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From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2003 08:18:03 +0000
Subject: Re: Additional Digital camera information

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Lots of pixels mean a larger chip. At the side mount position, the
diameter of the electron beam is perhaps 1-2 cm, so with a large
chip, you would only be illuminating a part of the chip. So, no point
in having a chip with lots of pixels at the side mount position.

There are at least two suppliers of 4k by 4k TEM CCD cameras - that
is, 16 megapixels, so you might want to do a bit more research on
your options.

I would also be careful in use of the word resolution - lots of
pixels does not necessarily mean that you get good resolution in the
final image. The key factor is the point spread function. To transfer
the electron image to the CCD, there is a scintillator and then a
coupling mechanism - either lenses/prism or fibre optic. What needs
to be considered is how wide an illuminated area is generated at the
CCD by a single electron hitting the scintillator. If you have small
pixel elements in the CCD, you end up with a single electron
illuminating 4 or 9 pixels - in such a case, there would be no
advantage to having lots of pixels. Very large pixel elements will
result in electrons at different positions in the image illuminating
the same CCD pixel element. So, good TEM CCD camera design requires a
careful matching of the CCD pixel element size to the point spread
function. Given that this match has been achieved, large pixel
elements are good - they store more charge, thus giving you greater
dynamic range.

I guess what that boils down to is, don't assume more pixels means a
better image. If the camera is well designed, it should but it is not
an assumption I would make. You also need to think about read-out
time - more pixels take longer to read-out to the computer.

My advice would always be to get images from your specimens and
compare the results from different cameras.

Regards
--
Larry Stoter

PS - I am an employee of JEOL (UK) Ltd


From daemon Sat Mar 1 09:32:33 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2003 15:21:51 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: USE HEXAMETHYLDISILAZANE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Here is my protocol for HMDS drying of bacteria. Have fun!


Dave

Preparation of bacteria for SEM using HMDS

Safety
Work in fume hood and use gloves
Retain ethanol and HMDS (hexamethyldisilazane) for disposal
in non-chlorinated waste bottle

Start with a lot of bacteria eg a 3 x1mm cubed pellet

Fixation

Fix in 4% glutaraldehyde in buffer (usually 0.1M )*
Leave for 1 hr at room temperature or 24hrs in the fridge
Rinse in buffer x3 (total storage time should exceed
fixation time by a factor of 3).

SEM Dehydration of bacteria in an Eppendorf

5m in 20% ethanol
5m in 30% ethanol
5m in 50% ethanol
5m in 70% ethanol
5m in 90% ethanol
5m in 100% ethanol
5m in 100% ethanol


5m in 100% ethanol / HMDS (2:1)
5m in 100% ethanol / HMDS (2:2)
5m in 100% ethanol / HMDS (1:2)
5m in 100% HMDS
5m in 100% HMDS

Centrifuge and resuspend in a 2 drops" of HMDS. Put on
drop on a clean (use acetone) small round coverslip on a
stub. Take rest of sample dilute by a drop and mount one
drop. Do this about 4 times to get a range of dilutions.

Sputter with gold and view in SEM.

*For 4% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M buffer
Take, say, 50mls of 0.2M buffer, 34ml d water and 16ml of
25% glutaraldehyde.



On Wed, 26 Feb 2003 10:49:26 -0600 (CST)
"ggm-at-servidor.unam.mx"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

}
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} }
} } hello
} }
} I NEED TO DRY BACTERY BY SUBLIMATION USING
HEXAMETHYLDISILAZANE } (HMDS), SOMEONE, COULD HELP ME,
BECAUSE ITS THE FIRST TIME I USE IT. SOMEONE } COULD TELL
ME HOW TO USE HMDS. }
} THANKS. }
} M.C. GUILLERMINA GLEZ. MANCERA } FAC.QUIMICA-UNAM
} MEXICO, D.F. }
} ------------------------------------------------- } Obtén
tu correo en www.correo.unam.mx } UNAMonos Comunicándonos
} }
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Sat Mar 1 13:31:48 2003



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2003 19:19:50 +0000
Subject: Re: Additional Digital camera information

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} My thanks to everyone who has sent me advice and information on digital
} image systems for TEM. I am still having trouble understanding why their
} is a difference in resolution between side mounted cameras and bottom
} mounted cameras. I see that bottom mounted cameras have a resolution of up
} to 6 megapixels while the highest I have seen so far for side mounted
} cameras is 2 megapixels. If anyone out there would be willing to try and
} explain this to me I would appreciate this and then I could in turn pass
} that on to my faculty bosses who would also like to know about the
} difference.
}
} Tom Bargar
} Electron Microscopy Core Research Facility
} 986395 Nebraska Medical Center
} Omaha, NE 68198-6395
}
} phone 402-559-7347
}
} tbargar-at-unmc.edu

Lots of pixels mean a larger chip. At the side mount position, the
diameter of the electron beam is perhaps 1-2 cm, so with a large
chip, you would only be illuminating a part of the chip. So, no point
in having a chip with lots of pixels at the side mount position.

There are at least two suppliers of 4k by 4k TEM CCD cameras - that
is, 16 megapixels, so you might want to do a bit more research on
your options.

I would also be careful in use of the word resolution - lots of
pixels does not necessarily mean that you get good resolution in the
final image. The key factor is the point spread function. To transfer
the electron image to the CCD, there is a scintillator and then a
coupling mechanism - either lenses/prism or fibre optic. What needs
to be considered is how wide an illuminated area is generated at the
CCD by a single electron hitting the scintillator. If you have small
pixel elements in the CCD, you end up with a single electron
illuminating 4 or 9 pixels - in such a case, there would be no
advantage to having lots of pixels. Very large pixel elements will
result in electrons at different positions in the image illuminating
the same CCD pixel element. So, good TEM CCD camera design requires a
careful matching of the CCD pixel element size to the point spread
function. Given that this match has been achieved, large pixel
elements are good - they store more charge, thus giving you greater
dynamic range.

I guess what that boils down to is, don't assume more pixels means a
better image. If the camera is well designed, it should but it is not
an assumption I would make. You also need to think about read-out
time - more pixels take longer to read-out to the computer.

My advice would always be to get images from your specimens and
compare the results from different cameras.

Regards
--
Larry Stoter

PS - I am an employee of JEOL (UK) Ltd


From daemon Sun Mar 2 13:58:56 2003



From: Vickie Frohlich :      frohlich-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Sun, 02 Mar 2003 10:16:00 -0600
Subject: Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Spectral Imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The University of Texas Health Science Center
and Hamamatsu Photonics KK will co-host
A Special Topics Symposium and Workshop on

Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Spectral Imaging

Symposium -
Academic and
Commercial Presentations
June 6-7, 2003
Gunter Hotel
Student: $ 200.00 (US)
Professional/Corporate: $ 250.00 (US)
Registration Deadline May 1, 2003

Workshop -
Hands-on Experience with
Latest Instrumentation
June 8-10, 2003
UT Health Science Cnt.
Tuition: $700.00 (US) Includes room and board
20 student limit / 4 scholarships available
Application Deadline April 7, 2003

For information and forms visit:

http://usa.hamamatsu.com/flim_spectral/default.htm
or
http://www.uthscsa.edu/csb/imaging-course.html



From daemon Sun Mar 2 23:52:53 2003



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 11:33:43 +0100
Subject: TEM: metrizamide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The -lm switch solved the problem. The math libraries need to be explicitly linked on the gcc command line. It is also not necessary to include tgmath.h. I have successfully compiled atompot, mulslice and image programs and they run successfully on the sample data files provided with the source code. The commands I used were:

gcc -O2 -mpentium -c *.c
gcc -O2 -mpentium atompot.c fft2dc.o memory.o slicelib.o tiffsubs.o -lm -o ../exe/atompot
gcc -O2 -mpentium mulslice.c fft2dc.o memory.o slicelib.o tiffsubs.o -lm -o ../exe/mulslice
gcc -O2 -mpentium image.c fft2dc.o memory.o slicelib.o tiffsubs.o -lm -o ./exe/image

My thanks to Paul Voyles and Dimiter Prodanov for their suggestions. The suggestion from Dimiter Prodanov was to upgrade to gcc 3.0 and not to use the -ansi option. I have not used the -ansi option but upgrading to gcc 3.0 is not required for this particular set of programs, IMHO.

With Best Regards,
Divakar

----
Dr R Divakar
Physical Metallurgy Section
MCG-IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603102, India
----

-----Original Message-----
} From: Paul Voyles [SMTP:voyles-at-engr.wisc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, February 27, 2003 10:02 AM
To: Divakar R (Dr)
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com


Hi everybody,

does anybody know anything about metrizamide embedding of TEM specimens?

Philip

Philip Koeck
Södertörns Högskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290
http://www.biosci.ki.se/em




From daemon Mon Mar 3 10:31:42 2003



From: Ann-Fook Yang :      yanga-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 11:20:02 -0500
Subject: re:osmium and immunolabeling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,

What I remember from an immunogold workshop given by Moise Bendayan, University of Montreal, Canada, is that different antigens react to osmium differently. Some are OK and others are not. If no one had worked on it before you have to find out yourself. You may incubate osmium treated section on a drop of saturarated sodium metaperiodate for 1 hr. before immunostaining. Following reference covers tissue precessing.
Bendayan, M. Protein A-gold and Protein G-gold postembedding immunoelectron microscopy. In Colloidal Bold: Principles, Methods and Applications Vol. 1, p33-94. Acacemic Press 1989.

AnnFook yang

} } } Tamara Howard {thoward-at-unm.edu} 02/28/03 01:22PM } } }
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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Mike -

I'm sure there are references out there, but all I can offer is personal
experience and word-of-mouth. I've used 1 (that I can think of off the
bat) antibody that gave "normal" staining on sections of tissue with
regular osmication, and some that were OK with reduced osmium (osmium
mixed with potassium ferrocyanide or ferricyanide - you'll get reams of
info on which to use!), and enough that were useless after any osmium to
make you cry. Osmium can also mess up your resin polymerization, so you
have to be careful - especially if you want to UV cure - dark tissue is a
major pain.

What do you mean by osmium reducing the size of gold label? You said you
were doing postembedding immuno....I haven't heard of any gold size
problems for postembedding (lots with pre-embedding and osmium) - how
would that happen?

Do you have some potentially unrescuable blocks that have already been
osmicated? You might try a gentle peroxide treatment on the sections, or
some EM version of antigen retrieval....

Good luck!

Tamara

On Fri, 28 Feb 2003, Mike Delannoy wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} To the listserver,
} I am looking for references on the effects of osmium staining
} on postembedded immunolabeling, ie reducing the amount and size
} of gold label on LR Gold/Whites sections. Also has anyone
} used very low osmium (0.05%?) successfully for IEM?
}
} Thank You
} Mike D
}
}
}

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|





From daemon Mon Mar 3 11:45:51 2003



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 09:36:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject: manual for nikon labophot pol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anyone have a manual for a Nikon Labophot Pol? I need to do a little
cleaning and probably regreasing for it, but don't have any kind of a
manual, basic, service or otherwise.
Thanks.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793


From daemon Mon Mar 3 13:01:48 2003



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 13:52:23 -0500
Subject: LKB 2178 Knifemaker II manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

We've lost the operating instructions to our LKB 2178 Knifemaker II. Can
someone make us a copy of their's? I'd certainly compensate you
for the associated costs. Thanks in advance.

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-487-2002
FAX 906-487-2934
Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills.htm





From daemon Mon Mar 3 13:06:34 2003



From: Pmtl :      mtl-at-njcc.com
Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 14:01:05 -0500
Subject: Need EM lab for DNA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The following party is looking for a outside laboratory to study the
structure of DNA in plasmid. This is beyond the scope of our
laboratory. I told her that someone in MSA can help her.
J. Roy Nelson, Ph.D.
Material Testing Laboratory
mtl-at-njcc.com

"I am interested in using electron microscopy to look at supercoiled
versus
open circular DNA in our sample of purified plasmid DNA. I would like
to
know who might offer this service and their price for the service."

Thank you.

Pam Freiden
pamela.freiden-at-stjude.org {mailto:pamela.freiden-at-stjude.org}




From daemon Mon Mar 3 13:13:09 2003



From: khara scott :      kharascott-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 11:05:25 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM of Pillbugs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listservers:

Has anyone done TEM on Armadillidium vulgare
(Pillbugs)? We're interested in the structure of the
eyes of these pillbugs. We're not very sure about the
structures that we are seeing and the preparation of
the specimen. If anyone has any literature that they
can recommend or experiences that they can share I
would greatly appreciate the help.

Khara Scott
EM Technician
Chicago State University

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Tax Center - forms, calculators, tips, more
http://taxes.yahoo.com/


From daemon Mon Mar 3 14:10:43 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 13:55:10 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM Polymer Staining Procedure

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Refer to "G. M. Brown and J. H. Butler, "New method for the
characterization of domain morphology of polymer blends using ruthenium
tetroxide staining and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM)",
Polymer 38 (15), 3937 (1997)" for a detailed description for preparation of
RuO4 solutions.

Regards,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"George.Theodossio
u-at-csiro.au" To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: TEM Polymer Staining Procedure
02/13/03 01:14 AM





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Dear All,

I have a colleague who is looking at silica particles in a polymer matrix.
He is planning TEM analysis of cross sections to image the particles,
determine their distribution and possibly some EDXS mapping. The samples
are cast as thin films and the silica could be as small as 5nm.
He has found a reference to the use of Phosphotungstic Acid (hope the
spelling is correct) to stain the polymer but not the silica, thus
improving
contrast in the TEM. This was done by floating off the cryo-microtomed
sections on a methanol solution of Phosphotungstic Acid. Alas, this is all
the information he has.

We don't have cryo microtomy facilities, so we were going to use our
microtome at room temp and also attempt to tripod polish.

Does anyone have a more detailed procedure of how to make up the solution
and stain the polymer?? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.


Regards
George

George Theodossiou
Physicist / Electron Microscopist
CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
Victoria, 3169
tel: +61 3 9545 2012
fax: +61 3 9544 1128

Visit our Web site http://www.cmst.csiro.au

Shipping address: CSIRO - Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, Gate 4
Normanby Rd. Clayton, Victoria,

PLEASE NOTE:

To the extent permitted by law, CSIRO does not represent, warrant and/or
guarantee that the integrity of this communication has been maintained or
that the communication is free of errors, virus, interception or
interference.

The information contained in this e-mail may be confidential or privileged.
Any unauthorised use or disclosure is prohibited. If you have received
this
e-mail in error, please delete it immediately and notify George Theodossiou
on +61 3 9545 2012. Thank you.









From daemon Mon Mar 3 15:42:13 2003



From: Paula Newcomb :      newcomb1-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 15:31:58 -0600
Subject: image query

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings--

I am a book designer with the University of Illinois Press and am
searching for a SEM image of a cancer cell(s) to use on the cover of a
book we are publishing.

It was suggested that I make my query on this list. The book talks
specifically about mantle-cell diffuse lymphoma but the image does not
need to be that exact, any malignant lymphoma would do.

We would of course credit any images we use and perhaps be able to pay
you or your organization a small fee. Please email me direct if you have
any information to pass on.

Thank you,

Paula Newcomb
Designer
University of Illinois Press
217.244.4706
newcomb1-at-uiuc.edu



From daemon Mon Mar 3 16:53:06 2003



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 16:44:43 -0600
Subject: Journal of Microscopy & Microanalysis April Issue : Table of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues:

Below is the Table of Contents from the upcoming issue of
the Journal of Microscopy & Microanalysis. Vol 9, No. 2

Editorial
Charles Lyman

Historical Bibliography
Key Events in the History of Electron Microscopy
F. Haguenau, P.W. Hawkes, J.L. Hutchinson, B. Satiat-Jeunemaître,
G.T. Simon, and D.B. Williams

Papers from the Australian Microbeam Analysis Society

Monet's Painting under the Microscope
Paula Dredge, Richard Wuhrer, and Matthew R. Phillips

Cathodoluminescence Efficiency Dependence on Excitation Density in
n-Type Gallium Nitride
Matthew R. Phillips, Hagen Telg, Sergei O. Kucheyev, Olaf Gelhausen,
and Milos Toth

Application of Quantitative Electron Microscopy to the Mineral
Content of Insect Cuticle
Ron Rasch, Bronwen W. Cribb, John Barry, and Christopher M. Palmer

Charge-Related Problems Associated with X-Ray Microanalysis in the
Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope at Low Pressures
Brendan J. Griffin and Alexandra A. Suvorova


From daemon Mon Mar 3 16:53:28 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 14:52:05 -0800
Subject: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List,
I'd like to find a protocol for making colloidal gold in 10 nm and 20
nm sizes. I'm sure someone on the list has either a procedure or a
reference to one. TIA for your help.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Mon Mar 3 17:19:19 2003



From: emlad :      emlad-at-hn.vnn.vn (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 17:11:40 -0600
Subject: 4th ASEAN Conference announcement & Call for papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,
The 4th ASEAN Microscopy Conference (ASEANMC4) will be held in Hanoi,
VietNam, from October 9 till 10, 2003. This Conference will be a
gathering of microscopists from the ASEAN and other regions of the
world. An important aim of the Conference is to promote mutual
understandings and to develop international collaborative research in
life and material sciences. Participants will have the opportunity to
review recent work, to discuss recent advances and identify new
challenges in the field of electron and light microscopy.
The Second announcement are currently in the mail to many
microscopist who are interested in this conference.
When we receive reply from you then we will send "the Second
announcement" to you by post as soon as possible.
We would like to extend our warmest welcome to you to participate and
look forward to seeing you in Hanoi in October 2003.

Chairman, Organizing committee

Prof. Nguyen Van Man

***********************************************

Mailing address:

Assoc. Prof. Nguyen Kim Giao

Electron Microscopy Unit

National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology

N0 1, Yersin street- Hai Ba Trung district - Hanoi - Vietnam

Tel: 84.04.9715434 Fax: 84.04.8210853

Email: {mailto:emlad-at-hn.vnn.vn} emlad-at-hn.vnn.vn, or
{mailto:emunihe-at-vol.vnn.vn} emunihe-at-vol.vnn.vn

***********************************************


From daemon Tue Mar 4 06:59:50 2003



From: Edward Calomeni :      calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 07:47:52 -0500
Subject: Re: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Bill,

Why make your own gold, so much easier to buy and store premade?

Anyway, way back when there was a review article in the EMSA Bulletin entitled Colloidal Gold as a Marker and Tracer in Light and Electron Microscopy. Published around 1986??? Author was J. Dewey This is a nice review article on most aspects of colloidal gold labeling..

Other references to look up are:

1). Mulpferdt, H. Experientia, 1982 (38) pg 1127-1128
2). Roth, J. 1983b Techniques in Immunocytochemistry, Vol. II (Academic Press) pg 217-284.

best of luck

Ed

Edward Calomeni
Director EM Lab
Ohio State University - Pathology
M018 Starling Loving Hall
320 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210-1240
614-293-5580 (office)
614-293-8806 (lab)
calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu



From daemon Tue Mar 4 07:34:49 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 08:28:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Note to list: This E-mail included a rather lengthy attachment that cannot
be sent via the list. Please E-mail me directly if you want the procedure
for making colloidal gold conjugates.


Bill,
I have used the enclosed procedure many times and it works great.
Although I am lazy these days and usually buy gold conjugates, I still have
some prepared by this method that worked great 8-10 years after being made.
I made primarily 5 and 10nm gold so cannot vouch for the 20nm results.

Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907



On 3/3/03 5:52 PM, "Bill Tivol" {tivol-at-caltech.edu} wrote:

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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear List,
} I'd like to find a protocol for making colloidal gold in 10 nm and 20
} nm sizes. I'm sure someone on the list has either a procedure or a
} reference to one. TIA for your help.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol
} EM Scientist and Manager
} Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
} Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
} California Institute of Technology
} Pasadena CA 91125
} (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}
}



From daemon Tue Mar 4 07:39:32 2003



From: Rostislav Zemek :      rosta-at-acarus.entu.cas.cz
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 13:40:01 +0100 (CET)
Subject: LM - question on inverted microscope, Hoffman and VAREL contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear users of ListServer,

I kindly ask you for your advice concerning inverted microscope. We need
to count tiny mites in alcohol samples. Mites were washed from plants, so
some debris is in samples, too. As mites are very small - adults are 0.2
times 0.05 mm, white soft bodies, observing them using dissection
microscope is very difficult, determination developmental stages and sex
impossible.

Therefore, we consider to purchase an inverted microscope but we are not
sure if to ask for that one which is equipped with relief contrasting
method. If yes, which would be the best? Hoffman modulation contrast
usually needs special condenser and lenses and is therefore more
expensive. Zeiss microscope has so called Variable relief (VAREL) contrast
which allows unilateral darkfield, perhaps convenient for our white
mites.

As we do not have a possibility to try inverted microscope with relief
contrast, I would very appreciate your opinion/advice.

Thank you.


Rostislav Zemek


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rostislav Zemek Phone : 00420-387775227
Institute of Entomology
Branisovska 31 Fax : 00420-385310354
370 05 Ceske Budejovice
Czech Republic E-mail: rosta-at-acarus.entu.cas.cz
------------------------------------------------------------------------------





From daemon Tue Mar 4 10:28:23 2003



From: Marilyn Levy :      mlevy-at-cellbio.wustl.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 10:19:35 -0600
Subject: Scoring wheels for LKB knife maker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone know of a source for ordering scoring wheels for an LKB knife
breaker, model 7801 B? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Marilyn Levy

Electron Microscopy Facility
Dept. of Cell Biology and Physiology
Washington U. School of Medicine
fax 314 362-7463


From daemon Tue Mar 4 10:28:45 2003



From: jan factor :      jfactor-at-purvid.ns.purchase.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 11:33:36 -0500
Subject: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues: Tungsten bulbs change as they age (e.g., move toward
more yellow wavelengths). Can anyone tell me if the mercury bulbs used
in fluorescence microscopes also change with age? If so, is it possible
that an old bulb might result in weakened fluorescence?
--Many thanks, Jan Factor

---------------------------------------
Jan Robert Factor, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
---------------------------------------
Division of Natural Sciences
Purchase College
State University of New York
Purchase, NY 10577
---------------------------------------
Ofc. Tel: 914-251-6659
Ofc. Fax: 914-251-6635
E-mail: jfactor-at-purvid.ns.purchase.edu
---------------------------------------




From daemon Tue Mar 4 10:32:34 2003



From: Sridhar Ramamurthy :      sramamur-at-uwo.ca
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 11:24:55 -0500
Subject: ASM 2003 Surface Engineering Congress - Call for Papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Whether your specialty involves fundamental research or practical
applications of surface treatments and coatings, we encourage you
to make a technical presentation at the 2nd ASM International
Surface Engineering Congress & Exposition, to be held Sept.
15-18, 2003 in Indianapolis.

This premier event uniquely focuses on the practical engineering
as well as the science of surface treatments and coatings. It's
your best opportunity for networking with industrial engineers
and scientists, industrial managers, and academic and government
researchers.

To further enhance the technological and economic relevance of
this year's technical sessions, our Congress will be co-located
with America's largest heat treating event, the 22nd ASM Heat
Treating Society Conference & Exposition, as well as the annual
meeting of the North American Die Casters Association.

Abstracts are due by March 10 for presentations (platform and
poster sessions) in the following areas:

Corrosion resistant surfaces
PVD/CVD processes and applications
Laser processes
Thermal barrier coatings
Computer modeling of deposition processes and applications
Characterization of coatings and thin films
Surface finishing effects and technologies
Surface metrology
Tribological coatings
Residual stresses development and effect on properties
Biomedical applications of coatings
New deposition equipments and manufacturing
Thermally sprayed coatings and applications
Plasma enhanced processes
Scanning probe microscopy for nanosciences

Please note that while "paper" submissions are encouraged for
publishing in our proceedings volume, they are NOT required. To
submit your abstract by March 10, please click on the following link:
http://www.asminternational.org/absubmit_surface.cfm

Sincerely,

Dr. Oludele Popoola, General Chair
Consultant
Novi, MI
popoola1-at-yahoo.com

Dr. Sudipta Seal, Program Chair
University of Central Florida
Orlando, FL
sseal-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu

Dr. Arnold Deutchman, Expositions Chair
Worthington BeamAlloy Corp., a Division of Worthington Industries, Inc.
Columbus, OH
ahdeutch-at-worthingtonindustries.com

Professor Narendra Dahotre, Proceedings Editor
University of Tennessee-Center for Laser Applications
Knoxville, TN
ndahotre-at-utk.edu


From daemon Tue Mar 4 11:04:39 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 11:58:32 -0500
Subject: Re: LM - question on inverted microscope, Hoffman and VAREL contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ask the vendor to bring the instrument you are considering to your lab for a
demonstration. We always do this for expensive items. Any vendor who will not
comply is not worth dealing with.

Geoff

Rostislav Zemek wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear users of ListServer,
}
} I kindly ask you for your advice concerning inverted microscope. We need
} to count tiny mites in alcohol samples. Mites were washed from plants, so
} some debris is in samples, too. As mites are very small - adults are 0.2
} times 0.05 mm, white soft bodies, observing them using dissection
} microscope is very difficult, determination developmental stages and sex
} impossible.
}
} Therefore, we consider to purchase an inverted microscope but we are not
} sure if to ask for that one which is equipped with relief contrasting
} method. If yes, which would be the best? Hoffman modulation contrast
} usually needs special condenser and lenses and is therefore more
} expensive. Zeiss microscope has so called Variable relief (VAREL) contrast
} which allows unilateral darkfield, perhaps convenient for our white
} mites.
}
} As we do not have a possibility to try inverted microscope with relief
} contrast, I would very appreciate your opinion/advice.
}
} Thank you.
}
} Rostislav Zemek
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} Rostislav Zemek Phone : 00420-387775227
} Institute of Entomology
} Branisovska 31 Fax : 00420-385310354
} 370 05 Ceske Budejovice
} Czech Republic E-mail: rosta-at-acarus.entu.cas.cz
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Tue Mar 4 11:30:17 2003



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 11:08:25 -0600
Subject: 10 days left: UBC 3D Live-cell Course, June 15 - 26

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Eighth Annual INTERNATIONAL 12-Day Short Course on

3D Microscopy of Living Cells
June 15 - 26, 2003 (Pre-course: afternoon, June 14)

Seventh, Post-course Workshop on

3D Image Processing,
June 28 - July 30, 2003

http:// www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/

Organized by Prof. James Pawley,
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)

in association with

The Departments of Pharmacology and Physiology
and the Brain Research Centre,
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


DATES

Applications must be received by March 15, 2003
Deposit due April 15, 2003
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday, June 14, 2003
First Lecture 7:30 PM Saturday, June 14, 2003
Live-cell Course ends, noon Thursday, June 26, 2003
3D Image Processing Course, June 28 - 30, 2003

APPLICATIONS

Applicants must complete a questionnaire on the web to assess
knowledge level, field of interest and proposed personal, live-cell,
project. www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/application.htm

Enrollment will be limited to about 24-32 participants
(exact number depends on number of 3D Systems available). Selection
will be made on the basis of background and perceived need. Those
without previous LM experience will be provided with access to basic
texts to read before the course begins. Application forms can be
obtained from:

Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU

Additional information is available from:
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/brochure.htm

We expect to have at least 11, 3D microscope workstations for student
use during 14 3D-Lab session and there will be an international faculty of 20.

Application deadlines:

Application forms must be received for screening by March 15, 2003.
Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, and a deposit of
50% must be received by April 15, 2003. In general, refunds of the
deposit will only be possible if someone on the waiting list can take
the place. The remainder is due before Registration.


Pre-Course Tuition (1/2 day Basic Optical principles) $120 (US)
3D Live-cell Course Tuition (includes lunches and snacks): $2450 (US)
3D Image Processing Workshop Tuition (includes lunches and snacks):
$900 (US)

Room/board about $40/day (US) depending on room type.

I hope that this includes all of the information that you need, but
if not, please get back to me.

Jim Pawley
--

--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 14 - 26, 2003, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: http://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2003


From daemon Tue Mar 4 11:41:08 2003



From: Leslie Eibest :      leibest-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 12:33:13 -0500
Subject: critical point dryers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello listers;

I'm in the market for a new critical point dryer, and trying to get a feel
for the pros and cons of the various units that are available. If you have
purchased a CPD in the last few years, would you please contact me
(off-line)? I would appreciate hearing what you have and how well it works.


Thanks!

Leslie Eibest
SEM lab manger
Dept. of Biology
Duke University



From daemon Tue Mar 4 11:59:07 2003



From: jmwired.com :      webmaster-at-jmwired.com
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 01:56:40 +0800
Subject: Need European Distributor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


JiaMing manufacturing company, a world class forged iron, stained class, wood furniture, bamboo floor, stone product manufacturing company.
Currently, is looking for European distributor. Please let us know if you're interested.
You can also visit our web site www.jmwired.com


E-mail:fujianjiaming-at-sina.com
webmaster-at-jmwired.com


From daemon Tue Mar 4 14:39:02 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:17:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Way to go Ed--you've got a great memory!

The article was by J. DeMay from Janssen Pharm in Beerse, Belgium and
it's on pg 54 of EMSA Bulletin 14, 1 Spring 1984. It has a detailed
appendix on how to make colloidal gold. The article is an extensive work
with a zillion references.

I could either a.) photocopy the article and send it to Bill, b.) scan
it in to PDFs and post their availability on the listserver, or c.) seek
permission to reprint a shorter version in Microscopy Today. That said,
Ed's suggestion to just go out and buy the stuff is a good one.

What does the community want?

Ron Anderson, Editor
Microscopy Today and Editor of the EMSA Bulletin in 1984

-----Original Message-----
} From: Edward Calomeni [mailto:calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 7:48 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Morning Bill,

Why make your own gold, so much easier to buy and store premade?

Anyway, way back when there was a review article in the EMSA Bulletin
entitled Colloidal Gold as a Marker and Tracer in Light and Electron
Microscopy. Published around 1986??? Author was J. Dewey This is a
nice review article on most aspects of colloidal gold labeling..

Other references to look up are:

1). Mulpferdt, H. Experientia, 1982 (38) pg 1127-1128
2). Roth, J. 1983b Techniques in Immunocytochemistry, Vol. II
(Academic Press) pg 217-284.

best of luck

Ed

Edward Calomeni
Director EM Lab
Ohio State University - Pathology
M018 Starling Loving Hall
320 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210-1240
614-293-5580 (office)
614-293-8806 (lab)
calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu





From daemon Tue Mar 4 15:26:51 2003



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 15:17:22 -0600
Subject: Vacuum Evaporation System

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Group,

Looking for some lab in the Dallas area ( will consider other areas ) that could take some silicate powder material and heat it to 1100-1200C in a vacuum. Want to melt the material into a sample that can be sectioned and polished for microprobe analysis.

Thanks

Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Department of Geological Sciences
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx. 75275
Voice: 214-768-2756
Fax: 214-768-2701
Email: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu



From daemon Tue Mar 4 15:42:04 2003



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 15:32:57 -0600
Subject: Re: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
Arc lamps probably do not change in spectrum as they age, but
for sure they lose intensity. Sometimes when you change an old one,
you will see a cloud of metalic deposit on the glass, presumably
lowering the output intensity. In my experience the loss depends on
the individual bulb, some lose more than others. But I have bulbs
that are clearly and obviously less bright at the end of their life.
Much rejoicing when the bulb gets changed.

Hope this helps,
Tobias Baskin


}
}
} Dear Colleagues: Tungsten bulbs change as they age (e.g., move toward
} more yellow wavelengths). Can anyone tell me if the mercury bulbs used
} in fluorescence microscopes also change with age? If so, is it possible
} that an old bulb might result in weakened fluorescence?
} --Many thanks, Jan Factor
}
} ---------------------------------------
} Jan Robert Factor, Ph.D.
} Professor of Biology
} ---------------------------------------
} Division of Natural Sciences
} Purchase College
} State University of New York
} Purchase, NY 10577
} ---------------------------------------
} Ofc. Tel: 914-251-6659
} Ofc. Fax: 914-251-6635
} E-mail: jfactor-at-purvid.ns.purchase.edu
} ---------------------------------------


--
_ ____ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ University of Missouri
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO USA
/ / / \ \ \ 65211-7400
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ voice: 573-882-0173
fax: 573-882-0123
http://www.biosci.missouri.edu/Baskin/baskin_lab__home_page.htm


From daemon Tue Mar 4 18:05:29 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 15:59:45 -0800
Subject: Colloidal gold--thanx

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List,
Thank you for the quick and informative responses. I have two
protocols in hand and several promising references.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Tue Mar 4 20:02:31 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 17:55:20 -0800
Subject: Re: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jan
I think mercury lamp may emit less light over the years for so many reasons
(decreasing pressure or just dust cover). I would suspect more the
filters: they may fade or change the properties under extended exposure to
the UV light. In general, all optical components with age became dirtier
and UV light may just make case the worse. Finally you may see funny
sometimes colored layers of decomposed (or what?) material covered optical
surfaces. It definitely will not increase the amount of light you have. Sergey

At 08:33 AM 3/4/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Mar 4 20:38:13 2003



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 18:26:26 -0800
Subject: Re: LM - question on inverted microscope, Hoffman and VAREL contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Geoff:

I can appreciate that anyone would prefer to have a vendor deliver an
instrument to their door to do an on-site demonstration, but you also
must realize that it is simply not possible in every instance. To say
that "Any vendor who will not comply is not worth dealing with" is quite
simplistic and offensive. I have nothing to do with this particular
customer, but I can certainly understand how several excellent
microscopy vendors may have difficulty justifying an on-site demo in the
Czech Republic. I personally have been to the Czech Republic several
times to demonstrate our systems, however, it can certainly not be
justified in every instance. To dismiss vendors so capriciously would
be doing a disservice to Dr. Zemek. Perhaps the company offering the
best solution at the best price has a better method of demonstrating its
performance than through an on-site demo. Technology these days is
pretty impressive.

