yd04.mx.aol.com (rly-yd04.mail.aol.com [172.18.150.4])
by air-yd02.mail.aol.com (v77.14) with ESMTP; Wed, 22 Nov 2000 23:04:36 -0500
Received: from www.quartzimaging.com (www.quartzimaging.com
[205.206.193.13]) by rly-yd04.mx.aol.com (v76_r1.19) with ESMTP; Wed, 22 Nov
2000 23:04:13 1900
Received: from CR1001314-A (unverified [24.113.41.19]) by
www.quartzimaging.com
(EMWAC SMTPRS 0.83) with SMTP id {B0000039292-at-www.quartzimaging.com} ;
Wed, 22 Nov 2000 20:12:15 -0800
Message-Id: {4.1.20001122195359.00a11a30-at-www.quartzimaging.com}
X-Sender: mmager-at-www.quartzimaging.com
X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Pro Version 4.1
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 20:03:28 -0800
To: Lhconsulting-at-aol.com
From: Mary Mager {mmager-at-qrtz.com}
Subject: Re: Does Mary Mager work for Quartz PCI or University of
British Columbia
In-Reply-To: {18.5496f0e.274d715b-at-aol.com}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="=====================_1931615516==_.ALT"
X-Antirelay: Good relay from local net4 24.113.41.19/32

} }


From daemon Thu Nov 23 11:39:13 2000



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 10:31:16 -0700
Subject: Re: SEM resolution calibration methods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris,

the way people with TEMs measure the resolution is pretty straight forward:
They take an image and do a Fourier transform (either through software FFT
or with an optical diffractometer). The FFT then shows essentially the
frequencies that are on the image. For a TEM you can also calculate the
Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), which essentially gives you the same
information. By comparing the two, you can thus find out, what the
resolution of the microscope is. Since the CTF is a fairly complex function,
there are different "resolutions": Point resolution (corresponds to the
frequency where the CTF becomes zero the first time), or the "lattice
resolution" (where the intensity of the oscillations goes below a certain
threshold).

For an SEM, I assume there is only a gradually declining FFT (Intensity vs.
spatial frequency). Unless someone "defines" where the cut-off is (for
example where the intensity has gone down to 20%), I don't think you can
really determine the resolution with certainty. The sample also needs to be
defined (for example a sharp metal edge, as any charging may affect the
resolution. Also the material itself may have to be defined, as edge effects
may influence the measurement. Finally, the sample must show structure below
the resolution limit of the microscope, otherwise you measure the
"resolution" of your sample. In TEMs that is fairly simple: use an amorphous
material. For SEM samples I don't know what could be used. Something with
atomic structure on the surface? A surface reconstructed semiconductor?



Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Jeffree [mailto:cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk]
Sent: Thursday, November 23, 2000 2:24 AM
To: Gary Gaugler
Cc: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Gary
I agree with you that an objective test is hard to come by and that
an industry-standard approach is lacking. I make the following
observations, for what they're worth:

There is no straightforward way of making a specimen that tests the
resolution of all SEMs, under all operating conditions and for all
specimen types. Gold on carbon is the best choice if that is what
you look at for a living. If you look at fine carbon structures on
carbon it's a poor test of practical resolution, although it may
indicate the general health of the instrument.

Makers differ in their approaches to resolution testing. Most employ
gold on carbon, but sometimes gold on magnetic tape or dendritic
crystalline gold or silver is preferred. Some measure the smallest
particles visible, others measure the smallest gaps between larger
particles. One practical difficulty in the former approach is that the
particles need to be most abundant in a size range close to the
dimensions you want to test for. SEM resolutions span at least an
order of magnitude from {0.5nm for in-lens fegsem to } 5nm for
tungsten sem, making production of a single universal specimen
difficult. At the limits of FEGSEM resolution, ~1nm, suitably small
gold particles on carbon or mag tape can be as rare as hen's teeth.
Another issue is that at the limit of an instrument's resolution the
image of a small particle has a bell-shaped gaussian distribution of
signal, fading imperceptibly into the background. The problem here
is to determine where the edges of the feature are located. Pixel
size is relevant here. If the feature is only two or three pixels wide,
typical of a x100k image at 1kx1k pixels, then pixel size has a
dominant effect on the measured size increments - ten pixels wide
or more begins to yield an approximation to continuous data, so the
image size must be large or the magnification high. The standard
test of resolution in microanalysis, where peaks are again
approximately normal curves, is to measure peak width at half
height, and one can approximate this approach in measuring a gold
particle by expanding the image contrast until local background is 0
and max signal is 255, setting the threshold to 127 and measuring
mean feret diameter of the feature. I think you'll find that if you
apply this type of criterion you will get a more conservative estimate
of resolution than is claimed by the manufacturer.

A variant of gold on carbon which we have tried is to deposit 1
nanometre gold colloid onto formvar/carbon, with 10nm gold to
provide something to focus on. This is a specimen that can be
characterised by TEM before examination in the SEM, so you can
determine what the actual particle size distribution is (difficult to do
that with gold on mag tape). FEGSEMs can "see" the 1nm gold
particles because there is strong signal against low background, but
as in light microscopy, where 25nm colloidal gold is readily seen
under reflected illumination, may image them to a larger diameter.
This larger diameter, measured using peak width at half height, thus
constitutes an estimate of instrument resolving power. Another
approach in principle (harder in practice) is to create perfectly
square, perfectly nanometre-sharp square edges in a perfectly
smooth surface of the element of your choice - silicon e.g., or a
layer of another element deposited thereon - and to measure the
peak width at half height of the edge transition.

Finally, theoretically it is possiible objectively to determine the
limiting dimensions recorded in any image by looking at its fourier
power spectrum. Biomolecular structure people regularly report
such data for TEM images, so presumably the technology is
availalble. Any observations on where, how, and the limitations of
applying it to sem resolution measurment would be gratefully
received.

Best wishes
Chris

} NIST used to offer a SEM calibration standard SRM-2069.
} I don't see this any longer. If one needs to calibrate or
} qualify a SEM's resolution at 250A or better, what is
} an appropriate method?
}
} I've used Au on C "standards" but these are more
} qualitative than quantitative. The question is how to
} make a quantitative measurement of SEM resolution?
}
} Vendor responses are welcome.
}
} Thanks,
} gary g.
}
}


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Thu Nov 23 13:37:20 2000



From: Grizzi Fabio ICH :      fabio.grizzi-at-humanitas.it
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 20:32:51 +0100
Subject: immunohistochemistry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

I would like to ask you how it is possible to identify the inflammatory
cells in paraffin embedded human liver specimens by means of
immunohistochemistry technique. Is there a better antibody?

Many thanks

Fabio Grizzi

Dott. Fabio Grizzi
Istituto Clinico Humanitas - Scientific Direction
Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Tel. ++390282244548
Fax ++390282244590
E-mail fabio.grizzi-at-humanitas.it {mailto:fabio.grizzi-at-humanitas.it}




From daemon Thu Nov 23 18:59:03 2000



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2000 13:58:47 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: Does Mary Mager work for Quartz PCI or University of British

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I don't see why this is being conducted on the list.

Can't you guys sort it out in private?

cheers

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Thu Nov 23 18:59:08 2000



From: COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 19:52:20 EST
Subject: UPDATE: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope before?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks to James and all others that replied and helped shed some light on
this matter

What it appears we have is bridge for an AO hair and fiber comparison scope.
It seems to be fixed in the split mode, which is fine, as it will show a
half for each scope. We have 2 model 10 AO scopes in the Museum's parts
stash and I put enough stuff together to make 2 with the exception that I
am missing the parts for both of the mechanical stages... Any one have some
AO carcasses out there we can raid for parts?

thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC


{ { Subj: Re: Has anyone out there used an AO comparison microscope before?
Date: 11/22/00 1:33:22 PM US Mountain Standard Time
From: James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us (James Roberts)
To: COURYHOUSE-at-sparc5.microscopy.com, MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


It depends on who's bridge you have. The two most common are the Leitz and
the AO design. An AO type would say AO, Reichart or Leica on the
manufactures logo depending on how new or old it is. Cambidge decided to use
the Leica name on both once they owned both designs so the Leitz could also
say Leica. There are other designs but these two make up probably more than
90% of all comparison bridges. I haven't worked with any of the others in
over 20 years and then only a bit.

