Microscopy ListServer Archives  


File Requested = 0207.txt
Retrival Software Version=NJZ07060908

From: Arthur Day :      ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 19:39:31 +1000
Subject: Turning machines off: (was LaB6 life expectancy)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Pavel,

I hope this doesn't start off a thorny side debate about the pros and
cons of turning our microscopes off or not when not in use, but I
think that Ritchie is correct. I don't know your local situation but
unless there is some really compelling reason to turn the electron
optics console off on weekends then you should ideally leave it on
permanently as you do the vacuum system. (Just blank out or turn down
the brightness if you are worried about "burn marks" from characters
on the TV monitor screens?) There are at least two elements to this:

1. Even if leaving the electronics on all of the time means that you
have to replace the monitor screens every few years, the risk of
other much more serious (read expensive) things going wrong over the
microscope's service life as a result of cycling the power hundreds
of times, is probably a lot more significant. The replacement costs
for the monitor screens would generally be peanuts compared with the
costs of diagnosing and replacing some of the other dozens of bits
and pieces in the electronics console, especially any one of a large
number of individual boards that could fail. Add to that the cost of
the down time while you wait for replacement parts. Usually you get a
fair bit of warning from an ageing monitor screen via gradual loss of
picture quality, so you can change it at leisure, and replacement
costs should only be in the order of hundreds of dollars or less
rather than the all-up costs in the thousands of dollars or more for
many components in the rest of the machine.

2. In any case there is a risk that turning the electron optics
console on and off hundreds of times could abruptly shorten the life
of the monitor tubes anyway -- even more than simply leaving them on,
because thermal cycling of the filament will place mechanical
stresses on the filament itself, the other gun components, and
metal-glass seals etc.

I suppose the disclaimer is that of course the optimum on/off regime
is dependent on one's particular local situation.

}
} Reading you question ,Ritchie, I thought you might be right. The
} electronics probably would last longer if I don't turn on and off the
} console 50 times a year, but I think TV monitors, would burn out.
}
} Regards,
} Pavel





Arthur Day, Electron Microscope Unit Phone: 61-2-9717-3457
Ansto Materials Division Fax: 61-2-9543-7179
PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Email: ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Australia www: http://www.ansto.gov.au/


From daemon Mon Jul 1 07:29:02 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2002 13:21:54 +0100
Subject: recirculating chiller

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,
I am interested in recirculating chillers that can be attached to
electropolishing units. These 'chillers' pump coolant to the
electropolishing unit and the temperatures range that I require needs to
be as far down as -40°C.
If someone has one could they send me the brand/make?

Thanks in advance,
Steven






From daemon Mon Jul 1 07:34:12 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 25 Jun 2002 13:29:19 +0100
Subject: recirculating chillers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,
I am interested in recirculating chillers that can be attached to
electropolishing units. These 'chillers' pump coolant to the
electropolishing unit and the temperatures range that I require needs to
be as far down as -40°C.
If someone has one could they send me the brand/make?

Thanks in advance,
Steven

--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Mon Jul 1 08:37:55 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:23:57 -0400
Subject: Re: travel to Quebec City

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Cora,

I booked my flight right into Quebec City. Check your arrangements.
Montreal is a long way from Quebec City.


Lee

At 8:36 AM -0400 6/28/02, Corazon D. Bucana wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Mon Jul 1 09:48:53 2002



From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 16:40:28 +0200
Subject: Conference list 2003

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear microscopists,

the initial microscopy conference collection for the year 2003 has
appeared at the Petr's Microscopy Resources at the

http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/meetings.php#2003

Petr Schauer
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dr. Petr Schauer tel.: (+420 5) 41514313 |
| Head of Electron Microscopy Laboratory fax : (+420 5) 41514404 |
| INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS (+420 5) 41514402 |
| ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC e-mail: petr-at-isibrno.cz |
| Kralovopolska 147, CZ-612 64 Brno petr-at-dp.fce.vutbr.cz |
| Czech Republic www: http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/ |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+



From daemon Mon Jul 1 09:51:18 2002



From: David.Cugier-at-abbott.com
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:45:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Kathy,

I have been using the older Leica Lynx tissue processor (Now distributed by
Electron Microscopy Sciences under the name Vision EMS processor) for 6 years
and have been extremely pleased with the reliability, efficiency, and quality.
There are a few potential short falls inherent with any automated tissue
processor versus processing by hand which include the incorporation of air
bubbles which can get trapped in the processing baskets and prevent good fluid
exchange with the tissue. Also there is the potential problem of vials
jamming if the vials are not seated securely in the carousel or if the vials
are not symetrically round. I have not experienced jamming vials but I know
this can be a problem if you are not careful. The automated tissue processors
are extremely helpful in our lab because we process thousands of samples a
year and the overall sample preservation is good.


David Cugier
Associate Cellular and Molecular Biologist
Abbott Labs
847-938-6725
David.Cugier-at-Abbott.com



kwalters
{kwalters-at-blue.weeg. To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
uiowa.edu} cc:
Subject: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples
06/27/02 04:02 PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

Has anyone had experience with this automated processor of EM samples? Thanks
for any information you can provide me.

Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------







From daemon Mon Jul 1 10:01:09 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 10:54:38 -0400
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: Polarizer and Crystals in LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Don,

Please begin with:

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/techniques/polarized/polarizedhome.html

Then, to get your colors from polarized light, you must understand
the phenomenon:

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/virtual/polarizing/

The key to having command of any tool is to understand how it works! The
microscope IS a tool!

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


} ----------
} From: danthony38-at-cogeco.ca
} Sent: Friday, June 28, 2002 9:04 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Polarizer and Crystals in LM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (danthony38-at-cogeco.ca) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
} June 26, 2002 at 13:32:34
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
} Email: danthony38-at-cogeco.ca
} Name: don anthony
}
} Education: 9-12th Grade High School
}
} Location: peterborough ont canada
}
} Question: I have seen beautiful photos of, (as I was told)chemicals
} crystalized on glass slides. As it was explained to me, a polorizer
} was placed in front of the light source,and a second polorizer, above
} the crystals being photographed. The profusion of colour was
} unbelieveable, and when the polorizer was moved slightly, the colours
} changed, creating a different picture. My question is,after trying to
} duplicate this proceedure, I'm getting no where, can anyone help?
} Also what chemicals make for the best crystals. Many thanks Don
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 1 10:02:43 2002



From: David.Cugier-at-abbott.com
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 09:56:28 -0500
Subject: Re: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Kathy,

I have been using the older Leica Lynx tissue processor (Now distributed by
Electron Microscopy Sciences under the name Vision EMS processor) for 6 years
and have been extremely pleased with the reliability, efficiency, and quality.
There are a few potential short falls inherent with any automated tissue
processor versus processing by hand which include the incorporation of air
bubbles which can get trapped in the processing baskets and prevent good fluid
exchange with the tissue. Also there is the potential problem of vials
jamming if the vials are not seated securely in the carousel or if the vials
are not symetrically round. I have not experienced jamming vials but I know
this can be a problem if you are not careful. The automated tissue processors
are extremely helpful in our lab because we process thousands of samples a
year and the overall sample preservation is good.


David Cugier
Associate Cellular and Molecular Biologist
Abbott Labs
847-938-6725
David.Cugier-at-Abbott.com



kwalters
{kwalters-at-blue.weeg. To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
uiowa.edu} cc:
Subject: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples
06/27/02 04:02 PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

Has anyone had experience with this automated processor of EM samples? Thanks
for any information you can provide me.

Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------







From daemon Mon Jul 1 10:07:41 2002



From: David.Cugier-at-abbott.com
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 10:01:20 -0500
Subject: Re: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Kathy,

I have been using the older Leica Lynx tissue processor (Now distributed by
Electron Microscopy Sciences under the name Vision EMS processor) for 6 years
and have been extremely pleased with the reliability, efficiency, and quality.
There are a few potential short falls inherent with any automated tissue
processor versus processing by hand which include the incorporation of air
bubbles which can get trapped in the processing baskets and prevent good fluid
exchange with the tissue. Also there is the potential problem of vials
jamming if the vials are not seated securely in the carousel or if the vials
are not symetrically round. I have not experienced jamming vials but I know
this can be a problem if you are not careful. The automated tissue processors
are extremely helpful in our lab because we process thousands of samples a
year and the overall sample preservation is good.


David Cugier
Associate Cellular and Molecular Biologist
Abbott Labs
847-938-6725
David.Cugier-at-Abbott.com



kwalters
{kwalters-at-blue.weeg. To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
uiowa.edu} cc:
Subject: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples
06/27/02 04:02 PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

Has anyone had experience with this automated processor of EM samples? Thanks
for any information you can provide me.

Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------







From daemon Mon Jul 1 10:21:11 2002



From: David.Cugier-at-abbott.com
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 10:14:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Kathy,

I have been using the older Leica Lynx tissue processor (Now distributed by
Electron Microscopy Sciences under the name Vision EMS processor) for 6 years
and have been extremely pleased with the reliability, efficiency, and quality.
There are a few potential short falls inherent with any automated tissue
processor versus processing by hand which include the incorporation of air
bubbles which can get trapped in the processing baskets and prevent good fluid
exchange with the tissue. Also there is the potential problem of vials
jamming if the vials are not seated securely in the carousel or if the vials
are not symetrically round. I have not experienced jamming vials but I know
this can be a problem if you are not careful. The automated tissue processors
are extremely helpful in our lab because we process thousands of samples a
year and the overall sample preservation is good.


David Cugier
Associate Cellular and Molecular Biologist
Abbott Labs
847-938-6725
David.Cugier-at-Abbott.com



kwalters
{kwalters-at-blue.weeg. To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
uiowa.edu} cc:
Subject: Lynx el Tissue Processor for EM samples
06/27/02 04:02 PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

Has anyone had experience with this automated processor of EM samples? Thanks
for any information you can provide me.

Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------







From daemon Mon Jul 1 10:27:18 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 11:20:52 -0400
Subject: FW: Ask-A-Microscopist: Polarizer and Crystals in LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Morning Don,
}
} Please begin with:
}
} http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/techniques/polarized/polarizedhome.html
}
} Then, to get your colors from polarized light, you must understand
} the phenomenon:
}
} http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/virtual/polarizing/
}
} The key to having command of any tool is to understand how it works! The
} microscope IS a tool!
}
} Regards,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} Schmucker II Science Center
} West Chester University
} South Church Street and Rosedale
} West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} Phone: 610-738-0437
} FAX: 610-738-0437
} fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
}
}
} ----------
} From: danthony38-at-cogeco.ca
} Sent: Friday, June 28, 2002 9:04 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Polarizer and Crystals in LM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (danthony38-at-cogeco.ca) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
} June 26, 2002 at 13:32:34
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
} Email: danthony38-at-cogeco.ca
} Name: don anthony
}
} Education: 9-12th Grade High School
}
} Location: peterborough ont canada
}
} Question: I have seen beautiful photos of, (as I was told)chemicals
} crystalized on glass slides. As it was explained to me, a polorizer
} was placed in front of the light source,and a second polorizer, above
} the crystals being photographed. The profusion of colour was
} unbelieveable, and when the polorizer was moved slightly, the colours
} changed, creating a different picture. My question is,after trying to
} duplicate this proceedure, I'm getting no where, can anyone help?
} Also what chemicals make for the best crystals. Many thanks Don
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 1 13:08:03 2002



From: Abdul Rani, Suriani :      suriani-at-erc.montana.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 11:58:44 -0600
Subject: Calibration in MetaMorph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi!

We have a problem here, whereby the picture taken using the confocal
microscopy is distorted in MetaMorph.The picture taken is 1mm by 1mm, but
when the planes are rotated(90° angle), the x and y axis seem distored. I
have been trying to calibrate the xy distances, but it doesn't seem to work.
I was wondering if anyone can inform me the exact ways of calibrating the
distances, or the reasons for the pictures being distorted.

Thank you for your help.

Suriani Abdul Rani
Control Lab
CBE,MSU
Montana

suriania-at-erc.montana.edu


From daemon Mon Jul 1 17:13:49 2002



From: tartenon-at-netscape.net
Date: Mon, 01 Jul 2002 18:05:20 -0400
Subject: RE: Calibration in MetaMorph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Easiest way to do this is contacting UIC at http://www.universal-imaging.com and follow the links to support, they have on site scientific to help you out.
"Abdul Rani, Suriani" {suriani-at-erc.montana.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor:  The Microscopy Society of America
} To  Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi!
}
} We have a problem here, whereby the picture taken using the confocal
} microscopy is distorted in MetaMorph.The picture taken is 1mm by 1mm, but
} when the planes are rotated(90° angle), the x and y axis seem distored. I
} have been trying to calibrate the xy distances, but it doesn't seem to work.
} I was wondering if anyone can inform me the exact ways of calibrating the
} distances, or the reasons for the pictures being distorted.
}
} Thank you for your help.
}
} Suriani Abdul Rani
} Control Lab
} CBE,MSU
} Montana
}
} suriania-at-erc.montana.edu
}
}


__________________________________________________________________
Your favorite stores, helpful shopping tools and great gift ideas. Experience the convenience of buying online with Shop-at-Netscape! http://shopnow.netscape.com/

Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Mail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com/



From daemon Mon Jul 1 18:53:10 2002



From: Kevin Frischmann :      kfrisch-at-amnh.org
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2002 08:31:56 -0700
Subject: Re: facility management

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ed,

I would have to say that the blame is not so much on NT as it is on typical user practices. The security of any system relies a great deal on the security practices of its users.

That said - there are, not surprisingly, a number of solutions to the problem along the lines of what you suggest. Since system administration is a secondary part of many readers' job descriptions (myself included), I feel emphasis ought to be on easy to configure/implement. (I don't know any details on scripting a command to execute after a specified period without input; perhaps "at")

I should mention first that I don't use auditing or auto-logout, so I can't claim first-hand experience that might allow me to point out possible pitfalls.
I do, however, always set the system to lock after a specified period (see below).

If the system is controlling instrumentation, or runs processes that take a long time (users likely to get coffee/lunch while waiting), I would suggest that the system be set to lock, rather than logoff. An auto-logoff will either hang waiting for applications to terminate, or terminate all applications if properly configured (losing unsaved data). This could be a real problem for some instruments, and upsetting for some users. If the system is set to lock, and a user forgets to logoff, anyone with administrative privileges (presumably you) can unlock the workstation in order to properly logoff the last user.

The easiest way I know to setup a local session timeout is to setup a password-protected screensaver. The first step here is to make sure users can't change the screensaver settings. This is best done using the NT system policy editor (NOT the Win 9x version). This is included with NT Server, and perhaps with the Resource Kit as well - I don't know of other ways to get it, but there may be. It can be installed on an NT workstation, using the NT Server disk.

If you have no way to obtain the policy editor, access to the screensaver tab (as well as just about anything else) can also be restricted by manually editing the registry. After restricting access to the screensaver settings, proceed as below:

To setup a lock timeout, just go to the screensaver tab, set the wait time reasonably short, and fill the "password protected" check-box -- doesn't get any easier!

To setup an auto-logoff timeout, you'll need to install and configure the winexit screensaver (included in the resource kit), as well as edit some permissions to keep it from hanging when trying to shut down programs.

My apologies to all if this has begun to wander a bit from the scope of this list, but many of us have to deal with these issues without proper background or support. (i.e. "winging it")

Ed: if you need further details I would suggest contacting me off the list.

Best,

Kevin Frischmann

Microscopy & Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA


------------------------------------------------------------------------

To: Kevin Frischmann {kfrisch-at-amnh.org}
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Judy,

I believe you can obtain the information you need without installing any
additional software. Windows NT has built-in tools for tracking users'
logons/logoffs (among other things), though it's not enabled by default.

Click Start -} Programs -} Administrative Tools (Common) -} User Manager
Select the Policies menu -} Audit..., and you'll find a window that allows
you to enable auditing, and select which events are audited and logged.
In your case, I'd recommend just enabling auditing for successful logons
and logoffs. Everything selected will be logged to the Security Event
Log: C:\WINNT\system32\config\SecEvent.Evt (Assuming %SystemRoot% is
C:\WINNT\).

In order to view, filter, sort, and archive the log, as well as change
settings like maximum file size and overwrite policy, use the Event
Viewer:
Click Start -} Programs -} Administrative Tools (Common) -} Event Viewer

Use Log -} Security to select the Security Log for viewing. I think
you'll find the View -} Filter Events... selection will allow you to do
everything you need, without having to import to a spreadsheet.

This is the easiest to configure option I can think of; If you need
something a bit more sophisticated, and/or need to audit a large number of
workstations, Fred Monson's suggestions are certainly more appropriate.

Best Regards,

Kevin Frischmann

Microscopy & Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Phone: 212-313-7975
Fax: 212-496-3480
email: kfrisch-at-amnh.org




At 05:06 PM 6/27/02 -0400, Judy Trogadis wrote:
This topic may have been discussed, if so, I will look at the archives if
you tell me an approximate date.

Some of the microscopes in our facility are sometimes left in a sorry
state by inexperienced or hasty users. I would like to keep track of users
who are actually capturing images, therefore using the computer (if
fingerprint sensors exist, let me know, I can just dust the microscope
knobs).

Has anyone used software that keeps a record of login ID's and hours of
use? We are on NT operating systems.

Thank you

Judy Trogadis
Bio-Imaging Coordinator
St. Michael's Hospital, 8Queen
30 Bond St.
Toronto, ON
M5B 1W8
Canada

ph: 416-864-6060 x6337
fax: 416-864-6043
trogadisj-at-smh.toronto.on.ca








From daemon Tue Jul 2 11:02:20 2002



From: kwalters :      kwalters-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Jul 2002 10:44:53 -0500
Subject: Leica EM processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The responses from the request for comments about the Lynx EM processor were
extremely helpful, so I thought I'd go out on a limb and see if anyone had
comments about the Leica EM processor.

I have collected the Lynx responses in a file and would be glad to send it on
if anyone needs this information.

Thanks,
Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------



From daemon Tue Jul 2 11:13:58 2002



From: kwalters :      kwalters-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Jul 2002 11:07:45 -0500
Subject: Leica EM Processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The responses from the request for comments about the Lynx EM processor were
extremely helpful, so I thought I'd go out on a limb and see if anyone had
comments about the Leica EM processor.

I have collected the Lynx responses in a file and would be glad to send it on
if anyone needs this information.

Thanks,
Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------



From daemon Tue Jul 2 15:38:34 2002



From: Brian McIntyre :      mcintyre-at-optics.rochester.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Jul 2002 16:19:21 -0400
Subject: silver tarnish analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi listers-

i'm looking at some daguerreotypes (early photographs on Ag coated Cu
plates) in the sem to find out about the silver tarnish that forms on the
surfaces. as expected i find sulphur in it, but not in all the areas that
look tarnished. i suspect that since the AgS layer may be thin when
compared to the beam penetration, and that the underlying material is all
Ag (with some Au toning agent) i may be swamping the signal from the
tarnish layer. curiously the areas with the most intense interference
colors are not the highest in S (no O present either). i've used low HV as
well as high. since this is on museum materials i can't prep a cross
section to see what's going on.

so the questions: will a tarnish layer on silver form a wedge of varying
thickness around an aperture to the ambient air? and if a wedge forms will
the interference colors indicate the local thicknesses accurately? does
light play any role in tarnishing (some areas beneath a matte paper look
untarnished, while adjacent areas outside the matte look heavily
tarnished)? and as for the vanishing S signal...any ideas? is there a
better way to probe the tarnish for thickness and composition (like SIMS)?

thx in advance.
b-


----------------------------------------------
Brian McIntyre
Electron Microscopy Lab- River Campus
Univ of Rochester
Rochester, NY 14627
716-275-3058/4875


From daemon Wed Jul 3 08:58:10 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 03 Jul 2002 08:45:59 -0500
Subject: copper braid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Listers,
I am trying to find a source for heavy copper braid wire to repair some accessories used for metal and carbon evaporation. This is the stiff but flexible wire that would go between the connectors in a high vacuum evaporator and, in this case, the carbon evaporation apparatus. Does anyone have a source in the USA who is likely to sell small quantities? I just need a couple of feet at most.

Thanks,
Debby


Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907




From daemon Wed Jul 3 09:21:27 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 3 Jul 2002 06:48:11 -0700
Subject: Nikon Coolscan 8000: EM film holder modification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id JAA18989
for dist-Microscopy; Wed, 3 Jul 2002 09:19:56 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id JAA18984
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail1-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Wed, 3 Jul 2002 09:19:26 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from mail.mcn.org (pop3.mcn.org [204.189.12.13])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with ESMTP id JAA18975
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ; Wed, 3 Jul 2002 09:19:14 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from [63.193.12.169] (ha-1o-men-p4-m13.mcn.org [63.193.12.169])
by mail.mcn.org (8.12.5/8.12.5) with ESMTP id g63EEOJK020723;
Wed, 3 Jul 2002 07:14:28 -0700 (PDT)
X-Sender: schooley-at-mail.mcn.org
Message-Id: {v03007800b948b09743f4-at-[63.193.12.100]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


} From: Majid Ghoddusi (mghoddusi-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au)

Hi all,

We are considering to purchase a Nikon SuperCoolscan 8000. Our TEM negative
size is 8.0x9.9 cm and from reading of previous postings on this subject it
appears that the film holder needs a bit of modification for TEM negatives
to fit in without going through the hassle of trimming them (I am aware that
the maximum area that I can scan is about 6.0x9.0, I just want to avoid
trimming down hundreds of negatives).

I would really appreciate it if colleagues who have tried it (modifying the
holder) successfully could please share their experience with me. I have
only seen the 120/220 film holder and it did not seem to be very easy to
modify.

Regards
majid

.....................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, DVM PhD
Senior Microscopist
Muscle Development Unit
Children's Medical Research Institute
locked Bag 23
Wentworthville NSW 2145
Australia
http://www.cmri.com.au
........................................................




From daemon Wed Jul 3 09:30:37 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 3 Jul 2002 07:22:32 -0700
Subject: EM film holder modification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From: Majid Ghoddusi (mghoddusi-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au)

Hi all,

We are considering to purchase a Nikon SuperCoolscan 8000. Our TEM negative
size is 8.0x9.9 cm and from reading of previous postings on this subject it
appears that the film holder needs a bit of modification for TEM negatives
to fit in without going through the hassle of trimming them (I am aware that
the maximum area that I can scan is about 6.0x9.0, I just want to avoid
trimming down hundreds of negatives).

I would really appreciate it if colleagues who have tried it (modifying the
holder) successfully could please share their experience with me. I have
only seen the 120/220 film holder and it did not seem to be very easy to
modify.

Regards
majid

....................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, DVM PhD
Senior Microscopist
Muscle Development Unit
Children's Medical Research Institute
locked Bag 23
Wentworthville NSW 2145
Australia
http://www.cmri.com.au
.......................................................




From daemon Wed Jul 3 12:29:36 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jul 2002 13:23:49 -0400
Subject: Re: copper braid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Debby,

Try any electronics store, this kind of material is commonly used for
attaching earth grounds, buss bars and the like. It also is used as a
solder removal aid, or wick. (In the latter case, it is held against a
connection that is to be de-soldered and heated with a soldering iron.
The solder melts and wicks its way into the briad toward the heat,
leaving the joint exposed.)

Too thin for your use? Braid three strands together, etc.

John Twilley

Debby Sherman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers,
} I am trying to find a source for heavy copper braid wire to repair some accessories used for metal and carbon evaporation. This is the stiff but flexible wire that would go between the connectors in a high vacuum evaporator and, in this case, the carbon evaporation apparatus. Does anyone have a source in the USA who is likely to sell small quantities? I just need a couple of feet at most.
}
} Thanks,
} Debby
}
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-052 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jul 3 13:46:07 2002



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jul 2002 13:35:11 -0500
Subject: Re: copper braid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 08:45 AM 7/3/2002 -0500, Debby Sherman wrote:
} I am trying to find a source for heavy copper braid wire to repair some accessories used for metal and carbon evaporation. This is the stiff but flexible wire that would go between the connectors in a high vacuum evaporator and, in this case, the carbon evaporation apparatus. Does anyone have a source in the USA who is likely to sell small quantities? I just need a couple of feet at most.

Unless you have special requirements for purity, just go to a
well-equipped hardware store and ask for "copper grounding wire",
a heavy gauge (6?) braid.

- John



From daemon Wed Jul 3 15:18:54 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jul 2002 16:18:24 -0400
Subject: Re: silver tarnish analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Brian,

If you haven't already done so, I would suggest that you consult the
people in the Image Permanence Institute of your own university. There
are individuals there, or formerly associated with it, who have done
considerable work in this area. Irving Pobboravsky comes to mind as one
of the few contemporary practitioners who might be able to provide
examples that could be sacrificed.

Just what the image forming structures are in a daguerreotype, and what
interferes with their optical effects, continue to be a subject of
research. The physical state of the surface has much to do with the
scattering of light, and tarnish effects lead to short range
redistribution of material in addition to the expected chemical
reactions. One might expect to find some silver amalgam present as well.

SIMS certainly would seem to be a valuable option. The material would
easily lend itself to ESCA or Auger techniques, as well.

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist

Brian McIntyre wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi listers-
}
} i'm looking at some daguerreotypes (early photographs on Ag coated Cu
} plates) in the sem to find out about the silver tarnish that forms on the
} surfaces. as expected i find sulphur in it, but not in all the areas that
} look tarnished. i suspect that since the AgS layer may be thin when
} compared to the beam penetration, and that the underlying material is all
} Ag (with some Au toning agent) i may be swamping the signal from the
} tarnish layer. curiously the areas with the most intense interference
} colors are not the highest in S (no O present either). i've used low HV as
} well as high. since this is on museum materials i can't prep a cross
} section to see what's going on.
}
} so the questions: will a tarnish layer on silver form a wedge of varying
} thickness around an aperture to the ambient air? and if a wedge forms will
} the interference colors indicate the local thicknesses accurately? does
} light play any role in tarnishing (some areas beneath a matte paper look
} untarnished, while adjacent areas outside the matte look heavily
} tarnished)? and as for the vanishing S signal...any ideas? is there a
} better way to probe the tarnish for thickness and composition (like SIMS)?
}
} thx in advance.
} b-
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------
} Brian McIntyre
} Electron Microscopy Lab- River Campus
} Univ of Rochester
} Rochester, NY 14627
} 716-275-3058/4875
}
}
}



From daemon Thu Jul 4 06:52:58 2002



From: Sally Stowe :      stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2002 21:41:30 +1000
Subject: Postdoc in multidisiplinary field

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A significant component of this work could involve microscopy

Dear colleague,

A postdoctoral fellowship is available at the Centre for Visual
Sciences, Australian National University. It would be appreciated if you
could bring the attached advertisement to the attention of potential
candidates.

yours sincerely

Gert Stange

ANUTECH Pty Ltd

and

AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Postdoctoral Fellow in Neurophysiology/Biorobotics

The Centre for Visual Sciences is seeking to fill a position to work on a
challenging research project investigating the principles of visual flight
control in insects. The research project, funded by a major aerospace
organization, aims at identifying the spatial transfer characteristics of
the optics and the spatiotemporal characteristics of the neuronal circuitry
associated with the simple eyes (ocelli) of dragonflies. The successful
applicant will apply optical, neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and
behavioural techniques, with specific attention to object/motion detection
mechanisms in the ocellar system and their integration with neuronal flight
control circuitry.
The biological results will be applied to the development of concepts for
novel attitude control systems capable of being implemented in ultra-light
hardware for application to micro-unmanned aerial vehicles.

Salary range will be $A 45,000 to $A 55,000. The position is for 1 year
initially, with prospects for extension for a further 2 years subject to
satisfactory performance and availability of project funding. Enquiries
should be directed to Dr. Gert Stange, ph +61 2 6125 5089, email
gert.stange-at-anu.edu.au. The selection criteria and duty statement can be
obtained from or from Beverley Cooper, ph +61 2 6125 5865, email .

Applications close on Friday 17 August, 2002.

Applications, including the names and contact details of 3 referees, should
be sent to Ms. Beverley Cooper, ANUTECH Pty Ltd., GPO Box 4, Canberra ACT
2601, fax +61 2 6257 1433.




From daemon Thu Jul 4 09:29:37 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 04 Jul 2002 09:20:25 -0500
Subject: copper braid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Thanks for all the replies regarding sources for copper braid. Most of the braid is tinned on the outside and can be either flat or round. A few of the responses are below.

1) If you disassemble co-axial cable you will find some copper braid wire within. Just remove this, attach crimp-on ends and you ae all set.

2) some local hardware stores corry it as it is used for grounding wire. It also is occasionally used to "wick" solder away from joins.

3) Newark Electronics sells what you want but you might have to buy 50-100
feet at about $30-$100. In Newark catalog 119, Beldon's braid is on page
1175 and Alpha's is on page 1239. Alpha calls theirs "tinned copper flat
braid". My Beldon braid # 8660 carried 14.5 amps and had a cross section
of about 3800 circular mils.

4) try hosfelt electronics. http://hosfelt.com/index.htm

5) Try McMaster Carr. http://McMaster.com

6) Ham radio folks often use braided wire as grounding wire.

7) This wire is often used in Physiology experiments where "noise" is often a problem. You might find it in a shop that repairs this equipment on your campus.

8) Try commercial dealers who sell High Vacuum equipment. They might be willing to sell some of the braid.

Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Thu Jul 4 09:59:08 2002



From: elbio martinez :      edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2002 11:43:17 ART
Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id JAA23882
for dist-Microscopy; Thu, 4 Jul 2002 09:57:11 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id JAA23879
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail1-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Thu, 4 Jul 2002 09:56:40 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from crdsf1.arcride.edu.ar (crdsf1.arcride.edu.ar [200.9.237.3])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id JAA23872
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Thu, 4 Jul 2002 09:56:28 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from arcride.edu.ar by crdsf1.arcride.edu.ar id aa17645;
4 Jul 2002 11:54 EST
Message-ID: {BasiliX-1.1.0-10257937973d245f05e7d34-at-wwwmail.ceride.gov.ar}
X-Mailer: BasiliX 1.1.0
X-SenderIP: 200.9.237.5


Hello all,
Please inform if theres someone who knows about the internal electronics of the detecting unit of a x-ray fluorescence which characteristics are:

EDAX PV9740/05

MODEL PV9500 165-17

ACTIVE AREA 10 MM2

AMPLIFIER MODEL 183 A

The problem is that some LED or PHOTODIODE of said detector burnt out. The detector is a vacuum packed unit and this diagnostic is the result of measurements on the detector connection pins guided by an electric circuit scheme.

If someone can give me advice, please contact me,



Tic. Ppal Elbio Martmnez
CERIDE - CONICET
G|emes 3450
3000 - Santa Fe
Argentina
email: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar


From daemon Thu Jul 4 10:04:21 2002



From: edmarti-at-crdsf2.arcride.edu.ar
Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 11:58:51 +0300
Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,
Please inform if theres someone who knows about the internal electronics of the detecting unit of a x-ray fluorescence which characteristics are:

EDAX PV9740/05

MODEL PV9500 165-17

ACTIVE AREA 10 MM2

AMPLIFIER MODEL 183 A

The problem is that some LED or PHOTODIODE of said detector burnt out. The detector is a vacuum packed unit and this diagnostic is the result of measurements on the detector connection pins guided by an electric circuit scheme.

If someone can give me advice, please contact me,



Tic. Ppal Elbio Martmnez
CERIDE - CONICET
G|emes 3450
3000 - Santa Fe
Argentina
email: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar


From daemon Thu Jul 4 10:26:13 2002



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Elbio_Mart=EDnez?= :      edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 12:20:05 -0300
Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello all,
Please inform if there's someone who knows about the internal electronics of
the detecting unit of a x-ray fluorescence which characteristics are:

EDAX PV9740/05

MODEL PV9500 165-17

ACTIVE AREA 10 MM2

AMPLIFIER MODEL 183 A

The problem is that some LED or PHOTODIODE of said detector burnt out. The
detector is a vacuum packed unit and this diagnostic is the result of
measurements on the detector connection pins guided by an electric circuit
scheme.

If someone can give me advice, please contact me,



Tic. Ppal Elbio Martmnez
CERIDE - CONICET
G|emes 3450
3000 - Santa Fe
Argentina
email: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar



From daemon Thu Jul 4 15:37:05 2002



From: Rogerio Lucio de Almeida - doutorado :      ralmeida-at-ifi.unicamp.br
Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 17:22:19 -0300 (BRT)
Subject: Looking for Abrikosov original article

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello All,
I'm looking for the original article of Abrikosov( in russian or in
english) in which he introduces
the Type-II superconductor. I can't find it on the internet. Does
anybody have the text or know where to look for it? Reference:
A.A. Abrikosov, Zh. Eksperim. i Teor. Fiz. 32, 1442 (1957) [Sov. Phys.
-- JETP 5, 1174 (1957)]

Thanks
R. Almeida











************************************
Rogerio Lucio de Almeida

















From daemon Thu Jul 4 17:09:44 2002



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 4 Jul 2002 15:00:15 -0700
Subject: Leaf Lumina or MicroLumina

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have or know where I can buy a Leaf Lumina or MicroLumina
camera. I understand the limitations of the technology, but for the price
I am hard pressed to find a camera of equal resolution/dynamic range.
Unless any one you have suggestions?

Thank you.
Ken

--
Ken Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
The University of Portland
Department of Biology
5000 N. Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97203

Tel.: 503-413-5391


From daemon Thu Jul 4 18:53:54 2002



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2002 11:44:34 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I guess you've already approached your friendly local Philips/EDAX
agent?

I may be wrong, but I've always thought that the manufacturer is in a
far better position to service these things than is anyone else.

Any interesting opinions out there?

cheers

rtch






} Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2002 11:43:17 ART
} From: elbio martinez {edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar}
} Reply-to: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
} Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
}
}
} Hello all,
} Please inform if theres someone who knows about the internal
} electronics of the detecting unit of a x-ray fluorescence which
} characteristics are:
}
} EDAX PV9740/05
}
} MODEL PV9500 165-17
}
} ACTIVE AREA 10 MM2
}
} AMPLIFIER MODEL 183 A
}
} The problem is that some LED or PHOTODIODE of said detector burnt
} out. The detector is a vacuum packed unit and this diagnostic is the
} result of measurements on the detector connection pins guided by an
} electric circuit scheme.
}
} If someone can give me advice, please contact me,
}
}
}
} Tic. Ppal Elbio Martmnez
} CERIDE - CONICET
} G|emes 3450
} 3000 - Santa Fe
} Argentina
} email: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
}
Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Fri Jul 5 02:00:32 2002



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2002 01:53:31 -0700
Subject: RE: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


One would like to think so, but we're often disappointed in life.

I don't have the schematics on that particular unit, but the manufacturer
would. Whether they would want to share that or not is another question.
The item in question is probably used to reset the detector. Normally,
the components within the vacuum would be only the detector diode and the
FET used as a preamplifier, the remaining preamplifier parts are usually
outside of the vacuum in a small metal box attached to the detector.
However, even if they are inside the vacuum of the dewar cold finger
assembly, that can be opened, repaired and re-pumped - if you have the
right vacuum fitting. Again, the manufacturer could supply you with that,
if they so desire.

The problem with manufacturers is often three fold - they often have
difficulty holding on to good techs, their self-interest is often to sell
you the latest system and they often see others working on their
instruments (even needy customers) as cutting into their profits. A lot of
oftens that occasionally add up to what is often seen as poor customer
service.

Individuals will generally remain loyal to a manufacturer as long as they
are able to meet that person's needs. If you've had a good result there,
consider yourself lucky. At any particular time, there is at least one
manufacturer that can actually provide good service with a view of their
customer's needs. Unfortunately, none has ever kept that up for more than
a few years. A customer's best friend is a good, local, service tech who
stays with the manufacturer for a long time. Someone who has a talent for
the work, good knowledge of the instruments, experience in working on them
and the manufacturer's backing for parts and information, is a great asset.

I'm most aquainted with SEMS. Twenty years ago, ETEC, after being a market
leader for many years, decided to get out of the business. Within the last
couple of years, we've seen that again with Amray. Those are two extremes
that used one business as a stepping stone to another. But in the ensuing
years, every manufacturer out there has enjoyed periods of high sales, good
customer relations, eroding sales, shifts in thoughts of service as a
profit center rather than a vital part of design engineering and marketing
leading to increases in turn-over rate and reduced knowledge and experience
on the part of their service engineers.

In XRF, HNU comes to mind as an extreme of the first kind. Every other
manufacturer as examples of the latter.

In many ways, it is a matter of the life cycle experienced by all
businesses. This natural life cycle has recently become a factor in
thought processes on business and the stock market. It is true across the
board, no matter what sector a business is in. It is the reason every
business has to be constantly re-inventing itself.

Now, Ritchie, to the heart of the matter, at least in a market the size of
America. We have here technicians with decades of experience in such
instrumentation. Many of them (I try to keep track of them as referrals)
have gone into business for themselves. This is generally a desire to
continue the work they love, without interference from corporations whose
mergers, acquisitions and buy-outs continually dilute and obfuscate the
customer's needs.

I am happy to here state that I am one of those who left that melee over
twenty years ago. I have never really advertised my services, but have
survived in business on word of mouth and benign exposure on the internet.
In every case, my customers have sought me out. There is only one
possible reason for that - the manufacturer has not provided the value that
the customer expects. Frankly, there is no one more knowledgeable on what
manufacturers are doing wrong, but not one has come to ask me what I would
so willingly tell them.

I do make my share of mistakes, but I have more experience on more
different systems from more manufacturers than just about anyone out there.
But that breadth of experience, itself, brings real life practical
knowledge that no manufacturer's tech can equal with his or hers limited
experience and knowledge.

I've tooted my own horn enough, but actually, I've been tooting the horn of
other independents out there. When you need us, it's good to know we're
there. When you don't, you should be glad that there are others who do,
because, in our own small way, we keep the manufacturer's feet on the
ground. I could tell you some real horror stories of what manufacturers
have pulled when they think that they have no competition, but I'll save
that for another day.


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Friday, July 05, 2002 4:45 AM, Ritchie Sims [SMTP:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} I guess you've already approached your friendly local Philips/EDAX
} agent?
}
} I may be wrong, but I've always thought that the manufacturer is in a
} far better position to service these things than is anyone else.
}
} Any interesting opinions out there?
}
} cheers
}
} rtch
}
}
}
}
}
}
} } Date: Thu, 04 Jul 2002 11:43:17 ART
} } From: elbio martinez {edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar}
} } Reply-to: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
} } Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
}
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---.
} }
} }
} } Hello all,
} } Please inform if theres someone who knows about the internal
} } electronics of the detecting unit of a x-ray fluorescence which
} } characteristics are:
} }
} } EDAX PV9740/05
} }
} } MODEL PV9500 165-17
} }
} } ACTIVE AREA 10 MM2
} }
} } AMPLIFIER MODEL 183 A
} }
} } The problem is that some LED or PHOTODIODE of said detector burnt
} } out. The detector is a vacuum packed unit and this diagnostic is the
} } result of measurements on the detector connection pins guided by an
} } electric circuit scheme.
} }
} } If someone can give me advice, please contact me,
} }
} }
} }
} } Tic. Ppal Elbio Martmnez
} } CERIDE - CONICET
} } G|emes 3450
} } 3000 - Santa Fe
} } Argentina
} } email: edmarti-at-ceride.gov.ar
} }
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}
}



From daemon Fri Jul 5 09:48:34 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Fri, 05 Jul 2002 16:37:05 +0200
Subject: Zeiss AxioCam HR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi listers,

Does anyone of you have some experience you want to share about the Zeiss
AxioCam HR? We are planning to buy one, but first I would like to know the
positiv and negativ things about it.
Thanks in advance,

Sven Terclavers



From daemon Fri Jul 5 10:28:48 2002



From: John Hoffpauir :      John.Hoffpauir-at-mail.tju.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2002 11:23:44 -0400
Subject: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


does anyone where i can obtain spare parts for an agfa print processor agfa
3700, or where a used one can be purchased?
thanks
john


From daemon Fri Jul 5 11:38:53 2002



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Jul 2002 17:34:09 +0100 (GMT Daylight Time)
Subject: Re: RE: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Fri, 5 Jul 2002 01:53:31 -0700 Allen Sampson
{ars-at-sem.com} wrote:
} The problem with manufacturers is often three fold - they often have
} difficulty holding on to good techs, their self-interest is often to sell
} you the latest system and they often see others working on their
} instruments (even needy customers) as cutting into their profits. A lot of
} oftens that occasionally add up to what is often seen as poor customer
} service.
}
} Individuals will generally remain loyal to a manufacturer as long as they
} are able to meet that person's needs. If you've had a good result there,
} consider yourself lucky. At any particular time, there is at least one
} manufacturer that can actually provide good service with a view of their
} customer's needs. Unfortunately, none has ever kept that up for more than
} a few years.

I wish to report that in the 25 years I have worked here we
have had continuous good service from a manufacturer.

During that time there have been a series of local
engineers most of whom have been replaced as they
progressed within the company. I do not feel that we have
ever been penalised for carrying out our own service,
indeed they have been helpful in supplying components,
information and even redundant items from scrapped
instruments to keep older instruments running. We have also
told them of alternative sources that we have found for
their repairs or components.

I accept that the situation may be different in other
parts of the world and that the original comments probably
refer to the USA but I wish to correct the impression that
manufacturers cannot keep up a high standard of service for
more than a few years. It is possible.

With any complex piece of equipment there is the
possiblilty of problems, the most important thing is for
the customer, the supplier and the service organisation to
have trust and faith in each other.

It takes hard work from all sides to build up this sort of
relationship, but it is worth it.

Ron
Disclaimer: I probably buy the engineers as many beers as
they buy me so I don't feel under any obligation.

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk





From daemon Fri Jul 5 16:28:26 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Fri, 05 Jul 2002 17:21:20 -0400
Subject: Re: XRF Detector Unit PV9500

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ron,

Perhaps something about wanting to remain on good terms with a customer with the
visibility of Oxford University has something to do with it? A firm named
"Widget Tool Alloys" might be perceived somewhat differently by a manufacturer.

Certainly in the U.S. the attitude of many OEMs often becomes "That's a really
old model... I'm sure we don't have any documentation on that. Most of our
customers have migrated to the _____ platform". While that is probably true in
the case of rapidly changing data handling systems, it is less true of other
systems. In my experience this has been particularly galling when it comes to
mechanical systems (for which nothing short of abuse should cause them to wear
out) and for detector electronics where the the nature of the detection process
and the signal conditioning requirements remained static for about two decades.

Disclaimer: If Widget Tool Alloys actually exists out there somewhere, my
apologies. No disrespect is intended.

John Twilley

Ron Doole wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} On Fri, 5 Jul 2002 01:53:31 -0700 Allen Sampson
} {ars-at-sem.com} wrote:
} } The problem with manufacturers is often three fold - they often have
} } difficulty holding on to good techs, their self-interest is often to sell
} } you the latest system and they often see others working on their
} } instruments (even needy customers) as cutting into their profits. A lot of
} } oftens that occasionally add up to what is often seen as poor customer
} } service.
} }
} } Individuals will generally remain loyal to a manufacturer as long as they
} } are able to meet that person's needs. If you've had a good result there,
} } consider yourself lucky. At any particular time, there is at least one
} } manufacturer that can actually provide good service with a view of their
} } customer's needs. Unfortunately, none has ever kept that up for more than
} } a few years.
}
} I wish to report that in the 25 years I have worked here we
} have had continuous good service from a manufacturer.
}
} During that time there have been a series of local
} engineers most of whom have been replaced as they
} progressed within the company. I do not feel that we have
} ever been penalised for carrying out our own service,
} indeed they have been helpful in supplying components,
} information and even redundant items from scrapped
} instruments to keep older instruments running. We have also
} told them of alternative sources that we have found for
} their repairs or components.
}
} I accept that the situation may be different in other
} parts of the world and that the original comments probably
} refer to the USA but I wish to correct the impression that
} manufacturers cannot keep up a high standard of service for
} more than a few years. It is possible.
}
} With any complex piece of equipment there is the
} possiblilty of problems, the most important thing is for
} the customer, the supplier and the service organisation to
} have trust and faith in each other.
}
} It takes hard work from all sides to build up this sort of
} relationship, but it is worth it.
}
} Ron
} Disclaimer: I probably buy the engineers as many beers as
} they buy me so I don't feel under any obligation.
}
} ----------------------
} Mr. R.C. Doole
} Department of Materials,
} University of Oxford.
} Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
} Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
} Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
} ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk





From daemon Mon Jul 8 06:16:29 2002



From: Chris Peppiatt :      chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 11:57:21 +0100
Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

Someone has asked me to do some work for them on mineral specimens. The
samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we will then coat with
carbon. Obviously we will set our software to deconvolute carbon from the
analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or silver and
then look at the carbon content. I suppose the questions I would like to
have answered are:

(1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some of the light
element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is there any way of
correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative analysis of carbon content?

(2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or carbon coatings from
such samples except for the obvious method of regrinding/polishing the
coating off?

Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Chris Peppiatt


============================================
Dr. Chris Peppiatt (Experimental Officer),
The National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science,
Science & Engineering Technology Building,
National University of Ireland Galway,
Galway City, Co. Galway,
Republic of Ireland.
chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
Phone: +353 91 512157 Fax: +353 91 750596
=============================================



From daemon Mon Jul 8 06:26:31 2002



From: Chris Peppiatt :      chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 12:20:14 +0100
Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

Someone has asked me to do some work for them on mineral specimens. The
samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we will then coat with
carbon. Obviously we will set our software to deconvolute carbon from the
analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or silver and
then look at the carbon content. I suppose the questions I would like to
have answered are:

(1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some of the light
element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is there any way of
correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative analysis of carbon content?

(2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or carbon coatings from
such samples except for the obvious method of regrinding/polishing the
coating off?

Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Chris Peppiatt


============================================
Dr. Chris Peppiatt (Experimental Officer),
The National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science,
Science & Engineering Technology Building,
National University of Ireland Galway,
Galway City, Co. Galway,
Republic of Ireland.
chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
Phone: +353 91 512157 Fax: +353 91 750596
=============================================



From daemon Mon Jul 8 08:54:38 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 09:39:33 -0400
Subject: Re: Leaf Lumina or MicroLumina

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} Does anyone have or know where I can buy a Leaf Lumina or MicroLumina
} camera. I understand the limitations of the technology, but for the price
} I am hard pressed to find a camera of equal resolution/dynamic range.
} Unless any one you have suggestions?
}
} Thank you.
} Ken
}
} --
Ken, Check Electron Microscopy Sciences.
No financial interest, just a long-time customer.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Mon Jul 8 09:05:20 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 09:57:56 -0400
Subject: RE: copper braid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Debby,
When I had this problem, I went to Pep Boys [no stock or other
relationship] and purchased some stranded copper battery cable. I had to
'trim' off the connectors, but the solution was satisfactory. Another
choice is any electric supply store that sells to contractors or a 'Home
Depot' [no stock or other relationship], though may be more likely to find
stranded Al than Cu there. I have always found stranded Cu at one or the
other of these places. Contractor supplies and Home Depot are usually less
expensive, because the cable is sold by the foot. Such cable is used in
many high wattage situations.

Hope this helps,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


} ----------
} From: Debby Sherman
} Reply To: Debby Sherman
} Sent: Wednesday, July 3, 2002 9:45 AM
} To: message to: MSA list
} Subject: copper braid
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers,
} I am trying to find a source for heavy copper braid wire to repair some
} accessories used for metal and carbon evaporation. This is the stiff but
} flexible wire that would go between the connectors in a high vacuum
} evaporator and, in this case, the carbon evaporation apparatus. Does
} anyone have a source in the USA who is likely to sell small quantities? I
} just need a couple of feet at most.
}
} Thanks,
} Debby
}
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
}
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
}
} S-052 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
}
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 8 09:16:44 2002



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Jul 2002 09:07:54 -0500
Subject: Re: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would be quite cautious in trying to directly measure carbon. We have
wanted to for years, but I tell clients not to expect much.

We can easily see carbon in carbonate minerals. I just do not try to
quantitate it directly. (The times I tried, I got very doubtful numbers. I
would like my results to be consistent within 50% relative error.) If you
are looking for carbon in lesser amounts, I am doubtful that it would work.

You are aware that the carbon is strongly absorbed by most other elements.
I understand that it is a big part of the problem. Even if you can get a
good carbon signal above background, you still have to deal with
uncertainty in the absorption coefficients.

There would also be problems if any of your resin smears over.

Maybe you can tell us a bit more what you would like to measure and we can
provide more information.

I recall a discussion a couple of months back about removing Au and Ag by
means other that polishing. It should be in the list archives.

Warren

At 11:57 AM 7/8/02 +0100, you wrote:
} Dear All,
}
} Someone has asked me to do some work for them on mineral specimens. The
} samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we will then coat with
} carbon. Obviously we will set our software to deconvolute carbon from the
} analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or silver
} and then look at the carbon content. I suppose the questions I would like
} to have answered are:
}
} (1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some of the light
} element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is there any way of
} correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative analysis of carbon content?
}
} (2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or carbon coatings
} from such samples except for the obvious method of regrinding/polishing
} the coating off?
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Regards,
}
} Chris Peppiatt

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Mon Jul 8 12:30:36 2002



From: Heeschen, Bill (WA) :      WAHEESCHEN-at-dow.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jul 2002 13:20:13 -0400
Subject: Retrofitting ElectroScan E-3 ESEM for fully automated control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:
If any of you have experience with a major retrofit to an ElectroScan E-3
ESEM for fully automated control (stage, gas pressure, imaging, EDS, etc.),
I would like to have your thoughts - both good news and bad.
Thanks,
Bill

William A. Heeschen, Ph.D.
Microscopy, Digital Imaging
The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, Mi 48667
waheeschen-at-dow.com


From daemon Tue Jul 9 04:58:36 2002



From: John MacIsaac :      jmacisaac-at-coxhanson.ca
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 06:50:31 -0300
Subject: Re: Frameborder (Out of Office)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am out of the office today, Monday, July 8, 2002.

Should you require immediate assistance, please contact my assistant, Gail Jensen, at (902) 421-6262, or by email at gjensen-at-coxhanson.ca.

} } } Microscopy 07/09/02 06:47 } } }

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{iframe src=3Dcid:IQ6Pu6g60H37Us1 height=3D0 width=3D0}
{/iframe}
{FONT} {/FONT} {/BODY} {/HTML}


___________________ ATTENTION!! _____________________
A Virus Has Been Detected in the file attachment(s).
The file attachment(s) have been removed by Guinevere,
the Groupwise Antivirus Scanner.

====} You may wish to notify the sender!
_____________________________________________________


From daemon Tue Jul 9 08:05:55 2002



From: Tom Moninger :      moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 07:50:38 -0500
Subject: LKB Knife Makers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Upon some serious cleaning we have discovered three LKB glass knife makers
that we do not need to keep. We have one Model 7800 and two Model 7801 Type
As that are in good working order. If you are interested please reply to me
off line with an offer.
Tom

Thomas Moninger (thomas-moninger-at-uiowa.edu)
University of Iowa Central Microscopy Research Facility (www.uiowa.edu/~cemrf)
View expressed are my own.



From daemon Tue Jul 9 08:26:35 2002



From: Tom Moninger :      moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 08:17:22 -0500
Subject: LKB knife makers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Upon some serious cleaning we have discovered three LKB glass knife makers
that we do not need to keep. We have one Model 7800 and two Model 7801 Type
As that are in good working order. If you are interested please reply to me
off-line with an offer.
Tom

Thomas Moninger (thomas-moninger-at-uiowa.edu)
University of Iowa Central Microscopy Research Facility (www.uiowa.edu/~cemrf)
View expressed are my own.



From daemon Tue Jul 9 08:26:35 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 09:17:57 -0400
Subject: FW: Gray, Microtomist's Formulary and Guide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Listers,

I am forwarding this as information about a volume that serves as a 'limited
access' ramp to the pre-1950's protocols and literature on staining and
microtechnique. The price I have been given for one is $84.50+. The other
relevant information is below in the remainder of the thread.

The last of Peter Gray is on the horizon. He has lasted longer than most.
This book has been discussed on the Histopathology Net List recently. You
can search at: http://www.histosearch.com/histonet.html

I have no business relationship with Krieger.

Regards,

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: Krieger
} Sent: Monday, July 8, 2002 6:06 PM
} To: Monson, Frederick C.
} Subject: Re: Gray, Microtomist's Formulary and Guide
}
} Dear Dr. Monson:
} We are selling the remaining stock we have. At the present time we have
} approximately 113 copies available. If you are interested in purchasing
} large quantities (over 50 copies) we can offer you special discounts.
} Sincerely,
} Cheryl Stanton
} Krieger Publishing Company
} P.O. Box 9542
} Melbourne, FL 32902-9542
} Tel: (321) 724-9542
} Fax: (321-951-3671
} 1-800-724-0025
} E-mail: info-at-krieger-publishing
} www.krieger-publishing.com
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Monson, Frederick C. {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu}
} To: 'Krieger' {info-at-krieger-publishing.com}
} Date: July 08, 2002 1:52 PM
} Subject: RE: Gray, Microtomist's Formulary and Guide
}
}
} } Hi Cheryl,
} } I know that you are modifying your web site, but when I called up
} } your list of books, this one was NOT included. If I am to recommend the
} } book, I must know its current disposition. For example, do you consider
} it
} } a current, and future, publication? Are you simply selling off the last
} of
} } the last run?
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: Krieger
} } } Sent: Monday, July 8, 2002 11:47 AM
} } } To: Monson, Frederick C.
} } } Subject: Re: Gray, Microtomist's Formulary and Guide
} } }
} } } Dear Dr. Monson:
} } }
} } } Please be advised this book is available at a list price of $84.50
} plus
} } } $5.00 for shipping via Ground UPS. Please advise if you require
} further
} } } information.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Cheryl Stanton
} } } Krieger Publishing Company
} } } P.O. Box 9542
} } } Melbourne, FL 32902-9542
} } } Tel: (321) 724-9542
} } } Fax: (321-951-3671
} } } 1-800-724-0025
} } } E-mail: info-at-krieger-publishing
} } } www.krieger-publishing.com
} } }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Monson, Frederick C. {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu}
} } } To: 'info-at-krieger-publishing.com' {info-at-krieger-publishing.com}
} } } Date: July 08, 2002 11:35 AM
} } } Subject: Gray, Microtomist's Formulary and Guide
} } }
} } }
} } } } Is this one now out of print for good?
} } } }
} } } } Thanks for help,
} } } }
} } } } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } } } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } } } Schmucker II Science Center
} } } } West Chester University
} } } } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } } } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } } } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } } } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } } } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } } } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } } } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } } } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} } }
} } }
}
}


From daemon Tue Jul 9 10:44:09 2002



From: Maruthi Sridhar Balaji Bhaskar :      sb183-at-Ra.MsState.Edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 10:34:43 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: SEM&LM - help needed for Metal localization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,
Here is the problem we had. we are trying to localize the metals(Zn
and Cd) within the planttissues (Barley). Prior work has shown that if you fix
the tissue in FAA or gluteraldehyde-type fixes and continue with dehydration
steps, the metals leach or diffuse out of the plant into the fix or dehydrating
agent.Metal localization has mostly been done using cryofixation and with a
cryostage. As the cryostage is not avilable at our EM Center. We fixed the
samples conventionally (gluteraldehyde, ethanol dehydration)and cryofractured
in liquid N and subjected them to EDS system, but it could barely pick up the
metal in the tissue. but the analytical studies (ICP) showed theres enough
metal accumulation.
some of the alternatives we are thinking is-
Treating the tissue samples with chemicals to precipitate the metals and
continue with conventional procedures with minimum dehydration and fixation
steps.
Do any of you know of stains for metals (Zn& Cd) that would allow us to stain
the cryosections specifically for metals and view them by LM? Or do you have
any better or alternative suggestions?
We would appreciate any input and suggestions you may have.
thanks in advance
B.B.M.Sridhar
Graduate Research Assistant
Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL)
& Department of Forest Products
Mississippi State University
Starkville, MS -39759
Phone(office)- 662-325-9044


From daemon Tue Jul 9 10:44:21 2002



From: Maruthi Sridhar Balaji Bhaskar :      sb183-at-Ra.MsState.Edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 10:37:40 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: SEM&LM - help needed for Metal localization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,
Here is the problem we had. we are trying to localize the metals(Zn
and Cd) within the planttissues (Barley). Prior work has shown that if you fix
the tissue in FAA or gluteraldehyde-type fixes and continue with dehydration
steps, the metals leach or diffuse out of the plant into the fix or dehydrating
agent.Metal localization has mostly been done using cryofixation and with a
cryostage. As the cryostage is not avilable at our EM Center. We fixed the
samples conventionally (gluteraldehyde, ethanol dehydration)and cryofractured
in liquid N and subjected them to EDS system, but it could barely pick up the
metal in the tissue. but the analytical studies (ICP) showed theres enough
metal accumulation.
some of the alternatives we are thinking is-
Treating the tissue samples with chemicals to precipitate the metals and
continue with conventional procedures with minimum dehydration and fixation
steps.
Do any of you know of stains for metals (Zn& Cd) that would allow us to stain
the cryosections specifically for metals and view them by LM? Or do you have
any better or alternative suggestions?
We would appreciate any input and suggestions you may have.
thanks in advance
B.B.M.Sridhar
Graduate Research Assistant
Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL)
& Department of Forest Products
Mississippi State University
Starkville, MS -39759
Phone(office)- 662-325-9044


From daemon Tue Jul 9 15:51:47 2002



From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 16:12:38 -0400
Subject: Stop algae growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I recall that over the past couple of years several people have
inquired about ways to control the growth of algae in recirculating
cooling water systems.

I just received a catalog from an outfit called Home Improvements
that lists a device called 'Power Clear' for controlling algal growth
in garden pools and ponds. It is essentially a 15 x 5 x 5" chamber
with hose connections at each end. When the circulator's hose is
connected to it the circulating water flows over a quartz-sleeved
ultra violet bulb, which is said to kill parasites, mold spores,
bacteria and fungi in the water.

It sounds as though this would be very suitable to use in water
recirculators for electron microscopes and related instruments. The
cost is only about $130, with replacement bulbs priced at $30. Check
www.ImprovementsCatalog.com, or call 1-800-642-2112.

--
Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237


From daemon Tue Jul 9 16:06:24 2002



From: brandon.k.rice-at-uwrf.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 13:40:55 -0700
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (brandon.k.rice-at-uwrf.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday, July
8, 2002 at 11:20:50
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: brandon.k.rice-at-uwrf.edu
Name: Brandon Rice

Organization: University of Wisconsin-River Falls

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: River Falls, WI, United States

Question: I am using a .50 NA objective and three lenses to image 1.6
micron silica spheres onto a camera. The focal lengths of the three
lenses after the objective are 125mm, 38.1mm, and 90mm respectively.
I am utilizing Kohler illumination to illuminate the sample. The
image of the spheres appear very stretched out in the vertical
direction; the spheres look more like ellipses. I have attempted to
realign the objective and lenses over and over, but this does not
seem to affect the image. What do you recommend I try to make the
spheres look spherical?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Tue Jul 9 16:06:24 2002



From: Ann-Fook Yang :      yanga-at-agr.gc.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 13:47:21 -0700
Subject: question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My colleague asks:
Is it true or is a hoax that there is a software which makes it
possible to get focussed light microscopy images from pairs of under-
and overfocussed micrographs? If it si true, what is the name of the
software and where is it available?
Thank you.
M. Kalab

Please reply to:
scimat-at-magma.ca


From daemon Tue Jul 9 16:56:06 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 14:46:23 -0400
Subject: Re: SEM&LM - help needed for Metal localization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/9/02 11:34 AM, Maruthi Sridhar Balaji Bhaskar at sb183-at-Ra.MsState.Edu
wrote:

} Here is the problem we had. we are trying to localize the metals(Zn
} and Cd) within the planttissues (Barley). Prior work has shown that if you
} fix
} the tissue in FAA or gluteraldehyde-type fixes and continue with dehydration
} steps, the metals leach or diffuse out of the plant into the fix or
} dehydrating
} agent.Metal localization has mostly been done using cryofixation and with a
} cryostage. As the cryostage is not avilable at our EM Center. We fixed the
} samples conventionally (gluteraldehyde, ethanol dehydration)and cryofractured
} in liquid N and subjected them to EDS system, but it could barely pick up the
} metal in the tissue. but the analytical studies (ICP) showed theres enough
} metal accumulation.
} some of the alternatives we are thinking is-
} Treating the tissue samples with chemicals to precipitate the metals and
} continue with conventional procedures with minimum dehydration and fixation
} steps.
} Do any of you know of stains for metals (Zn& Cd) that would allow us to stain
} the cryosections specifically for metals and view them by LM? Or do you have
} any better or alternative suggestions?
} We would appreciate any input and suggestions you may have.
} thanks in advance
Dear Maruthi,
Can you cryo-fix, then lyophylize at low temperatures (-90 C)? This
should retain the metals, but much of the structure will be hard to
visualize. If you can recognize the structures where the metals appear, you
can get a rough idea of the location of the metals, then try other
techniques to pin down the metals to better resolution if needed. Good
luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Tue Jul 9 18:08:38 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 18:49:09 +0200
Subject: Immunogold labeling with chicken =?iso-8859-1?Q?ab=B4s?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Has anybody out there experience with using chicken ab´s as primary ab´s
for immunogold labeling? Do they have disatvantages compared with
rabbit, mouse ab´s. I can remember that a couple of years ago there was
the word that the available anti-chicken-gold-conjugates are not as
"good" as anti-rabbit- or mouse-gold-conjugates.