Speaking as a family business owner and microscopy vendor for nearly 40
years, I guess I take it a bit personally when vendors are treated with
such disrespect. Scientists and vendors working together rather than as
adversaries is much more productive and serves the scientific community
much more effectively.

Best regards-

David

Geoff McAuliffe wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Ask the vendor to bring the instrument you are considering to your lab for a
} demonstration. We always do this for expensive items. Any vendor who will not
} comply is not worth dealing with.
}
} Geoff
}
} Rostislav Zemek wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Dear users of ListServer,
} }
} } I kindly ask you for your advice concerning inverted microscope. We need
} } to count tiny mites in alcohol samples. Mites were washed from plants, so
} } some debris is in samples, too. As mites are very small - adults are 0.2
} } times 0.05 mm, white soft bodies, observing them using dissection
} } microscope is very difficult, determination developmental stages and sex
} } impossible.
} }
} } Therefore, we consider to purchase an inverted microscope but we are not
} } sure if to ask for that one which is equipped with relief contrasting
} } method. If yes, which would be the best? Hoffman modulation contrast
} } usually needs special condenser and lenses and is therefore more
} } expensive. Zeiss microscope has so called Variable relief (VAREL) contrast
} } which allows unilateral darkfield, perhaps convenient for our white
} } mites.
} }
} } As we do not have a possibility to try inverted microscope with relief
} } contrast, I would very appreciate your opinion/advice.
} }
} } Thank you.
} }
} } Rostislav Zemek
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } Rostislav Zemek Phone : 00420-387775227
} } Institute of Entomology
} } Branisovska 31 Fax : 00420-385310354
} } 370 05 Ceske Budejovice
} } Czech Republic E-mail: rosta-at-acarus.entu.cas.cz
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
}
} --
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
} mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************

--
David Henriks
Vice President

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 38 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for
Metallogaphy,
Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is
privileged and
confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity
addressed.
If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or
disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling
+1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.



From daemon Tue Mar 4 20:42:30 2003



From: David Burton :      dburton-at-nwlink.com
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 18:38:01 -0800
Subject: Re: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can anyone tell me if the mercury bulbs used
} in fluorescence microscopes also change with age? If so, is it possible
} that an old bulb might result in weakened fluorescence?
} --Many thanks, Jan Factor

Mercury lamps lose their output as a function of time. At the end of the
rated life of the lamp the output is diminished by 30%, per the
manufacturer. Not letting the lamp warm up before shutting it off can also
cause the lamp to lose output, by darkening the envelope. It may also ruin
the lamp completely. These lamps must be on for a minimum of 15 minutes
after being lit, per the manufacturer. I suggest 20 minutes as a rule.

Alignment of the lamp is critical and can have a dramatic effect on the
light delivered to the specimen. It is very common for the lamp to be
installed incorrectly, or to have someone try and "adjust" the lamp for you
and throw the alignment off. The adjusting mechanism in the lamphouse of
many of these systems freezes up over time as the lubricants are dried up by
the intense heat of the lamp and this also contributes to an inability to
make the proper adjustments...

Good luck,

Try Lamp Technology or Bulbman as a resource for replacement lamps. Great
prices, good service.

Std disclaimer,
I have purchased thousands of lamps from both but have no other relationship
with them.

David Burton
Optical Specialist,
University of Washington
dbuw-at-u.washington.edu



From daemon Wed Mar 5 03:42:26 2003



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 10:39:21 +0100
Subject: RE: digital pictures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

We might be in the market for a new digital camera for microscopy/image
analysis. I am currently using a Nikon DXM 1200 (12 magapixels) but wonder
what else is out there as the development of such devices is going so quickly.

Contacts from users with likes/dislikes and also from the trade would be
welcome.

Obs/NB New postal/visiting address from July 2002!

Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institutet,
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.



From daemon Wed Mar 5 04:47:42 2003



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 10:38:37 -0000
Subject: Adhesives glass-to-glass or metal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are trying to make small optical cells for use under the optical
microsccope, by building up square glass "walls" on a microscope slide,
or mounting a metal washer on the same. The cavity is to contain some
rather agressive solvent mixtures, also sometimes to be heated, so
sticking with superglue or Aralidite does not always make a sound cell.
Could anyone tell us of a tough adhesive for these purposes?

(School essay, AD3000: "The greatest playwrite of the Early Computer
Age was William Shakespeare, who wrote the Comedy of Errors.")

+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+-----------------------------------------+
Phone:
{direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
{University internal extension 7867
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+-----------------------------------------+



From daemon Wed Mar 5 07:51:02 2003



From: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor :      MMalecki-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 07:43:07 -0800
Subject: RE: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ron et al.
I vote for creating Protocol Bank on the MSA WWW site and having Debby's
and Jan's protocols there as pdf files.
Marek.


At 03:17 PM 3/4/03 -0500 Tuesday, you wrote:
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Mar 5 08:32:54 2003



From: Eleana Sphicas :      sphicae-at-rockefeller.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 09:26:15 -0500
Subject: SEM - Help on Mounting delicate samples onto the stub

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi list members,

I went through all the SEM tips in the archives but I still couldn't find
answers to two specific
problems that I am facing:

1. Mouse Embryos: After OTO processing and CPD the samples became very
fragile and some are even damaged during the run. How does one get the
embryos onto the stub and orient them without damaging them? Or should the
sample be attached on to something before CPD?

2. Insects: In preparing whole insects for SEM, the problem I found was
that after CPD they also become very brittle, easily damaged. Some suggest
to stick a pin through the insect, but I don't know at what stage should
this be done. Before fixation? before CPD?

Eleana Sphicas
Bio-imaging Resource Center
Rockefeller university
(212)-327-8125



From daemon Wed Mar 5 09:02:35 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 09:56:45 -0500
Subject: Re: LM - question on inverted microscope, Hoffman and VAREL contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi David:

David Henriks wrote:

} Geoff:
}
} I can appreciate that anyone would prefer to have a vendor deliver an
} instrument to their door to do an on-site demonstration, but you also
} must realize that it is simply not possible in every instance.

That may be true.

} To say
} that "Any vendor who will not comply is not worth dealing with" is quite
} simplistic and offensive.

Hey, times are very tight here in University research land. We spend our money the
way we want to. We can't afford to buy equipment we have not tested. If this offends
you, so be it. In 30 years in university science, I have never had a vendor refuse to
demo a product, even an inexpensive one.

} I have nothing to do with this particular
} customer, but I can certainly understand how several excellent
} microscopy vendors may have difficulty justifying an on-site demo in the
} Czech Republic.

If that is the nature of their business, then that is the nature of their
business. The vendor runs his business the way he wants to, the customer spends his
money the way he wants to. Capitalism.

} I personally have been to the Czech Republic several
} times to demonstrate our systems, however, it can certainly not be
} justified in every instance. To dismiss vendors so capriciously would
} be doing a disservice to Dr. Zemek.

No, Dr Zemek can make his own decisions. I was suggesting one course of action for his
consideration.

} Perhaps the company offering the
} best solution at the best price has a better method of demonstrating its
} performance than through an on-site demo. Technology these days is
} pretty impressive.Speaking as a family business owner and microscopy vendor for
} nearly 40

} years, I guess I take it a bit personally when vendors are treated with
} such disrespect.

Not disrespect, it is just the way things operate in my world. How is 'not buying
a product without a demo to see if it fits your lab's needs' disrespectful??

} Scientists and vendors working together rather than as
} adversaries is much more productive and serves the scientific community
} much more effectively.

That is a very nice, general statement that no one would argue with. It is also
180 degrees opposite of buying a product without knowing if it will solve your
problem.

Geoff

} Best regards-
}
} David
}
} Geoff McAuliffe wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Ask the vendor to bring the instrument you are considering to your lab for a
} } demonstration. We always do this for expensive items. Any vendor who will not
} } comply is not worth dealing with.
} }
} } Geoff
} }
} } Rostislav Zemek wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } Dear users of ListServer,
} } }
} } } I kindly ask you for your advice concerning inverted microscope. We need
} } } to count tiny mites in alcohol samples. Mites were washed from plants, so
} } } some debris is in samples, too. As mites are very small - adults are 0.2
} } } times 0.05 mm, white soft bodies, observing them using dissection
} } } microscope is very difficult, determination developmental stages and sex
} } } impossible.
} } }
} } } Therefore, we consider to purchase an inverted microscope but we are not
} } } sure if to ask for that one which is equipped with relief contrasting
} } } method. If yes, which would be the best? Hoffman modulation contrast
} } } usually needs special condenser and lenses and is therefore more
} } } expensive. Zeiss microscope has so called Variable relief (VAREL) contrast
} } } which allows unilateral darkfield, perhaps convenient for our white
} } } mites.
} } }
} } } As we do not have a possibility to try inverted microscope with relief
} } } contrast, I would very appreciate your opinion/advice.
} } }
} } } Thank you.
} } }
} } } Rostislav Zemek
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } Rostislav Zemek Phone : 00420-387775227
} } } Institute of Entomology
} } } Branisovska 31 Fax : 00420-385310354
} } } 370 05 Ceske Budejovice
} } } Czech Republic E-mail: rosta-at-acarus.entu.cas.cz
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } }
} }
} } --
} } **********************************************
} } Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} } Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} } Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} } 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} } voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
} } mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} } **********************************************
}
} --
} David Henriks
} Vice President
}
} South Bay Technology, Inc.
} 1120 Via Callejon
} San Clemente, CA 92673 USA
}
} TEL: +1-949-492-2600
} Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
} FAX: +1-949-492-1499
}
} email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com
}
} Celebrating 38 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for
} Metallogaphy,
} Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.
}
} Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.
}
} The information contained in this message and any attachments is
} privileged and
} confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity
} addressed.
} If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or
} disclose this
} communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling
} +1-949-492-2600 and
} delete this message from your system.

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Wed Mar 5 10:10:31 2003



From: John Shields :      jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 11:00:38 -0500
Subject: old pictures of scopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everyone,
I've been trying to enlarge a "virtual museum" of older, significant scopes
and equipment used in electron microscopy. If you have a picture of older
equipment (out of use or still being used) I would like to include it on the
site. I would also like to include some information about the equipment
(dates, usage, location, any interesting features, etc..) and cite the
provider of the image as a contributor. This could also be a link to an
existing image at your site.
At present it represents equipment collected by the late Dr. Jerry Paulin.
I would like to add a "Contributed Collection" addition to this. I think it
would be great to show EM students the variety and provide them an
appreciation for the changes in equipment.

The museum, as it stands now, can be seen at www.uga.edu/caur/museum.htm

Thanks in advance for your participation.
John Shields
EM Lab
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
jshields-at-cb.uga.edu



From daemon Wed Mar 5 10:36:10 2003



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 10:29:56 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM - Help on Mounting delicate samples onto the stub

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Eleana & Listers,

What I've done for such delicate samples as you describe and with some
success is to take a pin (like an insect mounting pin, or push pin) cut to
about 1/4 inch in length, file a flat end, dip end in colloidal carbon
paint, gently touch that end to "underside" (or side opposite the one you
want to look at) of insect or embryo. The sample will stick to the paint so
then you can lift it up. Hold the pin by its side with a clamping type fine
tipped forceps.

Next step is to mount it onto an SEM sample stub. You can drill a small hole
into the stub surface that will take the diameter of the pin, or use a
clamping type SEM stub, both of which I have here. After mounting/clamping
the pin onto the stub, paint carbon paint over the stub surface, then you
will have a nice dark background behind the sample, which may also be
conveniently out of focus, due to height of sample above stub surface, which
helps to give dark featureless background for those full body glamour shots!

Good luck!

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)625-5754 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Bera


} Hi list members,
}
} I went through all the SEM tips in the archives but I still couldn't find
} answers to two specific
} problems that I am facing:
}
} 1. Mouse Embryos: After OTO processing and CPD the samples became very
} fragile and some are even damaged during the run. How does one get the
} embryos onto the stub and orient them without damaging them? Or should the
} sample be attached on to something before CPD?
}
} 2. Insects: In preparing whole insects for SEM, the problem I found was
} that after CPD they also become very brittle, easily damaged. Some suggest
} to stick a pin through the insect, but I don't know at what stage should
} this be done. Before fixation? before CPD?
}
} Eleana Sphicas
} Bio-imaging Resource Center
} Rockefeller university
} (212)-327-8125




From daemon Wed Mar 5 10:40:36 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 11:42:54 -0800
Subject: Re: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

A lot of the problem with arc sources is the electrodes. As the arc files over a long period of time, the electrodes erode, decreasing intensity. This problem adds to the deposition you have mentioned.

OptiQuip has a new stabilizer (LTS) and power supply (model 1600) for their Nobska fluorescence illuminators which automatically tests the lamp intensity 2000 times/s, compares it to a stored intensity, then signals the power supply to adjust the voltage to maintain the intensity. Normal stabilized power supplies control just the flicker. It's really great for everything from measurement to montage to deconvolution.

We ran an article last November in American Lab which discusses this new approach in detail:
Foster, B. "Optimizing illumination for Microscopy and Measurement", Am Lab, Nov 2002, Pp13-17.

Caveat: MME has no financial interest in this product.

Hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com


"Why didn't they teach us that sooner?" ... probably because no one thought to call MME about customized, on-site courses. Offered in all areas of microscopy, sample prep,and image analysis, they make an immediate impact on your productivity.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-


At 03:32 PM 3/4/03 -0600, Tobias Baskin wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Mar 5 11:47:50 2003



From: Michael Herron :      herro001-at-umn.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 11:37:38 -0600
Subject: Re: LM - question on inverted microscope, Hoffman and VAREL contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If a vendor cannot manage a demo, I doubt they will be there for support.

} To say
} that "Any vendor who will not comply is not worth dealing with" is quite
} simplistic and offensive.

No just reality.

--

Michael J. Herron, U of MN, Entomology
herro001-at-umn.edu
612-624-3688 Office, 624-3212 Lab, 625-5299 FAX


From daemon Wed Mar 5 11:52:42 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 09:46:55 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM - Help on Mounting delicate samples onto the stub

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I use a 5/0 Red Sable artist's brush. You can buy these from the EM
suppliers like Ted Pella for a couple bucks. I use them on embryos and
insects, just like you. Just gently touch the sample and it will usually
stick to the hairs. Then touch it down to your adhesive substrate. If the
sample won't stick to the brush, touch the brush to your tongue (or touch
your finger to your tongue then touch the brush to your finger). Saliva is
a wonderful thing.

Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu

At 09:26 AM 3/5/2003 -0500, Eleana Sphicas wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Mar 5 12:45:54 2003



From: Fr. Andrew Buechele :      andrewb-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 13:36:53 -0500
Subject: Re: Adhesives glass-to-glass or metal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Silicone sealant will probably work(something like Silastic (TM)). It's
both heat and solvent resistant. You can try the hardware store
variety, or contact Dow, GE, or one of the other manufacturers if you
need something more specialized.


On Wednesday, Mar 5, 2003, at 05:38 America/New_York, Robert H. Olley
wrote:

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} .
}
}
} We are trying to make small optical cells for use under the optical
} microsccope, by building up square glass "walls" on a microscope slide,
} or mounting a metal washer on the same. The cavity is to contain some
} rather agressive solvent mixtures, also sometimes to be heated, so
} sticking with superglue or Aralidite does not always make a sound cell.
} Could anyone tell us of a tough adhesive for these purposes?
}
} (School essay, AD3000: "The greatest playwrite of the Early Computer
} Age was William Shakespeare, who wrote the Comedy of Errors.")
}
} +-----------------------------------------+
} Robert H.Olley
} J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
} University of Reading
} Whiteknights
} Reading RG6 6AF
} England
} +-----------------------------------------+
} Phone:
} {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
} {University internal extension 7867
} Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
} Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
} URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
} +-----------------------------------------+
}
}
}
}
All the best,
Andy Buechele

Washington, DC USA



From daemon Wed Mar 5 13:38:26 2003



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 14:29:51 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM - Help on Mounting delicate samples onto the stub

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scott Whittaker
Laboratories of Analytical Biology
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural History
PO Box 37012 MRC104
Washington DC 20013-7012
202-357-1651


} } } Eleana Sphicas {sphicae-at-rockefeller.edu} 03/05/03 09:26AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi list members,

I went through all the SEM tips in the archives but I still couldn't find
answers to two specific
problems that I am facing:

1. Mouse Embryos: After OTO processing and CPD the samples became very
fragile and some are even damaged during the run. How does one get the
embryos onto the stub and orient them without damaging them? Or should the

sample be attached on to something before CPD?

Fixed and dehydrated tissues will become brittle. Process them adhered to
something. Amazingly SuperGlue does a nice job on fresh tissue. Use very
sparingly and do not cover or the fumes will deposit on the surfaces. There
are also ways to bind to glass coverslips (aminosilane), and then just
process the coverslip itself.

2. Insects: In preparing whole insects for SEM, the problem I found was
that after CPD they also become very brittle, easily damaged. Some suggest

to stick a pin through the insect, but I don't know at what stage should
this be done. Before fixation? before CPD?

Ha, the bane of my recent existence. How to keep insects looking lively.
Already dried specimens may be placed in a steam bath to absorb moisture and
then CAREFULLY arranged (Some of my researchers just plunk in warm water
overnight with a little surfactant). I prefer the steam because it doesn't
require CPD or HMDS so long as you control it. If samples are in alcohol or
fixative , you may pin mount them, but not through the body. Splay out the
critter, and place a pin to either side of the body, angled so that they
cross just over the structure. It takes time and lots of practice especially
to pin down all the legs, antenna, wings, body... but the results are well
worth it. I use silicone mats or filter paper underneath. If you don't have
the mini pins, a cactus works really well (my preference). From this point
dry in whatever manner suits you.

Fresh samples are most easily done by getting them to land on a damp piece
of filter paper. When happy, set on a liquid nitrogen chilled block to snap
freeze. I have also had success getting creepers to walk across tape and
then freezing in a lab freezer to kill. Freeze drying would be the preferred
method from this point.

Method three- Use an ESEM or cryo stage equipped instrument. Getting them
to sit still under the beam is the major drawback with ESEM

Good luck!!



Eleana Sphicas
Bio-imaging Resource Center
Rockefeller university
(212)-327-8125




From daemon Wed Mar 5 13:52:17 2003



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 11:40:23 -0800
Subject: SEM (?) of ancient coins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings:

Someone just dropped off a handful of "ancient" coins and wants to know if
there is anything an SEM could tell him about their authenticity. The
person dropping them off is not a crackpot treasure hunter type. He is a
careful and knowledgeable professor who is really stumped.

They come from Syria, where they were bought from a street vendor. They are
supposed to be silver and appear to be the real thing. If fake, they are
really good fakes. If I got the story right, the vendor did not claim that
they were authentic, but couildn't, wouldn't say where they came from. The
price was about right for reproductions, but on closer inspection, they do
not look like obvious forgeries.

We suspect they may be cast rather than struck and were wondering if there
are any characteristic features that would tell us how the coins were made.
We will do a little EDS to check on the metal, are there any trace metals
that might be a give away, either way?

If you know anything about coins or anyone who we could contact, we would
appreciate it very much if you could help us out.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Wed Mar 5 13:56:18 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 11:54:55 -0800
Subject: Re: Colloidal gold protocols

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Tuesday, March 4, 2003, at 12:17 PM, MicroscopyToday wrote:

} Way to go Ed--you've got a great memory!
}
} The article was by J. DeMay from Janssen Pharm in Beerse, Belgium and
} it's on pg 54 of EMSA Bulletin 14, 1 Spring 1984. It has a detailed
} appendix on how to make colloidal gold. The article is an extensive
} work
} with a zillion references.
}
} I could either a.) photocopy the article and send it to Bill, b.) scan
} it in to PDFs and post their availability on the listserver, or c.)
} seek
} permission to reprint a shorter version in Microscopy Today. That said,
} Ed's suggestion to just go out and buy the stuff is a good one.
}
} What does the community want?
}
Dear Ron,
I can print out the article from PDF files, so that would be my
preference; however, either of the other options is acceptable.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Wed Mar 5 14:51:12 2003



From: Stanley L. Flegler :      flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 15:38:14 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM (?) of ancient coins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Jonathan:
I've had a fair amount of experience using the SEM in the authentication of
ancient coins. Based on your description of the origin of these coins from
a street vendor, the chances of their being modern fakes are about 99.99%
The individuals in the countries where ancient coins are found know exactly
what genuine ancient coins are worth, especially silver ones, and they know
where to sell them, which is not a vendor on a street corner.

You are correct in your assumption that they are most likely a cast fakes;
most inexpensive reproductions are. Look carefully for a joining line at
the edge where the two halves were glued together, or look for an edge that
has been filed and then roughened to hide the joining line. Also, look for
small casting bubbles in the metal.

In terms of the SEM, do quantitative analysis of the metal. If the coin is
covered with toning, you may have to scrap a minute area clean to get an
accurate analysis. If the metal is too pure, i.e. greater that 92% silver,
be very suspicious. Look for trace metals. In genuine coins you may see
small amounts of lead (~2 wt%), gold (less than 1 wt% and often below
minimum detectable concentration), as well as iron. If it is cast, you are
more likely to see some common casting metal alloy that just looks like
silver. Look at the toning using EDS. Silver fakes are often toned with
paint (titanium), iodine, etc. Genuine toning will usually show lead,
iron, or chlorine from silver chloride (horn silver as it is know to
ancient numismatists). If the composition of the toning is identical all
over the coin, then be suspicious. Genuine ancients usually have
considerable variation in chemical composition of the toning.

I hope this helps.
Stanley L. Flegler, Director
Center for Advanced Microscopy
Michigan State University


From daemon Wed Mar 5 15:37:49 2003



From: Fortner, Jeffrey A. :      fortner-at-cmt.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 15:29:47 -0600
Subject: RE: SEM (?) of ancient coins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The best method might be to use x-rays. See, for instance:

http://www.anl.gov:80/OPA/logos18-1/astrolabes1.htm

I could put you in touch with one of the authors of that study, if you wish
to pursue it further.


"To achieve results never before accomplished, we must employ methods never
before attempted." -Sir Francis Bacon


Jeffrey A Fortner
Argonne National Laboratory
CMT/205
9700 S. Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439
(630) 252-5594
FAX: (630) 972-4438


} ----------
} From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
} Sent: Wednesday, March 5, 2003 1:40 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: SEM (?) of ancient coins
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Greetings:
}
} Someone just dropped off a handful of "ancient" coins and wants to know if
} there is anything an SEM could tell him about their authenticity. The
} person dropping them off is not a crackpot treasure hunter type. He is a
} careful and knowledgeable professor who is really stumped.
}
} They come from Syria, where they were bought from a street vendor. They
} are
} supposed to be silver and appear to be the real thing. If fake, they are
} really good fakes. If I got the story right, the vendor did not claim that
} they were authentic, but couildn't, wouldn't say where they came from. The
} price was about right for reproductions, but on closer inspection, they do
} not look like obvious forgeries.
}
} We suspect they may be cast rather than struck and were wondering if there
} are any characteristic features that would tell us how the coins were
} made.
} We will do a little EDS to check on the metal, are there any trace metals
} that might be a give away, either way?
}
} If you know anything about coins or anyone who we could contact, we would
} appreciate it very much if you could help us out.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Mar 5 16:51:01 2003



From: Mayandi Sivaguru :      sivagurum-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 16:37:18 -0600
Subject: Re: Mercury lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Barbara, we are using two sets of OptiQuip 1600 Power supply and LTS, which
runs two of our Mercury lamp housings. We have shipped (Currently packing
one) 7 times as of today in the year starting from January 1, 2002
(excluding this time) to New York for repair. That means an average of
repair on either one of the system in every two months.
Most of the time the Power supply blows the main fuses and burns the cord,
which is connecting the LTS.
It will take a two weeks to get the system back.
If you have used this system for a long time, do you had any problems like
these?
We appreciate your comments.

We have now asked the company's President to put a full stop on this saga
through our local Olympus Representative Mr. David Kinast.
Thanks

Shiv

Mayandi Sivaguru, PhD
Associate Director
Molecular Cytology Core Facility
2, Tucker hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

Voice: 1-573-882-4895
Fax: 1-573-882-0123

www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/






At 11:42 AM 3/5/03 -0800, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Wed Mar 5 21:35:52 2003



From: jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 22:29:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: SEM (?) of ancient coins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is a large body of information on this in the literature of the fields of archaeometry and art conservation science. The criteria that are important depend on the culture represented by the coins, their age, the burial conditions, ore types exploited for the metals and the treatment or mishandling that they have received since they were found.

Compositional information is often not sufficient by itself to make a determination. Phase analysis (by X-ray diffraction) or microstructural analysis by very limited metallographic testing (to minimize destructive action)may be required.

I've never heard this term "toning" before. Perhaps you are referring to the corrosion layer, oxide or patina that metal surfaces typically acquire and that may be falsified in the case of a forgery.

Unfortunately the criteria that you site could be highly misleading to someone unfamiliar with numismatics or with the methods that have been used over the years to treat ancient metals. Applying these criteria in the way that you suggest could result in a large proportion of legitimate ancient pieces being rejected.

On the other hand (other side of the coin?) in antiquity there were often large numbers of counterfeit coins in circulation. This is particularly true in an area like Syria that was a cross roads for many cultures and often outside close control of distant capitols. These ancient counterfeits are often debased but extremely valuable historical indicators of conditions at the time. Your criteria seem to assume that to be an antiquity a coin must be of high quality and from the official mint.

I would urge you to run any coins of potential value by a knowledgable numismatist before engaging in destructive tests or attempting to clean them. And not to base a decision on broad assumptions such as those regarding the purity of the metal.

John Twilley
Art Conservation Scientist

-------Original Message-------
} From: "Stanley L. Flegler" {flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu}
Sent: 03/05/03 03:38 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com, Jon Krupp {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}


Jonathan:
I've had a fair amount of experience using the SEM in the authentication
of
ancient coins. Based on your description of the origin of these coins
from
a street vendor, the chances of their being modern fakes are about 99.99%
The individuals in the countries where ancient coins are found know
exactly
what genuine ancient coins are worth, especially silver ones, and they
know
where to sell them, which is not a vendor on a street corner.

You are correct in your assumption that they are most likely a cast fakes;
most inexpensive reproductions are. Look carefully for a joining line at
the edge where the two halves were glued together, or look for an edge
that
has been filed and then roughened to hide the joining line. Also, look
for
small casting bubbles in the metal.

In terms of the SEM, do quantitative analysis of the metal. If the coin is
covered with toning, you may have to scrap a minute area clean to get an
accurate analysis. If the metal is too pure, i.e. greater that 92% silver,
be very suspicious. Look for trace metals. In genuine coins you may see
small amounts of lead (~2 wt%), gold (less than 1 wt% and often below
minimum detectable concentration), as well as iron. If it is cast, you
are
more likely to see some common casting metal alloy that just looks like
silver. Look at the toning using EDS. Silver fakes are often toned with
paint (titanium), iodine, etc. Genuine toning will usually show lead,
iron, or chlorine from silver chloride (horn silver as it is know to
ancient numismatists). If the composition of the toning is identical all
over the coin, then be suspicious. Genuine ancients usually have
considerable variation in chemical composition of the toning.

I hope this helps.
Stanley L. Flegler, Director
Center for Advanced Microscopy
Michigan State University

}


From daemon Wed Mar 5 22:45:03 2003



From: Dr. Raj Lartius :      rlartius-at-novascan.com
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 22:33:16 -0600
Subject: Re: live cell imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Judy,

I'm not sure if your cells would be compatible, but we often used a non-CO2
dependent HEPES buffer for relatively long term atomic force
microscopy/calcium imaging/electrophysiology experiments with primary
hippocampal neuron and glial cultures. Might be worth looking at.

All the best,

Raj

Dr. Raj Lartius
Novascan Technologies, Inc.
Iowa State University Research Park
2501 North Loop Drive
Ames, Iowa 50010 USA

Voice: 515-296-3164
Fax: 515-296-3144
Web: http://www.novascan.com/



At 01:14 PM 2/25/03, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Novascan Technologies, Inc.
Iowa State University Research Park
2501 North Loop Drive
Ames, Iowa 50010 USA

Voice: 515-296-3164
Fax: 515-296-3144
Web: www.novascan.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



From daemon Thu Mar 6 04:32:29 2003



From: Michael Rauscher :      michael.rauscher-at-uni-tuebingen.de
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 11:29:37 +0100
Subject: SEM Need Info on ISI SMS-2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

is anyone having any information on the lens design of the old ISI SMS 2
SEM. I'd require data on the geometry of the pole pieces as well as the
number of A-t. But for the meantime typical values for the lens currents
might already be helpful.

Thanks very much.

Michael


From daemon Thu Mar 6 08:51:19 2003



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 08:38:37 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM - Help on Mounting delicate samples onto the stub

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Besides the replies already given, I have used "live insect handling
forceps" for both types of samples mentioned (and many other fragile,
driec samples). These are blunt or fine-pointed forceps made of thin,
flexible stainless steel that allow a sure grip with minimal force.
As the name implies, they were originally developed by entomologists,
but I believe not for live insects, but minute, dried insects in
collections. I got mine from Fine Science Tools, cat #26029-10 &
26030-10 http://www.finescience.com/ . There should be other sources.
The other trick is to put a pointy bit of latex rubber on the end of
a dissecting needle and rub it on silk or wool or something to give
it a charge. The static electricity can then be used to pick up and
move fragile specimens. (My apologies to whoever first did this long
ago, but I don't remember whom to credit.)

Phil

} Hi list members,
}
} I went through all the SEM tips in the archives but I still couldn't
} find answers to two specific
} problems that I am facing:
}
} 1. Mouse Embryos: After OTO processing and CPD the samples became
} very fragile and some are even damaged during the run. How does one
} get the embryos onto the stub and orient them without damaging them?
} Or should the sample be attached on to something before CPD?
}
} 2. Insects: In preparing whole insects for SEM, the problem I found
} was that after CPD they also become very brittle, easily damaged.
} Some suggest to stick a pin through the insect, but I don't know at
} what stage should this be done. Before fixation? before CPD?
}
} Eleana Sphicas
} Bio-imaging Resource Center
} Rockefeller university
} (212)-327-8125

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Thu Mar 6 08:56:03 2003



From: Stanley L. Flegler :      flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 09:48:52 -0500
Subject: Re: Re: SEM (?) of ancient coins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Other than finding a joining line and/or casting bubbles, there is no one
single factor that can be used. Instead look for "mistakes" that a
modern counterfeiter may have made.


Doing an EDS check on the metal is an excellent first method of
determining authenticity. A high proportion of these tourist fakes are
cast and can be eliminated immediately by their alloys. A surprising
number do not even contain silver, but instead a casting alloy such as
Bismith, Lead, Tin, and Cadmium. A surprising number are cast using
solder!


Among the struck (as opposed to cast) fakes, the single most common
mistake of modern counterfeiters is to use either four nines pure silver
or silver from common silver coins (for example 90% Ag, 10% Cu) without
any trace metals. The ancients were not able to produce silver of ultra
high purity and trace amounts of other metals (lead, iron, and gold) are
present. Athens produced some of the highest silver content ancient
coins, but even then, they are perhaps 92% to 94% silver with other trace
elements. An excellent source of information on this area is
{underline} Metallurgy in Numismatics {/underline} , vol 1 and 2, published
by the Royal Numismatic Society, {underline} Analysis of Ancient
Metals {/underline} , by E. Caley, and {underline} The New Style Silver
Coinage of Athens {/underline} , by Margaret Thompson.


The term toning is often used by numismatists rather than corrosion
layer, oxide, etc. It is possible that a genuine ancient coin has been
cleaned and artificially retoned. Therefore, if you find titanium or
iodine on the surface, it still could be ancient.


There were counterfeit coins in ancient times. The most common example
is known as a "fourre." A copper core or blank was used with a thin
layer of silver bonded to it. These were then struck using dies that
attempted to copy the genuine coins in circulation. In ancient times,
silver coins were often tested by making a test cut on the edge to see if
a copper core was present. A number of these "tested" coins have
survived and are in collections, etc. The ancient counterfeiter made a
profit by passing these coins off as high silver coins, when in fact they
were mainly copper. Most of these coins can be identified by the breaks
in the silver layer that developed over the centuries. If there is any
doubt, the coin can be placed in the SEM and if a suspicious area proves
to copper, then that is a good indication that it is a fourre. If
further proof is needed, specific density testing can be done, short of
total destructive analysis.