The knob in the center of the front makes it sound more likely to be an AO
type. If it is, that knob should move the center prism set so that with it
turned fully clock-wise you would see all of the left scope and turned fully
counter-clock-wise you would see all of the right scope. With the knob
centered you would see half of each field. In some other position you would
see a smaller part of one field and a larger part of the other. If it is an
AO style bridge it sounds to me as if the rack and gear might be damaged so
the prism is not moving. The thin dividing line you see between the two
fields should move as you turn the knob to give you a smaller percentage of
one field and a larger percentage of the other. This lets us compare the
pattern of stria over a length of the toolmark, a bullet comparison is a type
of toolmark comparison. Side by side comparison is much more useful in
Firearm and toolmark comparison than overlapping fields are.

If it is a Leitz design some do not let you move the dividing line off
center but have other knobs that overlap the two fields or let you view just
one. These bench top Leitz bridges don't have a knob in the center of the
front so this probably isn't what you have.

In modern bridges the bridges that attach to separate scopes are designed
for hair and fiber comparisons and the like. Bullet ("Universal Forensic")
scopes have the objectives attached into the bridges in scopes that have been
built since well before I entered the field over a 1/4 century ago. They are
designed for much lower power and much longer working distances. The bridges
for hair and fiber comparison scopes (yes they can be used for all manor of
comparison but in forensic science labs that is their primary job and the way
they are usually refereed to) are quite similar to bullet scope bridge
designs but are designed to be attached to separate scopes that are basically
conventional compound microscopes with sub-stage lighting.

If you tell me more about the bridge you are trying to use I may be able to
tell you more that can help you set it up and see if it is working properly.
AO then Reichart and now Leica have always said that users should not open up
bridges to try repairs, as prism alignment is critical and easily disturbed.
Rebuilds are available basically only at the factory, no one else has the
alignment equipment to do it right. When other places have told me they
could rebuild one I found that their version of a rebuild amounted to a real
good cleaning job not prism replacement or realignment. If you do have an AO
type and the knob is not moving the rack the center prism is on you may need
such a rebuild. I did have a knob set screw come loose on an old one quite
a number of years ago. I got away with going inside and tightening it up but
I would not recommend it to anyone else as these are expensive pieces of
equipment and rebuilds are several thousand dollars (around 12K to 15K la!
st time I checked several years ago).

Jim


James L. Roberts
Firearm and Toolmark Examiner
Ventura Co. Sheriff's Lab
(805) 654-2308
James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us

} } } {"COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} 11/21/00 10:43PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Ahoy fellow enthusiasts!
Has anyone out there used a comparison microscope before?
I got a bridge unit and dropped it on top of 2 AO 10 scopes, there seems to
me a knob on the front that does nothing. I get one scope in once side of
the field and the image from the other scope on the other side.....

I suspect the knob makes them overlap (like we have seen on the police
shows but it does not seem to move the image.
when they compare bullets...)

any input?

thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC


} }


From daemon Thu Nov 23 21:09:40 2000



From: steven wintonick :      crimsem-at-hotmail.com
Date: Thu, 23 Nov 2000 22:03:06 -0500
Subject: SEM/EDS - Explosives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All,

Looking for some information on references (websites,books,journals, etc.)
and/or SOPs/Procedures for the analysis of explosives using SEM/EDS. Thanks.

Steve Wintonick
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com



From daemon Thu Nov 23 21:51:11 2000



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2000 14:46:23 +1100
Subject: Australian Workshop on Nanotubes and Fullerenes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From Ying Chen, ying.chen-at-anu.edu.au

First Announcement

Australian Workshop on Nanotubes and Fullerenes

May 3-4, 2001

Australian National University, Canberra


Scope
Fullerenes, nanotubes and related nanomaterials are receiving great
interest due to the new mechanical, physical and chemical properties and
potential applications in various areas. A workshop is designed to bring
together research scientists and engineers working in various disciplines
in the broad area of nanotube and Fullerene -related materials and to
provide an opportunity to exchange new ideas and results. Postgraduate
students are particularly encouraged to present their thesis work.

Program
The program consists of invited lectures from both Australian and
international leading scientists as well as oral and poster contributions.

It will be divided into the following sessions (but not limited to):

Thermodynamics and Modeling
Synthesis and Processing
Characterization
Properties and Applications

Partial list of invited speakers

Professor David Tomanek, Michigan State University, USA

Professor H. M. Cheng
Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, China
Title: Carbon nanotube synthesis and hydrogen storage

Professor M. Wilson, University of Technology, Sydney
Title: Changing the diameter of carbon nanotubes

Professor G. Wallace, University of Wollongong
Title: Carbon Nanotube/Conducting polymer Composites

Dr. L.M. Dai, Molecular Science, CSIRO
Title:Controlled growth and surface modification of carbon nanotubes

Venue
The workshop will be held in the seminar room of the link building (58) of

the Research School of Physical Science and Engineering, Mills Road, The
Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Abstract submission
Please send your abstracts and registration form by email attachment to
awnf2001-at-anu.edu.au Acceptance and presentation type (invited, oral or
poster) will be informed by e-mail. Example of abstract format and
registration forms can be found at:
http://www.rsphysse.anu.edu.au/nanotube/awnf2001/

Correspondence
Dr Ying Chen
Department of Engineering, FEIT
&Department of Electronic Materials Engineering
Research School of Physical Science and Engineering
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT 0200
Australia
E-mail: ying.chen-at-anu.edu.au, or awnf2001-at-anu.edu.au
Telephone: 61 02 6249 0380, ( 6125 0380 after 31-12-2000)
Fax: 61 02 6279 8338 ( 6125 6279 after 31-12-2000)

PhD scholarships on nanotube research are available at ANU and information

can be found at
group webpage: http://www.rsphysse.anu.edu.au/nanotube/


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU EMU
Box 475 Canberra ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6249 3218 or 6279 8525


From daemon Fri Nov 24 01:47:01 2000



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2000 08:48:30 +0100
Subject: Re: immunohistochemistry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

Yes it is very possible to identify such cells. Do you want to identify all
cells that might be involved in the inflammatory/immune response or subsets
of these. In the first case you could use a broad spectrum antibody to the
'leukocyte common antigen/s' CD45 family or if you want to identify the
subcategories eg macrophages, neutrophils, T/B lymphocytes etc then there
is also a wide range available.

If you want further details of supply companies mail back to me and I can
send you some web addresses - I have no connection to any companies - I am
just a user.

Have you talked to your local hospital pathology department?



At 20:32 2000-11-23 +0100, Grizzi Fabio ICH wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab/index_se.html

Tel +46 8 728 3734
Fax +46 8 728 3688

"Words are the seeds of misunderstanding - use them carefully."

"Give us the wisdom to know and not to feel that not knowing is less than
wisdom itself."

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Institutionen för Mikrobiologi, Patologi och Immunologi(IMPI), H5,
Karolinska Institutet,
Avdelningar för biomedicinsk
laboratorievetenskap och
biomedicinska ämnen,
Box 127 73,
S 112 96, Stockholm
Sverige

NB/Obs! Visiting address =

Lindhagensgatan 92
Kungsholmen


From daemon Fri Nov 24 02:29:04 2000



From: Tim E. Harper :      tim-at-cmp-cientifica.com
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2000 11:49:38 +0100
Subject: NanoTechnology Weekly

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike
What software do you recommend for this? Does AnalySIS have
this capability?
Chris

} From: Mike Bode {mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com}
To: "'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Dear All,

TNT (Trends in Nanotechnology) Weekly, a free, weekly e-mail round up of
happenings in the world of nanotechnology will be launched on 5th December
2000. More information and a sample issue can be found at www.cientifica.com

If anyone on the list would like to contribute, or comment on the
newsletter, or indeed help us to enhance is usefulness to the microscopy
community, please contact me directly.