Thanks for your help,

Stefan





°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Tue Jul 9 18:44:28 2002



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:37:30 +1200
Subject: Re: Stop algae growth (plus pH control)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Wilbur, Thanks for the update

The recirculating cooling water systems problem that we have the most
problem trying to get a handle on is controlling the pH of the
cooling water to prevent corrosion. Since the end of the good old
days when we were allowed to use Sodium Chromate and Sodium
Bicarbonate we have not yet found a satisfactory replacement.

Satisfactory includes; effectiveness at pH control, life time before
depletion, safe handling and disposal, cost, availablility.

Trying to get good advice also seems to like the proverbial hens teeth.

Anyone out there come up with any good products recently.

Allan




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Tue Jul 9 18:50:19 2002



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:43:12 +1200
Subject: Re: Stop algae growth (plus pH control)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Wilbur, Thanks for the update

The recirculating cooling water systems problem that we have the most
problem trying to get a handle on is controlling the pH of the
cooling water to prevent corrosion. Since the end of the good old
days when we were allowed to use Sodium Chromate and Sodium
Bicarbonate we have not yet found a satisfactory replacement.

Satisfactory includes; effectiveness at pH control, life time before
depletion, safe handling and disposal, cost, availablility.

Trying to get good advice also seems to like the proverbial hens teeth.

Anyone out there come up with any good products recently.

Allan




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Tue Jul 9 19:10:43 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 19:51:40 +0200
Subject: Immunogold labeling with hen =?iso-8859-1?Q?ab=B4s?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Has anybody out there experience with using chicken ab´s as primary ab´s

for immunogold labeling? Do they have disatvantages compared with
rabbit, mouse ab´s. I can remember that a couple of years ago there was
the word that the available anti-chicken-gold-conjugates are not as
"good" as anti-rabbit- or anti-mouse-gold-conjugates.

Thanks for your help,

Stefan





°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
c/o Rosenbaum Lab.
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Tue Jul 9 19:24:26 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 20:04:58 +0200
Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have the following problem:
I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
(but I need the lead to get enough stain).
The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
dependend.
Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?

Stefan



°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Tue Jul 9 19:39:55 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 17:37:08 -0700
Subject: Sony video printer sources

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone know of US sources for the Sony
UD-890 and UD-895CE video printers? I'd
like to see if they would interface to NTSC
640x480 composite video.

Anyone using these? Comments?

Off-line please.

tnx,
gary g.



From daemon Tue Jul 9 19:52:28 2002



From: Larry Allard :      L2A-at-ornl.gov
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 20:42:20 -0400
Subject: Fwd: Stop algae growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This looks great...I'm going to try it out right away. The full link
for PowerClear (one word) is:

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/parent.asp?pf%5Fid=228244x&dept%5Fid=30&strFindSpec=powerclear&Solutions=&code=

Thanks Wil.

Larry






} Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 16:12:38 -0400
} From: Wil Bigelow {bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu}
} Subject: Stop algae growth
} X-Sender: bigelow-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu
} To: Microscopy Listserver {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Distinguished Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

865-574-4981
865-576-5413 Fax
allardlfjr-at-ornl.gov


From daemon Tue Jul 9 21:07:31 2002



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2002 18:58:19 -0700
Subject: Administrivia: Double Postings...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

I've noticed a rash of double posting lately.
If you are getting an error message on your posting please
contact me. Do not simply try posting a second time.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
--
Nestor J. Zaluzec
Argonne National Lab
Materials Science Division.


Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Tel: 630-252-7901


Home: Zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Tel: 630-739-1160


From daemon Tue Jul 9 21:49:56 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2002 22:50:54 -0400
Subject: Re: Stop algae growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wil,

We looked into the use of UV sterilization (both those that generate ozone
and those that do not) for purposes of reducing or eliminating algae growth
in fountains containing artworks that are susceptible to staining or
corrosion by some of the chemical agents typically used for the same
purpose. I've also had to deal with the problem in closed recirculating
cooling systems. The problem is that the effects of UV are limited to the
flow-through cell and algae can still colonize the walls of the rest of the
system. When bits of the biofilm come off, they can block filter screens
and or the aperture that typically lies behind the anode of a fine-focus
X-ray tube. It doesn't matter that the debris got sterilized on its trip
through the UV lamp housing.

My experience with closed systems has been best when using only reverse
osmosis purified water with a very small amount of biocide. If there is no
source of minerals, the growth is retarded and cleaning may be limited to
three or four year intervals. Often, the nylon mesh of the intake filter
was the limiting factor, beginning to embrittle and give way, thereby
introducing its own problems.

John Twilley

Wil Bigelow wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I recall that over the past couple of years several people have
} inquired about ways to control the growth of algae in recirculating
} cooling water systems.
}
} I just received a catalog from an outfit called Home Improvements
} that lists a device called 'Power Clear' for controlling algal growth
} in garden pools and ponds. It is essentially a 15 x 5 x 5" chamber
} with hose connections at each end. When the circulator's hose is
} connected to it the circulating water flows over a quartz-sleeved
} ultra violet bulb, which is said to kill parasites, mold spores,
} bacteria and fungi in the water.
}
} It sounds as though this would be very suitable to use in water
} recirculators for electron microscopes and related instruments. The
} cost is only about $130, with replacement bulbs priced at $30. Check
} www.ImprovementsCatalog.com, or call 1-800-642-2112.
}
} --
} Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
} Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
} 3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
} Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
} Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237





From daemon Wed Jul 10 00:48:38 2002



From: Ronald Vane :      RVane-at-Evactron.com
Date: Monday, July 08, 2002 3:22 PM
Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Chris and all:

Quantitative analysis of Carbon by EDX is nearly impossible because of the
very shallow penetration depth of the Carbon X-rays. You really just measure
the surface. Surface analysis techniques such as XPS and Auger also show
that thin carbon films love to form on surfaces. If you have an XPS you use
your ion gun to sputter off the carbon surface scum to see the real surface.

Dry ashing in a plasma cleaner can also remove the carbon surface layer.
Sputter etching can be used to remove gold and silver coatings.

Ron Vane
XEI Scientific
3124 Wessex Way, Redwood City, CA 94061
650-369-0133
www.SEMCLEAN.com

Note: XEI Scientific makes the EVACTRON plasma cleaning system for Electron
Microscope Chambers and FIBs, but does not make desk top plasma dry ashers
or sputter etchers.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Peppiatt {chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}



From daemon Wed Jul 10 01:40:04 2002



From: Anaspec :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:31:43 +0200
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Anaspec South Africa
anaspec-at-icon.co.za


From daemon Wed Jul 10 05:21:23 2002



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 12:12:08 +0200
Subject: Re: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all

In the same idee, what about mesurements on boron carbide ? Carbon AND
boron concentrations ! I see nice spectras, without anything else ( a bit
O, some times Al and N). And I have variations between samples in the B/C
ratio. In such a case can I mesure only ratio variation, or is it possible
to try some quantification (with standards). The sample is bulk B4C
and laser ablation thick layers (with dropplets). Primary energy 3 to 5
keV.

I think it's a bit pretentious to quantify. What is other's opinion ?



J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

On Tue, 9 Jul 2002, Ronald Vane wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Chris and all:
}
} Quantitative analysis of Carbon by EDX is nearly impossible because of the
} very shallow penetration depth of the Carbon X-rays. You really just measure
} the surface. Surface analysis techniques such as XPS and Auger also show
} that thin carbon films love to form on surfaces. If you have an XPS you use
} your ion gun to sputter off the carbon surface scum to see the real surface.
}
} Dry ashing in a plasma cleaner can also remove the carbon surface layer.
} Sputter etching can be used to remove gold and silver coatings.
}
} Ron Vane
} XEI Scientific
} 3124 Wessex Way, Redwood City, CA 94061
} 650-369-0133
} www.SEMCLEAN.com
}
} Note: XEI Scientific makes the EVACTRON plasma cleaning system for Electron
} Microscope Chambers and FIBs, but does not make desk top plasma dry ashers
} or sputter etchers.
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Chris Peppiatt {chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Monday, July 08, 2002 3:22 PM
} Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Dear All,
} }
} } Someone has asked me to do some work for them on mineral specimens. The
} } samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we will then coat with
} } carbon. Obviously we will set our software to deconvolute carbon from the
} } analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or silver and
} } then look at the carbon content. I suppose the questions I would like to
} } have answered are:
} }
} } (1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some of the light
} } element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is there any way of
} } correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative analysis of carbon
} content?
} }
} } (2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or carbon coatings from
} } such samples except for the obvious method of regrinding/polishing the
} } coating off?
} }
} } Thanks in advance.
} }
} } Regards,
} }
} } Chris Peppiatt
} }
} }
} } ============================================
} } Dr. Chris Peppiatt (Experimental Officer),
} } The National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science,
} } Science & Engineering Technology Building,
} } National University of Ireland Galway,
} } Galway City, Co. Galway,
} } Republic of Ireland.
} } chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
} } Phone: +353 91 512157 Fax: +353 91 750596
} } =============================================
} }
} }
} }
}
}



From daemon Wed Jul 10 05:34:09 2002



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:27:36 +0100 (GMT Daylight Time)
Subject: Re: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


When you take a "contaminated" section from the Philips
does it then look OK in the Zeiss?


Dave


On Tue, 09 Jul 2002 20:04:58 +0200 Stefan Geimer
{stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have the following problem:
} I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
} it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
} in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
} etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} dependend.
} Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
}
} Stefan
}
}
}
} °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} Stefan Geimer
} MCDB Dept.
} Yale University
} P.O. Box 208103
} New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} U.S.A.
}
} Tel.: 203/432-3473
} Fax.: 203/432-6210
}
} e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Wed Jul 10 06:46:13 2002



From: Sarka Lhotak :      lhotaks-at-mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 07:36:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dobry den, Milosi,
metoda se jmenuje "deconvolution" a je k mani v cele rade image
analysis softwares. Napr. Northern Eclipse od Empix Imaging a mnohe dalsi.
Jak je v Ottawe? Jeste pisete pro Neviditelneho Psa? Uz ho nectu, protoze
na to naveseli tolik reklam, ze to muj staricky pocitac nezvlada.
Mnoho pozdravu,
Sarka Lhotakova

On Tue, 9 Jul 2002, Ann-Fook Yang wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} My colleague asks:
} Is it true or is a hoax that there is a software which makes it
} possible to get focussed light microscopy images from pairs of under-
} and overfocussed micrographs? If it si true, what is the name of the
} software and where is it available?
} Thank you.
} M. Kalab
}
} Please reply to:
} scimat-at-magma.ca
}
}



From daemon Wed Jul 10 07:10:31 2002



From: Gillmeister, Russ :      RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:03:52 -0400
Subject: Stop algae growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wil, I would think this would kill the algae in the water and the UV chamber
but other areas are still vulnerable.
We made the mistake of installing a cooling water tap off our Haskris
system on an EM400 for digital camera cooling by using clear tubing. The
algae growth took off. I contacted Philips to determine how we could treat
the coolant to prevent this algae growth. They recommended a 50 / 50, water
/ ethylene glycol. We did this and had no further problems with algae even
with the clear tubing in place. I would not do this without the OK from you
scope vendor.
Russ Gillmeister
Xerox
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
} From: Wil Bigelow [mailto:bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 4:13 PM
To: Microscopy Listserver


I recall that over the past couple of years several people have
inquired about ways to control the growth of algae in recirculating
cooling water systems.

I just received a catalog from an outfit called Home Improvements
that lists a device called 'Power Clear' for controlling algal growth
in garden pools and ponds. It is essentially a 15 x 5 x 5" chamber
with hose connections at each end. When the circulator's hose is
connected to it the circulating water flows over a quartz-sleeved
ultra violet bulb, which is said to kill parasites, mold spores,
bacteria and fungi in the water.

It sounds as though this would be very suitable to use in water
recirculators for electron microscopes and related instruments. The
cost is only about $130, with replacement bulbs priced at $30. Check
www.ImprovementsCatalog.com, or call 1-800-642-2112.

--
Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237


From daemon Wed Jul 10 07:43:45 2002



From: Gilles Grondin :      Gilles.Grondin-at-USherbrooke.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:35:31 -0400
Subject: iron detection.....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are trying to localize iron in yeast with light and electron microscopy
. Has anybody know of stains for iron at the light microscope and also for
electron microscope.

We would appreciate any input and suggestions you may have. Thanks for your
help,
Gilles




From daemon Wed Jul 10 07:59:48 2002



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:52:07 -0400
Subject: Design

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If there is anyone out there who has recently designed a new EM lab in new
construction, I would appreciate hearing what special instructions you gave
to the architects and engineers to assure the appropriate environmental
conditions for operation of the instruments.

Thanks, Greg
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, ICBR EM CORE
University of Florida Ph. 352-392-1295
PO Box 118525 Fax 352-846-0251
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/EM


From daemon Wed Jul 10 08:07:36 2002



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 09:00:19 -0400
Subject: Design

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



If there is anyone out there who has recently designed a new EM lab in new
construction, I would appreciate hearing what special instructions you gave
to the architects and engineers to assure the appropriate environmental
conditions for operation of the instruments.

Thanks, Greg


Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, ICBR EM CORE
University of Florida Ph. 352-392-1295
PO Box 118525 Fax 352-846-0251
Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/EM


From daemon Wed Jul 10 09:18:52 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 08:18:13 -0600
Subject: question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The answer is yes, actually several times.

1) Deconvolution. This technique takes several images (a stack) of images
taken at different focus positions, and calculates the "blurring" in each
image and finally removes it for a focused image. There are different types
of deconvolution (no neighbor, nearest neighbor, blind iterative). These
algorithms are fairly computation intense and can take a while to complete,
especially on large images. You also need information about the microscope
to get the best results.

2) Extended Focal Imaging (we call it that way, other manufacturers have
different names). This is a simpler approach, where the software simply
"collects" the focused parts from each image and combines them into a new
image. This usually works faster than deconvolution and you don't need any
other information from the microscope, but there might be artifacts in areas
where you find no structure on the image.

If you want to get more information, you can check "deconvolution" on the
internet, or go to our web site and look for "ride" (rapid image
deconvolution) and EFI (Extended Focal Imaging). As I mentioned above, other
manufacturers have similar software.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Ann-Fook Yang [mailto:yanga-at-agr.gc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 2:47 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


My colleague asks:
Is it true or is a hoax that there is a software which makes it
possible to get focussed light microscopy images from pairs of under-
and overfocussed micrographs? If it si true, what is the name of the
software and where is it available?
Thank you.
M. Kalab

Please reply to:
scimat-at-magma.ca


From daemon Wed Jul 10 10:11:15 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:03:44 +0200
Subject: follow up: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I tried a lot of stuff to solve my "pepper" problem either on the "stainig
side", like shorter lead stain, different batch of lead citrate, prolonged
washes after fix and osmium, I don´t use phosphate buffers, etc, etc or on the
scope side (Philips EM 201) like using different objektive/condensor
apertures, low kv, low emission, etc. etc. Nothing helped.

If I take a section I worked with a couple of weeks ago (and then it was ok in
the Philips EM 20, I took dozens of nice negs) and put it in the same Philips
EM 201 now (exactly the same scope settings) I get this "pepper" and it is
really bad. If I take such a "peppered" section to the Zeiss EM 10 I still can
see the "pepper", so it is not a problem of not being able to see the
contamination in the Zeiss.

It drives me crazy.

Stefan



°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Wed Jul 10 10:37:20 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 11:28:32 -0400
Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


But do you have the problem with a section that is taken from the Philips to
the Zeiss?

Thanks,

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: Stefan Geimer
} Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2002 2:04 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have the following problem:
} I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
} it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
} in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
} etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} dependend.
} Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
}
} Stefan
}
}
}
} °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} Stefan Geimer
} MCDB Dept.
} Yale University
} P.O. Box 208103
} New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} U.S.A.
}
} Tel.: 203/432-3473
} Fax.: 203/432-6210
}
} e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
}
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Jul 10 10:58:01 2002



From: Phil Fraundorf :      FraundorfP-at-umsl-mail02.umsl.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:50:14 -0500
Subject: Re: Design

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Greg,

I'm not sure what your design goals are, but the following
may give you some ideas...

We designed a lab, with focus on atom-resolution TEM and
SPM, to occupy half of the first floor of a 3 story building.
There was a writeup about it in the November 1999 issue (vol
4 no 11) of Laboratory Design. A brief quote from the article
said: "After reviewing geotechnical studies, designers
decided to place the electron microscopy lab on the first
floor, as far away as possible from the arterial road.
Mechanical equipment, as well as the microscope's generator,
were located on the first floor in the office wing, which is
separated from the lab block by a 2-in. seismic joint. A
second 2-in. expansion joint isolates the lab wing from the
adjacent Benton Hall. The microscopy lab rests on a dedicated
2-ft-thick concrete foundation, with theater-wall construction
further mitigating vibration." I'm not sure what they mean
here by "the microscope's generator", but the elastic barriers
they describe extend through all 3+1 floors of the facility.

Electrical wiring and air handling systems were designed
to minimize stray fields and asymmetric convection around
electron microscope columns, separate air conditioning
controls supplied the HREM room (allowing shut-down to test
it's effects on vibration if necessary) along with a ceiling
crane for column disassembly and a wall feedthrough
allowing the scope's low voltage power supplies to be located
in an adjacent, vibrationally separated, area. Hall closets
for chillers, transformers, etc. were located well away from
more sensitive instruments. Dust generating areas (e.g.
specimen prep) were located away from the scope rooms, and
specimen handling areas were given single-color floor tiles
to make small dropped objects easier to find.

Lastly, since we knew we couldn't do much after the fact
if building design goals were compromised during construction,
we made it a practice to attend weekly construction meetings,
and to schedule vibration isolation tests at appropriate times
during construction. I remember painfully one in particular,
when the only way we could figure how to measure vibration
attenuation between the 2-foot thick slab, and the newly-
poured floor surrounding, was for me to jump down from a
4-foot retaining wall onto the new floor hitting with maximum
impact (that was the bad part) while others monitored on-slab
and off-slab vibration. We got numbers for amplitude
attentuation (I think somewhere between a factor of 10 and
100, in the 10 Hz frequency range), but the next day I could
barely get out of bed. Of course, it was less the results
of the tests than the fact that everyone knew we were actively
doing them that, we felt, worked in our favor.

Most elements of the strategy worked (provided I don't
mention light leaks in the darkroom). Under normal contact
mode operating conditions sitting out in the room on a
vibration table, our Nanoscope III SPM has stationary-tip
vibration amplitudes of about half an Angstrom, and our
300 kV Philips SuperTwin continues to reliably deliver
contrast in the sub-2A range even on amorphous materials
using the lowest possible bias setting. If you have further
questions or would like more details, contact me off of the
list server.

Cheers. /pf

Phil Fraundorf
UM-StL Physics and Astronomy
St. Louis MO 63121
office: (314)516-5044
lab: (314)516-5024
fax: (314)516-6152
http://www.umsl.edu/~fraundor

*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

On 7/10/2002 at 9:00 AM you? wrote:

} If there is anyone out there who has recently designed a new EM lab in new
} construction, I would appreciate hearing what special instructions you
} gave
} to the architects and engineers to assure the appropriate environmental
} conditions for operation of the instruments.
}
} Thanks, Greg
}
} Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} Scientific Director, ICBR EM CORE
} University of Florida Ph. 352-392-1295
} PO Box 118525 Fax 352-846-0251
} Gainesville, FL 32611 http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/EM






From daemon Wed Jul 10 12:40:43 2002



From: Emmanuelle Roux :      eroux-at-caprion.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 13:32:03 -0400
Subject: Immunogold with hen Ab

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Stephan,
I haven't yet worked (soon but not yet, so I can't tell you much about protocoles) with IgY but I can tell you where to buy secondary Ab to IgY conjugated to gold: BIO/CAN Scientific (Jackson) 1-800-387-8125 or 905-828-2455
They are located in Ontario, Canada.
Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 6 nm cat# 703--195-155
Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 12 nm cat# 703--205-155
Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 18 nm cat# 703--215-155
Hope it helps

Emmanuelle



Emmanuelle Roux, PhD
Senior Scientist
Caprion Pharmaceuticals
7150 Alexander Fleming
St-Laurent, H4S 2C8
Quebec, Canada
Tel: 514-940-3600 ext. 3773
Fax: 514-940-3620



From daemon Wed Jul 10 12:44:56 2002



From: Emmanuelle Roux :      eroux-at-caprion.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 13:39:01 -0400
Subject: Immunogold with hen Ab

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Hi Stephan,
} I haven't yet worked (soon but not yet, so I can't tell you much about protocoles) with IgY but I can tell you where to buy secondary Ab to IgY conjugated to gold: BIO/CAN Scientific (Jackson) 1-800-387-8125 or 905-828-2455
} They are located in Ontario, Canada.
} Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 6 nm cat# 703--195-155
} Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 12 nm cat# 703--205-155
} Donkey anti-chicken IgY - 18 nm cat# 703--215-155
} Hope it helps
}
} Emmanuelle
}
}
}
} Emmanuelle Roux, PhD
} Senior Scientist
} Caprion Pharmaceuticals
} 7150 Alexander Fleming
} St-Laurent, H4S 2C8
} Quebec, Canada
} Tel: 514-940-3600 ext. 3773
} Fax: 514-940-3620
}


From daemon Wed Jul 10 12:47:43 2002



From: MARK JEFFREY TALBOT :      mark.talbot-at-studentmail.newcastle.edu.au (by
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 10:28:02 -0700
Subject: Congo Red

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I have a little problem. I am staining thin sections of LR White
embedded plant tissue with a 1% aqueous solution of Congo Red (Sigma)
for 1 min, with three 'copious' washes from a distilled water wash
bottle. Instead of the cell wall labelling, I get a 'negative' image of
the wall, and the cytoplasm stains strongly. I don't know why this is
so; I made up a mew batch of the stain, but that didn't improve the
labelling, and it's never happened before. I checked the pH, and it's
around 9. Am I going mad, or is there something about Gongo Red that I
should know about?

Thanks for you help in advance,


Mark.


Mark Talbot
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Newcastle
Callaghan NSW 2308
AUSTRALIA


From daemon Wed Jul 10 13:08:23 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:02:49 +0100
Subject: Re: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am curious to hear the answer to this question from Jacques and I have
something to add.
Once I performed EDS analyses on a sample of BC particles on C film in order to
test a new EDS analysis system installed on a new FEG 200KeV TEM. After selecting
the correct time constant in the EDS software I could get nice distinguishable C
and B peaks. Later I tried doing a similar EDS analysis on large FeB2 particles in

a Fe matrix. I mention large here to stress that the particles went through the
specimen foil so most of the X-rays were being emitted directly from the particles

without passing through the Fe matrix before reaching the detector. I never saw
even a hint of a B peak. These ppts should have contained 33at%B.
Was I doing something wrong or is that an indication of how easily boron X-rays
are absorbed within a sample containing large z atoms?

Faerber Jacques wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi all
}
} In the same idee, what about mesurements on boron carbide ? Carbon AND
} boron concentrations ! I see nice spectras, without anything else ( a bit
} O, some times Al and N). And I have variations between samples in the B/C
} ratio. In such a case can I mesure only ratio variation, or is it possible
} to try some quantification (with standards). The sample is bulk B4C
} and laser ablation thick layers (with dropplets). Primary energy 3 to 5
} keV.
}
} I think it's a bit pretentious to quantify. What is other's opinion ?
}
} J. Faerber
} IPCMS-GSI
} (Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
} Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
} 23, rue de Loess
} 67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
} France
}
} Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
} Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
} E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
}
} On Tue, 9 Jul 2002, Ronald Vane wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Dear Chris and all:
} }
} } Quantitative analysis of Carbon by EDX is nearly impossible because of the
} } very shallow penetration depth of the Carbon X-rays. You really just measure
} } the surface. Surface analysis techniques such as XPS and Auger also show
} } that thin carbon films love to form on surfaces. If you have an XPS you use
} } your ion gun to sputter off the carbon surface scum to see the real surface.
} }
} } Dry ashing in a plasma cleaner can also remove the carbon surface layer.
} } Sputter etching can be used to remove gold and silver coatings.
} }
} } Ron Vane
} } XEI Scientific
} } 3124 Wessex Way, Redwood City, CA 94061
} } 650-369-0133
} } www.SEMCLEAN.com
} }
} } Note: XEI Scientific makes the EVACTRON plasma cleaning system for Electron
} } Microscope Chambers and FIBs, but does not make desk top plasma dry ashers
} } or sputter etchers.
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Chris Peppiatt {chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie}
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } Date: Monday, July 08, 2002 3:22 PM
} } Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX
} }
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Dear All,
} } }
} } } Someone has asked me to do some work for them on mineral specimens. The
} } } samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we will then coat with
} } } carbon. Obviously we will set our software to deconvolute carbon from the
} } } analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or silver and
} } } then look at the carbon content. I suppose the questions I would like to
} } } have answered are:
} } }
} } } (1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some of the light
} } } element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is there any way of
} } } correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative analysis of carbon
} } content?
} } }
} } } (2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or carbon coatings from
} } } such samples except for the obvious method of regrinding/polishing the
} } } coating off?
} } }
} } } Thanks in advance.
} } }
} } } Regards,
} } }
} } } Chris Peppiatt
} } }
} } }
} } } ============================================
} } } Dr. Chris Peppiatt (Experimental Officer),
} } } The National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science,
} } } Science & Engineering Technology Building,
} } } National University of Ireland Galway,
} } } Galway City, Co. Galway,
} } } Republic of Ireland.
} } } chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
} } } Phone: +353 91 512157 Fax: +353 91 750596
} } } =============================================
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }

--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Jul 10 13:27:24 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:20:41 -0400
Subject: Re: iron detection.....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For the LM either "Prussian Blue" reaction or "Turnbull's Blue" reaction depending on whether your
iron is +3 (ferric) or +2 (ferros). Theses are very simple and in any histotechnique text (ferro- or
ferri- cyanide in HCl) . You should run a control for verification. At the EM level I would think that
iron deposits would be electron dense and not require any staining. In fact, they might be more visible in
an unstained section.

Gilles Grondin wrote:

} We are trying to localize iron in yeast with light and electron microscopy
} . Has anybody know of stains for iron at the light microscope and also for
} electron microscope.
}
} We would appreciate any input and suggestions you may have. Thanks for your
} help,
} Gilles

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Wed Jul 10 14:30:30 2002



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:26:13 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have to ask the obvious, just to make sure that your staining technique is
meticulous.

1. are you doing the lead citrate stain in a low Co2 environment? KOH,
sucks up CO2 a lot better than NaOH... so try that... in a glass petri dish.

2. Use ultra clean boiled water to make up the lead citrate stain to drive
out CO2.

3. Wash the living hell out of the grids after staining. I bang them up
and down 60 times in half a liter of ultra pure water in 3 separate beakers,
after every stain. [I can stain about 35 grids on one of those rubber grid
holders with the slits in them to hold the grids... they are nice. You can
cut more slits to hold even more grids.]

4. Never use the lead citrate near the bottom of the vial. Every time I
try that, I end up with peppering, and make sure that your stain is fresh.

The reason that you don't see the artifact in one microscope probably just
means that you dont' have the same contrast between the 2 machines... maybe
different obj. aperture sizes or a lot of other reasons. But trust me, it's
probably still there.



From daemon Wed Jul 10 14:36:07 2002



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:34:17 -0500
Subject: RE: follow up: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have to ask the obvious, just to make sure that your staining technique is
meticulous.

1. are you doing the lead citrate stain in a low Co2 environment? KOH,
sucks up CO2 a lot better than NaOH... so try that... in a glass petri dish.

2. Use ultra clean boiled water to make up the lead citrate stain to drive
out CO2.

3. Wash the living hell out of the grids after staining. I bang them up
and down 60 times in half a liter of ultra pure water in 3 separate beakers,
after every stain. [I can stain about 35 grids on one of those rubber grid
holders with the slits in them to hold the grids... they are nice. You can
cut more slits to hold even more grids.]

4. Never use the lead citrate near the bottom of the vial. Every time I
try that, I end up with peppering, and make sure that your stain is fresh.

The reason that you don't see the artifact in one microscope probably just
means that you dont' have the same contrast between the 2 machines... maybe
different obj. aperture sizes or a lot of other reasons. But trust me, it's
probably still there.



From daemon Wed Jul 10 14:45:43 2002



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:38:35 -0500
Subject: SEM: Removing cell membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,

I seem to recall reading somewhere about a method of removing the top cell membranes from a cell culture layer. It seems to have involved placing a layer of material over the cultured cells and stripping it away, but I can't remember anything about where I saw the reference.

Can somebody help jog my memory? Or did I dream this? I figure if ANYONE knows, you folks will!

Thanks!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/




From daemon Wed Jul 10 14:56:31 2002



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-urmc.rochester.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:50:06 -0400
Subject: RE: Silver enhancement of gold particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers:

Has anyone out there ever silver enhanced 20nm gold particles? I would like
to see by light microscopy the distribution in rat lung of inhaled gold
particles. I have done 1nm gold particle enhancement but that was for EM
viewing. Would it involve the same methodology?

Thanks!

Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954



From daemon Wed Jul 10 15:30:30 2002



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 15:27:18 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I have to ask the obvious, just to make sure that your staining technique is
meticulous.

1. are you doing the lead citrate stain in a low Co2 environment? KOH,
sucks up CO2 a lot better than NaOH... so try that... in a glass petri dish.

2. Use ultra clean boiled water to make up the lead citrate stain to drive
out CO2.

3. Wash the living hell out of the grids after staining. I bang them up
and down 60 times in half a liter of ultra pure water in 3 separate beakers,
after every stain. [I can stain about 35 grids on one of those rubber grid
holders with the slits in them to hold the grids... they are nice. You can
cut more slits to hold even more grids.]

4. Never use the lead citrate near the bottom of the vial. Every time I
try that, I end up with peppering, and make sure that your stain is fresh.

The reason that you don't see the artifact in one microscope probably just
means that you dont' have the same contrast between the 2 machines... maybe
different obj. aperture sizes or a lot of other reasons. But trust me, it's
probably still there.



From daemon Wed Jul 10 16:24:52 2002



From: Vetrano, John S :      john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:15:41 -0700
Subject: TEM/SEM Tech. Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all;

the following is copied from our HR group announcement. The official bits
are listed below. I can answer some questions but I'm not the decision
maker so please don't bombard me with emails!

cheers, JSV
******************

Would you like to work at a National Laboratory? The Pacific Northwest
National Laboratory is looking for a Microscopist. If you are interested,
please apply by visiting our website:
http://jobs.pnl.gov/jobs.asp?req=104165
PNNL is an EEO/AA employer and values diversity in the workplace. F/M/D/V
are encouraged to apply.

Materials Interfaces and Characterization
Materials Science Division
Science & Engineering Associate II
Min. Salary: 40K/yr - Max. Salary: 59K/yr (salary is commensurate with
education and experience).

This position requires experience in electron microscopy and a 4-year degree
in a field of science or its equivalent. Background should be in metal and
ceramic sample preparation and in the operation of transmission and scanning
electron microscopes. Working experience with the use of analytical
electron microscopes is highly desired. Background in the handling,
preparation and examination of materials is also required. Will lead
technical activities dealing with material preparation and characterization
for PNNL scientists and engineers in support of a variety of projects within
the technical group. Will be responsible for performing analytical
characterization of materials, using transmission and scanning electron
microscopy. Will contribute research data for publications in refereed
technical journals and in reports to various sponsors. Excellent oral and
written communication skills and ability to establish positive working
relationships with other technical staff is required. This position will
report to the Materials Interfaces and Characterization Technical Group
Manager.
***********************


********
John S. Vetrano
Sr. Research Scientist
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
MSIN P8-16
P.O. Box 999
Richland, WA 99352
Phone: (509)372-0724 Fax: (509)376-6308
Email: mailto:john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov


From daemon Wed Jul 10 16:34:06 2002



From: Vetrano, John S :      john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:26:00 -0700
Subject: TEM/SEM Tech. Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




} Hi all;
}
} the following is copied from our HR group announcement. The official bits
} are listed below. I can answer some questions but I'm not the decision
} maker so please don't bombard me with emails!
}
} cheers, JSV
} ******************
}
} Would you like to work at a National Laboratory? The Pacific Northwest
} National Laboratory is looking for a Microscopist. If you are interested,
} please apply by visiting our website:
} http://jobs.pnl.gov/jobs.asp?req=104165
} PNNL is an EEO/AA employer and values diversity in the workplace. F/M/D/V
} are encouraged to apply.
}
} Materials Interfaces and Characterization
} Materials Science Division
} Science & Engineering Associate II
} Min. Salary: 40K/yr - Max. Salary: 59K/yr (salary is commensurate with
} education and experience).
}
} This position requires experience in electron microscopy and a 4-year
} degree in a field of science or its equivalent. Background should be in
} metal and ceramic sample preparation and in the operation of transmission
} and scanning electron microscopes. Working experience with the use of
} analytical electron microscopes is highly desired. Background in the
} handling, preparation and examination of materials is also required. Will
} lead technical activities dealing with material preparation and
} characterization for PNNL scientists and engineers in support of a variety
} of projects within the technical group. Will be responsible for
} performing analytical characterization of materials, using transmission
} and scanning electron microscopy. Will contribute research data for
} publications in refereed technical journals and in reports to various
} sponsors. Excellent oral and written communication skills and ability to
} establish positive working relationships with other technical staff is
} required. This position will report to the Materials Interfaces and
} Characterization Technical Group Manager.
} ***********************
}
}
} ********
} John S. Vetrano
} Sr. Research Scientist
} Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
} MSIN P8-16
} P.O. Box 999
} Richland, WA 99352
} Phone: (509)372-0724 Fax: (509)376-6308
} Email: mailto:john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov
}


From daemon Wed Jul 10 16:59:04 2002



From: R. Ann Bliss :      bliss5-at-llnl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 14:52:25 -0700
Subject: Replacement parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers:

If anyone out there has a Kevex Analyst 8000 in "excess storage" we
would be interested in a pulse processor (4460). Who knows? We may be
looking for other modules in the near future. Please contact me
offline.

Warm Regards,
Annie
--

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

R. Ann Bliss
Technician, Chemistry and Materials Science
Materials Science and Technology Division
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

_____________________________


From daemon Wed Jul 10 18:24:24 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:12:58 -0400
Subject: TMC Isolation Platform

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a TMC isolation platform for a TEM that we wish to sell as our new
scope will not fit on this platform. Currently used for a JEOL 100C. Unit
purchased in 1994 and in excellent condition. Interested parties should
contact

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Wed Jul 10 18:54:14 2002



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:53:01 -0700
Subject: Re: SEM: Removing cell membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


HI Randy,
We've done this with cell cancer lines incubated onto a bone
surface or with bacteria incubated on a polished planchet of
hornblende. I placed double stickey C tabs cut into thin slivers onto an
alumium stub, remove the tab cover, inverted the aluminum, stub with the
exposed sticky +conductive surface over a dried /coated and previously
imaged sample, touching it lightly to the surface before pulling it
away---the idea being to Au/Pd coat both stubs, and then check them for
the cells, cell content or for the pit formed when the cells anchored into
the layer of bone / hornblende. As might be expected, I had fewer problems
with the hornblende surface than with the bone slice.
I hope that your ultrasmall gold course went well.
Rosemary


.At 02:38 PM 7/10/02 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 10 19:17:30 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu (by way of
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 17:02:27 -0700
Subject: Haskris Water Chiller

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Haskris Water to Air Chiller, puchased in 1994 to cool one Jeol 840 SEM and
a Jeol 100C TEM, from 1994 to 1996. 1996 to present only used for the TEM.
Unit is in very good condition. Asking $20000.00 or Best offer plus
removal and shipping costs. Contact

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html


From daemon Wed Jul 10 23:26:27 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 21:15:58 -0400
Subject: Re: Stop algae growth (plus pH control)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/9/02 7:37 PM, Allan Mitchell at allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
wrote:

}
} Hi Wilbur, Thanks for the update
}
} The recirculating cooling water systems problem that we have the most
} problem trying to get a handle on is controlling the pH of the
} cooling water to prevent corrosion. Since the end of the good old
} days when we were allowed to use Sodium Chromate and Sodium
} Bicarbonate we have not yet found a satisfactory replacement.
}
} Satisfactory includes; effectiveness at pH control, life time before
} depletion, safe handling and disposal, cost, availablility.
}
} Trying to get good advice also seems to like the proverbial hens teeth.
}
} Anyone out there come up with any good products recently.
}
Dear Allan,
Back at the HVEM, we used Aqua Treet 42 for anti-corrosion and adjusted
the pH to between 8.0 and 8.5 with NaOH. The Aqua Treet--from Aqua Labs
somewhere in NJ as I recall--works well at that pH. We checked the
concentration with a color kit once each month, and had to add more only
occasionally; it is very safe (I didn't drink any, but it is not corrosive,
etc.); the cost was under $100 for a 5 gal tub, which has lasted for many
years, and is nowhere near the bottom. Last time I checked, Aqua Labs was
reachable by phone and was on the web. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Wed Jul 10 23:27:38 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 21:19:36 -0400
Subject: Re: SEM&LM - help needed for Metal localization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/9/02 7:46 PM, rcmoretz-at-att.net at rcmoretz-at-att.net wrote:

} Altho' not directly involved in the
} work, I do remember that the fixative was hydrogen
} sulfide saturated glutaraldehyde (really noxious mixture-
} -in more ways than one!). There is also some literature
} related to Cd localization, but I can't dredge up
} names.
} Roger Moretz
} --
} Where the world is only slightly
} less weird than it actually is.

Dear Roger,
Sulfide should precipitate Cd as well as Zn.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Thu Jul 11 06:23:28 2002



From: Jan Coetzee :      janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 13:13:38 +0200
Subject: Re: SEM: Removing cell membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Randy
There was a presentation at a South African EM Society meeting in 1983
on this subject:
Hughes, F & Rijkenberg, F H J - 1983: An epidermis removal technique
for studying infection processes of Puccinia sorghi in Maize leaves.
Proc. Electron Microsc. Soc. South Afr. 13, 17-18.

The basics are: Fix and dehydrate specimens, then CPD, mount onto SEM
stub. A second stub, onto which double-sided sticky tape has been
affixed, is pressed to the specimen surface and pulled away. After
coating both stubs, the inner and outer surfaces of the specimen can
be studied.

If required, I can fax you a copy of the two pages.

Regards
Jan Coetzee


"Tindall, Randy D." wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear listers,
}
} I seem to recall reading somewhere about a method of removing the top cell membranes from a cell culture layer. It seems to have involved placing a layer of material over the cultured cells and stripping it away, but I can't remember anything about where I saw the reference.
}
} Can somebody help jog my memory? Or did I dream this? I figure if ANYONE knows, you folks will!
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/

--
Jan Coetzee
Lab for Microscopy and Microanalysis
University of Pretoria, South Africa.
Tel: 012-420-2075, Fax 012-362-5150
www.up.ac.za/academic/electron/emunit1.htm


From daemon Thu Jul 11 09:11:48 2002



From: cwuethri-at-caregroup.harvard.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 09:59:39 -0400
Subject: Re: Congo red

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Mark,

Some weeks ago, there was a discussion about the effects of pH and many
other factors on the stainings (in that case toluidine blue). The conclusion
was, if I can say, that we can never know ...., only try.

Regarding your problem, I had a similar experiment with ruthenium red on JB4
embedded European beeches sections. At neutral and basic pH, the stain is in
the cytoplasm (or in the vacuoles?).
At pH {= 5, the pectins (near the walls) stained. It remained me an
experiment I did on practical work (when I was student) in which we
experimented that the staining of the walls migrates to the vacuols when the
pH is changed from acidic to basic...

You can try quickly the same with your sections:

1) stain them as you do
2) rince them with an acidic buffer or solution and mount them in that
buffer (non permanent mounting)

3) look at them, perhaps you will see after some time that the staining in,
or near the walls

4) if it works, one conclusion would be : the pH of rinsing is as (or
perhaps in some cases) more important than the pH of the staining itself.
But I stop here, because I'm sure there will be many other opinions...

Another problem could perhaps be that embedding was not optimal (did you
your staining on the same sections than when it worked ?)...

Hope it hels

Chris Wuethrich
Beth Israel Deaconess medical Center
330, Brookline AVE
Boston, MA 02215


From daemon Thu Jul 11 09:11:48 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 10:02:59 -0400
Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


PCan someone please explain why the solutions still concentrate on the stain
and its condition rather than taking the tack that the problem lies with the
Philips scope?

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: Monson, Frederick C.
} Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 11:28 AM
} To: 'Stefan Geimer'
} Cc: 'List-Microscopy'
} Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} But do you have the problem with a section that is taken from the Philips
} to
} the Zeiss?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} } ----------
} } From: Stefan Geimer
} } Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2002 2:04 PM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I have the following problem:
} } I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} } citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} } contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} } associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} } problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} } kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} } with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} } (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} } The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} } scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
} } it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
} } in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} } grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
} } etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} } dependend.
} } Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
} }
} } Stefan
} }
} }
} }
} } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } Stefan Geimer
} } MCDB Dept.
} } Yale University
} } P.O. Box 208103
} } New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} } U.S.A.
} }
} } Tel.: 203/432-3473
} } Fax.: 203/432-6210
} }
} } e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}


From daemon Thu Jul 11 09:31:44 2002



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 10:25:35 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM: Removing cell membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Check the work of Richard G Anderson (Department of Cell Biology,
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas).

One example of publication which I think described that technique :
Moore MS, Mahaffey DT, Brodsky FM, Anderson RG.
Assembly of clathrin-coated pits onto purified plasma membranes.
Science 1987 May 1;236(4801):558-63.

"Tindall, Randy D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear listers,
}
} I seem to recall reading somewhere about a method of removing the top cell membranes from a cell culture layer. It seems to have involved placing a layer of material over the cultured cells and stripping it away, but I can't remember anything about where I saw the reference.
}
} Can somebody help jog my memory? Or did I dream this? I figure if ANYONE knows, you folks will!
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology,
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging and
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research,
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street
New Haven CT 06520
Tel : (203) 785 3681
Fax : (203) 785 7446




From daemon Thu Jul 11 10:59:10 2002



From: Xinran Liu :      xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 10:53:38 -0500
Subject: TEM film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

I plan to upgrade my film scanner for TEM 3.25x4 in. negatives.
(Currently I am using Microtek ScanMaker 8700 and Agfa Duoscan T2500). I
have located two scanners that fit into my requirement. One is Minolta
Dimage Scan multi Pro, the other one is Nikon Super Coolscan 8000ED.
Minolta scanner has a slightly higher optical resolution (4800 dpi) and
Dynamic range of 4.8.

Can anybody who has experience with these scanners help me to make a
decision? Thanks a lot.

Xinran Liu

Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
Center for Basic Neuroscience
UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
Phone: 214-648-1830
Fax: 214-648-1801
E-mail: xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu






From daemon Thu Jul 11 11:32:57 2002



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 11:30:05 -0500
Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The reason why I took this position is because I have sometimes seen
peppering as a result of faulty staining technique with lead citrate. I
have not see this sort of "peppering" as a result of microscope
contamination. In the case of microscope contamination, it shows more as a
general density increase over a specific area of the grid....like a burn.

That said, I've never used a Philips EM, but I have used Jeol 1010, Hitachi
7000, AEI 6B and AEI 801, Zeiss 109, and a Zeiss 10CR and an old Zeiss 9 I
believe. In my 18 years of experience, I've never seen peppering as a
result of a microscope contamination. It doesn't mean that it can't happen,
just that in my experience, I haven't seen it. I can only talk about what
I've seen, or haven't seen.


PCan someone please explain why the solutions still concentrate on the stain
and its condition rather than taking the tack that the problem lies with the
Philips scope?

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: Monson, Frederick C.
} Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 11:28 AM
} To: 'Stefan Geimer'
} Cc: 'List-Microscopy'
} Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} But do you have the problem with a section that is taken from the Philips
} to
} the Zeiss?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} } ----------
} } From: Stefan Geimer
} } Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2002 2:04 PM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I have the following problem:
} } I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} } citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} } contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} } associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} } problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} } kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} } with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} } (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} } The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} } scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
} } it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
} } in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} } grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
} } etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} } dependend.
} } Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
} }
} } Stefan
} }
} }
} }
} } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } Stefan Geimer
} } MCDB Dept.
} } Yale University
} } P.O. Box 208103
} } New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} } U.S.A.
} }
} } Tel.: 203/432-3473
} } Fax.: 203/432-6210
} }
} } e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}



From daemon Thu Jul 11 11:42:30 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 12:32:17 -0400
Subject: Haskris Correction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Haskris Water to Air Chiller, purchased in 1994 to cool one Jeol 840 SEM and
a Jeol 100C TEM, from 1994 to 1996. 1996 to present only used for the TEM.
This is a Model R150 Unit. 208/230 volts , 1 Phase 60 Hertz. Condenser is
1.75 HP. with lbs. refrigerant R-22 charge ,1/3 HP water pump with a 14
gallon tank. Unit is in very good condition. Asking $2,000.00 or Best offer
plus removal and shipping costs. Contact


Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Thu Jul 11 13:21:12 2002



From: agodl-at-o2.pl (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 11:08:34 -0700
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:Timm Method??

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (agodl-at-o2.pl) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
July 11, 2002 at 11:30:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: agodl-at-o2.pl
Name: Godlewski Andrzej

Education: Graduate College

Location: Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland

Question: Hallo,
In the autometallography the Timm method is used for revealing
cations (eg zinc, cobalt)in different biological materials. The idea
of This method is simply from chemical point of view: treatment of
sample with Na2S (high pH)[sulphide of cation present in sample],
wash, next AgNO3 in H2O (1%?)[substitution by silver other cattion ]
and photographic developer [for silver revealing].The method is
simply, accurate but not specific. The question: What is original
recipe of Timm method?
Best regard
A.Godlewski MD PhD D Sci

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jul 11 14:33:21 2002



From: Paul Toselli :      paultos-at-biochem.bumc.bu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 15:29:07 -0400
Subject: How to prevent mouse-brain paraffin-section loss

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

Our 5-micron paraffin-embedded mouse brain secions are washing off
our plus-coated microsope slides during our post-xylene alcohol
dehydration steps.

Does any one know how to prevent this from occuring?

Thank you.

Paul Toselli
Boston University Medical School




From daemon Thu Jul 11 14:44:54 2002



From: Paul Toselli :      paultos-at-biochem.bumc.bu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 15:42:23 -0400
Subject: How to prevent mouse-brain paraffin-section loss

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

Our 5-micron paraffin-embedded mouse brain secions are washing off
our plus-coated microsope slides during our post-xylene alcohol
dehydration steps.

Does any one know how to prevent this from occuring?

Thank you.

Paul Toselli
Boston University Medical School






From daemon Thu Jul 11 16:51:49 2002



From: Jian-Guo Zheng :      j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 16:42:17 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscopist: position open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Electron Microscopist
Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC)
Northwestern University, USA

Job description:

Research, collaboration and training of students and users of EPIC in
all aspects of electron microscopy: particularly specimen preparation
and FIB, SEM and TEM analysis.

Specific duties include:

(1) Teach, help and actively collaborate with users in preparing TEM/SEM
samples and their observation by SEM/TEM.
(2) Assist and conduct laboratory teaching in UG and graduate courses
related to specimen preparation and electron microscopy.
(3) Develop collaborative and independent research projects and topics
related to advanced electron microscopy and nanostructures.
(4) Maintain and develop sample preparation laboratory and equipment
such as FIB, ultramicrotome, IBTs, PIPS, electrojet polishers, cutting
saw, wire saw, grinder, vacuum evaporator, sputter coater, liquid
nitrogen and other accessories.
(5) Help maintain and develop computer facility within EPIC.

Qualifications and Needs:

A technical degree in physical science/engineering or bioscience is
needed. Actual hands-on experience in specimen preparation of hard and
soft materials, and electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) is required. Need to
be familiar with modern computers and basic user programs. Laboratory
teaching experience is highly desirable.

Excellent prospects for personal and professional growth.

Send Resume and 3 References directly to:

Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid
Materials Science & Engineering
Director, Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC)
2225 N. Campus Drive, 1133 MLSF
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Ph.: (847) 467-1363, Fax: (847) 467-6573
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu
http://vpd.ms.northwestern.edu
http://epic.ms.northwestern.edu
**********************************************************




From daemon Thu Jul 11 17:03:03 2002



From: Jian-Guo Zheng :      j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 16:55:58 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscopist: Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Electron Microscopist
Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC)
Northwestern University, USA

Job description:

Research, collaboration and training of students and users of EPIC in
all aspects of electron microscopy: particularly specimen preparation
and FIB, SEM and TEM analysis.

Specific duties include:

(1) Teach, help and actively collaborate with users in preparing TEM/SEM
samples and their observation by SEM/TEM.
(2) Assist and conduct laboratory teaching in UG and graduate courses
related to specimen preparation and electron microscopy.
(3) Develop collaborative and independent research projects and topics
related to advanced electron microscopy and nanostructures.
(4) Maintain and develop sample preparation laboratory and equipment
such as FIB, ultramicrotome, IBTs, PIPS, electrojet polishers, cutting
saw, wire saw, grinder, vacuum evaporator, sputter coater, liquid
nitrogen and other accessories.
(5) Help maintain and develop computer facility within EPIC.

Qualifications and Needs:

A technical degree in physical science/engineering or bioscience is
needed. Actual hands-on experience in specimen preparation of hard and
soft materials, and electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) is required. Need to
be familiar with modern computers and basic user programs. Laboratory
teaching experience is highly desirable.

Excellent prospects for personal and professional growth.

Send Resume and 3 References directly to:

Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid
Materials Science & Engineering
Director, Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC)
2225 N. Campus Drive, 1133 MLSF
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Ph.: (847) 467-1363, Fax: (847) 467-6573
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu
http://vpd.ms.northwestern.edu
http://epic.ms.northwestern.edu
**********************************************************



From daemon Thu Jul 11 18:10:14 2002



From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki :      kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 19:02:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: TEM film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

This is my experience with Minolta Scan Multi Pro film scanner.
After a couple of months using it I had to adapt the way I take my TEM
pictures to the scanner. The reason is that the 8x10cm negatives can't be
rotated even using the multi format film holder. And the largest area it
can scan is something around 6x9cm. If you are scanning a small area in
the negative this in not a problem. But in my case some of the pictures I
take is at low mag (less than 5k), and cover almost the entire negative.
What I do is choose a magnification that can fit everything of interest in
the "scannable" area. About the dynamical range, I still don't see much
difference between a negative scanned using the Minolta film scanner or
the old Epson tabletop scanner we have (supposed to be 3.0). But maybe it
is just a matter of getting used to the new scanner. BTW, if you download
the manual of this scanner from Minolta, you will notice in the
Specification section a notice about the Dynamical Range, "4.2 (tested
value)". Maybe this 4.8 is obtained under some "special" condition. :P

The Nikon one should not be much different, I suppose. :)

Regards,

Carlos

On Thu, 11 Jul 2002, Xinran Liu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} I plan to upgrade my film scanner for TEM 3.25x4 in. negatives.
} (Currently I am using Microtek ScanMaker 8700 and Agfa Duoscan T2500). I
} have located two scanners that fit into my requirement. One is Minolta
} Dimage Scan multi Pro, the other one is Nikon Super Coolscan 8000ED.
} Minolta scanner has a slightly higher optical resolution (4800 dpi) and
} Dynamic range of 4.8.
}
} Can anybody who has experience with these scanners help me to make a
} decision? Thanks a lot.
}
} Xinran Liu

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o



From daemon Thu Jul 11 21:56:35 2002



From: Microscopy Today :      microtoday-at-attglobal.net
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 21:44:46 -0500
Subject: FW: Microscopy Today July/August Issue TofC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Reproduced here is the table of contents for the July/August issue of
Microscopy Today.



It is in production at this time and should mail by the 12th.


Ron Anderson

Editor, Microscopy Today



MT JULY/AUGUST TofC



Very Tiny Bar Codes, Stephen W. Carmichael, Mayo Clinic



Progress Towards More Realistic In-Situ Microscopy Observations, A.
Howie, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge



Spectral Image Analysis: Getting The Most From All That Data, P.G.
Kotula, M.R. Keenan, and R. Loehman, Sandia National Laboratories



New Fluorescent Labeling Technologies for Ultrasensitive Cytochemical
and Histochemical Imaging, Iain Johnson, Molecular Probes, Inc



Artifacts and Non-Local Effects In SPM Potential Measurements, Sergei
V. Kalinin and Dawn A. Bonnell, University of Pennsylvania



Vibration, Resonance and the Effect on Microscopes , Douglas A.
Anderson, Schnabel Engineering Associates



The Basics of Immunoglobulins and Immunostaining, W. Gray (Jay)
Jerome, Vanderbilt University Medical Center



Swapping Atoms For Bits: Managing The Digital Evolution In The
Microscopy Laboratory, Judy A. Murphy, San Joaquin Delta College



A Note on Iodine and Vacuum , Scott D. Walck, PPG Industries, Inc.



A Simple Way to Eliminate Frost Build-up on Cryo-SEM Samples, Gib
Ahlstrand, University of Minnesota



Mousescope, Lee van Hook, Piltdown Research Institute, Münchhausen University



A Method for Safely Restraining Mouse Pups for Microscopy, Michael J.
Herron, University of Minnesota



A Simple Image Archive That's Cheap, Too! , Tim Morken, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention




From daemon Fri Jul 12 01:15:41 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jul 2002 23:06:52 -0700
Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I could not imagine the situation when the SAME section will looks dirty in
one microscope (does not matter Phillips or not) and perfectly fine in
another... Only one explanation: the 'good' microscope is misaligned
(sorry EM10) in such degree that you do see practically nothing (the dirty
things becomes invisible). I am so sorry for such rude interpretation. I
would more believe to the 'worse' microscope and will pay attention to the
staining procedure to avoid precipitates.

Sergey

At 09:30 AM 7/11/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Fri Jul 12 06:57:07 2002



From: kivambe :      kivambe-at-uccmail.co.tz
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:38:35 +0300 (EAT)
Subject: TEM/EDS of wood Question.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

How do I prepare bamboo wood for TEM (Microstructure) and EDS?
please, kindly give ideas,suggestions.

Thanks,

Maulid M. Kivambe
Electron Microscopy Laboratory,
Faculty of Science,
P.O.Box 35065,
Dar es Salaam,
Tanzania.

Phone: 255 022 2410462
Mobile: 255 0744 266667
Fax 255 022 2410480.



From daemon Fri Jul 12 06:57:08 2002



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 04:36:16 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Fred and those interested in reading...

I used a Philips 201 for a number of years and got great results as long
as I did not dwell too long in a particular area or a single grid.
However, I always used LN2 whenever I examined or photographed samples
because of the issue associated with vacuum contamination. You could
place a specimen in the field of view and literally watch the
contamination particles form!

The 201 had a mercury/oil diffusion pump and although this may not have
been the entire issue, it was a problem. The other issue was the age of
the instrument. My question would be: how many filament hours are you
getting out of the 201? This is frequently a choice method for
determining scope operation and vacuum function.

I have used and am still using a Zeiss EM10CA since purchased new in 1986.
In addition to the oil diffusion pump, the scope has twin getter pumps: I
always use LN2 when viewing or imaging specimens. I can sit there for 15
minutes and never see contamination. This is true for tissue embedded in
LR White, Epon, Epon substitutes, Spurrs, etc. Furthermore, I get an
average of 300 hours on Zeiss supplied tungsten filaments: yes, this is
true!!

So, Fred, I believe you are correct in your deduction!

Sincerely,
Ken

------
Ken Tiekotter,
The University of Portland
Department of Biology
5000 N. Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97203 USA

Director, MicroImaging Center, G50
Legacy Portland Hosptials
Legacy Holladay Park Medical Center
1225 NE 2nd Avenue
Portland, OR 97232 USA

Tel.: 503-413-5391

On Thu, 11 Jul 2002, Monson, Frederick C. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} PCan someone please explain why the solutions still concentrate on the stain
} and its condition rather than taking the tack that the problem lies with the
} Philips scope?
}
} Fred Monson
}
} } ----------
} } From: Monson, Frederick C.
} } Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 11:28 AM
} } To: 'Stefan Geimer'
} } Cc: 'List-Microscopy'
} } Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } But do you have the problem with a section that is taken from the Philips
} } to
} } the Zeiss?
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: Stefan Geimer
} } } Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2002 2:04 PM
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I have the following problem:
} } } I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} } } citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} } } contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} } } associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} } } problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} } } kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} } } with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} } } (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} } } The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} } } scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look at
} } } it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section observed
} } } in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} } } grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold trap
} } } etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} } } dependend.
} } } Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
} } }
} } } Stefan
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } } Stefan Geimer
} } } MCDB Dept.
} } } Yale University
} } } P.O. Box 208103
} } } New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} } } U.S.A.
} } }
} } } Tel.: 203/432-3473
} } } Fax.: 203/432-6210
} } }
} } } e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} } } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
}




From daemon Fri Jul 12 07:41:16 2002



From: Gunnar Glasser :      glasser-at-mpip-mainz.mpg.de
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:40:13 +0200
Subject: SEM Leo Gemini 15xx / Zeiss DSM982 "improved Inlens detector"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

i wonder if there are people out there who already possess the improved Inlens
detector for the LEO Gemini 15xx or the Zeiss DSM 982.

According to their sales people, the detection efficiency was increased by 250 .. 300%
and the new the detector material is supposed to be "radian hard" ... so far that is
what they told us - Sounds to good to be true?

We would like to get hold of comparable user-image material which shows the same
sample observed a)with your old and b)with the improved Inlens detector.
(... parameter's like acquisition time, detector settings and so on should be provided if
possible)

"Any" thougths, suggestions and experiences are welcome!

Gunnar



Dipl.Ing.(FH) G.Glasser, Elektronenmikroskopie
Max Planck Institut fuer Polymerforschung
Ackermannweg 10
55128 Mainz, GERMANY
phone:++49 +6131 379195 379391
fax: ++49 +6131 379100
web: http://www.mpip-mainz.mpg.de/~glasser

Disclaimer:
The statement above is mine alone and does not implicitly represent the position
of the MPI-P or the MPG!



From daemon Fri Jul 12 10:35:22 2002



From: Barbara Maloney :      bmalon01-at-fiu.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:20:10 -0400
Subject: TEM methods for nanoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Group - what would be the best procedure to prep a copper TEM grid
with nanoparticles? What glue or adhesive would you suggest? I'm
actually using a STEM holder (to get TEM image) on a SEM.
Thanks
Barb



From daemon Fri Jul 12 10:44:40 2002



From: Donald O'Leary :      donoleary-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:37:29 -0400
Subject: LM, Workshop on "Use of The Microscope", NYMS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


New York Microscopical Society
30 North Mountain Avenue
Montclair, NJ 07042


Bernard Friedman
Memorial Workshop



Use of the Microscope
September 21, 28, October 5, 12, 2002

A basic course on light microscopy which will cover the following topics:
Theory of microscopy
Kohler Illumination
Diffraction Theory
Contrast Methods
Polarized light
Phase Contrast
Interference
. . . . Hoffman contrast, Rheinberg, Dark-field & oblique Illumination,
etc.

The workshop will consist of four consecutive Saturdays of lectures and
hands on labs to cover the theoretical and practical aspects of microscopy.
The course instructors include Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc., Dennis O’Leary of
Micro-Optical Methods, Mary McCann of McCann Imaging, John Reffner of SensIR
Technologies, Inc. and N.Y.M.S. Instructor Don O'Leary.

WHEN: September 21, 28, October 5, 12, 2002 from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.

WHERE: 30 N. Mountain Avenue, Montclair, NJ, Phone (973) 744-0043 (
parking available, accessible by public transportation. Information on car
pools and transportation will be provided.)

COST: $325 for N.Y.M.S. members, $355 for non-members (includes membership)
Lunch and course materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.

WHO: Beginners and experienced users who wish to learn more about the
proper use of a microscope.

HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.
Send form to Don O'Leary, 6 Chittenden Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.

FURTHER INFORMATION: Call D. O'Leary (201) 797 -8849
E-mail donoleary-at-worldnet.att.net Fax (425) 988-1415

PLEASE POST
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------
Registration Form
Use of the Microscope 2002

N.Y.M.S. Member_________________ ($275) Non-Member__________($295)

Name______________________________________________________________________
Address____________________________________________________________________
Phone (W)_______________________(H)___________________________




From daemon Fri Jul 12 11:39:32 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 12:29:08 -0400
Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Timing is sometimes NOT everything, BUT in this case it was a fault. My
apology for the timing of my general question which was directed generally
BUT in time appeared as a direct response to Garry's suggestion.

In any case, for those who address my question, including Garry, I
appreciate the discussion and the enlightenment from those who have spent
much more time in the driver's seat than I.

I often pose questions in a way that can cause others to bristle, but my
questions are only intended to seek an answer. You see, I'm not certain
what 'peppering' even refers to when one is discussing artifact on a 60-90nm
section. I know that if I have such a problem a year from now that I will
take the grid to the SEM to try to determine whether the contamination is in
or on the section. On the other hand, if nothing else counts in this
business, experience does, and I listen most intently to those with
experience when they speak.

Respectfully yours,

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: Garry Burgess
} Sent: Thursday, July 11, 2002 12:30 PM
} To: 'Monson, Frederick C.'; 'List-Microscopy'
} Subject: RE: ???TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} The reason why I took this position is because I have sometimes seen
} peppering as a result of faulty staining technique with lead citrate. I
} have not see this sort of "peppering" as a result of microscope
} contamination. In the case of microscope contamination, it shows more as
} a
} general density increase over a specific area of the grid....like a burn.
}
} That said, I've never used a Philips EM, but I have used Jeol 1010,
} Hitachi
} 7000, AEI 6B and AEI 801, Zeiss 109, and a Zeiss 10CR and an old Zeiss 9 I
} believe. In my 18 years of experience, I've never seen peppering as a
} result of a microscope contamination. It doesn't mean that it can't
} happen,
} just that in my experience, I haven't seen it. I can only talk about what
} I've seen, or haven't seen.
}
}
} PCan someone please explain why the solutions still concentrate on the
} stain
} and its condition rather than taking the tack that the problem lies with
} the
} Philips scope?
}
} Fred Monson
}
} } ----------
} } From: Monson, Frederick C.
} } Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 11:28 AM
} } To: 'Stefan Geimer'
} } Cc: 'List-Microscopy'
} } Subject: RE: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } But do you have the problem with a section that is taken from the
} Philips
} } to
} } the Zeiss?
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: Stefan Geimer
} } } Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2002 2:04 PM
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: TEM, Epon sections, problem with "pepper"
} } }
} } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I have the following problem:
} } } I am observing Epon sections, stained with uranyl acetate and lead
} } } citrate in an Philips EM 201. The sections show a really severe
} } } contamination with electron dense grains. These grains are always
} } } associated with embedded structures (membranes, microtubules etc.).The
} } } problem started after I changed the cathode. The contamination looks
} } } kinda like lead-stain granularity and I think it has something to do
} } } with the lead. A section stained with uranyl acetate only looks fine
} } } (but I need the lead to get enough stain).
} } } The crazy thing is that I don´t have the problem when I use our other
} } } scope, a Zeiss EM 10. So if I take one of my sections and have a look
} at
} } } it in the Zeiss EM 10, everything is perfect. The same section
} observed
} } } in the Philips EM 201 shows this contamination with electron dense
} } } grains. Both scopes operated at comparable conditions (80 kv, cold
} trap
} } } etc.). So the contamination seems to be lead citrate and scope
} } } dependend.
} } } Anybody ever had that problem and might have an idea how to solve it?
} } }
} } } Stefan
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } } Stefan Geimer
} } } MCDB Dept.
} } } Yale University
} } } P.O. Box 208103
} } } New Haven, CT 06520-8103
} } } U.S.A.
} } }
} } } Tel.: 203/432-3473
} } } Fax.: 203/432-6210
} } }
} } } e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
} } } °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
}
}
}


From daemon Fri Jul 12 11:44:09 2002



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 17:41:33 +0100 (GMT Daylight Time)
Subject: Re: TEM methods for nanoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Barbara,

Assuming you really do mean nano particles and not micron
sized then just drop them onto a carbon support filmed Cu
grid and they will usually stick. Larger particles will
tend to come off or charge and fly off but most nano and
10s of nanometre particles will be OK. Of course if they
are magnetic the field might strip them off and if they are
non conductive charging will be worse etc.

The alternative is to suspend them (in ethanol) and drop a
drop of it onto the carbon support grid resting on a filter
paper. They will also usually stick but beware of
contaminating the surface by using dirty pipette, alcohol
etc. Nothing should be stored in plastic and wash the
utensils before use then you should be OK.

Good luck,
Ron


On Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:20:10 -0400 Barbara Maloney
{bmalon01-at-fiu.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Group - what would be the best procedure to prep a copper TEM grid
} with nanoparticles? What glue or adhesive would you suggest? I'm
} actually using a STEM holder (to get TEM image) on a SEM.
} Thanks
} Barb
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk



From daemon Fri Jul 12 11:51:36 2002



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 11:44:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Removing Cell Membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Many thanks to all who replied to my question about removing cell membranes for SEM! Lots of leads, references, and a couple complete protocols to keep me busy for awhile.

What a great list!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/




From daemon Fri Jul 12 13:39:51 2002



From: Mark Riggs :      Mark.Riggs-at-asml.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:30:44 -0400
Subject: xl40feg imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


primary application is imaging of Pt coated (2-3nm) resist lines of 100nm and less. standard scope parameters under 100,000x have been 10kv spot2. now find that i must run at 20-30kv to image clearly, and image degrades over time (as little as ½ hour). FEI boosted µA to 334 and performed alignments. what amazes me is that i am no longer damaging my samples. its as if the beam lacks the "oomph" to bend over the lines like it used to at even 10kv. is this a "beam density" issue?

Mark Riggs
SEM Metrology
ASML, Wilton, CT
mark.riggs-at-asml.com
ph:203-761-6856
lab:203-761-4403





From daemon Fri Jul 12 14:13:37 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 15:02:35 -0400
Subject: TMC Anti-vibration Platform

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a TMC MICRO-g Vibration Isolation System Model # 65-17171-01
that we wish to sell. The platform is 86" wide by 71" deep with a seating
cut out that is -at- 30" wide narrowing down to 12" and is about 38" deep.
System has 4 isolation feet. With the feet, it requires an area that is 97"
x 82". The weight of unit is between 2200 - 2500 lbs. Asking $4,000.00 or
best offer plus shipping and handling charges. Interested parties should
contact


Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Fri Jul 12 14:19:43 2002



From: mdhaque :      mdhaque-at-students.uiuc.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:13:10 -0500
Subject: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am looking at
is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
imaging..Thanks

Aman Haque

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aman Haque
Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534



From daemon Fri Jul 12 15:47:23 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:37:46 -0400
Subject: FEI Quanta?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dopes anyone have a FEI Quanta working that s/he would talk to me about on
the QT?

Sure would appreciate the info.

Thanks all and have a nice weekend,

Fred

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


From daemon Fri Jul 12 18:15:35 2002



From: Dwight Arrieche (IIBCA) :      darriech-at-cumana.sucre.udo.edu.ve
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 18:59:55 -0400 (VET)
Subject: On line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Greatly appreciate send me Listserver communications. Account were bloked
for a couple of weeks.

Thanks



From daemon Fri Jul 12 18:15:50 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 17:17:32 -0600
Subject: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dislocations have very specific visibility criteria in a TEM, which are
basically determined by their burgers vector. I am not close to my TEM books
right now, so I can't be more specific, but I am sure there are other people
here who are very familiar with dislocations. To read more about
dislocations and TEM, I would suggest to take a look at Sir Peter Hirsch's
book . I think, it's called "Electron Microscopy of Thin Crystals".

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: mdhaque [mailto:mdhaque-at-students.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2002 1:13 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,

I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am looking
at
is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
imaging..Thanks

Aman Haque

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aman Haque
Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534



From daemon Fri Jul 12 18:52:47 2002



From: Ronald Vane :      RVane-at-Evactron.com
Date: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 10:21 PM
Subject: Re: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, Steve, the much higher absorption coefficient for FE prevents the very
soft Boron X-rays from being emitted from FeB2 in sufficient quantity to be
detected.

Ron Vane
XEI Scientific

-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven Celotto {s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk}
Cc: Microscopy Society of America {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}



From daemon Fri Jul 12 20:48:37 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jul 2002 21:24:47 -0400
Subject: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Another book that you might want to look at is Williams and Carter's book, Transmission Electron Microscopy. It is available from Plenum.

One slick method to determine the Burgers vector of a dislocation is to set up a multi-beam convergent beam diffraction pattern (e.g. three beams) with the beams at or very nearly at the exact Bragg condition and place the spot over the dislocation. You also have to have dynamical diffraction conditions so that you can see the HOLZ lines in the disks. If you don't see the HOLZ lines, then lower the voltage of the microscope. You will see that there are nodes in the HOLZ lines that appear to split the lines. If you know the g for a HOLZ line, the number of nodes in the line tells you the value of g dot b for that g (e.g. g * b=1,2,3,etc.). With three such disks, you have three equations and three unknowns and you can determine b from one pattern without the need to tilt the sample to other orientations to find g dot b = 0 conditions where the dislocation will disappear. See Spence and Zuo's book, Electron Microdiffraction, also available from Plenum.

If you use the tilting to find two-beam conditions where the dislocation disappears, two such g dot b =0 conditions, where the g's are not collinear, will give you b because it is mutually perpendicular to both g's.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Bode [mailto:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2002 7:18 PM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Dislocations have very specific visibility criteria in a TEM, which are
basically determined by their burgers vector. I am not close to my TEM books
right now, so I can't be more specific, but I am sure there are other people
here who are very familiar with dislocations. To read more about
dislocations and TEM, I would suggest to take a look at Sir Peter Hirsch's
book . I think, it's called "Electron Microscopy of Thin Crystals".

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: mdhaque [mailto:mdhaque-at-students.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2002 1:13 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,

I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am looking
at
is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
imaging..Thanks

Aman Haque

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Aman Haque
Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534



From daemon Sat Jul 13 13:05:33 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sat, 13 Jul 2002 12:16:19 -0500
Subject: M&M 2002 : Program Search Engine Now On-Line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues:

The Microscopy & Microanalysis 2002 Program Search Engine is now on-line at

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/

You may search the 2002 program by Author, Title, Symposium, Day of the Week.
to obtain a summary listing of presentations and posters.

The Complete Program listing is also available via a PDF File.

Feel free to forward this information along to anyone you think might
be interested.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.


From daemon Sat Jul 13 13:51:58 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 01:03:16 -0500
Subject: VEECO buys FEI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


.. And let's not forget Hull and Bacon, "Introduction to Dislocations" from
Pergamon Press. And I think, there's also information in L. Reimer,
"Transmission Electron Microscopy" from Springer.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Walck, Scott D. [mailto:walck-at-ppg.com]
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2002 7:25 PM
To: Microscopy (E-mail)
Cc: 'Mike Bode'


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

The following news item was in the July 13-14, 2002 International Herald
Tribune, sandwiched between articles about Enron and Worldcom:

SEMICONDUCTOR BUY:
Veeco Instruments, Inc. said it would purchase FEI Co., a maker of gear for
the semiconductor industry, for $1 billion in stock in a deal that would
make it the sixth-largest U. S. maker of chip-manufacturing equipment.

The acquisition is the latest in a string of acquisitions by Veeco, a maker
of precision instruments and electronic testing products, and signals
further consolidation in the semiconductor equipment market.

The purchase will give Veeco a larger presence in the business of
microscopic measurement systems used to make semiconductors, data storage
devices and other electronic products.

The Amsterdam-based Philips Electronics NV, the largest holder of FEI shares
with a 25% stake, will own about 15% of the combined company, a spokesman
said.

Reuters, Bloomberg


I thought at least some members of this listserver would find this
information quite interesting. We might also pause and ask whether this
kind of consolidation is positive, negative, or neutral for the future our
industry and market place.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================


From daemon Sun Jul 14 07:43:24 2002



From: Darryn Capes-Davis :      dcapes-davis-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 22:31:53 +1000
Subject: Test Post

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry to post this but we have been having troubles posting and it may be
fixed now. So I am sending this as my staff have nothing actually to post at
the moment.

~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-
Darryn Capes-Davis BE
IT Manager
Children's Medical Research Institute
214 Hawkesbury Road
Westmead, NSW 2145
Australia
Tel.  +61 2 9687 2800
Fax  +61 2 9687 2120
Email  dcapes-davis-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au
~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-



From daemon Sun Jul 14 12:09:01 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 11:56:02 -0500
Subject: Administrivia: June 2002 Archives are now On-Line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

The June 2002 archives of the Microscopy Listserver are now on-line.

at http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From daemon Sun Jul 14 12:09:18 2002



From: JHoffpa464-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 12:57:40 -0400
Subject: Re: Test Post

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


test


From daemon Sun Jul 14 12:34:30 2002



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 19:31:11 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



The exhaustive treatment of the "classical", two beam diffraction contrast
of dislocations in TEM is contained in the book of A.K.Head, P.Humble,
L.M.Clarebrough, A.J.Morton and C.T.Forwood on "Computed electron
micrographs and defect identification". On the ground of the minimum
theoretical knowledge that any electron microscopist has to hold, it is
presented in all details, computer codes in Fortran included, the method
that can generate by computation the "classical" contrast of a rectilinear
dislocation and a complex of two dislocations and three stacking faults.
There are in use such computer programs, commercial and free ones, that
either are applying the codes given in that book or are providing more
advanced treatment dealing with the same problem.
It is surprising to see that the old "classical" knowledge of the
diffraction contrast interpretation has faded away during the HRTEM
offensive and that the necessity of looking back to the "simple" two beam
diffraction contrast is more and more a request.


Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************

At 14:13 12/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sun Jul 14 14:07:49 2002



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 13:56:28 -0700
Subject: RE: VEECO buys FEI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I suspect history will repeat itself yet again. The two other EM
manufacturers that come to mind that sold because of their semiconductor
production products are ETEC and Amray.

ETEC's SEM business quietly folded twenty years ago, just a couple of years
after being sold to Perkin-Elmer primarily because of their electron beam
lithography products. ETEC was the original American SEM manufacturer, had
major market share here for years and put out a fine instrument. But, in
the end, sold out entirely to a manufacturer who wanted to augment their
optical stepper line of lithography equipment with the electron beam mask
makers from ETEC.

Amray's history in this regard is probably recent enough that most here
have at least heard some of it. While they have not pulled completely out
of the general EM business, what steps they have taken would seem to point
to their long term commitment to.

In both cases, customers were hurt. Not just by the loss of the
manufacturers, but also by the way their EM businesses were casually tossed
aside. Perhaps, this time, someone will at least make an effort to make it
painless for their current customers. I hesitate to think that anyone
would actually consider making an effort to maintain and improve their
general EM business, or spin it off as a separate division or company.

Given FEI's broader base of EM instruments, perhaps it will happen. I
wouldn't bet on it though.

There, a gauntlet thrown down to anyone from Veeco who may be reading this.
Please prove me wrong and keep this business going. You have a lot of
very loyal customers out there.

As far as whether such change is good, bad or indifferent, I think it's
just natural. Over the last few decades we've seen EM emerge from the
research labs to applications that intersect virtually every industry. The
growth of electron beam instruments has branched in many, often overlaying,
directions. This provides opportunities for some companies that can pio
neer new applications - applications that can often prove more profitable.

The good news is that EM has become such a pervasive and useful set of
technologies. Add to that the relatively high profit margin for
manufacturer's (particularly those just starting out), and you have a
formula for a constantly competitive environment. The more the industry
tries to consolidate, I believe, the more new manufacturer's we'll see.
The unfortunate thing is trying to keep up with all the name changes.

(A little disclaimer might be in order here. As many of you know, I am a
rather outspoken third-party service provider for EM and other instruments.
I never particularly liked the corporate environment of Philips in
general, but they have apparently done a very good job of keeping their
customers satisfied. In over twenty years of business, I have yet to work
on one of their instruments, and that's very rare. They've done a good
job, and I hate to see the good ones go.)


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Saturday, July 13, 2002 11:03 PM, Garber, Charles A.
[SMTP:cgarber-at-2spi.com] wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} The following news item was in the July 13-14, 2002 International Herald
} Tribune, sandwiched between articles about Enron and Worldcom:
}
} SEMICONDUCTOR BUY:
} Veeco Instruments, Inc. said it would purchase FEI Co., a maker of gear
for
} the semiconductor industry, for $1 billion in stock in a deal that would
} make it the sixth-largest U. S. maker of chip-manufacturing equipment.
}
} The acquisition is the latest in a string of acquisitions by Veeco, a
maker
} of precision instruments and electronic testing products, and signals
} further consolidation in the semiconductor equipment market.
}
} The purchase will give Veeco a larger presence in the business of
} microscopic measurement systems used to make semiconductors, data storage
} devices and other electronic products.
}
} The Amsterdam-based Philips Electronics NV, the largest holder of FEI
shares
} with a 25% stake, will own about 15% of the combined company, a spokesman
} said.
}
} Reuters, Bloomberg
}
}
} I thought at least some members of this listserver would find this
} information quite interesting. We might also pause and ask whether this
} kind of consolidation is positive, negative, or neutral for the future
our
} industry and market place.
}
} Chuck
}
} ============================================
}
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
} President 1-800-2424-SPI
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
} Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
} Look for us!
} ########################
} WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} ########################
} ============================================
}
}
}
}



From daemon Sun Jul 14 17:09:23 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 15:01:59 -0700
Subject: RE: VEECO buys FEI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You may have an historical point here.

Amray is still alive and kicking. Even that they are
part of KLA-Tencor. The difference with them is that they
no longer support thermionic systems--just 305FE
Schottky gun systems. Since this is the same gun used
in the KLA CD-SEM systems, my hope is that SEM support
will continue for some time. I believe that KLA made
a major strategic blunder by exiting the general purpose SEM
market in favor of the high cost CD-SEMs. These giant
systems are all over the place at auctions and bone yards now
as the semi market has taken a nose dive. On the other hand
I don't see many used SEMs of any type come up for sale
at the rate of CD-SEMs. If KLA had kept the service going
for the non-FESEMs, they would have had a nice cash flow
instead of a loss.

They do not make lab SEMs any more. But the do service
the existing FESEMs. That is better than nothing. Mine is
very reliable and rarely needs service. Mostly, it is cleaning
and aperture replacement, and holder cleaning. I've heard
that all of the SEM technology is moving from MA to CA.
Perhaps parts supply will stay in MA. I'm not sure what the motivation
of this action is, but hopefully it will work out.

I'm working on a new XL-30 Sirion and am impressed by
how nicely it is built. But for me, the Amray is much easier to
use. Fast and efficient. Nice balance of computer control
and user interface. Probably just a personal preference.

Let's see what happens. You can bet that if the manufacturers
suffer economically, we users will too.

gary g.



At 01:56 PM 7/14/2002, you wrote:

} I suspect history will repeat itself yet again. The two other EM
} manufacturers that come to mind that sold because of their semiconductor
} production products are ETEC and Amray.
}
} ETEC's SEM business quietly folded twenty years ago, just a couple of years
} after being sold to Perkin-Elmer primarily because of their electron beam
} lithography products. ETEC was the original American SEM manufacturer, had
} major market share here for years and put out a fine instrument. But, in
} the end, sold out entirely to a manufacturer who wanted to augment their
} optical stepper line of lithography equipment with the electron beam mask
} makers from ETEC.
}
} Amray's history in this regard is probably recent enough that most here
} have at least heard some of it. While they have not pulled completely out
} of the general EM business, what steps they have taken would seem to point
} to their long term commitment to.
}
} In both cases, customers were hurt. Not just by the loss of the
} manufacturers, but also by the way their EM businesses were casually tossed
} aside. Perhaps, this time, someone will at least make an effort to make it
} painless for their current customers. I hesitate to think that anyone
} would actually consider making an effort to maintain and improve their
} general EM business, or spin it off as a separate division or company.
}
} Given FEI's broader base of EM instruments, perhaps it will happen. I
} wouldn't bet on it though.
}
} There, a gauntlet thrown down to anyone from Veeco who may be reading this.
} Please prove me wrong and keep this business going. You have a lot of
} very loyal customers out there.
}
} As far as whether such change is good, bad or indifferent, I think it's
} just natural. Over the last few decades we've seen EM emerge from the
} research labs to applications that intersect virtually every industry. The
} growth of electron beam instruments has branched in many, often overlaying,
} directions. This provides opportunities for some companies that can pio
} neer new applications - applications that can often prove more profitable.
}
} The good news is that EM has become such a pervasive and useful set of
} technologies. Add to that the relatively high profit margin for
} manufacturer's (particularly those just starting out), and you have a
} formula for a constantly competitive environment. The more the industry
} tries to consolidate, I believe, the more new manufacturer's we'll see.
} The unfortunate thing is trying to keep up with all the name changes.
}
} (A little disclaimer might be in order here. As many of you know, I am a
} rather outspoken third-party service provider for EM and other instruments.
} I never particularly liked the corporate environment of Philips in
} general, but they have apparently done a very good job of keeping their
} customers satisfied. In over twenty years of business, I have yet to work
} on one of their instruments, and that's very rare. They've done a good
} job, and I hate to see the good ones go.)
}
}
} Allen R. Sampson
} Advanced Research Systems
} 317 North 4th. Street
} St. Charles, Illinois 60174
}
} phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com
}
}
} On Saturday, July 13, 2002 11:03 PM, Garber, Charles A.
} [SMTP:cgarber-at-2spi.com] wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
} }
} } The following news item was in the July 13-14, 2002 International Herald
} } Tribune, sandwiched between articles about Enron and Worldcom:
} }
} } SEMICONDUCTOR BUY:
} } Veeco Instruments, Inc. said it would purchase FEI Co., a maker of gear
} for
} } the semiconductor industry, for $1 billion in stock in a deal that would
} } make it the sixth-largest U. S. maker of chip-manufacturing equipment.
} }
} } The acquisition is the latest in a string of acquisitions by Veeco, a
} maker
} } of precision instruments and electronic testing products, and signals
} } further consolidation in the semiconductor equipment market.
} }
} } The purchase will give Veeco a larger presence in the business of
} } microscopic measurement systems used to make semiconductors, data storage
} } devices and other electronic products.
} }
} } The Amsterdam-based Philips Electronics NV, the largest holder of FEI
} shares
} } with a 25% stake, will own about 15% of the combined company, a spokesman
} } said.
} }
} } Reuters, Bloomberg
} }
} }
} } I thought at least some members of this listserver would find this
} } information quite interesting. We might also pause and ask whether this
} } kind of consolidation is positive, negative, or neutral for the future
} our
} } industry and market place.
} }
} } Chuck
} }
} } ============================================
} }
} } Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
} } President 1-800-2424-SPI
} } SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
} } PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
} } West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
} } Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
} }
} } Look for us!
} } ########################
} } WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} } ########################
} } ============================================
} }
} }
} }
} }



From daemon Sun Jul 14 17:43:55 2002



From: Sally Stowe :      stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:34:17 +1000
Subject: Pacemakers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


One of our EM users is likely to need a heart pacemaker soon. Just to make
sure, we'd like to ask if there are any known problems associated with
pacemakers operating in the vicinity of TEMs and SEMs?

thanks
Sally



From daemon Sun Jul 14 23:51:13 2002



From: Majid Ghoddusi :      mghoddusi-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 14:40:53 +1000
Subject: test

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



only a test, please ignore.





















.....................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, DVM PhD
Senior Microscopist
Children's Medical Research Institute
Locked Bag 23
Wentworthville NSW 2145
Tel: (02) 9687-2800
Fax:(02) 968702120
www.cmri.com.au
.....................................................





From daemon Mon Jul 15 01:14:44 2002



From: Majid Ghoddusi :      mghoddusi-at-cmri.usyd.edu.au
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:06:05 +1000
Subject: test

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



test only, please ignore.



















.....................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, DVM PhD
Senior Microscopist
Children's Medical Research Institute
Locked Bag 23
Wentworthville NSW 2145
Tel: (02) 9687-2800
Fax:(02) 968702120
www.cmri.com.au
.....................................................





From daemon Mon Jul 15 07:25:11 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:20:10 -0400
Subject: Pacemakers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sally;

There are several variants in pacemakers. I worked on them back when in the
early models, fixed rate type [RCA/Cordis]. However, I would suggest to the
EM/TEM user that he consult the mfg. on the specific type he has and its'
precautions. If I'm not mistaken some have radio transmitters embedded for
remote monitoring purposes. EMP [Electromagnetic Pulse] is an issue but I
assume you aren't working on weapons systems or susceptibility of weapons
systems. From an operators perspective, just turning knobs and focusing, I
can't think of a reason why operating either instrument should be a problem.


Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Sally Stowe [mailto:stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au]
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2002 6:34 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


One of our EM users is likely to need a heart pacemaker soon. Just to make
sure, we'd like to ask if there are any known problems associated with
pacemakers operating in the vicinity of TEMs and SEMs?

thanks
Sally



From daemon Mon Jul 15 08:54:48 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 08:42:58 -0500
Subject: Administrivia: Test & Out of the Office Messages.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues


Test Messages:
----------
Each test message that you post creates ~ 3000 email
messages which get sent world wide, and needlessly
fill up the Ether and the Email queues.

Please read the FAQ's and don't post any!!

I will work with you if you are having problems, but don't inflict
these problems on thousands of your colleagues. Most of the
time your posting problems can get sorted out
in a few days without hasseling the greater community.

99+% of the posting problems have to do with the Email
filters I have setup to minimize JUNK/SPAM mail.
These sometimes catch valid posting, with false positive
results of the filters subroutines. That is unavoidable.

You all have to put up with these filters, otherwise
this list will die from junk mail. Right now the
filter stops ~ 30+ junk postings/day. Unfortunately
I personally still see them all, in my feeble attempt to
keep this beast running ....

Remember: No attachments, No embedded HTML,Send
your message as pure & simple ASCII (plain) text in
the body of your message. And if your mail gets "rejected"
please READ the rejection message and follow the
instructions!!

Out of the Office Messages:
-------------------
In addition, you should unsubscribe if you leave the office for
a few days, instead of just turning on your "on vacation/out of
the office messages". These programs also generate needless Email
to the list, most of which gets captured, but some gets
through. This is also covered in the FAQ.



Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From daemon Mon Jul 15 09:50:16 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 10:38:41 -0400
Subject: TMC ANTI-VIBRATION PLATFORM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a TMC MICRO-g Vibration Isolation System Model # 65-17171-01
that we wish to sell. The platform is 86" wide by 71" deep with a seating
cut out that is -at- 30" wide narrowing down to 12" and is about 38" deep.
System has 4 isolation feet. With the feet, it requires an area that is 97"
x 82". The weight of unit is between 2200 - 2500 lbs. Asking $4,000.00 or
best offer plus shipping and handling charges. Interested parties should
contact


Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Mon Jul 15 09:54:39 2002



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      dusevichv-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 09:47:34 -0500
Subject: RE: Carbon Quantitation by EDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nevertheless, boron in borides (Fe or Cr) is easely
detectable with WDS. Have done it on SX50.

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy

}
}
} Yes, Steve, the much higher absorption coefficient for FE
} prevents the very
} soft Boron X-rays from being emitted from FeB2 in sufficient
} quantity to be
} detected.
}
} Ron Vane
} XEI Scientific
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Steven Celotto {s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk}
} Cc: Microscopy Society of America {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Wednesday, July 10, 2002 10:21 PM
} Subject: Re: Carbon Quantitation by EDX
}
}
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} -----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------.
} }
} }
} } I am curious to hear the answer to this question from
} Jacques and I have
} } something to add.
} } Once I performed EDS analyses on a sample of BC particles on
} C film in
} order to
} } test a new EDS analysis system installed on a new FEG 200KeV
} TEM. After
} selecting
} } the correct time constant in the EDS software I could get nice
} distinguishable C
} } and B peaks. Later I tried doing a similar EDS analysis on large FeB2
} particles in
} }
} } a Fe matrix. I mention large here to stress that the
} particles went through
} the
} } specimen foil so most of the X-rays were being emitted
} directly from the
} particles
} }
} } without passing through the Fe matrix before reaching the
} detector. I never
} saw
} } even a hint of a B peak. These ppts should have contained 33at%B.
} } Was I doing something wrong or is that an indication of how
} easily boron
} X-rays
} } are absorbed within a sample containing large z atoms?
} }
} } Faerber Jacques wrote:
} }
} } }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} } }
} } } Hi all
} } }
} } } In the same idee, what about mesurements on boron carbide
} ? Carbon AND
} } } boron concentrations ! I see nice spectras, without
} anything else ( a bit
} } } O, some times Al and N). And I have variations between
} samples in the B/C
} } } ratio. In such a case can I mesure only ratio variation, or is it
} possible
} } } to try some quantification (with standards). The sample is bulk B4C
} } } and laser ablation thick layers (with dropplets). Primary
} energy 3 to 5
} } } keV.
} } }
} } } I think it's a bit pretentious to quantify. What is
} other's opinion ?
} } }
} } } J. Faerber
} } } IPCMS-GSI
} } } (Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
} } } Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
} } } 23, rue de Loess
} } } 67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
} } } France
} } }
} } } Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
} } } Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
} } } E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
} } }
} } } On Tue, 9 Jul 2002, Ronald Vane wrote:
} } }
} } }
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Dear Chris and all:
} } } }
} } } } Quantitative analysis of Carbon by EDX is nearly
} impossible because of
} the
} } } } very shallow penetration depth of the Carbon X-rays. You
} really just
} measure
} } } } the surface. Surface analysis techniques such as XPS and
} Auger also
} show
} } } } that thin carbon films love to form on surfaces. If you
} have an XPS you
} use
} } } } your ion gun to sputter off the carbon surface scum to
} see the real
} surface.
} } } }
} } } } Dry ashing in a plasma cleaner can also remove the carbon surface
} layer.
} } } } Sputter etching can be used to remove gold and silver coatings.
} } } }
} } } } Ron Vane
} } } } XEI Scientific
} } } } 3124 Wessex Way, Redwood City, CA 94061
} } } } 650-369-0133
} } } } www.SEMCLEAN.com
} } } }
} } } } Note: XEI Scientific makes the EVACTRON plasma cleaning
} system for
} Electron
} } } } Microscope Chambers and FIBs, but does not make desk top
} plasma dry
} ashers
} } } } or sputter etchers.
} } } }
} } } } -----Original Message-----
} } } } } From: Chris Peppiatt {chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie}
} } } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } } } Date: Monday, July 08, 2002 3:22 PM
} } } } Subject: Carbon Quantitation by EDX
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} -----------
} } } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } }
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------.
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } } } Dear All,
} } } } }
} } } } } Someone has asked me to do some work for them on
} mineral specimens.
} The
} } } } } samples will be mounted in resin and polished and we
} will then coat
} with
} } } } } carbon. Obviously we will set our software to
} deconvolute carbon from
} the
} } } } } analyses. We have the option to coat samples with either gold or
} silver and
} } } } } then look at the carbon content. I suppose the
} questions I would like
} to
} } } } } have answered are:
} } } } }
} } } } } (1) Heavy elements like gold or silver will absorb some
} of the light
} } } } } element (inc. carbon) X-rays when used as coatings. Is
} there any way
} of
} } } } } correcting for this to get an accurate quantitative
} analysis of carbon
} } } } content?
} } } } }
} } } } } (2) Is there any way of removing either gold/silver or
} carbon coatings
} from
} } } } } such samples except for the obvious method of
} regrinding/polishing the
} } } } } coating off?
} } } } }
} } } } } Thanks in advance.
} } } } }
} } } } } Regards,
} } } } }
} } } } } Chris Peppiatt
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } } } ============================================
} } } } } Dr. Chris Peppiatt (Experimental Officer),
} } } } } The National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science,
} } } } } Science & Engineering Technology Building,
} } } } } National University of Ireland Galway,
} } } } } Galway City, Co. Galway,
} } } } } Republic of Ireland.
} } } } } chris.peppiatt-at-nuigalway.ie
} } } } } Phone: +353 91 512157 Fax: +353 91 750596
} } } } } =============================================
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} }
} } --
} } Dr. Steven Celotto
} } Department of Engineering
} } Materials Science & Engineering
} } University of Liverpool
} } Brownlow Hill
} } Liverpool L69 3BX
} } UNITED KINGDOM
} }
} } Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
} } Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
} } email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 15 09:55:09 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 10:32:57 -0400
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Your posting reminded me of the software available at the MSA/MAS library. There is a public domain software program that is called "oneDis" (I think) that will simulate the image of a dislocation after providing the program with the imaging parameters. I would recommend that you donwload the software and "play" with it to learn what dislocations look like at different imaging conditions. It is quite useful and it will help with the original question that was posted.


You can get to the EMMPDL library from the MSA website. Here are instructions that I copied

EMMPDL - MASLIB - Mac & PC Shareware Libraries at Argonne National Laboratory. The following FTP Site give you access to these Software Libraries. Access is by anonymous Login:


Host : WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV or
the mirror site WWW.MSA.Microscopy.Com

Login:
Username = Anonymous
Password = Your Email Address







-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Corneliu Sarbu [mailto:Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2002 1:31 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



The exhaustive treatment of the "classical", two beam diffraction contrast
of dislocations in TEM is contained in the book of A.K.Head, P.Humble,
L.M.Clarebrough, A.J.Morton and C.T.Forwood on "Computed electron
micrographs and defect identification". On the ground of the minimum
theoretical knowledge that any electron microscopist has to hold, it is
presented in all details, computer codes in Fortran included, the method
that can generate by computation the "classical" contrast of a rectilinear
dislocation and a complex of two dislocations and three stacking faults.
There are in use such computer programs, commercial and free ones, that
either are applying the codes given in that book or are providing more
advanced treatment dealing with the same problem.
It is surprising to see that the old "classical" knowledge of the
diffraction contrast interpretation has faded away during the HRTEM
offensive and that the necessity of looking back to the "simple" two beam
diffraction contrast is more and more a request.


Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************

At 14:13 12/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Jul 15 10:34:51 2002



From: hard-at-acsu.buffalo.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 11:27:03 -0500
Subject: Course Announcement (2nd Posting)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Course Announcement

Title: Optical Microscopy and Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences

When: October 9 - October 18, 2002

Where: Marine Biology Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, USA

Tuition: $2200 (Includes room and board, text, handouts, supplies)

Application Deadline: July 25, 2002

Admission application and information:
Carol Hamel, Admissions Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543-1015
(508) 289-7401
Internet: admissions-at-mbl.edu
WWW: http://www.mbl.edu (Application forms available via Adobe Acrobat)

Course Director: Colin S. Izzard, State University of New York -at- Albany
Phone: [518] 442 - 4367
EMail: csizzard-at-csc.albany.edu

Course Description:

For Whom:
Designed primarily for research scientists, physicians, postdoctoral
trainees and advanced graduate students in animal, plant, medical and
material sciences. Non-biologists seeking a comprehensive introduction to
microscopy and video-imaging will benefit greatly from this course as well.
There are no specific prerequisites, but an understanding of the basic
principles of optics is desirable. Limited to 24 students.

The eight day course consists of lectures, laboratory demonstrations,
exercises and discussions that will enable the participant to obtain and
interpret microscope images of high quality, to perform quantitative optical

measurements, and to produce photographic and video records for
documentation
and analysis.

Topics to be covered include:
principles of microscope design and image formation
bright field, dark field, phase contrast, polarized light,
differential
interference contrast, interference reflection, and fluorescence
microscopy
confocal scanning microscopy, multiphoton excitation fluorescence
microscopy and image deconvolution
digital image restoration and 3-D reconstruction
video imaging, recording, enhancement, and intensification
analog and digital image processing and analysis
fluorescent probes and ratiometric-imaging
laser tweezers and laser scissors

Applications to live cells will be emphasized; other specimens will be
covered as well.

Students will have direct hands-on experience with state-of-the-art
microscopes, video and digital cameras, recorders and image processing
equipment provided by major optical and electronics companies. Instruction
will be provided by experienced staff from universities and industry.

STUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN BIOLOGICAL (PRIMARY
CULTURES, CELL LINES, PREPARED SLIDES, ETC.) AND MATERIAL SPECIMENS AND TO
USE THEM FOR COURSE EXERCISES, WHERE APPROPRIATE. Cell culture facilities
are available. Students are highly encouraged to discuss individual research
problems with the academic and commercial faculty.

For faculty list and additional information, see: http://www.mbl.edu




From daemon Mon Jul 15 10:41:40 2002



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 11:38:15 -0700
Subject: Re: Fwd: legal requirements for microscope images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Hmm--- strictly, any
} processing *at all* corrupts the primary image data.

Looking at something corrupts it's nature and asking a question about it
eliminates other perpectives. Cats, electrons and trees falling in the
forest are all phenomena that illustrate the point that detection of
absolute truth is inherently flawed.


____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Mon Jul 15 11:19:15 2002



From: Nicol Aitken :      nicol-at-semiconductor.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:12:03 -0400
Subject: Odd image effects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Then by all means, let us stop looking and asking questions lest we
corrupt truth...

----- Original Message -----
} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}


Greetings all,

I routinely have to look at semiconductor devices from top down for
failure analysis. All has been fine with our images until we started
imaging with our new microscope.

To give some background, what we are looking at is aluminum metal lines with
tungsten interconnects standing proud of the aluminum. When we image what we
see is significant darkening of the image around groups of interconnects
and, in extreme cases, around individual interconnects.

We see this primarily when imaging in backscatter, but sometimes also using
In-lens and E-T secondary detectors. does anybody have a reasonable
explanation to what this phenomenon is?

Thanks for you time

Nick


From daemon Mon Jul 15 15:25:42 2002



From: John F. Mansfield :      jfmjfm-at-umich.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:16:55 -0400
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Unsubscribe jfmjfm-at-umich.edu
--
John Mansfield PhD MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
USA
Phone: (734) 936-3352 FAX (734) 763-2282 Cell. Phone: (734) 834-3913
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 834-3913)
Email: jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html
Location: Lat. 42! 16' 48" Long. 83! 43' 48"





From daemon Mon Jul 15 15:28:10 2002



From: Jamila Shawon :      Jamila_Shawon-at-student.uml.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:21:24 -0400
Subject: to purchase microtome machine

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear all,

Currently we are looking for a microtome machine for our lab. Till now,
we use a microtome machine in another lab which is SORVAU & CAT 15350.
It has light source of 15400. We also like to have same type of
microtome with reasonable price.

So, any of you have any idea about the microtome, please let us know.
We will appreaciate that very much.

Thank you very much

Jamila Shawon



From daemon Mon Jul 15 16:42:57 2002



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 16:38:11 -0500
Subject: Texas Society for Microscopy Meeting Announcement and Call for Papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Texas Society for Microscopy
(http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/) will have its
Fall Meeting on Oct. 24-26, 2002 in Austin, TX at the
Embassy Suites Austin North Hotel .

The Thursday afternoon workshop will be on "TEM materials
preparation tools",
presented by Dr. Rocco Cerchiara, Applications Laboratory
Manager, E. A. Fischione.

The Friday afternoon workshop will be "Cryo-microtomy, with
emphasis on TEM
sample preparation", presented by Dr. Gregory Becker,
Product Manager,
RMC Products by Boeckeler.

Workshops sponsored by ASI, Inc. and TSM

There is also a call for papers for this meeting. All
technologies and disciplines involving
microscopy in any form are invited to contribute.

Please see our website, http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/ ,
for details, registration,
additional information, and author's instructions


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-598-1291 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From daemon Mon Jul 15 17:19:16 2002



From: simkin-at-egr.msu.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 18:11:59 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Odd image effects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nick,

It sounds as though you're getting a shadowing effect from the interconnects.
If a significant fraction of the backscattered electrons otherwise received by
your detector is blocked by the interconnects, then this will show up as
a darkening around these 'taller' features. This would be more pronounced for
W shadowing Al, as the BSEs coming off Al would tend to be comparatively low
energy, and thus more easily blocked by the W.
Assuming the geometry of the objects being imaged is the same as in your
previous 'scope, then it sounds as though either: 1) your collection
geometry for the new detector arrangement is larger (giving a larger solid angle
of collection in which some part of the signal is blocked), or 2) your new
detector has a different energy sensitivity as compared to the 'old' detector
(less sensitivity to lower energy electrons, OR a lower detection threshold
energy), or possibly even 3) the magnetic field strength in your chamber is
high enough to cause electrons emitted from your sample to spiral up about the
field lines to your detector, giving the same effect as if you had a larger
solid angle of collection. This last sounds like a possibility because of your
mention of an in-lens detector, which would tend to need a pretty strong
Z-axis magnetic field in order to operate.

Cheers,

Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)


} Greetings all,
}
} I routinely have to look at semiconductor devices from top down for
} failure analysis. All has been fine with our images until we started
} imaging with our new microscope.
}
} To give some background, what we are looking at is aluminum metal lines with
} tungsten interconnects standing proud of the aluminum. When we image what we
} see is significant darkening of the image around groups of interconnects
} and, in extreme cases, around individual interconnects.
}
} We see this primarily when imaging in backscatter, but sometimes also using
} In-lens and E-T secondary detectors. does anybody have a reasonable
} explanation to what this phenomenon is?
}
} Thanks for you time
}
} Nick


From daemon Mon Jul 15 17:47:56 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 15:43:49 -0700
Subject: Re: Odd image effects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hum...what is the new scope? What is the old scope?

What mag and KV are you using? Are the specimens
coated? With what and how much? What feature
sizes are you dealing with? Underneath the Al interconnects
should be TiW barrier metal if that process required it.
Z contrast will be high. If you are shooting with high KV,
large spot size and large aperture, I'd suspect charging.
Make sure that the specimen is grounded and is coated.
And use low KV (2-5) and a small probe diameter.

Posting a couple of sample images to your web site would
be helpful.

gary g.


At 01:12 PM 7/15/2002, you wrote:

} Greetings all,
}
} I routinely have to look at semiconductor devices from top down for
} failure analysis. All has been fine with our images until we started
} imaging with our new microscope.
}
} To give some background, what we are looking at is aluminum metal lines with
} tungsten interconnects standing proud of the aluminum. When we image what we
} see is significant darkening of the image around groups of interconnects
} and, in extreme cases, around individual interconnects.
}
} We see this primarily when imaging in backscatter, but sometimes also using
} In-lens and E-T secondary detectors. does anybody have a reasonable
} explanation to what this phenomenon is?
}
} Thanks for you time
}
} Nick



From daemon Mon Jul 15 19:45:36 2002



From: Greg Barclay :      gbarclay-at-trinidad.net
Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2002 20:34:15 -0500
Subject: Looking for SDR unit for Philips 515 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
I am looking for a Split Data Rotation unit (Part PW6762) for
a Philips 515 SEM. If you have such a device or know
where I can get one I would appreciate hearing from you.

Greg Barclay




From daemon Tue Jul 16 03:47:46 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 08:40:27 -0400
Subject: Odd image effects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

My lateral thoughts on the matter.

I don't think we corrupt the truth, it's more like we have a tendency to
produce corrupt representations of the truth.

We seek truth as best as we can, whilst recognising the limitations of

our methods (e.g. observation disturbs the object, sample preparation
induces artifacts, etc.)

and

ourselves (e.g. personal biases, the fact that we haven't considered all
possible explanations of the results etc.)

An honest and realistic scientist realises that he/she throws up as many
questions as he/she answers. Maybe in science, we just hope for better and
better approximations to the truth...

Of course, all this assumes that there is such an entity as "the truth",
independent of us, our thoughts, and our observations. Many philosophers
would deny that. I see no way that we can do science without this
assumption and we have to part company with some current philisophy as a
result. This assumption is of course deeply embedded in western culture and
very much part of the Judaeo-Christian and Muslim traditions.

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



----- Original Message -----
} From: {"MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
To: "Michael Cammer" {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
Cc: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, July 15, 2002 6:59 PM


Nicol;

What is the surface passivated with? If it is polyimide or
bisbenzocyclobutene you may get a little "burning" and definitely charging,
if uncoated. Also, hydrocarbons in your sample chamber will be, so to
speak, "painted" on the surface and look like the region you just rastered
on the SEM when you back out in mag.

A little more info. and someone may be able to help you with this.

Regards,

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Nicol Aitken [mailto:nicol-at-semiconductor.com]
Sent: Monday, July 15, 2002 4:12 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Greetings all,

I routinely have to look at semiconductor devices from top down for
failure analysis. All has been fine with our images until we started
imaging with our new microscope.

To give some background, what we are looking at is aluminum metal lines with
tungsten interconnects standing proud of the aluminum. When we image what we
see is significant darkening of the image around groups of interconnects
and, in extreme cases, around individual interconnects.

We see this primarily when imaging in backscatter, but sometimes also using
In-lens and E-T secondary detectors. does anybody have a reasonable
explanation to what this phenomenon is?

Thanks for you time

Nick


From daemon Tue Jul 16 10:10:59 2002



From: Kristian Ukkonen :      kristian.ukkonen-at-iki.fi
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 19:47:32 +0300
Subject: Re: Fwd: legal requirements for microscope images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you Ian for a thoughtful and insightful contribution -- indeed,
one that allows us to continue to believe in the usefulness of our
endeavors to uncover various aspects of the truth that we hope is out
there.

Pragmatically, we can believe that this world is below the shadow of a
dream, and taught by time take it so -- excepting always steam.*

*Rudyard Kipling's "McAndrew's Hymn"


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ian MacLaren" {maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de}



Michael Cammer wrote:
} } Hmm--- strictly, any
} } processing *at all* corrupts the primary image data.
}
} Looking at something corrupts it's nature and asking a question about it
} eliminates other perpectives. Cats, electrons and trees falling in the
} forest are all phenomena that illustrate the point that detection of
} absolute truth is inherently flawed.

http://angryflower.com/schrod.gif

Just the image for the lab fridge. :)

Kristian Ukkonen.



From daemon Tue Jul 16 14:54:38 2002



From: Yuquan Ding :      yding-at-uwaterloo.ca
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 15:50:59 -0400
Subject: INCA Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers:

The last year we installed ENCA 200 system in our JSM 840 SEM. Last week
when we repaired our SEM, liquid nitrogen in dewar was emptied to remove
water. Then we re-filled new liquid nitrogen through "warm up" and "cool
down" procedures. After that, we tried to calibrate this ISIS system. When
making "discriminators only", a message showed "ISIS calibration unable to
measure strobe peak. Abandoning calibration". At somebody's suggestion,
several times of conditioner were conducted, but the situation is the same.
We couldn't do anything now. The system seems to be locked. Also when
running EDS, no any peaks could be found, showing very high deadtime (99%).
Even without beam, the deadtime is also very high. It was suspected that the
detector system was damaged. I suspect that the strobed zero peak is
generated in the XP2 pulse processor, not in the detector. Why
"discriminators only" didn't work?

If anybody of you has experience with this type of problems, I would like to
have your opinions and thoughts. Thanks!

Our system No. 05426-2390-414-51, Model 6506, att 1: 32804c802, att2:
0120024, window: ATW2 det. area 10 mmxmm.

Yuquan Ding
Materials Labs
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
519-888-4567 x3766
Fax: 519-888-6197
Email: yding-at-uwaterloo.ca




From daemon Tue Jul 16 14:54:38 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 20:45:51 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


OneDis is the program developed by Head et al. It may be still in Fortran and it may still have its awkward input format (emulating the old punch card format). Prof. Veli-Tapani Kuokkala has repackaged the code into a user-friendly Windows format for PC. The program can still be download from his webpage.

http://www.tut.fi/units/ms/elm/enindex.htm

"Walck, Scott D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Your posting reminded me of the software available at the MSA/MAS library. There is a public domain software program that is called "oneDis" (I think) that will simulate the image of a dislocation after providing the program with the imaging parameters. I would recommend that you donwload the software and "play" with it to learn what dislocations look like at different imaging conditions. It is quite useful and it will help with the original question that was posted.
}
} You can get to the EMMPDL library from the MSA website. Here are instructions that I copied
}
} EMMPDL - MASLIB - Mac & PC Shareware Libraries at Argonne National Laboratory. The following FTP Site give you access to these Software Libraries. Access is by anonymous Login:
}
} Host : WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV or
} the mirror site WWW.MSA.Microscopy.Com
}
} Login:
} Username = Anonymous
} Password = Your Email Address
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8515 (fax)
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Corneliu Sarbu [mailto:Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
} Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2002 1:31 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} The exhaustive treatment of the "classical", two beam diffraction contrast
} of dislocations in TEM is contained in the book of A.K.Head, P.Humble,
} L.M.Clarebrough, A.J.Morton and C.T.Forwood on "Computed electron
} micrographs and defect identification". On the ground of the minimum
} theoretical knowledge that any electron microscopist has to hold, it is
} presented in all details, computer codes in Fortran included, the method
} that can generate by computation the "classical" contrast of a rectilinear
} dislocation and a complex of two dislocations and three stacking faults.
} There are in use such computer programs, commercial and free ones, that
} either are applying the codes given in that book or are providing more
} advanced treatment dealing with the same problem.
} It is surprising to see that the old "classical" knowledge of the
} diffraction contrast interpretation has faded away during the HRTEM
} offensive and that the necessity of looking back to the "simple" two beam
} diffraction contrast is more and more a request.
}
} Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
} Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
} Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
} B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
} ****************************************************************
} Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
} +32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
} Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
} e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} ****************************************************************
}
} At 14:13 12/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hi,
} }
} } I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am
} } looking at
} } is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
} } imaging..Thanks
} }
} } Aman Haque
} }
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } Aman Haque
} } Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
} } University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
} }
} } Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534

--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Tue Jul 16 15:49:41 2002



From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson :      dsoren-at-umich.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 16:37:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

One of our investigators wants to do TEM on a very minute quantity of
sperm, 40 of them to be exact. Does anyone have any suggestions for
preparing such a minute sample with the goal of actually being able to
find them upon ultrathin sectioning? So far we have tried suspending them
in a tiny drop of BSA, crosslinking the BSA with glutaraldehyde, and
treating it like a piece of tissue from that point on. Unfortunately,
looking for the sperm in the resulting tissue block is like trying to find
a pollywog in an ocean. Any helpful hints out there?

Thanks for your help.

Dotty


Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
(734)763-1170
FAX (734)763-1166
dsoren-at-umich.edu
c



From daemon Tue Jul 16 16:27:05 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 17:13:35 -0400
Subject: Biological Electron Microscopist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Transmission Electron Microscopist

Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology is seeking a
Transmission Electron Microscopist to run a new LEO912AB. Duties will
include: (1) teaching and training undergraduate and graduate students,
post-docs and faculty on instrument operation, (2) preparation and
sectioning of diverse biological specimens including yeast, virally infected
mammalian cells, brain slices and Drosophila embryos, using a variety of
methods including high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution techniques,
(3) daily microscope system checks and scheduling of users, (4) general lab
maintenance and supply. The candidate should have a BS/MS in a biological
field and several years of TEM experience. Knowledge of ultra-structural
and immuno-labeling protocols, the operation and care of microtomes and
other equipment needed for specimen preparation, a basic understanding of
digital imaging and the ability to manage and administer digital
workstations and image archives is essential. The candidate must be highly
interactive, willing to collaborate on diverse projects and able to identify
and research the best methods of specimen preparation and examination. Rank
and salary are dependent upon qualifications and experience. Please send
curriculum vitae, a list of references and representative samples of your
work to Professor Mark Rose, Chair, Search Committee, Department of
Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1014.
Princeton University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Lab Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Tue Jul 16 18:57:37 2002



From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-leland.stanford.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 16:45:08 -0700
Subject: unsubscribe for a while

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


unsubscribe



From daemon Tue Jul 16 20:36:11 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 20:24:03 -0500
Subject: Walter McCrone: 1916-2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues

It is with sadness that I learned today of the death
on July 10th of Walter McCrone. Many of you will know of his
work in the area of applied light microscopy, particuliarly
in the area of materials analysis and problem solving as well
as the number of books/short course etc.. which bear
his name .

Additional details about his life and work at the following WWW Site

http://www.mccrone.org/WalterMcCrone.html


Walter McCrone is survived by his wife, Lucy, who is also an
accomplished microscopist.

Contributions can be made in his name to the Walter C. McCrone
Scholarship Fund for Advanced Microscopy Studies, c/o McCrone
Research Institute, 2820 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60616.


Regards...

Nestor


From daemon Tue Jul 16 22:29:03 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 23:23:14 -0400
Subject: INCA Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mr. Ding;

Sounds like you either have a dead detector or the front end processing
electronics have failed. Dead time of 99% indicates something is radically
wrong. We had a similar situation recently with a EDX detector. The cause
was found to be a cracked detector window.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
} From: Yuquan Ding [mailto:yding-at-uwaterloo.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2002 3:51 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Listers:

The last year we installed ENCA 200 system in our JSM 840 SEM. Last week
when we repaired our SEM, liquid nitrogen in dewar was emptied to remove
water. Then we re-filled new liquid nitrogen through "warm up" and "cool
down" procedures. After that, we tried to calibrate this ISIS system. When
making "discriminators only", a message showed "ISIS calibration unable to
measure strobe peak. Abandoning calibration". At somebody's suggestion,
several times of conditioner were conducted, but the situation is the same.
We couldn't do anything now. The system seems to be locked. Also when
running EDS, no any peaks could be found, showing very high deadtime (99%).
Even without beam, the deadtime is also very high. It was suspected that the
detector system was damaged. I suspect that the strobed zero peak is
generated in the XP2 pulse processor, not in the detector. Why
"discriminators only" didn't work?

If anybody of you has experience with this type of problems, I would like to
have your opinions and thoughts. Thanks!

Our system No. 05426-2390-414-51, Model 6506, att 1: 32804c802, att2:
0120024, window: ATW2 det. area 10 mmxmm.

Yuquan Ding
Materials Labs
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
519-888-4567 x3766
Fax: 519-888-6197
Email: yding-at-uwaterloo.ca




From daemon Wed Jul 17 02:30:35 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 09:22:48 +0200
Subject: digest

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


digest



From daemon Wed Jul 17 04:02:58 2002



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 10:59:18 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Just a short comment: the Fortran (i.e. the punch card) format is not
awkward at all. Besides, as long as the graphics is available in Fortran
too, I don't see why we should abandon the good old language which is still
very appropriate for scientific "FORmula TRANslation". There are a huge
amount of very good programs written in that language, still in use in the
scientific world. As an evidence I can mention a version of the codes given
in the book of Head et al., I have written myself, in Fortran, with screen
display of the graphica result included (written in Fortran too). Its
advantage is that it can be run even on old computers, under DOS. And they
are still a lot of "old" computers all over the world.

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************


At 20:45 16/07/02 +0100, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 17 04:35:32 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 10:45:46 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all
Did anyone ever rework these programs to handle dislocations in low symmetry
structures, e.g. monoclinic or triclinic?

Thanks

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Steven Celotto" {s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk}
Cc: "Microscopy (E-mail)" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2002 9:45 PM


Perhaps I was not clear in saying what was awkward. It is their input format being
like that of a punch-card, not the Fortran language.
When I used their programs I had to make ascii/text files with the program
parameters (beam direction, line direction, operating, w, anno etc) in the 82 (?)
character line like when they had to input the data via punch cards. It was easy
for them because because they were 'brought up' with that format. I was amazed
that they could glance through the almost continuous strings of text and find
which parameter they wanted (and my mistakes). I had to count characters all the
time.

Corneliu Sarbu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Just a short comment: the Fortran (i.e. the punch card) format is not
} awkward at all. Besides, as long as the graphics is available in Fortran
} too, I don't see why we should abandon the good old language which is still
} very appropriate for scientific "FORmula TRANslation". There are a huge
} amount of very good programs written in that language, still in use in the
} scientific world. As an evidence I can mention a version of the codes given
} in the book of Head et al., I have written myself, in Fortran, with screen
} display of the graphica result included (written in Fortran too). Its
} advantage is that it can be run even on old computers, under DOS. And they
} are still a lot of "old" computers all over the world.
}
} Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
} Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
} Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
} B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
} ****************************************************************
} Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
} +32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
} Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
} e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} ****************************************************************
}
} At 20:45 16/07/02 +0100, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } OneDis is the program developed by Head et al. It may be still in Fortran
} } and it may still have its awkward input format (emulating the old punch
} } card format). Prof. Veli-Tapani Kuokkala has repackaged the code into a
} } user-friendly Windows format for PC. The program can still be download
} } from his webpage.
} }
} } http://www.tut.fi/units/ms/elm/enindex.htm
} }
} } "Walck, Scott D." wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } Your posting reminded me of the software available at the MSA/MAS
} } library. There is a public domain software program that is called
} } "oneDis" (I think) that will simulate the image of a dislocation after
} } providing the program with the imaging parameters. I would recommend
} } that you donwload the software and "play" with it to learn what
} } dislocations look like at different imaging conditions. It is quite
} } useful and it will help with the original question that was posted.
} } }
} } } You can get to the EMMPDL library from the MSA website. Here are
} } instructions that I copied
} } }
} } } EMMPDL - MASLIB - Mac & PC Shareware Libraries at Argonne National
} } Laboratory. The following FTP Site give you access to these Software
} } Libraries. Access is by anonymous Login:
} } }
} } } Host : WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV or
} } } the mirror site WWW.MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } }
} } } Login:
} } } Username = Anonymous
} } } Password = Your Email Address
} } }
} } } -Scott
} } }
} } } Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} } } PPG Industries, Inc.
} } } Glass Technology Center
} } } P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} } } Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} } } Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
} } }
} } } Walck-at-PPG.com
} } }
} } } (412) 820-8651 (office)
} } } (412) 820-8515 (fax)
} } }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } } From: Corneliu Sarbu [mailto:Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
} } } Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2002 1:31 PM
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } The exhaustive treatment of the "classical", two beam diffraction contrast
} } } of dislocations in TEM is contained in the book of A.K.Head, P.Humble,
} } } L.M.Clarebrough, A.J.Morton and C.T.Forwood on "Computed electron
} } } micrographs and defect identification". On the ground of the minimum
} } } theoretical knowledge that any electron microscopist has to hold, it is
} } } presented in all details, computer codes in Fortran included, the method
} } } that can generate by computation the "classical" contrast of a rectilinear
} } } dislocation and a complex of two dislocations and three stacking faults.
} } } There are in use such computer programs, commercial and free ones, that
} } } either are applying the codes given in that book or are providing more
} } } advanced treatment dealing with the same problem.
} } } It is surprising to see that the old "classical" knowledge of the
} } } diffraction contrast interpretation has faded away during the HRTEM
} } } offensive and that the necessity of looking back to the "simple" two beam
} } } diffraction contrast is more and more a request.
} } }
} } } Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} } } Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
} } } Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
} } } Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
} } } B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
} } } ****************************************************************
} } } Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
} } } +32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
} } } Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
} } } e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} } } ****************************************************************
} } }
} } } At 14:13 12/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
} } } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Hi,
} } } }
} } } } I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am
} } } } looking at
} } } } is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
} } } } imaging..Thanks
} } } }
} } } } Aman Haque
} } } }
} } } } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } } } Aman Haque
} } } } Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
} } } } University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
} } } }
} } } } Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534
} }
} } --
} } Dr. Steven Celotto
} } Department of Engineering
} } Materials Science & Engineering
} } University of Liverpool
} } Brownlow Hill
} } Liverpool L69 3BX
} } UNITED KINGDOM
} }
} } Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
} } Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
} } email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk

--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Jul 17 05:34:07 2002



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 11:25:44 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations: low symmetry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


No, as far as I know.
I have the Fortran/DOS versions for the cubic, tetragonal and hexagonal versions

in my draw. That is as low as they ever needed.
However, they show in their book how to modify the programs for tetragonal and
hexagonal crystals. In section 10.6 they explain how they designed the program
code so that modify it for other crystals can be done without massive amounts of

rewriting. And they explain how to do it giving the tetragonal and hexagonal
versions as examples. On the elastic constants in the ANCALC subroutine and the
'crystallography package' of the code needed to be modified.
If someone has the time and energy they could do it.