Stanley L. Flegler, Director

Center for Advanced Microscopy

Michigan State University




From daemon Thu Mar 6 10:49:56 2003



From: Jinguo Wang :      jqw11-at-psu.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 11:39:22 -0500
Subject: data storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers

Recently, we just installed a new JEOL 2010F TEM. The TEM has a 2k*2K
ultrascan CCD (not yet installed), EDS, Enfina PEELs and Digiscan STEM
system. We also have both Emispec and Gatan systems. This is a user based
facility. The TEM is booked everyday.

We are trying to figure out a way for data storage, to let users save data
for a period of time and let them transfer data through Internet.


I appreciate for the following informations:

what is the data storage system in your Lab?
how much data in a period of time (a day, a week) the users save?
how frequently they save and transfer the data?

Any other suggestion on internet security is also welcome



Thank you very much


Sincerely,

Jinguo Wang


Jinguo Wang, Ph.D
The Pennsylvania State University
Materials Research Institute
194 Materials Research Institute Building
University Park, PA 16802
Tel: (814) 865-9285
Fax: (814) 863-8561, (814) 863-0637
email: jqw11-at-psu.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 6 11:28:56 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 11:20:00 -0600
Subject: Haversian systems in flat bones?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A histology question for the light microscopists out there: Are Haversian
systems present in the flat bones formed by intramembranous ossification or
are they only in long bones? Thanks, Tom

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Thu Mar 6 12:36:13 2003



From: Mei Lie Wong :      wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 10:23:03 -0800
Subject: Cressington thickness monitor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have the Cressinton MTM10 thickness monitor. It has stopped
working. Does anyone know anything about this monitor and what I can
check other than the fuse which seems to be fine? OR does anyone know
how to get in touch with Cressington. I have left phone messages and
sent them email from their web site and have gotten no replies.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Mei Lie
--
Mei Lie Wong
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Department of Biochemistry
HHMI-UCSF
Ph. 415-476-4441 Fax 415-476-1902
http://util.ucsf.edu/agard/wong/index.html
email wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu


From daemon Thu Mar 6 13:09:10 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 11:02:00 -0800
Subject: Re: data storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I installed a Windows NT server 6 years ago. I made each microscope with a
computer interface a client. There is a Philips TEM with Gatan CCD,
Hitachi SEM, Leica confocal, 2 graphics workstations, and a backup
server. All the systems run Windows based software so they can be
networked as clients of the server (we include one Mac workstation for
poster printing). There is also a UNIX based deconvolution scope that
shares some parts of the facility. The server has about 60 gig of RAID 5
storage. Images acquired from any client are saved directly to the
server. Images are never saved to the client workstations so the
workstations stay more or less as delivered. No extraneous software is
written to the workstations so the microscope application that is installed
at setup remains unchanged. Users get an account on the server and this
allows them space on the server. Once the image is written to the server
it can be downloaded on the LAN, on the Internet via HTTP, or via
FTP. Even with the confocal on the network the 60 gig is plenty of space
for now. The server is considered a "transfer station" for
information. We do not store images. My policy is that images over 30
days old may be removed at any time without notification. In actual
practice, I do not remove anything less than 6 months old. If you want to
provide storage, you may need more space. We have over 200 accounts so we
leave storage and archiving to the individual but we do provide CD writing
and DVD writing hardware in the facility. We do not set quotas on data
storage. That feature is not native to Windows NT4.0 but can be added from
another vendor. That feature is available in Windows2000 Server. Storage
is cheap so quotas are not needed here yet. Security is managed by keeping
aware of patches and fixes to the operating system. A firewall is being
considered. In the 6 years that the system has been running there has been
no security breach and no viruses.

Contact me directly if you have questions.

Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu

At 11:39 AM 3/6/2003 -0500, Jinguo Wang wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 6 13:52:43 2003



From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconn.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 10:41:07 -0500
Subject: antivibration table

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We may need to buy a table to put our Zeiss Axiovert on. I am aware
of the various vibration isolation systems discussed here previously,
and have used a heavy slab on sorbothane feet on a standard table for
years with good success. However the tables that we received with our
new building seem to have alot of flex in teh legs, so that even with
an isolated slab on top, we are concerned about stage vibration. Can
anyone suggest a good solid table to use as a base, or should I just
go for a TMC/Kinetic systems table. Thanks- Dave
--

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
91 N. Eagleville Rd. U-3125
Storrs, CT 06269-3125
knecht-at-uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html



From daemon Thu Mar 6 16:11:39 2003



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:55:26 -0500
Subject: Re: data storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have been very happy with our Snap server otherwise known as an NAS
server. Basically just a bunch of hard drives and ethernet card. I have the
Quantum Snap with 240G of space mirrored. They are scalable and you can add
a bunch together to really serve some data. Users access their data in a
variety of ways, and it took about as long to set up as to unpack. It also
serves as the backup dump for the lab PC's.

We serve roughly 70 researchers and their associates annually generating
15-20k images. Our Molecular group uses a bunch of these as well for their
data sets (get big quick) and the users write data to CD's as they fill up
their quotas. Again authentication is done on a separate server and it all
sits behind the SI firewall keeping the riffraff out. Good luck



Scott Whittaker
Laboratories of Analytical Biology
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural History
PO Box 37012 MRC104
Washington DC 20013-7012
202-357-1651


} } } Jinguo Wang {jqw11-at-psu.edu} 03/06/03 11:39AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear Listers

Recently, we just installed a new JEOL 2010F TEM. The TEM has a 2k*2K
ultrascan CCD (not yet installed), EDS, Enfina PEELs and Digiscan STEM
system. We also have both Emispec and Gatan systems. This is a user based
facility. The TEM is booked everyday.

We are trying to figure out a way for data storage, to let users save data

for a period of time and let them transfer data through Internet.


I appreciate for the following informations:

what is the data storage system in your Lab?
how much data in a period of time (a day, a week) the users save?
how frequently they save and transfer the data?

Any other suggestion on internet security is also welcome



Thank you very much


Sincerely,

Jinguo Wang


Jinguo Wang, Ph.D
The Pennsylvania State University
Materials Research Institute
194 Materials Research Institute Building
University Park, PA 16802
Tel: (814) 865-9285
Fax: (814) 863-8561, (814) 863-0637
email: jqw11-at-psu.edu




From daemon Thu Mar 6 16:33:29 2003



From: Reynolds, Jodi JI :      ReynoldsJ-at-onesteel.com
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 09:25:11 +1100
Subject: sem - kevex delta class analyser

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear kevex users,

I am trying to get our kevex system running for fully quantitative analysis and have been saving reference standards. When I try to use the standards in deconvolution some are accepted while others are rejected with the message "not a standard for this element and line". Elements up to Al seem to be accepted while everything after Ca is rejected. We thought it may have something to do with the Kb line. I've tried everything I can think of, re-saving etc, I know I have used the same process for all the standards. Any suggestions?

Kind Regards,

Jodi Reynolds.
Onesteel Wire Mills
Newcastle
Australia


From daemon Thu Mar 6 16:55:41 2003



From: joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 16:46:31 -0600
Subject: Laminar Flow Hoods for Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have any recommndations on laminar flow hoods for optical
microscopy? We are looking for one to create a clean space for sample
prep and optical micrscopy.

Joe Neilly, Research Investigator
Abbott Laboratories
R45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Voice: 847-938-5024
Fax: 847-938-5027
email: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com



From daemon Thu Mar 6 17:34:09 2003



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 10:19:44 +1100
Subject: Confocal and TEM compatiibility?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi folks - does anyone have a confocal with a Coherent Enterprise II 651 UV
argon laser or similar, operating close to high resolution TEMs and SEMs -
are there likely to be any problems with electrical interference, either in
the power supply or radiated?

cheers

Sally


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
Research School of Biological Sciences
Australian National University, Canberra ACT0200
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU




From daemon Thu Mar 6 18:10:12 2003



From: Randy A Nessler :      nesslerr-at-mail.medicine.uiowa.edu (by way of
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:03:26 -0600
Subject: OEM TEM service feedback

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
I'd like to hear opinions about people's impression of the OEM (original
equipment manufacturer sponsored) service they receive for their TEM's. Is
it timely (average time from request to completion)? Are issues resolved
the first time (call backs for same problem)? Do you feel it is cost
effective? Is your downtime excessive? Minimal? Service personnel to
service area ratio? Feel free to add any topic I might have missed.
We are looking at acquiring new instrumentation, and thus are trying to
evaluate every aspect of such a purchase.

All responses will remain confidential.

Thanks in advance,
Randy Nessler
University of Iowa
Central Microscopy Research Facility
Iowa City, Iowa 52242
Phone 319-335-8142


From daemon Thu Mar 6 18:10:17 2003



From: Wiggins, Winston :      Winston.Wiggins-at-carolinashealthcare.org (by way
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:02:55 -0600
Subject: TEM:Biomedical EM Position Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,
An immediate opening for an experienced (T)EM tech is available here
at the Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, NC. Please see the
listing and apply on-line at
{http://www.carolinashealthcare.org} www.carolinashealthcare.org.

Go to Find A Job, then Job Search. Complete Step 1 with "Research
Services," Step 2 with "Cannon Research Center," leave Step 3 blank,
and click Find (Step 4.) Page down to Res Tech II, Position number
74366.

After viewing the listing (shown below and at the MSA job website,)
if interested go to "Apply On Line," and submit your cva/resume
indicating the position number.

Hope to hear from you soon!

Res Tech II
POSITION NUMBER: 74366 / LOCATION: Cannon Research Center / CATEGORY:
Research Services
FT,M-F,days. Prepare chemical reagent's, follow chemical protocols,
fixation through embedding of specimen, photo darkroom techniques
with print processing & related duties. Bio/Chem/Med laboratory, must
be able to stand & walk for extended periods. BA/BS in Biology/
Chemistry /or related.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Winston W. Wiggins, Supervisor
Cannon Electron Microscopy Lab
Carolinas Medical Center
P.O. Box 32861; Charlotte, NC 28232-2861
Ship to: 1000 Blythe Blvd; Charlotte, NC 28203
Ofc:704-355-1267 ; Lab:704-355-7220 ; Fax 704-355-0589
E-mail: {mailto:WWiggins-at-Carolinas.org} Winston.Wiggins-at-CarolinasHealthCare.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



***********************************************************************
This electronic message may contain information that is confidential
and/or legally privileged. It is intended only for the use of the
individual(s) and entity named as recipients in the message. If you
are not an intended recipient of this message, please notify the
sender immediately and delete the material from any computer. Do not
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contents or take any action in reliance on the information it
contains. Thank you.


From daemon Thu Mar 6 18:19:42 2003



From: Jim_Diorio-at-baxter.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:13:20 -0600
Subject: MMMS meeting annoucements (March 27th & May 13th)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Greetings

PLEASE CIRCULATE THIS TO ALL THAT MAY BE INTERESTED

The Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society (MMMS) is co-sponsoring
the following upcoming meetings:

March 27th at Northwestern University (with the Biological Imaging Facility
atNorthwestern) Topics include Tomography, Cryo FESEM in addition to
others (see details
below)

Location: Norris University Center, Lewis Room, Evanston,IL


May 13th - Joint meeting with the Milwaukee ASM Chapter

Topic - Color Metallography presented by George F. Vander Voort, Buehler
Ltd.

Location: Klemmer's Banquet Center,10401 W. Oklahoma Ave.Milwaukee, WI
53227(414) 541-0401, 5:00pm Social 6:00pm Dinner 7:00pm Program

For additional information on either program contact Robb Mierzwa
(mierzwa-at-jeol.com) or Jim DiOrio (jim_diorio-at-baxter.com)

Northwestern Program: (3/27/03)

9:00 am : Registration, 9:45 Welcome and introduction

10:00 Brad Marsh,Univeristy of Colorado at Boulder:3D Structure
studies of the pancreatic beta cell by high resolution EM
tomography

11:00 Valerie Kilman,Northwestern University:A new role for an old
kinase in the
Drosophila circadian clock

11:30 Veronica Ledoux,Northwestern University:Serial EM study of
inhibitory hippocampal synapses

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Stan Erlandsen,Univeristy of Minnesota Medical School:Visualizing
the glycocalyx:correlative microscopy on cell interaction and
detecting individual molecules with immunogold by cryoSEM

2:00 Kendrick Boardman,Northwestern University:Lymphangiogenesis:roles
of interstitial fluid flow and fluid channel formation

2:30 Greg Beitel,Northwestern University:Unexpected roles for the Na K
ATPase in epithelial tube-size control and septate (tight)junctions
organization

3:00 Reception:

4:00 Close


Driving directions to Northwestern University Evanston Campus available on
the Web. at http://www.northwestern.edu/campus/directions/


RSVP Required

Please send RSVP via email,phone,or fax to:
Robb Mierzwa,MMMS Program Coordinator
c/o JEOL USA,Inc.
3906 Lisa Avenue
Sheboygan,WI 53083
phone:(920)803-8945;FAX:(920)803-8946
email:mierzwa-at-jeol.com
Admission:Free to MMMS Members
MMMS Membership:$10.00
MMMS membership available at registration


From daemon Thu Mar 6 19:19:28 2003



From: Tom Pella :      tom_pella-at-tedpella.com
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 17:09:56 -0800
Subject: Cressington thickness monitor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mei Lie, of course we've already contacted you, but for clarification to the
rest of the list: Ted Pella, Inc. provides sales & service for Cressington
vacuum equipment (except the CFE-60) in North, Central and South America.
You can reach us at (800) 237-3526.

Tom Pella
Ted Pella, Inc.
http://www.tedpella.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mei Lie Wong [mailto:wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 10:23 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I have the Cressinton MTM10 thickness monitor. It has stopped
working. Does anyone know anything about this monitor and what I can
check other than the fuse which seems to be fine? OR does anyone know
how to get in touch with Cressington. I have left phone messages and
sent them email from their web site and have gotten no replies.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Mei Lie
--
Mei Lie Wong
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Department of Biochemistry
HHMI-UCSF
Ph. 415-476-4441 Fax 415-476-1902
http://util.ucsf.edu/agard/wong/index.html
email wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 6 19:41:52 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 15:33:13 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: data storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Thu, 6 Mar 2003, Scott Whittaker wrote:

} We have been very happy with our Snap server otherwise known as an NAS
} server. Basically just a bunch of hard drives and ethernet card. I have the
} Quantum Snap with 240G of space mirrored. They are scalable and you can add
} a bunch together to really serve some data. Users access their data in a
} variety of ways, and it took about as long to set up as to unpack. It also
} serves as the backup dump for the lab PC's.

I second the vote for the Snap server. Easy to set up and administer, plus
our main unit network guru has ours set up to backup on another one in
another building, while that one backs up on ours each night in case one
building burns down...

Aloha,
Tina


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Thu Mar 6 20:31:01 2003



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2003 18:19:04 -0800 (PST)
Subject: EDAX detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
I bought an EDAX model JSM-6100 detector for our lab through ebay at a
good price. The information on the detector is as follows:
132-01, 10 mm2 active area, ser# 7455-57440ME, amp model#194-SUTW,
PV9757/44ME.

It is the detector, connecting support arm, and dewar. It looks like it
has an amplifier or electronic box on it as well. I am however missing
the support electronics which go from the detector to the computer -
wiring, software, computer card, and computer. If anyone has any
experience with these detectors, or with installing them with homebuilt
computers - let me know. It's a long term project I have to upgrade an
Electronscan E3 ESEM to have analysis capability.

The detector looks like this one from EDAX:
http://www.edax.com/products/Microanalysis/detectors/standard_EDS/10_liter.html

Thanks everyone.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793


From daemon Fri Mar 7 00:35:33 2003



From: George.Theodossiou-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 17:21:13 +1100
Subject: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

A couple of days ago I embedded some samples for microtomy, using Procure
812. Today when I went to remove the blocks from the mould I found that the
mould material had adhered to the blocks and came away with the blocks, thus
destroying two mould blocks. I have never experienced this problem in the
past to such a degree.

The resin was measured and mixed properly and cured at 60 deg celcius. When
embedding I half fill the mould and cure it in the oven at 60 deg celcius
for an hour, then position the sample, fill the rest of the mould and back
in the oven for final curing. This has worked in the past for me.

Does anybody have a better method of removing the cured blocks and not
destroying the moulds, use a release agent etc etc??

Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Regards
George

George Theodossiou
Physicist / Electron Microscopist
CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
Victoria, 3169
tel: +61 3 9545 2012
fax: +61 3 9544 1128

Visit our Web site http://www.cmst.csiro.au

Shipping address: CSIRO - Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, Gate 4
Normanby Rd. Clayton, Victoria,

PLEASE NOTE:

To the extent permitted by law, CSIRO does not represent, warrant and/or
guarantee that the integrity of this communication has been maintained or
that the communication is free of errors, virus, interception or
interference.

The information contained in this e-mail may be confidential or privileged.
Any unauthorised use or disclosure is prohibited. If you have received this
e-mail in error, please delete it immediately and notify George Theodossiou
on +61 3 9545 2012. Thank you.




From daemon Fri Mar 7 06:12:22 2003



From: rcmoretz-at-att.net
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 12:01:47 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George:
My experience has been that the moulds age and that with repeated usage tend to
start adhering to the cured blocks. At that point it's time to purrchase new
moulds. I have had no success with release agents, etc.
Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
BI Pharmaceuticals
Ridgefield, CT
--
Where the world is only slightly
less weird than it actually is.
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} A couple of days ago I embedded some samples for microtomy, using Procure
} 812. Today when I went to remove the blocks from the mould I found that the
} mould material had adhered to the blocks and came away with the blocks, thus
} destroying two mould blocks. I have never experienced this problem in the
} past to such a degree.
}
} The resin was measured and mixed properly and cured at 60 deg celcius. When
} embedding I half fill the mould and cure it in the oven at 60 deg celcius
} for an hour, then position the sample, fill the rest of the mould and back

} in the oven for final curing. This has worked in the past for me.
}
} Does anybody have a better method of removing the cured blocks and not
} destroying the moulds, use a release agent etc etc??
}
} Your help would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Regards
} George
}
} George Theodossiou
} Physicist / Electron Microscopist
} CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
} Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
} Victoria, 3169
} tel: +61 3 9545 2012
} fax: +61 3 9544 1128
}
} Visit our Web site http://www.cmst.csiro.au
}
} Shipping address: CSIRO - Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, Gate 4
} Normanby Rd. Clayton, Victoria,
}
} PLEASE NOTE:
}
} To the extent permitted by law, CSIRO does not represent, warrant and/or
} guarantee that the integrity of this communication has been maintained or
} that the communication is free of errors, virus, interception or
} interference.
}
} The information contained in this e-mail may be confidential or privileged.

} Any unauthorised use or disclosure is prohibited. If you have received this
} e-mail in error, please delete it immediately and notify George Theodossiou
} on +61 3 9545 2012. Thank you.
}
}
}



From daemon Fri Mar 7 06:50:36 2003



From: Sara Prins :      SPrins-at-csir.co.za
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 14:41:52 +0200
Subject: Extractor current for LEO FE-SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All

Does anybody knows what is the acceptable variation in the extractor
current on a LEO 1500 FE-SEM? Is it expected to observe a variation of
the current for a Schottky FE-tip? Or might it be some external field? I
am setting up a monitoring log now to see if this variation is
periodic.

Our observed variation is about 3%.

Thanks in advance
Sara


--
This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by
MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.

"The CSIR exercises no editorial control over E-mail messages and/or
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organisation and the views in this message/attachments thereto are
therefore not necessarily those of the CSIR and/or its employees.
The sender of this e-mail is, moreover, in terms of the CSIR's Conditions
of Service, subject to compliance with the CSIR's internal E-mail and
Internet Policy."



From daemon Fri Mar 7 09:07:24 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 09:59:39 -0500
Subject: Re: Haversian systems in flat bones?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tom Phillips wrote:

} A histology question for the light microscopists out there: Are Haversian
} systems present in the flat bones formed by intramembranous ossification or
} are they only in long bones? Thanks, Tom

Tom:

Haversian systems are present in bone formed both ways. Haversian systems
may be absent in very thin trabeculae of bone. In that case nourishment by
diffusion through canaliculi is sufficient since the thickness of the trabecula
is not greater than the diameter of a Haversian system.

Geoff

} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Fri Mar 7 09:47:36 2003



From: Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D. :      joiner-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 09:39:26 -0600
Subject: Re: OEM TEM service feedback

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, Randy -

I have a geriatric JEOL 100C TEMSCAN that's older than dirt. It is under
service contract with JEOL and the JEOL crew here in the Houston area have
been phenomenally good about keeping it operating and operating well. They
respond very quickly, at least within 24 hours. Now, that may be because we
are in a large medical school in a large medical center and they have a lot
of instruments in the area and are generally close by. It could also be
because they just wander by my lab in a pavlovian reflex. I think they also
understand that I run a diagnostic lab and patients don't stop getting sick
just because Cartwright's scope is down. I am very happy with the service
from JEOL.

Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D.
Baylor College of Medicine
Dept. of Pathology
Houston, Texas U.S.A.

P.S. I have no financial ties to JEOL America, nor do I own stock in that
company. However my car is parked on the 5th floor of Garage #6 today with
the window down just enough for a plain brown envelope to slide through.

************************************************

At 06:03 PM 03/06/2003 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Mar 7 11:39:58 2003



From: Jaclynn Lett :      jlett-at-cid.wustl.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 11:16:29 -0600
Subject: embedding molds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have any thoughts about the advantages/disadvantages of the use
of various types of embedding molds (I'm referring to the substances from
which they're made). If there's a preference for a certain type of
material, then why?

We use Durcupan and EMbed/Araldite resins. I know that glycol methacrylate
will not polymerize correctly in silicone molds, but does well in
polyethylene. Other than that example, are there any problems in which the
resin reacts with the mold material in any way?

Our "clear" silicone molds eventually turn opaque, with it happening faster
around cavities that are used more often. Is this due to oven heat or the
resin?


Thank you,

J.M. Lett
Harold W. Siebens Hearing Research Center
Central Institute for the Deaf
4560 Clayton Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63110

jlett-at-cid.wustl.edu

voice: 314-977-0257
fax: 314-977-0030


From daemon Fri Mar 7 11:42:57 2003



From: tbargar-at-unmc.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 11:35:20 -0600
Subject: Digital imaging and image analysis courses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My bosses are interested in sending me to a short course or workshop in
digital imaging and image analysis. In particular they are looking for a
workshop or short course which would be using Image-Pro Plus and Photoshop.
Also geared toward biological EM applications. Anyone out there offering a
short course or workshop along these lines?

Tom Bargar
Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
986395 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, Ne 68198-6395

402-559-7347

tbargar-at-unmc.edu




From daemon Fri Mar 7 11:44:23 2003



From: Dean Abel :      dean-abel-at-uiowa.edu
Date: Sat, 08 Mar 2003 11:38:00 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello George,
When I was a graduate student at the University of Kansas, I was
taught to spray the embedding molds with a teflon spray as one would do to
a frying pan (I forget the brand name of the stuff). But for 15 years at
the University of Iowa I have not done this and have had no problems
removing blocks from "good" molds. When the molds begin to crack and the
blocks become difficult to remove, I discard the mold. I have never
experienced a sudden or overnight problem as you describe. Good luck.

Dean Abel
Biological Sciences 141 BB
University of Iowa
Iowa City IA 52242-1324
USA


At 05:21 PM 3/7/2003 +1100, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Mar 7 12:10:51 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 10:02:19 -0800
Subject: Re: Extractor current for LEO FE-SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


AFter three Zr/O-W Schottky guns, my experience
suggests that 3% variation is OK. I log Iext
twice per month and perform gun brightness
measurment every two months. I also record
IPG and IPC pump currents.

These types (my type?) tend to rise in Iext
after install and then stabilize at some
certain current. At 92uA, mine varies by
no more than +- 2uA. When the Iext starts
to change more than this, that is an indicator
that the gun is dying. Along with higher or
lower Iext, gun chamber vacuum will deteriorate
IPG will increase). When this happens, it's
about two weeks to a totally dead gun. Typical
life is about two years. My last one lasted
exactly two years two months. some folks report
half that lifetime. Keeping good vacuum and
proper protocol for protecting the gun saves
the cost of a new gun....or at least, puts it
off longer.

gary g.


At 04:41 AM 3/7/2003, you wrote:

} Hello All
}
} Does anybody knows what is the acceptable variation in the extractor
} current on a LEO 1500 FE-SEM? Is it expected to observe a variation of
} the current for a Schottky FE-tip? Or might it be some external field? I
} am setting up a monitoring log now to see if this variation is
} periodic.
}
} Our observed variation is about 3%.
}
} Thanks in advance
} Sara
}
}
} --
} This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by
} MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.
}
} "The CSIR exercises no editorial control over E-mail messages and/or
} attachments thereto/links referred to therein originating in the
} organisation and the views in this message/attachments thereto are
} therefore not necessarily those of the CSIR and/or its employees.
} The sender of this e-mail is, moreover, in terms of the CSIR's Conditions
} of Service, subject to compliance with the CSIR's internal E-mail and
} Internet Policy."



From daemon Fri Mar 7 12:16:42 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 12:09:24 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I never used to have the problem with molds cracking or sticking to the
resin but about 3 years ago it became a common occurence in my lab. I
thought at first the supplier had changed the formulation but it was true
from more than one supplier. Teflon sprays - available at your hardware
store - help some but not much. I think using BDMA rather than DMP-30 in
your epoxy resin mix makes it worse but that is not something I have
carefully examined. Recently I switch to polyethylene "disposal" molds and
they work pretty well - I re-use them but have only done this 3-4 times so
I don't know what their lifespan will be.









} Hello George,
} When I was a graduate student at the University of Kansas, I was
} taught to spray the embedding molds with a teflon spray as one would do
} to a frying pan (I forget the brand name of the stuff). But for 15 years
} at the University of Iowa I have not done this and have had no problems
} removing blocks from "good" molds. When the molds begin to crack and the
} blocks become difficult to remove, I discard the mold. I have never
} experienced a sudden or overnight problem as you describe. Good luck.
}
} Dean Abel
} Biological Sciences 141 BB
} University of Iowa
} Iowa City IA 52242-1324
} USA
}
}
} At 05:21 PM 3/7/2003 +1100, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Fri Mar 7 12:17:02 2003



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 13:22:08 EST
Subject: Re: Digital imaging and image analysis courses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George,
It sounds like your rubber mold
has had one to many cures-the same happened
to me with old rubber molds and Eponate 12.

Mike D
----- Original Message -----
} From: "George.Theodossiou-at-csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Perfect timing. I was just about to post the following on this list. I think
it exactly corresponds to your needs. We use Photoshop as a platform for the
course because of its familiarity to a wide user base, but all of the plugins
and techniques supplied are also fully compatible with Image Pro Plus.
typically about 40% of the attendees are from the biological research
community (other disciplines represented include materials science, medicine,
forensic applications, geology, industrial imaging, etc.).

John Russ
===

The three-day intensive hands-on workshop on Image Processing and Measurement
presented by John Russ (author of "The Image Processing Handbook" and
"Practical Stereology") through the North Carolina State University
Department of Continuing and Professional Education is now in its 21st year.
The course dates for 2003 are May 21 - 23 in Raleigh, NC. This course has
generated highly favorable reviews from the thousands of previous students.
The primary focus is on images from various types of microscopy, with
practical guidance in correcting imaging defects, enhancing the images for
presentation and measurement, and performing stereological meaningful
measurements on them. Textbooks and computer software are provided to
attendees. Lab sessions with an opportunity to bring your own images makes
this course immediately useful and highly productive.

For full information on the course, including outlines, faculty information,
a downloadable brochure, and on-line registration, go to

http://members.aol.com/ipcourse

Class size is limited to maintain a high ratio of instructors to students, so
make your reservation now. You may also contact Cindy Allen at NCSU
Continuing Education, at 919-515-8171
====

In a message dated 3/7/03 12:46:15 PM, tbargar-at-unmc.edu-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
writes:

} My bosses are interested in sending me to a short course or workshop in
} digital imaging and image analysis. In particular they are looking for
} a
} workshop or short course which would be using Image-Pro Plus and Photoshop.
} Also geared toward biological EM applications. Anyone out there offering
} a
} short course or workshop along these lines?


From daemon Fri Mar 7 13:42:32 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 14:27:38 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George,
You can use a TFE release agent to extend the life of your moulds,
but the repeated heating, over time, causes the material to
breakdown...what you experienced is pretty much inevitable. Moulds
don't last forever.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Fri Mar 7 13:56:42 2003



From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-uky.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 14:48:59 -0500
Subject: Re: OEM TEM service feedback

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Joiner,
I don't know who you are, but I like your sense of humor. I'm thinking of
trying the plain brown envelope trick with Leica and Philips. Let me know
if it works.
Mary Gail Engle

At 09:39 AM 3/7/03 -0600, Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D. wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Mary Gail Engle
Sr. Research Laboratory Manager
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
Health Sciences Research Bldg. 001
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40536-0305

phone 859-323-6108
fax 859-257-9700


From daemon Fri Mar 7 14:54:28 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 15:45:35 -0500
Subject: SEM cold stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to hear opinions or experiences using a Peltier cooled
cryo-stage for SEM. Is this appropriate for high vacuum FEGSEM?

Greg

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
P.O. Box 118525
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295


From daemon Fri Mar 7 16:00:13 2003



From: Lois Anderson :      landers-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 16:57:48 -0500
Subject: EM Technician Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear George,
I always use a silicon release agent (a spray)
when I embed samples. Sometimes they release,
sometimes they don't or they take chunks of the
mold with them. The molds have a life, but I make
my own out of silicon rubber, so I just make some
more.
Good luck,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From:
{"George.Theodossiou-at-csiro.au"-at-sparc5.microscopy.c
om}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 10:21 PM


We are looking for a technician with experience in clinical electron
microscopy. Position Available immediately. Please contact me if you
are interested know anyone who might be.



Lois Anderson
Johns Hopkins University
Dept. of Pathology
Laboratory Manager
Electron Microscopy/Immunofluorescence
600 N. Wolfe Street/Pathology 709 A
Baltimore, MD 21287
(410) 955-2861/fax (410) 614-7110
landers-at-jhmi.edu




From daemon Fri Mar 7 17:42:28 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 17:33:18 -0600
Subject: TEM - spot size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was taught that going to Spot Size 1 in TEM gives more light at the
expense of more beam damage to the specimen and lower resolution. In
addition, I was told that one uses Spot Size 2 or 3 for high resolution
work. Can one of the TEM experts out there expand on these simple
statements. At what magnification does going to Spot Size 1 really begin to
hurt resolution - if i am working at 20K, should it make a difference? I
don't see much difference except in the amount of light. Comments and
personal prejudices will be warmly accepted. If it makes any difference, I
am working with conventional epon thin sections of biological material that
was osmicated and UA and Pb counterstained; most photos are 20K or less but
can sneak up to 40K or 50K. Thanks.

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Fri Mar 7 18:03:40 2003



From: Jian-Guo Zheng :      j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 17:56:03 -0600
Subject: Change gray scale image into color image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I have two questions for image processing experts. A) how to change a
gray scale image into a false color image. If the intensity of a gray
scale image is in the range of 0 - 255, red, orange and blue color
pixels in the corresponding color image should represent the pixels with
intensity in the range of 0-100, 101 - 200, and 201-255 in the gray
scale image, respectively. B) How to emerge three gray scale images into
a color image. If the intensity of gray scale images is in the range of
0 - 255, red, orange and blue pixels in the color image should represent
the pixels with intensity of 201-255 in the three gray scale images,
respectively.
Could you please tell me which software can solve the problems and how
to do them? Your help is highly appreciated. Thanks,
Jian-Guo


***********************************
Jian-Guo Zheng
Research Assistant Professor
Materials Science & Engineering
Manager, NUANCE-EPIC
http://www.nuance.northwestern.edu/epic/

Northwestern University
2220 Campus Drive, 1156 Cook Hall
Evanston, IL 60208-3108, USA
Phone: (847) 491-7807, Fax: (847) 491-7820
E-mail: j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu
http://www.nuance.northwestern.edu/epic/zheng/index.htm
***********************************





From daemon Fri Mar 7 18:34:03 2003



From: Ralph Common :      Ralph.Common-at-ht.msu.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Mar 2003 19:18:20 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM moulds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



The problem of blocks sticking to the moulds might be the mould itself.
They vary greatly in quality. We had to give up on one supplier because the
moulds would start to deteriorate after only two or three usages. We are
quite happy with the moulds supplied by Ted Pella (I have no financial
interest in the company), but even these vary from batch to batch.

Ralph Common
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology

-----------------


Dear Colleagues,

A couple of days ago I embedded some samples for microtomy, using Procure
812. Today when I went to remove the blocks from the mould I found that the
mould material had adhered to the blocks and came away with the blocks, thus
destroying two mould blocks. I have never experienced this problem in the
past to such a degree.