Regards

Tim

*****************************************************************
Tim E. Harper Managing Director
CMP Cientifica s.l.
Space & NanoTechnology Division
Phone +34 91 640 71 85 Fax +34 91 640 71 86
http://www.cmp-cientifica.com/




From daemon Fri Nov 24 12:41:23 2000



From: tsr :      tsr-at-codon.nih.gov
Date: Fri, 24 Nov 2000 13:37:20 -0800
Subject: June Mahs seminar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wondered if you could send me information on above. My address is:
10605 Belfast Place, Potomac, MD 20854 (or by return
e-mail)...thanks!...Tom Reese


From daemon Sun Nov 26 13:25:25 2000



From: eActive.com :      confirm-at-EACTIVE.COM
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2000 10:34:00 -0500
Subject: eActive.com - Confirmation message

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

Your email address is part of an email list acquired by eActive, Inc.

Your name came up as being interested in receiving information
using Video, Streaming Media, mp3, Windows Media Player,
QuickTime, Real Media Player, Flash, Shock Wave, Audio and
other Interactive Multimedia Presentations and to be kept
informed of all upcoming unique Sales, Information, Contests
and Giveaways presented by eActive.

If you do not reply to this message your email address
will be taken off the list and you will not receive
Interactive Multimedia Presentations.

eActive Inc. is committed to ensuring your Internet privacy.
In order to be absolutely certain that you have agreed to
receive Multimedia Presentations via email we are asking
you to verify your email address.

Therefore:
1) Click this link: mailto:confirm-at-eactive.com?subject=OK
or
2) Reply to this email with "OK" in the subject line.

If you have received this email in error, DO NOT REPLY,
simply delete this email and your name will be purged
from our database. You will not be contacted again by eActive.

Thank you!

If you have any questions please contact us at: admin-at-eactive.com


-----

eActive Inc.,
14000 Military Trail
Suite 210
Delray Beach, FL 33484


From daemon Sun Nov 26 19:31:57 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Sun, 26 Nov 2000 19:26:03 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: eActive.com .... is SPAM Mail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues....

A general message to answer a number questions I
have been receiving.

The eActive Mail dated Nov. 16th is SPAM/JUNK mail.
Neither MSA nor the Microscopy Listserver has sold
your address to anyone. I keep hold all addresses private
and do not disclose them to anyone.

The mail you all received was just a junk mailing, which
occassionally gets through the filters.

I have added eActive.Com to the SPAM filter so they
should not be bothering us again.

Cheers...
Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.




From daemon Mon Nov 27 09:07:23 2000



From: chris smith (IACR-RES) :      chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2000 14:56:12 -0000
Subject: Edwards E306A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jonathan,
I sent a preliminary message to your private e-mail address but got an
'undeliverable' note.
Given a working address I can send you a copy of my own instruction sheet,
photos of set up, etc. used weekly for 20 yrs with total success.
Please contact me direct on: chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
EM Unit, IACR-Rothamsted, Harpenden, UK


From daemon Mon Nov 27 11:52:04 2000



From: Erdem Yasar :      yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2000 19:43:34 +0200 (EET)
Subject: Re: ABOUT JSM5600 SEM AND JEM3010 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sir/Madam ,
JEM3010 was manufactured in 1999.it has got 1.500.000x mag and digital
camera system JSM5600 has got 300.000xmag and EDS system.
we have one kind of chose for prices. If we study together (I mean we
preapare a paper together), we reseach samples without any price.
Thanks for your interests..
I am waiting for your emails

**********************************
**********************************
** Research.Asst.ERDEM YASAR **
** University of Kirikkale **
** Department of Physics **
** TEM LABORATORY **
** 71450 KIRIKKALE/TURKEY **
** erdem.yasar-at-physics.org **
** yasar-at-science.ankara.edu.tr **
** yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr **
**********************************
**********************************

Home Page: http://turkuaz.kku.edu.tr/~yasar






From daemon Mon Nov 27 18:26:19 2000



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 13:23:47 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: ABOUT JSM5600 SEM AND JEM3010 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I hate to seem unkind, but isn't once enough for this?

cheers

rtch


} Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2000 19:43:34 +0200 (EET)
} From: Erdem Yasar {yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: ABOUT JSM5600 SEM AND JEM3010 TEM

} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
}
}
} Dear Sir/Madam ,
} JEM3010 was manufactured in 1999.it has got 1.500.000x mag and
} digital
} camera system JSM5600 has got 300.000xmag and EDS system.
} we have one kind of chose for prices. If we study together (I mean
} we preapare a paper together), we reseach samples without any price.
} Thanks for your interests..
} I am waiting for your emails
}
} **********************************
} **********************************
} ** Research.Asst.ERDEM YASAR **
} ** University of Kirikkale **
} ** Department of Physics **
} ** TEM LABORATORY **
} ** 71450 KIRIKKALE/TURKEY **
} ** erdem.yasar-at-physics.org **
} ** yasar-at-science.ankara.edu.tr **
} ** yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr **
} **********************************
} **********************************
}
} Home Page: http://turkuaz.kku.edu.tr/~yasar
}
}
}
}
}
Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Mon Nov 27 19:00:27 2000



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2000 16:55:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Balzer's 301 Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
We have a Balzer's 301 Freeze fracture etch unit that worked for some time
with no problems. However, one day the unit was overheating so I changed
the oil in the rotary pump. It worked fine until recently. I found that
one fuse had blown in the Pumping unit control TCS 100. Changing the fuse
did not help, and I noticed the transformer in the pumping unit was
discolored.

I was wondering if anyone has a spare transformer or TCS 100 Pumping unit
control they are not using? If not, can anyone suggest why the
transformer chose to die on us at this moment? Previously we kept the
unit pumping constantly. Due to a vacuum leak, I shut it off until it was
to be used for coating. Unfortunately, now it won't start up.
Gordon.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793



From daemon Mon Nov 27 23:53:37 2000



From: jekstrom-at-mediaone.net () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Mon, 27 Nov 2000 23:47:45 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Apergon objective lens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jekstrom-at-mediaone.net
Name: Jim Ekstrom
School: Phillips Exeter
State: NH

Question: I picked up an objective lens that is made in the US. It has
Apergon (in italics) with 200X below it. The lens which is roughly the
size of a normal 10X objective had a different thread than a normal
objective. Can you tell me anything about it?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Tue Nov 28 02:04:01 2000



From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 08:58:58 +0100
Subject: Java EMSA Spectrum Plotting Script

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

I'm looking a Java EMSA spectrum plotting script for web browsers.

--
Henrik Kaker
Metal Ravne d.o.o.
SEM-EDS Lab
Koroska cesta 14, 2390 Ravne
Slovenia
Phone: +386 02 82 21 131
Fax: +386 02 82 20 436
http://www.kaker.com




From daemon Tue Nov 28 02:05:59 2000



From: Radostin Danev :      rado-at-nips.ac.jp
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 17:02:04 +0900
Subject: Re: ABOUT JSM5600 SEM AND JEM3010 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} we have one kind of chose for prices. If we study together (I mean we
} preapare a paper together), we reseach samples without any price.

If you study alone - how much for a paper? (Joking ... sorry couldn't stop
myself)

Rado

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Radostin Danev
Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
---------------------------------------------------------------------





From daemon Tue Nov 28 03:24:51 2000



From: ken blight :      blight-at-icrf.icnet.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:18:45 +0000
Subject: MethylCellulose

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have a method for removing hardened methycellulose from
cryocections when the film is too thick?




From daemon Tue Nov 28 04:32:55 2000



From: C.L.Healey :      MBA00CLH-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 10:27:20 +0000
Subject: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I just wondered whether it would be at all possible to ask you a
question,

"Is the resolution of an optical microscope better with green or blue
light?".