Ian MacLaren wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear all
} Did anyone ever rework these programs to handle dislocations in low symmetry
} structures, e.g. monoclinic or triclinic?
}
} Thanks
}
} Ian MacLaren
} N.B. New address
} TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
} Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
} Tel: +49 6151 162894
} ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Steven Celotto" {s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk}
} Cc: "Microscopy (E-mail)" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2002 9:45 PM
} Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } OneDis is the program developed by Head et al. It may be still in Fortran
} and it may still have its awkward input format (emulating the old punch card
} format). Prof. Veli-Tapani Kuokkala has repackaged the code into a
} user-friendly Windows format for PC. The program can still be download from
} his webpage.
} }
} } http://www.tut.fi/units/ms/elm/enindex.htm
} }
} } "Walck, Scott D." wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } Your posting reminded me of the software available at the MSA/MAS
} library. There is a public domain software program that is called "oneDis"
} (I think) that will simulate the image of a dislocation after providing the
} program with the imaging parameters. I would recommend that you donwload
} the software and "play" with it to learn what dislocations look like at
} different imaging conditions. It is quite useful and it will help with the
} original question that was posted.
} } }
} } } You can get to the EMMPDL library from the MSA website. Here are
} instructions that I copied
} } }
} } } EMMPDL - MASLIB - Mac & PC Shareware Libraries at Argonne National
} Laboratory. The following FTP Site give you access to these Software
} Libraries. Access is by anonymous Login:
} } }
} } } Host : WWW.AMC.ANL.GOV or
} } } the mirror site WWW.MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } }
} } } Login:
} } } Username = Anonymous
} } } Password = Your Email Address
} } }
} } } -Scott
} } }
} } } Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} } } PPG Industries, Inc.
} } } Glass Technology Center
} } } P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} } } Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} } } Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
} } }
} } } Walck-at-PPG.com
} } }
} } } (412) 820-8651 (office)
} } } (412) 820-8515 (fax)
} } }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } } From: Corneliu Sarbu [mailto:Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
} } } Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2002 1:31 PM
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } The exhaustive treatment of the "classical", two beam diffraction
} contrast
} } } of dislocations in TEM is contained in the book of A.K.Head, P.Humble,
} } } L.M.Clarebrough, A.J.Morton and C.T.Forwood on "Computed electron
} } } micrographs and defect identification". On the ground of the minimum
} } } theoretical knowledge that any electron microscopist has to hold, it is
} } } presented in all details, computer codes in Fortran included, the method
} } } that can generate by computation the "classical" contrast of a
} rectilinear
} } } dislocation and a complex of two dislocations and three stacking faults.
} } } There are in use such computer programs, commercial and free ones, that
} } } either are applying the codes given in that book or are providing more
} } } advanced treatment dealing with the same problem.
} } } It is surprising to see that the old "classical" knowledge of the
} } } diffraction contrast interpretation has faded away during the HRTEM
} } } offensive and that the necessity of looking back to the "simple" two
} beam
} } } diffraction contrast is more and more a request.
} } }
} } } Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} } } Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
} } } Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
} } } Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
} } } B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
} } } ****************************************************************
} } } Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
} } } +32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
} } } Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
} } } e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} } } ****************************************************************
} } }
} } } At 14:13 12/07/02 -0500, you wrote:
} } }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Hi,
} } } }
} } } } I have a question: With TEM how can I be sure that the feature I am
} } } } looking at
} } } } is/are dislocation(s)? Can you suggest any reading on dislocation
} } } } imaging..Thanks
} } } }
} } } } Aman Haque
} } } }
} } } } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } } } Aman Haque
} } } } Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engg
} } } } University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
} } } }
} } } } Tel: 217-244-2760, Fax: 217-244-6534
} }
} } --
} } Dr. Steven Celotto
} } Department of Engineering
} } Materials Science & Engineering
} } University of Liverpool
} } Brownlow Hill
} } Liverpool L69 3BX
} } UNITED KINGDOM
} }
} } Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
} } Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
} } email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk
} }
} }
} }

--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Jul 17 06:13:30 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 13:07:51 +0200
Subject: subscribe digest

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


subscribe digest



From daemon Wed Jul 17 06:59:00 2002



From: James M. Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mta.ca
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 08:51:58 -0300
Subject: Re: INCA problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hmm, must be a Canadian problem, because I have a somewhat similar situation.
We also have an Inca system with a SATW window. The JEOL serviceman
was just here for the routine on our 5600, and when he vented the column and
started taking it apart, we noticed a thin film of condensation on the outside
portion of the detector finger. The metal here is just cool to the touch - certainly
not cold enough to freeze. We didn't have any significant increase in boiling of the
LN2, and consumption is pretty much the rate it has always been. At first, I wasn't
too alarmed (humidity is nearly 100% in the Maritime summer), but then I got to
thinking (dangerous ground, I know) - why does this only occur when the scope is
vented? I've never noticed this condensation before, but normally the detector is
inserted fully into the column, and I don't see much of the finger on the outside of
the column in that instance.

I'm thinking that we have a pinhole leak or entirely broken window, and I hadn't
noticed it before because I normally do specimen exchanges very quickly, and use
the EDS relatively infrequently.

With the scope pumped back down, we got the same high deadtime, no peaks
in the spectra behavior described below, but this subsided after a few minutes. Low
energy peaks were somewhat depressed, but were restored after running the conditioning
routine. Strangely, I've had this high deadtime, no peak behavior before, even a month
or so after installation, usually shortly after specimen exchange. My questions to this oh so
experienced and wise group are:

1. Do I have a leak in the window? I probably know the answer to this one.

2. What are the long term effects on the detector of operating in this manner?
With normal use, I'm not so far appreciably affecting pumpdown time of the scope,
so I think with brief exchanges I'm not condensing that much inside the scope.

3. We use the EDS system fairly infrequently. Would it be better to warm the system
up and only cool it down when we need it? Or would it be better to keep
it cold and run the conditioning circuit before use?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'd like to dash right out and fix the thing - but
there is absolutely no money in the budget in the forseeable future for such a repair.
Any brave souls out there who have attempted repairing broken windows themselves?

Thanks in advance,

Jim

--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
www: http://www.mta.ca/~jehrman



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America







From daemon Wed Jul 17 08:39:59 2002



From: Alan Nicholls :      nicholls-at-uic.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 08:33:17 -0500
Subject: Re: INCA Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Yuquan

We have had similar problems with an 18month old Inca system this year. In
our case it was a cracked window and dead FET. The detector had to go back
to Oxford for repair.

Alan

At 03:50 PM 7/16/2002 -0400, Yuquan Ding wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Alan W Nicholls, PhD
Director of Research Service Facility (Electron Microscopy)
Research Resources Center - East (M/C 337)
Room 100 Science and Engineering South Building
The University of Illinois at Chicago
845 West Taylor St
Chicago, IL 60607-7058

Tel: 312 996 1227
Fax: 312 996 8091
Office: Room 110

Web site www.rrc.uic.edu



From daemon Wed Jul 17 08:40:24 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 09:28:16 -0400
Subject: Re: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
}
} Hello,
}
} One of our investigators wants to do TEM on a very minute quantity of
} sperm, 40 of them to be exact. Does anyone have any suggestions for
} preparing such a minute sample with the goal of actually being able to
} find them upon ultrathin sectioning? So far we have tried suspending them
} in a tiny drop of BSA, crosslinking the BSA with glutaraldehyde, and
} treating it like a piece of tissue from that point on. Unfortunately,
} looking for the sperm in the resulting tissue block is like trying to find
} a pollywog in an ocean. Any helpful hints out there?
}
} Thanks for your help.
}
} Dotty
************************
Hi Dotty,
Your question is most timely from my perspective. I just ran up two
samples of sperm for a colleague. Initially, we tried agar, with the
same results you had with the BSA. My second, successful try
consisted simply of spinning the little guys down in an eppendorf
tube. Granted, I was using a 200 microliter suspension of sperm in
fix, and had many more than 40, but this worked well. I have a
small, table top centrifuge that I used at around 900g to bring them
to a pellet each time I changed solutions, and then an old Beckman
ultrafuge that holds the tubes horizontally to bring the pellet to
the very bottom when I put them into the resin. After osmium, I
could actually see the sample. With so few, you might want to pellet
them first, and then overlay them with a very small volume of the
BSA, just to hold them in place.

Good luck!
Lee

--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Wed Jul 17 09:20:15 2002



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 16:18:19 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM Dislocations: low symmetry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I've never heard about an adaptation of this program for a lower symmetry than
the tetragonal one (which can be found in the original book by Head et al.).
As one who has implemented the Onedis code I have the feeling that it is not
very difficult to adapt it for such a lower symmetry. You have just to look
at the
subroutines that are involved in the calculation of the mechanical strain
field and do
the necessary modifications. The components of that strain field are much more
numerous as the symmetry gets lower, but it can be done. The code given in the
book of Head et al. is a good starting point, in as much as the basic
principles
of the calculations of each of the subroutines are thoroughly presented.

Corneliu Sarbu!

At 11:27 17/07/02 +0200, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 17 10:03:26 2002



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 09:55:36 -0500
Subject: Re: INCA problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


James,
It sure sounds like you have a pinhole leak in your window. We developed
one in our Kevex Quantum detector on a JEOL 840A years ago. We only noticed
it when we had to vent the whole chamber for large samples. We normally
used the airlock and so the specimen chamber and detector were kept under
vacuum.

However, once we vented the column, we also vented the detector, at least
partially. That led to 99% deadtime until the air molecules could be pumped
back out the pinhole. Then things seemed to operate fine. I suppose a
person could keep on operating like that as routine, but contamination
might eventually build up on the crystal. We bit the bullet and shipped the
detector back for a window replacement that cost us somewhere between $2000
and 3000. It has been fine these many years since.

We normally see droplets of oil build up on our detector snout over time.
(That has been discussed here before.) After several months we take the
detector off the scope and clean it. We drizzle freon down the snout and
over the window. But you should check with your manufacturer to make sure
you don't do anything to damage your window (more) or dissolve the cement
holding the window in place.

I suppose water droplets could just as well build up. Iowa is humid, too,
but we vent with dry nitrogen and normally don't leave the chamber open all
that long, and the snout is not all that cool to the touch.

Warren

At 08:51 AM 7/17/02 -0300, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hmm, must be a Canadian problem, because I have a somewhat similar situation.
} We also have an Inca system with a SATW window. The JEOL serviceman
} was just here for the routine on our 5600, and when he vented the column and
} started taking it apart, we noticed a thin film of condensation on the outside
} portion of the detector finger. The metal here is just cool to the touch -
} certainly
} not cold enough to freeze. We didn't have any significant increase in
} boiling of the
} LN2, and consumption is pretty much the rate it has always been. At first,
} I wasn't
} too alarmed (humidity is nearly 100% in the Maritime summer), but then I
} got to
} thinking (dangerous ground, I know) - why does this only occur when the
} scope is
} vented? I've never noticed this condensation before, but normally the
} detector is
} inserted fully into the column, and I don't see much of the finger on the
} outside of
} the column in that instance.
}
} I'm thinking that we have a pinhole leak or entirely broken window, and I
} hadn't
} noticed it before because I normally do specimen exchanges very quickly,
} and use
} the EDS relatively infrequently.
}
} With the scope pumped back down, we got the same high deadtime, no peaks
} in the spectra behavior described below, but this subsided after a few
} minutes. Low
} energy peaks were somewhat depressed, but were restored after running the
} conditioning
} routine. Strangely, I've had this high deadtime, no peak behavior before,
} even a month
} or so after installation, usually shortly after specimen exchange. My
} questions to this oh so
} experienced and wise group are:
}
} 1. Do I have a leak in the window? I probably know the answer to this one.
}
} 2. What are the long term effects on the detector of operating in this manner?
} With normal use, I'm not so far appreciably affecting pumpdown time of the
} scope,
} so I think with brief exchanges I'm not condensing that much inside the scope.
}
} 3. We use the EDS system fairly infrequently. Would it be better to warm
} the system
} up and only cool it down when we need it? Or would it be better to keep
} it cold and run the conditioning circuit before use?
}
} Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'd like to dash right out and fix
} the thing - but
} there is absolutely no money in the budget in the forseeable future for
} such a repair.
} Any brave souls out there who have attempted repairing broken windows
} themselves?
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Jim
}
} --
}
} James M. Ehrman
} Digital Microscopy Facility
} Mount Allison University
} Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
} CANADA
}
} phone: 506-364-2519
} fax: 506-364-2505
} email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
} www: http://www.mta.ca/~jehrman
}
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Dear Listers:
} }
} } The last year we installed ENCA 200 system in our JSM 840 SEM. Last week
} } when we repaired our SEM, liquid nitrogen in dewar was emptied to remove
} } water. Then we re-filled new liquid nitrogen through "warm up" and "cool
} } down" procedures. After that, we tried to calibrate this ISIS system. When
} } making "discriminators only", a message showed "ISIS calibration unable to
} } measure strobe peak. Abandoning calibration". At somebody's suggestion,
} } several times of conditioner were conducted, but the situation is the same.
} } We couldn't do anything now. The system seems to be locked. Also when
} } running EDS, no any peaks could be found, showing very high deadtime (99%).
} } Even without beam, the deadtime is also very high. It was suspected that the
} } detector system was damaged. I suspect that the strobed zero peak is
} } generated in the XP2 pulse processor, not in the detector. Why
} } "discriminators only" didn't work?
} }
} } If anybody of you has experience with this type of problems, I would like to
} } have your opinions and thoughts. Thanks!
} }
} } Our system No. 05426-2390-414-51, Model 6506, att 1: 32804c802, att2:
} } 0120024, window: ATW2 det. area 10 mmxmm.
} }
} } Yuquan Ding
} } Materials Labs
} } Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
} } University of Waterloo
} } Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
} } 519-888-4567 x3766
} } Fax: 519-888-6197
} } Email: yding-at-uwaterloo.ca

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Wed Jul 17 10:11:35 2002



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 10:05:28 -0500
Subject: Re: subscribe digest

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If I may be so bold to stick my nose into what is normally Nestor's
business, I offer these sections taken from the list FAQ. The link to the
FAQ is given at the top of each posting.

Since Nestor's reminder to unsubscribe from the list rather than to simply
return "out of office" messages during absences, there have been a few
commands sent to the list to unsubscribe or to switch to digest mode. That
isn't the way to do it.

First, the list itself does not handle commands. Some implementations of
mailing lists do - many do not. This list simply is the latter form. See
note #2 below.

Second, there is no digest mode at this time. There may be later and I am
sure Nestor will tell us if digest mode becomes available.

Thanks, Nestor, for all your investment in this list. It is a wonderful aid.

Warren
------------------------------
How do I unsubscribe?

Send an Email Message to "Listserver-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com" in the body of
your message include the line
Unsubscribe Microscopy "USERID-at-EMailAddress"
Replace the "USERID-at-EMailAddress" with your real Email address.
Or use our WWW based form at:
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/UnSubscribeMicroscopy.html
IMPORTANT NOTE#1. To unsubscribe you must supply the original address which
you used when you first submitted your subscription. Over the last few
years I have found that many users have their mail forwarded to new
addresses, or use an alias. When they then try to unsubscribe, they forget
where there mail is being sent to (or forwarded from). This causes me lots
of headaches. So just remember in order to unsubscribe you from the list,
the listserver must know the your original subscription address to remove it!
Please be considerate. I am not a mindreader, and don't really enjoy
playing detective over the Internet. I have too many other things to do.
IMPORTANT NOTE #2: Do not send subscribe/unsubscribe message to
"Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com". When you do this ALL members of the
listserver receive your message. All administrative issues should be sent
to "Listserver-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com" and not to the general mailing list.


Is there a Digest Mode?

Digest Mode is not available on the present server. It is an option which
will be added in the future.
Digest Mode compresses all message from a single day into one long message
which is then sent to all subscribers. It is a nice option, and I intend to
get it running eventually.

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Wed Jul 17 10:40:19 2002



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 11:39:09 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dorothy,
Some possibilities
a. fix and wick the cells into a cellulose fiber similar
to the one produced by Microdyn
(microfiltration cartridges)--will send website
directly
b. fix and drop cells onto a disk of nitrocellulose paper,
add second disk of np to sandwich cells
and process in wells of a staining dish
c. filter using polycarbonate filer, fix, process, flat
embedd or use a Chen mold

Rosemary
At 04:37 PM 7/16/02 -0400, Dorothy Roak Sorenson wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 17 11:18:56 2002



From: akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 12:10:15 -0400
Subject: Re: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dotty,

I'm in a mountain cabin in Utah, looking at my e-mail on a laptop.

That's a tough problem. I could imagine something like the following:
Make up plastic embedding monomer and add a little dye to it. Polymerize a
block of it and then make tiny shavings or particles of it. Put some
sticky substance (polylysine, etc.?) on the surface of the shavings. Put
one or more shaving in with the sperm in a way that would cause the sperm
to attach to the shaving(s). You would have to decide whether the sperm
should be fixed before or after they attached to the shaving. When fixed
sperm are on the shaving(s), dehydrate them, and then put a shaving or
tight cluster of shavings into embedding medium at one end of a flat
embedding block. Polymerize the block. You should be able to see the
shaving(s) because of the dye, and can section them and see the sperm that
are on theeir surface.

Kent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--On Tuesday, July 16, 2002 4:37 PM -0400 Dorothy Roak Sorenson
{dsoren-at-umich.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello,
}
} One of our investigators wants to do TEM on a very minute quantity of
} sperm, 40 of them to be exact. Does anyone have any suggestions for
} preparing such a minute sample with the goal of actually being able to
} find them upon ultrathin sectioning? So far we have tried suspending them
} in a tiny drop of BSA, crosslinking the BSA with glutaraldehyde, and
} treating it like a piece of tissue from that point on. Unfortunately,
} looking for the sperm in the resulting tissue block is like trying to find
} a pollywog in an ocean. Any helpful hints out there?
}
} Thanks for your help.
}
} Dotty
}
}
} Dotty Sorenson
} Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
} Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
} University of Michigan Medical School
} Ann Arbor, Michigan
} (734)763-1170
} FAX (734)763-1166
} dsoren-at-umich.edu
} c
}







From daemon Wed Jul 17 13:16:44 2002



From: Larry Ackerman :      mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 11:13:20 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You might try mixing a small drop of stain such as Toluidine Blue in the
agar for easier visualization of your sample.

At 04:37 PM 7/16/02 -0400, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Larry Ackerman
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
UCSF, Box 0725, Rm U226
533 Parnassus Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94143 USA

415-476-8751 FAX 415-476-5774

http://www.ucsf.edu/jan



From daemon Wed Jul 17 16:51:06 2002



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 14:38:16 -0700
Subject: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you thought about using a FIB?

John Mardinly
Intel



-----Original Message-----
} From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson [mailto:dsoren-at-umich.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2002 1:38 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello,

One of our investigators wants to do TEM on a very minute quantity of
sperm, 40 of them to be exact. Does anyone have any suggestions for
preparing such a minute sample with the goal of actually being able to
find them upon ultrathin sectioning? So far we have tried suspending them
in a tiny drop of BSA, crosslinking the BSA with glutaraldehyde, and
treating it like a piece of tissue from that point on. Unfortunately,
looking for the sperm in the resulting tissue block is like trying to find
a pollywog in an ocean. Any helpful hints out there?

Thanks for your help.

Dotty


Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
(734)763-1170
FAX (734)763-1166
dsoren-at-umich.edu
c



From daemon Wed Jul 17 16:57:54 2002



From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Wed, 17 Jul 2002 15:54:56 -0300 (ADT)
Subject: TEM-hepes buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Everybody!
I was wondering if any of you have used Hepes buffer for electron
microscopy fixation. We used 2% glut in Hepes and we found
fixation unsatisfactory. Did any of you experienced any problems
using this system?
Thanks
Dorota


From daemon Wed Jul 17 19:07:06 2002



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 11:59:24 +1200
Subject: Flat embedding using Melinex problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kia Ora

A flat embedding problem. We have cryofixed and cryosubstituted some
Pisolithus tinctorius (a fungi) for one of our users and have run
into a a bit of a problem.

We cryosubsituted in 2% Osmium Tetroxide in Acetone for 72 hours in a
Leica AFS. After gradually bringing the samples to room temperature
and rinsing in absolute acetone we very slowly infiltrated into
Quetol 651 resin (formulation used; Quetol 651 10 g, NSA 10g, MNA 10g
DMP-30 0.45g). We then flat embedded the fungi between two sheets of
Melinex film (Agar Scientific catalogue number L4103) and polymerised
overnight at 60oC.

We have used Melinex film on numerous occasions in the past to flat
embed vibratomed sectioned brain slices, monolayers of culture cells
etc. We have used Melinex film with 'conventional' epoxy resins (ie
TAAB TK3, Agar 100 resin) and with LR White. We have not in the past
used Melinex with Quetol 651.

When we came to seperate the Melinex to remove the flat embedded
fungi the Melinex crazed and fractured , it wouldn't peel apart.

We ran a trial with old stock Melinex and some fairly new stuff. Not
wanting to get caught again we also trialed with some Alcar, Thermonx
and Mylar film. We tried the Quetol 651 again and some Agar 100.

Interestingly the Meinex (both the old stock and new stuff) reacted
in the same way both with the Quetol and the Agar 100 (which has
nevcer happened to us before). The Alcar, Thermonx and Mylar film
were all fine with the two resins.

Is, or has, anyone else out experienced the same problem and come up
with an answer ?

While on the subject, does anybody know at what temperature the
osmium in the acetone based cryosubstitution medium actual fixes at ?

It is my understanding that the idea is that the acetone/ osmium
fully infiltrates the tissue at the lower temperature, replacing the
cell water, but the osmium doesn't actually fix until the sample is
warmed up to a particular temperature (warmed up still being somewhat
lower than zero degress C).

Thanks in advance

Allan




--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Thu Jul 18 01:11:00 2002



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 16:00:17 +1000
Subject: Ultrastructure of boab nuts?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have a student interested in the ultrastructure of boab nuts....can
anyone help with the interpretation of micrographs?

cheers
Sally


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator,
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
Research School of Biological Sciences
Australian National University
Canberra ACT0200
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218
ph 02 6125 2743
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU




From daemon Thu Jul 18 07:48:48 2002



From: Katherine.S.Connolly-at-dartmouth.edu (Katherine S. Connolly)
Date: 18 Jul 2002 08:38:21 EDT
Subject: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I would do all steps in a centrufuge.
Kate Connolly


From daemon Thu Jul 18 08:53:17 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 09:44:07 -0400
Subject: RE: TEM-HEPES buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id IAA26258
for dist-Microscopy; Thu, 18 Jul 2002 08:50:26 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id IAA26250
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail1-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Thu, 18 Jul 2002 08:49:56 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from magic.wcupa.edu (magic.wcupa.edu [144.26.94.241])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with ESMTP id IAA26243
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Thu, 18 Jul 2002 08:49:44 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from mail.WCUPA.EDU (mail.wcupa.edu [144.26.92.199])
by magic.wcupa.edu (8.11.2/8.11.2) with ESMTP id g6IDj4W09403;
Thu, 18 Jul 2002 09:45:05 -0400 (EDT)
Received: by mail.wcupa.edu with Internet Mail Service (5.5.2650.21)
id {3N5PX6XC} ; Thu, 18 Jul 2002 09:44:13 -0400
Message-ID: {B47C27775351D41197DC00805FEA78A70602DD41-at-mail.wcupa.edu}


Morning,

When you changed your buffer from the old(?) to HEPES, what change,
if any, did you record in its osmolarity? Also, there ARE non-trivial
effects recorded for different buffering systems on various tissues. Every
change should be followed by an experiment to define new optima for the
tissues under consideration, and the best way to determine new optima is to
start with semi-thin section comparisons followed by ultrastructural
analysis.

If it was easy, we'd all be paid much more for our work.

Regards,


Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


} ----------
} From: Dorota Wadowska
} Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2002 2:54 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM-hepes buffer
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi Everybody!
} I was wondering if any of you have used Hepes buffer for electron
} microscopy fixation. We used 2% glut in Hepes and we found
} fixation unsatisfactory. Did any of you experienced any problems
} using this system?
} Thanks
} Dorota
}
}


From daemon Thu Jul 18 10:22:36 2002



From: Heather A Owen :      owenha-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 10:14:01 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: TEM-hepes buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Dorrota,

I've used HEPES buffer with eubacteria, cyanobacteria, several algae
(green and golden brown) and land plants with good success. I did a
side-by-side comparison of cacodylate, phosphate and PIPES (a different
organic buffer) early in my career - an increasingly more scary number of
years ago - and PIPES was by far the best. I tried HEPES on the advice of
a collegue that worked on dinoflagellates, and have been using it ever
since. I have not had much experience with animal tissue, with the
exception of some tissue cultured cells. We have used HEPES in these
situations when it was the buffer system the cells were grown in, and have
had no trouble with it.

Heather Owen


Dr. Heather A. Owen, Director
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Lapham Hall, P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, WI 53210
USA

Phone: (414)229-6816



From daemon Thu Jul 18 10:55:30 2002



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 11:49:34 -0600
Subject: Position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


ELECTRON MICROSCOPIST/ RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

YALE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE


Electron Microscopy Core Facility at the Yale University School of
Medicine Seeks experienced electron microscopist to assist Principal
Investigator and other research scientists as consultant for independent
experiments; overseeing the operation of the facility, preparation of
specimens, conducting immunocytochemical labeling, sample analysis and
statistical analysis. Candidate will be expected to conduct independent
research projects in consultation of PI; design experiments, interpret
results and present proposals for future experiments. Will also
supervise lab personnel and other users of the facility as well as teach
EM techniques to users on a 1:1 basis or formal courses organized
biannually.

Position requires a Master’s degree in the biological sciences and one
year prior experience in related position; or the equivalent combination
of education and experience. Previous experience in microscopy and in
the conduct of independent research is required; also strong computer
literacy is required.

Qualified candidates send resume and cover letter referencing source
code EASEM10769 to Ms. S. Greer at jobs-at-yale.edu. Fax: 203-432-9817.
Mail: PO Box 208344, New Haven, CT 06520-8344. For more information
about this position and Yale’s outstanding benefits package visit
www.yale.edu.

Yale University is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer.

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology,
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging and
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research,
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street
New Haven CT 06520
Tel : (203) 785 3681
Fax : (203) 785 7446




From daemon Thu Jul 18 11:43:17 2002



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 12:40:28 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM-hepes buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dorota,
We obtained good fixation of Arabidopsis thaliana buds using the
protocol from the following publication:
Owen HA and Makaroff CA. Ultrastructure of microsporogenesis and
microgametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ecotype
Wassilewskija (Brassicaceae). Protoplasma 185:7-21, 1995.
I don't have concentrations available to me at the moment but the
fixatives are fully described in this article. It was a great find for us
and we have used it on other plants as well.
Rosemary




From daemon Thu Jul 18 12:46:03 2002



From: JHoffpa464-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 13:37:15 -0400
Subject: Re: TEM-HEPES buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


if it was easy any HS student could do it and we would all be making min wage.
john


From daemon Thu Jul 18 12:56:07 2002



From: Lu-Chang Qin :      lcqin-at-physics.unc.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 13:48:59 -0400
Subject: broken spare TEM sample holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for a broken TEM sample holder that you may no longer need.
Please contact me if you have one - thanks in advance.

With best regards.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Lu-Chang Qin, ScD
Department of Physics and Astronomy &
Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Room 178 Phillips Hall, CB#3255
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255
Phone: (919) 843-3575



From daemon Thu Jul 18 13:50:26 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 12:02:11 -0700
Subject: RE: TEM-HEPES buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was surprised to find that some people in EM Labs used 0.1 M phosphate
buffer as a "PBS". From my course of biochemistry/cell biology PBS stands
for Phosphate Buffered Saline and is 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and 150
mM NaCl. If you replace 20 mM phosphate on 20 mM of any other buffer,
HEPES for instance, it's very unlikely the total osmomolarity will
changed... BUT, if you are using 0.1 (?) M HEPES it may be a HUGE
DIFFERENCE... You have to understand clearly, which buffer system you are
using. In biochemistry, we never ever use 100 mM range buffers itself (like
0.1 M phosphate/HEPES/MOPS etc). The purpose of the 'buffer' is to provide
necessary pH and sodium or potassium salts were used to provide necessary
osmosity... GA itself affect osmosity seriously and formally speaking,
osmosity should be corrected. From the 'chemical' point of view, HEPES
should not affect GA efficiency. Moreover, HEPES is the best buffer for GA
crosslinking because of it's huge buffer capacity in the neutral pH range.
As I understand, some 'buffer systems' like cacodylate helps to wash out
some content of the cell matrix and therefore makes some structural details
more pronounced. Mistakenly, some people called it 'good fixation'. If you
are using 100 mM range buffers, such 'washing effect' supposed to be very
pronounced. HEPES is good to preserve the matrix integrity, not for
washing out it's components. I am sorry for such obvious comment. Best
wishes, Sergey.

At 09:44 AM 7/18/02 -0400, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Jul 18 14:05:10 2002



From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-jax.org
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 14:58:39 -0400
Subject: Hand-held GFP detection devices???

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Everyone,

Rather than putting animals (such as mouse pups) under a
stereoscope that can detect GFP, has anyone ever heard of a hand-held
device that can be used to see if the pups are green?

Thank you in adance...

Lesley



Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191



From daemon Thu Jul 18 15:55:26 2002



From: kwalters :      kwalters-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 15:47:17 -0500
Subject: antibodies for porcine sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I have a project requiring that I identify cells grown in culture that were
originally taken from porcine tissue. The cells are suspected to be either
smooth muscle cells, endothelium, or fibroblasts. I am unfamiliar with which
antibodies would work for these cells. There are many antibodies for these
types of cells, but will they work in porcine tissue? Help.....


Thanks,
Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------



From daemon Thu Jul 18 18:13:31 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 16:01:27 -0700
Subject: RE: TEM-HEPES buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Not at all Fred. I was commenting the original message, not yours. No
worry. I think, we both agree that in order to get good answer, we have to
ask good questions. For instance the definition of the 'HEPES buffer' to
me mean that people talking about 10-20 mM concentration of HEPES. 0.1 M
HEPES is a stock solution to me. Others may think differently. As a result
there is misunderstanding may occur (exactly what you mean). Sergey


At 01:29 PM 7/18/02, you wrote:
} Did I say something wrong? I tried not to. But I can tell from what you
} wrote that we agree. My response was my nasty way to say that there was
} insufficient information to draw any conclusion and frame any answer.
}
} Hope you agree.
}
} Fred
}
}
} } ----------
} } From: Sergey Ryazantsev
} } Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 3:02 PM
} } To: Monson, Frederick C.; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: RE: TEM-HEPES buffer
} }
} } I was surprised to find that some people in EM Labs used 0.1 M phosphate
} } buffer as a "PBS". From my course of biochemistry/cell biology PBS
} } stands
} } for Phosphate Buffered Saline and is 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and
} } 150
} } mM NaCl. If you replace 20 mM phosphate on 20 mM of any other buffer,
} } HEPES for instance, it's very unlikely the total osmomolarity will
} } changed... BUT, if you are using 0.1 (?) M HEPES it may be a HUGE
} } DIFFERENCE... You have to understand clearly, which buffer system you are
} }
} } using. In biochemistry, we never ever use 100 mM range buffers itself
} } (like
} } 0.1 M phosphate/HEPES/MOPS etc). The purpose of the 'buffer' is to
} } provide
} } necessary pH and sodium or potassium salts were used to provide necessary
} } osmosity... GA itself affect osmosity seriously and formally speaking,
} } osmosity should be corrected. From the 'chemical' point of view, HEPES
} } should not affect GA efficiency. Moreover, HEPES is the best buffer for
} } GA
} } crosslinking because of it's huge buffer capacity in the neutral pH range.
} }
} } As I understand, some 'buffer systems' like cacodylate helps to wash out
} } some content of the cell matrix and therefore makes some structural
} } details
} } more pronounced. Mistakenly, some people called it 'good fixation'. If
} } you
} } are using 100 mM range buffers, such 'washing effect' supposed to be very
} } pronounced. HEPES is good to preserve the matrix integrity, not for
} } washing out it's components. I am sorry for such obvious comment. Best
} } wishes, Sergey.
} }
} } At 09:44 AM 7/18/02 -0400, you wrote:
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Morning,
} } }
} } } When you changed your buffer from the old(?) to HEPES, what
} } change,
} } } if any, did you record in its osmolarity? Also, there ARE non-trivial
} } } effects recorded for different buffering systems on various tissues.
} } Every
} } } change should be followed by an experiment to define new optima for the
} } } tissues under consideration, and the best way to determine new optima is
} } to
} } } start with semi-thin section comparisons followed by ultrastructural
} } } analysis.
} } }
} } } If it was easy, we'd all be paid much more for our work.
} } }
} } } Regards,
} } }
} } }
} } } Fred Monson
} } }
} } } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } } Schmucker II Science Center
} } } West Chester University
} } } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} } }
} } }
} } } } ----------
} } } } From: Dorota Wadowska
} } } } Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2002 2:54 PM
} } } } To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } } Subject: TEM-hepes buffer
} } } }
} } } }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Hi Everybody!
} } } } I was wondering if any of you have used Hepes buffer for electron
} } } } microscopy fixation. We used 2% glut in Hepes and we found
} } } } fixation unsatisfactory. Did any of you experienced any problems
} } } } using this system?
} } } } Thanks
} } } } Dorota
} } } }
} } } }
} }
} }

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Thu Jul 18 21:28:04 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jul 2002 19:23:35 -0700
Subject: XL-30 Sirion x-ray & diffusion pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone out there have any experience to share
about the Philips XL-30 (Sirion or other) with EDAX relative
to potential consequences of a diffusion pump versus
a turbo? It seems to me that a turbo pump would
go a long way to prevent contamination of the
detector window. I am not sure about this. The
Sirion isolates the chamber from the diffusion pump
during specimen exchange. Plus, it has a chilled
water trap. So this may not be a problem.

gg



From daemon Thu Jul 18 23:52:43 2002



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 14:47:35 +1000
Subject: Re: Hand-held GFP detection devices???

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Haven't tried this yet, but a blue fluorescent lamp, maximum emission
around 480 or so nm, may excite GFP enough to be visible in a dark room.
We're planning to test this to see if we can screen thousands of
GFP-expressing seeds. Could observe the fluorescence through a long-pass
theatre filter of some kind, like one of the Lee green or yellow filters,
which have quite sharp wavelength cutoffs (have used various Lee filters to
get different wavelength illumination for prac classes looking at
photomorphogenesis in plants).
good luck,
Rosemary
}
}
} Hi Everyone,
}
} Rather than putting animals (such as mouse pups) under a
} stereoscope that can detect GFP, has anyone ever heard of a hand-held
} device that can be used to see if the pups are green?
}
} Thank you in adance...
}
} Lesley
}
}
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191


Rosemary White
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia
rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
fax 61- 2 6246 5000
ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
mob. 61- 0402 835 973




From daemon Fri Jul 19 05:38:26 2002



From: Renaat Dasseville :      renaat.dasseville-at-rug.ac.be
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 13:36:07 +0200
Subject: SEM Peltier cold stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kristian
Thanks for that brief frisson of levity.
I failed to observe the promised cartoon on
the double slit experiment however.
Chris

Date sent: Tue, 16 Jul 2002 19:47:32 +0300
} From: Kristian Ukkonen {kristian.ukkonen-at-iki.fi}
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello,

We recently aquired a JSM5600LV SEM, with a Peltier cold stage. What is the
purpose of using this decive? All info on this is welcome!

Thanks

Renaat Dasseville
Protistology & Aquatic Ecology
Dept. Biology, University Gent
Krijgslaan 281, S8
9000 Gent, B E L G I U M

tel: +32 9 264 85 04
fax +32 9 264 85 99



From daemon Fri Jul 19 07:07:39 2002



From: joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 06:59:54 -0500
Subject: Re: XL-30 Sirion x-ray & diffusion pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have two XL30s. One is 8 years old with a diffusion pump and one is 1 year
old with a turbo pump. Both have Edax EDS systems, and we have not seen any
evidence of contamination on the x-ray detectors. The vacuum systems on our
Philips/FEI microscopes have been very reliable.

Joe Neilly, Research Investigator
Abbott Laboratories
R45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Voice: 847-938-5024
Fax: 847-938-5027



Gary Gaugler
{gary-at-gaugler To: MSA listserver {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
.com} cc:
Subject: XL-30 Sirion x-ray & diffusion pump
07/18/02
09:23 PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Does anyone out there have any experience to share
about the Philips XL-30 (Sirion or other) with EDAX relative
to potential consequences of a diffusion pump versus
a turbo? It seems to me that a turbo pump would
go a long way to prevent contamination of the
detector window. I am not sure about this. The
Sirion isolates the chamber from the diffusion pump
during specimen exchange. Plus, it has a chilled
water trap. So this may not be a problem.

gg








From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:12:28 2002



From: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 08:50:36 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dpu-at-spdc.ti.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
Thursday, July 18, 2002 at 13:16:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
Name: Dennis Pu

Organization: Texas Instruments

Education: Graduate College

Location: Dallas, Texas 75243

Question: Hello,
This is not exactly a question for school,
but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
My question deals with using microscopy to view
detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
grooves. My desire is to research what it might
take to build an optical record player.
I'm trying to determine whether it is
more practical to utilize some kind of optical
tracking of the groove for real-time play or
if scanning the whole record in at once and using
software to recognize the grooves and to produce
the sound would be better.
My first step is just to determine ways I
can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
consider one economical option that hobbyists
could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
archivists can use for transcribing old media
(vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
having to use destructive mechanical means.
I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
to offer.

Thanks,
Dennis Pu

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:12:30 2002



From: cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 08:49:10 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Etching Nickel-Titanium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
July 18, 2002 at 10:00:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Name: Chris Fanning

Organization: Cornell University

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Ithaca, Ny, US

Question: I am involved in undergraduate materials research on
Nickel-Titanium (50.5% ni). I have prepared an ~1cm cube of nitinol
potted in epoxy to be viewed in an SEM. Our goal is to obtain an ODF
via an EBSD scan. to accomplish this we need to get well defined
patterns in the EBSD. We are getting patterns now but they are not
good enough. We are considering etching and need recomendations for
etching solutions. Many people suggest an HF solution. Are there
alternatives to HF?

Our material prep was, ...
-cut with a slow speed (200 rpm) precision saw, diamond blade
-rough polish with 240, 320, 480(?), 600, 1200 Si-carbide paper by hand
-fine polish with 9u, 3u, 1u on nylon paper - polishing wheel, 200rpm
-fine polish with colloidal silica, by hand
-4 hrs on vibraory polisher with colloidal silica

any advice would be much appreciated! sorry for the long email,

Sincerely,
Chris Fanning

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:12:30 2002



From: Jason Patton :      jason.patton-at-anu.edu.au
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 00:07:29 +1000
Subject:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


subscribe microscopy



From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:12:29 2002



From: julycola-at-biof.ufrj.br (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 08:48:20 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: 16% formaldehyde from EMS Paraformaldehyde

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (julycola-at-biof.ufrj.br) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
July 18, 2002 at 09:15:20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: julycola-at-biof.ufrj.br
Name: Juliany Rodrigues

Organization: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Education: Graduate College

Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Question: We are not succeeding in preparing 16% formaldehyde from
EMS Paraformaldehyde. The final mixture is turbid no matter how much
NaOH we add.
What could be the cause? We have not had this kind of trouble in many
years of preparation. Do you advise pH adjustment of the freshly
prepared solution? Thank You for the help.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:21:17 2002



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 10:16:08 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM-HEPES buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sergey,

I disagree with your comment that a buffer has to be used in
the 10-20 mM range, and that at 0.1 M it should be considered
a stock solution. Clearly the concentration has to be proportional
to the buffering capacity required. When using large concentrations
of PFA (4-8 %), high concentration of HEPES is required to maintain
the pH neutral. We and others use routinely 250 mM Hepes "buffer"
with PFA fixation and get great morphology (as defined by an
absence of swelling of internal membranes and lack of extraction
of cytoplasmic components). Similarly, I know of many EM groups
who use routinely 100 or 200 mM phosphate solutions for fixation
for both GA and PFA fixation. As Fred said, what matters is to try
various techniques and identify the optimal conditions. Of course,
what someone calls great fixation can be seen as poor fixation
by someone else. Since nobody really knows what a cell is
supposed to look like at the microscopical level without having to
kill it first, remove all its water content and saturate it with heavy
metals, discussing what is a good or poor morphology can be
a futile exercise. According to what I consider reasonnable criteria
(some of which are listed above), I and others have found that
fixation in 200 or 250 mM solutions of HEPES, Pipes or phosphate
actually works well.
Best regards


Marc



Sergey Ryazantsev wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Not at all Fred. I was commenting the original message, not yours. No
} worry. I think, we both agree that in order to get good answer, we have to
} ask good questions. For instance the definition of the 'HEPES buffer' to
} me mean that people talking about 10-20 mM concentration of HEPES. 0.1 M
} HEPES is a stock solution to me. Others may think differently. As a result
} there is misunderstanding may occur (exactly what you mean). Sergey
}
} At 01:29 PM 7/18/02, you wrote:
} } Did I say something wrong? I tried not to. But I can tell from what you
} } wrote that we agree. My response was my nasty way to say that there was
} } insufficient information to draw any conclusion and frame any answer.
} }
} } Hope you agree.
} }
} } Fred
} }
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: Sergey Ryazantsev
} } } Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 3:02 PM
} } } To: Monson, Frederick C.; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: RE: TEM-HEPES buffer
} } }
} } } I was surprised to find that some people in EM Labs used 0.1 M phosphate
} } } buffer as a "PBS". From my course of biochemistry/cell biology PBS
} } } stands
} } } for Phosphate Buffered Saline and is 20 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and
} } } 150
} } } mM NaCl. If you replace 20 mM phosphate on 20 mM of any other buffer,
} } } HEPES for instance, it's very unlikely the total osmomolarity will
} } } changed... BUT, if you are using 0.1 (?) M HEPES it may be a HUGE
} } } DIFFERENCE... You have to understand clearly, which buffer system you are
} } }
} } } using. In biochemistry, we never ever use 100 mM range buffers itself
} } } (like
} } } 0.1 M phosphate/HEPES/MOPS etc). The purpose of the 'buffer' is to
} } } provide
} } } necessary pH and sodium or potassium salts were used to provide necessary
} } } osmosity... GA itself affect osmosity seriously and formally speaking,
} } } osmosity should be corrected. From the 'chemical' point of view, HEPES
} } } should not affect GA efficiency. Moreover, HEPES is the best buffer for
} } } GA
} } } crosslinking because of it's huge buffer capacity in the neutral pH range.
} } }
} } } As I understand, some 'buffer systems' like cacodylate helps to wash out
} } } some content of the cell matrix and therefore makes some structural
} } } details
} } } more pronounced. Mistakenly, some people called it 'good fixation'. If
} } } you
} } } are using 100 mM range buffers, such 'washing effect' supposed to be very
} } } pronounced. HEPES is good to preserve the matrix integrity, not for
} } } washing out it's components. I am sorry for such obvious comment. Best
} } } wishes, Sergey.
} } }
} } } At 09:44 AM 7/18/02 -0400, you wrote:
} } } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Morning,
} } } }
} } } } When you changed your buffer from the old(?) to HEPES, what
} } } change,
} } } } if any, did you record in its osmolarity? Also, there ARE non-trivial
} } } } effects recorded for different buffering systems on various tissues.
} } } Every
} } } } change should be followed by an experiment to define new optima for the
} } } } tissues under consideration, and the best way to determine new optima is
} } } to
} } } } start with semi-thin section comparisons followed by ultrastructural
} } } } analysis.
} } } }
} } } } If it was easy, we'd all be paid much more for our work.
} } } }
} } } } Regards,
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Fred Monson
} } } }
} } } } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } } } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } } } Schmucker II Science Center
} } } } West Chester University
} } } } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } } } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } } } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } } } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } } } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } } } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } } } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } } } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } } ----------
} } } } } From: Dorota Wadowska
} } } } } Sent: Wednesday, July 17, 2002 2:54 PM
} } } } } To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } } } Subject: TEM-hepes buffer
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } }
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } } } Hi Everybody!
} } } } } I was wondering if any of you have used Hepes buffer for electron
} } } } } microscopy fixation. We used 2% glut in Hepes and we found
} } } } } fixation unsatisfactory. Did any of you experienced any problems
} } } } } using this system?
} } } } } Thanks
} } } } } Dorota
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } }
} } }
}
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} Box 951737
} Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology,
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging and
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research,
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street
New Haven CT 06520
Tel : (203) 785 3681
Fax : (203) 785 7446




From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:25:37 2002



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-urmc.rochester.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 10:19:04 -0400
Subject: antibodies for porcine sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Renaat
The purpose of the peltier cold stage is to
cool the specimen, thereby reducing the vapour pressure of any
volatile liquids, such as water, oils, that it contains. At the
temperatures attainable with a peltier module (perhaps -30oC?) water
or ice cannot be completely stabilized, unless you can match the
partial pressure of water vapour in the chamber atmosphere to the
vapour pressure above ice at the specimen temperature employed. This
may require ESEM and may not be possible using LVSEM. However, the
rate of outgassing of wet specimens may be greatly reduced.
You can also stabilize some low melting point materials, such as
waxes, chocolate or butterfat in food samples by reducing their
temperature.
Chris

} From: "Renaat Dasseville" {renaat.dasseville-at-rug.ac.be}
To: "Microscopy Listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Kathy:

Try the SEROTEC company at www.serotec.co.uk or Veterinary Medical Research
& Development at www.vmrd.com or Upstate Cell Signaling Solutions at
www.upstate.com

Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954


-----Original Message-----
} From: kwalters [mailto:kwalters-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu]
Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2002 4:47 PM
To: microscopy


Hi All,

I have a project requiring that I identify cells grown in culture that were
originally taken from porcine tissue. The cells are suspected to be either
smooth muscle cells, endothelium, or fibroblasts. I am unfamiliar with
which
antibodies would work for these cells. There are many antibodies for these
types of cells, but will they work in porcine tissue? Help.....


Thanks,
Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------



From daemon Fri Jul 19 09:45:33 2002



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 16:37:33 +0200
Subject: Re: XL-30 Sirion x-ray & diffusion pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I don't have experience of the XL30, but so far I know, the XL30 serie
uses Edwards Diffstack diff pumps, which are very good pumps, and don't
backstream a lot. We use it (with Santovac oil) on UHV surface science
instruments without any contamination probleme (and Auger is sensitiv to
carbon...). As we know, contamination comes from the rouhing pump, and a
turbo pump stops better oil from it than a diff one. The question is : how
is the SEM chamber pumped from air pressure down to 1E-2mbar ? Is
the diff pump by pased by an oil seeled rouhing pump ? If so, you will
have a source of contamination independently from the diff or turbo
pump.

To avoid all sources of contamination, you have two designs possible :
-a turbo pump backed by a scroll. The two pumps are stopped when
the specimen chamber is vented, and are put on together to pumpd down
again. I think Leo does it this way.
-a fast entry lock, pumped by a scroll pump, and idealy a turbo
and a scroll on the chamber, or less expensive, a diff and a rotary
vane pump (with alumina foreline trap). I would prefer this design,
because I don't thing it's a good idee for a HR-SEM to put the whole
chamber to air at each specimen exchange.

What is meaningsless is to put a turbo pump as secondary pump, to avoid
contamination and than use a oil sealed pump to pump down the entry lock,
or do the primary vaccum with it, by passing the turbo. Of coarse you can
put a turbo on the fast entry lock too !

In all cases, if you use a rotary vane pump, put a foreline trap on it.


J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

On Thu, 18 Jul 2002, Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Does anyone out there have any experience to share
} about the Philips XL-30 (Sirion or other) with EDAX relative
} to potential consequences of a diffusion pump versus
} a turbo? It seems to me that a turbo pump would
} go a long way to prevent contamination of the
} detector window. I am not sure about this. The
} Sirion isolates the chamber from the diffusion pump
} during specimen exchange. Plus, it has a chilled
} water trap. So this may not be a problem.
}
} gg
}
}



From daemon Fri Jul 19 10:01:21 2002



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 15:54:52 +0100 (GMT Daylight Time)
Subject: Re: SEM Peltier cold stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It is for use in low vacuum mode. When you use it to cool
your hydrated samples they will lose water more slowly.

Dave


On Fri, 19 Jul 2002 13:36:07 +0200 Renaat Dasseville
{renaat.dasseville-at-rug.ac.be} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello,
}
} We recently aquired a JSM5600LV SEM, with a Peltier cold stage. What is the
} purpose of using this decive? All info on this is welcome!
}
} Thanks
}
} Renaat Dasseville
} Protistology & Aquatic Ecology
} Dept. Biology, University Gent
} Krijgslaan 281, S8
} 9000 Gent, B E L G I U M
}
} tel: +32 9 264 85 04
} fax +32 9 264 85 99
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jul 19 11:44:12 2002



From: Sophie Dahan :      sdahan-at-caprion.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 12:35:19 -0400
Subject: Immunofluorescence labeling of liver and lung paraffin sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

We are trying to conduct immunofluorescent labeling of tissue arrays of paraffin sections of multiple tissue types (from Abcam).....we are having problems reducing the background fluorescence in some tissues....liver and lung to name just a few. These are blaring green with FITC secondary antibodies alone!
Would anyone have good (low background noise) protocols for labeling these difficult tissue types?

I thank you in advance for any advice we can get on this.
Sophie

Sophie Dahan, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, Microscopy Lab
Caprion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Montreal, Quebec
Canada



From daemon Fri Jul 19 12:12:40 2002



From: Glen MacDonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 10:02:04 -0700
Subject: Workshop announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Workshop Announcement

Microscopy and Digital Imaging: Advances and Applications.
An afternoon with Dr. Alan Hibbs, Biocon, Ltd., Melbourne, Australia
Thursday, August 1, 2002, Health Sciences Building Room G-417

1:30-2:15 Medical diagnosis using miniaturized confocal microscopes and
a review of current confocal instruments for research.

2:30-3:15 Culture on the stage - growing cells and tissues on the
microscope for live cell imaging.

3:30-4:30 Refreshments and a roundtable discussion of audience questions
regarding microscopy, confocal microscopy, live cell imaging or related
issues: with the audience, Dr. Hibbs, invited UW faculty and staff.

Dr. Hibbs provides training and consulting throughout the world for
confocal microscopy and live cell microscopy.

Presented by:
The University of Washington Core for Communication Research - V.M.
Bloedel Hearing Research Center; Cellular Imaging Facility - Center for
Human Development and Disability; W.M. Keck Center for Advanced Studies
in Neural Signaling.

Refreshments are provided courtesy of Intelligent Imaging Innovations,
Denver, CO
www.intelligent-imaging.com

Please contact Glen MacDonald for more information.
--
Glen MacDonald
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
University of Washington Core for Communication Research
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 357923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
(206) 616-4156 (206) 616-1828 fax
**************************************************************************
C:} The box said "Requires Windows95 or better". So I bought a Macintosh.
**************************************************************************


From daemon Fri Jul 19 14:54:17 2002



From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson :      dsoren-at-umich.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 15:45:40 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: TEM sperm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,

Many thanks for the many very creative approaches to preparing minute
quantities of sperm for TEM. I'll pass them along to the investigator and
give some of them a try.

Dotty

Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
(734)763-1170
FAX (734)763-1166
dsoren-at-umich.edu



From daemon Fri Jul 19 16:33:49 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 12:48:27 -0400
Subject: Jeol 100C TEM for donation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear TEM Community,
We have a Jeol 100C 100 KV TEM serial # EM156009-05, that we are
willing to donate to a nonprofit or educational institution. The instrument
was built in 1974 and is in fair condition. Scope has 3 sets of 50 plate
film cassettes and boxes with built in vacuum film desiccator. It has been
under service contract with Jeol for the last 10 years. We will be
dismantling the scope at the end of this month It will be the donee's
responsibility to come and take the microscope. Interested parties should
send statement of purpose and reasons why we should select them as the donee
for this microscope. Please contact


Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory Manager
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
609-258-5432


Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Fri Jul 19 16:58:27 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 17:56:48 -0400
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Etching Nickel-Titanium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris;

Try contacting Acton Technologies in Pennsylvania, USA, "www.actontech.com."
I didn't see an etch specfically for Ni-Ti but they may offer some
solutions. They make up custom mixtures as well as off-the-shelf products.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu [mailto:cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu]
Sent: Friday, July 19, 2002 9:49 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
July 18, 2002 at 10:00:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cf_reu-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Name: Chris Fanning

Organization: Cornell University

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Ithaca, Ny, US

Question: I am involved in undergraduate materials research on
Nickel-Titanium (50.5% ni). I have prepared an ~1cm cube of nitinol
potted in epoxy to be viewed in an SEM. Our goal is to obtain an ODF
via an EBSD scan. to accomplish this we need to get well defined
patterns in the EBSD. We are getting patterns now but they are not
good enough. We are considering etching and need recomendations for
etching solutions. Many people suggest an HF solution. Are there
alternatives to HF?

Our material prep was, ...
-cut with a slow speed (200 rpm) precision saw, diamond blade
-rough polish with 240, 320, 480(?), 600, 1200 Si-carbide paper by hand
-fine polish with 9u, 3u, 1u on nylon paper - polishing wheel, 200rpm
-fine polish with colloidal silica, by hand
-4 hrs on vibraory polisher with colloidal silica

any advice would be much appreciated! sorry for the long email,

Sincerely,
Chris Fanning

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jul 19 17:30:01 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 15:21:14 -0400
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
} Name: Dennis Pu
}
} Organization: Texas Instruments
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Dallas, Texas 75243
}
} Question: Hello,
} This is not exactly a question for school,
} but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
} My question deals with using microscopy to view
} detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
} grooves. My desire is to research what it might
} take to build an optical record player.
} I'm trying to determine whether it is
} more practical to utilize some kind of optical
} tracking of the groove for real-time play or
} if scanning the whole record in at once and using
} software to recognize the grooves and to produce
} the sound would be better.
} My first step is just to determine ways I
} can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
} consider one economical option that hobbyists
} could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
} archivists can use for transcribing old media
} (vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
} having to use destructive mechanical means.
} I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
} to offer.
}
} Thanks,
} Dennis Pu
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
Dear Dennis,
One problem you'll have is that vinyl doesn't reflect very well, so it
will be hard to use optical microscopy to see the groove shape. Also, the
contrast will be inherently low. Trying to get the 3-D shape of both sides
of the groove will be a lot harder than determining this mechanically with a
macroscopic version of the atomic-force microscope--aka stylus and
cartridge. It might be possible to coat the grooves with a very thin layer
of a reflective metal and get a stereo view; a CD reader must do something
like this, but the information is probably stored in a different manner to
facilitate optical reading. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Fri Jul 19 18:47:32 2002



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 19:36:37 -0400
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dennis,

I collect and restore wind up phonographs. I remember reading
about a project where someone scanned Edison wax cylinder
records with a laser(s) and created recordings that contained
more sounds than could be heard through playing the records
on the original phonographs. The information got recorded by
the original mechanical means, but could not be heard through
mechanical playing. They may have done it with early 78's,
also, but I can't remember. It was a long time ago. FYI, the
cylinder records are "vertically cut", as opposed to "horizontally
cut" like the 78's and the later vinyl records.

Anyway, you might try searching for the information under phonos,
records, etc.

Regards,
Darrell

dpu-at-spdc.ti.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec) on 07/19/2002 09:50:36 AM

To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dpu-at-spdc.ti.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
Thursday, July 18, 2002 at 13:16:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
Name: Dennis Pu

Organization: Texas Instruments

Education: Graduate College

Location: Dallas, Texas 75243

Question: Hello,
This is not exactly a question for school,
but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
My question deals with using microscopy to view
detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
grooves. My desire is to research what it might
take to build an optical record player.
I'm trying to determine whether it is
more practical to utilize some kind of optical
tracking of the groove for real-time play or
if scanning the whole record in at once and using
software to recognize the grooves and to produce
the sound would be better.
My first step is just to determine ways I
can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
consider one economical option that hobbyists
could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
archivists can use for transcribing old media
(vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
having to use destructive mechanical means.
I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
to offer.

Thanks,
Dennis Pu

---------------------------------------------------------------------------







From daemon Fri Jul 19 18:47:33 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jul 2002 19:40:44 -0400
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Denis;

An interesting assignment. However, you should be aware that the grooves
are an analog of the frequency and magnitude of the sounds recorded. If you
image the grooves of a record, say on an electron microscope, you will
notice that it not only has waves horizontally, but waves in the "Z" axis as
well [vertically]. The two surfaces represent the left and right channels
of a stereo recording, and are thus separated.

Your assignment seems to deal with a non-destructive method of getting that
analog data off the surface by some means of "imaging." Electron
microscopy, it seems to me, may image a small area, but generating "numbers"
from that surface will be daunting. And it's numbers you need, not another
analog representation. You may look into "ultrasonic" imaging, at least for
the Z axis, something that works with "Time-of-flight" like radar, but
acoustically. I have an instrument in the laboratory called a "Sonoscan"
made by Sonoscan Corp. that can generate images of surfaces
non-destructively. There is also AFM, [Atomic Force Microscope] but the
scales you need are much more gross. You don't need to measure angstroms,
but probably 10's of microns. One pass of a record needle on that vinyl and
you've just milled off many angstroms. One question you will need to answer
is what the dynamic range of those grooves are from peak to trough so that
you can faithfully reconstruct the sound range in magnitude and the other
question is the rate of change in the grooves per linear measure to
reconstruct the frequency or pitch of the sound.

If you'd like, I would be more than happy to take a piece of vinyl record
and image it in our SEM to give you some notion of the surface you are
dealing with. However, you may have to supply the record, or at least a
piece of it. My wife will not like me sawing up her Frank Sinatra records
for such lofty scientific endeavors, even if it's for a student.

Good luck and publish your results.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com [mailto:dpu-at-spdc.ti.com]
Sent: Friday, July 19, 2002 9:51 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dpu-at-spdc.ti.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
Thursday, July 18, 2002 at 13:16:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
Name: Dennis Pu

Organization: Texas Instruments

Education: Graduate College

Location: Dallas, Texas 75243

Question: Hello,
This is not exactly a question for school,
but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
My question deals with using microscopy to view
detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
grooves. My desire is to research what it might
take to build an optical record player.
I'm trying to determine whether it is
more practical to utilize some kind of optical
tracking of the groove for real-time play or
if scanning the whole record in at once and using
software to recognize the grooves and to produce
the sound would be better.
My first step is just to determine ways I
can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
consider one economical option that hobbyists
could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
archivists can use for transcribing old media
(vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
having to use destructive mechanical means.
I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
to offer.

Thanks,
Dennis Pu

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jul 20 02:33:48 2002



From: drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 02:16:38 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: paraffin wax

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, July
19, 2002 at 22:18:04
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us
Name: Dave Rands

Organization: Lancaster High School/Special Education Department

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Lancaster, California, Los Angeles County

Question: We are having a difficult time getting our paraffin wax to
fill in around our speciman. We have tried several things and have
asked the other science teachers with no success. Can you help?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jul 20 02:33:49 2002



From: Stephen Black :      black-at-mshri.on.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 02:09:46 -0500
Subject: GFP emission lighting system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello everyone,
I read the item about a hand-held system for GFP emission. Our lab has been
using a number of lighting systems for GFP, YFP and RFP that are
manufactured in Hungary by BLS ( http://www.bls-ltd.com/ ).
Some results can be seen at ( http://www.mshri.on.ca/nagy ).Mr. Lajos Laszlo
has many years of experience in the development of biological equipment.
Regards,
Stephen Black


From daemon Sat Jul 20 02:33:49 2002



From: nuruh-at-uccmail.co.tz (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 02:10:45 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:indexing Diffraction Patterns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (nuruh-at-uccmail.co.tz) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, July
19, 2002 at 09:54:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: nuruh-at-uccmail.co.tz
Name: Saleh R

Organization: university of dar es salaam

Education: Graduate College

Location: Dar es salaam, Tanzania

Question: I want to index some spots of an electron diffraction
patterns, which web sites and/or books can help me on this?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jul 20 02:33:55 2002



From: bjbecker-at-ucsd.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 02:15:54 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: larval mussels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (bjbecker-at-ucsd.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, July
19, 2002 at 20:01:15
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: bjbecker-at-ucsd.edu
Name: Bonnie Becker

Organization: Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Education: Graduate College

Location: San Diego, CA USA

Question: I work with larval mussels (on the order of 100 microns),
using laser ablation technology to analyze their chemical structures.
I would like to stick them on a microscope slide such that

1. They don't pop off
2. I can put them on the slide in water and let the water dissolve
without handling them individually.
3. If possible (doubt it), it should be trace metal free.

So, I am looking for a coated microscope slide, but I don't know if I
need poly-l-lysine, silane, or something else? The shells are CaCO3,
and they are on the order of 100 microns.

Thanks!

--

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jul 20 21:27:33 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2002 16:09:04 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Schroedinger's cat aside, some ethical and legal issues about scientific
images will be raised at M&M 2002 in Quebec.