The resin was measured and mixed properly and cured at 60 deg celcius. When
embedding I half fill the mould and cure it in the oven at 60 deg celcius
for an hour, then position the sample, fill the rest of the mould and back
in the oven for final curing. This has worked in the past for me.

Does anybody have a better method of removing the cured blocks and not
destroying the moulds, use a release agent etc etc??

Your help would be greatly appreciated.

Regards
George

George Theodossiou
Physicist / Electron Microscopist
CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
Victoria, 3169
tel: +61 3 9545 2012
fax: +61 3 9544 1128




From daemon Fri Mar 7 18:56:32 2003



From: Rong Yu :      ryu-at-lbl.gov
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 16:48:28 -0800
Subject: TEM: Ceramic grids/slots/holes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,
Most of grids are made of metals.
Can anyone tell me if there are ceramic grids/slots/holes?
Many thanks,
Rong Yu

--
*************************************
Rong Yu Ph.D.
Materials Science Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
University of California
Berkeley, CA94720, USA
Phone: 1-510-486-6809
Fax: 1-510-486-7768
*************************************



From daemon Fri Mar 7 19:02:47 2003



From: Rong Yu :      ryu-at-lbl.gov
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 16:55:41 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM - spot size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The larger spot, the worse spatial coherence, and thus lower resolution for
"High-Resolution" imaging.
But such difference in resolution is hardly be detected at lower
magnifications, e.g. 20k-50k.

Tom Phillips wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I was taught that going to Spot Size 1 in TEM gives more light at the
} expense of more beam damage to the specimen and lower resolution. In
} addition, I was told that one uses Spot Size 2 or 3 for high resolution
} work. Can one of the TEM experts out there expand on these simple
} statements. At what magnification does going to Spot Size 1 really begin to
} hurt resolution - if i am working at 20K, should it make a difference? I
} don't see much difference except in the amount of light. Comments and
} personal prejudices will be warmly accepted. If it makes any difference, I
} am working with conventional epon thin sections of biological material that
} was osmicated and UA and Pb counterstained; most photos are 20K or less but
} can sneak up to 40K or 50K. Thanks.
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu

--
*************************************
Rong Yu Ph.D.
Materials Science Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
University of California
Berkeley, CA94720, USA
Phone: 1-510-486-6809
Fax: 1-510-486-7768
*************************************




From daemon Fri Mar 7 19:21:19 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 17:15:01 -0800
Subject: Re: Change gray scale image into color image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In Photoshop, convert your image to indexed color:

Image, Mode, Indexed Color

In the Indexed Color dialogue box, choose:

Palette, Custom

You will see a grid of 256 squares. Click and drag over the first 85
squares and a color picker box will appear. Set those squares to the color
you want by setting both the beginning and end square of the 85 squares to
the same color. Do this three times for the three colors you want. Think
about saving the indexed color profile so you don't have to do it again.

For your second question, I believe the Channels, Merge feature should be
used. No time for details now but review the PhotoShop manual for this
feature. We routinely use it to reconstruct 3 channel false color images
from the confocal.

Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu

-------------------------------------------------.


} Hi,
} I have two questions for image processing experts. A) how to change a
} gray scale image into a false color image. If the intensity of a gray
} scale image is in the range of 0 - 255, red, orange and blue color
} pixels in the corresponding color image should represent the pixels with
} intensity in the range of 0-100, 101 - 200, and 201-255 in the gray
} scale image, respectively. B) How to emerge three gray scale images into
} a color image. If the intensity of gray scale images is in the range of
} 0 - 255, red, orange and blue pixels in the color image should represent
} the pixels with intensity of 201-255 in the three gray scale images,
} respectively.
} Could you please tell me which software can solve the problems and how
} to do them? Your help is highly appreciated. Thanks,
} Jian-Guo
}
}
} ***********************************
} Jian-Guo Zheng
} Research Assistant Professor
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Manager, NUANCE-EPIC
} http://www.nuance.northwestern.edu/epic/
}
} Northwestern University
} 2220 Campus Drive, 1156 Cook Hall
} Evanston, IL 60208-3108, USA
} Phone: (847) 491-7807, Fax: (847) 491-7820
} E-mail: j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu
} http://www.nuance.northwestern.edu/epic/zheng/index.htm
} ***********************************



From daemon Fri Mar 7 22:20:13 2003



From: Beauregard :      beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 22:10:15 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I totally agree with Roger.
You said, "etc. etc." I took this to mean you wanted a lot of help and info.

I use EPONATE 12 clone epoxy and the stuff releases fine when new PE molds
are used. I have used flat silicone? embedding molds colored green and
blue. This gets to be expensive when they give out. When they get old,
the silicone rubber sticks as streaks on the blocks and wrecks the mold for
any further use. They work fine for a time, just like the PE does. I have
used my PE disposable molds, below, for over 8 years.

I use cheap Wheaton Bottle PE caps that can be purchased separately in
different size diameters. (see below) I like a flat mold over the
'vertical' BEEM capsules that you can buy because of the types of samples I
do and control of sample geometry.
Anyway, after 5-10 uses, the epoxy sticks so bad that the polyethelene has
to be trashed to get the round block out. I just throw the cheap mold away
and use a new one. Hint: Just before the PE is going to stick, some
crazing and slight sticking seems to take place. Also a thin or thick
white area in the PE after removal signals the next embedding will be very
hard to remove.

I believe the PE has some plasticizer on or near the surface that acts as a
release agent. I could be wrong but there is something on the surface, in
any case.

I use this large low profile mold because I do a lot of automotive coatings
that contain TiO2 crystals and the larger molds are easier to pop the block
out of. TiO2 trashes a diamond knife faster than most other things I run.
This costs money and uses up diamond knife edge needlessly. So once I
release a coil coat, 5 µm soda can ink or thicker 'mil' coating, I pin it
down flat with straight pins that stick into the PE bottle caps and that
hold the corners of the coating. Why use the pins? Sometimes the heat
cure can cause the samples to curl during the curing and that also
translates into excessive diamond knife edge useage and other problems in
the TEM.
I don't have to worry about a small sized sample being submitted. (The
metal panels I get can be 10's of sq. inches in size.) If you only put a
small amount of epoxy in at first, the raised number in the cap mold allows
a thin film of epoxy to wick under the film even after pinning. After
wetting, you can add the rest of the epoxy. This totally surrounds the
embedded film or coating with epoxy.
I saw the cured block with a X-ACTO RAZOR saw. It's faster but messy.
Anyway, this flatness allows me to orient the straight and planar sample in
the microtome so the smallest amount or profile is presented to the diamond
knife edge used to thin section the coating for the TEM or for staining.

So why don't I use the small silicone molds? What I want to do is select
the best flat area in the block that has the plane of the coating co-planar
with the bottom of the mold. This also makes the coating co-planar with
the jaws of the microtome vise mount on my RMC 6000 XL. This ensures that
the diamond thin section cuts will be rectangular and not skewed. This is
very critcal to the EDS examination of anti-reflective coatings on polymers.

These caps are listed in the regular Wheaton Catalog and can be ordered
from Fisher Scientific using the Wheaton cap number.

I have never used Procure 812 but most clones of EPON 812 are the same. I
have tested the ORIGINAL EPON 812 against Medcast (no longer available from
Pella) and their Eponate 12 by having the NMR spectra run. Yes I still
have a bottle of real EPON 812 from Shell ! NMR is not that sensitive as
an analytical assay technique but the spectra match very close. The
original stuff is thicker than Eponate 812 or the old Medcast. Obviously
the molecular weight is now different in these newer clones.
One other embedding kit I tested had minor levels of aromatics, FYI.

For cutting or trimming epoxy, use extra long Weck SS Razor Blades. They
cost more but the pressure needed to be applied to cut the epoxy is 3-5
times less than a regular razor blade. This makes them safer to use from
this stand point only. THESE blades CUT TISSUE like your FINGERS a lot
easier also! They are extremely sharp and dangerous to use. They make a
new regular razor seem dull. Take heed!!!! Never place your fingers or
anything else below the edge of these blades.

I hope this helps give you some perspective and an overview of some hints
on how others use Epon 812 clone epoxy and about silicone versus PE molds.

Paul Beauregard
Senior Research Associate
PPG Industries
Monroeville Chemicals Technical Center
440 College Park Drive
Monroeville, PA 15146
724-325-5131

}
} George:
} My experience has been that the moulds age and that with repeated usage
tend to
} start adhering to the cured blocks. At that point it's time to purrchase
new
} moulds. I have had no success with release agents, etc.
} Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
} Dept of Toxicology
} BI Pharmaceuticals
} Ridgefield, CT
} --
}
} } Dear Colleagues,
} }
} } A couple of days ago I embedded some samples for microtomy, using Procure
} } 812. Today when I went to remove the blocks from the mould I found that
the
} } mould material had adhered to the blocks and came away with the blocks,
thus
} } destroying two mould blocks. I have never experienced this problem in the
} } past to such a degree.
} }
} } The resin was measured and mixed properly and cured at 60 deg celcius.
When
} } embedding I half fill the mould and cure it in the oven at 60 deg celcius
} } for an hour, then position the sample, fill the rest of the mould and back
}
} } in the oven for final curing. This has worked in the past for me.
} }
} } Does anybody have a better method of removing the cured blocks and not
} } destroying the moulds, use a release agent etc etc??
} }
} } Your help would be greatly appreciated.
} }
} } Regards
} } George
} }
} } George Theodossiou
} } Physicist / Electron Microscopist
} } CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
} } Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
} } Victoria, 3169
} } tel: +61 3 9545 2012
} } fax: +61 3 9544 1128




From daemon Sat Mar 8 11:54:14 2003



From: mwb142-at-psu.edu ()
Date: Sat, 8 Mar 2003 11:39:34 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Sparrow approximation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (mwb142-at-psu.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
March 7, 2003 at 12:42:42
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mwb142-at-psu.edu
Name: Matt Bell

Organization: Penn State

Education: Graduate College

Location: State College, PA

Question: I know that there is a Sparrow approximation for resolution
of an optical wave. Does that apply for acoustic waves? And if so,
what is the formula for the Sparrow approximation for lateral and
vertical resolution?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sun Mar 9 12:38:13 2003



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Sun, 09 Mar 2003 16:35:22 -0500
Subject: Univ. Labs - Facility use charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mr. Zheng,

What you are suggesting is not the only way. Of course you can create a
false color image, but you can just as easily create a full color image by
assigning each of the three colors to one color channel of the full color
(24-bit) image. If you really do need a false color image, you can simply
convert this image. The results are likely to be better as any reasonable
software will optimize the color palette.

As for software, look for software that supports Fluorescence imaging (such
as, but not limited to, our analySIS software). Your question is a standard
problem in fluorescence, as often a b/w camera is used (because of higher
sensitivity) to acquire several fluorescence channels and merge them into a
color image. Often it is more than 3 colors, which makes it more
complicated, but it is still a standard technique (multiple Fluorescence)
for many software packages.

Please contact me offline if you want more information.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Jian-Guo Zheng [mailto:j-zheng3-at-northwestern.edu]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 4:56 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: 'Jian-Guo Zheng'


Hi,

We have 3 SEM's and 2 TEM's in our facility with varying costs and amounts
of use associated with each. Using the Cost/Hours of Use=Rate leaves us
with scopes having unappealingly high rates simply because they aren't
used much or have higher annual costs. Your heads are nodding in
agreement now, right?

What can't I use an "average" rate for SEM's and TEM's that (somewhat)
smooths out those irregular use and costs patterns? Of course I can,
right? Well, in truth it would help me to be able to tell Research
Accounting that others are doing it too :} ).

Is anyone else doing this or something like it?

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From daemon Sun Mar 9 22:04:12 2003



From: George.Theodossiou-at-csiro.au
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 14:53:48 +1100
Subject: TEM Embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

Thank you for all the replies and useful hints, for release agents and
different types of moulds.

I understand that moulds have a finite life but what really annoyed me about
this instance was that the moulds were white silicone rubber, had only been
used 3-4 times previously and had very few cracks. I thought they had a bit
of life left in them. Oh well, it just makes work more fun.

Regards
George


George Theodossiou
Physicist / Electron Microscopist
CSIRO Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology
Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC
Victoria, 3169
tel: +61 3 9545 2012
fax: +61 3 9544 1128

Visit our Web site http://www.cmst.csiro.au

Shipping address: CSIRO - Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology, Gate 4
Normanby Rd. Clayton, Victoria,

PLEASE NOTE:

To the extent permitted by law, CSIRO does not represent, warrant and/or
guarantee that the integrity of this communication has been maintained or
that the communication is free of errors, virus, interception or
interference.

The information contained in this e-mail may be confidential or privileged.
Any unauthorised use or disclosure is prohibited. If you have received this
e-mail in error, please delete it immediately and notify George Theodossiou
on +61 3 9545 2012. Thank you.




From daemon Mon Mar 10 04:01:11 2003



From: paqui :      paqui-at-mercuri.el.ub.es
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 10:53:31 +0100
Subject: Post-doctoral position avalaible

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A postdoctoral position is available in the Electronics Department of the
University of Barcelona (Spain) (www.el.ub.es), within the frame of the
“Ramon y Cajal” programme ({http://www.mcyt.es/CAJAL/default.htm" }http://www.mcyt.es/CAJAL/default.htm).

The successful candidate should have practical experience in FIB and
related techniques, and it will be engaged in the use of this equipment in
the development of Micro and Nanosystems Engineering during a period
of five years.
Qualified applicants should send their curriculum to the address below
or to e-mail to paqui-at-el.ub.es

The deadline for presentation of a research project in the area of
Electronic Technology is estimated to be about the middle of April.
Therefore, the people interested should contact us as soon as possible
(before the 25 March).

Best regards*******************************+
Francesca Peiro

EME, Electronic Materials and Engineering
Dpt. Electronics
University of Barcelona
Marti i Franques 1
08028 Barcelona, Spain

Tel. (34-93) 402 11 39
Fax. (34-93) 402 11 48
e-mail: paqui-at-el.ub.es
****************************



From daemon Mon Mar 10 06:31:45 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 08:46:27 -0500
Subject: Re: Univ. Labs - Facility use charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there,

what is the timescale of these variations? In case seconds, then there is
something wrong with your filament ... this may be fixed with an bakeout and a
"reconditioning": trying to find a new extractor voltage and filament current
is usually the last measure before exchanging the filament
I think the DENKA's behave a bit different compared to the one's from FEI ...

There is also some further reading which may be helpful for understanding:
F. Zhou:"Handbook of charged particles optics", pp.77-102 "A Review of the
ZrO/W Schottky Cathode", CRC Press

But the main point to check the status of your GEMINI is the probe current:
With a 30µm aperture -at- 1kV our's have been at 90..130pA (...as long as the
aperture is o.k.).
The DENKA we are using right now has about 5500h and has been at more than
180µA extractor current (...EHT on) more or less form the beginning!!! On the
second to minute timescale the variations are definitely below 0,5%(!!!) ...
o.k.: we are doing only LV-morphology work (...no EDX/WDX) ... and we do not
change the extractor voltage from the set working point of 6KV for more than +/-
400V for longer than 4h ... IGP vac always better than 2x10^-9´mbar

If the variation (... always talking about the time after having reached the
saturation, that means 4..6h after switching on the gun!!!) is periodically on
a minute to hour scale, there is something wrong with the ZrO droplet which
should wet the tip of the W single crystal ...

Hope this helps a bit?

Gunnar





Date sent: Fri, 07 Mar 2003 10:02:19 -0800
To: "Sara Prins" {SPrins-at-csir.co.za}
} From: Gary Gaugler {gary-at-gaugler.com}


Owen,
I ran into the same problem when we set up our rate structure last year.
Accounting wanted each scope treated separately based on it's use and
service contract costs. This amounted to vastly different rates for our
three scopes.
We intend to go back and argue for the need to treat all as one unit and
combine maintenance costs plus use hours to come up with a reasonable hourly
rate for all. Our internal people are fortunate in that the rate will be
heavily subsidized for most of them, make it very affordable. It will
affect external users and some unsubsidized university users the most but
should end up being more fair overall than the way it is now. Hopefully
this will be accepted by the university accounting office.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907


On 3/9/03 4:35 PM, "Owen P. Mills" {opmills-at-mtu.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} We have 3 SEM's and 2 TEM's in our facility with varying costs and amounts
} of use associated with each. Using the Cost/Hours of Use=Rate leaves us
} with scopes having unappealingly high rates simply because they aren't
} used much or have higher annual costs. Your heads are nodding in
} agreement now, right?
}
} What can't I use an "average" rate for SEM's and TEM's that (somewhat)
} smooths out those irregular use and costs patterns? Of course I can,
} right? Well, in truth it would help me to be able to tell Research
} Accounting that others are doing it too :} ).
}
} Is anyone else doing this or something like it?
}
} Owen
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}
}
}
}




From daemon Mon Mar 10 09:00:57 2003



From: John :      jmontara-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 09:48:52 -0500
Subject: Univ. Labs - Facility use charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Owen,

I can not answer your specific question about whether others are using
average cost. However, as a recent graduate from business school, and one
who three times attended summer hockey camp at your university (Go Huskies!)
I offer some input that I hope you find helpful.

Accounting costs are an approximation of opportunity cost, and to the extent
that they reflect opportunity cost they serve as a fair measure for transfer
pricing (of services purchased within the organization) or a useful measure
for external pricing (of services sold outside the organization).

Opportunity cost indicates the value that you might extract from your tool
given the options that you have. Options may include performing research,
charging an external customer, and selling the tool. In an extreme, if you
choose one option, others are foregone. If you strictly perform research,
for example, your opportunity cost is the difference between the present
value of performing that research and the greater of charging external
customers or selling the tool. You might have reason to argue that you are
doing the right thing and to do so by stating alternatives, and noting that
those alternatives provide less value than your desired use.

Opportunity cost may be the marginal cost of operating a tool. Marginal
costs would be those costs that occur only when you turn the tool on,
excluding those costs which are otherwise committed to, such as purchase
price of the tool and cost to maintain the building. Considering another
extreme, it may be that your highest and best use of this tool and the
facility would be to rent it out at a fee merely greater than the cost of
electricity to run the tool.

In contrast to opportunity costs of today, your organization's accounting
costs are probably what is required to recover dollars already spent to
purchase the unit and to operate the facility that it houses it. Indeed,
this would reflect the opportunity cost at the time the tool was purchased.
However, such accounting may reflect little of today's economic situation
and in the worst case it leads to failure to extract the most possible value
from the tool.

While you may find standard practices to support use of "average pricing", I
hope that you might also consider opportunity cost as a method for both
decision making as well as persuasion. Finally, I recommend an easy reading
novel that provides an understanding of standard accounting practices and
suggests a framework for extracting maximum value from an organization's
assets, "The Goal", by Elijahu M. Goldratt.

Sincerely,

John Moore
Montara Industries
New Hill, North Carolina
919-434-8457

"Assembling a team to provide 3rd party support for the Applied Materials
SEMVison."

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Owen P. Mills" {opmills-at-mtu.edu}
To: "Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Sunday, March 09, 2003 4:35 PM


Hi,

We have 3 SEM's and 2 TEM's in our facility with varying costs and amounts
of use associated with each. Using the Cost/Hours of Use=Rate leaves us
with scopes having unappealingly high rates simply because they aren't
used much or have higher annual costs. Your heads are nodding in
agreement now, right?

What can't I use an "average" rate for SEM's and TEM's that (somewhat)
smooths out those irregular use and costs patterns? Of course I can,
right? Well, in truth it would help me to be able to tell Research
Accounting that others are doing it too :} ).

Is anyone else doing this or something like it?

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills






From daemon Mon Mar 10 10:42:29 2003



From: COWLES, Elizabeth A. (Biology) :      COWLESE-at-easternct.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 11:32:34 -0500
Subject: Connecticut Microscopy Society Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopy Friends:

The Connecticut Microscopy Society is pleased to present Dr. Pietro De
Camilli on Thursday, March 27 at the Peabody Museum at Yale University. Dr.
De Camilli will describe his work on synaptic transmission. A reception and
dinner precede the lecture. Information is on our website,
http://www.connms.org
We hope to see you there!

Elizabeth Cowles, President of the Connecticut Microscopy Society

Elizabeth A. Cowles, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Biology
220 Goddard Hall
Eastern Connecticut State University
83 Windham St.
Willimantic, CT 06226
voice: 860-465-4385
fax: 860-465-5213
email: cowlese-at-easternct.edu
home page: http://www.easternct.edu/personal/faculty/cowlese/index.html
http://biology.easternct.edu


From daemon Mon Mar 10 14:47:13 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 15:32:57 -0500
Subject: Re: Haversian systems in flat bones?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To amplify what Geoff has said slightly, I would only add that "FIRST"
dermal bone is often called "woven bone" (non-lamellar in its initial
structure) and may even become known as "spicular or trabecular" bone
thereafter before it becomes remodeled as lamellar bone. The reason I
mention this is that if one is looking at embryonic/fetal bone, then one may
not see haversian systems or periosteal or endosteal lamellar bone at the
time of sampling. Furthermore, there are even some small fish whose bone is
actually acellular in the adult (as I recall dimly from coursework taken
years ago). Some of the smaller sesamoid bones may also lack haversian
and/or lamellar bone, although without looking I would bet that either or
both of my patellas do. The haversian system is considered the fundamental
unit of bone remodeling and is often referred to as an 'osteon'.

It would be relatively easy to distinguish between the lamellae of
periosteal and endosteal bone from those in haversian bone. Indeed, one can
often observe between periosteum and endosteum the arcs of remnant older
haversian systems between the newer, uninterrupted osteons.

It would also be worthwhile mentioning that the axes of collagen fibrils are
parallel within a single lamella and opposing in adjacent lamellae [mindful
of micelles of cellulose in adjacent layers of wood growth] and not
described as being paraxial with the long axis of a long bone. Thus,
perfect transections of long bone viewed with the TEM will never show
transverse sections of collagen micells without some tilt.

The most recent really good basic histology book is the 12th edition of
Bloom and Fawcett, published in 1994 (ISBN: 0-412-04691-1). There should be
some of this latest in a classic series of higher-end biology books
available on the used book market. I got mine as new just last year.

Hope this helps too,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging

Mail to:
Geology, CASI
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383

Phone & FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu

For help and information only,
The CASI houses:
An FEI Quanta 400 and Technai 12T,
Oxford INCA Energy 400,
Tousimis AutoSamdri 815 and
Olympus FV-300.


-----Original Message-----
} From: Geoff McAuliffe [mailto:mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 10:00 AM
To: Tom Phillips
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Tom Phillips wrote:

} A histology question for the light microscopists out there: Are Haversian
} systems present in the flat bones formed by intramembranous ossification
or
} are they only in long bones? Thanks, Tom

Tom:

Haversian systems are present in bone formed both ways. Haversian
systems
may be absent in very thin trabeculae of bone. In that case nourishment by
diffusion through canaliculi is sufficient since the thickness of the
trabecula
is not greater than the diameter of a Haversian system.

Geoff

} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Mon Mar 10 15:47:32 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 12:48:16 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM - spot size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Friday, March 7, 2003, at 04:55 PM, Rong Yu wrote:

} The larger spot, the worse spatial coherence, and thus lower
} resolution for
} "High-Resolution" imaging.
} But such difference in resolution is hardly be detected at lower
} magnifications, e.g. 20k-50k.
}
} Tom Phillips wrote:
}
} } I was taught that going to Spot Size 1 in TEM gives more light at the
} } expense of more beam damage to the specimen and lower resolution. In
} } addition, I was told that one uses Spot Size 2 or 3 for high
} } resolution
} } work. Can one of the TEM experts out there expand on these simple
} } statements. At what magnification does going to Spot Size 1 really
} } begin to
} } hurt resolution - if i am working at 20K, should it make a
} } difference? I
} } don't see much difference except in the amount of light. Comments and
} } personal prejudices will be warmly accepted. If it makes any
} } difference, I
} } am working with conventional epon thin sections of biological
} } material that
} } was osmicated and UA and Pb counterstained; most photos are 20K or
} } less but
} } can sneak up to 40K or 50K. Thanks.
} }
Dear Tom and Rong,
Another consideration for very high mags is that the closer the beam
is to crossover, the poorer the resolution, so one may want to use a
smaller spot size number (actually, bigger spot) further from crossover
rather than a bigger spot size number at crossover. Also, your
specimen may be better behaved vis-ŕ-vis charging/heating induced beam
movement if a larger area is illuminated. As you said, Rong, all this
is irrelevant at 20k-50k.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Mon Mar 10 16:20:38 2003



From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 17:09:34 -0500
Subject: Re: embedding molds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just some last minute comments from a long-time mold manufacturer:

Standard blue silicone rubber molds - These are quite pliable. We've found
the life span is mainly dependent upon the number of cures and components of
the epoxy mixture. Over-curing at high temps can also limit lifespan.

Clear silicone rubber molds - These require a different silicone
formulation. They do tend to crack when bent. Obviously you have to
balance this with the bottom illumination advantage.

We've looked at other rubber molds manufactured in the U.S. and most use
pretty good material. Our labs do use our TFE spray which helps in certain
situations and it is now environmentally-friendly.

We also do a lot of custom silicone molds and some are quite large. These
may require modification of curing procedures.

John Arnott
Disclaimer: Ladd sells EM supplies and accessories

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com




From daemon Mon Mar 10 17:23:45 2003



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 10:08:34 +1100
Subject: white opaque resin?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Does anyone know of an opaque white resin that can be used for tissue
infiltration? We want to progressively section and photograph the block
face

Thanks
Sally


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
Research School of Biological Sciences
Australian National University, Canberra ACT0200
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU




From daemon Mon Mar 10 23:50:46 2003



From: Teresa Flores :      tflore-at-lsuhsc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 2003 23:40:48 -0600
Subject: Negative/film auto developer?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Is anyone using an automatic negative/film developer for TEM negatives
that
they are happy with?
Our EM Lab is looking for an auto developer that would develope
Technical
Pan Film TP-120 (a roll of approx 8 negatives that is taken with a Zeiss
TEM 109).
Manufacturer and price will be most helpful.
Any imput will be appreciated.
Many thanks to all who respond or take precious time to read.
Teresa


From daemon Tue Mar 11 00:09:19 2003



From: rajmeister-at-msn.com ()
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 00:02:04 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: oil immersion slide?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (rajmeister-at-msn.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
March 10, 2003 at 22:49:28
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: rajmeister-at-msn.com
Name: Raj

Organization: Mary Washington College

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: F'brg, VA, USA

Question: Hello,
My question is, what do you think about the Observer IV microscope
overall for its price($265)? And also what is the procedure for
preparing an oil immersion slide for use at 1000x?
Thanks

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Tue Mar 11 08:45:56 2003



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 08:34:40 -0600
Subject: TEM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

We are the latest folks to get caught by the "New Formulation" TEM
films. We had a couple of batches come out of our nitrogen-burst
processor looking like they'd been tossed into a vat of developer and
left untouched for a couple minutes. The negs were way light and
mottled with streaks and patches indicative of poor agitation.
Unfortunately, I didn't even realize we had any of this film in our
inventory, since we hadn't bought any since before the controversy hit
the listserver, so our poor student lab assistant got the blame.

When we finally hit on the cause of this, we were able to remedy it by
increasing our agitation cycle to 2 seconds every 10 seconds, instead of
2 seconds every 30 seconds (which worked beautifully with the old film).
We use a 4-minute development in d-19 at 68-70 degrees F, and we may
move to 5 minutes. The agitation marks have been eliminated and density
is back into the good range, although still a bit lighter than before.
We had also started to get a "thumbprint" mark on the bottom of the
negatives which puzzled us greatly until our faculty coordinator pointed
out that it coincided exactly with the round plastic rod that the
negatives rest on at the bottom of the rack. It was causing increased
local agitation in a half-oval pattern as the nitrogen bubbles swirled
around it. Lifting the negatives up slightly seems to have cured this.
For some reason we had never noticed it before.

In case you were curious, the student lab assistant has been duly
apologized to and was very gracious in his victory.

Cheers,
Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core---We're the Fun Core!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



From daemon Tue Mar 11 08:47:45 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:43:25 -0500
Subject: Re: white opaque resin?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Consult a professional photographer who is familiar with the type of job
you are doing. Proper lighting coupled with a specific film and processing
may allow tissue in a paraffin or epoxy block to stand out from the
background.
You might also try mixing something into your embedding material to make
it opaque.

Geoff

Sally Stowe wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Does anyone know of an opaque white resin that can be used for tissue
} infiltration? We want to progressively section and photograph the block
} face
}
} Thanks
} Sally
}
} Dr Sally Stowe
} Facility Coordinator, ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
} Research School of Biological Sciences
} Australian National University, Canberra ACT0200
} AUSTRALIA
} stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218
} http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Tue Mar 11 09:26:45 2003



From: kbovard-at-creighton.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:16:57 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Water Quality Statement for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for a statement of acceptable water quality for TEM usage.
This may be familiar to those of us who are *blessed* to be inspected by
CAP. All I know about water quality is when it's NOT! Does anyone have a
statement that they use that they would be willing to share?!

Thanks,

Karen Bovard
EM Lab
Creighton University Medical Center
Omaha, Nebraska



From daemon Tue Mar 11 09:26:45 2003



From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:22:41 -0600
Subject: OMS/CSMMS Spring Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Oklahoma Microscopy Society and the Central States Microscopy and
Microanalysis Society will be holding a joint meeting in Tulsa,
Oklahoma on April 10-11, 2003. The theme of tis meeting is "The Art
of the Science Image."

Thusday, April 10
Session I: Image Creation
9:00-9:50 Opening Address: "Images and Human Understanding", John Russ, NCSU

10:00-10:45 "A Review of X-Ray Mapping", John Friel, PGT

10:45-11:00 BREAK

11:00-12:00 "Spectrum Imaging: The Next Step in Microanalysis", Paul
Kotula, Sandia Labs

12:00-1:00 LUNCH

1:00-1:30 "Winning the Depth of Field Battle in Light Microscopy",
Jim DeMian, 3M Co.

1:30-2:30 "Specialized Methods in Light Microscopy", Robert Weaver,
McCrone Inst.

2:30-2:45 BREAK

2:45-4:45 Choice of Workshops: 1) Spectrum Imaging; 2) Image
Processing; 3) LM Methods


Evenong Reception - IMAX Theatre
6:00-7:00 Buffet Dinner
7:00-8:30 "Four Million House Guests" a.k.a. "The Hidden Dimension",
3D movie and Keynote Addrerss: "SEM Stop-Frame, Color, 3D Animation
for Motion Pictures", David Scharf, Scarf Photography

Friday April 11
Session II: Image Processing and Analysis
8:30-12:30 "Guide to Image Analysis Workshop", John Russ, NCSU

12:30-1:30 LUNCH

Session III: Image Presentation
1:30-2:15 "Basic Principles of Image Composition for Scientists", TU Art Dept.

2:15-2:30 BREAK

2:30-3:30 "Exploring the Invisible: the Cultural Impact of
Microscopy", Lynn Gamwell, SUNY

Special Features
Corporate Exhibitors
Demonstrations of image processing software
Region-wide "Art of the Science Image" competition
Art Gallery displays "Images from Science", Rochester Inst. of Tech
and from David Scharf

Hotel Accommodations
Renaissance Tulsa, the city's newest hotel, located across from the
IMAX theatre, special meeting rate of $84 per night for single or
double; complimentary pool and fitness facilities; complimentary
shuttle from airport and to nearby shopping mall.

Registration
In advance ( {3/31), $40 for members, $50 for non-members, $20 for students
On-site (} 3/31), $50 for members, $60 for non-members, $25 for students
Thursday night reception: $20
note: non-member registration includes a 2003 membership to either OMS or CSMMS

For more information or to receive a registration packet, contact Lou
Ross at rosslm-at-missouri.edu or at (573) 882-4777.

--
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W136 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-5120
(573) 882-4777, fax 884=5414
email: rosslm-at-missouri.edu
web: www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc


From daemon Tue Mar 11 09:26:59 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 10:20:49 -0500
Subject: Re: Univ. Labs - Facility use charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Leslie,
We have been in the very fortunate position to have extensive university
support to cover costs associated with this microscopy facility. The
administration, primarily the School of Agriculture, has provided sufficient
funds to cover service contracts on 3 EMs and additional funds for other
operating costs. In addition salaries of two full-time professional level
positions are covered by schools of Agriculture, Science, and Veterinary
Medicine since this core facility caters primarily to researchers within
those schools. This means that for many years we had no charges for use of
the facility other than to cover consumables such as film. The facility
encourages multi-user access but also does provide full service (there were
always charges for service).

Under current financial stress, we have instituted a rate system to try
to cover future increases in costs as well as to try to reclaim some of the
current operating costs. Salaries are not figured into the recharge except
for the service option. Administrators here understand that EM facilities do
not make money...they are fortunate to recover most of their costs but even
this is difficult if you want the facility used by the greatest possible
number of researchers.