Thanks for your help,

Claire
mba00clh-at-sheffield.ac.uk


From daemon Tue Nov 28 06:59:51 2000



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 23:16:29 +1000
Subject: RE: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Claire
Blue is best
To a rough approximation the resolving power is limited to half the
wavelength of the light used. Thus blue -at-480nm = 240 nm, green
-at- 540nm = 270 nm
Chris

Date sent: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 10:27:20 +0000
} From: "C.L.Healey" {MBA00CLH-at-sheffield.ac.uk}
Organization: The University of Sheffield
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


If its a good microscope, then under oil immersion the blue would give better
resolution because blue light has a shorter wavelengths than green, but . . .
Some people may find blue harder on the eye and less subjectively, it depends
on the colours of the specimen too. If highest resolution is the object then
the specimen should be very thin, say 2 um or less and at that point contrast
becomes an issue and its useful to know that the filter will render the
complimentary colours within the specimen more darkly.
So you could have fun and draw an Oswald colour circle (rainbow colours
arranged in a circle with complimentary colours opposite) and figure out which
filter would render which colours in the specimen darker or lighter.
Thus specimen contrast could be enhanced and green will be more useful to
optimize contrast with more specimens.
Such fancy colour considerations apply to viewing and B+W photography, whereas
in colour photography most people would prefer realistic colours and that, with
a daylight type film requires the right blue filter and the transformer set to
the bulb's voltage.
There is also an argument to be made that all of that is too complicated and
that a digital camera is more fun.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Tuesday, November 28, 2000 8:27 PM, C.L.Healey
[SMTP:MBA00CLH-at-sheffield.ac.uk] wrote:
}
} Hi,
}
} I just wondered whether it would be at all possible to ask you a
} question,
}
} "Is the resolution of an optical microscope better with green or blue
} light?".
}
} Thanks for your help,
}
} Claire
} mba00clh-at-sheffield.ac.uk



From daemon Tue Nov 28 07:45:35 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 07:40:59 -0600
Subject: MSA Undergraduate Research Scholarship Program

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Press Release for Fall 2000
Microscopy Society of America
Undergraduate Research Scholarship Program

With this year's call for applications the MSA Undergraduate Research
Scholarship Program begins its 13th year providing funding for
undergraduate research. To date over 65 projects covering a wide
range of topics in the physical and biological sciences have received
support through this program. Over the years nearly all the
scholarship recipients have maintained a strong interest in imaging
sciences and have gone on to graduate school, professional school,
teaching, or industry positions.

The program, which is funded by MSA, is able to support approximately
30% to 40% of applicants. The maximal award from MSA is currently
$3000 and helps to provide student stipends, supply costs, and
limited travel expenses associated with the research. Additional
support in the form of instrument use time, equipment purchases, etc.
is generally provided by the studentís supervisor and/or through the
sponsoring institution. Abstracts reporting the research results,
are prepared by scholarship awardees, and published in "Microscopy
and Microanalysis".

The program actively seeks external sources of matching funds in
order to maintain the favorable levels of support both in terms of
the number of projects supported and the level of support for each.
We are extremely grateful for the matching support provided by MSA
sustaining members and individuals. Their support has enabled the
program to increase both the number of awards and the maximum amount
of each award to $3000.

The MSA Undergraduate Research Scholarship Program is currently
soliciting applications from students interested in conducting a
research project which involves the use of any microscopy technique.
Students should be sponsored by a member of MSA. The maximal award
is $3000.
**The application deadline is Dec 31, 2000.**
Applications can be obtained from the MSA Business Office,
businessoffice-at-msa.microscopy.com or call toll free at (800) 538-3672.
If you have any questions or require additional information regarding
the program please contact either:

Dr. Ralph Albrecht, University of Wisconsin
1656 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706
(608) 263-3952 or 263-4162; (608) 262-7420 FAX;
albrecht-at-ahabs.wisc.edu

Dr. Richard Ornberg, Monsanto Company
Analytical Sciences Center, 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63167
(314) 694-1184; (314) 694-6727 FAX;
rlornb-at-ccmail.monsanto.com




From daemon Tue Nov 28 07:46:26 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 07:42:21 -0600
Subject: Materials Scientist/MicroCharacterization Position Opening at DoE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

A Job position for a Materials Scientists with a background in
electron beam microcharacterization has opened today and has
been posted on the US DoE BES web site:

(Position Number PN-01-SC-13-082, GS-1301-15).

http://www.science.doe.gov/production/bes/BESjobs.html

An appointee will be required to provide verification of U. S.
citizenship and/or employment eligibility under the Immigration
Reform and Control Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-603). If selected,
a male applicant born after December 31, 1959, must confirm his
selective service registration status

Applications will be accepted through January 26, 2001.

Cheers... Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

P.S. Contact DoE at BES-at-science.doe.gov for additional information




From daemon Tue Nov 28 07:50:23 2000



From: Kromer, Barry :      KROMERB-at-cellutissue.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 08:46:21 -0500
Subject: Camera adapter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for an adapter to mount an Olympus D340 digital camera to a
standard stereo microscope eyepiece. Does anyone have a possible
solution for my problem?
Thanks.
Barry Kromer
kromerb-at-cellutissue.com



From daemon Tue Nov 28 08:32:19 2000



From: Ni, Chao-Ying :      CYNi-at-rodel.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:23:18 -0500
Subject: Seeking a H2O recirculator (air cooled)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear colleagues,

We have a JSM-845 SEM with a fairly old water recirculator. Because of the
age, the water recirculator does not work properly and needs to be replaced.
Could anybody help me locate a used chiller for the SEM? The chiller itself
has to be air cooled. Thanks very much.

Chao-Ying Ni
Rodel Inc.
Materials Development Center
451 Bellevue Road
Newark, DE 19713


From daemon Tue Nov 28 09:04:27 2000



From: Ni, Chao-Ying :      CYNi-at-rodel.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:56:17 -0500
Subject: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, you are right. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the
wave length of the light you use for illumination. The "green" or "blue"
light has shorter wave length compared with other lights/colors, hence has
higher resolving capability, e.g., point-to-point resolution. Also, "white
light" is composed of all of "the lights" in the visible range of the light
spectrum, and it may cause so-called chromatic aberration for microscopes.

-cy
Rodel

-----Original Message-----
} From: C.L.Healey [mailto:MBA00CLH-at-sheffield.ac.uk]
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2000 5:27 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,

I just wondered whether it would be at all possible to ask you a
question,

"Is the resolution of an optical microscope better with green or blue
light?".

Thanks for your help,

Claire
mba00clh-at-sheffield.ac.uk


From daemon Tue Nov 28 09:51:59 2000



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:46:35 -0600
Subject: RE: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
Two other points to keep in mind:

1) Detector sensitivity. As a rule, the human eye is more sensitive
to green than blue. Other detectors (cameras, film, etc) will have
their own wavelength dependence.

2) Sample character. A living cell is more likely to be
hurt/stimulated by blue than green light.

Just a few more tangential remarks on this thread.

Tobias
--
_ ____ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ University of Missouri
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO USA
/ / / \ \ \ 65211-7400
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ voice: 573-882-0173
fax: 573-882-0123


From daemon Tue Nov 28 09:52:04 2000



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 10:47:10 -0500
Subject: Re: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html







I just wondered whether it would be at all possible to ask you a
question,

"Is the resolution of an optical microscope better with green or blue
light?".

Thanks for your help,
Dear Claire,
In theory, the best attainable resolution with blue light would be slightly
better than that with green light; however, in practise, the lenses for a given
microscope might be designed to have lower spherical aberration for green light
(if, for example, the scope were designed to use all wavelengths of visible
light, green would be a better compromise than blue), and the properties of the
specimen would probably play a bigger role in attainable resolution than the
wavelength of light used to observe it, for example, a specimen damaged by the
shorter wavelength light would be better observed using the longer wavelength.
Also, the medium used to observe or record the image might be capable of better
resolution with green light. Now that I've probably told you more than you
wanted to know, I can say that it is always possible to ask a question, as long
as you are willing to put up with the answer.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From daemon Tue Nov 28 09:53:07 2000



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:52:37 -0600
Subject: MSA student scholarship clarification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listmembers:

In response to a question, I would like to add this bit to the MSA
undergraduate scholarship announcement:

This is not limited to students in the USA or North America. Any
undergraduate student anywhere is eligible to apply for the award,
provided the person supervising their research is a member of MSA.