First, at the Presidential Happenings symposium on Monday at 5:00, Colin
Smith of Adobe Systems, Inc. in Canada will present "Harnessing the Power
of Photoshop 7", demonstrating the new and powerful features of this
latest release of Adobe Photoshop. Those of you who saw Julianne Kost's
excellent presentation at M&M 2001 in Long Beach will remember the
audience gasping at both the wonderful features of Photoshop 6 they may
not have known about, and also at the power to potentially manipulate
image data beyond all recognition.

On Tuesday the Problem Solving with the Experts program, beginning at 8:00
am, will be Addressing Issues in Digital Imaging for the
Microscopist: II. In addition to Jose Mascorro speaking about converting
film negatives to digital files and Judy Murphy explaining her solution
for handling huge numbers of digital files in the microscopy laboratory, I
will be presenting a talk, "Adobe Photoshop for Image Adjustment: How to
Start and When to Stop". For the first part I will demonstrate the usual
steps required to prepare digital micrographs and combine them into a
figure plate for publication. Then I hope to stimulate a discussion on the
kinds of manipulation that can be performed on images and the effects
those may have on data, and what this might mean for truth and ethics in
scientific imaging.

On Thursday, beginning at 10:30 am, the Technologists' Forum Roundtable
Discussion will be about the Legal and Ethical Issues of Data Ownership,
focusing on copyrights of images and other forms of data. Barbara
M. Knoppers, a recognized expert in ethics and the law, and other
representatives of academia and industry will be on the panel.

In addition, there may also be a Public Policy Committee session on
Wednesday at 2:00 pm about the copyright and legal issues, so watch the
program and daily newsletter for an announcement.

The MSA Education Committee has recently added a subcommittee on the
Ethics of Digital Image Processing, with the purpose of drafting a white
paper of recommendations.

As you can see, there are lots of opportunities for lively discussion!

See you all in Quebec,
Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Sun Jul 21 17:41:38 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 17:13:56 -0500
Subject: facility support survey at last

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,
Here finally are the results of the facility support survey first put
out at last year's M&M meeting, then on the microscopy and confocal
listservers.
Alltheusualexcuses for the delay. Including formatting the results in
ascii for the email servers.
I did try to think of wise things to say about this, but any comments
would take far too much space for the listservers, so I've decided to
simply present the raw numbers. I hope there will be room to run
these results in Microscopy Today as graphs or something, but I can
make no promises.
%s of course don't add to 100 because of rounding errors.

The analyses of the returned surveys were done by Barbara Foster's
crew MME ( mme-at-mail.map.com ). Many thanks, Barbara and gang.

There is no heading #1 as that contained information that would
identify individual institutions. I discarded that information before
I sent the surveys to MME or indeed did anything else. This
information was collected solely in case of duplicate responses, and
was trashed as soon as it was no longer needed for this purpose.

There is the usual problem with sample size. I hope the information
will be useful in spite of this.
I also hope some vestige of legible organization survives the email process ...
Phil

2. Nature of institution
COUNT %
Academic 50 89
Other 4 7
Private research 2 4
Commercial 1 2
56 Total Respondents
57 Total Responses

3. Type of facility
COUNT %
Institution core 32 58
Departmental 19 35
Other 5 9
Satellite 1 2
55 Total Respondents
57 Total Responses
4. Predominate work
COUNT %
Biological 53 87
Materials 27 44
61 Total Respondents
80 Total Responses

5. User Base
COUNT %
Multi - user 56 93
Service 47 78
60 Total Respondents
103 Total Responses

6. Type of microscopes
COUNT %
TEM 48 80
SEM 36 60
Optical 18 30
Confocal 18 30
Other 18 30
Other Optical 16 27
FESEM 12 20
ESEM or LV 12 20
Other Confocal 5 8
Scanning Probe 5 8
FETEM 3 5
Other Scanning Probe 3 5
60 Total Respondents
194 Total Responses

7. Salaries
COUNT %
100% Your Institution 31 50
80% Your Institution 6 10
50% Your Institution 5 8
100% User fees 4 6
20% Grants 4 6
100% Grants 4 6
10% Your Institution 3 5
20% User fees 3 5
25% User fees 3 5
30% User fees 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
25% Grants 3 5
70% Your Institution 2 3
75% Your Institution 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
10% Grants 2 3
50% Grants 2 3
Other 2 3
20% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
90% Your Institution 1 2
Other 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
Other User fee percentage 1 2
30% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
70% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2
Other Grants 1 2
62 Total Respondents
98 Total Responses

8. Instrument maintenance
COUNT %
100% User fees 19 31
100% Your Institution 18 30
50% Your Institution 6 9
50% Grants 4 6
10% Your Institution 3 5
90% Your Institution 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
60% User fees 3 5
20% Your Institution 2 3
40% Your Institution 2 3
Other 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
80% User fees 2 3
90% User fees 2 3
10% Grants 2 3
20% Grants 2 3
100% Grants 2 3
25% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
25% User fees 1 2
30% User fees 1 2
60% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2
61 Total Respondents
84 Total Responses

9. Replacement of existing equipment
COUNT %
100% Grants 16 30
100% Your Institution 11 20
50% Your Institution 6 11
50% Grants 5 9
60% Grants 5 9
20% Your Institution 4 7
30% Your Institution 4 7
10% User fees 4 7
100% User fees 4 7
25% Your Institution 3 5
40% Your Institution 3 5
20% User fees 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
10% Your Institution 2 4
70% Grants 2 4
75% Grants 2 4
90% Grants 2 4
40% User fees 1 2
75% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
90% User fees 1 2
10% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
80% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2
56 Total Respondents
87 Total Responses

10. Purchasing of new equipment
COUNT %
100% Grants 21 37
100% Your Institution 9 16
50% Your Institution 6 11
50% Grants 6 11
20% Your Institution 5 9
30% Your Institution 5 9
70% Grants 4 7
20% User fees 3 5
60% Grants 3 5
80% Grants 3 5
10% Your Institution 2 4
25% Your Institution 2 4
40% Your Institution 2 4
75% Your Institution 2 4
10% User fees 2 4
30% User fees 2 4
100% User fees 2 4
10% Grants 2 4
90% Grants 2 4
60% Your Institution 1 2
70% Your Institution 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
25% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2
57 Total Respondents
89 Total Responses

11. Supplies
COUNT %
100% User fees 28 46
100% Your Institution 9 15
50% Grants 5 8
80% Your Institution 4 7
10% Your Institution 3 5
50% Your Institution 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
90% User fees 3 5
10% Grants 3 5
90% Your Institution 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
30% User fees 2 3
20% Grants 2 3
100% Grants 2 3
20% Your Institution 1 2
25% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
40% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
20% User fees 1 2
25% User fees 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
70% Grants 1 2
90% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2
61 Total Respondents
85 Total Responses

12. Operating expenses
COUNT %
100% User fees 19 40
100% Your Institution 16 33
50% Your Institution 6 12
50% User fees 6 12
100% Grants 3 6
20% Your Institution 1 2
40% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
80% Your Institution 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
20% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2
48 Total Respondents
59 Total Responses
--
}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, AMFSC and BBPIC microscopy facilities
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Sun Jul 21 19:57:44 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 17:53:27 -0700
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Will the transactions at the conference be available
either electronically or via print? This would be most
interesting.

I'm curious about the distinction between ethics and
legal issues. Image analysis technology can produce
legal data in cases where it was not possible in the past.
I don't see that this has anything to do with ethics. It
seems to me to be an issue of what can technology do
and then what will the legal system accept? There are numerous
instances of this issue. So far as I know, technology won.

gary g.



From daemon Sun Jul 21 23:17:42 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 21:13:37 -0700
Subject: Amray 1830 final aperture holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have one of these assemblies and do not need it.

If someone can use it, please let me know. It only
fits the conical lens 1800-series units (1830)...not the flat
lens 1800-series units.



From daemon Mon Jul 22 04:47:01 2002



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 10:36:37 +0100
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dennis

when I saw your query, I thought I had seen such a technology mentioned
in a magazine. If you look at the websites below there are companies
which are already using laser scanning technology to read vinyl LPs.

http://www.stereotimes.com/turn030300.shtm

http://avconvert.com/laserturntable/

This would suggest that this is a mature technology but the 'kit' is
very expensive.

Malcolm Haswell


"by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec" wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (dpu-at-spdc.ti.com) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
} Thursday, July 18, 2002 at 13:16:32
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
} Name: Dennis Pu
}
} Organization: Texas Instruments
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Dallas, Texas 75243
}
} Question: Hello,
} This is not exactly a question for school,
} but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
} My question deals with using microscopy to view
} detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
} grooves. My desire is to research what it might
} take to build an optical record player.
} I'm trying to determine whether it is
} more practical to utilize some kind of optical
} tracking of the groove for real-time play or
} if scanning the whole record in at once and using
} software to recognize the grooves and to produce
} the sound would be better.
} My first step is just to determine ways I
} can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
} consider one economical option that hobbyists
} could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
} archivists can use for transcribing old media
} (vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
} having to use destructive mechanical means.
} I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
} to offer.
}
} Thanks,
} Dennis Pu


From daemon Mon Jul 22 05:31:28 2002



From: :      PHYSIOL4-at-sun.ac.za
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 12:13:45 +0200
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: paraffin wax

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param} Hi there


What kind of specimens are you working with? I'm not sure what
you meant by " {/color} We are having a difficult time getting our paraffin
wax to fill in around our speciman" - do you mean the wax won't
literally surround your specimen, or do you mean the wax won't go
{italic} inside {/italic} the specimen? If you mean it won't go inside the specimen,
you can try placing your specimen, together with the wax, under a
vacuum overnight. If this still doesn't work.... maybe your tissue isn't
fixed properly?


Hope this helps! {color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param}

{nofill}

"When life hands you a lemon ... bring out the tequila and salt."


From daemon Mon Jul 22 08:37:40 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 09:27:50 -0400
Subject: RE: Immunofluorescence labeling of liver and lung paraffin sectio

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Sophie,

Nice problem. First a question. How does one contrive a microarray
solution without using micro-sections? And I'm not trying to be funny.

Found these by searching Google for {bilirubin autofluorescence}

http://info.med.yale.edu/labmed/faculty/labs/krauselab/HumanBMliver.pdf

The above has a specific reference to autofluorescense in liver.

http://info.med.yale.edu/labmed/faculty/labs/krauselab/miceliver.pdf

The above is even better (photomicrographs).

The liver is a biochemical factory with one of its functions focused on
detoxification. It's association with degradation of hemoglobin is the
source of your consternation. If you want to defeat the autofluorescence,
you will have to post-process the molecules to "quench" them chemically
without destroying any of the cellular antigens. Since the source of this
background is most likely large quantities of resonant molecules, I would
think a bath in bromine (additive) might do the trick, or a hydrogenation
(additive too but perhaps more dangerous), or a hydration, but the last is
usually hydrolytic. This starts as a problem in organic chemistry and ends
with a choice of a relatively mild alternative.

The folks at Yale seem to have some experience here, you might ask them
directly for help on the above.

I think!

Good luck,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/



} ----------
} From: Sophie Dahan
} Sent: Friday, July 19, 2002 12:35 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Immunofluorescence labeling of liver and lung paraffin
} sections
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} We are trying to conduct immunofluorescent labeling of tissue arrays of
} paraffin sections of multiple tissue types (from Abcam).....we are having
} problems reducing the background fluorescence in some tissues....liver and
} lung to name just a few. These are blaring green with FITC secondary
} antibodies alone!
} Would anyone have good (low background noise) protocols for labeling these
} difficult tissue types?
}
} I thank you in advance for any advice we can get on this.
} Sophie
}
} Sophie Dahan, Ph.D.
} Senior Scientist, Microscopy Lab
} Caprion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
} Montreal, Quebec
} Canada
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 22 09:50:58 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 10:41:49 -0400
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Here's the REAL dope, answering your question with a photo and a URL.

Hope it helps: http://members01.chello.se/christer.hamp/phono/poliak.html

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


} ----------
} From: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
} Sent: Friday, July 19, 2002 9:50 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Imaging Grooves in Records
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (dpu-at-spdc.ti.com) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
} Thursday, July 18, 2002 at 13:16:32
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
} Email: dpu-at-spdc.ti.com
} Name: Dennis Pu
}
} Organization: Texas Instruments
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Dallas, Texas 75243
}
} Question: Hello,
} This is not exactly a question for school,
} but I hope we're all here to learn and explore.
} My question deals with using microscopy to view
} detailed images of the inside of vinyl record
} grooves. My desire is to research what it might
} take to build an optical record player.
} I'm trying to determine whether it is
} more practical to utilize some kind of optical
} tracking of the groove for real-time play or
} if scanning the whole record in at once and using
} software to recognize the grooves and to produce
} the sound would be better.
} My first step is just to determine ways I
} can use microscopy to even see inside groove. I'd
} consider one economical option that hobbyists
} could tinker with at home, and one "best" solution
} archivists can use for transcribing old media
} (vinyl, wax cylinders, acetates, etc...) without
} having to use destructive mechanical means.
} I'd appreciate any suggestions you have
} to offer.
}
} Thanks,
} Dennis Pu
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 22 10:09:33 2002



From: swiding :      swiding-at-temple.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 11:03:09 -0400
Subject: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello List,

This is not a technical problem. I am seaching for graphics
software for creating\printing posters and banners. We have poster
sessions several times a year for the students. We were using an old
DOS program but our computer lab has been upgraded(OS + network printers)
and I can't get the program to work with the network printers.

Does anyone have any suggestions for this software application? It has to
be user friendly because of the students. And it has to be cheap because
of the budget.


Thanks,

Steve Widing
EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
Biology Department
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA



From daemon Mon Jul 22 12:00:47 2002



From: JHoffpa464-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 12:54:24 -0400
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: paraffin wax

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


"When life hands you a lemon ... bring out the tequila and salt."
nice thing to say to underage kids!!!!!!


From daemon Mon Jul 22 12:49:10 2002



From: Brian Matsumoto :      matsumot-at-lifesci.ucsb.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 10:43:02 -0700
Subject: Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Course Announcement for Microscopy Workshop, west coast
Deadline to enroll August 7, 2002

The seminar / workshop will be an intensive lecture/laboratory series that
will enable participants to develop theoretical and hands-on expertise with
light microscopes. Attendees will closely interact with the instructors
while using modern research grade microscopes, cameras, and computers.

The Integrated Microscopy Facility, operated by the Department of Molecular,
Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB) and the Neuroscience Research
Institute (NRI), is offering a workshop on modern techniques in microscopy
and electronic imaging. This 5-day workshop will be offered from September
9th through September 13th, 2001 and will consist of lectures and laboratory
exercises that will run from 9 am to approximately 5 pm each day.

The seminars and laboratories will cover basic optical theory and how it
pertains to increasing contrast (signal to noise ratio) in biological
samples. Fundamental techniques such as fluorescence, phase contrast,
Nomarski differential interference contrast, and darkfield imaging will be
taught and attendees will use microscopes equipped to perform these optical
enhancement techniques. In addition, the theory and practice of electronic
image acquisition (analog and digital) will be discussed and attendees will
work with low-light cameras, digital image processing computers, and
morphometric programs. There are five research grade microscopes, five
electronic imaging cameras, three computer workstations, and one confocal
microscope. With a maximum enrollment of 10 students, there will be ample
opportunity to work with all of the microscopes and cameras. For those so
interested, intensive hands-on instruction and guidance on the confocal
microscope will be provided. Working together with the instructors, the
participants will gain theoretical and practical experience on applying
modern optical and computational techniques for biological research.

September 9th
Morning Lab and Seminar: Fundamentals of Microscopy. Parts of the
microscope, obtaining Köhler illumination and the nature of light.
Afternoon Lab and Seminar: Optical Enhancement of the Image. Phase contrast,
darkfield, and Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast.
After 6pm: Optional review and lab work.

September 10th
Morning Lab and Seminar: Fluorescence microscopy: Selection of
fluorochromes, filters and objectives.
Afternoon Lab and Seminar: Role of specimen preparation in Fluorescence
microscopy. Introduction to digital microscopy.
After 6pm: Optional review and lab work.

September 11th
Morning Lab and Seminar: Image Acquisition for Microscopy: Selection of
electronic cameras.
Afternoon Lab and Seminar: Computer Enhancement of the image: Uses of image
processing.
After 6 pm: Optional review and lab work.

September 12th
Morning Lab and Seminar: Confocal Microscopy and Deconvolution
Afternoon Lab and Seminar: Continuation with Confocal Microscopy and 3D
imaging
After 6pm: Beach Barbecue

September 13th
Morning Lab Review
Afternoon Lab Optional Topics (attendees choice)

To find out more about the course and to register, please go to the
following web site:

http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/mcdb/events/imaging_workshop/index.php

===============================
Brian Matsumoto, Ph.D.
Research Biologist
Dept. MCDB & NRI
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106

Office Phone 805-893-8702
FAX 805-893-4724



From daemon Mon Jul 22 12:49:10 2002



From: jinsong wu :      jinsong.wu-at-asu.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 10:33:20 -0700
Subject: liquid He transferring kids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, Listers:

We have a new liquid-He holder. However, it takes three men to
work together for about one and half hours for every filling up of the
holder. At the same time, there is high risk to destroy the vacuum.
Then we have merely about 30 minutes' working time.

Please let me know your kind suggestions on the possible techniques
of the transferring of the liquid He from the tank to the holder.
For example, is it possible to put the He tank in near room and use
some transferring kits connecting the tank and the holder so as to be
able to work continuously?

Any replies from commercial sources or vendors are welcome to my
personal email address: jinsong.wu-at-asu.edu.

Thanks a lot,

jinsong wu
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-1504

Tel: 480-965-2535 (o)





From daemon Mon Jul 22 12:56:37 2002



From: Gabriel A. Rosa :      cimic-at-bg.fcen.uba.ar
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 14:50:40 -0300
Subject: PhiliipsTEM 301 Spare part Help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, I need a piece of the TEM Philips 301, and I need
to know if someone can donate it, or sell it, it is the
ROLL MEMBRANE of the camera plates, the serial number is 5322 360
40071

Thanks



Gabriel Adriano Rosa
Area Servicios Generales
Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas
Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires
Ciudad Universitaria, 4 piso, Pab. II,
C1428EHA, Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA
TE -(54-11)-4576-3349
FAX (54-11)-4576-3384
e-mail micros-at-bg.fcen.uba.ar




From daemon Mon Jul 22 13:58:11 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 08:50:33 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary Gaugler wrote:

} Will the transactions at the conference be available
} either electronically or via print? This would be most
} interesting.
}
} I'm curious about the distinction between ethics and
} legal issues. Image analysis technology can produce
} legal data in cases where it was not possible in the past.
} I don't see that this has anything to do with ethics. It
} seems to me to be an issue of what can technology do
} and then what will the legal system accept? There are numerous
} instances of this issue. So far as I know, technology won.

I hope to have a transcript of these sessions available in print at some
point.

One thing I hope we can do is make the distinction between manipulation of
"native" images (the definition of which is also a question) for
publication as a representation of true image, and "image analysis" for
ferreting out information from these images.

A few organizations have guidelines for image manipulation:

1. The criminal justice system has a Scientific Working Group on Imaging
Technologies (SWGIT) that has come up with recommendations for capture,
storage, processing, analysis, transmission and output of
images. http://www.for-swg.org/it_files/swgit_guidelines.html

2. The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) has a general code
of ethics and a statement specifically about digital media at
http://www.nppa.org/services/bizpract/digitalethics.html See also the
DigitalCustom Model Ethics Guidelines at
http://www.digitalcustom.com/howto/mediaguidelines.htm for suggested
guidelines for journalists.

3. The Department of Defense once had a Memorandum on Digital Manipulation
that appeared in the Military Review. Although I have not managed to get
my hands on the original, it is reproduced in part at
http://media.gn.apc.org/manidod.html

4. Other organizations, such as the North American Nature Photographers
Association (NANPA) have ethics committees that are trying to formulate
guidelines, or at least a way to label what sorts of manipulations have
been performed on images. See a couple of papers and discussions at
http://www.nanpa.org/committees/ethics/manip_intro.html

In addition, several agencies, such as the FDA, have guidelines for the
handling, transmission and storage of images, especially those potentially
involved in legal issues. In those cases, each step in acquiring,
storing, moving and manipulation of images must be documented, as well as
a record of anyone who has accessed those files.

Generally, these organizations have had to come up with guidelines for
images that may be used in legal proceedings. However, research scientists
generally operate in a self-policing environment, where a code of ethics
encourages presentation of the "truth". All kinds of data can be
manipulated in many ways, either fraudently or innocently. It's the
innocent/uninformed/untrained use of digital image manipulation that
scares me the most!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From daemon Mon Jul 22 15:53:13 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 15:45:27 -0500
Subject: support survey again

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It spite of my best efforts to format the survey with Geneva
fixed-width font in ascii, it still came across to some folks (many?)
all disarranged. So Here is the survey reformatted by J Quinn at SUNY
(Stony Brook, I believe).
Phil
**************************************************

2. Nature of institution
COUNT %
Academic 50 89
Other 4 7
Private research 2 4
Commercial 1 2

56 Total Respondents
57 Total Responses

**************************************************

3. Type of facility
COUNT %
Institution core 32 58
Departmental 19 35
Other 5 9
Satellite 1 2

55 Total Respondents
57 Total Responses

**************************************************

4. Predominate work
COUNT %
Biological 53 87
Materials 27 44

61 Total Respondents
80 Total Responses

**************************************************

5. User Base
COUNT %
Multi - user 56 93
Service 47 78

60 Total Respondents
103 Total Responses

**************************************************

6. Type of microscopes
COUNT %
TEM 48 80
SEM 36 60
Optical 18 30
Confocal 18 30
Other 18 30
Other Optical 16 27
FESEM 12 20
ESEM or LV 12 20
Other Confocal 5 8
Scanning Probe 5 8
FETEM 3 5
Other Scanning Probe 3 5

60 Total Respondents
194 Total Responses

**************************************************

7. Salaries
COUNT %
100% Your Institution 31 50
80% Your Institution 6 10
50% Your Institution 5 8
100% User fees 4 6
20% Grants 4 6
100% Grants 4 6
10% Your Institution 3 5
20% User fees 3 5
25% User fees 3 5
30% User fees 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
25% Grants 3 5
70% Your Institution 2 3
75% Your Institution 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
10% Grants 2 3
50% Grants 2 3
Other 2 3
20% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
90% Your Institution 1 2
Other 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
Other User fee percentage 1 2
30% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
70% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2
Other Grants 1 2

62 Total Respondents
98 Total Responses

**************************************************

8. Instrument maintenance
COUNT %
100% User fees 19 31
100% Your Institution 18 30
50% Your Institution 6 9
50% Grants 4 6
10% Your Institution 3 5
90% Your Institution 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
60% User fees 3 5
20% Your Institution 2 3
40% Your Institution 2 3
Other 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
80% User fees 2 3
90% User fees 2 3
10% Grants 2 3
20% Grants 2 3
100% Grants 2 3
25% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
25% User fees 1 2
30% User fees 1 2
60% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2
61 Total Respondents
84 Total Responses

**************************************************

9. Replacement of existing equipment
COUNT %
100% Grants 16 30
100% Your Institution 11 20
50% Your Institution 6 11
50% Grants 5 9
60% Grants 5 9
20% Your Institution 4 7
30% Your Institution 4 7
10% User fees 4 7
100% User fees 4 7
25% Your Institution 3 5
40% Your Institution 3 5
20% User fees 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
10% Your Institution 2 4
70% Grants 2 4
75% Grants 2 4
90% Grants 2 4
40% User fees 1 2
75% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
90% User fees 1 2
10% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
80% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2

56 Total Respondents
87 Total Responses

**************************************************

10. Purchasing of new equipment
COUNT %
100% Grants 21 37
100% Your Institution 9 16
50% Your Institution 6 11
50% Grants 6 11
20% Your Institution 5 9
30% Your Institution 5 9
70% Grants 4 7
20% User fees 3 5
60% Grants 3 5
80% Grants 3 5
10% Your Institution 2 4
25% Your Institution 2 4
40% Your Institution 2 4
75% Your Institution 2 4
10% User fees 2 4
30% User fees 2 4
100% User fees 2 4
10% Grants 2 4
90% Grants 2 4
60% Your Institution 1 2
70% Your Institution 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
25% Grants 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
75% Grants 1 2

57 Total Respondents
89 Total Responses

**************************************************

11. Supplies
COUNT %
100% User fees 28 46
100% Your Institution 9 15
50% Grants 5 8
80% Your Institution 4 7
10% Your Institution 3 5
50% Your Institution 3 5
50% User fees 3 5
90% User fees 3 5
10% Grants 3 5
90% Your Institution 2 3
10% User fees 2 3
30% User fees 2 3
20% Grants 2 3
100% Grants 2 3
20% Your Institution 1 2
25% Your Institution 1 2
30% Your Institution 1 2
40% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
20% User fees 1 2
25% User fees 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
40% Grants 1 2
70% Grants 1 2
90% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2

61 Total Respondents
85 Total Responses

**************************************************

12. Operating expenses
COUNT %
100% User fees 19 40
100% Your Institution 16 33
50% Your Institution 6 12
50% User fees 6 12
100% Grants 3 6
20% Your Institution 1 2
40% Your Institution 1 2
60% Your Institution 1 2
80% Your Institution 1 2
40% User fees 1 2
60% User fees 1 2
80% User fees 1 2
20% Grants 1 2
Other 1 2

48 Total Respondents
59 Total Responses

**************************************************


From daemon Mon Jul 22 15:53:14 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 16:44:47 -0400
Subject: RE: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Gary,

In imaging, it would be unethical for a female model to hand deliver a photo
which showed an amplified chest prior to surgery, unless she stipulated that
she is hopeful that she will look as she appears in the photo after her
surgery is done. If, on the other hand, she sent such photos thru the mail
without an accompanying declaration, she might be arrested for fraudulent
use of the mail.

It is both legal and ethical for the model to send such an amplified photo
to past and future clients and ask if she has surgery and alters her
appearance as in the photo whether she will be more or less employable.

She can be both legal and ethical with her boyfriends by sending them such a
photo and asking whether she will be more or less enjoyable after such an
alteration.

It would be illegal for the model to represent herself with an
enhanced chest in a public advertisement without the declaration. She would
also be leaving herself legally liable is she, unethically, used such a
photo to acquire employment on the pretence that she had the chest in the
photograph unless she arrived at the job with a note from her physician
attesting to the fact that between the sending of the photograph, her
employment and her arrival, her chest had suffered a deflation.

I cannot think of anything more along these lines now. I would have
to see the original and altered photographs before reaching any other
conclusions.

They may be sent to the address below.

If a male model were to act in the manner of the female described
above, let the employer and boyfriend beware, there is NO legal or ethical
issue that can save them.

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/






} ----------
} From: Gary Gaugler
} Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2002 8:53 PM
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Will the transactions at the conference be available
} either electronically or via print? This would be most
} interesting.
}
} I'm curious about the distinction between ethics and
} legal issues. Image analysis technology can produce
} legal data in cases where it was not possible in the past.
} I don't see that this has anything to do with ethics. It
} seems to me to be an issue of what can technology do
} and then what will the legal system accept? There are numerous
} instances of this issue. So far as I know, technology won.
}
} gary g.
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Jul 22 16:32:59 2002



From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki :      kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 17:26:28 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: service center for Leitz Optical Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

We have a Leitz Ortholux II optical microscope that needs to be
serviced. I tried to contact the manufacturer for the a list of service
center nearby, but the 2 companies they indicated are possibly
out-of-business (phone number not working). Can someone indicate some
service center near tho my area, Albany-NY? What we need is clean/align
the optics and fix a mechanical problem with the stage. Regards,

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o



From daemon Mon Jul 22 16:33:39 2002



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 14:27:53 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Adobe Illustrator is the software of choice for making posters. It is
available at academic discount for educators for about $80-$150 or so.
Other option would be to buy an older used version from somone. You
should be able to get it quite cheaply.

Other software you might find economic and useful is from www.jasc.com
they have paintshop pro which is similar to photoshop, but much cheaper.


\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Mon, 22 Jul 2002, swiding wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello List,
}
} This is not a technical problem. I am seaching for graphics
} software for creating\printing posters and banners. We have poster
} sessions several times a year for the students. We were using an old
} DOS program but our computer lab has been upgraded(OS + network printers)
} and I can't get the program to work with the network printers.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions for this software application? It has to
} be user friendly because of the students. And it has to be cheap because
} of the budget.
}
}
} Thanks,
}
} Steve Widing
} EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
} Biology Department
} Temple University
} Philadelphia, PA
}
}



From daemon Mon Jul 22 18:13:16 2002



From: Larry Hanke :      hanke-at-mee-inc.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 18:00:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I suggest that you look into Paint Shop Pro from JASC
Software. This is a Photoshop-type program with a lot of
functionality and low price ~$100US. I think that the
program can be downloaded for evaluation at jasc.com. We use
this program extensively for posters, image processing,
printing, etc.
--
Larry D. Hanke, P.E.
Materials Evaluation and Engineering, Inc.
Practical Solutions Through Technology and Innovation
http://www.mee-inc.com (763) 449-8870




From daemon Mon Jul 22 20:22:21 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 18:12:20 -0400
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/22/02 11:03 AM, swiding at swiding-at-temple.edu wrote:

}
} This is not a technical problem. I am seaching for graphics
} software for creating\printing posters and banners. We have poster
} sessions several times a year for the students. We were using an old
} DOS program but our computer lab has been upgraded(OS + network printers)
} and I can't get the program to work with the network printers.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions for this software application? It has to
} be user friendly because of the students. And it has to be cheap because
} of the budget.
}
Dear Steve,
I have used PrintMaster for this and other applications. They do not
make a version for Mac (boo, hiss) but their Windows version works well, is
not expensive, and is easy to use. Good luck. I am not affiliated with
this product or its manufacturer (not even as a user, since I now have an
iBook).
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Mon Jul 22 20:24:30 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 18:16:19 -0400
Subject: Re: liquid He transferring kids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/22/02 1:33 PM, jinsong wu at jinsong.wu-at-asu.edu wrote:

} We have a new liquid-He holder. However, it takes three men to
} work together for about one and half hours for every filling up of the
} holder. At the same time, there is high risk to destroy the vacuum.
} Then we have merely about 30 minutes' working time.
}
} Please let me know your kind suggestions on the possible techniques
} of the transferring of the liquid He from the tank to the holder.
} For example, is it possible to put the He tank in near room and use
} some transferring kits connecting the tank and the holder so as to be
} able to work continuously?
}
} Any replies from commercial sources or vendors are welcome to my
} personal email address: jinsong.wu-at-asu.edu.
}
} Thanks a lot,
}
Dear Jinsong,
Could you please post a summary of the replies you get to the list
(assuming I'm not the only one interested)? TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Tue Jul 23 04:17:18 2002



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 11:07:37 +0200
Subject: Software for TEM in Materials Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
I asked once before but didn't get many replies.

What software are people using for interpreting TEM images and diffraction
patterns?

I am here NOT including simulation of HREM or simulation of dislocation
images in CTEM.

What I am particularly interested in is simulation of Kikuchi patterns and
SAD patterns, and plotting of stereographic projections for determining
dislocation line directions.

Do the makers of Desktop Microscopist still exist? Is there a current
version of this package? What is it like? Earlier versions tended to have
rather too many bugs and a tendency for unexpected crashes. Nevertheless, it
did lots of useful stuff.

Is Ideal Microscope still for sale? This is also handy for some things.

It doesn't have to be for Mac, it could also be for PC.

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 05:02:50 2002



From: Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 11:56:53 +0200
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Steve,

why not use Powerpoint? OK, it is from Microsoft, but as most universities have a campus
licence for MS Office, and most students have it on their personal computers, too, it might be
a solution. And the students have to learn to work with all Office-programs anyway...

:-) Torsten




Torsten Fregin

Universität Hamburg - Zoologisches Institut
Abt. Neurophysiologie
AG Wiese - Raum 413
Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3
20146 Hamburg, Germany
Telefon *49-(0)40-42838-3931
Fax *49-(0)40-42838-3937
eMail Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
Torsten-at-Fregin.de





From daemon Tue Jul 23 07:02:07 2002



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 07:53:46 -0400
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

Another *REALLY* inexpensive solution that faculty and students here
have been using for posters has been Power Point (Really inexpensive if you
have MS Office already). Now power point has very little image manipulation
capability, so we fiddle images (EM, LM, Photo's, Graphs, Gels, etc.) else
where (Corel Photopaint, Adobe Photoshop, etc.), save as JPEG's or TIFF's
etc. and insert in Power Point. But Power point is easy to arrange images
and text.



} This is not a technical problem. I am seaching for graphics
} software for creating\printing posters and banners. We have poster
} sessions several times a year for the students. We were using an old
} DOS program but our computer lab has been upgraded(OS + network printers)
} and I can't get the program to work with the network printers.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions for this software application? It has to
} be user friendly because of the students. And it has to be cheap because
} of the budget.
}
}
} Thanks,
}
} Steve Widing
} EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
} Biology Department
} Temple University
} Philadelphia, PA



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From daemon Tue Jul 23 07:12:37 2002



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 14:04:59 +0200
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 08:42:52 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 23 Jul 2002 08:34:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
"Monson, Frederick C." {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu}
CC: "'List-Microscopy'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 2.1 (Mac)
X-Priority: 3
MIME-Version: 1.0
Reply-To: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by sparc5.microscopy.com id IAA08357



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 23 Jul 2002 08:34:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Fred,
I think your example is in extremely poor taste. What is legal and ethical involving one's own body is between that individual and their doctor, dentist, etc. and none of your business. This has little or nothing to do with scientific data.
Debby Sherman

On Monday, July 22, 2002 3:44 PM, Monson, Frederick C. {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu} wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Jul 23 08:42:57 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 23 Jul 2002 08:36:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id IAA08385
for dist-Microscopy; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:41:54 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id IAA08380
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail1-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:41:24 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from herald.cc.purdue.edu (herald.cc.purdue.edu [128.210.11.29])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with ESMTP id IAA08373
for {microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com} ; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:41:12 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from 128.210.121.247 (lsmf07.btny.purdue.edu [128.210.121.247])
by herald.cc.purdue.edu (8.12.3/8.12.3/herald) with SMTP id g6NDaa4P023935;
Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:36:37 -0500 (EST)
"message to: MSA list" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 2.1 (Mac)
X-Priority: 3
MIME-Version: 1.0
Reply-To: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by sparc5.microscopy.com id IAA08374



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 23 Jul 2002 08:36:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Steve,

Microsoft Powerpoint works fairly well if the posters are not huge. You just have to give the program enough memory. Go to Page Setup and set it for banner or custom (upper left) with your poster size inserted. This program is not as good as some drawing programs but is readily available on most computers and your printers should be able to handle it. Just remember that sometimes printers have a hardtime printing the background color. If that happens just make a box the size of the background and fill it with the color or pattern of preference. It should print fine.
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907

On Monday, July 22, 2002 10:03 AM, swiding-at-temple.edu wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Jul 23 08:54:41 2002



From: Christopher S. Zurenko :      czurenko-at-khri3.khri.med.umich.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:47:59 -0400
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id IAA08443
for dist-Microscopy; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:53:27 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id IAA08439
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail1-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:52:56 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from changeofhabit.mr.itd.umich.edu (changeofhabit.mr.itd.umich.edu [141.211.144.17])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with ESMTP id IAA08431
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 08:52:44 -0500 (CDT)
Received: from mail.khri.med.umich.edu (khri3.khri.med.umich.edu [141.214.13.203])
by changeofhabit.mr.itd.umich.edu (8.9.3/3.2r) with ESMTP id JAA16902
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:48:09 -0400 (EDT)
Received: from KHRI3/SpoolDir by mail.khri.med.umich.edu (Mercury 1.48);
23 Jul 02 09:48:09 -0400
Received: from SpoolDir by KHRI3 (Mercury 1.48); 23 Jul 02 09:48:02 -0400


I certainly do not have as much experience as many on this list
serve but with my training and experience to date, I have never
heard the term "optical microscopy" used. Microscopy using an
incandescent or "normal" bulb is typically referred to as "light
microscopy" or "bright-field microscopy".

Someone please correct me if I'm in error.

Cheers!

------------------------------------------
Christopher S. Zurenko
Research Assistant
Kresge Hearing Research Institute
The University of Michigan Medical School
MSRB 3, Room 9303
1150 W. Medical Center Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0648
Lab Phone: 734-763-9680
czurenko-at-umich.edu
http://www.khri.med.umich.edu/research/raphael_lab/index.htm


From daemon Tue Jul 23 08:55:41 2002



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:53:45 -0700
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I will propose a rough definition to be shredded, confirmed and clarified
by others.

First of all, I'm going to call it "light microscopy" instead of "optical
microscopy".

Light microscopy involves radiation from the UV (approximately 320 nm)
through the infra red (approximately 1100 nm). This can be transmittance
or reflectance. Typically, we mean by use of compound optics.


____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 10:27:08 2002



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:19:01 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How about "ROM"? ("Regular Old Microscopy"?!)

Tamara

On Tue, 23 Jul 2002, Ian MacLaren wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
} a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?
}
} Optical microscopy?
}
} Light Microscopy?
}
} Light optical microscopy?
}
} Something else?
}
} The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
} microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
} else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.
}
} What should I use then?
}
} Best wishes
}
} Ian MacLaren
} N.B. New address
} TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
} Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
} Tel: +49 6151 162894
} ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/
}
}
}

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|



From daemon Tue Jul 23 10:32:11 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 11:25:29 -0400
Subject: RE: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


OK-1. I was told, by friendly, and private, warnings, that my example would
get a response like this. Well, OK-2. I have spent the last 20 minutes
carefully crafting an appropriate response, but in the end I decided to
remain 'friendly' rather than speak to a parenthetic, and impertinent, side
issue. Thus, the result of those minutes resides in my 'Draft' folder.

Now I want it clearly understood, that if I had received THIS message in
private, that I would have apologized, sincerely, for the pain I had caused.
But it wasn't friendly either.

The issue, however, IS imaging and how processing/alteration relate to
ethical and legal issues. I chose an example, BECAUSE it should have
focused on the many effects imaging/images have on our lives.

Finally, the fact that I married a beautifully proportioned woman when I was
25 was, when all was said and done, 95% her choice and less than 5% mine,
because I did listen to the opinions of others while I basked in the light
of my good fortune. Also, my Mother, at the age of 67, had a breast
reduction (is that Politically correct?), which was more for her comfort
and less for her appearance. Both of these occurrences must be the reason
for my lack of understanding that our discussion was about imaging and not
body parts, and that much of our imaging has been and will continue to be of
body parts from animals, people and automobile engines.

So let's stick to the issue, and don't make me send the other message which
was about defending my right of subject (the FIRST amendment???) selection.
And, if you don't like my choice of example, pick a better one and let's
discuss the real issue.

Respectfully,

Fred Monson

P.S. I will not comment further on this parenthetic unless suitably
provoked!

} ----------
} From: Debby Sherman
} Reply To: Debby Sherman
} Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 9:34 AM
} To: 'Gary Gaugler'; Monson, Frederick C.
} Cc: 'List-Microscopy'
} Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging
}
} Fred,
} I think your example is in extremely poor taste. What is legal and
} ethical involving one's own body is between that individual and their
} doctor, dentist, etc. and none of your business. This has little or
} nothing to do with scientific data.
} Debby Sherman
}
} On Monday, July 22, 2002 3:44 PM, Monson, Frederick C. {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu}
} wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hi Gary,
} }
} } In imaging, it would be unethical for a female model to hand deliver a
} photo
} } which showed an amplified chest prior to surgery, unless she stipulated
} that
} } she is hopeful that she will look as she appears in the photo after her
} } surgery is done. If, on the other hand, she sent such photos thru the
} mail
} } without an accompanying declaration, she might be arrested for fraudulent
} } use of the mail.
} }
} } It is both legal and ethical for the model to send such an amplified
} photo
} } to past and future clients and ask if she has surgery and alters her
} } appearance as in the photo whether she will be more or less
} } employable.
} }
} } She can be both legal and ethical with her boyfriends by sending them
} such a
} } photo and asking whether she will be more or less enjoyable after such an
} } alteration.
} }
} } It would be illegal for the model to represent herself with an
} } enhanced chest in a public advertisement without the declaration. She
} would
} } also be leaving herself legally liable is she, unethically, used such a
} } photo to acquire employment on the pretence that she had the chest in the
} } photograph unless she arrived at the job with a note from her physician
} } attesting to the fact that between the sending of the photograph, her
} } employment and her arrival, her chest had suffered a deflation.
} }
} } I cannot think of anything more along these lines now. I would have
} } to see the original and altered photographs before reaching any other
} } conclusions.
} }
} } They may be sent to the address below.
} }
} } If a male model were to act in the manner of the female described
} } above, let the employer and boyfriend beware, there is NO legal or
} ethical
} } issue that can save them.
} }
} } Regards,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } Schmucker II Science Center
} } West Chester University
} } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: Gary Gaugler
} } } Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2002 8:53 PM
} } } To: MSA listserver
} } } Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging
} } }
} } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Will the transactions at the conference be available
} } } either electronically or via print? This would be most
} } } interesting.
} } }
} } } I'm curious about the distinction between ethics and
} } } legal issues. Image analysis technology can produce
} } } legal data in cases where it was not possible in the past.
} } } I don't see that this has anything to do with ethics. It
} } } seems to me to be an issue of what can technology do
} } } and then what will the legal system accept? There are numerous
} } } instances of this issue. So far as I know, technology won.
} } }
} } } gary g.
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
}
}


From daemon Tue Jul 23 10:36:26 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:39:18 -0600
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Here is what the Encyclopedia Britannica has to say about "Optics":

science concerned with the genesis and propagation of light, the changes
that it undergoes and produces, and other phenomena closely associated with
it. There are two major branches of optics, physical and geometrical.
Physical optics deals primarily with the nature and properties of light
itself. Geometrical optics has to do with the principles that govern the...

(They would not give me more). Then there is this for "electron optics":

branch of physics that is concerned with beams of electrons, their
deflection and focusing by electric and magnetic fields, their interference
when crossing each other, and their diffraction or bending when passing very
near matter or through the spacings in its submicroscopic structure.
Electron optics is based on the wave properties of electrons, which,
according...

The Encyclopedia Britannica, however, uses "Light microscopy", not "optical
microscopy".

Both phrases are being used, and generally people understand what you are
saying regardless of what you are using. In fact, even "Light microscopy"
should be qualified further as in "Visible Light microscopy" (as opposed to
"Infrared microscopy").

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 6:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 11:09:05 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:06:57 -0700
Subject: RE: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Good points. But this is from the standpoint of the model--who
I presume did not prepare the manipulated photos. How do
ethics play into the "picture" relative to those who create them?

I can think of one. Suppose a person is accused of a crime.
Some optical evidence is manipulated to either acquit them or
condemn them. This would be un-ethical for the preparer either
way. But knowing that an image could be manipulated, would
the prosecutor or defense argue that the image was improperly
manipulated?

What I'm thinking of is the ability to see things that otherwise could
not be visualized. These things can make or break a legal event.

Check out:

http://www.imagecontent.com/lucis/whitepaper.html

especially the forensic application link.

gary g.

Disclaimer: I am an authorized dealer for Image Content products.
Lucis is used in forensic science.



At 01:44 PM 7/22/2002, you wrote:
} Hi Gary,
}
} In imaging, it would be unethical for a female model to hand deliver a photo
} which showed an amplified chest prior to surgery, unless she stipulated that
} she is hopeful that she will look as she appears in the photo after her
} surgery is done. If, on the other hand, she sent such photos thru the mail
} without an accompanying declaration, she might be arrested for fraudulent
} use of the mail.
}
} It is both legal and ethical for the model to send such an amplified photo
} to past and future clients and ask if she has surgery and alters her
} appearance as in the photo whether she will be more or less employable.
}
} She can be both legal and ethical with her boyfriends by sending them such a
} photo and asking whether she will be more or less enjoyable after such an
} alteration.
}
} It would be illegal for the model to represent herself with an
} enhanced chest in a public advertisement without the declaration. She would
} also be leaving herself legally liable is she, unethically, used such a
} photo to acquire employment on the pretence that she had the chest in the
} photograph unless she arrived at the job with a note from her physician
} attesting to the fact that between the sending of the photograph, her
} employment and her arrival, her chest had suffered a deflation.
}
} I cannot think of anything more along these lines now. I would have
} to see the original and altered photographs before reaching any other
} conclusions.
}
} They may be sent to the address below.
}
} If a male model were to act in the manner of the female described
} above, let the employer and boyfriend beware, there is NO legal or ethical
} issue that can save them.
}
} Regards,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} Schmucker II Science Center
} West Chester University
} South Church Street and Rosedale
} West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} Phone: 610-738-0437
} FAX: 610-738-0437
} fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
}
}
}
}
}
}
} } ----------
} } From: Gary Gaugler
} } Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2002 8:53 PM
} } To: MSA listserver
} } Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Will the transactions at the conference be available
} } either electronically or via print? This would be most
} } interesting.
} }
} } I'm curious about the distinction between ethics and
} } legal issues. Image analysis technology can produce
} } legal data in cases where it was not possible in the past.
} } I don't see that this has anything to do with ethics. It
} } seems to me to be an issue of what can technology do
} } and then what will the legal system accept? There are numerous
} } instances of this issue. So far as I know, technology won.
} }
} } gary g.
} }
} }
} }



From daemon Tue Jul 23 11:18:11 2002



From: efosten-at-mmm.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 11:12:28 -0500
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Occam's Razor:~~ 'One should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the
number of entities required to explain anything'.

The late Walter McCrone used the term "Light Microscopy" (as do, today, the
institutions he founded) - who would argue with Walter.


Ev Osten

efosten-at-mmm.com
651-736-0104
fax: 651-733-0648

3M Company
Corporate Analytical Technology Center
3M Center, 201-BE-16
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
U.S.A.



From daemon Tue Jul 23 11:59:25 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 12:49:59 +0200
Subject: EM 201 "pepper" problem solved

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I found out what was giving me this bad contamination of my grids in the Philps
EM 201. It was the O-ring which is located within the specimen holder. This
O-ring is sitting at the rod (which you move by pressing the button at the end
of the specimen holder) which pushes this "claw-mechanism" forward, thus
releasing the tip of the specimen holder with the grid. This O-ring and the area
around it was smeared with some slimy, black stuff. Maybe material of the O-ring
itself, but for sure way too much of some grease. So every grid I inserted got
his own cloud of dirt. Nice! Why it started so suddenly to give me this
contamination problem, I have no idea. But I know, sometimes things just start
all of a sudden to go wrong.
I should have thought much earlier about the inside of the specimen holder.
There are moving parts, telling me that there should be also an O-ring and
stuff. It is funny, I think because I worked for so long exclusively with a CM
10 and its "one-piece" specimen holder, I just did not see the problem. Scary,
how limited thinking can become if you get used to a specific system.

So Fred Monson was right with his statement:
So, here's what I think from what you have told me. All of a sudden, you are
getting the rain of death from the 201, and you have thought of everything but,
perhaps?????, an outgassing (old o-ring) phenomenon
associated with inserting the stage. The proverbial "cloud of dust".

It was such a good feeling to clean the specimen holder, put a grid in the scope
and everything is back to normal!


Thanks a lot for your help,

Stefan



From daemon Tue Jul 23 12:39:43 2002



From: Gillmeister, Russ :      RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 13:32:17 -0400
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ian,
I think it would be great if the term light microscopy were used.
TEM is definitely an optical microscopy technique.
You could argue about SEM. While the column is electron optical, the image
formation mechanism is not.
SPM is not with possible exception of near field.