Now, that is the brief history behind the facility funding. It is true
that you must charge identical amounts to all users of a facility if any are
paying for costs using grant funds. You cannot preferentially exempt some
people and supplement others. We use the subsidies to keep our rates low for
all users. By doing this there is also the commitment by the administrators
to continue the subsidies and not expect the facility to cover all
associated costs. Everyone within the university who are doing sponsored
research or unfunded research pay the same amount.

However, in some cases researchers do proprietary work on contract with
private companies. In this case, they are not able to share the results
with the research community so are not entitled to subsidized rates. At the
present time they pay the full amount based on actual costs divided by use.
Since the use is by university staff, no indirect charges are applicable.
This also applies to companies who have direct ties to the university such
as those who are industrial affiliates of departments or programs (in which
case they are paying a fee for access to university staff and facilities).

Those companies who do not have formal ties to the university pay the
unsubsidized rates plus indirect costs to the university to cover
infrastructure costs. They also would pay consultant costs for assistance by
university staff.

We have found so far that keeping rates low through the subsidies
increases the number of users. Since the equipment does no good if unused,
this is very desirable. In return, as the number of users increases, so
does the revenue. The revenue then goes to "pay back" funds used for the
subsidies. I would guess that we generate more overall revenue with the
lower rates and more users benefiting from the facility than if we charged
double the cost and user numbers fell accordingly. Its like anything
else...if users perceive a bargain they will come...and often spend more
than they originally intended because they feel they are getting value for
their $.

Now, some equipment has been purchased by asking university faculty to
contribute required funds. This is the case for some of our light
microscopes and computer equipment. In this case, when these researchers
agree to help fund facility equipment, they understand that access is on a
first-come basis. In return the equipment is maintained and students are
trained in the use by facility staff. The researchers individually put in
much less money than if they were purchasing the entire instrument so we
usually end up getting higher end equipment. There are no fees associated
with using this jointly funded equipment.

Major equipment is funded almost entirely through instrumentation grants
with required matches from the university. Researchers who assist in
writing these grants understand that they are doing this partially as a
service to the university community. They do not get preferential treatment
if the instrument resides in the common core facility but usually end up
using the equipment most since they had the research justification for it in
the first place.

Devising a fair rate system is a complicated business and we have found
that we need to clarify and revise as the system reveals the need.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907

On 3/10/03 11:53 AM, "Leslie Eibest" {leibest-at-duke.edu} wrote:

} Hi Debby,
}
} I'm very interested in the method used there to subsidize some
} users. Currently, we have a couple of departments that subsidize my salary
} and the service contract, and those department members have free use of the
} equipment and technical assistance. Outsiders were charged reasonable
} rates. Everyone loved the system, and it provided a lot of stability for
} the SEM lab. However, Sponsored Programs has come down on our necks, saying
} that this unfairly subsidizes some grant holders and not others. All
} federal grant holders should be charged the lowest rate. We will have to
} raise more funds from user fees, so now we'll have to charge
} everyone. Researchers and students without funding won't be able to use
} the equipment. Adding to the fun, they won't let me keep reserves for
} equipment repairs and upgrades. It's ironic, since NSF was pleased that
} our lab was accessible to so many users.
}
} Have you had to deal with these issues yet? If so, how do you get around
} the problems?
}
} Leslie
}
}
}
} } We intend to go back and argue for the need to treat all as one unit and
} } combine maintenance costs plus use hours to come up with a reasonable hourly
} } rate for all. Our internal people are fortunate in that the rate will be
} } heavily subsidized for most of them, make it very affordable. It will
} } affect external users and some unsubsidized university users the most but
} } should end up being more fair overall than the way it is now. Hopefully
} } this will be accepted by the university accounting office.
} }
} } Debby
} }
} } Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
} } Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} } Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} } S-052 Whistler Building
} } 170 S. University Street
} } West Lafayette, IN 47907
} }
} }
} } On 3/9/03 4:35 PM, "Owen P. Mills" {opmills-at-mtu.edu} wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Hi,
} } }
} } } We have 3 SEM's and 2 TEM's in our facility with varying costs and amounts
} } } of use associated with each. Using the Cost/Hours of Use=Rate leaves us
} } } with scopes having unappealingly high rates simply because they aren't
} } } used much or have higher annual costs. Your heads are nodding in
} } } agreement now, right?
} } }
} } } What can't I use an "average" rate for SEM's and TEM's that (somewhat)
} } } smooths out those irregular use and costs patterns? Of course I can,
} } } right? Well, in truth it would help me to be able to tell Research
} } } Accounting that others are doing it too :} ).
} } }
} } } Is anyone else doing this or something like it?
} } }
} } } Owen
} } }
} } } Owen P. Mills
} } } Electron Optics Engineer
} } } Materials Science & Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } PH 906-369-1875
} } } FAX 906-487-2934
} } } mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} } } http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
}



From daemon Tue Mar 11 11:12:29 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:34:50 -0500
Subject: M&M2003-Core Facility management

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Oops, sorry. My posting was about the 4469 film. Thanks for the
reminder, Mike.

Randy

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Coviello [mailto:coviello-at-mae.uta.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 12:52 PM
To: Tindall, Randy D.


To all,
The Core Facility Management session at the annual Microscopy and
Microanalysis meeting is a forum to discuss topics relating to the
management issues associated with core facilities in both the academic and
private sector. The format has been to have a presenter to introduce the
topic and then having an interactive discussion session. Many of the
proceedings have been taped, transcribed and published in Microscopy Today
so that those who could not attend the meetings still had the benefit of the
discussions. Some of the topics discussed in past sessions include:

Managing Users
Justification of costs/cost recovery
Equipment maintenance issues
Training Users
Calibration of Ems
Scientific Ethics and responsibilities of facility managers.

I must finalize the topic(s) for M&M 2003. As we want to make this session
timely, I would like input from readers on topics of current interest. This
year we will receive no support from M&M 2003 but they have promised us a
room and audio-visual equipment.

Please respond immediately with topic suggestions.

Thanks,
Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Tue Mar 11 12:19:15 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 12:08:52 -0600
Subject: Kryostat question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


First, let me assure you I know how to spell cryostat! The listserver spam
filter blocks messages with CRY (as in Cry for Help) in them and Nestor is
working on it. In the meantime I thought I would try this work around. I
have several questions for the cryostat gurus out there.

First, how do you decide whether to infiltrate with sucrose? I will be
fixing my tissue with 2% paraformaldehyde and some protocols call for
direct freezing and others for infiltration with 30% sucrose in PBS
first. I know the sucrose will cryo-protect and suspect it will also
improve the plasticity but is there a disadvantage? A minor side question
is whether the 30% sucrose can be simply made up in 1x PBS or do you need
to account for the change in volume that the sucrose will probably
cause. Presumably osmolarity is no longer a big issue if you are using 30%
sucrose.

Second, what is the feeling on knives - high profile vs low profile? Is it
worth paying extra for the heavy duty ones to minimize chatter or is that
only needed for hard tissues. I will be cutting lymph nodes.

Thanks for any tips. Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Tue Mar 11 15:41:11 2003



From: Gretchen.Ziegler-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:56:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: oil immersion slide?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



If you buy that microscope you need to check if it has UL listing... most
inexpensive are not. That is safety issue.





From daemon Tue Mar 11 16:56:52 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 17:41:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Kryostat question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Tom:

Tom Phillips wrote:

} First, how do you decide whether to infiltrate with sucrose?

If you are going to freeze the tissue cryoprotection is a good idea. If your
samples are small and you freeze quickly, you may be able to get away w/o
cryoprotection.

} I will be
} fixing my tissue with 2% paraformaldehyde and some protocols call for
} direct freezing and others for infiltration with 30% sucrose in PBS
} first. I know the sucrose will cryo-protect and suspect it will also
} improve the plasticity but is there a disadvantage?

Not that I know of.

} A minor side question
} is whether the 30% sucrose can be simply made up in 1x PBS or do you need
} to account for the change in volume that the sucrose will probably
} cause.

I don't. I have used sucrose concentrations from 20% to 30% with no apparent
differences so if you are off a bit, no problem. What is important is the speed
of freezing, the faster the better.

} Presumably osmolarity is no longer a big issue if you are using 30%
} sucrose.

Nope. At least not in my experience.

} Second, what is the feeling on knives - high profile vs low profile? Is it
} worth paying extra for the heavy duty ones to minimize chatter or is that
} only needed for hard tissues. I will be cutting lymph nodes.

I can't help you there, I usually cut rodent brains with plain old microtome
knives.

} Thanks for any tips. Tom
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Tue Mar 11 20:28:51 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2003 18:16:02 -0800
Subject: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is perhaps a bit unusual of a topic
but it is centered on EDS viability for
foiling double blind testing.

Question: Can EDS be used to analyze
a double blind tablet to ascertain whether
it is placebo or a study medication?

It would seem that the inability to see
light element H might not be a limiting
factor. Are there signatures of placebos
that would strongly differentiate them
from study meds? How might one guard
against educated analysis of study meds?
If the basic elements are C, H and O, are
there distinct signatures or quantities
that one could use to distinguish between
placebo and study meds?

gary g.



From daemon Wed Mar 12 02:59:32 2003



From: yimin yao :      yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 09:48:37 +0100
Subject: FIB cross section for nanotube film on substrate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear colleagues,

Does anyone have experience to use FIB to make cross-section TEM samples for
a carbon nanotube film on substrate?

Best regards,


Yiming

------------------------------------
Dr. Yiming Yao

Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Experimental Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-41296, Göteborg
Sweden

Tel: +46 31 772 3633
Fax: +46 31 772 3224
email: yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
website: http://fy.chalmers.se/~yimin

-------------------------------------



From daemon Wed Mar 12 08:23:17 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 09:06:18 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Randy,
I'm glad you apologized to your student...its very frustrating to be
lamed for someting that is totally out of your control!
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Wed Mar 12 08:29:31 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 09:16:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Kryostat question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


HI Tom,
The preference in our facility is to cryoprotect with sucrose
whenever possible. We even freeze our tissues in a 1:1 mixture of
sucrose (20% in PBS) and OCT. It makes a softer block, and you may
have to drop your chamber temp to -20, but it cuts very smoothly and
yields very nice structure. The only time we don't use sucrose is
when the primary Ab's to be used won't tolerate any fixation, then we
snap freeze and pray. Our protocol is a modification of that
published by Barthel & Raymond in J Histochem Cytochem 3899)
1383-1388 1990. They were looking at eyes.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Wed Mar 12 09:56:42 2003



From: Katharine Dovidenko :      KDovidenko-at-uamail.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 10:46:40 -0500
Subject: FIB cross section for nanotube film on substrate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Yimin:

I am not sure what is the film thickness you need to cross-section, if it's
over 10 microns it might be quite difficult. However, we have successfully
cross-sectioned individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bundles of
those (on SiO2/Si substrates) using combination of FIB 'lift-out' and broad
beam ion milling in Gatan Ion Mill. At the first stage, you use the FIB
'lift-out' technique to make a sample with the thickness 0.8-1.0 microns.
The sample is then mounted with the glue on the edge (on a bar) of the Cu
half-grid and subjected to ion milling (4 kV, followed by 2 kV) in Gatan
Ion Mill. Typical milling time in Gatan: 4-6 minutes. Keep checking the
sample thickness in TEM and continue milling as necessary. The sample
quality is good enough for high resolution TEM and EELS.

Let me know if you are interested in more detail, I can send you our recent
paper.

Regards,
Katharine
*******************************
Katharine Dovidenko
Assistant Professor
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering & UAlbany Institute for Materials
University at Albany-SUNY
251 Fuller Rd., Albany, NY 12203
Phone: (518) 437-8781


-----Original Message-----
} From: yimin yao [mailto:yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2003 3:49 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear colleagues,

Does anyone have experience to use FIB to make cross-section TEM samples for
a carbon nanotube film on substrate?

Best regards,


Yiming

------------------------------------
Dr. Yiming Yao

Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Experimental Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-41296, Göteborg
Sweden

Tel: +46 31 772 3633
Fax: +46 31 772 3224
email: yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
website: http://fy.chalmers.se/~yimin

-------------------------------------



From daemon Wed Mar 12 15:40:47 2003



From: Michael Radermacher :      mraderma-at-physiology.med.uvm.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:37:21 -0500
Subject: Course in 3D EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Announcement

UVM Practical Course on Three-dimensional Cryo Electron Microscopy of
Single Particles

August 11-17, 2003
Burlington, Vermont

The course will teach the principles of three-dimensional reconstruction
of single particles from electron micrographs.

It includes demonstrations of the experimental aspects, teaching of the
basic theoretical principles and six hours per day of hands on
experience in processing data sets from cryo-electron microscopy images.

Participants will work in groups of two and six instructors will be
available to guide everyone step by step through the complete
reconstruction process. Four participants will have the opportunity to
carry out practical microscopy work the two days following the end of
the course.

For further information and application
visit our web site:
http://physioweb.med.uvm.edu/Cryo_Practical/

Organizers and Teachers:

Michael Radermacher
Teresa Ruiz
Montserrat Barcena
Jean Francois Menetret
Montserrat Samso
T.B.A.

__________________________________________________
Michael Radermacher, Assoc. Prof.
University of Vermont
College of Medicine
Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics
HSRF Building
Burlington, VT 05405




-------------------------------------------------
This mail sent through IMP: http://horde.org/imp/


From daemon Wed Mar 12 17:39:12 2003



From: Pmtl :      mtl-at-njcc.com
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 18:26:06 -0500
Subject: EM lab for DNA - Thanks.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pam Freiden of St. Jude thanks MSA for the response. She will be
deciding which one to use shortly.

Roy Nelson
Material Testing Laboratory
mtl-at-njcc.com


From daemon Wed Mar 12 18:44:54 2003



From: Ken Gaugler :      ken-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 16:33:59 -0800
Subject: Re: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Study medications would most likely contain detectable amounts of
nitrogen. There might also be Na or K.

-Ken Gaugler

Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} This is perhaps a bit unusual of a topic
} but it is centered on EDS viability for
} foiling double blind testing.
}
} Question: Can EDS be used to analyze
} a double blind tablet to ascertain whether
} it is placebo or a study medication?
}
} It would seem that the inability to see
} light element H might not be a limiting
} factor. Are there signatures of placebos
} that would strongly differentiate them
} from study meds? How might one guard
} against educated analysis of study meds?
} If the basic elements are C, H and O, are
} there distinct signatures or quantities
} that one could use to distinguish between
} placebo and study meds?
}
} gary g.
}
}
}


--
ken-at-gaugler.com
(408) 296-4926






From daemon Wed Mar 12 19:55:37 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2003 17:51:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Tuesday, March 11, 2003, at 06:16 PM, Gary Gaugler wrote:

} This is perhaps a bit unusual of a topic
} but it is centered on EDS viability for
} foiling double blind testing.
}
} Question: Can EDS be used to analyze
} a double blind tablet to ascertain whether
} it is placebo or a study medication?
}
} It would seem that the inability to see
} light element H might not be a limiting
} factor. Are there signatures of placebos
} that would strongly differentiate them
} from study meds? How might one guard
} against educated analysis of study meds?
} If the basic elements are C, H and O, are
} there distinct signatures or quantities
} that one could use to distinguish between
} placebo and study meds?
}
Dear Gary,
Most medications consist of small amounts of the active ingredient
mixed with a much larger amount of matrix (which provides sufficient
volume to handle a tablet, gets the active ingredient into the
stomach--and sometimes further along the digestive tract--dissolves at
a rate appropriate to deliver the drug as desired, etc.). The placebo
in a properly designed trial consists of matrix identical to that for
the drug, so EDS analysis would almost certainly give the same result
for both.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 13 01:10:05 2003



From: jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 08:53:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com: You are not subscribed to xlsem-at-lists.acs.ohio-state.edu.
Your message is returned to you unprocessed. If you want to subscribe,
send mail to listproc-at-lists.acs.ohio-state.edu with the following request:

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} From Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com Thu Mar 13 02:00:05 2003
Received: from ohsmtp02.ogw.rr.com (ohsmtp02.ogw.rr.com [65.24.7.37])
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for {xlsem-at-lists.acs.ohio-state.edu} ; Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:59:49 -0500 (EST)


In your message you only mention elements you believed would be present in
the placebo tablet. However as Ken Gaugler alluded to, if you had
information regarding the chemical composition of the active ingredient you
might be able to ascertain if it were absent in a placebo tablet. For
example, if the active contained sulfur EDS would (likely) be able to detect
the sulfur in a tablet assuming the excipients/binders (see response from
Bill Tivol) did not contain sulfur. However, unless you can verify this on
a tablet containing the active ingredient I would be very careful in coming
to a conclusion based upon a negative finding by EDS.

FYI Polarized light microscopy can also be helpful with this type of
investigation.

Regards, jr



-----Original Message-----
} From: Bill Tivol [mailto:tivol-at-caltech.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2003 8:51 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



On Tuesday, March 11, 2003, at 06:16 PM, Gary Gaugler wrote:

} This is perhaps a bit unusual of a topic
} but it is centered on EDS viability for
} foiling double blind testing.
}
} Question: Can EDS be used to analyze
} a double blind tablet to ascertain whether
} it is placebo or a study medication?
}
} It would seem that the inability to see
} light element H might not be a limiting
} factor. Are there signatures of placebos
} that would strongly differentiate them
} from study meds? How might one guard
} against educated analysis of study meds?
} If the basic elements are C, H and O, are
} there distinct signatures or quantities
} that one could use to distinguish between
} placebo and study meds?
}
Dear Gary,
Most medications consist of small amounts of the active ingredient
mixed with a much larger amount of matrix (which provides sufficient
volume to handle a tablet, gets the active ingredient into the
stomach--and sometimes further along the digestive tract--dissolves at
a rate appropriate to deliver the drug as desired, etc.). The placebo
in a properly designed trial consists of matrix identical to that for
the drug, so EDS analysis would almost certainly give the same result
for both.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu





From daemon Thu Mar 13 08:05:31 2003



From: Antun Tonejc :      atonejc-at-phy.hr
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 14:54:22 -0800
Subject: 12th CRO-SLO Crystall. Meeting, National Park Plitvice Lakes, Croatia.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a pleasure to announce the final circular for the:

12th Croatian Slovenian Crystallographic Meeting to be held
in Hotel Jezero, National Park Plitvice Lakes, Croatia (June 19-22,
2003). All additional information with Instructions for Abstract,
Registration Form and Hotel Accommodation is contained
on the web site:

http://www.chem.pmf.hr/~hkz/plitvice

Looking forward to seeing you on Plitvice Lakes
Organizing Committee





From daemon Thu Mar 13 09:31:45 2003



From: didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 09:23:13 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Critical Point Drying Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
March 13, 2003 at 08:01:06
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr
Name: Didier GOUX

Organization: UniversitČ de CAEN

Education: Graduate College

Location: France

Question: subject :Critical point drying/CPD 020

Dear all,

We use a balzers CPD 020 for critical point drying.
When the engineer show me how to use it, I noticed that the
temperature were set to 42 degres celcius (314 K)
but the critical temperature is 31 degres celcius (304 K).

did I make a mistake?? or is it OK

Thank you all

Didier Goux

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Mar 13 09:40:10 2003



From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science :      COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 17:28:58 +0200
Subject: Number of publications supported by the EMU per year?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All
This is one of those "odd ones". Seems like administration love there admin
tools. Here is one they would like a realistic answer of.
"How many publications can the University expect per year from a EMU with
one TEM, one SEM, and one CLSM ?"
The EMU is staffed by 3 people.
The size of the University:
Overall total 12,286 students

Full-time 9977
Part-time 2309

Male - 6328
Female - 5958

Undergraduate - 11,336
Post graduate - 950

After a nice laugh, please help me on this one. I anticipate the normal
"next" question in the near future: Cost recovery through consultancy!


Stephan H Coetzee
Department of Physics
EMU
Private Bag 0704
Abalone,
Botswana

Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw {mailto:Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw}

Telephone: (+267) 355 2462
Fax: (+267) 3185 097
Telephone: (+267) 355 0000 Switchboard




From daemon Thu Mar 13 10:18:20 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 10:09:25 -0600
Subject: Re: Number of publications supported by the EMU per year?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It is good to know that administrators the world over all ask for wacky
things. It helps to show there are no real differences between us
all. This is a silly exercise but here is how I would answer it. A
realistic level of production for a faculty member is 2 refereed papers a
year (clearly 5-6 would be an excellent but not impossible goal but on
average, 2 would be good for cell biologists). I would suggest that you
estimate 2 / year for every faculty member whose research publications
would always include at least 1 micrograph and a lesser fraction for the
heathen biochemist and molecular biologists who only occasionally dabble in
the most difficult science of microscopy. The real flaw with this exercise
is that it will be taken as a measure of productivity of the EMU when,
unless your staff are terribly incompetent (an unlikely prospect), it is
really a measure of faculty productivity and quality. You could have a
great EMU but if you don't have aggressive faculty, it won't get used.

At 05:28 PM 3/13/2003 +0200, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Thu Mar 13 11:04:15 2003



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 16:55:18 +0000 ()
Subject: Thanks, and two queries.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



(1) Thanks to all those who replied to my 'adhesive' question. I also now
remember the correspondence on this listerver concerning the sawing up of
M-Bond 610 chunks. I've found that M-Bond 610 is supplied in something
like 25 ml bottles - does one have to use the whole of one pair of bottles
once it's opened?

(2) Something completely different - has anyone recently purchased a new
vacuum coating unit for TEM? How much did it cost, and do you like it?
Trying to get a price from a manufacturer directly can be very wearing -
they seem to want to interrogate you about what you want to do with it,
rather than letting you know if the thing is within your budget.

LAB TALK (Caption searching for a cartoon):

"Call me an airhead? There's a Penning gauge on yours!"

+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+-----------------------------------------+
Phone:
{direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
{University internal extension 7867
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+-----------------------------------------+




From daemon Thu Mar 13 11:09:16 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 11:55:59 -0500
Subject: TEM of mouse bones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
Please allow me to pick your collective brains....
A client just requested a TEM study of mouse ankle joints. I have
looked at many things in the scope over the years, but I've never had
to process & cut bone. Mice have tiny bones, and this will be the
ankle...even tinier: Do I need to decalcify? How should we fix (I
usually use a modified Karnovsky's (2.5% GA, 4% PFA + 0,02% picric
acid) as my primary fix.) How & when do I decalcify? Any preferred
resin?
I feel like a babe in the woods.
Thanks,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Thu Mar 13 14:18:09 2003



From: kwalters :      kwalters-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 14:07:03 -0600
Subject: osmometer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am in the market for an osmometer. Does anyone have experience with these
instruments to share? I am also interested in literature from vendors.
Thank you in advance.

Kathy

Kathy Walters //
Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
85 EMRB / /\
University of Iowa / /\ \
Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
|| / /
--------------
------------------



From daemon Thu Mar 13 18:25:24 2003



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com
Date: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 19:02:09 -0500
Subject: Using a Kodak MDS 100 digital camera on a light microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Microscopists !

I have grown weary of snagging digital images with a camera held in
my bare hand over the eyepiece or camera port of a stereomicroscope
while manipulating an object with the other hand, which actually
does work passably well because of the effectively high "film" speed
of the digital camera. The images have vignetting and there's
usually way too much light, though. It's not a good optical match,
because the digital camera's lens gets in the way; there's a need
for a transfer lens ... which would be too dear and too specialized.

Therefore, I bought a suitable video adapter with C mount for my
company's stereomicroscope and then bought a Kodak MDS 100 camera,
both on eBay, in my price range (less than $500 in it so far). While
waiting for the camera to arrive (hopefully complete in its original
wrapping as advertised by the eBay seller, as Kodak has disowned
the thing) I'm anticipating with the following questions:

1. Have any of you light microscopists got experiences to share ?
2. Has anyone tried to mate the camera with a PC running Linux ?
3. Are there any wavelength issues, such as poor image quality due
to infrared seeping through all that glass ?

I do have experience operating a flatbed scanner that uses the USB
port as well as the TWAIN interface - and that is all favorable so
far. My digital camera uses floppy disks, so image transfer via that
route isn't very fast, but it's pretty reliable except when I make
images on very hot days, whereupon some of the floppy files are DOA.
And no, I'm not trying to get it to work from a Linux PC right from
the get-go. The main PC is using W98SE.

And for the time being I have given up all hope of making one of the
old, defunct flatbed scanners work like a film-plane scanner. Too
many mechanical and optical issues. Thanks for your help on that.

Best regards,
George Langford, Sc.D.
Principal Consultant
Amenex Associates, Inc.
amenex-at-amenex.com
http://www.amenex.com/


From daemon Fri Mar 14 02:29:51 2003



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-INMAT.PW.EDU.PL
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 09:15:34 +0000
Subject: Re: Number of publications supported by the EMU per year?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


*From: "Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science" {COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw}
*To: "Listserver Microscopy (E-mail)" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
*Subject: Number of publications supported by the EMU per year?
*Date sent: Thu, 13 Mar 2003 17:28:58 +0200

*------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Best regards,

Witold Zielinski




*Dear All
*This is one of those "odd ones". Seems like administration love there admin
*tools. Here is one they would like a realistic answer of.
*"How many publications can the University expect per year from a EMU with
*one TEM, one SEM, and one CLSM ?"
*The EMU is staffed by 3 people.
*The size of the University:
*Overall total 12,286 students
*
*Full-time 9977
*Part-time 2309
*
*Male - 6328
*Female - 5958
*
*Undergraduate - 11,336
*Post graduate - 950
*
*After a nice laugh, please help me on this one. I anticipate the normal
*"next" question in the near future: Cost recovery through consultancy!
*
*
*Stephan H Coetzee
*Department of Physics
*EMU
*Private Bag 0704
*Abalone,
*Botswana
*
*Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw {mailto:Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw}
*
*Telephone: (+267) 355 2462
*Fax: (+267) 3185 097
*Telephone: (+267) 355 0000 Switchboard
*
*
*
*
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) ;)

Witold Zielinski, Ph.D.
Warsaw University of Technology
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
02-507 Warszawa, Woloska 141
POLAND

phone #: /48 22/ 660 87 07
660 87 36
fax #: /48 22/ 848 48 75

email: wiziel-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl


From daemon Fri Mar 14 08:28:26 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 09:19:17 -0500
Subject: Re: osmometer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I will preface my remarks by stating that I have not worked with osmometers
since the 1980's. That said, there are two different types of osmometers/two
different ways of measuring osmolarity.
1. Freezing point depression
2. Vapor pressure.
How #1 works is obvious, how #2 works I have no clue. I prefered a Wescor Vapor
pressuer osmometer because I could use a sample as small as 7 microliters. The
freezing point depression osmometers I had access to needed a much larger
volume for accurate results. That may have changed in subsequent years.
Most renal physiologists have an osmometer for measuring urinc
concentration, perhaps someone in the physiology dept can help.

Geoff

kwalters wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am in the market for an osmometer. Does anyone have experience with these
} instruments to share? I am also interested in literature from vendors.
} Thank you in advance.
}
} Kathy
}
} Kathy Walters //
} Central Microscopy Research Facility / /
} 85 EMRB / /\
} University of Iowa / /\ \
} Iowa City, Iowa 52242 / / \ \
} Phone #: (319) 335-8142 / / \ \
} Fax #: (319) 384-4469 ______ ((0))
} email: Katherine-Walters-at-uiowa.edu |__| / /
} || / /
} --------------
} ------------------

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Fri Mar 14 08:49:56 2003



From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 09:41:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: osmometer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Thu, 13 Mar 2003, kwalters wrote:

} Does anyone have experience with these instruments to share?

There are two basic types commonly used: vapor pressure osmometers and
freezing point osmometers. The major manufacturer of freezing point
osmometers went out of business several years ago. I am not aware of
other manufactures. As a cell physiologist who works with osmoregulation,
I use the vapor pressure osmometer regularly. Every colleague that I know
uses the Wescor brand (Utah). I am not familiar with any other brands. I
am absolutley satisfied with my Wescor, but have no means for making a
comparison with other brands. These are not that cheap--I think one could
cost $4-5K.

Best,

Don
____________________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718






From daemon Fri Mar 14 10:12:26 2003



From: Ribaudo, Anthony :      anthony.ribaudo-at-honeywell.com
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 09:01:49 -0700
Subject: Transmission Electron Holography of Polymers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Greetings:
I have not heard much lately about Holographic TEM lately.

From what I read, even though unstained polymer sections provide little modulation of the electron wave amplitude,
there are variations in the wave phase. Holographic imaging techniques can be used to recover these phase modulations
and thereby create contrast between multi-phase polymers without the use of stains. Can anyone provide an update on
the state-of-the-art of this technique?

regards,

Anthony J. Ribaudo
Staff Scientist
Analytical Sciences Microscopy Facility
Honeywell International
Specialty Materials Division

(973)-455-2943
e-mail anthony.ribaudo-at-honeywell.com



From daemon Fri Mar 14 11:00:01 2003



From: mahaaba-at-juntos.com
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 11:56:49 -0500
Subject: THANK YOU

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Greetings,

Following the sudden death of my husband General Sani Abacha the former head of
state of Nigeria in August 1998, I have been thrown into a state of utter
confusion, frustration and hopelessness by the present civilian administration,
I have been subjected to physical and psychological torture by the security
agents in the country. My son is still under detention arraigned before the
federal high
courtof Nigeria for an offence he did not commit even though the government
might release him soon. As a widow that is so traumatized,I have lost
confidence with anybody within the country. You must have heard over the media
reports and
the internet on the recovery of various huge sums of money deposited by my
husband in different security firms abroad, Some companies willingly gave up
their
secrets and disclosed our money confidently lodged there or many outright
blackmail. In fact the total sum discovered by the Government so far is in the
tune of $700. Million dollars. And they are not relenting to make me poor for
life. I got
your contacts through my personal research,and out of desperation decided to
reach you through this medium.I will give you more information as to this
regard as soon as you reply. I repose great confidence in you hence my
approachto you due to security network placed on my day to day affairs I cannot
afford to visit the embassy so that is why I decided to contact you and Ihope
you will not betray my confidence in you. I have deposited the sumof 40 million
dollars with a security firm abroad whose name is witheld for now until we open
communication.shall be grateful if you could receive this fund into your
account for safe keeping. This arrangement is known to you and my son Mustapha
alone, so my son will deal
directly with you as security is up my whole being. I am seriously considering
to settle down abroad in a friendly atmosphere like yours as soon as this fund
get into your account so that I can start all over again if only you wish, but
if it is impossible,just help me in diverting this fund into your account which
will accrue you 30% of this fund . Please honesty is the watch word in this
transaction. I will require your telephone and fax numbers so that we can
commence communication immediately and I will give you a more detailed picture
of things. In case you dont
accept please do not let me out to the security as I am giving you this
information in total trust and confidence I will greatly appreciate if you
accept my proposal in good faith. Please expedite action.

Sincerely yours,

Hajia Mariam Abacha.

N/B: Please copy your response:hajiamahaaba-at-netscape.net


From daemon Fri Mar 14 11:00:06 2003



From: mahaaba-at-juntos.com
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 11:56:49 -0500
Subject: THANK YOU

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Greetings,

Following the sudden death of my husband General Sani Abacha the former head of
state of Nigeria in August 1998, I have been thrown into a state of utter
confusion, frustration and hopelessness by the present civilian administration,
I have been subjected to physical and psychological torture by the security
agents in the country. My son is still under detention arraigned before the
federal high
courtof Nigeria for an offence he did not commit even though the government
might release him soon. As a widow that is so traumatized,I have lost
confidence with anybody within the country. You must have heard over the media
reports and
the internet on the recovery of various huge sums of money deposited by my
husband in different security firms abroad, Some companies willingly gave up
their
secrets and disclosed our money confidently lodged there or many outright
blackmail. In fact the total sum discovered by the Government so far is in the
tune of $700. Million dollars. And they are not relenting to make me poor for
life. I got
your contacts through my personal research,and out of desperation decided to
reach you through this medium.I will give you more information as to this
regard as soon as you reply. I repose great confidence in you hence my
approachto you due to security network placed on my day to day affairs I cannot
afford to visit the embassy so that is why I decided to contact you and Ihope
you will not betray my confidence in you. I have deposited the sumof 40 million
dollars with a security firm abroad whose name is witheld for now until we open
communication.shall be grateful if you could receive this fund into your
account for safe keeping. This arrangement is known to you and my son Mustapha
alone, so my son will deal
directly with you as security is up my whole being. I am seriously considering
to settle down abroad in a friendly atmosphere like yours as soon as this fund
get into your account so that I can start all over again if only you wish, but
if it is impossible,just help me in diverting this fund into your account which
will accrue you 30% of this fund . Please honesty is the watch word in this
transaction. I will require your telephone and fax numbers so that we can
commence communication immediately and I will give you a more detailed picture
of things. In case you dont
accept please do not let me out to the security as I am giving you this
information in total trust and confidence I will greatly appreciate if you
accept my proposal in good faith. Please expedite action.

Sincerely yours,

Hajia Mariam Abacha.