Phil
--
}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, AMFSC and BBPIC microscopy facilities
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Tue Nov 28 10:22:40 2000



From: Dr Malcolm Roberts :      m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 16:16:59 +0200
Subject: Fe-rich samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hallo Folks,
We're fiddling around with some rather Fe-rich amphiboles here.
Analysis by WD on our trusty JEOL 733. Totals are coming out a bit high
for an amphibole, and we've started discussing the problem a bit. One of
us has had a bell rung with regards to ZAF correction on Fe-rich
silicates. Anyone have any more ideas on this, and how we might do a bit
of believable scientific fudging?
Cheers,
Malc.

--
Dr MP Roberts Phone: [+27](0)46 603 8313
Dept of Geology Fax: [+27](0)46 622 9715
Rhodes University Cell: 083 4060 262 (usually off)
6140 Grahamstown e-mail: m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za
SOUTH AFRICA




From daemon Tue Nov 28 12:06:19 2000



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 13:57:27 -0400
Subject: Green or blue?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



A little tangential to this thread, but....

We in the micropaleontology business (or formerly in it) have for years
been staining Foraminiferal and Ostracode shells with green food colouring
to enhance their appearance in binocular microscopes. It seems to bring out
the contrast a bit, and the dye tends to settle in, and accentuate,
morphological features which aid in identification. Green seems to work a
bit better than blue, but as Tobias points out, that may have more to do
with the sensitivity of the human eye. A pretty cheap little trick, too -
you wouldn't believe how many foram shells you can dye with one little
bottle.....

Frank Thomas
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Tue Nov 28 12:28:32 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 13:17:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: MethylCellulose

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It should just dissolve in water or buffer if you soak the slides for a
while. Then recoat with more dilute MeCell if you want.

On Tue, 28 Nov 2000, ken blight wrote:

} Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 09:18:45 +0000
} From: ken blight {blight-at-icrf.icnet.uk}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: MethylCellulose
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Does anyone have a method for removing hardened methycellulose from
} cryocections when the film is too thick?
}
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265



From daemon Tue Nov 28 13:01:19 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 08:54:21 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Reset on Reichert Cryocut

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello, all-

I am posting this for a colleague-

We have a Reichert-Jung Cryocut 1800 cryostat. The motor which moves the
specimen in and out is stuck in the STOP, fully advanced position and will
not retract. I know there is a manual way to get the specimen holder back
to its Home position, but I have forgotten, and it is not in my
manual. Can anyone help me with this?

Mahalo!

Dr. David T. Webb
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Dept. of Botany
dave-at-hawaii.edu

You may email him directly, or I will forward any replies.

High 70s F, windy, intermittant clouds. Beautiful November light.

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Nov 28 15:15:05 2000



From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 15:51:20 -0500
Subject: TEM - Availability of Transparent Sleeves for TEM Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


November 28, 2000

To all,
I just found out that Kodak has discontinued the manufacture of its
transparent sleeves, CAT 150 3812. Does anyone know of a suitable
replacement for this product and where it can be purchased, preferably in
either Canada or the N. Eastern U.S.?

Thanks for your help.
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com



From daemon Tue Nov 28 16:07:19 2000



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 14:00:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Blue, but to such a small extent that it really can't make much
difference. The shorter the wavelength, the higher the
resolution. However, for some black and white films used for
photomicrography, such as Technical Pan, a green filter gives better
results. Hope this helps.

Lesley Weston.



On Tue, 28 Nov 2000, C.L.Healey wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} I just wondered whether it would be at all possible to ask you a
} question,
}
} "Is the resolution of an optical microscope better with green or blue
} light?".
}
} Thanks for your help,
}
} Claire
} mba00clh-at-sheffield.ac.uk
}
}



From daemon Tue Nov 28 19:43:08 2000



From: richard black :      m02jmy00-at-cwcom.net
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 01:28:52 +0000
Subject: Edwards E306

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Jonathan,
Tried to send message but got undeliverable message. If you want to
contact me direct I could give you some tips if that is any use. I have
used one very regularly for carbon coating for some years, with a good
degree of success.
cheers.
Richard Black



From daemon Tue Nov 28 22:59:52 2000



From: Andrew Jephcoat :      Andrew.Jephcoat-at-earth.ox.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 22:53:40 -0600
Subject: Searching for Leitz Wetzlar LWD Objective

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



To: ListServer
Re: Please post the message below. Thank you.

Would like to purchase (now unobtainable) Leitz Wetzlar
long working distance objective originally
manufactured for a Universal Stage. 1or 2 off.
Manufacturer Part number : 559123
Barrell details: 160/- L25/0.22 (P) (UT40/0.34).

Any information on possible source would be welcome.

--
Dr Andrew P. Jephcoat +44-(0)1865-272067
Department of Earth Sciences
Parks Road +44-(0)1865-272000 (Dept.)
Oxford OX1 3PR +44-(0)1865-272072 (FAX)
UK andrew-at-
earth.ox.ac.uk
http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/Research/interior.htm




From daemon Wed Nov 29 03:26:46 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 09:17:28 +0000
Subject: Re: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chuck Berger wrote:
} Take into account that the eye is most sensitive in the green }
} region & what color is your objective corrected for?

Yes, but sensitivity is a detector property, not a property of the
optics.

Correct me if I am wrong, but the corrections made to an
apochromat are primarily to bring different wavelengths to the same
plane of focus, not primarily to optimise for resolution at a particular
wavelength

Lesley Weston wrote:
} Blue, but to such a small extent that it really can't make much
} difference. The shorter the wavelength, the higher the
} resolution. However, for some black and white films used for
} photomicrography, such as Technical Pan, a green filter gives
} better results. Hope this helps.

Again this is a detector-sensitivity issue which does not alter the
fundamental fact that diffraction-limited resolving power of light
optics is higher in blue light than in green.

One of the reasons why users of Panchromatic films prefer to work
with a green filter is that it provides more natural-looking contrast
and grey-scale values, for the very reason that Chuck Berger is
referring to - that the eye has better brightness and contrast
sensitivity in green. Technical Pan has red sensitivity extended into
the near infrared, and contributions to the image from these
wavelengths may certainly degrade resolution of the recorded
image a) because they may not focus at the same plane as green
light, and b) because these longer wavelengths cannot form
diffraction limited image details as small as the shorter blue and
green wavelengths. The relationship between wavelength and
resolution becomes important here - because the near infra red
(~900-1000nm) has twice the wavelength of blue/blue-green (450-
500nm) the diffraction limited resolution is poorer by a factor of two.

Incidentally, such considerations are also important when using
monochrome CCD cameras. Many of these (such as Pulnix TM6,
for example) have spectral sensitivity extended into the infrared
(considerably further than Technical Pan). IR forms a large fraction
of the illumination intensity of a light microscope unless an IR filter
is fitted. The IR component degrades both resolution and contrast,
and the problem is in this case not adequately resolved by using a
green filter alone, since most transmit IR. Use of a heat-absorbing
glass filter, or even a petri dish with a layer of dilute copper
sulphate solution, will improve performance in such systems quite
dramatically.