My two cents. Or maybe one today.
The longer I work the farther I am from retirement!!!!
Russ Gillmeister
Xerox
~~~~~~~~~~~~~


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 8:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 13:07:07 2002



From: dale anderson :      dale.anderson-at-attglobal.net
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 13:58:27 -0400
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I asked this same question of Barry Carter and his response was the best
I've heard:

Visible light microscopy or VLM.

Ron

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 8:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy
involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or
something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/




From daemon Tue Jul 23 13:21:11 2002



From: Gary Gill :      garygill-at-dcla.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 13:13:39 -0500
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'll locate my reprint at home that will provide an answer and let you know
tomorrow. The great John R. Baker of England authored a series of 7 reports
of the Nomenclature Committee that were published primarily in the
Proceedings of the Royal Microscopical Society from 1967 thru 1970. One of
these provided the definition you seek.

Gary Gill


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 7:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Tue Jul 23 14:41:33 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 09:33:10 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


As much as the example of the model annoyed me, I am going to continue
with it to raise some points.

Let's say the model had her picture taken by one of her boyfriends, who
happened to have a camera with a long telephoto lens. Subsequently the
model purchases and uses the new Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement
device, and diligently follows the instructions for use for three
weeks. She then has another picture taken.

Scenario 1: The second photo is taken by a different boyfriend, who has
his favorite super wide-angle lens on his camera, the one with the
pincushion effect that makes objects in the middle of the field appear
larger than those to the sides. He has no idea how the first photo was
taken.

Scenario 2: The second photo is taken by the first boyfriend, who
deliberately uses a wide-angle lens this time instead of the telephoto.

Scenario 3: In the first two scenarios the model genuinely thinks the
device has enlarged her bust.

Scenario 4: In the first two scenarios the model knows the device has NOT
increased her bust, but knows a bit about photography. She knows that the
telephoto lens will make her bust appear smaller due to foreshortening,
and the wide angle lens will make it look bigger, and has asked that those
particular lenses be used for the photos. The boyfriends are in on this or
they are not in on this.

Scenario 5: The photo shoots were not set up by an advertising agency for
the Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.

Scenario 6: The photo shoots were set up by an advertising agency for the
Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.

If you look at all the possible combinations and factor in whether each
participant knowingly or unknowingly performed their roles, and whether
they performed their part either knowingly and maliciously, or
unknowingly, or because they were uneducated about the properties of their
imaging devices, you can see that the images might or might not represent
the "truth". And this is WITHOUT digital or even darkroom
manipulation! Throw in differences in lighting and possibly the film type
and even the chemicals used to make the prints, and you see that you do
not have a controlled experiment here. Add a little personal bias (I might
personally consider the model to be an airhead and the first boyfriend to
be a fool and the second to be a power-hungry, manipulating character, and
so might draw conclusions based on personal bias when viewing the
images) and you've got not only flawed data, but a possible
misinterpretation of the data.

Now let's open these pictures in Photoshop ...

Aloha,
Tina


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Jul 23 15:24:38 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 16:16:11 EDT
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It's easy to imagine lots of scenarios in which the ability of the image to
fairly represent the truth might be compromised. But it is a lot more
interesting to consider some real cases. And still ones that do not require
actual "manipulation" of the image as those of us who do image processing and
use Photoshop think of it.

During the OJ mess, several newpapers and magazines printed pictures that
showed his face much darker and more shadowed than a "fair" image taken in
good light would have looked. It certainly made him appear more sinister. Was
that conscious bias or not? There have been arguments both ways. Along the
same lines, how about Richard Nixon's famous use of makeup to lighten a dark
5 o'clock shadow. That happened way before any picture was even taken. Was it
"fair" or not? Arguably, he did more damage to most americans than OJ.

News organizations are always being criticized for cropping of pictures. They
always claim it is just to fit things into the available space, but removing
other people and the surroundings from a picture can make it appear to be
something very different. They also don't always say that a picture of person
A with person B was taken 5 years ago and is file photo, and that those two
people were not together during some recent news event. This can create very
misleading impressions. It isn't just the tabloids that do it, either.

I think all of this is heavily overblown. For years I edited The Journal of
Computer Assisted Microscopy. Probably every issue had somewhere an image
captioned "typical" or "representative" microstructure. Nonsense - that was
widely understood to mean "the best picture we ever got" or worse yet "the
only good picture we ever got." No one picture can ever be representative in
a statistical sense. But if it was understood honestly by the author as
fairly representing that aspect of the structure that they were interpreting
or reporting on, then I say it is OK to use it.

Science is based on honest reporting and the inclusion of enough information
for others to duplicate our work. Sure, there will always be a few people who
try to cut a corner or shade the truth. I don't really care whether they do
it by selecting the field of view in the microscope, or by using the
Photoshop paint brush to remove some embarassing structure - it is wrong if
they knowingly introduce bias. And it is wrong if they don't know it but
should, but that gets a little bit trickier. Those who cheat are usually
caught in the end - science is a self-correcting process.

Worrying about whether applying an unsharp mask to an image to clean it up
for publication is misplaced concern. Most scientists know when they are
getting close to the line of fair representation, and choose not to cross it.
The nature of the tools is irrelevant. Telling people exactly what you did is
usually the best way to ensure that others can properly interpret your work.

In the broad sense, this applies to legal issues as well, but there the
problems get stickier. Experts may legitimately disagree about whether a
series of processing operations on an image reveal useful new information or
not, and it usually comes down to who is more convincing to the jury, at
least in the US/Canada/England legal system (please, let's not even think
about the French system!). I've been involved in these, been in the witness
box for days on end, and have written a book about it that says most of what
I have to say. This isn't the right forum for that debate anyway.

John Russ


From daemon Tue Jul 23 15:31:47 2002



From: Greg Strout :      gstrout-at-ou.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 15:25:48 -0500
Subject: EM Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


EM POSITION IN MATERIALS RESEARCH
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

Applicants are sought for a material-science research position at the
University of Oklahoma, in Norman, OK. The position is funded through
the NSF-funded OK-NanoNet, a Oklahoma- based network of researchers
involved in research involving nanostructures. The successful candidate
will participate in a team environment and must be familiar with
characterization of nanotubes and crystalline semiconductors including
the preparation of plan and cross-sectional samples. Experience with
HRTEM, diffraction techniques and image simulation is preferred. High
resolution SEM experience desirable.
Candidates should send a curriculum vita including a list of
publications, a statement of research interests and arrange for three
references letters to C-SPIN Program Manager, Department of Physics and
Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman OK 73019-0225. Consideration
of applications will commence August 15th and continue until the
positions are filled. The University of Oklahoma is an Equal-Opportunity
Affirmative-Action employer.


--
==================================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
WWW Virtual Library for Microscopy:
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not necessarily those of
the University of Oklahoma
==================================================================




From daemon Tue Jul 23 16:22:32 2002



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:14:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How about
visual light microscopy
laser microscopy
x-ray microscopy
electron microscopy
etc?



On Tue, 23 Jul 2002, Ian MacLaren wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
} a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?
}
} Optical microscopy?
}
} Light Microscopy?
}
} Light optical microscopy?
}
} Something else?
}
} The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
} microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
} else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.
}
} What should I use then?
}
} Best wishes
}
} Ian MacLaren
} N.B. New address
} TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
} Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
} Tel: +49 6151 162894
} ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/
}
}



From daemon Tue Jul 23 16:26:56 2002



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:20:33 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Still confusing. Per de Broglie, accelerated electron beam is light, so
does neutron......


On Tue, 23 Jul 2002, Michael Cammer wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I will propose a rough definition to be shredded, confirmed and clarified
} by others.
}
} First of all, I'm going to call it "light microscopy" instead of "optical
} microscopy".
}
} Light microscopy involves radiation from the UV (approximately 320 nm)
} through the infra red (approximately 1100 nm). This can be transmittance
} or reflectance. Typically, we mean by use of compound optics.
}
}
} ____________________________________________________________________________
} Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
} Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
} (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
}
}



From daemon Tue Jul 23 16:41:47 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:32:40 -0400
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: paraffin wax

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Afternoon Dave,
If your specimen is already infiltrated with paraffin, then it is
likely that you are letting the paraffin on the surface of the infiltrated
specimen harden before you add the paraffin to fill the mold. If that is
true, then you need to do the following.
1. Find a piece of metal that is at least 1/8-1/4" thick
and around 7-8" square or in diameter
2. mount the metal about 7-10" above the table using one or
two clamps from chemistry
3. find a goose-neck lamp (60Watt bulb) and turn the hood
over so the light is directed toward the ceiling
4. slide the light under the metal plate leaving about 1"
between the hood and the plate
5. place an aluminum pie plate about the size of the metal
plate on the metal.
6. place a bit of paraffin in the pie plate and turn on the
lamp. If the paraffin is too hot, you should lower the lamp further from
the plate, or replace the 60W bulb with a 40W or a 25W. The temperature you
want is no higher than 60oCelcius.
7. when the paraffin begins to melt, place your cardboard
(folded from an index card to the right size for the specimen, but not less
than 1/2x1/2" in area) right on the melted paraffin and place a few pieces
of solid paraffin in the bottom of the box.
8. when THAT paraffin begins to melt, add the infiltrated
piece of specimen with the surface to be sectioned facing down.
9. when the specimen is covered with melted paraffin,
carefully remove the box to another pie plate on the table and watch while
the paraffin on the very bottom of the box begins to harden and trap the
specimen so it can't move. Prior to this you can use a warm dissecting
needle to position the specimen and tease trapped air bubbles to rise in the
paraffin.
10. you can move the box back-and-forth to the hot plate
until you are satisfied that the specimen is surrounded by melted paraffin.
11. when you are satisfied, and the specimen is trapped in a
slightly solid layer of paraffin, add sufficient paraffin to fill the box to
half its height but not less than 1/2" OR to 1/4" over the height of the
specimen.
12. If you are satisfied that the paraffin around the
specimen and the new, melted paraffin are merging nicely, and that no
paraffin is leaking from the box, you can fill the box to it's top (no more
than 1") with more melted paraffin and begin to blow lightly on the surface
of the melted paraffin.
13. When a layer of translucent paraffin forms that
prevents you from seeing the specimen in any detail you may VERY GENTLY and
SLOWLY immerse the block/box in cool water. NOTE: when the water is about
to spill over into the box, the box should be tilted slightly to permit the
water to slowly cover the paraffin. When the box is fully immersed, place
the container under a stream of running cold water so the paraffin block
will harden uniformly.
14. I generally leave the water running on my blocks while
I continue to make more blocks until I am finished. Then I let the last
block remain immersed in the running water for another 15min. Then I place
all my blocks in the fridge, or an ice bath, for at least a hour before I
begin to section any of them.
15. Trim before sectioning, and don't forget to turn off
the lamp!

Regards and hope this helps,

Fred Monson

P.S. If I did not correctly understand your problem, please come
back at me about your question.

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/



----------
} From: drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us
} Sent: Saturday, July 20, 2002 3:16 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: paraffin wax
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, July
} 19, 2002 at 22:18:04
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
} Email: drands-at-avuhsd.k12.ca.us
} Name: Dave Rands
}
} Organization: Lancaster High School/Special Education Department
}
} Education: 9-12th Grade High School
}
} Location: Lancaster, California, Los Angeles County
}
} Question: We are having a difficult time getting our paraffin wax to
} fill in around our speciman. We have tried several things and have
} asked the other science teachers with no success. Can you help?
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
}


From daemon Tue Jul 23 17:39:02 2002



From: Robert Blystone :      rblyston-at-trinity.edu (by way of
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:26:29 -0500
Subject: Microscopy nomenclature

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To the List

If there is electron microscopy, can there be photon microscopy?

Bob Blystone


--
Robert V. Blystone, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Trinity University
San Antonio, Texas 78212
(210) 999-7243 or FAX (210) 999-7229
rblyston-at-trinity.edu
http://www.trinity.edu/rblyston


From daemon Tue Jul 23 17:57:06 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 18:49:36 -0400
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just Opinion Ian, and I hope not volatile or the source of physical
conflict.

And Ev, I couldn't help it. Further, I was finished when yours, with which
I entirely agree, arrived.

Light - those wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum(EMS) to
which WE (our visual systems) are sensitive (not reactive, meaning
illuminated or slightly heated, NOT burned!)

Optics - the study of the behavior of light, but, more broadly, the
behavior of any part of the EMS as it interacts with materials,
electromagnetic fields or objects.

Optical microscope - any microscope constructed of optical elements
constructed of glass or other transparent materials which by their
construction affect the passage of light.

Light microscope
any microscope that uses the "Visible" portion of the EMS to
illuminate an object for viewing OR which transmits visible light from an
object source stimulated by 'illumination' from a non-visible part of the
EMS (i.e. UV 'light'!?!?!?!, which is also known as 'black' 'light', or even
"invisible light" - one of the ultimate oxymorons)
sub-species of light microscopes
bright field
dark field
phase
fluorescent
etc.

Electronic microscope
any microscope whose image is formed by a non-visual
detector that is electrically powered.

Electron Microscope - a microscope whose image derives from the use
of electrons as illumination

X-Ray microscope - a microscope whose image derives from the use of
X-Rays as illumination

Atomic Force Microscope - an electronic microscope whose image is
formed by magic!

By the above definitions which, I opine, are generally held, one can
use the term, "Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope", because the term does
not stipulate that the illumination is "optical" or visual. Thus we are
safe in using the term CLSM to describe a system which has both UV and
Visual EMS wavelengths of excitation, as well as the term CLS(L)M ("L" =
light!), because the illumination from which the 'image' originates is
visible and the elements by which the illumination is manipulated are
correctly described as "optical" elements. On the other hand, and just to
add confusion, the filters on the excitation side are considered optical (or
visible) filters OR UV filters, while on the emission side, we describe all
of the filters as barrier filters.

I understand that the Physicists are attempting to alter the
definitions of "light" and "dark", and that suggests that most of the fun is
yet to come.

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/



} ----------
} From: Ian MacLaren
} Reply To: Ian MacLaren
} Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 8:04 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy
} involving
} a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?
}
} Optical microscopy?
}
} Light Microscopy?
}
} Light optical microscopy?
}
} Something else?
}
} The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
} microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
} else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.
}
} What should I use then?
}
} Best wishes
}
} Ian MacLaren
} N.B. New address
} TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
} Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
} Tel: +49 6151 162894
} ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jul 23 18:18:35 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 17:16:57 -0600
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Tina,

I don't think we even have to consider just images. Any DELIBERATE
misrepresentation of data is unethical (at least scientifically. Ethics is
based on what is "morally" right, and "Morals" are not the same globally).
In your example, nothing is really unethical until the time when something
is claimed to be the case against better knowledge.

If I measure the resistance of a wire and find a big drop when I lower the
temperature, I can claim to have found some form of superconductor. Nothing
unethical about it. If I don't tell that I had a piece of a known
superconductor hooked up in parallel, now that would be unethical.

See you in Quebec!!

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Tina Carvalho [mailto:tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 1:33 PM
To: Microscopy Listserver


As much as the example of the model annoyed me, I am going to continue
with it to raise some points.

Let's say the model had her picture taken by one of her boyfriends, who
happened to have a camera with a long telephoto lens. Subsequently the
model purchases and uses the new Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement
device, and diligently follows the instructions for use for three
weeks. She then has another picture taken.

Scenario 1: The second photo is taken by a different boyfriend, who has
his favorite super wide-angle lens on his camera, the one with the
pincushion effect that makes objects in the middle of the field appear
larger than those to the sides. He has no idea how the first photo was
taken.

Scenario 2: The second photo is taken by the first boyfriend, who
deliberately uses a wide-angle lens this time instead of the telephoto.

Scenario 3: In the first two scenarios the model genuinely thinks the
device has enlarged her bust.

Scenario 4: In the first two scenarios the model knows the device has NOT
increased her bust, but knows a bit about photography. She knows that the
telephoto lens will make her bust appear smaller due to foreshortening,
and the wide angle lens will make it look bigger, and has asked that those
particular lenses be used for the photos. The boyfriends are in on this or
they are not in on this.

Scenario 5: The photo shoots were not set up by an advertising agency for
the Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.

Scenario 6: The photo shoots were set up by an advertising agency for the
Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.

If you look at all the possible combinations and factor in whether each
participant knowingly or unknowingly performed their roles, and whether
they performed their part either knowingly and maliciously, or
unknowingly, or because they were uneducated about the properties of their
imaging devices, you can see that the images might or might not represent
the "truth". And this is WITHOUT digital or even darkroom
manipulation! Throw in differences in lighting and possibly the film type
and even the chemicals used to make the prints, and you see that you do
not have a controlled experiment here. Add a little personal bias (I might
personally consider the model to be an airhead and the first boyfriend to
be a fool and the second to be a power-hungry, manipulating character, and
so might draw conclusions based on personal bias when viewing the
images) and you've got not only flawed data, but a possible
misinterpretation of the data.

Now let's open these pictures in Photoshop ...

Aloha,
Tina


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *

* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*

****************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Jul 23 18:30:36 2002



From: Eric.Hines-at-csiro.au
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 09:23:43 +1000
Subject: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the microscope.
Eric.


From daemon Tue Jul 23 22:28:19 2002



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:19:03 EDT
Subject: Re: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 07/23/2002 4:40:19 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
Eric.Hines-at-csiro.au-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

{ { Dear all,
Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the microscope.
Eric.

} }

Eric,

I don't know about reticles with angles, but one of my favorite reticle
suppliers here in the US is Klarmann Rulings.

They have a fairly extensive catalog, and they also will make custom reticles
per your specifications. We've been very pleased with the work they've done.

You can get contact information from their website at:
{www.reticles.com}

and here's (hopefully) the direct link: {A HREF="http://www.reticles.com/"}
Click here: Reticles, stage micrometers, filter glass, pinholes, apertures,
comparator screens, optical fabrication, evaporate {/A}

Cheers,

Bob Chiovetti
GTI Microsystems


From daemon Tue Jul 23 23:03:33 2002



From: R Divakar :      divakar-at-igcar.ernet.in
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 09:26:38 +0530
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We metallurgists here call it optical metallography meaning we use the visible region of the EM spectrum for imaging metallic surfaces.

----
Divakar R
Physical Metallurgy Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research
Kalpakkam 603102, India
----

-----Original Message-----
} From: Michael Cammer [SMTP:cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 9:21 AM
To: Ian MacLaren; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I will propose a rough definition to be shredded, confirmed and clarified
by others.

First of all, I'm going to call it "light microscopy" instead of "optical
microscopy".

Light microscopy involves radiation from the UV (approximately 320 nm)
through the infra red (approximately 1100 nm). This can be transmittance
or reflectance. Typically, we mean by use of compound optics.


____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/






From daemon Tue Jul 23 23:29:13 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 21:22:36 -0700
Subject: RE: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Very good point Mike and Tina: Any DELIBERATE misrepresentation of data is
unethical in science, I believe. Sergey

At 04:16 PM 7/23/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Jul 23 23:47:52 2002



From: Frederick Schamber :      schamber-at-aspexllc.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:44:59 -0700
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John Russ makes some important points. Integrity in presenting information isn't
a question only of manipulation of the data itself -- whether "high tech" or not
-- but can also involve much more subtle kinds of efforts to shade the perception
of the recipient. For example, in presenting data or opinions, one might
exaggerate or misrepresent one's qualifications -- though this does not actually
alter the validity of the data or opinions expressed, it does represent an
attempt to influence their credibility. In many fields of endeavor this is, of
course, the accepted norm, and even in the scientific arena, the line quickly
becomes quite fuzzy -- when does an effort to make a convincing case pass over
into deceit?

Ultimately, our best guarantee of integrity in scientific data is the integrity
of the one reporting. The key, it seems to me, is not simply whether the one
offering the data or making the assertion "honestly believes" in the conclusion,
but also exercises a high degree of personal scrupulousness as to whether the
recipient is given enough information to make their own objective assessment.
Often this is less about clear "rules" than about adhering to accepted norms of
behavior. For example, a researcher who consistently observes a particular
phenomenon is not considered to be deceitful if she/he chooses a particularly
clear-cut example for illustration -- this is what we expect. But, we don't
expect a scientist to support his/her conclusion by selecting an untypical
example -- this violates the trust of the community. Or to use the above
example, we expect that a researcher will represent their personal qualifications
in a generally favorable light -- but we don't expect to have to check the
accuracy of their resume. A scrupulous scientist endeavors to be scrupulous
about not only the bare facts, but also about the "frame" in which they are
presented.

In the ultimate analysis, there aren't hard-and-fast rules which always apply and
there will always be argument about where the line should be drawn. But this is
why it is so important that we police ourselves -- when we do see clear intent to
alter, misrepresent, withhold or otherwise bias information, we have an
obligation to "blow the whistle" -- even when such actions do not materially
alter the conclusion.

The above, of course, is about ethics. But I tend to be one of those who thinks
that if people behave ethically, the "legal" issues pretty much take care of
themselves.

Fred Schamber



"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} It's easy to imagine lots of scenarios in which the ability of the image to
} fairly represent the truth might be compromised. But it is a lot more
} interesting to consider some real cases. And still ones that do not require
} actual "manipulation" of the image as those of us who do image processing and
} use Photoshop think of it.
}
} During the OJ mess, several newpapers and magazines printed pictures that
} showed his face much darker and more shadowed than a "fair" image taken in
} good light would have looked. It certainly made him appear more sinister. Was
} that conscious bias or not? There have been arguments both ways. Along the
} same lines, how about Richard Nixon's famous use of makeup to lighten a dark
} 5 o'clock shadow. That happened way before any picture was even taken. Was it
} "fair" or not? Arguably, he did more damage to most americans than OJ.
}
} News organizations are always being criticized for cropping of pictures. They
} always claim it is just to fit things into the available space, but removing
} other people and the surroundings from a picture can make it appear to be
} something very different. They also don't always say that a picture of person
} A with person B was taken 5 years ago and is file photo, and that those two
} people were not together during some recent news event. This can create very
} misleading impressions. It isn't just the tabloids that do it, either.
}
} I think all of this is heavily overblown. For years I edited The Journal of
} Computer Assisted Microscopy. Probably every issue had somewhere an image
} captioned "typical" or "representative" microstructure. Nonsense - that was
} widely understood to mean "the best picture we ever got" or worse yet "the
} only good picture we ever got." No one picture can ever be representative in
} a statistical sense. But if it was understood honestly by the author as
} fairly representing that aspect of the structure that they were interpreting
} or reporting on, then I say it is OK to use it.
}
} Science is based on honest reporting and the inclusion of enough information
} for others to duplicate our work. Sure, there will always be a few people who
} try to cut a corner or shade the truth. I don't really care whether they do
} it by selecting the field of view in the microscope, or by using the
} Photoshop paint brush to remove some embarassing structure - it is wrong if
} they knowingly introduce bias. And it is wrong if they don't know it but
} should, but that gets a little bit trickier. Those who cheat are usually
} caught in the end - science is a self-correcting process.
}
} Worrying about whether applying an unsharp mask to an image to clean it up
} for publication is misplaced concern. Most scientists know when they are
} getting close to the line of fair representation, and choose not to cross it.
} The nature of the tools is irrelevant. Telling people exactly what you did is
} usually the best way to ensure that others can properly interpret your work.
}
} In the broad sense, this applies to legal issues as well, but there the
} problems get stickier. Experts may legitimately disagree about whether a
} series of processing operations on an image reveal useful new information or
} not, and it usually comes down to who is more convincing to the jury, at
} least in the US/Canada/England legal system (please, let's not even think
} about the French system!). I've been involved in these, been in the witness
} box for days on end, and have written a book about it that says most of what
} I have to say. This isn't the right forum for that debate anyway.
}
} John Russ



From daemon Tue Jul 23 23:51:51 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 21:44:27 -0700
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Not agree, Fred:
" Optical microscope - any microscope constructed of optical elements
constructed of glass or other transparent materials which by their
construction affect the passage of light."====} not necessary light, may be
electrons, or even gamma-rays (gamma-ray microscope) - everything which has
a 'waive nature' irradiation. In EM the optics are based on the
electro-magnetic lenses. I think, 'optics' it's more like technical
solution to manipulate the wave-nature irradiation. Combination of the
lenses and mirrors is usual solution for the microscopes. Material should
be adequate to the irradiation: glass for visible light, quartz for UV,
KCl(Li-?) - for infra-red light and so on... So, we could talk about
'electro-magnetic optics' of the particular EM or about infra-red optics...
We could say: optics for the visual light microscope or UV light
microscope... Sometimes it needs to be precise using terminology, which
comes from the physics - those guys are very precise. Sergey

At 03:49 PM 7/23/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Wed Jul 24 01:15:37 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:05:10 -0400
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/23/02 5:20 PM, Chaoying Ni at cni-at-udel.edu wrote:


}
} Still confusing. Per de Broglie, accelerated electron beam is light, so
} does neutron......
}
}
Dear Chaoying Ni,
Well, an accelerated electron emits light and is a wave, but it is not
light (to a real physicist, it gets heavier as its speed increases).
Focussing neutron beams is a challenge; using the magnetic moment to apply
force might be possible. Perhaps one ought to say "visible photon
microscopy", but that will not be the standard terminology.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Wed Jul 24 01:33:00 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:24:16 -0400
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/23/02 6:49 PM, Monson, Frederick C. at fmonson-at-wcupa.edu wrote:

Dear Fred,
First, by processing your message, I hope I have not done anything
unethical.
}
} Just Opinion Ian, and I hope not volatile or the source of physical
} conflict.
}
Likewise, unless by "physical conflict" you mean that physicists
disagree.

} (i.e. UV 'light'!?!?!?!, which is also known as 'black' 'light', or even
} "invisible light" - one of the ultimate oxymorons)
}
You know I'm keeping this part in for a reason.

} Electronic microscope
} any microscope whose image is formed by a non-visual
} detector that is electrically powered.
}
}
} Atomic Force Microscope - an electronic microscope whose image is
} formed by magic!

As, "When technology becomes sufficiently advanced, it is equivalent to
magic." (Can't remember the author or exact quote.)
}
} By the above definitions which, I opine, are generally held, one can
} use the term, "Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope", because the term does
} not stipulate that the illumination is "optical" or visual. Thus we are
} safe in using the term CLSM to describe a system which has both UV and
} Visual EMS wavelengths of excitation, as well as the term CLS(L)M ("L" =
} light!),

However since laser is the acronym for "Light Amplification by
Stimulated Emission of Radiation", then the "light" in CLSM is, indeed,
invisible, and CLS(L)M is redundant. Maybe C(V)LSM?
}
} I understand that the Physicists are attempting to alter the
} definitions of "light" and "dark", and that suggests that most of the fun is
} yet to come.
}
I think "light" and "dark" remain the same, but most of the matter and
energy will prove to be dark. Now, could we investigate them by dark-field
microscopy? I agree; the fun's just beginning.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Wed Jul 24 01:40:46 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:35:16 -0700
Subject: Re: Microscopy nomenclature

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bob:

Google search "photon microscopy" - 26000 articles
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=photon+microscopy
Sergey

At 03:26 PM 7/23/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Wed Jul 24 03:23:03 2002



From: ankohangela :      ankohangela2002-at-yahoo.co.uk
Date: lun., 15 juil 2002 09:46:12
Subject: please make conscience to my plea

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there,

probably i did not get the whole thread, but did anybody mention
OpenOffice ? (see http://www.openoffice.org) - It is OpenSource, so the
only thing you have to take care about is how you get hold of the
software package for computer-system: For Linux, Solaris and Win32-
Systems there should be version 1.01 available by now. A version 1.0x
for MacOS X will hopefully be available by the end of this year.

No fee's, no trick's, no backdoor's, no legal annoyancies ... !!!

Up to now we made pretty good experiences when composing our
posters. (Ok, every program has bugs, but we found appropriate help in
the OpenOfffice user/developer community)

If you would like to have a professional spellchecker and thesaurus, you
will have to spend a few $ and try StarOffice 6.0 (... same source code
like OpenOffice!!!)

.. and the best thing is: the import/export filters to dif. MS-Office appl.
are pretty good so you will be able to communicate with BiilyG's
"people")


..try it!
Gunnar








Date sent: 23 Jul 2002 08:36:42 -0500
} From: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
boundary="----=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD"

------=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD
Content-Type: text/plain;charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear sir,



PLEASE REPLY VIA THIS EMAIL FOR EASY ACCESSING.
(ankohangela2002-at-yahoo.co.uk)

Please permit me to use this medium to thank you once more
for given me this avenue to explain my problem to you.

But firstly, i will like to tell you who am so that you
will understand and comprehend my point clearly.

Am angela ankoh and am here in Benin Republic with my
junior brother David and we are from Congo Democractic but
now in Benin Republic as a result of the war in my
country. And here in benin we entered as a refugee as a
result of the war in my country. And am still a studet and
my brother too. Am 24 years and david is 21. am studying
medicine and my brother also is mechanical engineering

Please we need your help because the war has claimed the
life of both my father and mother leaving us alone in this
world. But before the death of my father, he used my name
to deposit some money WHICH VALUED AT 9 MILLION UNITED STATE DOLLARS in
a finance house here in republic of benin and and he used
me as the beneficiary and owner of the money but since we
entered here as a refugee i cannot have access to my money
because i do not have account here and they do not allow
refugees to operate account here.

Please what i need from you is to help us settle the finance house for their clearing fee and open an account
with your name in any bank here in benin so that i can
submit your particulars to the finance house to effect the
change of the ownership in your name as the new
beneficiary and after they will change the name to your
favour and they will deposit in your bank here. And you
will then instruct the bank here to further transfer to
you account over there so that we can come over there for
the continuation of our education while you help us to
manage the money;

furthermore, what i actually need from you is to help us
clear the money from the finance house to aviod any
dumorage on the moneyand after making the change of the benficiary to your name the finance house will deposit in your account here and you then can further transfer to your account over for our onward coming for the continuation of our education while you help us to control the money because the finance house and my
late father had an agreement when the money will be in
their custody and if we fail to come and claim as agreed
that will be charging for it. and i do not want it to
heppen because this is the only hope of our life.

secondly, you will be required to open an account here in
benin republic where the finance house will deposit and
upon your instruction to the bank after the finance hoiuse
deposited the m bank will further transfer according to
your wish to any of your account you prefer,and we proceed
with you for the continuation of our education.in this
regard you are only required to clear and open an account
and the finance house deposit in your account here..

please if you are ready to help us, please kind forward the
following so that i can effect the change of the
beneficiary to your name as the new beneficiary so that
once you arrive and do the clearing and open the account
they will deposit it in your account immediately and you
have access to the money.

I NEED YOUR FULL NAME, ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBER .THIS
WILL ENABLE ME TO PROCEED FOR THE CHANGE OF THE OWNERHSIP
IN YOIUR FAVOUR AS THE NEW BENEFICARY OF THE MONEY.

GOD BE WITH US ALL AS WE AWAIT YOUR POSITIVE ANSWER.

FROM ANGELA ANKOH.

NOTE YOU CAN AS WELL REACH ME OR DAVID ON THIS NUMBER THE COUNTRY CODE IS 229 AND THE NUMBER IS 989857. I REPEAT 229-989857.AND EMAIL ankohangela2002-at-yahoo.co.uk



------=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD--

------=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD
Content-Type: application/octet-stream;name="you.txt"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
Content-Disposition: attachment;filename="you.txt"

YWRyZWFtZXJAYWRmaWxtd29ya3MuY29tDQpmaWxtY3JpdGljQGFkZmlsbXdvcmtzLmNvbQ0Kd3d3
QGNsYXMudWZsLmVkdQ0KY29tbWVudHNAYWRmaWxtd29ya3MuY29tDQpzdWdnZXN0aW9uc0BhZGZp
bG13b3Jrcy5jb20NCndlYm1hc3RlckBhZGZpbG13b3Jrcy5jb20NCnlzaGlyYW5AaWlsLmludGVs
LmNvbQ0KbWFpbGluZ2xpc3RAYWRmaWxtd29ya3MuY29tDQpkaXJlY3RvckBhZGZpbG13b3Jrcy5j
b20NCnBldGVyX2ZyYW50emVuQGhvdG1haWwuY29tDQptb25rZWVzLWFsZXJ0QG9uZWxpc3QuY29t
DQp5b3VAdW5rbm93bi5jb20NCndpbm5pZS56aXBAZnJlZW5ldC5kZQ0K


------=_NextPart_ZAKWWATYQD--

From daemon Wed Jul 24 04:23:57 2002



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 10:16:44 +0100 (BST)
Subject: Re: liquid He transferring kids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jinsong,

You do not say if it is a SEM or TEM He holder. My comments relate to our
experience with our TEM He holder but I guess most would also apply to a
SEM He stage.

We have a side entry He holder that uses the He boil off gas to precool
the He dewar so that we do not have a Liquid N2 jacket.

We do not loose vacuum when filling but we do support the transfer tube to
prevent too much strain on the holder.

The initial fill takes about 45 minutes. It is best for 2 people to set up
and remove the He transfer tube, although it is possible for a single
person to do it it just seems safer with two.

Depending on temperature the hold time is generally about 50 mins to 3
hours (50 mins at 7K or 8K, 2 hours at 15K, 2.5 hours at 21K etc.).

Subsequent transfers take about 30 minutes.

As we tend to use the holder infrequently and book a week of He stage work
when we want it we will always repump the vacuum jackets on the transfer
dewar and holder before each session.

The most diffucult thing is to determine when the dewar is full and on the
first trial we shot most of a 50l dewar of He through the holder as we
could not tell the difference between the He gas plume and the He liquid
plume on the exhaust line. With experience we can now fill with about 5L
of He.

It is important to use the gas to cool the holder down to a reasonable
level (50K) to avoid loosing too much liquid.

I would suggest that if you have problems you contact the supplier to get
advice on filling technique.

Good luck,
Ron


On Mon, 22 Jul 2002, jinsong wu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi, Listers:
}
} We have a new liquid-He holder. However, it takes three men to
} work together for about one and half hours for every filling up of the
} holder. At the same time, there is high risk to destroy the vacuum.
} Then we have merely about 30 minutes' working time.
}
} Please let me know your kind suggestions on the possible techniques
} of the transferring of the liquid He from the tank to the holder.
} For example, is it possible to put the He tank in near room and use
} some transferring kits connecting the tank and the holder so as to be
} able to work continuously?
}
} Any replies from commercial sources or vendors are welcome to my
} personal email address: jinsong.wu-at-asu.edu.
}
} Thanks a lot,
}
} jinsong wu
} Department of Physics and Astronomy
} Arizona State University
} Tempe, AZ 85287-1504
}
} Tel: 480-965-2535 (o)
}
}
}
}
}

===========================================================================
Mr. Ron Doole e-mail ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
Department of Materials, phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
University of Oxford, fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
Parks Road.
Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
============================================================================





From daemon Wed Jul 24 04:40:49 2002



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 11:33:25 +0200
Subject: Fwd: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



With all due respect for the participants to the discussion, I'd like to draw
your attention on the oversimplifications you are introducing here.

Generally, the "accelerated" electrons can emit X-rays (that is the basic
principle of synchrotron X-ray generation), which are electromagnetic waves,
as light is too.

It is not correct to say that the (accelerated or not) electron or the
neutron are light;
they have an associated wavelength (according to quantum mechanics), but they
are not waves. In fact, the quantum mechanical wavelength associated
(according
to the de Broglie principle) to any particle (but "detectable" only for the
case of
elementary particles) is a matter that generates a lot of confusion.

The people who are not paying enough attention to these notions can be led to
express even stranger opinions, as was the case of an attendant to a
conference
on electron microscopy, who was strongly against the opinion that the
photon has
mass zero; how can that happen - according to him - as long as the
electron has
an impulse ? Well, it happens "just like that" !

So, please, be careful when discussing that kind of matters: quantum
mechanics is
a little more profound than to say "electron is light, and so is neutron"
etc. These are
nothing but confusions.

I have expressed that opinion as a physicist.


Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************


} User-Agent: Microsoft Outlook Express Macintosh Edition - 5.01 (1630)
} Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 23:05:10 -0400
} Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?
} From: Bill & Sue Tivol {wtivol-at-earthlink.net}
} To: microscopy list {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 24 04:57:07 2002



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 05:31:06 -0700
Subject: RIP (hopefully) Ethical and legal imaging and nomenclature of microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there,

probably i did not get the whole thread, but did anybody mention
OpenOffice? (see http://www.openoffice.org) - It is OpenSource, so the
only thing you have to take care about is how you get hold of the
software package for your computer-system: For Linux, Solaris and Win32-
Systems there should be version 1.01 available by now. A version 1.0x
for MacOS X will hopefully be available by the end of this year.

No fee's, no trick's, no backdoor's, no legal annoyancies ... !!!

Up to now we made pretty good experiences when composing our
posters. (Ok, every program has bugs, but we found appropriate help in
the OpenOfffice user/developer community)

If you would like to have a professional spellchecker and thesaurus, you
will have to spend a few $ and try StarOffice 6.0 (... same source code
like OpenOffice!!!)

.. and the best thing is: the import/export filters to dif. MS-Office appl.
are pretty good so you will be able to "communicate" with BiilyG's
"people".

..try it!
Gunnar



Date sent: 23 Jul 2002 08:36:42 -0500
} From: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}


Sorry, but the number of postings on these two subjects is driving me
crazy. So, hopefully, here's the start of a new round of messages related
to the ethics of imaging and the nomenclature of microscopy techniques.

First, in regard to ethics and legal imaging, one really has to question
the need to tie ethics to one of the most unethical professions in the
world. Be that as it may, ethical behavior is just that - behavior that
each individual chooses to follow. Civilization is just a consensus
between humans as to what is acceptable and desirable in all of us. It is
a noble cause which often results in great things such as the scientific
principles and the law. However, there are always those among us who are
willing to subvert those ideals to our own individual desires.

Some find a fine line between what they want to portray and what is by
measurement. All too easy these days to wash away what we might consider
unimportant. But true discovery often lies in those details that most
would overlook. That applies whether it is a legal or scientific matter.
We are all creatures of assumptions, and those assumptions are often
wrong. What is important in a legal matter is to portray what you believe
and let your credibility lend weight to the testimony. There will be
others doing the same for your side, and the other. The law is a search
for the truth of a matter, the same as science. The difference is one of
time. Science discovers the truth over years, decades, centuries and
millennium. The law has to proceed in a timely manner, governed by the
life spans of humans. Science can afford mistakes, and often makes them.
In law, a mistake can mean the immediate difference between life and
death.

Better to simply do your best, represent the data as you found it, and
leave the interpretation to those unfortunate souls who actually have to
make the life and death decisions. Judge, jury and executioner are
assigned by law, not science. Thank God, because science has the
unfortunate position of being corrected rather regularly. Human decisions,
too, have the unfortunate position of often being wrong. But the law is
designed for that, not science. Law is about humans, science is about
everything else. Until the time there is actually any reasonable total
understanding (if ever) of the biology, environment and intellect of
humans, science can have no real claim on matters of law.

In brief (way too late), don't assume that you know what will play best
before the audience. Even simple manipulations shade the truth. A trained
eye can recognize the subtle lighting effects used to portray the before
and after effects of tooth whitening and wrinkle removers common on TV ads.
But realize that millions are spent by those who don't. Should we
regulate the production of ads (do you want the government to spend your
money on that)?

OK, on to nomenclature. Lets start trying to come to a simple and pract
ical consensus on 'microscopy'. How about a means to produce an enlarged
image of something. Not enhanced, just enlarged. In a sense, a means to
produce a closer look.

A prefix to this would seem to be the major problem. 'Optical' is probably
outdated. Done in by the common use of optics to also describe the
electrostatic and electro-magnetic effects used in electron microscopy.
Better to use the term optics to describe the various refraction and
reflection mechanisms in general. In this context, all light, x-ray,
gamma-ray and electron manipulation systems could be termed 'optical'.

Light, x-ray and gamma-rays do have a definable basis. All involving
photons, there are definitions regarding their generation. The actual
wavelengths may overlap, but the mechanisms of their generation do provide
a recognizable distinction. They can all be considered optical, perhaps
classically so, because they use materials to provide the refraction and
reflection required (grazing incidence angle optics in the case of x-ray
and gamma-rays).

Electrons comprise a transition from classical optics to electrostatic and
electro-magnetic optics. They can be manipulated by materials (electron
diffraction) as well as electronic means.

All right, getting to specifics. All of the energies mentioned above can
be used in both transmission and reflective modes. This begins the general
classification. The first class should be 'transmission microscopy',
techniques that provide an image from passing the source energies though a
sample. This would include substage illumination light microscopy, TEMs
and normal x-ray imaging.

Next general classification should be 'reflective microscopy'. This would
encompass the techniques of reflective light microscopy, SEM and potential
x-ray and gamma-ray reflective microscopy (I don't know if these techniques
have been developed yet, but could be). These are basically contour
mapping techniques that essentially record surface slopes in regards to the
primary source of illumination.

A third general classification should be made for the more recent scanning
probe instruments. These are basically topographical methods that record
the topography of material surfaces based on various physical properties.
Their progenitors are the profilometer and Edison's record player. I
would suggest the term 'profile microscopy' for these techniques, as they
produce a profile of the topography at various one dimensional locations.

Within those general classifications, one should distinguish the energy
involved. For example, TEM could still remain transmission electron
microscopy, but SEM should perhaps be changed to Reflective Electron
Microscopy or REM. Seems silly here, but consider the case of STEM. The
actual imaging mode in STEM is determined by the placement of the detector
used. In the case of a secondary or BSE detector located above the sample,
it would be REM. Where the image is formed by detection means below the
sample it would be TEM. There are TEMs that produce STEM images that look
like SEM and SEMs that produce STEM images that look like TEM. STEM, by
itself, says nothing - better to make scanning a sub grouping. And that
brings up the actual item being detected - secondary electron, backscatter
electron, Auger electron or x-ray (anything I missed?). We won't go there
now.

So, light or optical microscopy would become light transmission or light
reflective microscopy. A mixture of the two, light transmission/reflective
microscopy. So it goes through electron, x-ray and gamma-ray (and anything
else we can come up with). Scanning probe microscopy (profile microscopy)
should be further identified by the detection means, as they currently are
(minus the 'profile').

Confused yet? I am. And we haven't even gotten to the confocal and
holographic methods yet. Suffice to say, either live with the current
nomenclature or find some common taxonomy for imaging techniques. Frankly,
we're getting to the point where it would be nice to have a taxonomy for
these techniques.

What's in a name?



Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com





From daemon Wed Jul 24 06:13:41 2002



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 07:06:56 -0400
Subject: Re: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I had a special eye piece that I used for accurately measuring diatom
striations that would read out to some small fraction of a degree - they
are called filar ocular micrometers and are still available for some
microscopes.


Bill Miller


At 11:19 PM 7/23/2002 -0400, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 24 07:23:58 2002



From: swiding :      swiding-at-temple.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 08:15:52 -0400
Subject: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello List,

Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro,
Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
this feature.

Thanks,

Steve Widing
EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
Biology Department
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA



From daemon Wed Jul 24 08:41:36 2002



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 09:33:25 -0400
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Lets pose a question:

What is microscopy? The use of some form of the EMS to examine an
object's properties.

What are Optics? Are they not the component of the system that allows
us to harness and control the particular range of the EMS we want to
use?

I don't agree that you can separate Optics as being only for the use of
longer wavelength (Visual spectrum or say UV-IR).

Optics should be as defined by physics. Any lens element that changes
the character or distribution of any component of the EMS.

I'm going through a small library behind me here are a few snippets:

"The transmission electron microscope is a type of microscope and thus
conforms to the definition of a microscope which is "an optical
instrument consisting of a lens or a combination of lenses used for
making enlarged or magnified images of minute objects.""
-Clinton J. Dawes 'Biological Techniques for Transmission and Scanning
Electron Microscopy 1979 edition published by Ladd. - third printing

That's just one good example.

Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine an
object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
Microscopes from Light microscopes.

Here are a few terms I use:
CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne Whallon
and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
This has been shortened to just:
LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is between
UV and IR

And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:

Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position of
being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that goes
very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).

Make any sense?

Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Biology Department
Central Michigan University
Mt Pleasant, MI 48859



From daemon Wed Jul 24 08:41:42 2002



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:33:38 +0200
Subject: Electropolishing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
Any suggestions for the best electropolishing solution and conditions for a
Nickel-based superalloy (CMSX-4). We have a Struers Tenupol.

Thanks

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Wed Jul 24 08:50:45 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 08:44:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All of these comments raise the issue that there should be a more
rigorous photography component to any course that teaches microscopy,
whether as a field of study or as a tool.
All good microscopy courses teach photography to some extent, but
this should be expanded, and include more theory. And more material
normally considered part of the photography courses taught in art
schools.
This would have obvious influences on training on the legal and
ethical issues of imaging in microscopy. Perhaps education should be
a part of the ethics sessions at M&M.
Phil

} As much as the example of the model annoyed me, I am going to continue
} with it to raise some points.
}
} Let's say the model had her picture taken by one of her boyfriends, who
} happened to have a camera with a long telephoto lens. Subsequently the
} model purchases and uses the new Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement
} device, and diligently follows the instructions for use for three
} weeks. She then has another picture taken.
}
} Scenario 1: The second photo is taken by a different boyfriend, who has
} his favorite super wide-angle lens on his camera, the one with the
} pincushion effect that makes objects in the middle of the field appear
} larger than those to the sides. He has no idea how the first photo was
} taken.
}
} Scenario 2: The second photo is taken by the first boyfriend, who
} deliberately uses a wide-angle lens this time instead of the telephoto.
}
} Scenario 3: In the first two scenarios the model genuinely thinks the
} device has enlarged her bust.
}
} Scenario 4: In the first two scenarios the model knows the device has NOT
} increased her bust, but knows a bit about photography. She knows that the
} telephoto lens will make her bust appear smaller due to foreshortening,
} and the wide angle lens will make it look bigger, and has asked that those
} particular lenses be used for the photos. The boyfriends are in on this or
} they are not in on this.
}
} Scenario 5: The photo shoots were not set up by an advertising agency for
} the Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.
}
} Scenario 6: The photo shoots were set up by an advertising agency for the
} Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.
}
} If you look at all the possible combinations and factor in whether each
} participant knowingly or unknowingly performed their roles, and whether
} they performed their part either knowingly and maliciously, or
} unknowingly, or because they were uneducated about the properties of their
} imaging devices, you can see that the images might or might not represent
} the "truth". And this is WITHOUT digital or even darkroom
} manipulation! Throw in differences in lighting and possibly the film type
} and even the chemicals used to make the prints, and you see that you do
} not have a controlled experiment here. Add a little personal bias (I might
} personally consider the model to be an airhead and the first boyfriend to
} be a fool and the second to be a power-hungry, manipulating character, and
} so might draw conclusions based on personal bias when viewing the
} images) and you've got not only flawed data, but a possible
} misinterpretation of the data.
}
} Now let's open these pictures in Photoshop ...
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Wed Jul 24 09:18:56 2002



From: Gary Gill :      garygill-at-dcla.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 09:12:03 -0500
Subject: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


http://www.reticles.com/cckr810.htm
Klarmann Rulings Inc.
COMPARATOR
KR-810 360° PROTRACTOR

Gary Gill

-----Original Message-----
} From: "Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 6:24 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the microscope.
Eric.


From daemon Wed Jul 24 09:30:05 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 10:29:03 -0400
Subject: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Folks;

Should the term "optical" be used at all when there is an optical to
electronic transformation such as in a photomultiplier tube in an SEM or a
CCD device in an electronic camera? I imagine if the word "optical" is used
there should be no transformation from light to electron and the path
between the human eye and the illuminated specimen should be direct other
than the glass in between. However, one must somehow get the "optical" image
onto some medium such as a piece of paper as one would do in "wet"
photography and emulsions. In the end, every image no matter how generated,
is a perception of reality in the human brain or for that matter any
specie's brain/nervous system. I might ask what is color in the mind? Is
blue still blue when my dog looks at it? I will check with my dog on this.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gillmeister, Russ [mailto:RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 1:32 PM
To: 'Ian MacLaren'
Cc: 'MSA'


Ian,
I think it would be great if the term light microscopy were used.
TEM is definitely an optical microscopy technique.
You could argue about SEM. While the column is electron optical, the image
formation mechanism is not.
SPM is not with possible exception of near field.

My two cents. Or maybe one today.
The longer I work the farther I am from retirement!!!!
Russ Gillmeister
Xerox
~~~~~~~~~~~~~


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 8:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
What do you consider to be the standard terminology for microscopy involving
a conventional microscope with the sample illuminated by light?

Optical microscopy?

Light Microscopy?

Light optical microscopy?

Something else?

The first seems to be often used, but as far as I can see, every form of
microscopy is optical, whether using light, electrons, X-rays or something
else. So, it seems to be a bit too vague.

What should I use then?

Best wishes

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Wed Jul 24 10:28:07 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 11:05:34 -0400
Subject: Polaroid SprintScan45 drivers for Windows 2000

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a polaroid SprintScan45 and we have just updated the computer which is running Windows 2000. Has anyone successfully got this scanner working with 16 bit mode? I would be interested in getting copies of the drivers that you are using. Please respond off the list. Thanks.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)




From daemon Wed Jul 24 10:32:20 2002



From: Matt Ervin :      mervin-at-arl.army.mil
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 11:26:19 -0400
Subject: Re: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Eric-
I noticed that Edmund Industrial Optics sells such an item for
$82.50US. Pg. 269 in their 2002 catalogue (800)363-1992.

Sincerely,
Matthew Ervin, Ph.D.
(301)394-0017 phone, (301)394-1559 fax
MErvin-at-ARL.Army.mil

M/S: AMSRL-SE-RL
US Army Research Laboratory
2800 Powder Mill Road
Adelphi, MD 20783-1197

Disclaimer: The opinions and views expressed above are those of the author
and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory
or any other government agency



"Eric.Hines-at-csiro.au"
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
07/23/02 07:23 PM cc:
Subject: eyepiece graticule






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear all,
Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the
microscope.
Eric.







From daemon Wed Jul 24 10:32:37 2002



From: James.Passmore-at-sealedair.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 11:27:38 -0400
Subject: Re: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Steve,

I tried a couple of searches on ZDNet downloads, and found several
shareware programs priced around $20.

Try this link:
http://downloads-zdnet.com.com/3120-20-0.html?qt=poster&tg=dl-2001
(You will have to weed out programs to post to Usenet newsgroups,
screensavers, etc., but there really aren't too many to deal with.)

HTH,
Jim Passmore
Sr. Analytical Chemist
Cryovac Division
Sealed Air Corporation
james.passmore-at-sealedair.com
864-433-2927 voice
864-433-2205 fax






|---------+----------------------------}
| | swiding |
| | {swiding-at-temple.e|
| | du} |
| | |
| | 07-24-02 08:15 AM|
| | |
|---------+----------------------------}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| To: E-mail/ {Microscopy" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} "-at-nimbus.ocis.temple.edu} |
| cc: |
| Subject: Software hunt update |
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|




------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello List,

Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop, Paint Shop
Pro,
Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
this feature.

Thanks,

Steve Widing
EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
Biology Department
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA









From daemon Wed Jul 24 11:01:42 2002



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 08:54:44 -0700
Subject: Re: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

Illustrator can spread the print over several 8.5 x 11 sheets and I would
expect that Canvas could also. It is called "tiling" so check the Help
files to see if it is listed. We use Illustrator and PowerPoint for
posters up to 44 inches by several feet. PowerPoint is limited to 52 x 52
inches but can be scaled. Illustrator costs $99 with an educational
discount at our bookstore and is the program of choice for posters, etc,
around here. We find some issues with the proprietary postscript in
PowerPoint but no problems with Illustrator.

Good luck,
Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu


At 08:15 AM 7/24/2002 -0400, swiding wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jul 24 11:17:22 2002



From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 12:10:38 -0400
Subject: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Steve,

Do you have access to Microsoft Publisher?? It has templates for banners.
Or, if you need to customize your own sizes, you can do so, and then it has
a print option called "tile". If your material is, say, 18 inches by 4 feet,
the "tile" feature will print it out across an appropriate number of 8.5x11
pages, complete with alignment markings for trimming and lining up the
output. Is this what you need??

###################
Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, EM Facility
Trinity College - LSC314
300 Summit Street
Hartford CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
f. 860-297-2538
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
w. http://www.trincoll.edu/~alehman/
Facility beta: http://www.trincoll.edu/~alehman/EM_Facility.htm


-----Original Message-----
} From: swiding [mailto:swiding-at-temple.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 8:16 AM
To: E-mail


Hello List,

Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop, Paint Shop
Pro,
Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
this feature.

Thanks,

Steve Widing
EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
Biology Department
Temple University
Philadelphia, PA



From daemon Wed Jul 24 11:47:40 2002



From: Kevin Frischmann :      kfrisch-at-amnh.org
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 12:39:30 -0400
Subject: Re: Microscopy nomenclature

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Bob:
}
} Google search "photon microscopy" - 26000 articles http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=photon+microscopy
} Sergey

Sergey:

A caution on misinterpreting number of articles listings on google searches, and some general advice on constructing search strings to better eliminate "false hits", if I may.

It seems to me that two-photon, multi-photon, three-photon, entangled-photon and "photon emission microscopy" ought to be eliminated from your google search judging from the context of this thread (these all seem like much more specific terms than what listers are going after). Trying this google search instead:
"photon microscopy" -2-photon -entangled -two-photon -multi-photon -entangled
cuts your 26000 articles down to 34.

This could not be cut down with more search terms, because google limits search terms to 10 words, preventing me from eliminating "three-photon", "3-photon", "dual-photon", "single-photon", "photon emission microscopy"

Searches within those 34 pages yielded only 1 or 2 that I would say may be using the term "photon microscopy" as a general term like "light microscopy". Looks more like all of them are probably referring to various fluorescence microscopies.

Happy Googling! (how's that for terminology!)

-Kevin


Kevin Frischmann, Laboratory Manager
Microscopy & Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Phone: 212-313-7975
Fax: 212-496-3480
email: kfrisch-at-amnh.org



From daemon Wed Jul 24 12:39:37 2002



From: Kevin Frischmann :      kfrisch-at-amnh.org
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 13:32:42 -0400
Subject: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

If you have Adobe Illustrator "page tiling" will solve your problem. Other programs with "banner" features include: QuarkXpress, PageMaker, and CorelDRAW!. A cheaper, more consumer-oriented alternative is Corel Print House. Also, printer driver features may help - look for "N-up" options (document options... page layout in Windows), which allow spreading a print job across 1x2, 2x2, 2x3, 3x3 & 4x4 pages in the drivers I have.


Kevin Frischmann, Laboratory Manager
Microscopy & Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Phone: (212) 313-7975
Fax: (212) 496-3480
email: kfrisch-at-amnh.org


************************************************************


} Hello List,
}
} Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
} program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
} would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
} the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro,
} Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
} this feature.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Steve Widing
} EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
} Biology Department
} Temple University
} Philadelphia, PA



From daemon Wed Jul 24 12:45:12 2002



From: Pierre-M. Charest :      pcharest-at-rsvs.ulaval.ca
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 13:36:32 -0400
Subject: M&M 2002 - Golf Tournament & Social Events

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear Colleague Microscopist

We still have some places available for the Golf Tournament of
Microscopy & Microanalysis 2002. Departure will be on Sunday August
4 at 9:00 AM in front of the Convention Centre of Quebec City.

If you will to register, please contact Jean-Marc Tremblay at the
following email address:

jmarc-at-qvc.qc.ca

Cost: $75/person includes Green Fee, Cart, Transportation,
Round-trip and refreshments.
Deadline: August 31

The Local Arrangement Committee (LAC) informs you that Option #1
(Firework Festival) for the Wednesday Night Social is sold out.
However, Option #2 (Music and Dinner at the Chapel of Amerique
Francaise) is still on sale. Tickets will be sold at the LAC booth
in the exhibit hall of the Convention Centre.

We look forward to seeing you in the Beautiful City of Quebec,

Pierre



From daemon Wed Jul 24 12:59:34 2002



From: Pierre-M. Charest :      pcharest-at-rsvs.ulaval.ca
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 13:49:26 -0400
Subject: M&M 2002 - Golf Tournament & Social Events

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear Colleague Microscopist

We still have some places (22) available for the Golf Tournament of
Microscopy & Microanalysis 2002. Departure will be on Sunday August
4 at 9:00 AM in front of the Convention Centre of Quebec City.

If you will to register, please contact Jean-Marc Tremblay at the
following email address:

jmarc-at-qvc.qc.ca

Cost: $75/person includes Green Fee, Cart, Transportation,
Round-trip and refreshments.
Deadline Correction: JULY 31

The Local Arrangement Committee (LAC) informs you that Option #1
(Firework Festival) for the Wednesday Night Social is sold out.
However, Option #2 (Music and Dinner at the Chapel of Amerique
Francaise) is still on sale. Tickets will be sold at the LAC booth
in the exhibit hall of the Convention Centre.

We look forward to seeing you in the Beautiful City of Quebec,

Pierre



From daemon Wed Jul 24 14:19:36 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:11:53 -0400
Subject: Electropolishing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I remember using a Perchloric acid solution with Butyl Cellusolve, cooled on a very difficult cast Inconel 718 alloy. I bet that it would work for you.

Please read up on the safety precautions for Perchloric acid solutions.

Here are some recipes to start with. I don't have all the voltages and temperatures. Most of the perchloric solutions that I have used int he past have been chilled.

20%Perchloric acid
70%ethanol
10%butyl cellusolve

20% pechloric
80%ethanol
22V, 0ºC

10% pechloric
90%ethanol
15V, 0ºC

20%Perchloric acid
50%ethanol
15%butyl cellusolve
15%water
4ºC




-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 9:34 AM
To: microscopy list


Dear all,
Any suggestions for the best electropolishing solution and conditions for a
Nickel-based superalloy (CMSX-4). We have a Struers Tenupol.

Thanks

Ian MacLaren
N.B. New address
TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Tel: +49 6151 162894
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/



From daemon Wed Jul 24 14:31:20 2002



From: Chris Jeffree :      c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 20:26:42 +0100
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Geoff
Only some light and electron microscopes can be defined as optical in
the sense that the
image is created using lenses.
The scanning electron microscope does not image an object using
lenses.
In the SEM the sole function of the lenses in the electron optical
column
is to create the electron probe with which the specimen is scanned.
Therefore, by your criterion the TEM would be an optical microscope,
but the SEM would not.
In an exactly analogous way, the functions of the lens optics in a
laser scanning confocal microscope
are to form the diffraction limited spot and to spatially filter the
light emitted from that spot. NOT to generate a 2-D image.
Your definition of "optical" would therefore also exclude LSM from
the class Optical Microscopes.
Personally, I don't think either exclusion is particularly useful,
particularly when we consider that many modern
microscopes are hybrids of optical and other technologies. Where does
STEM fit in? Does x-ray microscopy need to
use an x-ray lens to qualify as an optical technique? What is the
status of scanned probe microscopes that use
laser optics to sense probe movement? Should Near-field optical
microscopy be renamed Near-field light microscopy?

Chris

} Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine
an
} object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} Microscopes from Light microscopes.
}
} Here are a few terms I use:
} CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne
Whallon
} and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} This has been shortened to just:
} LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is
between
} UV and IR
}
} And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
}
} Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position
of
} being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that
goes
} very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
}
} Make any sense?
}
} Geoff Williams
} Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Biology Department
} Central Michigan University
} Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
}
}



From daemon Wed Jul 24 14:42:28 2002



From: Kevin Frischmann :      kfrisch-at-amnh.org
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 15:35:59 -0400
Subject: Re: Software hunt update - my error

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} "...Also, printer driver features may help - look for "N-up" options (document options... page layout in Windows), which allow spreading a print job across 1x2, 2x2, 2x3, 3x3 & 4x4 pages in the drivers I have."

oops - forget that part; N-up is the opposite of what you want, but I believe I've seen print drivers that can accomplish what you want.

Kevin Frischmann, Laboratory Manager
Microscopy & Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Phone: 212-313-7975
Fax: 212-496-3480
email: kfrisch-at-amnh.org



From daemon Wed Jul 24 15:02:23 2002



From: Wang, Zhiyu :      Zhiyu_Wang-at-Maxtor.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 13:56:11 -0600
Subject: FW: INCA deadtime problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi, Yuquan:

Recently I experienced a very similar problem. I got through the problems
and made this toy work.
Here is my status and solution:

System: Oxford Link ISIS 300 with ATW2 window 10 mm2, Hitachi S3500N VP SEM
, W-filament without airlock.
Problem on 03/25/02: Deadtime came to 100% suddenly, even without beam on.
The zero energy peak floated to 0.2-0.3 KeV, heavy background on 0.1-1 KeV.
The system was totally useless.
Solution: Run detector reconditioner program (takes 2.00 hours). Then shut
down EDS computer, and shut down EDS controller box. Then turn on the EDS
controller, and reboot the EDS computer and system. Use Co standard and
high vacuum mode, 25KV, acquire a EDS spectrum. High deadtime was gone.
Adjust beam current so that the count rate is ~1500 and deadtime is ~30%,
and close acquisition window (this step sets up your SEM to right beam dose
for EDS detector). Next, run Full Calibration program and sign Co as the
standard on dialog window. It takes about 5 minutes. Then calibrate the
spectrum for location of zero energy peak on acquisition window. All set up
is done. It is my feeling that the Oxford software has less intelligence to
clean up the junk program in the system and you have to totally shut down
(power off) the system to get rid of the junk program segments.

Problem on 07/19/02: The same problem came again, and the same procedure
was conducted. Problem is gone.

I have no clear clue what causes the high deadtime. If there is a pinhole
on window, the EDS functionality should not be able to recover and abnormal
LN2 consumption would be the result. The work load on this SEM is extremely
heavy, we switch between VP and high vacuum modes, use high voltages from
0.8-25KV at any value, change sample about 30 times/day. No air dry device
or dry N2 attached to the release air line. Icing and outgas product on
surface of window may be the most likely candidate for this problem. You
need to make sure there is no lighting source (chamber view source) and
radioactivity material involved during reconditioning and full calibration
procedure.

Hopeful this helps a bit.

Zhiyu Wang
Sr. Engineer
Maxtor Corp.
Milpitas, CA
(408)894-5588



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Dear Listers:
} } }
} } } The last year we installed ENCA 200 system in our JSM 840 SEM. Last
week
} } } when we repaired our SEM, liquid nitrogen in dewar was emptied to
remove
} } } water. Then we re-filled new liquid nitrogen through "warm up" and
"cool
} } } down" procedures. After that, we tried to calibrate this ISIS system.
When
} } } making "discriminators only", a message showed "ISIS calibration unable
to
} } } measure strobe peak. Abandoning calibration". At somebody's suggestion,
} } } several times of conditioner were conducted, but the situation is the
same.
} } } We couldn't do anything now. The system seems to be locked. Also when
} } } running EDS, no any peaks could be found, showing very high deadtime
(99%).
} } } Even without beam, the deadtime is also very high. It was suspected
that the
} } } detector system was damaged. I suspect that the strobed zero peak is
} } } generated in the XP2 pulse processor, not in the detector. Why
} } } "discriminators only" didn't work?
} } }
} } } If anybody of you has experience with this type of problems, I would
like to
} } } have your opinions and thoughts. Thanks!
} } }
} } } Our system No. 05426-2390-414-51, Model 6506, att 1: 32804c802, att2:
} } } 0120024, window: ATW2 det. area 10 mmxmm.
} } }
} } } Yuquan Ding
} } } Materials Labs
} } } Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
} } } University of Waterloo
} } } Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
} } } 519-888-4567 x3766
} } } Fax: 519-888-6197
} } } Email: yding-at-uwaterloo.ca
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 23 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Jul 24 15:13:41 2002



From: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:11:26 -0400
Subject: Grain Boundary Etch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi people
I need a grain boundary etchant for ceramic chip capacitors. I would like
to view the ceramic boundaries. If someone out there that has a formula to
share I would appreciate. Thank you

p.s. I know this is not the best forum for this question but I have
received no response from EDFAS and hope that someone here or someone you
may know can answer this question.

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
www.tdk.com



From daemon Wed Jul 24 15:26:34 2002



From: Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:19:24 -0400
Subject: microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We need to cut "thick?" cross sections of polymer/metal laminates for FTIR
microscope analysis.
Material thickness is around 100 microns..(section thickness somewhere
around 0.5 to 1mm i think)
I have 2 ultra microtomes but the sample size and section thickness
obtained from the ultramicrotome are to small for this application.

Any suggestions on the type of microtome i should consider. (Used is a
definite option)
or is there another piece of equipment i can use for this?

We are currently slicing pieces of our sample with a razor blade but this
causes some smearing in the layers.
I am currently being courted by one vendor who is going to lend me a
microtome to try out.

Suggestions are greatly appreciated
Vendors please reply to me directly.

Cheers

Paul D. Nolan
Electron Optics

Alcan International Limited
Kingston Research and Development Centre
P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9

Tel: (613) 541-2066
Fax: (613) 541-2134
paul.nolan-at-alcan.com



From daemon Wed Jul 24 15:30:08 2002



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:30:06 -0700
Subject: Licensing policies for use of photomicrographs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I would like to know of any licensing policies and procedures used by
university EM and/or imaging facilities to handle requests to use
photomicrographs.
Thanks once again for your input.
Rosemary



From daemon Wed Jul 24 15:47:07 2002



From: Pollinger, Mel :      pollingm-at-bsci.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 16:41:41 -0400
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Geoff:

Which would you rather be in contact with, a high intensity beam of focused
light from a microscope lamp, or an electron beam of 50,000volts. I think
you are confused if you think there is no difference in IR, UV, visible
light, and electron microscopy. It seems that your desire is to win an
argument based upon silly logic, rather than reason and science.

Mel

} ----------
} From: Geoff Williams[SMTP:willi1gl-at-cmich.edu]
} Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 9:33 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Lets pose a question:
}
} What is microscopy? The use of some form of the EMS to examine an
} object's properties.
}
} What are Optics? Are they not the component of the system that allows
} us to harness and control the particular range of the EMS we want to
} use?
}
} I don't agree that you can separate Optics as being only for the use of
} longer wavelength (Visual spectrum or say UV-IR).
}
} Optics should be as defined by physics. Any lens element that changes
} the character or distribution of any component of the EMS.
}
} I'm going through a small library behind me here are a few snippets:
}
} "The transmission electron microscope is a type of microscope and thus
} conforms to the definition of a microscope which is "an optical
} instrument consisting of a lens or a combination of lenses used for
} making enlarged or magnified images of minute objects.""
} -Clinton J. Dawes 'Biological Techniques for Transmission and Scanning
} Electron Microscopy 1979 edition published by Ladd. - third printing
}
} That's just one good example.
}
} Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine an
} object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} Microscopes from Light microscopes.
}
} Here are a few terms I use:
} CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne Whallon
} and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} This has been shortened to just:
} LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is between
} UV and IR
}
} And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
}
} Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position of
} being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that goes
} very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
}
} Make any sense?
}
} Geoff Williams
} Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Biology Department
} Central Michigan University
} Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
}
}


From daemon Wed Jul 24 16:05:22 2002



From: Gary Gill :      garygill-at-dcla.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 09:12:03 -0500
Subject: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


http://www.reticles.com/cckr810.htm
Klarmann Rulings Inc.
COMPARATOR
KR-810 360° PROTRACTOR

Gary Gill

-----Original Message-----
} From: "Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 6:24 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,
Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the microscope.
Eric.


From daemon Wed Jul 24 16:19:34 2002



From: Pollinger, Mel :      pollingm-at-bsci.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:14:22 -0400
Subject: RE: eyepiece graticule

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Edmund Scientific - check their website

} ----------
} From: Gary Gill[SMTP:garygill-at-dcla.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 10:12 AM
} To: '"Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com';
} microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: eyepiece graticule
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} http://www.reticles.com/cckr810.htm
} Klarmann Rulings Inc.
} COMPARATOR
} KR-810 360° PROTRACTOR
}
} Gary Gill
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: "Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} [mailto:"Eric.Hines%csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 6:24 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: eyepiece graticule
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} Does anyone know of a supplier of eyepiece graticules with radial lines at
} known angles (a protractor) so we can measure angles through the
} microscope.
} Eric.
}


From daemon Wed Jul 24 16:24:26 2002



From: Pollinger, Mel :      pollingm-at-bsci.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:22:34 -0400
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Um,

No argument. Not at all. I thought this was a discussion. Geesh.
Forgive me for thinking there would be reasonable discussion about this
like in other open forum/listserver stuff I'm a member of.

As for silly logic.

Does not logic follow that a detector is the final source? Confocal:
PMT or CCD (in general) is the detector. Still dependent on optics is
it not? IE to focus and scan the beam? Right?

SEM. Sure its just an electron microprobe, but it still uses the
fundamentals of optics to create that probe does it not?

No I'm not confused. I'm pretty darn clear. But maybe I'm making it
too simple. To clean.

Optical microscopy is pretty much all microscopy. Sure some just use a
focused beam of electrons to generate X-rays or to mill samples. Still
requires the use of optics.

I think too many people even in this community loose sight of
fundamental underlining interconnections.

I've no need to win arguments. I enjoy reading the comments.

Mel, I hate to say it but you sound like the person with silly logic
void of tangible related science ;)

Every type of microscope has a different application and use. Yes they
are all pretty much optical microscopes. When you think about them in
that manner and then begin to examine their differences the taxonomy
becomes clear and painfully simple. Maybe it is the fact that taxonomy
isn't unfamiliar to me as a Biologically trained microscopist.

Sorry Allen, your's wasn't quite the RIP. ;)

Geoff

-----Original Message-----
} From: Pollinger, Mel [mailto:pollingm-at-bsci.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 4:42 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; 'Geoff Williams'


Dear Geoff:

I can see that you must win the argument. So be it! You are the winner!

Mel

} ----------
} From: Geoff Williams[SMTP:willi1gl-at-cmich.edu]
} Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 5:18 PM
} To: 'Pollinger, Mel'; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?
}
} Um,
}
} No argument. Not at all. I thought this was a discussion. Geesh.
} Forgive me for thinking there would be reasonable discussion about this
} like in other open forum/listserver stuff I'm a member of.
}
} As for silly logic.
}
} Does not logic follow that a detector is the final source? Confocal:
} PMT or CCD (in general) is the detector. Still dependent on optics is
} it not? IE to focus and scan the beam? Right?
}
} SEM. Sure its just an electron microprobe, but it still uses the
} fundamentals of optics to create that probe does it not?
}
} No I'm not confused. I'm pretty darn clear. But maybe I'm making it
} too simple. To clean.
}
} Optical microscopy is pretty much all microscopy. Sure some just use a
} focused beam of electrons to generate X-rays or to mill samples. Still
} requires the use of optics.
}
} I think too many people even in this community loose sight of
} fundamental underlining interconnections.
}
} I've no need to win arguments. I enjoy reading the comments.
}
} Mel, I hate to say it but you sound like the person with silly logic
} void of tangible related science ;)
}
} Every type of microscope has a different application and use. Yes they
} are all pretty much optical microscopes. When you think about them in
} that manner and then begin to examine their differences the taxonomy
} becomes clear and painfully simple. Maybe it is the fact that taxonomy
} isn't unfamiliar to me as a Biologically trained microscopist.
}
} Sorry Allen, your's wasn't quite the RIP. ;)
}
} Geoff
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Pollinger, Mel [mailto:pollingm-at-bsci.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 4:42 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; 'Geoff Williams'
} Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?
} Importance: High
}
} Dear Geoff:
}
} Which would you rather be in contact with, a high intensity beam of
} focused
} light from a microscope lamp, or an electron beam of 50,000volts. I
} think
} you are confused if you think there is no difference in IR, UV, visible
} light, and electron microscopy. It seems that your desire is to win an
} argument based upon silly logic, rather than reason and science.
}
} Mel
}
} } ----------
} } From: Geoff Williams[SMTP:willi1gl-at-cmich.edu]
} } Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 9:33 AM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?
} }
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Lets pose a question:
} }
} } What is microscopy? The use of some form of the EMS to examine an
} } object's properties.
} }
} } What are Optics? Are they not the component of the system that allows
} } us to harness and control the particular range of the EMS we want to
} } use?
} }
} } I don't agree that you can separate Optics as being only for the use
} of
} } longer wavelength (Visual spectrum or say UV-IR).
} }
} } Optics should be as defined by physics. Any lens element that changes
} } the character or distribution of any component of the EMS.
} }
} } I'm going through a small library behind me here are a few snippets:
} }
} } "The transmission electron microscope is a type of microscope and thus
} } conforms to the definition of a microscope which is "an optical
} } instrument consisting of a lens or a combination of lenses used for
} } making enlarged or magnified images of minute objects.""
} } -Clinton J. Dawes 'Biological Techniques for Transmission and Scanning
} } Electron Microscopy 1979 edition published by Ladd. - third printing
} }
} } That's just one good example.
} }
} } Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine an
} } object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} } Microscopes from Light microscopes.
} }
} } Here are a few terms I use:
} } CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne Whallon
} } and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} } This has been shortened to just:
} } LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is
} between
} } UV and IR
} }
} } And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} } topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
} }
} } Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position of
} } being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that goes
} } very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} } folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
} }
} } Make any sense?
} }
} } Geoff Williams
} } Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} } Biology Department
} } Central Michigan University
} } Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
} }
} }
}


From daemon Wed Jul 24 18:05:08 2002



From: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 18:57:20 -0500
Subject: Mother finds 71 Thousand in 15 Year Olds Closet

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All our mailings are sent complying to the proposed H.R. 3113 Unsolicited Commercial Electronic Mail Act of 2000. Please see the bottom of this message for further information and removal instructions.


PARENTS OF 15 - YEAR OLD - FIND $71,000 CASH HIDDEN IN
HIS CLOSET!

Does this headline look familiar? Of course it does. You most likely have just
seen this story recently featured on a major nightly news program (USA).
And reported elsewhere in the world (including my neck of the woods –
New Zealand). His mother was cleaning and putting laundry away when
she came across a large brown paper bag that was suspiciously buried
beneath some clothes and a skateboard in the back of her 15-year-old sons
closet. Nothing could have prepared her for the shock she got when she
opened the bag and found it was full of cash. Five-dollar bills, twenties,
fifties and hundreds - all neatly rubber-banded in labelled piles.