N/B: Please copy your response:hajiamahaaba-at-netscape.net


From daemon Fri Mar 14 12:25:00 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 10:21:00 -0800
Subject: Re: Thanks, and two queries.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Thursday, March 13, 2003, at 08:55 AM, Robert H. Olley wrote:

} (2) Something completely different - has anyone recently purchased a
} new
} vacuum coating unit for TEM? How much did it cost, and do you like it?
} Trying to get a price from a manufacturer directly can be very wearing
} -
} they seem to want to interrogate you about what you want to do with it,
} rather than letting you know if the thing is within your budget.
}
}
Dear Robert,
I recently priced out several vacuum evaporators, and the one we
ordered was slightly under $20k. We wanted a desk-top unit, and we
wanted a turbo pump for the vacuum. It has not yet arrived, so I can't
tell you whether we'll like it, but I've had good experiences with
similar units. If your requirements are different, you could possibly
get away with a much cheaper unit, ~$5k, with a mechanical pump for the
vacuum. We need to evaporate both carbon and metals, but we don't need
sputtering capability. Since the uses to which the unit will be put
make a big difference in the price, I think the manufacturer or
supplier is justified in asking rather than just selling the fanciest
unit to each customer.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Fri Mar 14 13:07:29 2003



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 10:59:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Number of publications supported by the EMU per year?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Stephan
This is a question of particular interest to us as we have to be
accountable too and I am looking forward to the replies
We use:

Utilization of our facility is monitored by
1) The numbers of researchers using the facility from individual departments.
2) The numbers of researchers using the facility from off campus and
from industry.
3) The numbers of participants in the in-house workshops.
4) The numbers of graduate students taking credit courses in electron
and light microscopy.
5) The numbers of students in various UBC courses visiting the facility.
6) The numbers of research papers produced with the assistance of the facility.
7) The numbers of projects handled by the facility's staff.
8) The number of research theses produced with support from the facility.

The numbers of users we mostly generate from the billing. For the
numbers of papers and theses we have to remind users constantly that
we need those numbers. There is a note on the billing when it is sent
out. Does anyone have any other ideas how to generate these numbers?
Elaine

} Dear All
} This is one of those "odd ones". Seems like administration love there admin
} tools. Here is one they would like a realistic answer of.
} "How many publications can the University expect per year from a EMU with
} one TEM, one SEM, and one CLSM ?"
} The EMU is staffed by 3 people.
} The size of the University:
} Overall total 12,286 students
}
} Full-time 9977
} Part-time 2309
}
} Male - 6328
} Female - 5958
}
} Undergraduate - 11,336
} Post graduate - 950
}
} After a nice laugh, please help me on this one. I anticipate the normal
} "next" question in the near future: Cost recovery through consultancy!
}
}
} Stephan H Coetzee
} Department of Physics
} EMU
} Private Bag 0704
} Abalone,
} Botswana
}
} Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw {mailto:Coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw}
}
} Telephone: (+267) 355 2462
} Fax: (+267) 3185 097
} Telephone: (+267) 355 0000 Switchboard

--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
First Vice President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From daemon Fri Mar 14 14:30:01 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2003 15:17:25 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Critical Point Drying Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Didier,
Your answer is here:

http://www.polaron-range.com/Manuals/Current%20Technical%20Briefs/CPD%20Tech
nical%20Brief.pdf

In brief, one usually sets the temperature slightly higher than the
critical point to insure that one has passed it.

Cheers,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging

Mail to:
Geology, CASI
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383

Phone & FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu

For help and information only,
The CASI houses:
An FEI Quanta 400 and Technai 12T,
Oxford INCA Energy 400,
Tousimis AutoSamdri 815 and
Olympus FV-300.


-----Original Message-----
} From: didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr [mailto:didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr]
Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2003 10:23 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
March 13, 2003 at 08:01:06
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr
Name: Didier GOUX

Organization: UniversitČ de CAEN

Education: Graduate College

Location: France

Question: subject :Critical point drying/CPD 020

Dear all,

We use a balzers CPD 020 for critical point drying.
When the engineer show me how to use it, I noticed that the
temperature were set to 42 degres celcius (314 K)
but the critical temperature is 31 degres celcius (304 K).

did I make a mistake?? or is it OK

Thank you all

Didier Goux

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sun Mar 16 16:25:51 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 17:11:08 -0800
Subject: RE: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am not sure if my first posting got through, but, the definitive answer to this question comes from either Raman microscopy or FT-IR microscopy. No guessing, just good chemical fingerprinting.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

~-at-~-at-~~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-
Optimizing Light Microscopy for Biological and Clinical Labs is available
in individual copies or classroom size orders. Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com
for details.
~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-

At 08:53 AM 3/13/03 -0500, jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sun Mar 16 20:34:25 2003



From: James Martin :      james.s.martin-at-att.net
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:23:55 -0500
Subject: RE: Placebo uncovered

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Near IR (NIR) focal plane array systems provide direct visual
differentiation of active and placebo tablets, as well as the areal
distribution of components within the tablet. For an example, see
http://www.spectraldimensions.com/products/index.html.

James Martin
Orion Analytical, LLC
www.orionanalytical.com

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Hi,

I am not sure if my first posting got through, but, the definitive answer to
this question comes from either Raman microscopy or FT-IR microscopy. No
guessing, just good chemical fingerprinting.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

~-at-~-at-~~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-
Optimizing Light Microscopy for Biological and Clinical Labs is available
in individual copies or classroom size orders. Visit
www.MicroscopyEducation.com
for details.
~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-

At 08:53 AM 3/13/03 -0500,
jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America







From daemon Sun Mar 16 21:00:54 2003



From: henryp-at-bhphoto.com ()
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 20:53:42 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: WW II era Leica microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (henryp-at-bhphoto.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
March 14, 2003 at 12:11:56
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: henryp-at-bhphoto.com
Name: Henry Posner

Organization: B&H

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: New York, NY USA

Question: I am in possession of my father's WW II era Leica
microscope. It's missing the chrome clips which hold a slide in
place. Where can I get a pair and where can I learn more about this
instrument and its current value? TIA

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Mar 17 02:31:45 2003



From: Peter Heimann :      peter.heimann-at-uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 09:17:56 +0100
Subject: Re: Osmometer "Knauer" Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


the company "Knauer" in Berlin / Germany builds among other scientific
instruments osmometers for over 40 years. I have a freezing point one
and am very contented with it.
they have represantatives all over the world, just check their website
http://www.knauer.net/
peter
--
**********************************
peter.heimann-at-uni-bielefeld.de
Dr. Peter Heimann
Developmental Biology & Molecular Pathology; W7-107
University of Bielefeld
D 33501 Bielefeld / Germany
phone: xx49(0)521-106-5628 / 5627
FAX : " " - 5654
www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Entwicklungsbiologie/
www.uni-bielefeld.de/SFB549
***********************************



From daemon Mon Mar 17 03:39:41 2003



From: pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:33:31 +0100
Subject: Calcium ratio measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

In the past I have been working on Calcium ratio measurements in
microscopy. It has been a while since I was actively involved and I am
curious about new developments in the field.

People have been using ultrafast camera's for Calcium ratio imaging,
which puzzles me a bit. From what I remember, at 20 deg. Celsius, the
Calcium sensitive probe Fura-2 needs 5-10 ms to reach equilibrium in a
solution of about 140 mM Calcium. We used regular PAL video cameras (25
fps, 40 msec./frame) with a frame splitter device, which enabled us to
monitor intracellular Calcium changes and relocation at 1/4 of the frame
rate, at 10 msec in individual cells. Taking the Nyquist sampling
theorem into account, this is sufficient to monitor most phenomena we
were interested in.

We used Fura-2, as the use of Calcium ratio imaging which has some
advances compared to non-ratio Calcium measurement (i.e. concentration
changes of the probe). What are good alternatives to Fura-2 for
intracellular Calcium measurements. For Calcium ratio measurements, a
Mercury arc lamp provides the best result I guess, with its high
emission of light in the near-UV range (I do not like Mercury arcs for
other fluorescent work, due to their "spiky" spectrum, but prefer Xenon
arcs instead, as their emission is more evenly spread through the
visible spectrum).

For the optics we used Fluorite lenses, as they transmit better in the
near-UV range, than glass objectives. What is your opinion of the optics
for Calcium ratio measurements ?

We used mechanical filter changers for switching between the excitation
wavelengths, what about elctronic devices ? From what I remember, their
transmission efficiency is much lower than "traditional" filters ?

Some data :
The concentration of intracellular Calcium lies between 10 nM and 10 uM
or even higher I believe. The excitation wavelength optimum changes when
Fura-2 binds Calcium. Fura-2 has a Kd of about 145 nM and is about
saturated above 1 uM Calcium (this may change depending on the
conditions ?).

When Fura-2 binds Calcium, the excitation optimum shifts between 300 and
400 nm, 363 (ion free) and 335 nm, in practice 340 nm and 380 nm are
taken for the two excitation wavelengths (Mercury arc peaks). The more
Calcium is present, the higher the absorption shift towards 340 nm. One
can detect this shift by monitoring the emission at 510 nm (~green
light), the change in emission intensity will reflect the absorption
shift between 340 and 380 nm. The Kd (dissociation constant) for Calcium
of Fura-2 is ~135 nM in Mg2+ free Calcium buffers and ~224 nM in the
presence of 1 mM Mg2+. Although Fura-2 may accurately indicate peaks of
Calcium up to 500 nM in cells, Fura-2 exhibits limited sensitivity above
500 nM Calcium.

There is no Calcium dependent change in absorption at about 360 nm.,
which is called the isosbestic point of Fura-2. Measurement of the 510
nm emission when exciting at 360 nm can be used as a measure for
fotobleaching of Fura-2.

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm


From daemon Mon Mar 17 03:48:03 2003



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:40:37 +0100
Subject: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where I
could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would be
especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
would be another good solution.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material-und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany


From daemon Mon Mar 17 06:14:19 2003



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 07:03:32 EST
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 3/17/03 4:48:38 AM, maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de writes:

} Dear all,
}
} I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
} averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
} analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where
} I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would
} be especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
} would be another good solution.
}
The Image Processing Tool Kit (for 8 bit images) and Fovea Pro (for 16 bit
images) both include that routine, as a Photoshop-compatible plugin. see
http://ReindeerGraphics.com




From daemon Mon Mar 17 07:44:51 2003



From: erik =?iso-8859-1?Q?s=F8rbr=F8den?= :      erik.sorbroden-at-fys.uio.no
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 14:34:27 +0100
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


hei johan
er dette noe for oss (deg?
Erik--

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



In a message dated 3/17/03 4:48:38 AM, maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de writes:

} Dear all,
}
} I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
} averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
} analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where
} I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would
} be especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
} would be another good solution.
}
The Image Processing Tool Kit (for 8 bit images) and Fovea Pro (for 16 bit
images) both include that routine, as a Photoshop-compatible plugin. see
http://ReindeerGraphics.com



From daemon Mon Mar 17 07:48:46 2003



From: J-H Lignot :      J-H.Lignot-at-c-strasbourg.fr
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 14:46:02 +0100
Subject: Post doctorate position in Biology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Post doctorate position in Biology.

A one-year postdoctoral position (with a possible one-year extension) is
opened at the CNRS in Strasbourg, France (CEPE: Centre d’Ecologie et de
Physiologie Energétiques). The aim of the project is to look at the
morphological and functional flexibility of the intestinal mucosa in
vertebrates through light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy.
An experienced microscopist is required with skills in immunohistochemistry
(immunofluorescence) and transmission and scanning electron microscopy
(immunogold). Skills in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM)
-and possibly in western blotting- would be an advantage. If interested,
please send a resume to Dr JH Lignot by fax or by email.


Dr Jean-Hervé Lignot,
Université Louis Pasteur / CNRS CEPE
23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, Cedex 2, France
Fax: 00 33 0388106906
Tel: 00 33 0388106938



From daemon Mon Mar 17 08:15:01 2003



From: J-H Lignot :      J-H.Lignot-at-c-strasbourg.fr
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 15:11:21 +0100
Subject: Post doctorate position in Biology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Post doctorate position in Biology.

A one-year postdoctoral position (with a possible one-year extension) is
opened at the CNRS in Strasbourg, France (CEPE: Centre d’Ecologie et de
Physiologie Energétiques). The aim of the project is to look at the
morphological and functional flexibility of the intestinal mucosa in
vertebrates through light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A
good microscopist is required with skills immunohistochemistry
(immunofluorescence), transmission and scanning electron microscopy
(immunogold). Skills in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM)
-and possibly in western blotting- would be an advantage. If interested,
please send a resume to Dr JH Lignot by fax (0033 388106 906) or by email
(J-H.Lignot-at-c-strasbourg.fr).


Dr Jean-Hervé Lignot,
Université Louis Pasteur / CNRS CEPE
23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, Cedex 2, France
Fax: 00 33 0388106906
Tel: 00 33 0388106938



From daemon Mon Mar 17 10:56:35 2003



From: Gary Laevsky :      laevsky-at-scripps.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 08:44:08 -0800
Subject: imaging cell chamber

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

I'm building a humidified/heated chamber to do live cell imaging of
mammalian cells. iIm looking for a vendor that sells warm air blowers that
would be useful.

Thanks in advance for the input.

Best,

Gary







Gary S. Laevsky, Ph.D.
Research Associate
The Scripps Research Institute
10550 N. Torrey Pines Road/IMM-24
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 784-9372




From daemon Mon Mar 17 11:01:58 2003



From: William Stratton :      wgstratton-at-wisc.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:53:06 -0600
Subject: Recommendations for Electropolisher?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings all,

I am in the market for a electropolisher for TEM sample preparation & was
wondering if anyone had any suggestions. Preferably a twin jet
electropolisher for amorphous metal sample preparation.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated,

William Stratton

-------------------
William G. Stratton
Research Assistant
University of Wisconsin - Madison

1509 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706
Office: 608-265-6391
Fax: 608-262-8353
wgstratton-at-wisc.edu



From daemon Mon Mar 17 13:12:36 2003



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 13:04:48 -0600
Subject: OMU3 Belts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone know where I could get another rubber drive belt for the
Reichert OMU3 ultramicrotome? Ours broke, and when we try to glue it, it
just keeps breaking again.


From daemon Mon Mar 17 13:19:32 2003



From: Tom Schamp :      cts2v-at-virginia.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 14:13:36 -0500
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dr. Russ,

Does this rotational averaging routine from Reindeergraphics take into
account the ellipticity of the (imperfect) SAD ring patterns? If so, does
it automatically find the major and minor axes or does that require manual
adjustment?

Thanks,

Tom Schamp


On 3/17/03 7:03 AM, ""DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com"
{"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} In a message dated 3/17/03 4:48:38 AM, maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de writes:
}
} } Dear all,
} }
} } I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
} } averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
} } analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where
} } I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would
} } be especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
} } would be another good solution.
} }
} The Image Processing Tool Kit (for 8 bit images) and Fovea Pro (for 16 bit
} images) both include that routine, as a Photoshop-compatible plugin. see
} http://ReindeerGraphics.com
}
}
}
}




----------------
Tom Schamp ph: (434) 982-4595
University of Virginia fx: (434) 982-5660
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering email: cts2v-at-virginia.edu
116 Engineer's Way
Charlottesville, VA 22904




From daemon Mon Mar 17 15:18:23 2003



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 09:08:03 +1200
Subject: Laminin antibody

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kia Ora

I am interested in looking at the general Laminin distribution within
a basement membrane. Does anybody know of, or have, an antibody that
will cross react with a number of Laminin subclasses, rather than
just a specific Laminin subclass ?

I am more than happy to receive answers from antibody suppliers.

Thanks in advance

Allan




--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Mon Mar 17 16:50:39 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 14:39:04 -0800
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Monday, March 17, 2003, at 01:40 AM, Ian MacLaren wrote:

} I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the
} rotational averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity
} versus line plot analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give
} me any hints where I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's
} digital micrograph would be especially good, since we use this program
} often. A Photoshop plug-in would be another good solution.
}
} Thanks in advance for any help you can give.
}
Dear Ian,
I wrote a routine both for SPIDER and as a stand-alone, which
determines the center and radius of a ring from an input of between 3
and 20 points on the ring. SPIDER can then produce a rotational
average by padding your original diffractogram into a larger image such
that the center of the pattern is the center of the larger image and
using the rotational averaging module in SPIDER. This does not qualify
as a plug-in for DM, but it could do the job. Since I have moved from
Albany, I no longer have access to the code, but perhaps someone there
could get it to you, if you decide you need it. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Mon Mar 17 17:50:32 2003



From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 17:41:10 -0600
Subject: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ian, You may want to look at the program ProcessDiffraction
http://www.mfa.kfki.hu/~labar/ProcDif.htm by János L. Lábár. It will do
what you are asking and is a stand alone program. I have used it a handful
of times, but never very intensely.

-Ray

Ray D. Twesten, PhD.
Center for Microanalysis of Materials
Seitz Materials Research Laboratory
104 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801
+1 217 244-6177 (Fax -2278)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 3:41 AM
To: Microscopy Listserver
Cc: Ralf Theissmann


Dear all,
I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where I
could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would be
especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
would be another good solution.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material-und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany



From daemon Mon Mar 17 17:57:18 2003



From: Thomas, Larry (PNNL) :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 15:49:42 -0800
Subject: RE: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rotational averaging is included in a software package for Digital Micrograph written at the NCEM. It's available for download at http://ncem.lbl.gov/frames/software.htm.

Larry Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
P.O. Box 999
Mail Stop P8-16
Richland, WA, USA

email: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
phone: (509) 372-0793
fax; (509) 376-6308


} ----------
} From: Tom Schamp
} Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 11:13 AM
} To: "DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; ian.maclaren-at-physics.org; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Rotational averaging
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dr. Russ,
}
} Does this rotational averaging routine from Reindeergraphics take into
} account the ellipticity of the (imperfect) SAD ring patterns? If so, does
} it automatically find the major and minor axes or does that require manual
} adjustment?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Tom Schamp
}
}
} On 3/17/03 7:03 AM, ""DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com"
} {"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} }
} } In a message dated 3/17/03 4:48:38 AM, maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de writes:
} }
} } } Dear all,
} } }
} } } I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
} } } averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
} } } analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where
} } } I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would
} } } be especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
} } } would be another good solution.
} } }
} } The Image Processing Tool Kit (for 8 bit images) and Fovea Pro (for 16 bit
} } images) both include that routine, as a Photoshop-compatible plugin. see
} } http://ReindeerGraphics.com
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
} ----------------
} Tom Schamp ph: (434) 982-4595
} University of Virginia fx: (434) 982-5660
} Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering email: cts2v-at-virginia.edu
} 116 Engineer's Way
} Charlottesville, VA 22904
}
}
}
}
}


From daemon Mon Mar 17 19:14:42 2003



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:05:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear John Russ,

This is an open reply to the listserver for your posting, but my questions are directed to you.


I tried the radial profile option in Fovea Pro on a ring pattern file that I have that has the pattern centered. I got a nice radial profile. I then offset the image and put a black background where the image was offset. If you take that radial profile, you get something quite different. Could you tell us the general algorithm that you use to obtain this?

I would also like to know whether the circular Hough Transform that you discussed with me a few years ago would take into account this offset or must the pattern be centered?

Again with the circular Hough Transform, could that address an elliptical pattern?

On another note:

I helped MDI, Inc. modify their electron diffraction module in WinJade several years ago. Here are some of the problems that had to be addressed with their system.
1) some diffraction patterns can have an aspect ratio that is not 1:1 either due to the microscope or the digitizing process. This needs to be taken care of because it can be as much as 2%. For the microscope itself, the presence of an elliptical pattern can be checked quite easily by taking two identical diffraction patterns of polycrystalline gold and overlaying one over the other, but rotated 90 degrees.
2) patterns are often off-center and must be centered for the radial profile
3) Their original algorithm simply took the number of pixels in a ring and divided by the number of pixels in the ring for an average. This had the effect of decreasing the intensities quickly. In effect, they were taking the integral over dxdy, not the integral over d(theta)rdr, i.e. not taking the average in polar coordinates. For spotty patterns, this drastically cut down the intensities at larger radii in the pattern because of the large number of black pixels in the rings bring the intensities down. We developed four algorithms for using on patterns and which was best depended on the type of pattern e.g. completer rings, spotty rings, etc. The four algorithms were:

J1: Average All Pixels in a Ring --The radius for each pixel in the image is calculated, the intensity at each radius is summed, divided by the number of pixels at that radius, and the pattern is normalized to 10,000 counts.

J2: Average Above-Average Pixels --The average of each radius is found and only pixels at each radius that have intensities above the average for the radius is used. The intensity is calculated for each radius by averaging these pixels and the pattern is normalized.

J3: Sum of Above-Average Pixels --The sum of the above-average pixels is used instead of the average and the pattern is normalized.

J4: Take Maximum Pixel in Ring --The highest intensity pixel in each ring is used as the intensity.

Here are the conclusions that I found with WinJade to real world diffraction patterns:

Care must be taken when choosing the mode of data reduction.
J1 and J2 give very good results with complete rings.
J2 works very well with incomplete but readily apparent rings.
J2 gives an improved peak/bkg ratio because it excludes pixels below the
average intensity value for a given ring.
J3 is noisy.
It works well when there are discrete spots on a black background.
J4 works well for spotty patterns and finds all of the d-spacings present.
It provides good values of d-spacings at large radii.

This program was really great for working with SAD patterns. You could compare the radial profile with the powder diffraction database, compare with X-ray diffraction data, overlay either experimental XRD data or PDF patterns on the SAD pattern, and easily calibrate the camera constant easily for the program. Unfortunately, in the new version of WinJade, they did not include the electron diffraction module. They have it in another program that they sell, but I already bought the upgrade to the new program and can't use the old version on Windows 2000. -Bummer.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: "DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Monday, March 17, 2003 7:04 AM
To: ian.maclaren-at-physics.org; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



In a message dated 3/17/03 4:48:38 AM, maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de writes:

} Dear all,
}
} I am sure I remember that someone had produced a routine for the rotational
} averaging of SAD ring patterns to produce an intensity versus line plot
} analagous to a XRD diffractogram. Could anyone give me any hints where
} I could get such a thing? A plug-in for Gatan's digital micrograph would
} be especially good, since we use this program often. A Photoshop plug-in
} would be another good solution.
}
The Image Processing Tool Kit (for 8 bit images) and Fovea Pro (for 16 bit
images) both include that routine, as a Photoshop-compatible plugin. see
http://ReindeerGraphics.com




From daemon Mon Mar 17 19:54:06 2003



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:46:04 EST
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott (and anyone else interested in this conversation)


The plugin uses a circular hough to get the radially averaged intensities. It
expects the center of the pattern to be "near" the center of the image, as it
does not store the full 3D accumulator space for a Hough (the axes are
x-center, y-center and radius). I suppose that with computer memories getting
larger it would be possible to store a larger array, if someone has a
pressing need. The method works by adding up the grey scale brightnesses of
each pixel in the original image into the points in the Hough array that
define a possible circle through those points - in other words a cone in the
Hough space. Then the central axis of the pattern is found by locating the
brightest column in the space, and the intensities along that axis form a
plot of the circularly averaged intensities. The routine does NOT perform an
elliptical hough transform, which would require a 5 dimensional array
(x-center, y-center, minor axis, major axis, angle). It is certainly possible
to write something to do that, but it simply hasn't come up before. What I
usually do with images that have some distortion (e.g., non-round SAED
patterns) is fix that first, before the measurement. But writing an
elliptical Hough wouldn't be hard (given enough memory) and if someone wants
to agitate for that, I'll consider doing it. Might even give it away, as this
seems like a pretty specialized application.


John Russ


In a message dated 3/17/03 8:05:29 PM, walck-at-ppg.com writes:



I tried the radial profile option in Fovea Pro on a ring pattern file that I
have that has the pattern centered. I got a nice radial profile. I then
offset the image and put a black background where the image was offset. If
you take that radial profile, you get something quite different. Could you
tell us the general algorithm that you use to obtain this?

I would also like to know whether the circular Hough Transform that you
discussed with me a few years ago would take into account this offset or must
the pattern be centered?

Again with the circular Hough Transform, could that address an elliptical
pattern?




From daemon Mon Mar 17 20:03:16 2003



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:56:05 EST
Subject: Re: Rotational averaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott (and any others):

No question it can be done. All of the math is pretty trivial, but there is a
modest amount of programming involved and before embarking on it I'd like to
see how much interest there is. Apparently someone has written something that
does circular averaging in DM, and if that meets peoples' needs there is no
point in my writing a Photoshop plugin as well. If a groundswell of interest
develops (i.e., more than just you), I'll try to design a fairly simple but
adequate user interface to get the camera constant, so that the output plot
and Excel file have all of the 1/d, d, etc values included. If the
ellipticity of the pattern is an instrument constant, it is still easier to
fix it before measurement rather than add the extra parameters to the Hough.

John Russ

=====

In a message dated 3/17/03 8:48:57 PM, walck-at-ppg.com writes:

} John,
}
} I think that you would be surprised how many elliptically patterns are
} out there that people don't even know they have until someone points it
} out. The microscope manufacturers don't go out of their way to tell you.
}
}
}
} One more question for you. How do you calibrate the output. The data
} is given (in my case) with a maximum radius as something like 4.6 um.
} I then went in and made the um/pixel value =1 and so now even though it
} is saying that the max radius is in um, I know that it is in pixels. Still,
} is there anyway you could have a diffraction pattern calibration in the
} program similar to the magnification calibration for images? this way,
} d-spacing, 1/d spacings, 2theta, values, and 2theta(XRD Cu-Ka) values could
} be calculated.
}
}
}
} I could see an elliptical check with the camera constant calibration.
} Two vertical lines that you can adjust in and out so that they are tangent
} to opposite sides of the same ring and then two horizontal lines to do
} the same thing. The value of the separations of the lines would agree
} for a circular pattern as a check. This could also check the centering
} of the pattern when the two lines are over top of each other and their
} separation is zero.
}
}
}
} -Scott


From daemon Tue Mar 18 00:39:30 2003



From: Diane G. Miller :      miller-at-coho.net (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 23:09:21 -0600
Subject: Demographics for clinical and research labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,

I was wondering if anyone can tell me where I might find demographics
for research and clinical labs in the US. Any site's you can refer
me to would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Diane


From daemon Tue Mar 18 01:44:17 2003



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-INMAT.PW.EDU.PL
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 08:30:53 +0000
Subject: Re: Recommendations for Electropolisher?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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*Date sent: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:53:06 -0600
*From: William Stratton {wgstratton-at-wisc.edu}
*Subject: Recommendations for Electropolisher?
*To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

*------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello,

We're using double jet polisher Tenupol made by Struers for many
years and may say that it's good maschine for metallic TEM specimen
preparation. However such requirment as electropolishing of amporhous
metal is maybe too specific. Good performence of this method depends
rather on the metal than on its state.

Best regards,

Witold Zielinski


*Greetings all,
*
*I am in the market for a electropolisher for TEM sample preparation & was
*wondering if anyone had any suggestions. Preferably a twin jet
*electropolisher for amorphous metal sample preparation.
*
*Any feedback would be greatly appreciated,
*
*William Stratton
*
*-------------------
*William G. Stratton
*Research Assistant
*University of Wisconsin - Madison
*
*1509 University Avenue
*Madison, WI 53706
*Office: 608-265-6391
*Fax: 608-262-8353
*wgstratton-at-wisc.edu
*
*
*
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) ;)

Witold Zielinski, Ph.D.
Warsaw University of Technology
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
02-507 Warszawa, Woloska 141
POLAND

phone #: /48 22/ 660 87 07
660 87 36
fax #: /48 22/ 848 48 75

email: wiziel-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl


From daemon Tue Mar 18 02:42:40 2003



From: pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 09:36:32 +0100
Subject: Re: imaging cell chamber

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

The company Solent Scientific manufactures full enclosure incubation
chambers for Research Inverted Microscopes, Confocal Microscopes and
Multi Photon Microscopes. Maybe they can help with the necessary
equipment ?

Their website:
http://www.solentsci.com/

Note: I have no commercial relation with this company. At my previous
employer they used to build their own fully equipped incubator chambers
for long-term time-lapse studies of mammalian cells (} 24 h.).

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations (ESO)
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 619
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

http://www.unionbio.com/

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm

====================
Gary Laevsky wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear all,
}
} I'm building a humidified/heated chamber to do live cell imaging of
} mammalian cells. iIm looking for a vendor that sells warm air blowers that
} would be useful.
}
} Thanks in advance for the input.
}
} Best,
}
} Gary
}
} Gary S. Laevsky, Ph.D.
} Research Associate
} The Scripps Research Institute
} 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road/IMM-24
} La Jolla, CA 92037
} (858) 784-9372


From daemon Tue Mar 18 05:29:14 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 03:17:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: imaging cell chamber

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Garry,
You can get it stitched neatly, That is what I did
for my Reichert ultracutE, It is working for 3 years
like that.
Shashi

Does anyone know where I could get another rubber
drive belt for the
Reichert OMU3 ultramicrotome? Ours broke, and when we
try to glue it,
it
just keeps breaking again.


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
http://platinum.yahoo.com


From daemon Tue Mar 18 07:38:49 2003



From: jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 08:27:37 -0500
Subject: Dark Membrane Filter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have a source for black or darkly colored membrane filters. I
am setting up to do an OM particle counting / sizing study and need a filter
with a pore size of {0.45 micrometers that will be resistant to cyclohexane.

Thanks,
John A. Robson
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
PO Box 368
900 Ridgebury Rd
Ridgefield, CT 06877

Phone (203)798-5640
Fax (203)798-5698
e-mail jrobson-at-RDG.boehringer-ingelheim.com





From daemon Tue Mar 18 09:09:56 2003



From: Vickie Frohlich :      frohlich-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 09:07:04 -0600
Subject: Symposium and Workshop - FLIM and Spectral

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
will host a
Symposium and Workshop
sponsored by Hamamatsu Photonics KK
on

Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging
and
Spectral Imaging


Academic Participants:
Philippe Bastiaens (GER)*Robert Clegg (USA)*Mary Dickinson (USA)*Paul
French (UK)
Hans Gerritsen (Neth)*Brian Herman (USA)*Ammasi Periasamy (USA)
Herbert Schneckenburger (GER)*Ton Visser (Neth)*Timo Zimmermann (GER)

Corporate Participants:
Becker & Hickl GmbH*Bio-Rad*Carl Zeiss Inc.*Coherent*Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.
LaVision GmbH *Leica *Lightform Inc.*Nikon*Olympus
Photon Technology International (PTI)*Technical Manufacturing Corp. (TMC)

Symposium Registration Deadline: May 1, 2003
June 6-7, 2003
The Sheraton Gunter Hotel
205 E. Houston St.
San Antonio, TX
Student: $200 ($250 after May 1)
Professional: $250 ($300 after May 1)


Workshop Application Deadline: April 7, 2003
June 8-10, 2003
UT Health Science Center
San Antonio, TX
Tuition: $700
(includes room and board)
20 student limit/4 scholarships

For Information and Forms Visit:
http://usa.hamamatsu.com/flim_spectral/default.htm
or
http://www.uthscsa.edu/csb/imaging-course.html



From daemon Tue Mar 18 10:49:17 2003



From: Gary Laevsky :      laevsky-at-scripps.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 08:36:13 -0800
Subject: imaging chamber

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you all for the ideas. I appreciate it.

Gary







Gary S. Laevsky, Ph.D.
Research Associate
The Scripps Research Institute
10550 N. Torrey Pines Road/IMM-24
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 784-9372




From daemon Tue Mar 18 10:49:22 2003



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 16:20:05 -0000
Subject: Spot Size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi



Rushing around South Africa at the moment I have just seen the request for
data on Spot Size in a TEM, perhaps I can help?



The Spot Size control adjusts the first condenser lens and in combination
with the second condenser lens they demagnify the virtual source to provide
a certain beam "spot size" on the specimen. This spot size may be measured
by setting the magnification at 10,000X where 1um = 1cm. When trying to
produce a quality image I would always suggest one uses a spot size smaller
than 3um.



Whilst the Spot Size is used by most people at its largest setting (bright)
it is not the way the designers expect the instrument to be. Good operating
techniques should always take the spot size into account, even at lower
magnifications better quality images will be attained at smaller spot sizes.



Since papers were produced in 1944 about transmission images (LM and EM) we
have known that parallel beams are very important if you are chasing the
best image quality, biology or materials we always desire high coherence.
There are some misunderstandings on how to obtain a parallel beam or high
coherence, for example setting the final condenser under focus is incorrect.
The procedure for high coherence would be to use the smallest spot size you
could tolerate (this probably means you must up the emission current, use at
least 20 to 30 uA). Once in this condition over focus the final condenser
(clockwise from crossover) the spot, whatever size it is now, becomes your
new virtual source. The further over focus you go, the greater the distance
between the specimen and the crossover the more parallel the beam and
therefore it attains a higher coherence, which is what we are after. You
will deduce the smaller the condenser aperture the sharper the spot and the
smaller the spot the greater the coherence for a given degree of over focus.