(PS this will not help improve the performance of your colour ccd
camera, so don't ask :-)

Best wishes
Chris
==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JH, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Wed Nov 29 08:41:26 2000



From: Blancaflor, Elison :      eblancaflor-at-noble.org
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 08:32:40 -0600
Subject: RA position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Research Assistant
Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
A research assistant position is available to join the microscopy support
group. The research assistant will be assigned to work on various projects
using microscopy techniques. This will involve immunocytochemistry (light
and electron), in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy. A B.S. degree
in Biology and previous experience in light and electron microscopy of plant
material is required. Organizational skills and the ability to work
collaboratively with various research groups are essential. Salary is
commensurate with experience ($28,000 to $39,200.00). Application and job
description obtainable from the Noble Foundation website, www.noble.org
{../index.html} . To apply, send a letter outlining research interests and
experience, CV and names of 3 references to:

Jane Nance, Human Resources Department
RE: Position #PltBio30700-EB147
Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
PO Box 2180
Ardmore, OK 73402, USA.


From daemon Wed Nov 29 08:45:48 2000



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 08:43:52 -0600
Subject: Re: optical microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris,

You're not wrong, but there is a subtle point here: the optics are
designed around green light, typically 550nm, and then corrected for
blue and red (if apochromatic). This means the the optics work
optimally in green light, and therefore would resolve green light
best. Theoretically, shorter, blue light has higher resolution, but
the theory isn't taken advantage of unless the optics are designed
for blue light. Note that the filter in phase contrast microscopes is
typically green, because the phase annulus in the objectives is
designed for 550nm, because the (uncorrected) optics are designed for
550nm. +/- of course.

Phil

} Chuck Berger wrote:
} } Take into account that the eye is most sensitive in the green }
} } region & what color is your objective corrected for?
}
} Yes, but sensitivity is a detector property, not a property of the
} optics.
}
} Correct me if I am wrong, but the corrections made to an
} apochromat are primarily to bring different wavelengths to the same
} plane of focus, not primarily to optimise for resolution at a particular
} wavelength
--
}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, AMFSC and BBPIC microscopy facilities
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Wed Nov 29 09:14:06 2000



From: Matthew Lynn :      mlynn-at-miami.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 11:11:13 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM - Availability of Transparent Sleeves for TEM Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Robert
No need to apologize! On the contrary, many thanks for your most
informative comments. You clearly know rather more about it than I
do!
Best wishes
Chris

Date sent: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 09:25:16 -0500 (EST)
} From: Robert Wieland {wieland-at-ME.UDel.Edu}
To: c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk



Paul,

I don't know the size or cost of those Kodak sleeves, but I have used Print
File archival sleeves from Get Smart Products in Manhasset, NY. According to
my 1999 catalog:

Phone: (800) 827-0673
Fax: (516) 365-0673

Hope this helps!
Matt

Matthew J. Lynn, Ph.D.
Center for Advanced Microscopy
University of Miami
(305)284-4736
mlynn-at-miami.edu

On Tuesday, November 28, 2000 3:51 PM, Gerroir, Paul J
[SMTP:Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com] wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} November 28, 2000
}
} To all,
} I just found out that Kodak has discontinued the manufacture of its
} transparent sleeves, CAT 150 3812. Does anyone know of a suitable
} replacement for this product and where it can be purchased, preferably in
} either Canada or the N. Eastern U.S.?
}
} Thanks for your help.
} Paul
}
} Paul J. Gerroir
} Microscopy
} Materials Characterization
} Xerox Research Centre of Canada
} 2660 Speakman Drive
} Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1
}
} Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
} FAX: (905) 822-7022
} email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com



From daemon Wed Nov 29 13:30:09 2000



From: Jesse Rodrigues :      Jesse_Rodrigues-at-kopin.com
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 14:22:44 -0500
Subject: Imaging etched quartz

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi,

Does anyone have any experience imaging etched quartz or glass in a
FESEM?

Thank you,
Jesse

Jesse Rodrigues
Kopin Corporation
695 Myles Standish Blvd
Taunton, MA 02780
jrodrigues-at-kopin.com
(508) 824-6696




From daemon Wed Nov 29 14:04:31 2000



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 11:57:22 -0800
Subject: ultramicrotome room?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings:

Do you have any advice regarding environmental controls for a small room to
be used for ultrathin sectioning?

I have been asked for recommendations regarding things like air filters,
temperature control, and humidity.

It will be a small room, maybe 6' x 9', in a modern university science
building. The researcher is going to put a new ultramicrotome in there and
will want to do serial sectioning on conventional resin blocks. Cryo may
come later, so if there is anything special needed for that, now is the
time to add it to the list.

I have always been OK with standard sort of rooms, regular building air
filters etc, if there is anything special I have overlooked, please let me
know so I can pass it along.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Wed Nov 29 16:15:48 2000



From: Schumacher, Elaine :      efschuma-at-uop.com
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 15:58:42 -0600
Subject: RE: TEM - Availability of Transparent Sleeves for TEM Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I put in a call to the photographic equipment supplier in the Chicago area
through whom I've ordered the sleeves in the past. He contacted Kodak, and
was told that Kodak is no longer carrying this item (apparently it's not
actually manufactured by Kodak?), but that the sleeves are available from
Tiffen, a maker of filters and other photographic equipment. I was told
that the next time I place an order, I just need to let the purchasing agent
know that the supplier is Tiffen, rather than Kodak. I haven't yet been
able to get contact information for Tiffen (they have a website, but I'm
blocked from accessing it at work), or to verify this by placing an order,
but I thought I'd pass along what I've learned so far. If I find that this
is a dead end, I'll let you know.

Elaine Schumacher
UOP
Des Plaines, IL
847-391-3403
efschuma-at-uop.com


From daemon Wed Nov 29 20:13:05 2000



From: Schumacher, Elaine :      efschuma-at-uop.com
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 15:58:42 -0600
Subject: RE: TEM - Availability of Transparent Sleeves for TEM Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I put in a call to the photographic equipment supplier in the Chicago area
through whom I've ordered the sleeves in the past. He contacted Kodak, and
was told that Kodak is no longer carrying this item (apparently it's not
actually manufactured by Kodak?), but that the sleeves are available from
Tiffen, a maker of filters and other photographic equipment. I was told
that the next time I place an order, I just need to let the purchasing agent
know that the supplier is Tiffen, rather than Kodak. I haven't yet been
able to get contact information for Tiffen (they have a website, but I'm
blocked from accessing it at work), or to verify this by placing an order,
but I thought I'd pass along what I've learned so far. If I find that this
is a dead end, I'll let you know.

Elaine Schumacher
UOP
Des Plaines, IL
847-391-3403
efschuma-at-uop.com




From daemon Wed Nov 29 20:50:28 2000



From: Schumacher, Elaine :      efschuma-at-uop.com
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 15:58:42 -0600
Subject: RE: TEM - Availability of Transparent Sleeves for TEM Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I put in a call to the photographic equipment supplier in the Chicago area
through whom I've ordered the sleeves in the past. He contacted Kodak, and
was told that Kodak is no longer carrying this item (apparently it's not
actually manufactured by Kodak?), but that the sleeves are available from
Tiffen, a maker of filters and other photographic equipment. I was told
that the next time I place an order, I just need to let the purchasing agent
know that the supplier is Tiffen, rather than Kodak. I haven't yet been
able to get contact information for Tiffen (they have a website, but I'm
blocked from accessing it at work), or to verify this by placing an order,
but I thought I'd pass along what I've learned so far. If I find that this
is a dead end, I'll let you know.

Elaine Schumacher
UOP
Des Plaines, IL
847-391-3403
efschuma-at-uop.com




From daemon Thu Nov 30 00:14:34 2000



From: Sampath, Srinidhi (CORP, GEITC) :      Srinidhi.Sampath-at-geind.ge.com
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 09:14:59 +0530
Subject: LM: Views on Spot cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Hi everyone:
} I would like the society's views on the Spot RT-SLider digital camera. How
} long does it take to capture an image (fluorescence) and any hardware /
} software bugs experienced by users?
}
} S. Srinidhi,
} Materials Scientist
} gJohn F. Welch Technology Center
} _______________________________________
} Inorganic Materials Laboratory
} GEITC, Upper ground floor. Unit IV,
} Innovator building, International Tech Park,
} Whitefield Road, Bangalore - 560066.
} Phone: 8410702 / 03 / 08 / 09 / 841 1580 x: 1176
} Fax:8410704.
} e-mail: srinidhi.sampath-at-geind.ge.com
}
}


From daemon Thu Nov 30 02:57:59 2000



From: E.M.M. Manders :      e.manders-at-chem.uva.nl
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 09:46:15 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 2001 in Amsterdam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



************************************************
Plan Now to Participate FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 2001
************************************************

Focus on Microscopy 2001 (FOM 20001) is a world leading international
conference on advanced microscopy. It is the joint meeting of the 13th
International Conference on Confocal Microscopy and the 13th International
Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy.