"My first thought was that he had robbed a bank", says
the 41-year-old woman, "There was over $71,000 dollars in that bag --
that's more than my husband earns in a year".

The woman immediately called her husband at the
car-dealership where he worked to tell him what she had discovered.He came
home right away and they drove together to the boys school and picked him up.
Little did they suspect that where the money came from was more shocking than
actually finding it in the closet.

As it turns out, the boy had been sending out, via
E-mail, a type of "Report" to E-mail addresses that he obtained off the
Internet. Everyday after school for the past 2 months, he had been doing
this right on his computer in his bedroom.

"I just got the E-mail one day and I figured what the
heck, I put my name on it like the instructions said and I started sending it
out", says the clever 15-year-old.

The E-mail letter listed 5 addresses and contained
instructions to send one $5 dollar bill to each person on the list, then delete
the address at the top and move the others addresses Down , and finally
to add your name to the top of the list.

The letter goes on to state that you would receive
several thousand dollars in five-dollar bills within 2 weeks if you sent out
the letter with your name at the top of the 5-address list. "I get junk
E-mail all the time, and really did not think it was going to work", the boy
continues.

Within the first few days of sending out the E-mail,
the Post Office Box that his parents had gotten him for his video-game
magazine subscriptions began to fill up with not magazines, but envelopes
containing $5 bills.

"About a week later I rode [my bike] down to the post office and my box
had 1 magazine and about 300 envelops stuffed in it. There was also a yellow
slip that said I had to go up to the [post office] counter.
I thought I was in trouble or something (laughs)". He goes on, "I went up
to the counter and they had a whole box of more mail for me. I had to ride
back home and empty out my backpack because I could not carry it all".
Over the next few weeks, the boy continued sending out the E-mail."The
money just kept coming in and I just kept sorting it and stashing it in the
closet, barely had time for my homework".He had also been riding his bike
to several of the banks in his area and exchanging the $5 bills for twenties,
fifties and hundreds.

"I didn't want the banks to get suspicious so I kept riding to different banks
with like five thousand at a time in my backpack. I would usually tell the lady
at the bank counter that my dad had sent me in to exchange the money] and
he was outside waiting for me.One time the lady gave me a really strange look
and told me that she would not be able to do it for me and my dad would have
to come in and do it, but I just rode to the next bank down the street (laughs)."
Surprisingly, the boy did not have any reason to be afraid.The reporting news

team examined and investigated the so-called "chain-letter" the boy was
sending out and found that it was not a chain-letter at all.In fact, it was
completely legal according to US Postal and Lottery Laws, Title 18,
Section 1302 and 1341, or Title 18, Section 3005 in the US code, also in the
code of federal regulations, Volume 16, Sections 255 and 436, which
state a product or service must be exchanged for money received.

Every five-dollar bill that he received contained a little note that read,
"Please send me report number XYX".This simple note made the letter
legal because he was exchanging a service (A Report on how-to) for
a five-dollar fee.

[This is the end of the media release. If you would
like to understand how the system works and get your $71,000 - please
continue reading. What appears below is what the 15 year old was sending out
on the net - YOU CAN USE IT TOO - just follow the simple instructions].

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
BE FINANCIALLY FREE LIKE OTHERS WITHIN A YEAR!!! Before
you say "Bull", please read the following. This is the letter you
have been hearing about on the news lately. Due to the popularity of
this letter on the Internet, a national weekly news program recently
devoted an entire show to the investigation of this program described
below, to see if it really can make people money. The show also
investigated whether or not the program was legal. Their findings
proved once and for all that there are "absolutely NO Laws prohibiting
the participation in the program and if people can follow the simple
instructions, they are bound to make some megabucks with only $25
out of pocket cost".


DUE TO THE RECENT INCREASE OF POPULARITY &
RESPECT THIS PROGRAM HAS ATTAINED, IT IS CURRENTLY
WORKING BETTER THAN EVER.


Note* follow the directons below, I had best results the second
time when i hired a bulk email service in addition to following the
reports instructions.

In order for all of us to be successful, many, many emails must be
sent so that the returns are many. I have been extremely successful
using the following company. They send out the offers, and all
I do is accept money for reports, then I send back to the people as
soon as possible.


This is what one had to say: "Thanks to this profitable
opportunity. I was approached many times before but each
time I passed on it. I am so glad I finally joined just to
see what one could expect in return for the minimal effort
and money required. To my astonishment, I received total
$610,470.00 in 21 weeks, with money still coming in".

Pam Hedland, Fort Lee, New Jersey.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Here is another testimonial: "This program has been around
for a long time but I never believed in it. But one day when
I received this again in the mail I decided to gamble my $25
on it. I followed the simple instructions and walaa ..... 3
weeks later the money started to come in. First month I
only made $240.00 but the next 2 months after that I made a
total of $290,000.00. So far, in the past 8 months by re-
entering the program, I have made over $710,000.00 and I am
playing it again. The key to success in this program is to
follow the simple steps and NOT change anything."
More testimonials later but first,


=

=For each report, send $5 CASH, THE NAME & NUMBER OF THE
REPORT YOU ARE ORDERING and YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS to the
person whose name appears ON THAT LIST next to the report.
MAKE SURE YOUR RETURN ADDRESS IS ON YOUR ENVELOPE
TOP LEFT CORNER in case of any mail problems.

=You will need all 5 reports so that you can save them on your computer.
Within a few days you will receive, vie e-mail, each of the 5 reports from
these 5 different individuals. Save them on your computer so they will be
accessible for you to send to the 1,000's of people who will order them from
you. Also make a floppy of these reports and keep it on your desk in case
something happens to your computer.


IMPORTANT - DO NOT alter the names of the people who are
listed next to each report, or their sequence on the list, in any way other
than what is instructed below in step "1 through 6" or you will loose out
on majority of your profits. Once you understand the way this works, you
will also see how it does not work if you change it. Remember, this method
has been tested, and if you alter, it will NOT work!!! People have tried to
put their friends/relatives names on all five thinking they could get all the
money. But it does not work this way. Believe us, we all have tried to
be greedy and then nothing happened. So Do Not try to change anything
other than what is instructed. Because if you do, it will not work for you.
Remember, honesty reaps the reward!!!


1.... After you have ordered all 5 reports, take this
advertisement and REMOVE the name & address of the person in
REPORT # 5. This person has made it through the cycle and is
no doubt counting their fortune.
2.... Move the name & address in REPORT # 4 down TO REPORT #5.
3.... Move the name & address in REPORT # 3 down TO REPORT #4.
4.... Move the name & address in REPORT # 2 down TO REPORT #3.
5.... Move the name & address in REPORT # 1 down TO REPORT #2
6.... Insert YOUR name & address in the REPORT # 1 Position.


PLEASE MAKE SURE you copy every name & address ACCURATELY!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


**** Take this entire letter, with the modified list of
names, and save it on your computer. DO NOT MAKE ANY OTHER
CHANGES. Save this on a disk as well just in case if you
loose any data. To assist you with marketing your business
on the internet, the 5 reports you purchase will provide you
with invaluable marketing information which includes how to
send bulk e-mails legally, where to find thousands of free
classified ads and much more. There are 2 Primary methods to
get this venture going:


METHOD #1: BY SENDING BULK E-MAIL LEGALLY
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Let's say that you decide to start small, just to see how it
goes, and we will assume You and those involved send out
only 5,000e-mails each. Let's also assume that the mailing
receive only a 0.2% response (the response could be much
better but lets just say it is only 0.2%. Also many people
will send out hundreds of thousands e-mails instead of only
5,000 each). Continuing with this example, you send out only
5,000 e-mails.


With a 0.2% response, that is only 10 orders for report # 1.
Those 10 people responded by sending out 5,000 e-mail each
for a total of 50,000. Out of those 50,000 e-mails only 0.2%
responded with orders. That equals 100 people responded and
ordered Report # 2.

Those 100 people mail out 5,000 e-mails each for a total of
500,000 e-mails. The 0.2% response to that is 1000 orders
for Report #3.

Those 1000 people send out 5,000 e-mails each for a total of
5 million e-mails sent out. The 0.2% response to that is
10,000 orders for Report #4.

Those 10,000 people send out 5,000 e-mails each for a total
of 50,000,000 (50 million) e-mails. The 0.2% response to
that is 100,000 orders for Report #5. THAT'S 100,000 ORDERS
TIMES $5 EACH=$500,000.00 (half million).
Your total income in this example is: 1..... $50 +2.....
$500 + 3.....$5,000 + 4..... $50,000 + 5.....
$500,000........Grand Total=$555,550.00


NUMBERS DO NOT LIE. GET A PENCIL & PAPER AND FIGURE OUT THE
WORST POSSIBLE RESPONSES AND NO MATTER HOW YOU CALCULATE IT,
YOU WILL STILL MAKE A LOT OF MONEY!


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
REMEMBER FRIEND, THIS IS ASSUMING ONLY 10 PEOPLE ORDERING
OUT OF 5,000 YOU MAILED TO. Dare to think for a moment what
would happen if everyone or half or even one 4th of those
people mailed 100,000e-mails each or more? There are over
150 million people on the Internet worldwide and counting.
Believe me, many people will do just that, and more!


METHOD #2: BY PLACING FREE ADS ON THE INTERNET
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Advertising on the net is very very inexpensive and there
are hundreds of FREE places to advertise. Placing a lot of
free ads on the Internet will easily get a larger response.


We strongly suggest you start with Method #1 and add METHOD
#2 as you go along. For every $5 you receive, all you must
do is e-mail them the Report they ordered. That's it. Always
provide same day service on all orders. This will guarantee
that the e-mail they send out with your name and address on
it, will be prompt because they can not advertise until they
receive the report.


=ORDER EACH REPORT BY ITS NUMBER & NAME ONLY. Notes: Always
send $5 cash (U.S. CURRENCY) for each Report. Checks NOT
accepted. Make sure the cash is concealed by wrapping it in
at least 2 sheets of paper or aluminum foil. On one of those
sheets of paper, Write the NUMBER & the NAME of the Report
you are ordering, YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS and your name and
postal address.

PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR THESE REPORTS NOW:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
REPORT #1: The Insider's Guide to Advertising for Free on the Net


Order Report #1 from:

M. Eiseman
P.O.Box 451971
Sunrise, FL 33345-1971

__________________________________________________________
REPORT #2: The Insider's Guide to Sending Bulk e-mail on the Net


Order Report #2 from:

GM Boland
353 Jonestown Rd
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27104

__________________________________________________________
REPORT #3: Secret to Multilevel marketing on the Net


Order Report #3 from:

Mrs. Caroline Abee
113 Ervin Ave NE
Valdese, NC 28690-9601

__________________________________________________________
REPORT #4: How to become a millionaire utilizing MLM & the Net


Order Report #4 from:

L. Samon
P. O. Box 31
Castletown
Isle of Man
IM99 5XP

______________________________________________________
REPORT #5: How to send out 0ne Million emails for free


Order Report #5 From:

Gail R. Gitlitz
905 Belltown Rd.
Tellico Plns, Tn 37385

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ YOUR SUCCESS GUIDELINES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Follow these guidelines to guarantee your success:

=within 2 weeks, continue sending e-mails until you do. =After you have received 10 orders, 2 to 3 weeks after that
you should receive 100 orders or more for REPORT #2. If you
did not, continue advertising or sending e-mails until you
do.

=YOU CAN RELAX, because the system is already working for
you, and the cash will continue to roll in! THIS IS
IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER: Every time your name is moved down on
the list, you are placed in front of a Different report.
You can KEEP TRACK of your PROGRESS by watching which report
people are ordering from you. IF YOU WANT TO GENERATE MORE
INCOME SEND ANOTHER BATCH OF E-MAILS AND START THE WHOLE
PROCESS AGAIN. There is NO LIMIT to the income you can
generate from this business!!!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
FOLLOWING IS A NOTE FROM THE ORIGINATOR OF THIS PROGRAM: You
have just received information that can give you financial
freedom for the rest of your life, with NO RISK and JUST A
LITTLE BIT OF EFFORT. You can make more money in the next
few weeks and months than you have ever imagined. Follow the
program EXACTLY AS INSTRUCTED. Do Not change it in any way.
It works exceedingly well as it is now.

Remember to e-mail a copy of this exciting report after you
have put your name and address in Report#1 and moved others
to #2 thru #5 as instructed above. One of the people you
send this to may send out 100,000 or more e-mails and your
name will be on every one of them. Remember though, the
more you send out the more potential customers you will
reach. So my friend, I have given you the ideas,
information, materials and opportunity to become financially
independent. IT IS UP TO YOU NOW!

="My name is Mitchell. My wife, Jody and I live in Chicago. I
am an accountant with a major U.S. Corporation and I make
pretty good money. When I received this program I grumbled
to Jody about receiving "junk mail". I made fun of the whole
thing, spouting my knowledge of the population and
percentages involved. I "knew" it wouldn't work. Jody
totally ignored my supposed intelligence and few days later
she jumped in with both feet. I made merciless fun of her,
and was ready to lay the old "I told you so" on her when the
thing didn't work. Well, the laugh was on me! Within 3 weeks
she had received 50 responses. Within the next 45 days she
had received total $ 147,200.00....all cash! I was shocked.
I have joined Jody in her "hobby".

Mitchell Wolf, Chicago, Illinois

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
"Not being the gambling type, it took me several weeks to
make up my mind to participate in this plan. But
conservative that I am, I decided that the initial
investment was so little that there was just no way that I
wouldn't get enough orders to at least get my money back".
"I was surprised when I found my medium size post office box
crammed with orders. I made $319,210.00 in the first 12
weeks. The nice thing about this deal is that it does not
matter where people live. There simply isn't a better
investment with a faster return and so big".

Dan Sondstrom, Alberta, Canada

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
"I had received this program before. I deleted it, but later
I wondered if I should have given it a try. Of course, I had
no idea who to contact to get another copy, so I had to wait
until I was e-mailed again by someone else......11 months
passed then it luckily came again...... I did not delete
this one! I made more than $490,000 on my first try and all
the money came within 22 weeks".

Susan De Suza, New York, N.Y

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
If you have any questions of the legality of this program,
contact the Office of Associate Director for Marketing
Practices, Federal Trade Commission, Bureau of Consumer
Protection, Washington,D.C.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

This email was sent to you via Saf-E Mail Systems. Your email address was automatically inserted into the To and From addresses to eliminate undeliverables which waste bandwidth and cause internet congestion. Your email or webserver IS NOT being used for the sending of this mail. No-one else is receiving emails from your address. You may utilize the removal link below if you do not wish to receive this mailing.

http://202.105.49.100/remove.html



From daemon Wed Jul 24 18:05:15 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 19:05:02 -0400
Subject: Imaging Micro-organisms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Folks;

Since many of you do biological imaging vis-a-vis SEM and "optical" means, I
have a question. When imaging bacteria or any micro-organism, is the species
identified by it's shape, general apperance, size etc.? Or better yet, just
how is it identified in the EM? Or does this require some other assay for
identification and then it is imaged to generate other information? I don't
image bio materials but it is something that I would like to be able to show
my daughter who is interested in the micro-biological world. I see a future
in electronic bio-identification and since her interests seem to lie in that
direction, I'd like to explain some of this intelligently.

Peter




From daemon Wed Jul 24 18:22:13 2002



From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-mrl.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 18:13:32 -0500
Subject: Out of Office AutoReply: Mother finds 71 Thousand in 15 Year Olds Closet

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ray Twesten will be away from the office until Monday 7/29/02.


From daemon Wed Jul 24 19:06:11 2002



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 19:58:01 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have had great success cutting thick sections 100-500 nm (0.1-0.5 mm)
of biological samples using a Tissue Slicer from EMS. Vibratome is another
brand; not sure who sells it.

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265



From daemon Wed Jul 24 19:07:21 2002



From: eckhard.langer-at-amd.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 02:01:46 +0200
Subject: Out of Office AutoReply: Mother finds 71 Thousand in 15 Year

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm out of the office until 26.07.2002. Please contact MA Meyer or Malwine Cante.

Regards

Eckhard Langer



From daemon Wed Jul 24 19:39:54 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 17:38:18 -0700
Subject: RE: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What difference does this make?

i.e., what is the purpose of this effort?
I think that the image manipulation topic is much
more important than this one. But that is MHO.

gary g.



From daemon Wed Jul 24 20:49:15 2002



From: Tyrone L. Daulton :      tdaulton-at-nrlssc.navy.mil (by way of
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 20:38:41 -0500
Subject: Re: Software hunt - Canvas will work

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Steve Widing,
Canvas will print on multiple sheets which can be taped or glued together to
make banners or posters. You need to set the document size to larger than one
sheet of paper. Select Page Setup in the File menu, select the Canvas 7 (or
Canvas 5) opinion, and click the "tile" button. This will set up
Canvas to print
across multiple sheets which are tiled to match your graphics file.
You can tape
these sheets together to form your banner. Good luck.
Tyrone Daulton

swiding wrote:

}
}
} Hello List,
}
} Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
} program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
} would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
} the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop,
} Paint Shop Pro,
} Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
} this feature.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Steve Widing
} EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
} Biology Department
} Temple University
} Philadelphia, PA

--
_____________________________________________________
Tyrone L. Daulton
Director: Marine Geosciences - Electron Microscopy Facility
Physicist and Senior Electron Microscopist

Naval Research Laboratory
Marine Geosciences Division (Code 7400)
Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-5004

Voice (228)-688-4877
Fax (228)-688-4093
email tdaulton-at-nrlssc.navy.mil
tld-at-howdy.wustl.edu


From daemon Wed Jul 24 20:49:15 2002



From: Nakama, Mari :      MNakama-at-feico.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 20:38:50 -0500
Subject: Listserve Posting from FEI Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




This message is in response to a Listserver posting concerning Veeco
and FEI Merger.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Since we announced our proposed merger with Veeco Instruments last
Friday, July 12, some of you have raised concern over our future
commitment to your needs. FEI has grown as a result of our strong
technology portfolio and our ability to leverage it across our
diverse customer base, including the very important scientific
research sector. The solutions we offer cross over our industry
sectors more every year. Make no mistake, we intend to continue the
growth of Veeco FEI through expanded focus on the needs of the
scientific research industry and microscopists, delivering the tools
you need to succeed. Please visit our website at www.feicompany.com
{ {http://www.feicompany.com} http://www.feicompany.com} and visit the
merger information page that is accessible from our home page for
more on how we intend to serve you better as a result of this merger.

Thank you,
Vahe' Sarkissian,
Chairman, president and CEO, FEI Company.



Cheers,
George Scholes
Director of North American Sales
7451 NW Evergreen Parkway
Hillsboro, OR 97124
PH # 503-640-7644
FX # 503-640-7663
gscholes-at-feico.com


From daemon Wed Jul 24 20:49:16 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 18:53:08 -0700
Subject: Re: Imaging Micro-organisms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter,

Microbes are like people and come in different sizes, shapes and
morphologies but can not be identified to the genus/species level
(such as Salmonella typhimurium) using EM alone. EM will allow one to
identify the microbe to the major group, however.

For example, the major categories of bacteria are Gram positive, Gram
negative. EM (as well as light microscopy after using Gram staining
procedures) will permit one to ID the bacteria as G+ or G- based on
cell wall structure. Then, based on the size and shape of the cell
(coccus, rod, curved, pleomorphic, etc.), the presence of various
structures (flagella, oil bodies, extracellular capsules, etc.) one
would probably get a "reasonable idea" of the genus (Streptococcus,
Bacillus, Vibrio, etc.) but that's about all one can achieve using
morphology alone.

Further biochemical (physiological) tests would be needed after
isolating the organism and growing a pure culture of it. These are
standard, microbiological tests and commercial kits are available,
including immunological and molecular ones.

Fungi would be identified in a similar manner (morphology, staining
reactions in LM, isolation of organism, biochemical/physiological
tests, etc.).

Viruses could be identified to the major family based on morphology
(herpes, adenovirus, poxvirus, etc.) and some viruses are so unique
(rabies, Ebola, Hepatitis B) that the morphology (and clinical
presentation) would give a fairly accurate "presumptive diagnosis"
that could later be confirmed by more specific tests (immunological,
molecular, etc.). An experienced medical microbiologist or
pathologist can give an amazingly accurate identification based on
morphology and clinical symptoms alone.

Of course, in the case of a newly emerged virus (where no test
systems have been developed) EM is extremely valuable and may give
the first indication that we are dealing with a new organism (Ebola,
Hepatitis B, HIV).

I hope that the microbiologically-oriented microscopists/pathologists
who follow this list will comment further on this matter based on
their own clinical and laboratory experiences dealing with a variety
of micro organisms. Needless to say, this is an extremely interesting
and potentially life-saving activity.

John B.


} From: Peter Tomic {PTomic-at-anadigics.com}
To: MSA listserver {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


It is and it isn't. There are rod bacteria, spiral bacteria,
and other sorts of bacteria that do allow identification by
general appearance. I've have major discussions with
Tina Swatch about morphology differences between
similar bacteriums.

It seems that the bottom line is that you can distinguish the
major types by rod, sphere, spiral, etc. But to make a
determination of a specific type within one of these groups
is difficult. For example, Yersinia pestis and Yersinia enterocolitica
look basically the same. Pestis is the cause of the Plague. To me,
side by side, they look the same. E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria
kinda look the same too. But I'm not a microbio guy. So maybe
they would have a sweet spot in the microbio's eye.

If you want to find out what a specific bacterium is, that leads
to serology. That is way out of my league. I too look for
morphology. I'm most interested in whether the thing looks
like a rod or a spiral. And I want to know if this rod looks like
some other bacterium rod. Other than that, it is academic. And it is.

But for your daughter, the initial shapes should be of importance.
Rod, cocci, spiral, etc. These are well-documented. It is a very
big, tiny world. Marvelous....and potentially deadly.

For a good reference, try Black, J. (1996). Microbiology: Principles
& applications. Prentice-Hall: New Jersey. ISBN 0-13-190745-X

If she can get through this text, she should be able to get through
microbio 1A with no sweat. I sweat every time I read this book. There
is a lot there. Very good. It is sort of like a compendium of Widlar,
Grebene, Hunter, Meyer, Hamilton, Lynn, and Gray. But these are
not microbio. :-)

gary g.



At 04:05 PM 7/24/2002, you wrote:

} Folks;
}
} Since many of you do biological imaging vis-a-vis SEM and "optical" means, I
} have a question. When imaging bacteria or any micro-organism, is the species
} identified by it's shape, general apperance, size etc.? Or better yet, just
} how is it identified in the EM? Or does this require some other assay for
} identification and then it is imaged to generate other information? I don't
} image bio materials but it is something that I would like to be able to show
} my daughter who is interested in the micro-biological world. I see a future
} in electronic bio-identification and since her interests seem to lie in that
} direction, I'd like to explain some of this intelligently.
}
} Peter



From daemon Wed Jul 24 21:07:06 2002



From: =?windows-1252?Q?S=F8rensen_Henning_Sund?= :      Henning.S-at-danfoss.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 04:00:47 +0200
Subject: Autosvar - Ikke til stede: Mother finds 71 Thousand in 15 Year Ol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jeg er tilbage på kontoret mandag d.29. juli 2002.
I am out of the office until Monday Juli 29, 2002.

Med venlig hilsen/Best regards
Henning Sund Sørensen
L7-S40/Tlf.:2309



From daemon Wed Jul 24 21:09:17 2002



From: Agneta =?iso-8859-1?Q?=D6stberg?= :      agneta.ostberg-at-sandvik.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 03:59:56 +0200
Subject: Agneta =?iso-8859-1?Q?=D6stberg=2F0140=2FSANDVIK_is_out_of_the_office=2E?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I will be out of the office starting 2002-07-08 and will not return until
2002-08-05.

I will respond to your message when I return. If urgent contact Mette
Ramberg/0140/SANDVIK or Claes-Ove Pettersson/0140/SANDVIK.



From daemon Wed Jul 24 21:24:42 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 21:14:56 -0500
Subject: Adminsitrivia: Out of Office replies....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes folks I see them.

I'm trying to figure out how to effectively block them, all
of which started with a spam mail about "Mother finding 71 ...."

Now I hope you all understand why I ask people to unsubscribe rather
than just turning on an " out of the office message" ! I've been
able to stop these in the past, but the characteristics of
this set are unique and are get through the junk mail filter.

sigh...

Nestor


From daemon Wed Jul 24 21:30:46 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 19:29:52 -0700
Subject: Re: Software hunt update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a bleed issue. Most all programs can handle this.

There are many apps out there that can do what you want
and more. The specific ways of doing this will vary greatly.

Check it out from all aspects.

gary g.


At 05:15 AM 7/24/2002, you wrote:

} Hello List,
}
} Thanks for all the suggestions. What I am looking for is a graphics
} program that will print banners on sheet paper (8.5 x 11). Our old program
} would spread the banner across the sheets. After printing, you would put
} the sheets together for the banner. We have Canvas, Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro,
} Powerpoint, etc. software but as far as I can determine none of them have
} this feature.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Steve Widing
} EM Tech / Computer Labs Manager
} Biology Department
} Temple University
} Philadelphia, PA



From daemon Wed Jul 24 21:34:02 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 19:33:13 -0700
Subject: Re: Grain Boundary Etch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Why not just backscatter this image? There would not
be any special specimen prep or other efforts.

This is done all the time for FA of passive and active
components.

gary g.


At 01:11 PM 7/24/2002, you wrote:

} Hi people
} I need a grain boundary etchant for ceramic chip capacitors. I would like
} to view the ceramic boundaries. If someone out there that has a formula to
} share I would appreciate. Thank you
}
} p.s. I know this is not the best forum for this question but I have
} received no response from EDFAS and hope that someone here or someone you
} may know can answer this question.
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.tdk.com



From daemon Wed Jul 24 23:49:02 2002



From: System Attendant :      ZMAIL-SA-at-zilog.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jul 2002 22:38:58 -0600
Subject: ScanMail Message: To Sender, sensitive content found and action t

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Trend SMEX Content Filter has detected sensitive content.

Place = microscopy-at-microscopy.com; ; ; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sender = microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject = Mother finds 71 Thousand in 15 Year Olds Closet
Delivery Time = July 24, 2002 (Wednesday) 22:38:56
Policy = Anti-Spam
Action on this mail = Quarantine message

Warning message from administrator:
Content filter has detected a sensitive e-mail.


From daemon Thu Jul 25 00:48:46 2002



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 00:44:00 -0700
Subject: RE: Listserve Posting from FEI Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you, Mari, for passing that belated message on.

I do hope that Veeco FEI breaks the mold of past mergers. This letter and
what is available on the web site is certainly more than past events have
offered. The only thing that would have offered more assurance would have
been a higher up addressing this forum directly. Time will tell.


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Wednesday, July 24, 2002 6:39 PM, Nakama, Mari [SMTP:MNakama-at-feico.com]
wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} This message is in response to a Listserver posting concerning Veeco
} and FEI Merger.
} -----------------------------------------------------------
} Since we announced our proposed merger with Veeco Instruments last
} Friday, July 12, some of you have raised concern over our future
} commitment to your needs. FEI has grown as a result of our strong
} technology portfolio and our ability to leverage it across our
} diverse customer base, including the very important scientific
} research sector. The solutions we offer cross over our industry
} sectors more every year. Make no mistake, we intend to continue the
} growth of Veeco FEI through expanded focus on the needs of the
} scientific research industry and microscopists, delivering the tools
} you need to succeed. Please visit our website at www.feicompany.com
} { {http://www.feicompany.com} http://www.feicompany.com} and visit the
} merger information page that is accessible from our home page for
} more on how we intend to serve you better as a result of this merger.
}
} Thank you,
} Vahe' Sarkissian,
} Chairman, president and CEO, FEI Company.
}
}
}
} Cheers,
} George Scholes
} Director of North American Sales
} 7451 NW Evergreen Parkway
} Hillsboro, OR 97124
} PH # 503-640-7644
} FX # 503-640-7663
} gscholes-at-feico.com
}



From daemon Thu Jul 25 03:59:49 2002



From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 10:18:43 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Re: Electropolishing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




hi,
Struers sold original solution for electropolishing nickel alloys or ask
this company about composition and technical parameters for tenupol machine,
in the many books from Vander Voort via ASTM handbook to Petzow, or in
the internet you can find data about solution for polishing nickel

best regards

Krzysztof Jan Huebner

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl} :-)

Instytut Odlewnictwa
ul Zakopianska 73 telefon (0-12) 2618111 wew 356
30-418 Krakow faks (0-12) 2660870

On Wed, 24 Jul 2002, Ian MacLaren wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear all,
} Any suggestions for the best electropolishing solution and conditions for a
} Nickel-based superalloy (CMSX-4). We have a Struers Tenupol.
}
} Thanks
}
} Ian MacLaren
} N.B. New address
} TU-Darmstadt, FB Materialwissenschaft, FG Strukturforschung
} Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
} Tel: +49 6151 162894
} ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://members.lycos.co.uk/IanMacLaren/
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Jul 25 04:07:50 2002



From: Sousan Abolhassani :      sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 11:01:15 +0200
Subject: Re: Ethical and legal issues in imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From a scientifique point of view, microscopy (as a general
term that would define all techniques mentioned in the recent
list messages and other non-mentioned ones), is
a method of OBSERVATION of phenomena (usually) of interest
to the scientifique community.

Therefore, like any other scientifique technique, microscopy
is a tool for the study of phenomena. The data obtained (again
like any other scientifique technique) is to be collected
carefully and subsequently interpreted.

An honest researcher and scientist is expected, when reporting
his/her work, to distinguish between the results of his/her
OBSERVATIONS (i.e. the data) and the INTERPRETATION of those results.

The observations being exposed without prejudice and therefore
without manipulation, should be reported to the scientifique
community, in order that any other scientist could use the
data as a set of facts that can be accumulated for
the understanding of the phenomena, independant from the
way the data is interpreted by the observer.

If so, the observer has the right to give his/her interpretation,
by clearly defining them as such, which if it is done without any
prejudice and by performing a careful analysis, should further help to
elucidate the understanding of the phenomenon, because the
observer is the one who has the closest access to his/her
OBSERVATIONS.

This would mean that any manipulation of data (whether it is images
or other data) would be in fact a self destroying effort in
a scientifique study, the most valuable contribution of the scientist
starting with his/her effort to collect a correct data.

A true scientist in my opinion is one who sincerely wishes to help
advance the science and who does not dogmatically fix his/her mind
to an INTERPRETATION; the history showing us several examples of
the failure of such attitudes, when the discoveries have been
braught by pioneers of modern science.

Regards,

Sousan

Philip Oshel wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} All of these comments raise the issue that there should be a more
} rigorous photography component to any course that teaches microscopy,
} whether as a field of study or as a tool.
} All good microscopy courses teach photography to some extent, but
} this should be expanded, and include more theory. And more material
} normally considered part of the photography courses taught in art
} schools.
} This would have obvious influences on training on the legal and
} ethical issues of imaging in microscopy. Perhaps education should be
} a part of the ethics sessions at M&M.
} Phil
}
} } As much as the example of the model annoyed me, I am going to continue
} } with it to raise some points.
} }
} } Let's say the model had her picture taken by one of her boyfriends, who
} } happened to have a camera with a long telephoto lens. Subsequently the
} } model purchases and uses the new Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement
} } device, and diligently follows the instructions for use for three
} } weeks. She then has another picture taken.
} }
} } Scenario 1: The second photo is taken by a different boyfriend, who has
} } his favorite super wide-angle lens on his camera, the one with the
} } pincushion effect that makes objects in the middle of the field appear
} } larger than those to the sides. He has no idea how the first photo was
} } taken.
} }
} } Scenario 2: The second photo is taken by the first boyfriend, who
} } deliberately uses a wide-angle lens this time instead of the telephoto.
} }
} } Scenario 3: In the first two scenarios the model genuinely thinks the
} } device has enlarged her bust.
} }
} } Scenario 4: In the first two scenarios the model knows the device has NOT
} } increased her bust, but knows a bit about photography. She knows that the
} } telephoto lens will make her bust appear smaller due to foreshortening,
} } and the wide angle lens will make it look bigger, and has asked that those
} } particular lenses be used for the photos. The boyfriends are in on this or
} } they are not in on this.
} }
} } Scenario 5: The photo shoots were not set up by an advertising agency for
} } the Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.
} }
} } Scenario 6: The photo shoots were set up by an advertising agency for the
} } Super-Duper-Triple-D Breast Enhancement Device.
} }
} } If you look at all the possible combinations and factor in whether each
} } participant knowingly or unknowingly performed their roles, and whether
} } they performed their part either knowingly and maliciously, or
} } unknowingly, or because they were uneducated about the properties of their
} } imaging devices, you can see that the images might or might not represent
} } the "truth". And this is WITHOUT digital or even darkroom
} } manipulation! Throw in differences in lighting and possibly the film type
} } and even the chemicals used to make the prints, and you see that you do
} } not have a controlled experiment here. Add a little personal bias (I might
} } personally consider the model to be an airhead and the first boyfriend to
} } be a fool and the second to be a power-hungry, manipulating character, and
} } so might draw conclusions based on personal bias when viewing the
} } images) and you've got not only flawed data, but a possible
} } misinterpretation of the data.
} }
} } Now let's open these pictures in Photoshop ...
} }
} } Aloha,
} } Tina
} }
} }
} } ****************************************************************************
} } * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} } * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} } * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} } ****************************************************************************
}
} --
} Philip Oshel
} Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
} Department of Animal Sciences
} University of Wisconsin
} 1675 Observatory Drive
} Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
} voice: (608) 263-4162
} fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Thu Jul 25 07:04:45 2002



From: Microshaw-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 07:56:29 -0400
Subject: Poor Angela

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Nice scam.

From daemon Thu Jul 25 07:54:19 2002



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=F6ran_Axelsson?= :      axelsson-at-acc.umu.se
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 14:54:31 +0200
Subject: Re: Software hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

OpenOffice was mentioned in a previous posting. When I read a later
answer I added one and one and
realised I should press help in my OpenOffice.
There was one entry for "tiling - pages for printing in presentations"
"Tile pages
Select this option if the pages are to be printed in tile format.
For this purpose, select a page format
that is larger than the paper format."

.. and it won't cost you a cent to try (unless you have a modem
connection :-)

http://www.openoffice.org/

Nuff said!

Regards, Göran Axelsson



swiding wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Thu Jul 25 08:04:45 2002



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 08:58:06 -0400
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris,

I've noticed that the list has come up quite consistently saying SEM
doesn't fit the definition. Well technically no in some respects, but
in theory it does use optical properties and principles to create a
probe.

Sorry for draggin this seemingly tiresome discussion on.

For the record - that definition is Dawes - not mine. And When I read
it I'm not sure how it excludes LSM or SEM. But then I'm sure Mel knows
in his mind why. ;)

The end result is still an image that used optics to either create a
probe or a line and taking the information from that line and
translating it into an image.

Forgive me if this bores the list. I'll make every attempt to ignore
the desire to post anything about this subject, from here on out.

Geoff

-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Jeffree [mailto:c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 3:27 PM
To: Geoff Williams
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Geoff
Only some light and electron microscopes can be defined as optical in
the sense that the
image is created using lenses.
The scanning electron microscope does not image an object using
lenses.
In the SEM the sole function of the lenses in the electron optical
column
is to create the electron probe with which the specimen is scanned.
Therefore, by your criterion the TEM would be an optical microscope,
but the SEM would not.
In an exactly analogous way, the functions of the lens optics in a
laser scanning confocal microscope
are to form the diffraction limited spot and to spatially filter the
light emitted from that spot. NOT to generate a 2-D image.
Your definition of "optical" would therefore also exclude LSM from
the class Optical Microscopes.
Personally, I don't think either exclusion is particularly useful,
particularly when we consider that many modern
microscopes are hybrids of optical and other technologies. Where does
STEM fit in? Does x-ray microscopy need to
use an x-ray lens to qualify as an optical technique? What is the
status of scanned probe microscopes that use
laser optics to sense probe movement? Should Near-field optical
microscopy be renamed Near-field light microscopy?

Chris

} Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine
an
} object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} Microscopes from Light microscopes.
}
} Here are a few terms I use:
} CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne
Whallon
} and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} This has been shortened to just:
} LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is
between
} UV and IR
}
} And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
}
} Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position
of
} being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that
goes
} very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
}
} Make any sense?
}
} Geoff Williams
} Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Biology Department
} Central Michigan University
} Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
}
}




From daemon Thu Jul 25 08:05:55 2002



From: Margaret M. Miller :      millermm-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 07:59:47 -0500
Subject: relocating to Houston,TX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

I know of someone who wishes to relocate to
Houston. If anyone is interested in a hard working,
dedicated team player please send contact information and I will pass it on.

Thanks in advance.



From daemon Thu Jul 25 09:22:52 2002



From: Jay Stanley :      jaystanley-at-cox.net
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 09:20:08 -0500
Subject: TLM :Wild M20 screw

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anybody have any idea what the measurment and thread count is on the Wild
M20 condenser set screw (the one that holds the condenser in the carrier)??
Thanks
Jay



From daemon Thu Jul 25 09:22:52 2002



From: kbovard-at-creighton.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 09:14:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Lodging for MSA 2002 in Quebec (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I just found out that I have been OK'd to go to the MSA 2002 Conference in
Quebec City. Now I'm scrambling to find a hotel. All of the hotels that
the conference cites are full and from what I can tell about the city,
many other hotels are full too. Does anyone have any leads as to a
reasonably-priced hotel that is close to the Convention Center. I am a
woman traveling alone and so safety is a high concern. I really don't
need a 4-star hotel either. Additionally, does anyone need a roommate. I
am a non-smoker, non-partier and consider myself a fairly respectful
roommate. It is nice to have someone to watch out for you in a strange
place.

Sincerely,
Karen Bovard
Creighton University Medical Center
Pathology Electron Microscopy Lab
Omaha, Nebraska

(402-280-4651)




From daemon Thu Jul 25 09:44:01 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 09:37:22 -0500
Subject: Re: Imaging Micro-organisms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter,

Welcome to the wonderful world of taxonomy and systematics. There is
no simple answer to your question, other than "It depends, what kind
of critter are we talking about?"
Very little can be said about bacteria on the basis of simple
morphology. Gross descriptions can be made, as in "rod-shaped",
"coccus", "coccoid in a tetrad", and the like, but that's about it.
Much more information not obtainable from morphology alone is needed.
Other microbial organisms must be identified by morphology as seen in
the light microscope. Ciliates for example can often be gotten to
family in the SEM, sometimes to genus (I wouldn't trust species), and
light microscopy is required for species identification -- this is
usually done by silver staining of the kinetochores at the bases of
the cilia.
Some of the testate taxa of amoebae can be ID'd to lower levels by
the form of the test. Here, I mean the forms that construct little
houses to live in, *not* the forms that secrete "shells". or
"skeletons" (I'm avoiding the correct technical terms here to get the
idea across).
Foraminiferans, Radiolarians, Acantharia (with strontium sulphate
"skeletons" no less) and other such amoeboid forms, and groups such
as diatoms, and other "skeleton" forming groups are ID'd to species
by light microscopic morphology or SEM, after removal of the organic
bits. Either by killing and chemical means, or a few thousands or
millions of years of geological time.
Diatoms also used to be ID'd by producing metal-shadowed carbon
replicas of the test and imaging them in the TEM.
Groups that grow plates on the outside, such as some dinoflagellates
and coccolithophorids are ID'd often or exclusively on the morphology
of the plates, and this requires light microscopy or SEM.

Generally speaking, Protistans are all identified by light
microscopy. Some IDs may now be made by SEM or even TEM, but usually
these are supplementary methods for studies of evolutionary
relationships.
This is also true for most groups -- up to the phylum level -- of
small metazoans and algae, and indeed for macroscopic critters,
microscopic data may be either required or useful for identification.
Bacteria (in the broad sense), no. They can be grouped into broad
categories, but without extensive information on colony formation,
metabolic requirements and products, behavior (such as motility) and
so forth, they can't be ID'd by morphology.
Many of us have been doing "electronic bio-identification" for
decades. The future is there, if only we can convince the people that
sign the paychecks. Until then, we'll run microscopy facilities.
A good place to start is Dave Scharf's SEM books for neat images with
good information, and a good invertebrate text, such as Brusca and
Brusca "Invertebrate Zoology". But there are a wealth of such
sources, and a bookstore with a good nature section will have some on
their shelves. Fun browsing.

Phil

} Folks;
}
} Since many of you do biological imaging vis-a-vis SEM and "optical" means, I
} have a question. When imaging bacteria or any micro-organism, is the species
} identified by it's shape, general apperance, size etc.? Or better yet, just
} how is it identified in the EM? Or does this require some other assay for
} identification and then it is imaged to generate other information? I don't
} image bio materials but it is something that I would like to be able to show
} my daughter who is interested in the micro-biological world. I see a future
} in electronic bio-identification and since her interests seem to lie in that
} direction, I'd like to explain some of this intelligently.
}
} Peter

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Thu Jul 25 12:28:21 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 11:28:41 -0600
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Geoff,

I think you said it yourself: In one case optics is used to create a probe
(not an image), in the other case optics is used to create the image itself.


Would you call an EDS spectrum also an "optical image"? It is created using
the same probe you used for the micrograph (or "SEM image").

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Geoff Williams [mailto:willi1gl-at-cmich.edu]
Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2002 6:58 AM
To: 'Chris Jeffree'
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Chris,

I've noticed that the list has come up quite consistently saying SEM
doesn't fit the definition. Well technically no in some respects, but
in theory it does use optical properties and principles to create a
probe.

Sorry for draggin this seemingly tiresome discussion on.

For the record - that definition is Dawes - not mine. And When I read
it I'm not sure how it excludes LSM or SEM. But then I'm sure Mel knows
in his mind why. ;)

The end result is still an image that used optics to either create a
probe or a line and taking the information from that line and
translating it into an image.

Forgive me if this bores the list. I'll make every attempt to ignore
the desire to post anything about this subject, from here on out.

Geoff

-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Jeffree [mailto:c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 3:27 PM
To: Geoff Williams
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Geoff
Only some light and electron microscopes can be defined as optical in
the sense that the
image is created using lenses.
The scanning electron microscope does not image an object using
lenses.
In the SEM the sole function of the lenses in the electron optical
column
is to create the electron probe with which the specimen is scanned.
Therefore, by your criterion the TEM would be an optical microscope,
but the SEM would not.
In an exactly analogous way, the functions of the lens optics in a
laser scanning confocal microscope
are to form the diffraction limited spot and to spatially filter the
light emitted from that spot. NOT to generate a 2-D image.
Your definition of "optical" would therefore also exclude LSM from
the class Optical Microscopes.
Personally, I don't think either exclusion is particularly useful,
particularly when we consider that many modern
microscopes are hybrids of optical and other technologies. Where does
STEM fit in? Does x-ray microscopy need to
use an x-ray lens to qualify as an optical technique? What is the
status of scanned probe microscopes that use
laser optics to sense probe movement? Should Near-field optical
microscopy be renamed Near-field light microscopy?

Chris

} Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine
an
} object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} Microscopes from Light microscopes.
}
} Here are a few terms I use:
} CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne
Whallon
} and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} This has been shortened to just:
} LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is
between
} UV and IR
}
} And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
}
} Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position
of
} being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that
goes
} very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
}
} Make any sense?
}
} Geoff Williams
} Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Biology Department
} Central Michigan University
} Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
}
}




From daemon Thu Jul 25 12:48:38 2002



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 13:46:12 -0700
Subject: fiber optic coupling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are purchasing a small UV laser (Oriel 79111 -- any comment son this
welcome too) for zapping cells in an OPTICAL MICROSCOPE at 337nm.

Instead of dealing with mirros and an open beam in the lab, Oriel
recommends its fiber optic which has a standard SMA termination.

We're new at this laser stuff. Does anybody know how to connect the fiber
to the UV in port at the back of an Olympus microscope?

Thanks!


____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Thu Jul 25 16:13:32 2002



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 16:05:06 -0500
Subject: Blade holder for high profile, heavy duty blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everyone,

We are looking for a new blade holder that will work in a sliding
microtome to section celloidin embedded temporal bones. We want
to use high profile blades that are heavy duty to reduce chatter.
We found several sources for the blades, but we can't find a holder
that will hold a blade that is both high profile AND heavy duty
(.033"-.035" thick).Does anyone know of a supplier of a holder for
this type of blade?

Thanks in advance,
Karen Pawlowski, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
UT Dallas



From daemon Thu Jul 25 17:08:42 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 17:02:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Lodging for MSA 2002 in Quebec (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I don't seem to have the URL anymore, but go to the Quebec City web
site (I got it by a Google search) and go to "accomodations". Click
on the downtown and old city areas, and you'll get about 100 hotels,
most of them cheaper than the meeting hotels, and within 5 - 10
minutes walk of the convention center.
Phil

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Thu Jul 25 18:47:13 2002



From: Benyam Estifanos :      benyam-at-mac.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 19:32:38 -0400
Subject: Re: Lodging for MSA 2002 in Quebec (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Karen,

You may try the following web site:
http://www.bbselect.com
or call them 1 800 741-1617 (Reservation-at-BBSelect.com).

Regards,
Benyam

On Thursday, July 25, 2002, at 10:14 AM,
"kbovard-at-creighton.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I just found out that I have been OK'd to go to the MSA 2002 Conference
} in
} Quebec City. Now I'm scrambling to find a hotel. All of the hotels
} that
} the conference cites are full and from what I can tell about the city,
} many other hotels are full too. Does anyone have any leads as to a
} reasonably-priced hotel that is close to the Convention Center. I am a
} woman traveling alone and so safety is a high concern. I really don't
} need a 4-star hotel either. Additionally, does anyone need a
} roommate. I
} am a non-smoker, non-partier and consider myself a fairly respectful
} roommate. It is nice to have someone to watch out for you in a strange
} place.
}
} Sincerely,
} Karen Bovard
} Creighton University Medical Center
} Pathology Electron Microscopy Lab
} Omaha, Nebraska
}
} (402-280-4651)
}
}
}



From daemon Thu Jul 25 19:14:32 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 21:28:12 -0400
Subject: fiber optic coupling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you tried TBS?

-----Original Message-----
} From: Karen Pawlowski [mailto:kpawlow-at-swbell.net]
Sent: July 25, 2002 3:05 PM
To: Histology Net List Server (E-Mail); MSA listserver submission


Michael;

I have a New Wave Corp. laser I use on a micromanipulator in the lab.
[semiconductors]. It is used to cut thin and thick films of metal in the
range of 400 angstroms to several microns. However, this laser was married
to a Mitutoyo widefield microscope and a filter was placed in the optical
path in front of the eyepieces for safety reasons by New Wave. I strongly
recommend that you check with the mfg. and your safety officer, if you have
one, or OSHA, relative to the possibility of eye injury. You don't want to
find out later that you are generating lesions in your retina when firing
it. The calculation for permissible emission is somewhat complex and
involves wavelength, power, pulse width and repetition rate so it's not
particularly straightforward. I assume this is a pulsed laser application.
If CW [continuos wave], the allowable energy changes.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.
Warren, New Jersey

-----Original Message-----
} From: Michael Cammer [mailto:cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2002 4:46 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


We are purchasing a small UV laser (Oriel 79111 -- any comment son this
welcome too) for zapping cells in an OPTICAL MICROSCOPE at 337nm.

Instead of dealing with mirros and an open beam in the lab, Oriel
recommends its fiber optic which has a standard SMA termination.

We're new at this laser stuff. Does anybody know how to connect the fiber
to the UV in port at the back of an Olympus microscope?

Thanks!


____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.

Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461

(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Thu Jul 25 20:35:36 2002



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2002 20:29:47 -0500
Subject: Re: Blade holder for high profile, heavy duty blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Robin,

I did talk to TBS and they said none of their holders accomodate the
highprofile-heavy duty blades. The only holder they have that
accomodates heavy duty blades is a low profile holder.

Karen

Robin Thain wrote:
}
} Have you tried TBS?
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Karen Pawlowski [mailto:kpawlow-at-swbell.net]
} Sent: July 25, 2002 3:05 PM
} To: Histology Net List Server (E-Mail); MSA listserver submission
} Subject: Blade holder for high profile, heavy duty blades
}
} Hi everyone,
}
} We are looking for a new blade holder that will work in a sliding
} microtome to section celloidin embedded temporal bones. We want
} to use high profile blades that are heavy duty to reduce chatter.
} We found several sources for the blades, but we can't find a holder
} that will hold a blade that is both high profile AND heavy duty
} (.033"-.035" thick).Does anyone know of a supplier of a holder for
} this type of blade?
}
} Thanks in advance,
} Karen Pawlowski, Ph.D.
} Research Scientist
} UT Dallas



From daemon Fri Jul 26 05:16:25 2002



From: heckman-at-bgnet.bgsu.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 06:06:18 -0500
Subject: dye specific for collagen or fibrin?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear list-ers-
I got an inquiry from a former student:
"I'm looking for a dye/stain
that we could use on native collagen or elastin or fibrin as an
indicator and that would then give us a single peak absorbance at about
650 nm or higher. I've found numerous dyes, but they do not have the
single peak absorbance many times or else they are mostly for use with
nucleotide labeling, which isn't what we're after here. Many dyes I've
found require use with some sort of denaturing agent that would change
the structure of the protein, something we want to avoid. Can you help
by either suggesting some dyes we may want to take a look at or some
companies that we may want to look to for something of this nature?"
Many thanks,
Carol Heckman
Bowling Green State University




From daemon Fri Jul 26 07:39:17 2002



From: joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 07:30:31 -0500
Subject: Re: Lodging for MSA 2002 in Quebec (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I found the following lists very helpful. Many hotels are available in the
surrounding areas.

http://www.highwayhome.com/travel/tourismbycity/quebeccity/quebeccityhotels.html

http://www.quebecregion.com/e/hebergement.asp

Joe Neilly, Research Investigator
Abbott Laboratories
R45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Voice: 847-938-5024
Fax: 847-938-5027
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From daemon Fri Jul 26 07:45:34 2002



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 08:39:42 -0400
Subject: Re: Terminology: optical microscopy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike, (and all)

I wouldn't call it an "optical image" BUT it does use 'optics' to create
the probe. And the optics are a critical part of the system. And thus
optical microscopy.

But if you break down what the spectrum really is, it is a
representation of the spectrum, is it not? And it is a visual
representation in as much as it is a graphical display of the number of
counts at each energy point, correct? So then you could call the EDS
spectrum an optical image, esp since the end result is presented for a
final detector commonly used in conventional light microscopy, which is
the Human Retina. Now of course the visual display of the spectrum is
really just a bunch of numbers, and depending on the output and the
desired information in that bunch of numbers the spectrum display is
rather unimportant at times. In as much though, as you combine the
pieces and the collection of instrumentation to examine it, you could
call it an optical image. But I know there are too many folks out there
that are having a hard time following, or understanding my perspective
on this. I suppose the reason why I find it so important is that it is
a fundamental and critical cohesive link or binding agent that
demonstrates the interrelationship of the different ways we examine
things. Kinda like the similarity that all 'Trees' have. Sure they are
different and do different things but they all can be put together in a
common way.

I was thinking about it during my commute. GO back to the basic, the
archetypal form, of the microscope, then follow the derivatives, stop
looking at just the piece of the system that is important to YOU and
look at it as a whole. Does not nearly every type of microscope use
optics? And thus does not the term optical microscope seem rather
redundant?

It would be like calling the absence of color (meaning black), dark
black. Black is dark. No shades for the absence of color. But then I
suppose I just pulled in a whole separate issue of another razor - what
is color and how to some people define it compared to others.

Respectfully to all, esp to those that find this a waste of bandwidth,
Geoff Williams

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Bode [mailto:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2002 1:29 PM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Geoff,

I think you said it yourself: In one case optics is used to create a
probe
(not an image), in the other case optics is used to create the image
itself.


Would you call an EDS spectrum also an "optical image"? It is created
using
the same probe you used for the micrograph (or "SEM image").

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Geoff Williams [mailto:willi1gl-at-cmich.edu]
Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2002 6:58 AM
To: 'Chris Jeffree'
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Chris,

I've noticed that the list has come up quite consistently saying SEM
doesn't fit the definition. Well technically no in some respects, but
in theory it does use optical properties and principles to create a
probe.

Sorry for draggin this seemingly tiresome discussion on.

For the record - that definition is Dawes - not mine. And When I read
it I'm not sure how it excludes LSM or SEM. But then I'm sure Mel knows
in his mind why. ;)

The end result is still an image that used optics to either create a
probe or a line and taking the information from that line and
translating it into an image.

Forgive me if this bores the list. I'll make every attempt to ignore
the desire to post anything about this subject, from here on out.

Geoff

-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Jeffree [mailto:c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 3:27 PM
To: Geoff Williams
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Geoff
Only some light and electron microscopes can be defined as optical in
the sense that the
image is created using lenses.
The scanning electron microscope does not image an object using
lenses.
In the SEM the sole function of the lenses in the electron optical
column
is to create the electron probe with which the specimen is scanned.
Therefore, by your criterion the TEM would be an optical microscope,
but the SEM would not.
In an exactly analogous way, the functions of the lens optics in a
laser scanning confocal microscope
are to form the diffraction limited spot and to spatially filter the
light emitted from that spot. NOT to generate a 2-D image.
Your definition of "optical" would therefore also exclude LSM from
the class Optical Microscopes.
Personally, I don't think either exclusion is particularly useful,
particularly when we consider that many modern
microscopes are hybrids of optical and other technologies. Where does
STEM fit in? Does x-ray microscopy need to
use an x-ray lens to qualify as an optical technique? What is the
status of scanned probe microscopes that use
laser optics to sense probe movement? Should Near-field optical
microscopy be renamed Near-field light microscopy?

Chris

} Optical Microscopy: does that mean it uses a lens system to examine
an
} object? If so then it becomes impossible to separate the Electron
} Microscopes from Light microscopes.
}
} Here are a few terms I use:
} CLM: Conventional Light Microscopy (I learned from Dr. Joanne
Whallon
} and Dr Shirely Owens at Michigan Sate University)
} This has been shortened to just:
} LM: Light microscopy with the assumption made that the light is
between
} UV and IR
}
} And yes - I will get directly to the posed question so as to say on
} topic and focused to Ian MacLaren's original Email:
}
} Light Microscopy works very well and I think deserves the position
of
} being the 'correct' term. LM is a nice simple abbreviation that
goes
} very well with TEM, SEM, AFM, STEM, LSM, CLSM, LSCM (those confocal
} folks need to settle down and pick LSM ;) ).
}
} Make any sense?
}
} Geoff Williams
} Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} Biology Department
} Central Michigan University
} Mt Pleasant, MI 48859
}
}





From daemon Fri Jul 26 07:54:52 2002



From: mark.lewis-at-thermo.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 08:48:53 -0400
Subject: Re: Blade holder for high profile, heavy duty blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Karen,

Thermo Shandon sells a disposable holder that holds heavy duty disposable
blades. I am not sure if it will fit your microtome or not, but it is 130
mm long and 39 mm in height. The order number is 47.

Call me if I can be of further assistance.

Best regards,

Mark

Mark Lewis
Product Specialist
Thermo Shandon
171 Industry Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275 USA
Direct: (412) 747-4013
Fax: (412) 788-1097
E-mail: mark.lewis-at-thermoshandon.com

This e-mail message and all attachments transmitted herewith are trade
secret and/or confidential information intended only for the viewing and
use of the addressee.  If the reader of this message is not the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, use, communication,
dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is
prohibited.  If you have received this communication in error, please
notify the sender immediately by telephone, or electronic mail, and delete
this message and all copies and backups thereof.  Thank you for your
cooperation.






Karen
Pawlowski To: Robin Thain {rthain-at-telusplanet.net}
{kpawlow-at-swbe cc: "Histology Net List Server (E-Mail)"
ll.net} {histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu} , MSA listserver
submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
07/25/2002 Subject: Re: Blade holder for high profile,
09:29 PM heavy duty blades






Hi Robin,

I did talk to TBS and they said none of their holders accomodate the
highprofile-heavy duty blades. The only holder they have that
accomodates heavy duty blades is a low profile holder.

Karen

Robin Thain wrote:
}
} Have you tried TBS?
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Karen Pawlowski [mailto:kpawlow-at-swbell.net]
} Sent: July 25, 2002 3:05 PM
} To: Histology Net List Server (E-Mail); MSA listserver submission
} Subject: Blade holder for high profile, heavy duty blades
}
} Hi everyone,
}
} We are looking for a new blade holder that will work in a sliding
} microtome to section celloidin embedded temporal bones. We want
} to use high profile blades that are heavy duty to reduce chatter.
} We found several sources for the blades, but we can't find a holder
} that will hold a blade that is both high profile AND heavy duty
} (.033"-.035" thick).Does anyone know of a supplier of a holder for
} this type of blade?
}
} Thanks in advance,
} Karen Pawlowski, Ph.D.
} Research Scientist
} UT Dallas








From daemon Fri Jul 26 08:53:16 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 09:44:20 -0400
Subject: FW: soil aggregates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I forward this thread to the Microscopy list in the hope of getting more of
a response for these folks that I was able to provide. If that is true, I
think they will appreciate the help. I like the part about sectioning dust
in sulfur (cake I suppose) and realized that most of us, who have delved
into the mysteries of infiltrating and embedding, have spent some time
sectioning 'dust' embedded in paraffin or plastic of one sort or another
whether we knew it at the time or not. Knowing that dust is in and on
everything we work with, breath and eat makes one consider the advisability
of moving to a bubble combo of workshop and home. Well, not immediately.

The needy are: MaryLou: mim11-at-cornell.edu and Bob Schoonhoven:
rschoon-at-email.unc.edu

Hope there's some real dirty expertise out there. It looks like we're in
the loop for a real ESEM here, and I better start learning about what to
expect from dirt and soil in my microscope.

Thanks and for those going, have fun in Quebec.

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: MaryLou
} Sent: Friday, July 26, 2002 7:08 AM
} To: Monson, Frederick C.
} Cc: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} Subject: RE: soil aggregates
}
}
} Good Morning Fred,
}
} Your internet searching capabilities are astounding. I thank you extremely
}
} much for all the sites you sent. This should keep the dirt people happy
} for a long time. While I enjoy challenges, this one was just a tad out of
}
} my realm. The critter eyes are piling up and I must get back to the
} safety
} of paraffin :)
}
} Thanks again,
} Mary Lou
}
}
}
} At 02:35 PM 7/25/2002 -0400, you wrote:
} } Mary Lou,
} }
} } You sound like one who has been working this area, but you are
} } asking a question that I would consider elementary for a material complex
} } such as soil. Thus, I did my usual and instituted a search to see what I
} } could find, because I am likely to see similar questions within the near
} } future.
} }
} } For me, a real beginner, I think I will spend time here, and then start
} } conversing with the experts whose methods are cited.
} }
} } http://www.soils.org/divs/s9/micromorph/micro.html
} }
} } From what I see, most of what workers in dirt consider "thin sectioning"
} } involves grinding and/or sawing. When I first had to work with a truly
} hard
} } substance, I immediately found myself in the domain of the material
} } scientist. Geologists don't ordinarily consider cutting a thin section
} as
} } we do, they think of grinding one - just like the ground bone sections
} that
} } one finds in almost all elementary histology slide sets.
} }
} } Aggregates of micro-size particles can be mounted and ground, if they are
} on
} } the macro- side of micro-. If smaller, and it is paramount that the
} } aggregates NOT be disturbed, then I would turn, as rapidly as possible,
} to
} } more esoteric methods such as ion or plasma etching which can be used on
} } embedded material and can, apparently be very productive.
} }
} } Here are a couple sites that might help to present the degree to which
} } technology using electron optics and focused ion beams or plasmas are
} used
} } in both analysis and production.
} }
} } http://www.mrsec.harvard.edu/facilities.html
} }
} } http://www.mmc.or.jp/std/5.htm [this is a gas!]
} }
} } http://www.feicompany.com/eng/data/trimming.html
} }
} } Finally, Ion Beam Milling at,
} }
} } http://www.ionbeammilling.com/IONBEAMMILLINGILLUSTRETION.htm
} }
} }
} } Hope this helps,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } Schmucker II Science Center
} } West Chester University
} } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: MaryLou
} } } Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 12:31 PM
} } } To: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} } } Cc: dawit Solomon
} } } Subject: soil aggregates
} } }
} } } Dear Histonetters,
} } }
} } } A colleague is wanting to see inside soil aggregates of varying
} } } thicknesses, up to several hundred microns. I was able to make
} paraffin
} } } sections, 20 microns, by soaking the samples in paraffin for many
} } } hours. No solvents allowed. A researcher at NASA gets 1 micron
} sections
} } } from his dust particles in sulfur. We have no idea how he does it.
} } } Thinner is better. Any suggestions out there? Do any bone grinders
} have
} } } any
} } } ideas? Do you know of anybody else we can ask?
} } } Please include Dawit in your responses. Dawit, do you have anything to
} } } add?
} } }
} } } Thank you very much.
} } } Mary Lou
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
}


From daemon Fri Jul 26 10:10:23 2002



From: Mike McKay :      mike.mckay-at-vitana.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 11:01:13 -0400
Subject: Manipulation of images.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In reply to Sousan Abolhassani who wrote
"This would mean that any manipulation of data (whether it is images
or other data) would be in fact a self destroying effort in
a scientifique study, the most valuable contribution of the scientist
starting with his/her effort to collect a correct data."