Work with a design team and they expect everyone to over focus, they expect
everyone to use small condenser apertures and they expect everyone to use
small spot sizes. They do not expect everyone to use too low an emission
current because this makes the task too difficult! Unfortunately almost
everyone does use too low a current, I have talked before about filament
life being the most important feature of many laboratories and it is always
to the determent of image quality.



So in short you should always use a smallish spot size when taking
micrographs and you should always run with the second condenser over focus.
With sheet film photography try to use 3 to 4 seconds exposure, as this will
give you better coherence too. Also remember that the denser the negative
the more contrast you will build in your final print.



Hope this helps, spot size IS so important in the production of a quality
image.



Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant EM

Protrain for Electron Microscopy Courses World Wide

+44 1280 816512

www.emcourses.com




From daemon Tue Mar 18 13:21:21 2003



From: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 13:11:15 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:Staining Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
March 18, 2003 at 11:42:39
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy
Name: Alvaro Olivera

Organization: Sciences University

Education: Graduate College

Location: Montevideo,Uruguay

Question: may i adding potassium ferrocyanide to 1%OsO4 postfixation
to enhance contrast-staining cellular components in a routin
coloidal-gold immunocytochemistry method?
how do you prepare this ferrocyanide solution?
what rate do you use?
and if i use Lowicril(absence of osmium treatment), may i adding to
the glutaraldehyde solution? how do you prepare and what rate?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Tue Mar 18 14:50:17 2003



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 12:36:15 -0800
Subject: Info. on cryoEM & PhotoScan 2002?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi:

Can anyone fill me in on some of the issues surrounding doing high res
cryoEM and/or the need for something like a PhotoScan 2002 high res scanner
from ZI Imaging.

I need to get some of the basics down so I can have a reasonable chance of
understanding a proposal being made here.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Tue Mar 18 15:15:34 2003



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 13:03:29 -0800
Subject: CPD or HMDS for wood blocks?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi again:

I have a guy who wants to look at the interior of some wood blocks using
our conventional SEM. He is trying to see bacteria and anything else that
might be hiding in there.

His blocks are pretty small, about 5mm cubes. I thought about CPD, but had
second thoughts about how long to soak in CO2 etc. He did some experiments
and it took a couple of hours for some dye to make it all the way into the
middle of the block. Plus he has about 30 of these things to look at. That
could add up to a lot of time and CO2.

I got an idea that HMDS might work for this project, but have no experience
with it. I think that being able to soak the blocks for a long time in HMDS
would be good, as would the chance to let them sublime to dryness over a
long time without too much attention.

Do you think I am on the right track or is there something I am missing.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Tue Mar 18 16:31:16 2003



From: hkonishi-at-unm.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 15:18:57 -0700
Subject: references of electron dose

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A journal editor requested me to provide a reference regarding how to
measure electron dose. I looked over some textbooks and experimental
sections of some papers on electron beam damage. However, I could not
find. If someone knows a reference, please advise.

Hiromi Konishi
University of New Mexico
hkonishi-at-unm.edu


From daemon Tue Mar 18 17:32:29 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 15:21:31 -0800
Subject: Re: Spot Size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve, thanks for the very good comment on spot size issue.

Without knowing all these details I was told many years ago to use smaller
possible spot size (yes, I do have some idea what coherence is) and
owerfocus second condenser. Working in Russia and here in US I always set
all my TEMs for spot size 3 (JEM12000EX) surviving the battle with previous
"spot size 1" lovers. If microscope aligned correctly, I never ever had a
problem with illumination even with regular tungsten filament in
magnification range x5-80K. My standard exposure time is 1.5-1.7 sec
for 4489 film. In order to insure dynamic range, negatives should be very
grayish. If it's too dark - you will loose the film's dynamic range. If
you need extra contract - use more contrasty paper. In the nowadays, when
we switched mostly for digital imaging, low illumination is just not an
issue. My digital camera is exactly 10x more sensitive than 4489 film, so
I have exposure time 0.1-0.2 sec with tungsten filament, spot size
3. Another reason to use smaller spot size - it's more easy to focus the
images, at least to me: I do see focus changes more clear with smaller spot
size. As for illumination, we have to keep in mind that e-beam itself
damage our fragile biological samples, so less light - better for your sample.
Thanks again for such detailed comment. Sergey


At 08:20 AM 3/18/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Mar 18 19:47:08 2003



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 08:13:44 -0600
Subject: CPD or HMDS for wood blocks?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I saw a black (Whatman) Nuclepore polycarbonate membrane filter (0.2 and
0.4 um pore) in VWR. You'd have to check the chemical resistance charts
if polycarbonate is resistant to cyclohexane.

Lizette Tuason

-----Original Message-----
} From: "jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2003 5:28 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Jonathan,

We recently looked at wood blocks in our FESEM and the only preparation
we did was to freeze them in liquid nitrogen, then fracture them with
pliars to expose the internal structure, followed by several days in a
vacuum chamber to get as much moisture and air out as possible. We
glued them down with copius amounts of conductive paint, then sputtered
the bejesus out of them.

The structure was well preserved and we did find bacteria.

The only problem was breaking the harder pieces of wood. Some of the
wood was ancient and very brittle, but the new pieces were tough.

Hope this is applicable to your problem.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core---We're the Fun Core!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



-----Original Message-----
} From: Jon Krupp [mailto:jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2003 3:03 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi again:

I have a guy who wants to look at the interior of some wood blocks using
our conventional SEM. He is trying to see bacteria and anything else
that might be hiding in there.

His blocks are pretty small, about 5mm cubes. I thought about CPD, but
had second thoughts about how long to soak in CO2 etc. He did some
experiments and it took a couple of hours for some dye to make it all
the way into the middle of the block. Plus he has about 30 of these
things to look at. That could add up to a lot of time and CO2.

I got an idea that HMDS might work for this project, but have no
experience with it. I think that being able to soak the blocks for a
long time in HMDS would be good, as would the chance to let them sublime
to dryness over a long time without too much attention.

Do you think I am on the right track or is there something I am missing.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu





From daemon Wed Mar 19 10:04:37 2003



From: schrader :      schrader-at-bafm.de (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 09:55:19 -0600
Subject: TEM - preparation of milk foams

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Has anybody experience in praparation of weak milk foams?
We prefer freeze fracture technique.
The bubbles size is at maximum 1 mm.
Of special interest is the air-milk interface.

Many thanks
Katrin Schrader


From daemon Wed Mar 19 11:49:03 2003



From: Philip Flaitz :      flaitz-at-US.ibm.com
Date: April 9, 2003
Subject: Meeting -- Metropolitan Microscopy Soc. -- Mahwah, NJ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The next meeting of the Metropolitan Microscopy Society will be held on
April 9th, 2003 at the EDAX facility in Mahwah, NJ. EDAX has graciously
agreed to host our meeting and to provide complimentary coffee and lunch
to all the attendees.

The forthcoming meeting comprises five presentations offering a blend of
microscopic, spectroscopic and image processing applications. Mike Marko
will describe the cutting edge methods for tomographic reconstruction of
biological organelles. Paul Kotula and Tom Hancewicz will discuss methods
to extract maximum value from the data by analyzing spectral images. Matt
Libera will illustrate ways to form novel surface patterns on polymeric
materials, using electrons, for controlling biological activity and Del
Redfern will highlight the advances in high-resolution imaging in
projection x-ray microscopy.

We invite all members to attend and to inform their colleagues and fellow
workers who may also wish to attend the meeting. This will not only offer
an opportunity to listen to some of the experts in their respective fields
but also a venue to meet colleagues and exchange ideas as well as to
discuss some of the new items that are in the pipeline for this year.

It is important that members should pre-register as it will help us plan
for lunches. The pre-registration deadline is April 4 and can be
accomplished electronically. Please respond via email or fax to Evan Slow
directly. For all attendees, the meeting fee, which includes lunch, will
be $20.00.

For any additional information about the meeting, please contact any of
the officers. We hope to see you on April 9th at the meeting in Mahwah!


Chairman................Al Sicignano (914) 674-8649
alsicignano-at-worldnet.att.com
Co-Chairman...........Manoj Misra (201) 840-2702
manoj.misra-at-unilever.com
Sec./Treas. ............Evan Slow (201) 760-2524 slow-at-leo-usa.com




Time: 9:30 am (registration begins)

Place: EDAX Inc, 91 McKee Drive, Mahwah, NJ 07430-2120.
(201) 529-4880
Mapquest: http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&address=18+mckee+drive&city=mahwah&state=nj&zipcode=&homesubmit=Get+Map


· 9:30 ? 9:55 Registration and Coffee


· 9:55? 10:00 Introduction
Manoj Misra, Unilever Research and
Development, Edgewater, NJ

· 10:00 ? 10:45 Electron tomography: techniques and applications
Mike Marko, Wadsworth Research Center,
Albany, NY

· 10:45 ? 11:30 Current Methods in Multivariate Spectroscopic
Image Analysis
Tom Hancewicz, Unilever Research and
Development, Edgewater, NJ

· 11:30 ? 12:15 Electron-beam surface-patterned polymers
Matt Libera, Stevens Institute of
Technology, Hoboken, NJ

· 12:15 ? 1:00 Lunch (included with registration ? please
pre-register!))

· 1:00-1:30 EDAX Tour

· 1:30 ? 2:15 Spectral Imaging: The Next Step in Microanalysis
Paul Kotula, MAS Sponsored Tour Lecturer,
Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM

· 2:15- 3:00 Projection X-ray microscopy in the SEM
Del Redfern, EDAX, Mahwah, NJ



Philip L. Flaitz
IBM Microelectronics, Hopewell Junction, NY
Ph.......(845) 892-3094, FAX -2003
pager - 800-352-4732, PIN# 1121
flaitz-at-us.ibm.com


From daemon Wed Mar 19 14:51:14 2003



From: hkonishi-at-unm.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 13:40:10 -0700
Subject: Reference of electrn dose measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) id OAA22715
for dist-Microscopy; Wed, 19 Mar 2003 14:46:34 -0600 (CST)
Received: from njz_spm_filter (sparc5 [206.69.208.10])
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id OAA22711
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail3-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Wed, 19 Mar 2003 14:46:03 -0600 (CST)
by sparc5.microscopy.com (8.9.3+Sun/8.9.3) with SMTP id OAA22703
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ; Wed, 19 Mar 2003 14:45:51 -0600 (CST)
Received: (qmail 6988 invoked by uid 99); 19 Mar 2003 13:40:10 -0700
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi.
I am looking for a reference regarding electron dose measurement.
Journal editor requested me to provide a reference on dose measurement
in microscope. I looked over some textbooks and papers on electron
damages, but I could not find. If someone knows a reference (textbook
or experimental section in papers), please advise.
Thank you,

Hiromi Konishi, Ph.D.
University of New Mexico
hkonishi-at-unm.edu


From daemon Wed Mar 19 21:09:30 2003



From: Diane G. Miller :      miller-at-coho.net (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 20:55:14 -0600
Subject: Demographics for clinical and research labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All,

I was wondering if anyone can tell me where I might find demographics
for research and clinical labs in the US. Any site's you can refer
me to would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Diane


From daemon Wed Mar 19 21:52:41 2003



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 21:43:51 -0600
Subject: Re: CPD or HMDS for wood blocks?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jon,

I'm not sure that the requirements are clearly stated but I'll try my best
to respond. If the person already has the blocks of wood cut, and they are
only 5mm square, then they most likely are dried out as are any bacteria
within the blocks and there is no point in rehydrating and then dehydrating
with HMDS or CPD - the damage has already been done. On the other hand, if
the blocks of wood are in a buffer solution, then perhaps HMDS would work
but you will have to soak for quite a while and then it will take some time
to dry. Five mm blocks could be dehydrated in a graded ethanol series (10,
20, 30, 50, 70, 80, 95, 3x100, 3:1 ethanol:HMDS, 1:1, 1:3 and then 100%
HMDS. I'm guessing on the times as it would depend on the type of wood.
I'd try 30min or so for each step.

How does he plan to look at anything in the interior of the block with an
SEM? Will he section them? Depending on the wood, he might need a sliding
microtome and a good sharp microtome blade (I've never had much success with
razor blades and always preferred a good heavy, sharp blade. If he is going
to look at only the surface, then whatever is there is already dried by the
above process. I really don't know how the xylem parenchyma and the xylem
rays are going to look (I'm assuming secondary xylem as you wrote "wood
blocks". And depending on the material and what he wants to look at he
might have to embed in some type of removable embedment.

If he is planning on sectioning the wood then the blocks will have to be
soaked in warm water or sometimes I've had to use steam to soften the
lignified secondary walls immediately before and during sectioning. This
would create sections that you could then run up into HMDS; they would
dehydrate much faster.

Just a few ideas and thoughts,
Damian Neuberger




} Hi again:
}
} I have a guy who wants to look at the interior of some wood blocks using
} our conventional SEM. He is trying to see bacteria and anything else that
} might be hiding in there.
}
} His blocks are pretty small, about 5mm cubes. I thought about CPD, but had
} second thoughts about how long to soak in CO2 etc. He did some experiments
} and it took a couple of hours for some dye to make it all the way into the
} middle of the block. Plus he has about 30 of these things to look at. That
} could add up to a lot of time and CO2.
}
} I got an idea that HMDS might work for this project, but have no
experience
} with it. I think that being able to soak the blocks for a long time in
HMDS
} would be good, as would the chance to let them sublime to dryness over a
} long time without too much attention.
}
} Do you think I am on the right track or is there something I am missing.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}




From daemon Thu Mar 20 04:58:32 2003



From: corneliu sarbu :      corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:50:28 +0100
Subject: Re: Reference of electrn dose measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi,

I would propose to measure the beam current by using a Faraday cage and, by
integration in time, you can get an acceptable approximation of the electron
dosis of irradiation of your sample. The Faraday cups/cages are commercially
available; you may have some doubts about the precision of electron beam
current measurement, but it will work.

Sincerely,

Corneliu Sarbu



At 19/03/03 13:40, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************



From daemon Thu Mar 20 04:58:37 2003



From: corneliu sarbu :      corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:47:22 +0100
Subject: Re: Reference of electrn dose measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi,

I would propose to measure the beam current by using a Faraday cage and, by
integration in time, you can get an acceptable approximation of the electron
dosis of irradiation of your sample. The Faraday cups/cages are commercially
available; you may have some doubts about the precision of electron beam
current measurement, but it will work.

Sincerely,

Corneliu Sarbu

At 19/03/03 13:40, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************



From daemon Thu Mar 20 05:13:48 2003



From: David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:03:04 +0000
Subject: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
using SEM with cryo-stage.

The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon cement. A
co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly reduced
electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but could not
remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any information on this?
Thanks,

David Mallard
Department Earth Sciences
Bristol University, UK


From daemon Thu Mar 20 05:32:45 2003



From: Leszek =?iso-8859-1?Q?Ke=9Cpin=B4ski?= :      kepinski-at-int.pan.wroc.pl (by
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 05:24:34 -0600
Subject: School on TEM of Powdered Nanostructured Materials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues:

Please take note of the upcoming
School on Electron Microscopy of Powdered Nanostructured Materials

which will be hold in Wroc?aw (Poland), 19-20 September 2003.
For complete information, please look at:
http://celtam.int.pan.wroc.pl/ISEM/
Or Email: kepinski-at-int.pan.wroc.pl

Looking forward to seeing you in Wroc?aw
Organizing Committee


From daemon Thu Mar 20 08:38:42 2003



From: Shanling Shi :      Shanling.Shi-at-unilever.com
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 09:25:52 -0500
Subject: TEM Immunolabeling related questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi. there,

Currently I am working on a project which need label cytokeratin in skin
sample. we use NCK-CK15 from Novocastra Lab as primary antibody. we got nice
result on paraffin section at LM level. But we couldn't get any K15 gold
labeling on LR white sections. The sample was fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde
and embedded in LR White at 50C for 1 day. We did get gold labeling of
filaggrin on the LR white sections from same block. I was wondering if the
cytokeratin antigen survived after sample preparation. Here are my questions.
1) Has anyone done this kind of labeling on resin embedded sections? If anyone
did similar experiment, can you share the reference or protocol?
2) Immunohistochemistry always need perform antigen retrieval on sections
before labeling, what about EM immunolabeling?
3) I have some references about antigen retrieval of resin sections. I tried
high pressure heat and microwave heat with sodium citrate buffer. But I lost
almost all sections from grids. Is there any tricks to keep sections stick on
the coated or bare nickel grids.

Any suggestions are really appreciated!

Shanling

Shanling Shi
Advanced Imaging & Measurement
Unilever Research & Development -Edgewater
45 River Road
Edgewater, NJ 07020
201-840-2340
Shanling.Shi-at-unilever.com




From daemon Thu Mar 20 10:09:22 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:01:23 -0500
Subject: Bad Addresses for Microscopy Today

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The U.S. Post Office’s new Merlin (?) system has rejected the following
addresses from the mailing of the March issue of Microscopy Today.

These subscribers were not sent magazines. I noticed several instances
of 4-digit ZIP codes, other than that they look OK to me.
 
If you see your name here will you please resubscribe at
http://www.microscopy-today.com
 
Thanks,
 
Ron Anderson, MT Editor
 
Ms. Becca Hoffman Triquint Semiconductor
Dr. Stephen Giovannoni Oregon  State Univ
Dr. Andrew Gabor Evergreen Solar Inc
Dr. Emil Adamec McLean Hospital
Dr. Arthur Coates Microtherm
Mr. Vincenzo Lordi Princeton University
Dean Face DuPont
Ms. Hermina Borgerink Wake Forest Univ Medical School
Ms. M.L. Henson Usacil - Conus
Mr. Larry L. Flinn US Army Criminal Inv Lab-Conus
Larry Flynn Usacil-Conus[[same person]]
Dr. Irene Kokkala North Georgia College
Heike Gabrisch Cal Tech
Ms. Vina R. Diderrich Univ Of Tennessee
Ms. Judith A. Mescher Desc - Eltf
Dr. Lewis D. Stegink Univ Of Iowa
Mr. Wayne Engleman Monsanto BB3G
Dr. John Longlet Chevron Chemical Co
Daryl L Goad Texas A & M University
Mr. John Curulli University of Southern California
Dr. David Carter Center for Plant Cell Biology
Ms. Susan DeMaggio Univ Of California
Matthias Rief Stanford Univ
Victoria Doyle-Jones Stanford University
 
 
Actually, this is a fairly short list for a database of over 16,500
subscribers!



From daemon Thu Mar 20 10:09:23 2003



From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 10:04:40 -0600
Subject: 2nd reminder OMS/CSMMS meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just a reminder about the exciting and innovative joint meeting of
the Oklahoma Microscopy and Central States Microscopy and
Microanalysis Societies that will be held at the University of Tulsa
on April 10-11. Entitled "The Art of the Scientific Image", the
two-day event will focus on the creation of scientific images, their
digital processing and analysis, and their effective presentation.
Connections between scientific imaging, human vision, and art will be
explored throughout the meeting, which will feature an art exhibit
and a region-wide contest for scientific images presented for
aesthetic appeal rather than scientific content. Renowned imaging
expert Dr. John Russ, author of The Image Processing Handbook, will
present a workshop on the basics of image analysis, and Dr. Rob
Weaver from the McCrone Research Institute will demonstrate
techniques for forming beautiful images using specialized light
microscopy techniques. A highlight of the meeting will be the
keynote address by David Scharf, called by Time magazine "an Ansel
Adams of inner space," whose scanning electron microscope images are
regularly published in science journals, as well as in popular
magazines such as Time, Nature, and Discovery. His address will
accompany a viewing of the IMAX film "Hidden Dimensions" for which
his contributions received an Emmy award. The meeting will close
with an address by Dr. Lynn Gamwell, whose recent book Exploring the
Invisible documents two centuries of connections between science,
art, architecture, and culture.

The program and a registration form can be found on our website, see below

We are looking into a chartering a bus for those wishing to attend
the meeting. The cost would be ~$50 per person and need to reserve it
by Wednesday March 26 so please let us know asap if you are
interested.

For more information contact Randy (tindallr-at-missouri.edu) or Lou
(rosslm-at-missouri.edu).


Thanks,
Lou
Central States Microscopy and Microanalysis Society
http://treefrog.cvm.uiuc.edu/~lam/csmms/


From daemon Thu Mar 20 10:27:57 2003



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 08:18:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM Immunolabeling related questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Shanling,

We have immunolabeled human skin for filaggrin and keratins at both light
and electron microscopic levels. We have used mostly Zamboni's fixed
tissue embedded in LRWhite with good success for filaggrin, K10 and Pan
Keratin. However, I haven't tried K15. Two of my favorite tricks for
unmasking are, 1) 0.3% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in 0.01M tris pH 7.6
incubated for 5-10 min, then rinse and continue as normal. 2) incubate the
grid on 0.01% trypsin in PBS for 5-10 min., rinse and continue as normal.

Robert Underwood
U of Washington
Div. of Dermatolgy

On Thu, 20 Mar 2003, Shanling Shi wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi. there,
}
} Currently I am working on a project which need label cytokeratin in skin
} sample. we use NCK-CK15 from Novocastra Lab as primary antibody. we got nice
} result on paraffin section at LM level. But we couldn't get any K15 gold
} labeling on LR white sections. The sample was fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde
} and embedded in LR White at 50C for 1 day. We did get gold labeling of
} filaggrin on the LR white sections from same block. I was wondering if the
} cytokeratin antigen survived after sample preparation. Here are my questions.
} 1) Has anyone done this kind of labeling on resin embedded sections? If anyone
} did similar experiment, can you share the reference or protocol?
} 2) Immunohistochemistry always need perform antigen retrieval on sections
} before labeling, what about EM immunolabeling?
} 3) I have some references about antigen retrieval of resin sections. I tried
} high pressure heat and microwave heat with sodium citrate buffer. But I lost
} almost all sections from grids. Is there any tricks to keep sections stick on
} the coated or bare nickel grids.
}
} Any suggestions are really appreciated!
}
} Shanling
}
} Shanling Shi
} Advanced Imaging & Measurement
} Unilever Research & Development -Edgewater
} 45 River Road
} Edgewater, NJ 07020
} 201-840-2340
} Shanling.Shi-at-unilever.com
}
}
}
}



From daemon Thu Mar 20 12:27:40 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 18:15:13 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Could you use OCT compound? The Oxford reps say it can be
mixed with a graphite powder. I have never got round to
trying it.

Dave


On Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:03:04 +0000
"David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures
}
} I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
} using SEM with cryo-stage.
}
} The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon cement. A
} co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly reduced
} electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but could not
} remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any information on this?
} Thanks,
}
} David Mallard
} Department Earth Sciences
} Bristol University, UK
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Thu Mar 20 12:33:53 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 18:26:27 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Thu, 20 Mar 2003 11:03:04 +0000
"David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures
}
} I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
} using SEM with cryo-stage.
}
} The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon cement. A
} co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly reduced
} electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but could not
} remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any information on this?
} Thanks,
}
} David Mallard
} Department Earth Sciences
} Bristol University, UK
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Thu Mar 20 16:02:59 2003



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 15:50:21 -0600
Subject: reminder of the Texas Society for Microscopy Spring Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The 2003 Spring Meeting of
THE TEXAS SOCIETY FOR MICROSCOPY
“Embracing All Forms of Microscopy”

April 3, 4, 5, 2003

Meeting will be held in Hubbard Hall on the campus of Texas
Woman’s University, Denton, TX.

THURSDAY WORKSHOP
Microwave Techniques
Presented by Rick Giberson, Research and Development
Manager, Ted Pella, Inc.
Workshop sponsored by Ted Pella, Inc. and TSM

MSA LAS-SPONSORED SPEAKER
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2003
HUBBARD HALL
TWU - DENTON CAMPUS
Dr. Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Engineering and Director,
UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, University
of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.
Topic: "Focused Ion Beam Specimen Preparation for
Everything". Focused ion beam techniques have been developed

to prepare site-specific specimens in a reproducible and
rapid manner for SEM and TEM analysis. The conventional and
the lift-out methods of specimen preparation will be
discussed and FIB applications on a wide range of materials
will be presented. The usefulness for using the FIB for
solving scientific research problems will be emphasized.

Registration forms, hotel information, and author's
instructions can be found on our website,
http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/ . Questions about the
program can be directed to Jo Taylor, Program Chair, at
jtaylor-at-sfasu.edu.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (webmaster-at-texasmicroscopy.org)
TSM webmaster
http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~










From daemon Thu Mar 20 16:08:48 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 14:02:38 -0800
Subject: Arabidopsis infiltration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have a group looking at very early germinated Arabidopsis sp. They are
having problems with good infiltration of the Epon-Araldite epoxy. While
they are out searching the literature for solutions, I thought I'd drop a
note to the list. Any suggestions for an infiltration protocol for these
tiny plants? Spurr's? Dice up those little seeds?

TIA


Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 20 17:05:09 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 15:00:27 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 03:03 AM,
"David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
}
} SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures
}
} I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
} using SEM with cryo-stage.
}
} The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon cement. A
} co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly reduced
} electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but could not
} remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any information on
} this?
} Thanks,
}
Dear David,
I do not know the properties of the cement you mention, nor do I have
at hand any quantitative data on the conductivities of carbon at 293 K
vs 77 K; however, the conductivity of carbon evaporated films at 77 K
is sufficient for TEM observations at that temp. The conductivity of
carbon at 4.2 K is not adequate for observations, and maybe that is
what your co-worker remembers. On the other hand, SEM and TEM are
sufficiently different that carbon could also be inadequate for SEM
observations at 77 K.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Thu Mar 20 17:14:22 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 15:07:56 -0800
Subject: micro-management blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


After 24 years of managing our small facility as a collaborative effort
with interested faculty, I now have a new supervisor with little technical
expertise. Our facility consists of an older TEM, a new SEM, a new
deconvolution scope, and a Lieca SP1 confocal. I don't want to air our
dirty laundry but I need a little help in justifying our equipment to the
new boss. Now, she is proud of the fact that she still uses PhotoShop 3.0
and states that the best way to get a good picture is to take a good
picture and then don't mess with it. While there is certainly some truth
in the second fact, it is also very naive. And the first fact classifies
her as a Luddite. Her research centers around the confocal and the
deconvolution scope. So the move is on to dump the TEM and give the
Digital Darkroom to the department Network Admin. This will free me up to
tackle confocal projects for her and spend more time dusting. Yes, after
24 years of managing the facility on my own my new boss has actually given
me a dusting schedule. However, she is quick to point out that this is not
micro-managing. Alright, I digress. I need to justify having a couple
graphics workstations, a slide scanner, a flat bed scanner with
transparency tray, and a photo-quality printer. She would give this
equipment to the Network Admin who would integrate it with the common
computer room. I treat this equipment like I do optical equipment. I am
concerned that once relocated to a common room, with no supervision, it
will rapidly deteriorate. I also take exception with the apparently
wide-spread belief that the computer support staff is the best source of
information on digital imaging. I guess because it is digital?

So how do I keep those pieces of equipment I deem necessary for the
facility? I think we should have a photo-quality printer. I think we need
the scanner with tray for those increasingly rare occasions that we need to
scan in a TEM neg or an illustration for a PowerPoint slide or
publication. I find that I am not good at making an argument for what
seems blindingly obvious to me. I just sputter and fume and ask, "... how
can anyone have an Imaging Facility without a couple workstations and
printers?". Or a TEM.

And then there is always the possibility she is right. Maybe we don't need
to do this stuff to the standards I embrace. Should I convert to her
mantra: "Do more, less well."?

Any good arguments out there that have worked for any of you?



Rick H.



From daemon Thu Mar 20 21:31:39 2003



From: Dave Phelan :      emudp-at-mail.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 14:12:25 +1100
Subject: Upgrade of viewing screen on Jeol JSM840 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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G'day

I have an ageing Jeol JSM840 SEM (~20 years old) with a rapidly fading
viewing screen and with no framestore. I cannot get a replacement viewing
screen so am looking at other options such as getting a third part image
grabbing system that would allow tv rate viewing of a reasonable sized
image on a pc screen for focussing etc. A framestore for averaging would
also be useful. I don't need the system for capturing digital images, I can
already do that via my EDS system, it's the viewing screen that is the
problem. The EDS capture system does not allow tv rate viewing.

The Deben Pixie 3000 system appears to do what I want but I'm interested
to know of any other similar systems available. I'd also like to hear
comments from users of the Deben system.

Cheers

Dave





Dave Phelan
EM/X-Ray Unit
University of Newcastle
NSW 2308
AUSTRALIA
Ph 02 4921 5667
Fax 02 4921 7019
emudp-at-mail.newcastle.edu.au



From daemon Fri Mar 21 02:56:01 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 08:45:18 -0000
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


David
Carbon has very useful conductivity at 77K, though 100K would be
more typical of an LTSEM system cooled by LN2. This is easy to
confirm in the lab with a multimeter. My measurements indicate
that a 3mm dia. graphite rod 70mm long has a resistance of 1.2
ohms at room temperature and 2.1 ohms at 77K. No dramatic
conductivity loss, therefore.

Leit-C is solvent-based paint, and expensive too. Is it really the
best choice for your purpose, I wonder. I use TissueTek or aqueous
colloidal graphite (Aquadag) to attach ice samples to stubs.
Effective and much cheaper.
Best wishes
Chris

On 20 Mar 03, at 15:00, Bill Tivol wrote:

} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
}
} On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 03:03 AM,
} "David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} }
} } SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures
} }
} } I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
} } using SEM with cryo-stage.
} }
} } The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon
} } cement. A co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly
} } reduced electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but
} } could not remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any
} } information on this? Thanks,
} }
} Dear David,
} I do not know the properties of the cement you mention, nor do I have
}
} at hand any quantitative data on the conductivities of carbon at 293 K
} vs 77 K; however, the conductivity of carbon evaporated films at 77 K
} is sufficient for TEM observations at that temp. The conductivity of
} carbon at 4.2 K is not adequate for observations, and maybe that is
} what your co-worker remembers. On the other hand, SEM and TEM are
} sufficiently different that carbon could also be inadequate for SEM
} observations at 77 K. Yours, Bill Tivol EM Scientist and Manager
} Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
} California Institute of Technology Pasadena CA 91125 (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Fri Mar 21 03:00:05 2003



From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science :      COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 10:48:17 +0200
Subject: micro-management blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yeah ;)

This is a rough one. We have just stated a new EM lab (less than two years
operational)
Our TEM (Which is new!) is not functioning due to the SIS camera being away
for repairs under warranty now for some time. The EDS has been sent back
twice now and I hope this time around the repairs will be successful. Being
in Africa does have it pro's to like the weather, the birds and wildlife.
We also have a lot more freedom in research. I am seeing forward to a
prosperous year full of publications with EM input and well trained
motivated users! (my whish list and also the units goal)

Thus if your TEM is running this is already a blessing. This alone (service
contract cost depending) should be enough to motivate for keeping it. We
are in a process to monitoring all publications on all instruments as a
justification to keep it running or to replace it should the kneed arise.

My wife is brilliant at management and she helps me a lot. Her motto is
always: "if you motivate something well enough you can cell ice to an
Eskimo."

This is the most important point of all:
Since she is now directing the facility, please go ask her to give the
Objectives, Goals and mission statement for the facility to you in writing
(Her view). If possible ask her also for a 5, and 10 Year plan for the
facility. Before attempting to motivate anything think things over
carefully. You two must be able to work in peace since strive will destroy
the facility quickly and drive users away! With unity much can be achieved
since her signature is required most likely on all purchase requests,
motivations and budget expenditure.

When you do the motivation, link your instruments to the objectives and
goals of your institute as well as the ones you got from her. Let her see
that you are on her side and you would like to see these goals achieved.

If you can provide a list of publications where each instrument was involved
in over its lifespan as a percentage of the total number of publications
published in your institution it should help to explain the kneed of each
instrument, scanner, SG's etc...

You can probably get a letter from the IT guys to state that your
application, software, set-up and configuration is unique to the institution
and it serve the best to keep it out the hands of ordinary villains to
prevent expensive reconfiguration and repair. I had to fight to keep them
out without driving them away since I kneed there help but not there
software upgrades etc!

If you have a good relationship with your research office ask them for a
opinion in writing.

It is worth it to do a survey in the institute to all relevant users, past
users and possible users including head of departments. Things worth
getting a answer on are questions like: What do you expect from the
facility, What instruments would you like to be present in the unit, Past
usage, usefulness of input in their research. Possible future utilisation
of your unit. Suggestions to improve the service as well as suggestions
wishes for instruments/capability's currently not present. If you can get
postgads promised to instruments and research programs including your
facility the better. I know that is not always possible but if you do not
ask you will not know. We did that at a previous institute where I was
employed. This was a very useful exercise. This helped to direct the unit
and improve on our service. These documents are also a very useful source
for equipment motivation when it is combined into a format top management
can understand.

Hopefully from this information the wise path to follow will be much more
clearer to all.