FOM 2001 will be held on April 1-4, 2001 at the Academic Medical Centre
(AMC) of the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.


For further information: http://www.focusonmicroscopy.org/
----------------------------------------------------------



Important Dates:
----------------
Camera-ready Abstract Due Date: February 1, 2001
Early Registration Due Date: February 15, 2001
Hotel Reservation Due Date: February 15, 2001


Location:
---------
The Academic Medical Centre (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam is
situated only 15 minutes from the Amsterdam city centre where you will find
all sorts of restaurants, museums, concert halls historical buildings and
nice pubs. The organisation provides you with a public transport card, so
you can easily find your way from your hotel, through the city centre, to
the conference.


Hotel Accommodation:
--------------------
Hotels can be reserved through the RAI Hotel Service. See hotelform on the
website (or ask at the Conference Office). The Conference Office does not
make reservations. You can also make you own (cheaper) reservation through
on-line hotel reservation sites such as http://www.medialink.nl/amsterdam .


Conference Topics:
------------------
Theory, Instrumentation, 4D-Imaging of living cells, Multi-photon
excitation, Recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, FLIP), Fluorescence energy
transfer (FRET), Non-linear optics (CARS, SHG, THG), Time-resolved imaging
(FLIM), Green fluorescent protein (GFP), 4D- and 3D-Image processing,
reconstruction and analysis, Virtual Reality (VR), X-Ray microscopy, Near
field microscopy, Industrial applications in lithography and data storage,
and many other techniques and applications.

This year, there will be special attention for the issue: "Microscopy of
living cells and tissue"


International Organizing Commitee:
----------------------------------
G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; A.C. Boccara,
ESPCI, France; P.C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo, USA; C. Cogswell, University of
Sydney, Australia; J. Dobrucki, Jagiellonian University, Poland; R. Van
Driel, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; M. Gu, Swinburne
University of Technology, Australia; K.S. Ha, Korea Basic Science
Institute, Korea; S.W. Hell, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany; B.
Hermann, University of Texas HSC at San Antonio, USA; F.J. Kao, National
Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan; S. Kawata, Osaka University, Japan; A.
Kriette, University of Giessen, Germany; E.M.M. Manders, University of
Amsterdam, The Netherlands; M. Müller, University of Amsterdam, The
Netherlands; C. Saloma, University of Philippines, Philippines; C.J.R.
Sheppard, University of Sydney, Australia; E.H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Germany;
T. Wilson, University of Oxford, UK.


Conference Office:
------------------
Mrs M.P.A. Beunk-Timmers
Nicolaes Tulp Institute
PO-Box 23213
1100 DS Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Fax: +31-(0)20-6963228
Phone +31-(0)20-5668585
Web: http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org
E-mail: info-at-FocusOnMicroscopy.org


Local Organising Committee:
---------------------------
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff and Dr. E.M.M. Manders




---------------
Erik M.M. Manders, PhD
Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences
Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam

Visit: Kruislaan 316, Biulding III, room 2.07, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Plantage Muidergracht 12, 4th floor, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Mail: Kruislaan 316
1098 SM AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
E-mail: e.manders-at-chem.uva.nl
Tel: +31-(0)20-5256225 (5257702)(5255136)
Fax: +31-(0)20-5256271
Web: http://wwwmc.bio.uva.nl/
http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org/
---------------



From daemon Thu Nov 30 03:34:50 2000



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 09:19:57 +0000
Subject: Re: ultramicrotome room?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John

if cryo will be used later, it might be worth considering whether there will be
enough ventilation to prevent a build up of nitrogen gas and subsequent oxygen
depletion. If nothing else is done then an oxygen depletion monitor should be
top of the list before liquid nitrogen is used or stored in such a small room.

The sums for calculating oxygen loss when liquid nitrogen is evaporated are
fairly straight forward and I would always assume the worst scenario.

In the last two years there have been two fatal incidents, that I know of,
which have involved oxygen depletion so even if the use of liquid nitrogen is
in the future and a remote possibility it's worth considering now.

On a more trivial note it might be worth specifying floor and benches which
don't crack with constant liquid nitrogen spillages.

I hope this helps.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Sciences
University of Sunderland
UK

Jon Krupp wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Greetings:
}
} Do you have any advice regarding environmental controls for a small room to
} be used for ultrathin sectioning?
}
} I have been asked for recommendations regarding things like air filters,
} temperature control, and humidity.
}
} It will be a small room, maybe 6' x 9', in a modern university science
} building. The researcher is going to put a new ultramicrotome in there and
} will want to do serial sectioning on conventional resin blocks. Cryo may
} come later, so if there is anything special needed for that, now is the
} time to add it to the list.
}
} I have always been OK with standard sort of rooms, regular building air
} filters etc, if there is anything special I have overlooked, please let me
} know so I can pass it along.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu



From daemon Thu Nov 30 06:52:48 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:41:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: ultramicrotome room?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jon:
As you have said, the standard conditions and filters are really all that
are necessary. The only thing I have really had a problem with are air
currents. I generally ended up setting up a cublicle type area just barely
large enough for the microtome and me, with a curtain (the "plastic strip"
type used in cold rooms works)to minimize air currents. One other thing
that needs to be monitored/controlled is humidity (more than temperature,
even). Too dry or too humid, and forget sectioning! Of course, I was doing
massive serial sectioning, so controlling the environment became an
obsession. Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals

On Wed, 29 Nov 2000 11:57:22 -0800, Jon Krupp wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Greetings:
}
} Do you have any advice regarding environmental controls for a small room
to
} be used for ultrathin sectioning?
}
} I have been asked for recommendations regarding things like air filters,
} temperature control, and humidity.
}
} It will be a small room, maybe 6' x 9', in a modern university science
} building. The researcher is going to put a new ultramicrotome in there
and
} will want to do serial sectioning on conventional resin blocks. Cryo may
} come later, so if there is anything special needed for that, now is the
} time to add it to the list.
}
} I have always been OK with standard sort of rooms, regular building air
} filters etc, if there is anything special I have overlooked, please let
me
} know so I can pass it along.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Thu Nov 30 07:38:04 2000



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Wednesday, November 29, 2000 2:57 PM
Subject: Fwd: ultramicrotome room?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Jonathan,
Assuming the building is completed, the simplist modification to a "typical" room is to install a drip ventilation ceiling rather than one with a normal type of air vent. The drip ceilings are made up of ceiling tiles that have many small slits throughout which allow air to filter down into the room. This type of ventilation virtually eliminates drafts which, aside from vibration, can be a major problem in microtomy.
If you are lucky enough to be designing a room in a building under construction, the ideal situation for microtome and microscope rooms is a "floating " foundation. This is when the room floor (obviously in the lowest level) is on concrete supports that are isolated from the main building foundation. That way vibrations from the building as a whole are not transfered directly to the floor of the room in question. Going along with this is the use of flexible morter where internal walls join outside walls.

Debby


Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057
--------------------------------------


Greetings:

Do you have any advice regarding environmental controls for a small room to
be used for ultrathin sectioning?

I have been asked for recommendations regarding things like air filters,
temperature control, and humidity.

It will be a small room, maybe 6' x 9', in a modern university science
building. The researcher is going to put a new ultramicrotome in there and
will want to do serial sectioning on conventional resin blocks. Cryo may
come later, so if there is anything special needed for that, now is the
time to add it to the list.