My meager understanding of the scientific method is that, in reporting the
interpretation of data, the scientist has to completely describe the manner
and methods by which the data was captured and the interpretation drawn.
The requirement is that a subsequent scientists should be able to reproduce
the conditions of the experiment and recreate the data. Or, using the raw
data, recreate the manipulated image.

In this context, scientific images do not preclude manipulation and analysis
as long as the algorithms used are described in such a way that their effect
on the data is clear. Add to the algorithms the experimental setup used to
capture the images and the complete "picture" allows peers to assess and
test the validity of the interpretation.

Yes, the scientist may want to keep the raw image data for future use or to
share with others. But in reporting results (the interpretation), the raw
data is often too cumbersome to be useful. Manipulation, then, is a very
useful tool to make sense of difficult and cumbersome data including images.

Yours,

Michael McKay

{ { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { P i x e L I N K } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } }
Michael McKay, Product Manager {mailto:mike.mckay-at-vitana.com}
Vitana Corporation
2500 Don Reid Drive Tel: (613) 247-1211 x 152
Ottawa, Ontario Cell: (613) 859-6174
Canada K1H 1E1 Fax: (613) 247-2001
"Making Digital Imaging Simple {http://www.pixelink.com} "
{ { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { { P i x e L I N K } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } } }




From daemon Fri Jul 26 14:55:40 2002



From: Kristen Lennon :      kalen-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 14:47:57 -0500
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please unsubscribe for now.
thanks




From daemon Fri Jul 26 16:32:46 2002



From: Louise_Harner-at-albint.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 17:27:28 -0400
Subject: Re: FW: soil aggregates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Looking at the comment about a NASA researcher obtaining 1 micron sections
from "dust particles in sulfur", my first thought is that the researcher
might be mounting the dust in polymeric sulfur and then sectioning it.
While I've never heard of this before, I imagine it would work.

The crystal form of sulfur depends on temperature. I don't have my CRC
handbook here to check for temperature/form/stability info. However a quick
check at:
http://www.starcrete.com/info.htm
gives a melting point of 120 °C for their current version of sulfur
concrete (a polymeric sulfur based chemical-resistant substitute for
Portland cement concrete). They use an additive to stabilize the sulfur in
the orthorhombic form over a wide temperature range. Since the polymeric
sulfur bonds to aggregate (i.e., rocks, gravel, sand, etc.) to create the
sulfur concrete, I would assume it would infiltrate and bond with the soil
fairly well. I don't know how easily it can be sectioned with
biological-type equipment; as noted, a lot of us on the materials side use
lapidary equipment rather than microtomes. You could contact STARcrete(TM)
Technologies, Inc. (I have no relationship with them) and ask if they have
a microscopist on staff who could help you (in the links section of their
website, there is an ASTM paper mentioned with a comment about SEM showing
the microstructure). Alternatively, someone at the International Cement
Microscopy Association might have experience with this. Of course, you
could always contact the researcher at NASA, but that would take the fun
out of it for the rest of us.

- Louise

Louise Harner
Research Microscopist
Albany International Research Co.
777 West Street, P.O. Box 9114
Mansfield, MA 02048
508-339-7300 phone
508-339-4996 fax
Louise_Harner-at-albint.com





"Monson,
Frederick C." To: "'List-Microscopy'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
{fmonson-at-wcupa.ed cc:
u} Subject: FW: soil aggregates

2002/07/26 09:44
AM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I forward this thread to the Microscopy list in the hope of getting more of
a response for these folks that I was able to provide. If that is true, I
think they will appreciate the help. I like the part about sectioning dust
in sulfur (cake I suppose) and realized that most of us, who have delved
into the mysteries of infiltrating and embedding, have spent some time
sectioning 'dust' embedded in paraffin or plastic of one sort or another
whether we knew it at the time or not. Knowing that dust is in and on
everything we work with, breath and eat makes one consider the advisability
of moving to a bubble combo of workshop and home. Well, not immediately.

The needy are: MaryLou: mim11-at-cornell.edu and Bob Schoonhoven:
rschoon-at-email.unc.edu

Hope there's some real dirty expertise out there. It looks like we're in
the loop for a real ESEM here, and I better start learning about what to
expect from dirt and soil in my microscope.

Thanks and for those going, have fun in Quebec.

Fred Monson

} ----------
} From: MaryLou
} Sent: Friday, July 26, 2002 7:08 AM
} To: Monson, Frederick C.
} Cc: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} Subject: RE: soil aggregates
}
}
} Good Morning Fred,
}
} Your internet searching capabilities are astounding. I thank you
extremely
}
} much for all the sites you sent. This should keep the dirt people happy
} for a long time. While I enjoy challenges, this one was just a tad out
of
}
} my realm. The critter eyes are piling up and I must get back to the
} safety
} of paraffin :)
}
} Thanks again,
} Mary Lou
}
}
}
} At 02:35 PM 7/25/2002 -0400, you wrote:
} } Mary Lou,
} }
} } You sound like one who has been working this area, but you are
} } asking a question that I would consider elementary for a material
complex
} } such as soil. Thus, I did my usual and instituted a search to see what
I
} } could find, because I am likely to see similar questions within the near
} } future.
} }
} } For me, a real beginner, I think I will spend time here, and then start
} } conversing with the experts whose methods are cited.
} }
} } http://www.soils.org/divs/s9/micromorph/micro.html
} }
} } From what I see, most of what workers in dirt consider "thin
sectioning"
} } involves grinding and/or sawing. When I first had to work with a truly
} hard
} } substance, I immediately found myself in the domain of the material
} } scientist. Geologists don't ordinarily consider cutting a thin section
} as
} } we do, they think of grinding one - just like the ground bone sections
} that
} } one finds in almost all elementary histology slide sets.
} }
} } Aggregates of micro-size particles can be mounted and ground, if they
are
} on
} } the macro- side of micro-. If smaller, and it is paramount that the
} } aggregates NOT be disturbed, then I would turn, as rapidly as possible,
} to
} } more esoteric methods such as ion or plasma etching which can be used on
} } embedded material and can, apparently be very productive.
} }
} } Here are a couple sites that might help to present the degree to which
} } technology using electron optics and focused ion beams or plasmas are
} used
} } in both analysis and production.
} }
} } http://www.mrsec.harvard.edu/facilities.html
} }
} } http://www.mmc.or.jp/std/5.htm [this is a gas!]
} }
} } http://www.feicompany.com/eng/data/trimming.html
} }
} } Finally, Ion Beam Milling at,
} }
} } http://www.ionbeammilling.com/IONBEAMMILLINGILLUSTRETION.htm
} }
} }
} } Hope this helps,
} }
} } Fred Monson
} }
} } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } Schmucker II Science Center
} } West Chester University
} } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} }
} } } ----------
} } } From: MaryLou
} } } Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 12:31 PM
} } } To: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} } } Cc: dawit Solomon
} } } Subject: soil aggregates
} } }
} } } Dear Histonetters,
} } }
} } } A colleague is wanting to see inside soil aggregates of varying
} } } thicknesses, up to several hundred microns. I was able to make
} paraffin
} } } sections, 20 microns, by soaking the samples in paraffin for many
} } } hours. No solvents allowed. A researcher at NASA gets 1 micron
} sections
} } } from his dust particles in sulfur. We have no idea how he does it.
} } } Thinner is better. Any suggestions out there? Do any bone grinders
} have
} } } any
} } } ideas? Do you know of anybody else we can ask?
} } } Please include Dawit in your responses. Dawit, do you have anything
to
} } } add?
} } }
} } } Thank you very much.
} } } Mary Lou
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
}







From daemon Fri Jul 26 17:01:27 2002



From: ncontisfsu-at-netscape.net (Nelson Conti)
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 17:55:16 -0400
Subject: RE: Imaging Micro-organisms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} Peter Tomic {PTomic-at-anadigics.com} wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Folks;
} }
} } Since many of you do biological imaging vis-a-vis SEM and "optical" means, I
} } have a question. When imaging bacteria or any micro-organism, is the species
} } identified by it's shape, general apperance, size etc.? Or better yet, just
} } how is it identified in the EM? Or does this require some other assay for
} } identification and then it is imaged to generate other information? I don't
} } image bio materials but it is something that I would like to be able to show
} } my daughter who is interested in the micro-biological world. I see a future
} } in electronic bio-identification and since her interests seem to lie in that
} } direction, I'd like to explain some of this intelligently.
} }
} } Peter
} }
} }
} }
} }
} Dear Peter-
} Although I haven't tried to identify micro-organisms (such as bacteria) by way of SEM, my background (at both Bachelor's and Master's) is in microbiology, and I have taken a class on electron microscopy.
} So, here's my opinion:
} I believe that, in general, the identification of bacteria is done by evaluating a number of characteristics such as shape, general appearance, movement and (sometimes) specialized tests such as blood agar plates for Streptococcus aureus (the bug that can cause strep throat). Thus, I would imagine that the purpose of using SEM lies in obtaining more information about that particular bacterium other than what information you can get by light microscopy. That is, SEM allows the user to identify, say, a particular surface protein, and so on; conversely, light microscopy is ideal to identify that bacterium's particular shape (rod, coccus, etc), motility (or lack of), and so on. As to its identification by EM .. I'm personally unaware of anyone trying to determine a particular bacterium by that type of microscopy because it's been my experience, at least at the intro level in college, for students to use light microscopes, make wet mounts, etc. for basic identification of bacteri!
a.
} A few comments:
} Personally, I'm pleased that your daughter has decided to be keen on learning more about micro-organisms because they are decidedly a very interesting group from a historical standpoint (diseases) and for the very important role they play in the environment.
} My Master's thesis dealt with eukaryotic micro-organisms called ciliates which are part of a larger ensemble named protozoa. In your time in high school, you may recall seeing a long-ish organism with "hair" (err, cilia) all over its surface with many genera-- it would be Paramecium sp.
} I mention the above because ciliates can be thought of as micro-organisms much like our "standard" examples--bacteria or yeast. I found that EM is especially helpful for identifying details of some part of a ciliate such as its mouth (a place where food is taken in for nourishment and energy for cell division).
} Nelson Conti
}


--
164 Ferne Court
Palo Alto, CA 94306
Email: [ncontiSFSU-at-netscape.net]



__________________________________________________________________
Your favorite stores, helpful shopping tools and great gift ideas. Experience the convenience of buying online with Shop-at-Netscape! http://shopnow.netscape.com/

Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Mail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com/



From daemon Sat Jul 27 17:11:28 2002



From: Tom Malis :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Sat, 27 Jul 2002 17:55:42 -0400
Subject: Re: soil aggregates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If the aggregate holds together reasonably well and don't outgas overly, FIB
should be fairly straightforward to 'drop' cross-sections at various points
in the mass down to 20 microns or so.

Interestingly, if ultrathin ( {200 nm) sections were needed for TEM
examination, ultramicrotomy could be used, though not easily. However,
micron thick sections of largish hard particles in the aggregate would
probably be too much for even a histoknife.

I would try and find a FIB.

Tom

Dr. Tom Malis
Science Advisor
Mineral Technology Branch
Natural Resources Canada
555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ontario
613-995-7358
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca


} From: "Monson, Frederick C." {fmonson-at-wcupa.edu}
} Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 09:44:20 -0400
} To: "'List-Microscopy'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Subject: FW: soil aggregates
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I forward this thread to the Microscopy list in the hope of getting more of
} a response for these folks that I was able to provide. If that is true, I
} think they will appreciate the help. I like the part about sectioning dust
} in sulfur (cake I suppose) and realized that most of us, who have delved
} into the mysteries of infiltrating and embedding, have spent some time
} sectioning 'dust' embedded in paraffin or plastic of one sort or another
} whether we knew it at the time or not. Knowing that dust is in and on
} everything we work with, breath and eat makes one consider the advisability
} of moving to a bubble combo of workshop and home. Well, not immediately.
}
} The needy are: MaryLou: mim11-at-cornell.edu and Bob Schoonhoven:
} rschoon-at-email.unc.edu
}
} Hope there's some real dirty expertise out there. It looks like we're in
} the loop for a real ESEM here, and I better start learning about what to
} expect from dirt and soil in my microscope.
}
} Thanks and for those going, have fun in Quebec.
}
} Fred Monson
}
} } ----------
} } From: MaryLou
} } Sent: Friday, July 26, 2002 7:08 AM
} } To: Monson, Frederick C.
} } Cc: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} } Subject: RE: soil aggregates
} }
} }
} } Good Morning Fred,
} }
} } Your internet searching capabilities are astounding. I thank you extremely
} }
} } much for all the sites you sent. This should keep the dirt people happy
} } for a long time. While I enjoy challenges, this one was just a tad out of
} }
} } my realm. The critter eyes are piling up and I must get back to the
} } safety
} } of paraffin :)
} }
} } Thanks again,
} } Mary Lou
} }
} }
} }
} } At 02:35 PM 7/25/2002 -0400, you wrote:
} } } Mary Lou,
} } }
} } } You sound like one who has been working this area, but you are
} } } asking a question that I would consider elementary for a material complex
} } } such as soil. Thus, I did my usual and instituted a search to see what I
} } } could find, because I am likely to see similar questions within the near
} } } future.
} } }
} } } For me, a real beginner, I think I will spend time here, and then start
} } } conversing with the experts whose methods are cited.
} } }
} } } http://www.soils.org/divs/s9/micromorph/micro.html
} } }
} } } From what I see, most of what workers in dirt consider "thin sectioning"
} } } involves grinding and/or sawing. When I first had to work with a truly
} } hard
} } } substance, I immediately found myself in the domain of the material
} } } scientist. Geologists don't ordinarily consider cutting a thin section
} } as
} } } we do, they think of grinding one - just like the ground bone sections
} } that
} } } one finds in almost all elementary histology slide sets.
} } }
} } } Aggregates of micro-size particles can be mounted and ground, if they are
} } on
} } } the macro- side of micro-. If smaller, and it is paramount that the
} } } aggregates NOT be disturbed, then I would turn, as rapidly as possible,
} } to
} } } more esoteric methods such as ion or plasma etching which can be used on
} } } embedded material and can, apparently be very productive.
} } }
} } } Here are a couple sites that might help to present the degree to which
} } } technology using electron optics and focused ion beams or plasmas are
} } used
} } } in both analysis and production.
} } }
} } } http://www.mrsec.harvard.edu/facilities.html
} } }
} } } http://www.mmc.or.jp/std/5.htm [this is a gas!]
} } }
} } } http://www.feicompany.com/eng/data/trimming.html
} } }
} } } Finally, Ion Beam Milling at,
} } }
} } } http://www.ionbeammilling.com/IONBEAMMILLINGILLUSTRETION.htm
} } }
} } }
} } } Hope this helps,
} } }
} } } Fred Monson
} } }
} } } Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} } } Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} } } Schmucker II Science Center
} } } West Chester University
} } } South Church Street and Rosedale
} } } West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} } } Phone: 610-738-0437
} } } FAX: 610-738-0437
} } } fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} } } CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} } } WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} } } Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
} } }
} } } } ----------
} } } } From: MaryLou
} } } } Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2002 12:31 PM
} } } } To: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} } } } Cc: dawit Solomon
} } } } Subject: soil aggregates
} } } }
} } } } Dear Histonetters,
} } } }
} } } } A colleague is wanting to see inside soil aggregates of varying
} } } } thicknesses, up to several hundred microns. I was able to make
} } paraffin
} } } } sections, 20 microns, by soaking the samples in paraffin for many
} } } } hours. No solvents allowed. A researcher at NASA gets 1 micron
} } sections
} } } } from his dust particles in sulfur. We have no idea how he does it.
} } } } Thinner is better. Any suggestions out there? Do any bone grinders
} } have
} } } } any
} } } } ideas? Do you know of anybody else we can ask?
} } } } Please include Dawit in your responses. Dawit, do you have anything to
} } } } add?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you very much.
} } } } Mary Lou
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} }
} }



From daemon Sun Jul 28 17:02:44 2002



From: stiernberg-at-oregoncoast.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sun, 28 Jul 2002 16:02:42 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM Leitz Dialux

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (stiernberg-at-oregoncoast.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday, July
28, 2002 at 12:51:43
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: stiernberg-at-oregoncoast.com
Name: Ed Stiernberg

Organization: retired, 72 years old, checked grad school tho not in one

Education: Graduate College

Location: Tillamook, Oregon, USA

Question: For some 30 years, I have used a Leitz Dialux for pollen
grain work, utilizing mainly the 40X planapo objective and the 602
condenser. Recently, I saw a Dialux with what looks like a Berek
condenser. Please let me know how to obtain information on this
other type of condenser. I want to know if it is chosen for some
special work, how it differs from the more common 602, and the
practical principles underlying the two diaphragms with which it is
equipped.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jul 29 07:49:37 2002



From: Joanne Marrison :      jlm2-at-YORK.AC.UK
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 13:40:42 +0100
Subject: Surplus Leica Ultracut Ultramicrotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have a Leica Ultracut Ultramicrotome surplus to
requirements and free to a good home.
If anyone is interested please contact Meg Stark on
ms1-at-york.ac.uk.

J Marrison
Department of Biology
University of York
Heslington
York
YO10 5DD




From daemon Mon Jul 29 08:13:05 2002



From: Rafal Dunin-Borkowski :      red10-at-cam.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 14:04:41 +0100
Subject: TEM - PostDoc in Cambridge from October 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Post-Doctoral Research Assistant

Electron Holography of Semiconductor Devices

Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge, UK

A Post-Doctoral Research Assistant position is available from 1 October
2002 to pursue a programme of research into the development of electron
holography of semiconductor devices, with a particular emphasis on the use
of a novel electrical biasing holder to pass electrical currents through
samples as they are examined in the TEM.

The successful applicant will join a small team at Cambridge developing
electron holography for the characterisation of both electric and magnetic
fields in nanostructured materials. The research will be carried out in
conjunction with the Universities of Surrey and Limerick, as well as with
industry and with collaborators outside the UK.

It is essential that applicants have experience of advanced transmission
electron microscopy and image processing with a background in an
experimental physical science. Experience of electron holography is
desirable but not essential.

The position is funded by the EPSRC and is for 2 years in the first
instance. The starting salary will be on the University RA1A scale (£17,626
- £26,491).

Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Paul Midgley, Tel. +44 (0)1223 334561,
E-mail: pam33-at-cam.ac.uk or to Dr Rafal Dunin-Borkowski, Tel. +44 (0)1223
334564, E-mail: rafal.db-at-msm.cam.ac.uk.

Applications should be sent to Dr P.A. Midgley, Department of Materials
Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street,
Cambridge, CB2 3QZ, UK, and should include a full CV with the names and
addresses of two referees.

Closing date: 31 Aug 2002.



From daemon Mon Jul 29 14:01:21 2002



From: Armando Verdugo :      aeverdugo-at-alliedhightech.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 11:47:09 -0700
Subject: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello listers,

I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
laboratory.

Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
reference.

Thank you all in advance.

Regards,

Armando Verdugo
Laboratory Supervisor
(800) 675-1118 US and Canada
(310) 635-2466 Worldwide
(310) 762-6808 Fax


Visit our New Website!

www.alliedhightech.com


From daemon Mon Jul 29 15:16:27 2002



From: ATC SEM Laboratory :      atcsem-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 16:06:18 -0400
Subject: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I need to analyze Si wafers for: Trench depth, Oxide thickness, Step height.
The pitch is 1, 5, and 20 um.
Does any one have suggestions how to proceed with the analysis.

Thanks in advance,

Pavel



From daemon Mon Jul 29 19:07:36 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 16:45:07 -0700
Subject: Re: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 01:06 PM 7/29/2002, you wrote:

} Hi,
} I need to analyze Si wafers for: Trench depth, Oxide thickness, Step height.
} The pitch is 1, 5, and 20 um.
} Does any one have suggestions how to proceed with the analysis.
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Pavel

Could you explain your situation a bit more? What type of
technology is being used? Is this damascene or SOG/LPCVD
etch-back planarization? Are you interested in cross section
or top-down? Any other data? Like number of metal layers,
type of metal, number of poly layers, minimum feature size.

gary g.



From daemon Mon Jul 29 19:07:36 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 17:55:19 -0600
Subject: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I just did a quick check on the OSHA web site (www.osha.gov), but the only
hits were GaAs in connection with lasers and laser safety.

I did find a Materials Data Safety Sheet for GaAs:
http://www.wafertech.co.uk/msds/msds_gaas.html

and: http://www.nd.edu/~astuckey/MSDS/GaAs.htm

There were more hits relating to toxicity, but mostly dealt with Arsenic
toxicity. Go to Yahoo and search for "GaAs toxicity" for more information.

We used some pretty ugly stuff to prepare GaAs (Bromine-Methanol), and I
would be concerned about those things at least as much as about the GaAs
itself.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Armando Verdugo [mailto:aeverdugo-at-alliedhightech.com]
Sent: Monday, July 29, 2002 12:47 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello listers,

I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
laboratory.

Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
reference.

Thank you all in advance.

Regards,

Armando Verdugo
Laboratory Supervisor
(800) 675-1118 US and Canada
(310) 635-2466 Worldwide
(310) 762-6808 Fax


Visit our New Website!

www.alliedhightech.com


From daemon Mon Jul 29 22:10:08 2002



From: Tran Quang Huy :      tranquanghuy78-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jul 2002 19:54:13 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Detect dengue viruses type 4 by using immuno electron microscopy ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Virologists and Micoscopists,
I am a student (senior), I'm realizing the topic "
Research dengue viruses type 4 on Mosquito cells
C6/36". I used TEM to detect dengue viruses by using
immuno electron microscopy immuno gold conjugate but
without success. I tried many times. It was too
difficult to select antibodies and antibodies molarity
for dengue viruses type 4. I know you have a lot of
experienes to detect viruses. Please show me the
methods to realize the immuno electron microscopy
technics to detect dengue viruses type 4.
Thanks you
Tran Quang Huy



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Health - Feel better, live better
http://health.yahoo.com


From daemon Tue Jul 30 08:50:15 2002



From: ATC SEM Laboratory :      atcsem-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 09:42:14 -0400
Subject: Re: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary,
I do not really know what type of semiconductors these are, but looking on
SEM I think it is silicon based with Si nitride and oxide steps. EDS does
not pick up any metals. Looking at the cross section on a light microscope
at 1000x I can see the steps, but edge is not good enough to take
measurements of the step height using SEM. Is there any way to get edge
retention or some other techniques to get the measurements. I would also
prefer to get photos of the features.

Richard Beanland mentioned cleaving the wafer. Is this would get me good
enough edge to do the measurements and if it would , how do I cleave through
{110} plane? The steps are about 0.5 - 0.25um high. I would also try HF to
get some contrast.

Thank you,
Pavel





From daemon Tue Jul 30 09:10:19 2002



From: Joanne Marrison :      jlm2-at-YORK.AC.UK
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 15:03:56 +0100
Subject: Surplus Leica Ultracut Ultramicrotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

Many thanks for all your interest - the microtome has now
found a new home.

Regards
J Marrison

--
Dept of Biology
University of York
Heslington
York, UK
YO10 5DD



From daemon Tue Jul 30 10:34:08 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 11:31:30 -0400
Subject: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike & Co.;

What is of concern with GaAs is fine particulates, the type that can get
deep into the lungs [.5um to 2 uM]. I'm not sure if the As disassociates
itself from the Ga once inhaled and in the mucus of lung tissue. Backside
grinding/polishing can be an issue since most processes that lap and grind
create a slurry and ultimately a dried particulate source for inhalation. I
don't think OSHA has a standard for the compound as such, just As alone.

As far as FIB is concerned, I see no issue with that since the area an FIB
can mill is miniscule.

This listing is of particular interest to me since we make GaAs micro
devices.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Bode [mailto:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
Sent: Monday, July 29, 2002 7:55 PM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


I just did a quick check on the OSHA web site (www.osha.gov), but the only
hits were GaAs in connection with lasers and laser safety.

I did find a Materials Data Safety Sheet for GaAs:
http://www.wafertech.co.uk/msds/msds_gaas.html

and: http://www.nd.edu/~astuckey/MSDS/GaAs.htm

There were more hits relating to toxicity, but mostly dealt with Arsenic
toxicity. Go to Yahoo and search for "GaAs toxicity" for more information.

We used some pretty ugly stuff to prepare GaAs (Bromine-Methanol), and I
would be concerned about those things at least as much as about the GaAs
itself.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Armando Verdugo [mailto:aeverdugo-at-alliedhightech.com]
Sent: Monday, July 29, 2002 12:47 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello listers,

I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
laboratory.

Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
reference.

Thank you all in advance.

Regards,

Armando Verdugo
Laboratory Supervisor
(800) 675-1118 US and Canada
(310) 635-2466 Worldwide
(310) 762-6808 Fax


Visit our New Website!

www.alliedhightech.com


From daemon Tue Jul 30 10:38:53 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 11:38:17 -0400
Subject: Re: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pavel;

If you have a "TallySurf" device, you can measure step height easily with it
and we use it routinely [accuracy within 20 angstroms]. However, you need
to state what the step height is, or what you think it is, for a method to
be chosen. The easiest method, provided you have a good SEM [FESEM is
best], is simply cleaving the wafer at a right angle across the step, trench
or oxide of interest and view it on edge. FIB takes too long and does not
give you quick multiple looks or the variance across the wafer easily. The
SEM will also let you see wall angles and the trench profile. Optical
methods alone may be misleading unless these are very large feautres. All
of this assumes a destructive analysis and you aren't sticking the wafer
back in your production line.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Monday, July 29, 2002 7:45 PM
To: ATC SEM Laboratory
Cc: MSA listserver


At 01:06 PM 7/29/2002, you wrote:

} Hi,
} I need to analyze Si wafers for: Trench depth, Oxide thickness, Step
height.
} The pitch is 1, 5, and 20 um.
} Does any one have suggestions how to proceed with the analysis.
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Pavel

Could you explain your situation a bit more? What type of
technology is being used? Is this damascene or SOG/LPCVD
etch-back planarization? Are you interested in cross section
or top-down? Any other data? Like number of metal layers,
type of metal, number of poly layers, minimum feature size.

gary g.



From daemon Tue Jul 30 12:59:43 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 09:34:22 -0700
Subject: Re: Licensing policies for use of photomicrographs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Rosemary,
I have never had any requests to use any of my micrographs, although I have
found several used without my permission by a vendor selling printers at the
M&M show. He downloaded them from a web site that did have my permission. My
policy has always been that public funds pay for my facility, therefore the
micrographs I take are public property. It is a courtesy to acknowledge the
creator of the image. Any of my users can do what they like with their
pictures and my commercial customers have rights over images I take for them.
At 04:30 PM 07/24/2002 -0700, you wrote:
}
} Dear Listers,
} I would like to know of any licensing policies and procedures used by
} university EM and/or imaging facilities to handle requests to use
} photomicrographs.
} Thanks once again for your input.
} Rosemary
}
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Jul 30 13:30:22 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 11:23:12 -0700
Subject: Re: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Armando,
When I had to organize the cleanup of a crystal-growing room that had left a
lot of GaAs dust around, I looked up the MSDS in order to devise a cleanup
protocol. The arsenic is only a problem if the material is acidified, so we
mopped up with a little soap and water and discarded the wet paper towels
and protective clothing as comtaminated waste. GaAs is fairly inert, but I
would avoid allowing any dust out of your cutting or polishing operations.
Clean up any fragments or dust and treat as any other arsenic-containing
compound: avoid inhalation and skin contact.
At 11:47 AM 07/29/2002 -0700, you wrote:

} Hello listers,
}
} I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
} may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
} TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
} laboratory.
}
} Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
} reference.
}
} Thank you all in advance.
}
} Regards,
}
} Armando Verdugo
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Jul 30 13:53:08 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 11:44:13 -0400
Subject: Re: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 7/30/02 9:42 AM, ATC SEM Laboratory at atcsem-at-earthlink.net wrote:

} I do not really know what type of semiconductors these are, but looking on
} SEM I think it is silicon based with Si nitride and oxide steps. EDS does
} not pick up any metals. Looking at the cross section on a light microscope
} at 1000x I can see the steps, but edge is not good enough to take
} measurements of the step height using SEM. Is there any way to get edge
} retention or some other techniques to get the measurements. I would also
} prefer to get photos of the features.
}
} Richard Beanland mentioned cleaving the wafer. Is this would get me good
} enough edge to do the measurements and if it would , how do I cleave through
} {110} plane? The steps are about 0.5 - 0.25um high. I would also try HF to
} get some contrast.
}
Dear Pavel,
How about evaporating a heavy metal from a point source at a
well-defined angle. By measuring the shadows and the orientation of the
steps with respect to the shadowing direction you could calculate their
size. Do you need more accuracy than you could get by this technique?
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Tue Jul 30 14:09:35 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 14:54:39 -0400
Subject: Ultracut E service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
A colleague of mine just moved to the NIH and has inherited a
less-than-functional Reichert ultracut E. Its missing things like
the chuck holder & knife stage! If anyone can give him the name of a
service person in his "neighborhood" please send that info to:
Patrick Nahirney ata nahirnep-at-mail.nih.gov

Thanks,
Hope to see many of you in Quebec,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jul 30 14:32:13 2002



From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 15:21:23 -0400
Subject: TEM film cassettes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have 3 set of boxes and film holders for 3 1/4 x 4" from a JEOL 100C that
I will give away to anyone. You just have to pay for shipping.

Joe Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
609-258-5432

Visit us at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/facility/confocal/index.html



From daemon Tue Jul 30 17:06:19 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 18:01:48 -0400
Subject: Re: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pavel;

I saw your image and you have what you need right there. That image looks
like a cleave, yes? Doesn't look like an FIB did that. Why you don't detect
aluminum is beyond me. Are you sure your EDS is functioning?? Looks like
the Al metal is almost as thick as the phospho-silicate glass passivation.
Where's the scale bar on the SEM pic?

Details please.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: ATC SEM Laboratory [mailto:atcsem-at-earthlink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 9:42 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Gary,
I do not really know what type of semiconductors these are, but looking on
SEM I think it is silicon based with Si nitride and oxide steps. EDS does
not pick up any metals. Looking at the cross section on a light microscope
at 1000x I can see the steps, but edge is not good enough to take
measurements of the step height using SEM. Is there any way to get edge
retention or some other techniques to get the measurements. I would also
prefer to get photos of the features.

Richard Beanland mentioned cleaving the wafer. Is this would get me good
enough edge to do the measurements and if it would , how do I cleave through
{110} plane? The steps are about 0.5 - 0.25um high. I would also try HF to
get some contrast.

Thank you,
Pavel





From daemon Tue Jul 30 19:34:47 2002



From: ahmad.yekta-at-imaging.brocku.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 19:17:57 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Reference Books/Materials Fluorescence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ahmad.yekta-at-imaging.brocku.ca) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
July 30, 2002 at 14:26:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ahmad.yekta-at-imaging.brocku.ca
Name: Ahmad Yekta

Organization: Imaging Research

Education: Graduate College

Location: St Catharines, Ontario, Canada

Question: I would like to know about a few good references on the
subject of calibration and standardization of fluorescence
microscopes. E.g., uniformity of measuring field, sensitivity,...

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Wed Jul 31 02:07:38 2002



From: moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 08:58:12 +0200
Subject: Temperature range for EPOXY BOND 110

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I need to heat up samples to around 400°C for in-situ experiments. To hold the samples I want to glue them in place. Does anyone have any experience with EPOXY BOND 110 from TEDPELLA ? What temperature can it take before it desintegrates ? Or is there a good high temperature adhesive that you can recommend.

Thanks for the help in advance.

Andreas Meyer.

Moritz Andreas Meyer
Dipl.-Ing. (FH), MSc.
Materials Analyst
Materials Analysis Laboratory

AMD Saxony Manufacturing GmbH
Wilschdorfer Landstraße 101
M/S E32-MA
D-01109 Dresden
F. R. Germany

Tel. +49-351-277-4149
Fax +49-351-277-9-4149
moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com






From daemon Wed Jul 31 03:00:36 2002



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 08:53:39 +0100
Subject: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Richard Beanland mentioned cleaving the wafer. Is this would get me good
} enough edge to do the measurements and if it would , how do I cleave
through
} {110} plane? The steps are about 0.5 - 0.25um high. I would also try HF to
} get some contrast.

Pavel,
Just to enlarge on cleaving somewhat. I tend to find that the best
{110} cleaves are done without supporting the substrate (i.e. not breaking
it over an edge such as a glass slide or ruler). Here is a description of
what I have found to work - it would take about 30 seconds to demonstrate,
but is rather more difficult to describe without even a picture!
Draw a single line on the top of the wafer with a diamond scriber (about
2mm long, at the edge of the wafer), lined up with the region you want to
cleave through. Then hold the wafer between thumb and forefinger in both
hands, with the scribe mark on top between your thumbs. Break the wafer by
bending the sides downwards, trying to keep the force at the edge of the
wafer where the scribe mark is. If it works, the wafer should cleave very
easily with a dull 'dink'. If you haven't drawn a good single scribe line
then you can end up with a shower of fragments, particularly with big III-V
wafers which have high defect densities - safety glasses and an area where
you can retrieve the thousands of shards might be a good idea until you get
the hang of it! It is difficult to cleave off less than a cm of material
using this technique and get a good edge, and not easy to cleave through
small regions. If you have a small amount of material or small regions of
interest, gluing a stack of material followed by careful grinding and
polishing will be more sucessful. Ion milling the polished or cleaved
surface is also nesessary for good measurements of metal layers since they
will deform plastically during cleaving or polishing.

Good luck,

Richard

_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356398
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: ATC SEM Laboratory [mailto:atcsem-at-earthlink.net]
Sent: 29 July 2002 21:06
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,
I need to analyze Si wafers for: Trench depth, Oxide thickness, Step height.
The pitch is 1, 5, and 20 um.
Does any one have suggestions how to proceed with the analysis.

Thanks in advance,

Pavel



=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.

No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================
Any questions about Bookham's E-Mail service should be directed to postmaster-at-bookham.com.



From daemon Wed Jul 31 03:46:22 2002



From: Alan Bright :      bright-at-dial.pipex.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2002 15:10:05 +0100
Subject: microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Paul,

I think I can help you here, please send me a small sample so that I can do
some tests. I will then return the results with my findings.

Best Regards

Alan Bright

Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
St Margaret's Way
Huntingdon
Cambridgeshire
PE29 6EU
England

Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: 24 July 2002 21:19
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Bob.Thompson/KRDC-at-alcan.com


We need to cut "thick?" cross sections of polymer/metal laminates for FTIR
microscope analysis.
Material thickness is around 100 microns..(section thickness somewhere
around 0.5 to 1mm i think)
I have 2 ultra microtomes but the sample size and section thickness
obtained from the ultramicrotome are to small for this application.

Any suggestions on the type of microtome i should consider. (Used is a
definite option)
or is there another piece of equipment i can use for this?

We are currently slicing pieces of our sample with a razor blade but this
causes some smearing in the layers.
I am currently being courted by one vendor who is going to lend me a
microtome to try out.

Suggestions are greatly appreciated
Vendors please reply to me directly.

Cheers

Paul D. Nolan
Electron Optics

Alcan International Limited
Kingston Research and Development Centre
P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9

Tel: (613) 541-2066
Fax: (613) 541-2134
paul.nolan-at-alcan.com




From daemon Wed Jul 31 05:16:20 2002



From: Alan Bright :      bright-at-dial.pipex.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 10:27:47 +0100
Subject: microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Dear Paul,

I think I can help you here, please send me a small sample so that I can do
some tests. I will then return the results with my findings.

Best Regards

Alan Bright

Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
St Margaret's Way
Huntingdon
Cambridgeshire
PE29 6EU
England

Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: 24 July 2002 21:19
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Bob.Thompson/KRDC-at-alcan.com


We need to cut "thick?" cross sections of polymer/metal laminates for FTIR
microscope analysis.
Material thickness is around 100 microns..(section thickness somewhere
around 0.5 to 1mm i think)
I have 2 ultra microtomes but the sample size and section thickness
obtained from the ultramicrotome are to small for this application.

Any suggestions on the type of microtome i should consider. (Used is a
definite option)
or is there another piece of equipment i can use for this?

We are currently slicing pieces of our sample with a razor blade but this
causes some smearing in the layers.
I am currently being courted by one vendor who is going to lend me a
microtome to try out.

Suggestions are greatly appreciated
Vendors please reply to me directly.

Cheers

Paul D. Nolan
Electron Optics

Alcan International Limited
Kingston Research and Development Centre
P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9

Tel: (613) 541-2066
Fax: (613) 541-2134
paul.nolan-at-alcan.com




From daemon Wed Jul 31 07:34:22 2002



From: Ami Frank :      act105-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 09:36:07 -0400
Subject: Temperature range for EPOXY BOND 110

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter,
I did not submitted any SEM images, just light photo with micron bar. Could
you e-mail them to me directly, so I would know what are you taking about.

Regards,
Pavel
atcsem-at-earthlink.net



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Peter Tomic" {PTomic-at-Anadigics.com}
To: "'ATC SEM Laboratory'" {atcsem-at-earthlink.net} ;
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 6:01 PM


Andreas-

Epoxy Technology sells an epoxy that we found to work extremely well. It
is called Epo-Tex, and it lists its degradation temperature at 341 degrees
(TGA). I am not sure how close to 400 degrees you needed, but if this is
close enough, their contact phone number is 978-667-3805.

Ami Frank

******************************
Ami Frank
Department of Biology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park, PA 16802
Office: 814-865-1769
Fax: 814-865-6193
email: act105-at-psu.edu
******************************
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi all,

I need to heat up samples to around 400°C for in-situ experiments. To hold
the samples I want to glue them in place. Does anyone have any experience
with EPOXY BOND 110 from TEDPELLA ? What temperature can it take before it
desintegrates ? Or is there a good high temperature adhesive that you can
recommend.

Thanks for the help in advance.

Andreas Meyer.

Moritz Andreas Meyer
Dipl.-Ing. (FH), MSc.
Materials Analyst
Materials Analysis Laboratory

AMD Saxony Manufacturing GmbH
Wilschdorfer Landstraße 101
M/S E32-MA
D-01109 Dresden
F. R. Germany

Tel. +49-351-277-4149
Fax +49-351-277-9-4149
moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com




From daemon Wed Jul 31 08:56:38 2002



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 09:49:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Surplus 1-Philips 501 with windowless EDS & 2-complete EDXA 9800

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello listers,

We have a Philips 501 with windowless EDS, both working before being
dismantled, and also a complete 9800 EDXA system. Free for non-profit edus
or orgs, or best offer to coms. Please send me inquiries off-line. Thanks!

****************************************
Chaoying Ni, PhD
201 DuPont Hall
The W.M. Keck Electron Microscopy Facility
College of Engineering
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716

(302) 831-8354 (O); -2318(L); -4545(Fax)
http://eml.masc.udel.edu
*****************************************



From daemon Wed Jul 31 09:24:14 2002



From: Stephanie Tyndall :      stephanie.tyndall-at-uconn.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 10:18:30 -0400
Subject: vanishing membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In my first attempt at TEM I lost all the membranes on cultured primary
hippocampal neurons. All cellular organelles were intact and had no apparent
distortion. Has anyone else experienced this and if so do you know what
causes the membranes to vanish?

Alternately I'd be very interested in any fixation protocols anyone has for
primary hippocampal neurons that have worked for them in the past. I am
particularly interested in observing synapses.

Thanks!
Stephanie



From daemon Wed Jul 31 09:42:40 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 08:45:22 -0600
Subject: Re: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would definitely recommend some form of ventilation for all cutting and
polishing operations. When we dimpled GaAs samples for TEMs, it was
sometimes possible to smell the typical Garlic odor from the Arsenicoxide
(and no, I had not been out eating Garlic soup the day before). Although I
don't know at this time if Arsenicoxide is toxic and at what levels (not too
low, as I am still writing this), why take the chances.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mary Mager [mailto:mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 12:23 PM
To: Armando Verdugo
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Armando,
When I had to organize the cleanup of a crystal-growing room that had left a
lot of GaAs dust around, I looked up the MSDS in order to devise a cleanup
protocol. The arsenic is only a problem if the material is acidified, so we
mopped up with a little soap and water and discarded the wet paper towels
and protective clothing as comtaminated waste. GaAs is fairly inert, but I
would avoid allowing any dust out of your cutting or polishing operations.
Clean up any fragments or dust and treat as any other arsenic-containing
compound: avoid inhalation and skin contact.
At 11:47 AM 07/29/2002 -0700, you wrote:

} Hello listers,
}
} I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
} may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
} TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
} laboratory.
}
} Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
} reference.
}
} Thank you all in advance.
}
} Regards,
}
} Armando Verdugo
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Jul 31 10:10:33 2002



From: Beth Gregory :      gregory-at-4pi.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 10:59:56 -0400
Subject: room available at Hilton Quebec for M&M

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have an extra reservation. I'm not sure how easy it would be to change
the single to a double.

Room Occupancy Type(# of People): Single
Room Type: Deluxe Room
Smoking Preference: Non Smoking Room
Total Nights: 6
Dates: Check-In Date: 08/03/2002 - Check-Out Date: 08/09/2002
Price (per night) CAD 235.00

If you are interested, please reply directly to me, not the list, for
additional information. Beth




From daemon Wed Jul 31 10:58:21 2002



From: Armando Verdugo :      aeverdugo-at-alliedhightech.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 08:53:34 -0700
Subject: Temperature range for EPOXY BOND 110

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mr. Meyer,

EpoxyBond 110 is a product of Allied High Tech Products, Inc.
(http://www.alliedhightech.com/mounting/mountingacce/).

It is capable of withstanding up to about 385 degrees Celsius.

Should you have any additional questions, please contact our Manager of
Technical Products at the number below.

Gary Liechty
Manager, Technical Products
Allied High Tech Products, Inc.
310-635-2466
gdliechty-at-alliedhightech.com


Best regards,

Armando Verdugo
Laboratory Supervisor
(800) 675-1118 US and Canada
(310) 635-2466 Worldwide
(310) 762-6808 Fax


Visit our New Website!

www.alliedhightech.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 11:58 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi all,

I need to heat up samples to around 400°C for in-situ experiments. To hold
the samples I want to glue them in place. Does anyone have any experience
with EPOXY BOND 110 from TEDPELLA ? What temperature can it take before it
desintegrates ? Or is there a good high temperature adhesive that you can
recommend.

Thanks for the help in advance.

Andreas Meyer.

Moritz Andreas Meyer
Dipl.-Ing. (FH), MSc.
Materials Analyst
Materials Analysis Laboratory

AMD Saxony Manufacturing GmbH
Wilschdorfer Landstraße 101
M/S E32-MA
D-01109 Dresden
F. R. Germany

Tel. +49-351-277-4149
Fax +49-351-277-9-4149
moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com






From daemon Wed Jul 31 10:58:24 2002



From: Edgar Voelkl :      evoelkl-at-nline.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 10:37:35 -0500
Subject: RE: Semiconductor Wafers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to offer one additional non-destructive method. Using
interferometric or holographic methods would give a very good measurement
of the step height and with some care information about the profile of the
edge. There should be some Michelson or Tolansky interferometers around -
I am afraid though they are not being sold any longer.

Edgar

At 08:53 AM 7/31/2002 +0100, Richard Beanland wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


________________________
Dr. Edgar Voelkl
M&M2002 Program Chair
(LOA ORNL)

nLine Corp.
4150 Freidrich Lane, Suite A
Austin, TX 78744

TEL: (512) 440-7720 x133
FAX: (512) 447-2765
eVoelkl-at-nLine.com



From daemon Wed Jul 31 11:04:13 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 11:58:03 -0400
Subject: Temperature range for EPOXY BOND 110

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If you look in the first MRS TEM Sample Prep book (I think that it is Vol 115), there is an article there on using an adhesive from Ceramabond for high temperature in-situ cross section preparation. You can look up the adhesives on Ceramabond's web site. I am sorry that I don't have all of the particulars.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: "moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 2:58 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi all,

I need to heat up samples to around 400°C for in-situ experiments. To hold the samples I want to glue them in place. Does anyone have any experience with EPOXY BOND 110 from TEDPELLA ? What temperature can it take before it desintegrates ? Or is there a good high temperature adhesive that you can recommend.

Thanks for the help in advance.

Andreas Meyer.

Moritz Andreas Meyer
Dipl.-Ing. (FH), MSc.
Materials Analyst
Materials Analysis Laboratory

AMD Saxony Manufacturing GmbH
Wilschdorfer Landstraße 101
M/S E32-MA
D-01109 Dresden
F. R. Germany

Tel. +49-351-277-4149
Fax +49-351-277-9-4149
moritz-andreas.meyer-at-amd.com






From daemon Wed Jul 31 11:04:13 2002



From: Armando Verdugo :      aeverdugo-at-alliedhightech.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 09:00:19 -0700
Subject: Re: GaAs Hazards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks to all who provided very useful information!

Our laboratory generally has a very minimal amount of GaAs processing, but
it seems recently we have seen somewhat of an increase, hence the reason for
this request. In my experience the best way to protect from the hazards of
the material is to process the material wet and wear rubber gloves, which is
exactly what everyone has responded as a good method.

Again, many thanks.

Armando Verdugo
Laboratory Supervisor
(800) 675-1118 US and Canada
(310) 635-2466 Worldwide
(310) 762-6808 Fax


Visit our New Website!

www.alliedhightech.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Mary Mager [mailto:mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 11:23 AM
To: Armando Verdugo
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Armando,
When I had to organize the cleanup of a crystal-growing room that had left a
lot of GaAs dust around, I looked up the MSDS in order to devise a cleanup
protocol. The arsenic is only a problem if the material is acidified, so we
mopped up with a little soap and water and discarded the wet paper towels
and protective clothing as comtaminated waste. GaAs is fairly inert, but I
would avoid allowing any dust out of your cutting or polishing operations.
Clean up any fragments or dust and treat as any other arsenic-containing
compound: avoid inhalation and skin contact.
At 11:47 AM 07/29/2002 -0700, you wrote:

} Hello listers,
}
} I need to gather information on the toxicity and possible health risks that
} may be encountered by my technicians in processing (i.e. Cross-Sectioning,
} TEM/Pre-FIB, Backside Grinding, etc.) GaAs die sections in our applications
} laboratory.
}
} Any policies from other labs would be appreciated, as well as points of
} reference.
}
} Thank you all in advance.
}
} Regards,
}
} Armando Verdugo
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Jul 31 14:39:56 2002



From: Wright, Cheryl W :      CWright-at-Sikorsky.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 15:30:31 -0400
Subject: room available at Hilton Quebec for M&M

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


O U C H !!!!!!!!!!!!!! me

-----Original Message-----
} From: Beth Gregory [mailto:gregory-at-4pi.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 11:00 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I have an extra reservation. I'm not sure how easy it would be to change
the single to a double.

Room Occupancy Type(# of People): Single
Room Type: Deluxe Room
Smoking Preference: Non Smoking Room
Total Nights: 6
Dates: Check-In Date: 08/03/2002 - Check-Out Date: 08/09/2002
Price (per night) CAD 235.00

If you are interested, please reply directly to me, not the list, for
additional information. Beth




From daemon Wed Jul 31 15:07:46 2002



From: Dorothy Roak Sorenson :      dsoren-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 16:00:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: vanishing membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Stephanie,

I, too, have had trouble in the past with vanishing membranes in cell
monolayers, though not hippocampal cells. The remedy was to en bloc stain
in aqueous 3% uranyl acetate for 15 minutes prior to dehydration and then
do a rapid dehydration in a graded series of ethanol beginning with 50 %.
End the dehydration with just one treatment of 100 % EtOH and then go right
into the infiltration with increasing concentrations of epon mixed in EtOH.
Try to minimize the cells' exposure to EtOH which tends to leach out
membranes.

I hope this helps.

Dotty

Dotty Sorenson
Microscopy and Image Analysis Laboratory
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
University of Michigan Medical School
Ann Arbor, Michigan
(734)763-1170
FAX (734)763-1166
dsoren-at-umich.edu

On Wed, 31 Jul 2002, Stephanie Tyndall wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} In my first attempt at TEM I lost all the membranes on cultured primary
} hippocampal neurons. All cellular organelles were intact and had no apparent
} distortion. Has anyone else experienced this and if so do you know what
} causes the membranes to vanish?
}
} Alternately I'd be very interested in any fixation protocols anyone has for
} primary hippocampal neurons that have worked for them in the past. I am
} particularly interested in observing synapses.
}
} Thanks!
} Stephanie
}
}



From daemon Wed Jul 31 15:44:35 2002



From: David French :      d.french-at-det.csiro.au
Date: Thu, 01 Aug 2002 09:21:35 +1000
Subject: Cameca Camebax for Disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pavel;

Please accept my apology. I confused your optical images with an example
someone sent me of a cleaved MOS device.

Very sorry for the confusion.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
} From: ATC SEM Laboratory [mailto:atcsem-at-earthlink.net]
Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 8:29 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Peter,
I did not submitted any SEM images, just light photo with micron bar. Could
you e-mail them to me directly, so I would know what are you taking about.

Regards,
Pavel
atcsem-at-earthlink.net



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Peter Tomic" {PTomic-at-Anadigics.com}
To: "'ATC SEM Laboratory'" {atcsem-at-earthlink.net} ;
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 6:01 PM


Good morning All,
CSIRO at Sydney, Australia has a Cameca Camebax for disposal "as is where
is". The instrument was purchased in 1983 and has 4 WDS spectrometers, LN2
anticontamination cold trap, Argon anti-contamination leak unit and Kevex
7000 EDS unit. If interested please contact me for further details.
Instrument must be removed by end of August.

Regards,
David French
David French
Mineralogist/Geochemist

Mail Address:
CSIRO Energy Technology,
Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre,
Private Mail Bag 7,
Bangor NSW2234 ,
Australia
Delivery Address
CSIRO Energy Technology,
Store, Building 2
Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre,
New Illawarra Road
Lucas Heights NSW2234 ,
Australia
Phone direct: 61-2-9710-6879
XRD Laboratory 61-2-9710-6903
switch: 61-2-9710-6777
Fax: 61-2-9710-6800
E-mail: d.french-at-det.csiro.au


From daemon Wed Jul 31 18:31:59 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 19:24:41 -0400
Subject: FW: vanishing membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Don't feel too bad Stephanie,
}
} On my first attempt at TEM, my hand was held, along with all others in the
} class, so that there would not be a variety of subcellular objects that
} disappeared from the same tissue in the same class. Learning was fun in a
} class mode, but the training didn't last if you read beyond the next
} paragraph.
}
} If you used the glutaraldehyde-osmium sequence and saw the tissue blacken,
} then the membranes should have been there, unless they were dissolved in
} the heat of the embedment. If the unbound osmium wasn't washed out of the
} tissue, the alcohol will not be nice. If you use 100% EtOH in the final
} dehydration, it might have been from a bottle that was opened by a lab
} mate last week and the cap wasn't tightened properly.
}
} Practice with embedments first without tissue. Kick everyone else out of
} the lab. Separate all of your solutions and reagents. Do not ever share
} space with people who do paraffin embedding! Get REALLY grumpy and
} obsessive about everything. Then, when your lab is just the way you want
} it, you can begin to accumulate successes.
}
} The real key is to avoid using any important tissue for at least the six
} months of concerted effort it takes to whip the protocol to its knees and
} make it obey!
}
} My first attempt on my own, using the same generic protocol used in the
} course I took, resulted in sections on which I couldn't see any
} recognizable structure in the nuclei in the tissue. Learning these
} 'simple and straight forward' methods can be much like living through
} fraternity hazing, even if you are female. When you finally believe you
} will never be able to do any of it, you will be just in front of the door
} to success.
}
} Don't ask for suggestions. Hide away in your lab. Get a good book on the
} method(s). Carefully look over your protocol and ask what should be
} happening with every step. Then try IT again and again. When you finally
} understand the step-by-step rationale of the process, you can probably
} troubleshoot your own problems. Even learning to mix the resins is
} difficult when you try it on your own. Just know that every step of the
} process has a reason existing and that every one of them will cause at
} least one angry moment in every tech's career.
}
} Wait until you get great sections and they run away from the grid while
} you chase them in the boat. Or they get lost during staining and aren't
} on the grid when you take them to the EM. Or you put them in one place
} and when you get to the TEM all the sections are folded over the edge of
} the grids you prepared. Or both the carbon film and sections disappear
} between the lab and the EM suite, but they reappear when you return to
} look for them. Or you finally get it all right and you can see them on
} the screen, and, on that one occasion, the EM has a hiccup and the beam
} burns a hole in your section big enough for a truck to drive through. Or
} all of your first set of negatives are overexposed or overdeveloped, or
} out of focus. Then someone hears that you know how to do EM and comes to
} ask you for help, after you've just lost an important piece of tissue down
} the drain. All of these impediments are intended by the EM god to make
} you tough and hard.
}
} Every part of the process conspires to taunt you, embarrass you in front
} of others, and get you frustrated.
}
} I decided to show my son last night how to change brakes on one of our
} cars. Of course, nothing went as it had on the previous 20 brake lining
} changes and he got to see his Dad chasing around trying to catch jumping
} springs and lost clamps and holes that couldn't be found. I was
} frustrated and embarrassed, but he learned a great lesson, one which I had
} forgotten. Don't let your Dad teach you how to do anything. There is a
} god who interferes every time. Unfortunately, I've not learned this
} lesson over the course of 'teaching' four children how to do this and
} that. Some procedures never relent in their desire to impede your
} progress. Preparing tissue for TEM is one of those processes that only
} gives in when another beginner shows up somewhere. All of a sudden it
} will get easier.
}
} Those of us who have been THERE are here to help you through the hard
} times, but we won't be able to tell you how to fix the plagues that beset
} you as you progress toward EM heaven. We probably won't be able to tell
} you where your membranes have gone either, or, even worse, why they refuse
} to show themselves after all the trouble you took to preserve them and
} show them off. The only thing that drives us all is the expectation that
} membranes are always there when we start with a piece of tissue. As a
} young research fellow once said to me after failing to get a reaction in
} rabbit tissue to a mouse monoclonal antibody against a human elastin
} epitope, "It is clear that the rabbit simply doesn't have any elastin."
} Sometimes I think he had a true understanding of the issue of unfounded
} expectations in science, but then I had only stained elastin as an
} anatomic constituent of rabbit tissue for years prior to hearing his
} assertion.
}
} So, Stephanie, we finally come to this most unkind question, the one rests
} at the nub of your problem. What evidence do you have that the cells on
} that plastic substrate ever had membranes?
}
} Please take only a few parts of this seriously. Which parts is a secret.
} And, if you would like to know why you have been subjected to this, it is
} because I have spent the afternoon wraslin' with a critical point dryer
} that works beautifully if one can get it closed before the specimen dries
} by other means than critical.
}
} Also, did you know that a reconstruction of a stack of optical sections
} will show moving particles in standard orbits as rings and those moving in
} arched paths as columns? This sort of thing merely suggests that one
} SHOULD probably get back to the old and reliable ways of looking at
} things: Fixed, immobilized and embedded, thin sectioned, stained with
} safe uranium and lead, illuminated by a beam of high energy electrons, and
} recorded on a piece of Mr. Kodak's fancy photo-sensitive celluloid.
}
} It couldn't be true, but here's a(n) (im)possibility. I asked the
} following on a test long ago. [Lord! Was I nasty as a youngster!!!]
} "Consider a 60nm section that is nowhere vertical through an interface
} between cell or cell constituent or cell embedment. Under such a
} condition, what would be the visible evidence of the bimolecular lipid
} leaflet (or membrane) which is so characteristically used to describe the
} plasma and other so-called 'membranes'?" The correct answer is "There
} would be None". The unasked part of the question is, "How likely is such
} a scenario?" or "How easily would you be to find evidence of a
} bimolecular lipid leaflet in a thin section of a 1mm cube of liver
} parenchymal cells?" "What would a stack of smooth endoplasmic reticulum
} with a 20nm interlamellar spacing look like if the stack were sectioned at
} an angle of 45 degrees to a line which was perpendicular to the lamellae
} of the array?"
}
} This is a short answer question that is worse. "The nucleus that is shown
} in this photomicrograph exists in a paraffin section of liver taken from a
} mouse. Please describe the molecular structure of the nuclear envelope as
} you see it in THIS nuclear profile in the section described." The
} correct answer, of course, is that after all that processing the lipid
} portion of the membrane is gone unless some part of it has been treated so
} that it remains. Osmium tetroxide reacts with unsaturated double bonds to
} preserve THOSE parts of lipid membranes, but even that is partly mystery.
}
} So, I have tried to answer your question with a few thoughts from a grumpy
} old man who has had a bad afternoon with a technology whose success is
} sometimes determined by a person named Serendipity. Critical point dryers
} are either constructed from brass pipe with 1" walls or tiny, thread-like
} copper pipes connected to stainless steel chambers and valves by BIG
} compression fittings. When such instruments go bad, they become
} inscrutable. None of this, however, helps you to find those miscreant
} membranes. Well, as I said above, it was unlikely that we would be able
} to find them for you. The gods don't work in THAT mysterious way. EVER!!
} When you lose your membranes, you are the only one who can find them, no
} matter where they have gone or why. The rest of us are only capable of
} asking questions that may or may not help in the search. You know, "Did
} you look under the bed?"
}
} Regards and sympathy,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} Schmucker II Science Center
} c/o Geology/Astronomy
} West Chester University
} South Church Street and Rosedale Ave
} West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} Phone: 610-738-0437
} FAX: 610-738-0437
} fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
} CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
} WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
} Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
}
}
} ----------
} From: Stephanie Tyndall
} Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 10:18 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: vanishing membranes
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} In my first attempt at TEM I lost all the membranes on cultured primary
} hippocampal neurons. All cellular organelles were intact and had no
} apparent
} distortion. Has anyone else experienced this and if so do you know what
} causes the membranes to vanish?
}
} Alternately I'd be very interested in any fixation protocols anyone has
} for
} primary hippocampal neurons that have worked for them in the past. I am
} particularly interested in observing synapses.
}
} Thanks!
} Stephanie
}
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Jul 31 18:37:33 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jul 2002 19:30:06 -0400
Subject: RE: microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wow! This is like having Walter McCrone offer to do your microscopy for
you. Lucky man! I hope we can hear about the solution to the problem.

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Schmucker II Science Center
c/o Geology/Astronomy
West Chester University
South Church Street and Rosedale Ave
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
FAX: 610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI URL: http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
WCUPA URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/
Visitors URL: http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/


} ----------
} From: Alan Bright
} Reply To: bright-at-dial.pipex.com
} Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2002 10:10 AM
} To: "Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com;
} Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc: Bob.Thompson/KRDC-at-alcan.com
} Subject: RE: microtome
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Paul,
}
} I think I can help you here, please send me a small sample so that I can
} do
} some tests. I will then return the results with my findings.
}
} Best Regards
}
} Alan Bright
}
} Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
} St Margaret's Way
} Huntingdon
} Cambridgeshire
} PE29 6EU
} England
}
} Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
} Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
} Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
} Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: "Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} [mailto:"Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
} Sent: 24 July 2002 21:19
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc: Bob.Thompson/KRDC-at-alcan.com
} Subject: microtome
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We need to cut "thick?" cross sections of polymer/metal laminates for FTIR
} microscope analysis.
} Material thickness is around 100 microns..(section thickness somewhere
} around 0.5 to 1mm i think)
} I have 2 ultra microtomes but the sample size and section thickness
} obtained from the ultramicrotome are to small for this application.
}
} Any suggestions on the type of microtome i should consider. (Used is a
} definite option)
} or is there another piece of equipment i can use for this?
}
} We are currently slicing pieces of our sample with a razor blade but this
} causes some smearing in the layers.
} I am currently being courted by one vendor who is going to lend me a
} microtome to try out.
}
} Suggestions are greatly appreciated
} Vendors please reply to me directly.
}
} Cheers
}
} Paul D. Nolan
} Electron Optics
}
} Alcan International Limited
} Kingston Research and Development Centre
} P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
} Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9
}
} Tel: (613) 541-2066
} Fax: (613) 541-2134
} paul.nolan-at-alcan.com
}
}
}
}





MicroscopyListserver Archive Email Extraction Software Version NJZ07060908

Return to Microscopy Listserver Home Page


Return to MSA HomePage