I have always been OK with standard sort of rooms, regular building air
filters etc, if there is anything special I have overlooked, please let me
know so I can pass it along.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu






From daemon Thu Nov 30 09:59:48 2000



From: FRIEDA CHRISTIE :      F.Christie-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 11:23:20 BST
Subject: Ultramicrotome room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jon,

I arrived in post to find that a brand new Ultracut S had been
installed in a converted cleaners cupboard measuring (4' x 10')
located several metres from the building's main plant room.
Despite standing on an anti-vibration table the resonance through
the walls from the plant room mean that I have to time my
sectioning work so that it doesn't coincide with the machinery next
door. In addition, there was a cool air ventilation shaft directly
above the Ultracut that made the water in the knife boat resemble
something out of 'A Perfect Storm'!!!. ( I subsequently had that
blocked off). One other problem that you may encounter in such a
small room is the build up of static electricity due to the dry air. I
find that it helps the fill the sink with water when cutting.
I also suggest that you consider very carefully if it is wise to work
with cryo in such a small area as, I believe that this could be a
major hazard.

These are my personal experiences and I do not speak on behalf of
my organisation, but I hope that they are of some use to you in this
matter.




From daemon Thu Nov 30 12:15:29 2000



From: Xinran Liu :      xinran.liu-at-UTSouthwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 10:29:43 -0600
Subject: Follow-up on Hippocampal EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


First of all, I would like to thank people who responded to my previous post
regarding problems on cultured hippocampal EM. Special thanks to JoAnn
Buchanan, Dorothy Sorenson and Michael Plociniak and others who provided
valuable suggestion that lead to the fantastic results.

Here are the major modification on my previous protocol:

1. Make sure the culture is healthy.
2. Shorten fixation and dehydration time.
3. Prolong the uranyl acetate staining to 30-40 min.
4. Section at 50-60 nm thickness (setting).
5. Observe cells at 60 kV rather than a higher accelerating voltage.

Hope this helps with people who have the similar problems as I had before.

Xinran

********************************************
Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
Center for Basic Neuroscience
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
6000 Harry Hines Blvd., NA4.214A
Dallas, TX 75390-9111
Phone: (214) 648-1830
Fax: (214) 648-1801
E-mail: xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu



From daemon Thu Nov 30 12:53:33 2000



From: giselle melville :      giselledgt-at-excite.com
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 10:47:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Thesis question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Good afternoon

My name is Giselle. I am a graduate student working on my thesis. My
thesis topic is "Methods of preparation of petrographic thin sections for
Electron Microscopy". I have a collection of thin sections (chert) and I am
preparing the sections for analysis by a TEM 1200. The thin sections are
initially prepared by methods Ultramicrotomy and Ion Milling. TEM
parameters used will be electron diffraction and elemental composition to
obtain identification of the mineral and microstructures. I need more
information (references) on recent literature (1998-2000) on my subject or
similiar work done using these methods for analyis by TEM.

I need your help!!!

Thank you for your time.





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html



From daemon Thu Nov 30 15:35:59 2000



From: Ladd Research :      sales-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 16:26:24 -0500
Subject: Looking for address of Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Could anyone provide me with a phone number, e-mail or fax number for
the company "RAITH USA" It is a Germany Company and I thought there was
a distrbutor in the US

Thanks

D. Sicard
--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

web site http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955


From daemon Thu Nov 30 17:13:44 2000



From: Louise_Harner-at-albint.com
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 18:02:28 -0500
Subject: Pricing suggestions? B&L projection 'scope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My boss wants to sell one of our projection microscope systems to someone she
knows. I have been given the job of suggesting a price and would appreciate
suggestions from anyone on the listserver. To prevent clutter on the listserver,
please respond to my e-mail address: Louise_Harner-at-albint.com

The projection microscope system has Bausch & Lomb optics. It is basically an
inverted monocular microscope and projects an image onto the tabletop -
magnification of 500X at the table. The top of the lamp house is about 42 inches
above the table. The light goes through a condenser, then through the slide,
into a 20X objective, and out the monocular eyepiece. The normal focusing and
x-y stage controls are supplemented by hand control extensions (x, y, and z) and
by foot control extensions (x and y). There is a catalog number on the lamp
housing: B&L cat. # 31-32-61, but I'm not sure if that is for the lamp only or
the whole system. The system was used primarily to measure fiber diameters.

Thanks in advance for your help!


Louise Harner
Albany International Research Co.
Mansfield, MA

Louise_Harner-at-albint.com



From daemon Thu Nov 30 18:24:40 2000



From: DENISE MARTIN :      DENISE.MARTIN-at-cfisd.net
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 18:16:31 -0600
Subject: Seeking TEM specimens for high school students

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I work for a public school system in Houston, TX. We acquired a Philips
TEM as a donation. It is now installed. We are not set up to prepare
specimens and won't be (if ever) at least until next year.
}
} Am in serach of prepared grids you may not need anymore for our high
} school students to look at. Descriptions of grid would be beneficial,
} i.e. what specimen is and what might be occurring.
}
} Seeking specifically:
} plant tissue (leaves, stems, & roots)
} animal cells
} prokaryotic cells
} samples from various kingdoms
} dividing cells
} human tissue
}
} Please advise if you can help! THANKS!
}
} Denise Martin
} Cy-Fair ISD - Science Resource Center
} 11206 Telge Rd.
} Cypress, TX 77429
} 281-897-4695
}




From daemon Thu Nov 30 21:57:33 2000



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 13:18:38 +1000
Subject: RE: ultramicrotome room? Draft elimination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In my experience, in most climatic zones a room for ultramicrotomy should be
air-conditioned. This frequently creates drafts and these must be eliminated.
The frequently used louvered airduct ceiling outlets are unsuitable and if they
are blocked this would unbalances a complex AC systems.
The cheapest, highly effective way to make such an outlet draft-free is to
mount a 600mm sheet metal inverted "Chinese hat" below the outlet so that a
150mm gap is maintained.
This hat will break the draft and direct the airflow along the ceiling and then
down the walls. Effectively the outlet area is greatly increased and the air
speed slowed and re-directed.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, November 30, 2000 10:42 PM, Roger Moretz [SMTP:rcmoretz-at-excite.
com] wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Jon:
} As you have said, the standard conditions and filters are really all that
} are necessary. The only thing I have really had a problem with are air
} currents. I generally ended up setting up a cublicle type area just barely
} large enough for the microtome and me, with a curtain (the "plastic strip"
} type used in cold rooms works)to minimize air currents. One other thing
} that needs to be monitored/controlled is humidity (more than temperature,
} even). Too dry or too humid, and forget sectioning! Of course, I was doing
} massive serial sectioning, so controlling the environment became an
} obsession. Hope this helps.
}
} Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
} Dept of Toxicology
} Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals
}
} On Wed, 29 Nov 2000 11:57:22 -0800, Jon Krupp wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Greetings:
} }
} } Do you have any advice regarding environmental controls for a small room
} to
} } be used for ultrathin sectioning?
} }
} } I have been asked for recommendations regarding things like air filters,
} } temperature control, and humidity.
} }
} } It will be a small room, maybe 6' x 9', in a modern university science
} } building. The researcher is going to put a new ultramicrotome in there
} and
} } will want to do serial sectioning on conventional resin blocks. Cryo may
} } come later, so if there is anything special needed for that, now is the
} } time to add it to the list.
} }
} } I have always been OK with standard sort of rooms, regular building air
} } filters etc, if there is anything special I have overlooked, please let
} me
} } know so I can pass it along.
} }
} } Thanks
} }
} } Jonathan Krupp
} } Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} } University of California
} } Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} } (831) 459-2477
} } jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________________
} Tired of slow Internet? Get -at-Home Broadband Internet
} http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html
}



From daemon Sun Dec 10 18:24:19 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Sun, 10 Dec 2000 18:21:47 -0600
Subject: Test at 6:21 to TestList

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html










MicroscopyListserver Archive Email Extraction Software Version NJZ07060908

Return to Microscopy Listserver Home Page


Return to MSA HomePage