Good luck.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Rick Harris [mailto:raharris-at-ucdavis.edu]
Sent: Friday, March 21, 2003 1:08 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


After 24 years of managing our small facility as a collaborative effort
with interested faculty, I now have a new supervisor with little technical
expertise. Our facility consists of an older TEM, a new SEM, a new
deconvolution scope, and a Lieca SP1 confocal. I don't want to air our
dirty laundry but I need a little help in justifying our equipment to the
new boss. Now, she is proud of the fact that she still uses PhotoShop 3.0
and states that the best way to get a good picture is to take a good
picture and then don't mess with it. While there is certainly some truth
in the second fact, it is also very naive. And the first fact classifies
her as a Luddite. Her research centers around the confocal and the
deconvolution scope. So the move is on to dump the TEM and give the
Digital Darkroom to the department Network Admin. This will free me up to
tackle confocal projects for her and spend more time dusting. Yes, after
24 years of managing the facility on my own my new boss has actually given
me a dusting schedule. However, she is quick to point out that this is not
micro-managing. Alright, I digress. I need to justify having a couple
graphics workstations, a slide scanner, a flat bed scanner with
transparency tray, and a photo-quality printer. She would give this
equipment to the Network Admin who would integrate it with the common
computer room. I treat this equipment like I do optical equipment. I am
concerned that once relocated to a common room, with no supervision, it
will rapidly deteriorate. I also take exception with the apparently
wide-spread belief that the computer support staff is the best source of
information on digital imaging. I guess because it is digital?

So how do I keep those pieces of equipment I deem necessary for the
facility? I think we should have a photo-quality printer. I think we need
the scanner with tray for those increasingly rare occasions that we need to
scan in a TEM neg or an illustration for a PowerPoint slide or
publication. I find that I am not good at making an argument for what
seems blindingly obvious to me. I just sputter and fume and ask, "... how
can anyone have an Imaging Facility without a couple workstations and
printers?". Or a TEM.

And then there is always the possibility she is right. Maybe we don't need
to do this stuff to the standards I embrace. Should I convert to her
mantra: "Do more, less well."?

Any good arguments out there that have worked for any of you?



Rick H.



From daemon Fri Mar 21 04:41:53 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 02:32:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: micro-management blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Rick,
Definitely spurr's is the best. I do not how hard is
the seed coat, You could try araldite-DDSA-DMP
mixture. after fixation and dehydration, PO etc,
Infilterate with 20% resin mix in PO and leave your
sample vial open overnight. Next day(~20h) change it
to fresh 100% resin mix for about 2hrs before
embedding. curing, usual at 60 deg C for 72hrs.
Shashi Singh
Scientist CCMB
Hyderabad-India

croscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
Society of
America


I have a group looking at very early germinated
Arabidopsis sp. They
are
having problems with good infiltration of the
Epon-Araldite epoxy.
While
they are out searching the literature for solutions, I
thought I'd drop
a
note to the list. Any suggestions for an infiltration
protocol for
these
tiny plants? Spurr's? Dice up those little seeds?

TIA


Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
http://platinum.yahoo.com


From daemon Fri Mar 21 06:56:19 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 12:45:16 -0000
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Peter
No, I did a two-point measurement with the rod connected at both
ends. The rod was immersed in liquid nitrogen while remaining
connected, so the resistances are comparable. The figures I quote
are the resistance of the specified length of the 3mm carbon rod,
not the resistivity of carbon, which is usually quoted as ohms per
square.
Chris

} David;
}
} In doing this measurement of electrical resistivity, did you use a
} "four point Kelvin" measurement to determine sheet resistance? It's
} the only way I know of to know and compare resistances unless all
} things in the comparison are held the same, i.e. thickness, width and
} length.
}
} Peter Tomic
}
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Chris Jeffree" {cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk}
} To: {David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk} ; "Bill Tivol" {tivol-at-caltech.edu}
} Cc: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} Sent: Friday, March 21, 2003
} 3:45 AM Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC
} at low temperatures
}
}
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---.
} }
} }
} } David
} } Carbon has very useful conductivity at 77K, though 100K would be
} } more typical of an LTSEM system cooled by LN2. This is easy to
} } confirm in the lab with a multimeter. My measurements indicate that
} } a 3mm dia. graphite rod 70mm long has a resistance of 1.2 ohms at
} } room temperature and 2.1 ohms at 77K. No dramatic conductivity loss,
} } therefore.
} }
} } Leit-C is solvent-based paint, and expensive too. Is it really the
} } best choice for your purpose, I wonder. I use TissueTek or aqueous
} } colloidal graphite (Aquadag) to attach ice samples to stubs.
} } Effective and much cheaper. Best wishes Chris
} }
} } On 20 Mar 03, at 15:00, Bill Tivol wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---- -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} } } Society of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---- -.
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 03:03 AM,
} } } "David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} } } }
} } } } SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low
} } } } temperatures
} } } }
} } } } I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical
} } } } doped) using SEM with cryo-stage.
} } } }
} } } } The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon
} } } } cement. A co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly
} } } } reduced electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures
} } } } but could not remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have
} } } } any information on this? Thanks,
} } } }
} } } Dear David,
} } } I do not know the properties of the cement you mention, nor do I
} } } have
} } }
} } } at hand any quantitative data on the conductivities of carbon at
} } } 293 K vs 77 K; however, the conductivity of carbon evaporated
} } } films at 77 K is sufficient for TEM observations at that temp.
} } } The conductivity of carbon at 4.2 K is not adequate for
} } } observations, and maybe that is what your co-worker remembers. On
} } } the other hand, SEM and TEM are sufficiently different that carbon
} } } could also be inadequate for SEM observations at 77 K. Yours, Bill
} } } Tivol EM Scientist and Manager Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
} } } Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96 California Institute of Technology
} } } Pasadena CA 91125 (626) 395-8833 tivol-at-caltech.edu
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
} } ==========================================
} } Dr. Chris Jeffree
} } University of Edinburgh
} } BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
} } Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
} } Waddington Building
} } King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
} } EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
} } Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
} } FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
} } Mobile 07710 585 401
} } email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
} } =========================================
} }
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Fri Mar 21 06:59:04 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 12:51:48 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


More questions! How do you decide whether to use TissueTek
or aqueous colloidal graphite (Aquadag) for an application?
Where do get the latter?

Dave


On Fri, 21 Mar 2003 08:45:18 -0000 Chris Jeffree
{cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} David
} Carbon has very useful conductivity at 77K, though 100K would be
} more typical of an LTSEM system cooled by LN2. This is easy to
} confirm in the lab with a multimeter. My measurements indicate
} that a 3mm dia. graphite rod 70mm long has a resistance of 1.2
} ohms at room temperature and 2.1 ohms at 77K. No dramatic
} conductivity loss, therefore.
}
} Leit-C is solvent-based paint, and expensive too. Is it really the
} best choice for your purpose, I wonder. I use TissueTek or aqueous
} colloidal graphite (Aquadag) to attach ice samples to stubs.
} Effective and much cheaper.
} Best wishes
} Chris
}
} On 20 Mar 03, at 15:00, Bill Tivol wrote:
}
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -.
} }
} }
} }
} } On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 03:03 AM,
} } "David.Mallard-at-bristol.ac.uk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} } }
} } } SEM -cryo. need info on conduction by Leit-C CCC at low temperatures
} } }
} } } I am looking at samples of ice (glacier & artificial chemical doped)
} } } using SEM with cryo-stage.
} } }
} } } The samples are stuck to stubs using Leit-C conductive carbon
} } } cement. A co-worker has suggested to me that carbon has greatly
} } } reduced electrical conduction at liquid nitrogen temperatures but
} } } could not remember where he had seen it. Does anyone have any
} } } information on this? Thanks,
} } }
} } Dear David,
} } I do not know the properties of the cement you mention, nor do I have
} }
} } at hand any quantitative data on the conductivities of carbon at 293 K
} } vs 77 K; however, the conductivity of carbon evaporated films at 77 K
} } is sufficient for TEM observations at that temp. The conductivity of
} } carbon at 4.2 K is not adequate for observations, and maybe that is
} } what your co-worker remembers. On the other hand, SEM and TEM are
} } sufficiently different that carbon could also be inadequate for SEM
} } observations at 77 K. Yours, Bill Tivol EM Scientist and Manager
} } Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
} } California Institute of Technology Pasadena CA 91125 (626) 395-8833
} } tivol-at-caltech.edu
} }
} }
}
}
} ==========================================
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
} Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
} Waddington Building
} King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
} EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
} Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
} FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
} Mobile 07710 585 401
} email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
} =========================================
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Mar 21 09:19:58 2003



From: Peter Y Eastman :      PEastman-at-rohmhaas.com
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 10:05:54 -0500
Subject: CPD or HMDS for wood blocks?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jonathan,

If you just want to see the interior of the wood, it should be easy enough

to split 5mm cubes with a single edge razor blade, knife or wood chisel
along the longitudinal axis. You have your choice of exposing surfaces
with orientations that are radial, tangential or something in between. (If

those terms don't mean anything to you, take a look at the Soc. for Wood
Sci. & Tech. at http://www.swst.org/teach/set2/struct1.html for an
excellent introduction to wood structure and terminology).

If you need to expose a cross-section, I'd echo the LN2 idea with a couple

of suggestions. For my wood science MS research, I had to break numerous
5mm square by 50mm "matchsticks" with as brash (perpendicular to the long
axis and not jagged) a failure as possible for an SEM study. What worked
best for me was to lightly score the wood on the tension side where I
wanted the break and insert it into a small jig that clamped the
matchstick on both sides of the score line. I immersed the jig w/ wood in
LN2 until the boiling slowed significantly (may take a while, wood is a
good insulator) and broke the sample immediately and energetically on
removal from the LN2. If your pieces are only 5mm cubes, you may not be
able to use such a jig, but perhaps you don't need the brash failure I
did. Another factor I found important was the moisture content of the wood

- too low was a problem. No matter what technique you use, you'll likely
encounter the variability of wood. Count on lots of replications!

Pete Eastman
Microscopy
Rohm and Haas Company
215 619-5229




"Tindall, Randy D." {TindallR-at-missouri.edu}
03/19/2003 09:13 AM


To: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}
cc: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
bcc:
Subject: RE: CPD or HMDS for wood blocks?


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Jonathan,

We recently looked at wood blocks in our FESEM and the only preparation
we did was to freeze them in liquid nitrogen, then fracture them with
pliars to expose the internal structure, followed by several days in a
vacuum chamber to get as much moisture and air out as possible. We
glued them down with copius amounts of conductive paint, then sputtered
the bejesus out of them.

The structure was well preserved and we did find bacteria.

The only problem was breaking the harder pieces of wood. Some of the
wood was ancient and very brittle, but the new pieces were tough.

Hope this is applicable to your problem.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core---We're the Fun Core!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



-----Original Message-----
} From: Jon Krupp [mailto:jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2003 3:03 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi again:

I have a guy who wants to look at the interior of some wood blocks using
our conventional SEM. He is trying to see bacteria and anything else
that might be hiding in there.

His blocks are pretty small, about 5mm cubes. I thought about CPD, but
had second thoughts about how long to soak in CO2 etc. He did some
experiments and it took a couple of hours for some dye to make it all
the way into the middle of the block. Plus he has about 30 of these
things to look at. That could add up to a lot of time and CO2.

I got an idea that HMDS might work for this project, but have no
experience with it. I think that being able to soak the blocks for a
long time in HMDS would be good, as would the chance to let them sublime
to dryness over a long time without too much attention.

Do you think I am on the right track or is there something I am missing.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu









From daemon Fri Mar 21 11:51:26 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 09:46:55 -0800
Subject: Re: Upgrade of viewing screen on Jeol JSM840 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 07:12 PM, Dave Phelan wrote:

} I have an ageing Jeol JSM840 SEM (~20 years old) with a rapidly fading
} viewing screen and with no framestore. I cannot get a replacement
} viewing
} screen so am looking at other options such as getting a third part
} image
} grabbing system that would allow tv rate viewing of a reasonable sized
} image on a pc screen for focussing etc. A framestore for averaging
} would
} also be useful. I don't need the system for capturing digital images,
} I can
} already do that via my EDS system, it's the viewing screen that is the
} problem. The EDS capture system does not allow tv rate viewing.
}
Dear Dave,
If you have old screens or screen blanks, they can be recoated with
phosphor. There are companies that do this; I don't have access to
their names or addresses, but I am pretty sure I have posted at least
one to the list in the past. You can also recoat the screen blank
yourself, and I think I posted a procedure to the list also. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Fri Mar 21 15:47:07 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 03 16:35:09 -0500
Subject: Passive image capture system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1a ] --

Dave Phelan wrote:
============================================================================
========
I have an ageing Jeol JSM840 SEM (~20 years old) with a rapidly fading
viewing screen and with no framestore. I cannot get a replacement viewing
screen so am looking at other options such as getting a third part image
grabbing system that would allow tv rate viewing of a reasonable sized
image on a pc screen for focussing etc. A framestore for averaging would
also be useful. I don't need the system for capturing digital images, I can
already do that via my EDS system, it's the viewing screen that is the
problem. The EDS capture system does not allow tv rate viewing.

The Deben Pixie 3000 system appears to do what I want but I'm interested to
know of any other similar systems available. I'd also like to hear comments
from users of the Deben system.
============================================================================
=========
Another alternative is the passive image capture software called Spectrum
Mono, as described on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/software/spectrum.shtml

It does what you want it to do, and, it is perhaps the lowest cost
alternative for a product of this type. On most older SEMs it is easily
installed, either by the user or the preferred service engineer. We have
had the software running on one of our own Model 840 JEOL SEMs and it seems
to perform up to expectations.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies has distributed this "passive" image capture
software for some time and we have a vested interest in its promotion.

Chuck

PS: Remember that we are striving to be 100% paperless, therefore there
are no paper copies kept of this correspondence. Please be sure to always
reply by way of "reply" on your software so that the entire string of
correspondence can be kept in one place.
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================


From daemon Fri Mar 21 20:32:48 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 2003 18:20:30 -0800
Subject: LN2 dewar

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Can anyone recommend a source of 5-10L
LN2 portable dewars? These are for filling
a 10L EDS detector. The LN2 will be
transported by car.

Any ideas?

tnx,
gary g.



From daemon Sat Mar 22 06:15:33 2003



From: Muhammad Khalil Hasan :      mmhasan2000-at-e.coolworks.com
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 01:00:44 -0800
Subject: Project

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sir,

Before I introduce myself, I wish to inform you that
this letter is not a hoax mail and I urge you to treat
it serious. I am Dr. Muhammad Khalil Hasan, a banker
with the Mashreq Bank Plc Dubai, UAE. I am the
Accounts officer late Mr. Robert Chapman the African
Area Director of SIL International, who unfortunately
died in the crash of Kenya Airways Flight 431 in
Abidjan, Ivory Coast, January 30 2000. You will read
more stories about the crash on visiting this website,
news.airwise.com/airlines/archive/2000/kenya2000.html
and also in this website, where Chapman's company
talked about his death in the Kenya crash. You shall
as well find the pictures of Chapman and his wife
there. Mr. Chapman was from Hamilton, Ontario Canada.

Since the death of Chapman, I as his accounts officer
in the bank, have made several enquiries to locate his
only surviving relation, without any success. I came
across your name and contact, on the course of my
personal searching for Chapman's relations, so I
decided to contact you for this project.

I am contacting you to assist in repatriating and
securing the wealth left behind in a fixed deposit
account by Robert, before they get confiscated or
declared unserviceable by my bank. The board of my
bank, has issued a notice that after 2 months from now
and no next of kin shown up for the claim, the funds
will be confiscated and declared unserviceable. Since
I and my team have been unsuccessful in locating
Robert's relatives for sometime now, I seek your
consent to present you as the Next of Kin of the
deceased since you are a foreigner, so that the
proceed of this deposit valued at $USD7.5 Million
Dollars can be released to you.

The bank will release the funds to any foreigner who
has all related information/documents to the bank
account. I am in charge of this matter in my bank,
because I am his accounts officer. Your application
will be directed to my department for verification and
approval. Everything is under my control.

I shall provide you all the information and copy of
the certificate of deposit issued to Robert when he
deposited the funds. I shall also involve a good
attorney who shall represent you in all the
appropriate offices for the claim. Please, find in the
attachment my work ID Card. This is just to proof to
you that my proposal is genuine. I also have all
necessary information we need for the claim and once
the money is transferred to you, I shall destroy all
the documents used for the claim and leave no traces.
After everything, you shall have 40% of the total
sum,while 60% for me.


All requires is your honest cooperation to enable us
see this business successful. I guarantee that this
will be executed under a legitimate arrangement that
will protect you from any breach of the law. Robert
was a very good man and it is not wise to allow his
hard earned wealth to be stolen by the greedy
directors of my bank.

Further details awaits your response by email. PLEASE,
TREAT THIS PROPOSAL AS TOP SECRET. Please, confirm the
receipt of my Id Card in the attachment, as it was
difficult to attach.

Best Regards

Muhammad Khalil Hasan.
Banker.





From daemon Sat Mar 22 07:42:32 2003



From: William C. Hamlett, Ph.D. :      whamlett-at-nd.edu
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 09:12:47 -0500
Subject: Need scoring wheel cartridge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tell her NO! Make no consigns not afoot to compromise or be her friend just
tell her no.

When you end up in her supervisors offices explaining the dusting duties,
her ludilite ways and designs to enslave you. If he tells you to go along to
get along say no. Let her find some other domestic servant to do her work.
and call a head hunter.

Unless dusting is what you should be doing I would think if you are any good
you can find a better paying job down the hall and let here dust her own
lab.

The only thing is you have to mean no you can say it and not mean it shows.

One of the reasons women get less pay is they will put up with a lot more
abuse on the job than most a,m/

No is an extremely powerful word that is not used near enough. If the whole
lab will tell her no se will be gone by the end of the moth unless she is
sleeping wiht the boss. Then it will take another month or two. In the mean
time a match stem propping the valve on a tire open will annoy here. do it
to two tires cost here 45 minutes that day.A 10 dollar bill will get the
doomster sat where her car can't get over night. A 40 dollar tip will get a
pitcher of ice water down the front of her dress as she gets up to speak at
a meeting..

Even the densest manager gets the clue some where along the line.

Bad management is on of the most embedded instructions in our country and to
letters NO can bring them to their knees if everyone cooperates and be rid
of them.

They may be a great tech and like the work give them power over other can
turn Dr. Jeckel into Mr. Hyde.

Being a bad manger is only a third the mangers fault. A third or more rests
with their boss and third rests with the people that work for them. You were
looking for a job when you found this one and the next one should pay better
with new challenges and new manure piles to afford.

good luck

Gordon Couger
Stillwater, OK
www.couger.com/gcouger
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Rick Harris" {raharris-at-ucdavis.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2003 5:07 PM


I am in need of a scoring wheel cartridge for a Leica Reichert Knifemaker
II. Please reply with source contact info.

Thanks.

William C. Hamlett, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy & Cell Biology
Indiana University School of Medicine
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556, USA
e-mail whamlett-at-nd.edu
Telephone 574-631-7194
FAX 574-631-7821
http://www.nd.edu/~whamlett




From daemon Sat Mar 22 10:40:34 2003



From: MICRO :      micro-at-formatex.org
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 17:28:30 +0100
Subject: APPLIED PHYSICS 2003 - Microscopy topics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear colleague

This is to inform you that the Call for Abstracts for the forthcoming
International Meeting on Applied Physics (APHYS-2003), to be held during
October 14-18th 2003 in Badajoz (Spain), is open. All the information
regarding this interdisciplinary conference can be found at the Conference
website

www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm

Some of the topics to be covered will be

- Surfaces, Interfaces and Colloids
- Imaging Techniques, Microscopy
- Nano-sciences and Technologies
- Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry
- Materials Science & Engineering, Applied Solid State Physics/Chemistry
- Advanced and Fuctional Materials
- Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials
- Biological & Medical Physics
- Computational Physics
- Radiation Physics, Applied Nuclear Physics/chemistry, Radiation Protection

In addition to the regular Scientific Program, several International
Workshops will be held as pre-conference events. The following Workshops are
presently confirmed

1. Workshop on Modern Applied Microscopy in Molecular and Cell Biophysics
Research
2. International Interdisciplinar Workshop on Bioengineered Non-crystalline
Solids
3. Workshop on Interfaces in Colloidal and Particulate Systems
4. International Workshop on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry

The Conference will be specifically interested in receiving reports on
Interdisciplinary researches relating Physics with other Sciences such as
Biology, Chemistry, Information Technology, Medicine, etc or relating
different Physics areas. In other words, we are specially (but not
exclusivelly) interested in reports applying the techniques, the training,
and the culture of physics to research areas usually associated with other
scientific and engineering disciplines

APHYS-2003 will also serve as a platform to search for partners for
transnational collaboration projects, specially for the EU Sixth Framework
Program (NETworks of Excellence and Integrated Projects). "Projects
Presentations" and "Call for Partners" presentations proposals are therefore
encouraged and welcomed. If you are interested in taking part of this
Conference feature, please send us the corresponding form available at the
website.

In addition to the "traditional" oral contributed and posters presentation,
a Virtual Participation modality has been established for those researchers
unable to attend it in person. A limited number of works can be presented in
this way. Please refer to the Conference website for details.

If you are interested in taking part of APHYS-2003, please send us your
PRE-REGISTRATION FORM (at the main website of the conference) as soon as
possible. The pre-registration form is also available through the direct URL
http://www.formatex.org/aphys2003/preregistration.htm

Deadline for abstracts submission is April 30th 2003 (for oral presentations
proposals; for posters additional time will be provided) although we highly
recommend you to submit your abstract as soon as possible to avoid
saturation during the days before the deadline.

Proceedings
Accepted and presented papers will be reviewed for publication in special
issues of several international Journals:
- Journal of Microscopy
- Journal of Non-crystalline Solids
- Applied Surface Science
- Colloids and Surfaces A
- Powder Technology (to be confirmed)
- Microelectronics Journal
- Physica Scripta
- Radiation Protection Dosimetry
- Applied Physics A (Materials Science & Processing, to be confirmed).
- Biomedial Materials and Engineering

Also a book "Advances in Applied Physics" will be published by an
international publisher (Kluwer or the American Institute of Physics, with
those papers accepted for presentation but not suitable for the journal
issues.For up-to-date information on publications participating at the
Conference as publishers, please visit regularly the Conference website
(Proceedings
sections).

For any question or suggestion, please do not hesitate to contact us at
secretariat-at-formatex.org, or visit www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm
(Bookmark the page!!) We would also appreciate if could disseminate this
Call for Papers through your Department or Institution.

We hope to meet you at this exciting and interdisciplinar international
meeting!

J.A.Mesa Gonzalez
APHYS-2003 Secretariat
C / Encarnacion, 3 1şE
06001 Badajoz
SPAIN
Email: secretariat-at-formatex.org
Fax: +34 924 258 615



From daemon Sat Mar 22 12:19:25 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2003 10:10:36 -0800
Subject: Re: LN2 dewar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


SUV would be fine versus car. I thought
that there were Dewars that could be
filled and had pressure relief vents.
Then, comes the problem of getting the
LN2 out of the Dewar.

This is a tough area to tackle for a
low use system. I suspect EDS would
be used a half a day per week, perhaps
less. Total of around 100 hours per
year. For the non-use periods, the
detector would be empty. This is suppose
to be OK.

gary g.


At 09:42 AM 3/22/2003, you wrote:
} Gary
} There is really only one way to carry liquid nitrogen safely by car
} and that is outside it. A pick-up truck, or SUV with a rear transport
} cage for a dewar would be ideal, but if liquid nitrogen spills inside
} the car you, your passengers and other road users are in mortal
} danger. Taylor-Wharton manufacture dry shippers that can safely
} transported inside cars and aircraft, but unfortunately they are
} designed as refrigerators, and will not release liquid nitrogen when
} inverted. They are therefore useless for refilling your EDS
} detector.
} Chris
}
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} Inveresk Cottage
} 26, Carberry Road
} Inveresk
} Musselburgh
} Midlothian
} EH21 8PR
} Tel: +44 131 665 6062
} FAX +44 131 653 6248
} Mobile 07710 585 401
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
} To: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2003 2:20 AM
} Subject: LN2 dewar
}
}
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
} }
} }
} } Can anyone recommend a source of 5-10L
} } LN2 portable dewars? These are for filling
} } a 10L EDS detector. The LN2 will be
} } transported by car.
} }
} } Any ideas?
} }
} } tnx,
} } gary g.
} }
} }



From daemon Sat Mar 22 19:07:35 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 03 19:54:02 -0500
Subject: Carriage of liquid nitrogen

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1a ] --

Gary Gaugler wrote:
============================================================================
SUV would be fine versus car. I thought that there were Dewars that could
be filled and had pressure relief vents. Then, comes the problem of getting
the LN2 out of the Dewar.

This is a tough area to tackle for a low use system. I suspect EDS would be
used a half a day per week, perhaps less. Total of around 100 hours per
year. For the non-use periods, the detector would be empty. This is
suppose to be OK.
============================================================================
==
I thought that in the USA at least, since liquid nitrogen is considered to
be a "dangerous goods" material, in order to transport it, one would need to
be a licensed "dangerous goods" transporter. For example those who deliver
liquid nitrogen have their trucks placarded with the green flammable gas
placard. This is all highly regulated by the US DOT.

Is it not similar to the case for transporting hazardous waste, one needs to
be licensed to carry it in a vehicle?

I am not the last word on this, however, and there could be some exemptions,
perhaps for personal use, but if there are, I have not heard of any. We
all have to make our own decisions about such things, but one should be sure
that laws and/or regulations are not being violated. In the event of an
accident, enormous legal liability for someone could be the result (not a
legal opinion, just a lay presumption).

Chuck

===========================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Sun Mar 23 11:59:56 2003



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:43:56 -0800
Subject: Re: Arabidopsis infiltration

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Sun, 23 Mar 2003 10:43:56 -0700


Rick,
There are a number of factors to consider. It would help to know what
parts are not infiltrated well to determine the cause of the problems.

Spurr's is definitely easier to get into plant material. If the seeds
are still intact it will be hard to get any resin in. You stated that
they are early germinants. Does this mean that they have broken through
the seed coat? If they haven't, you may have to abrade the seeds in
some way to get fixation and infiltration. Larger seeds can be shaken
over sandpaper, but this may not work with the smaller seeds. (Dicing
the seeds may work but could smash the cells.) Consider extending the
infiltration time to several days to a week. I have had to infiltrate
for more than a week to get successful embedding of some woody
material. You will have to make regular changes of resin, but it does
make a difference.

I don't know your protocol, but another factor may be fixation and
especially dehydration. You have to use extended fixation and
dehydration times to allow hydrophobic resin to penetrate plant
material. Often the woody parts retain water and the resin won't
penetrate.

If you have access to a lab microwave then you should consider trying
infiltration in there. It really helps!

Good luck,

Kim
{} {} {} {} {}
Kim Rensing PhD
Department of Botany, UBC
6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver BC, Canada
V6T 1Z4


On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 02:02 PM, Rick Harris wrote:
}
} I have a group looking at very early germinated Arabidopsis sp. They
} are having problems with good infiltration of the Epon-Araldite epoxy.
} While they are out searching the literature for solutions, I thought
} I'd drop a note to the list. Any suggestions for an infiltration
} protocol for these tiny plants? Spurr's? Dice up those little seeds?
}
} TIA
}
}
} Rick A. Harris, Director
} Microscopy and Imaging Facility



From daemon Sun Mar 23 12:00:01 2003



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:42:52 -0800
Subject: Re: Arabidopsis infiltration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rick,
There are a number of factors to consider. It would help to know what
parts are not infiltrated well to determine the cause of the problems.

Spurr's is definitely easier to get into plant material. If the seeds
are still intact it will be hard to get any resin in. You stated that
they are early germinants. Does this mean that they have broken through
the seed coat? If they haven't, you may have to abrade the seeds in
some way to get fixation and infiltration. Larger seeds can be shaken
over sandpaper, but this may not work with the smaller seeds. (Dicing
the seeds may work but could smash the cells.) Consider extending the
infiltration time to several days to a week. I have had to infiltrate
for more than a week to get successful embedding of some woody
material. You will have to make regular changes of resin, but it does
make a difference.

I don't know your protocol, but another factor may be fixation and
especially dehydration. You have to use extended fixation and
dehydration times to allow hydrophobic resin to penetrate plant
material. Often the woody parts retain water and the resin won't
penetrate.

If you have access to a lab microwave then you should consider trying
infiltration in there. It really helps!

Good luck,

Kim
{} {} {} {} {}
Kim Rensing PhD
Department of Botany, UBC
6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver BC, Canada
V6T 1Z4


On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 02:02 PM, Rick Harris wrote:
}
} I have a group looking at very early germinated Arabidopsis sp. They
} are having problems with good infiltration of the Epon-Araldite epoxy.
} While they are out searching the literature for solutions, I thought
} I'd drop a note to the list. Any suggestions for an infiltration
} protocol for these tiny plants? Spurr's? Dice up those little seeds?
}
} TIA
}
}
} Rick A. Harris, Director
} Microscopy and Imaging Facility



From daemon Sun Mar 23 14:32:17 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 09:10:34 +1200
Subject: Re: Upgrade of viewing screen on Jeol JSM840 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dave,

JEOL will have your picture tube (CRT) for a replacement. If they don't by
some miracle, then contact Richardson Electronics at www.rell.com or
(630)208-2200. Use information from your SEM CRT label (monitor pulls out,
label is on the side of a CRT). You can get new CRT form Richardson for
couple-three hundred $. Make sure they are aware that CRT phosphor must have
longer decay time (phosphor type is also stated on the CRT label). Longer
phosphor decay time is not critical, but helpful.

If you in the mood, get a monochrome video monitor (such as security
monitor), and connect TV video from SEM to it.

Countless video frame grabbers with frame averaging function are available-
too many to list. What features and what price range are you looking for?

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax
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----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dave Phelan" {emudp-at-mail.newcastle.edu.au}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2003 10:12 PM


Hi, Bill

Could you re-post the directions for a home-cooking procedure?
I didn't think it was possible to recoat CRTs.

cheers

rtch




}
}
} On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 07:12 PM, Dave Phelan wrote:
}
} } I have an ageing Jeol JSM840 SEM (~20 years old) with a rapidly
} } fading viewing screen and with no framestore. I cannot get a
} } replacement viewing screen so am looking at other options such as
} } getting a third part image grabbing system that would allow tv rate
} } viewing of a reasonable sized image on a pc screen for focussing
} } etc. A framestore for averaging would also be useful. I don't need
} } the system for capturing digital images, I can already do that via
} } my EDS system, it's the viewing screen that is the problem. The EDS
} } capture system does not allow tv rate viewing.
} }
} Dear Dave,
} If you have old screens or screen blanks, they can be recoated with
} phosphor. There are companies that do this; I don't have access to
} their names or addresses, but I am pretty sure I have posted at least
} one to the list in the past. You can also recoat the screen blank
} yourself, and I think I posted a procedure to the list also. Good
} luck. Yours, Bill Tivol EM Scientist and Manager Cryo-Electron
} Microscopy Facility Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96 California
} Institute of Technology Pasadena CA 91125 (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Sun Mar 23 16:17:11 2003



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 16:07:39 -0600
Subject: Re: Carriage of liquid nitrogen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




} From: "Garber, Charles A." {cgarber-at-2spi.com}
:
: Gary Gaugler wrote:
:
============================================================================
: SUV would be fine versus car. I thought that there were Dewars that could
: be filled and had pressure relief vents. Then, comes the problem of
getting
: the LN2 out of the Dewar.
:
: This is a tough area to tackle for a low use system. I suspect EDS would
be
: used a half a day per week, perhaps less. Total of around 100 hours per
: year. For the non-use periods, the detector would be empty. This is
: suppose to be OK.
:
============================================================================
: ==
: I thought that in the USA at least, since liquid nitrogen is considered to
: be a "dangerous goods" material, in order to transport it, one would need
to
: be a licensed "dangerous goods" transporter. For example those who
deliver
: liquid nitrogen have their trucks placarded with the green flammable gas
: placard. This is all highly regulated by the US DOT.
:
: Is it not similar to the case for transporting hazardous waste, one needs
to
: be licensed to carry it in a vehicle?
:
: I am not the last word on this, however, and there could be some
exemptions,
: perhaps for personal use, but if there are, I have not heard of any. We
: all have to make our own decisions about such things, but one should be
sure
: that laws and/or regulations are not being violated. In the event of an
: accident, enormous legal liability for someone could be the result (not a
: legal opinion, just a lay presumption).
:
: Chuck
:
Liquid nitrogen should be much less dangerous the liquid oxygen and I see
trucks that haul live fish with LOX tanks on them. They may be hauling the
LOX without the proper permits. The people in the bait fish business are not
particular careful about obeying the law. Artificial insemination
technicians carry LN2 dewers all over the country as well.

To pump the LN2 put a pipe that reaches the bottom of the tank. Just close
the vents and put a little current through a heater submerged in the
nitrogen and the pressure will pump the LN2 out the pipe. Four psi should
pump about 10 gallons a minutes or more though a 3/4 inch pipe to a
container the same height as the LN2 tank.

If the temperature of boiling propane is low enough you could vaporize
propane and dispose ot it in a flame and greatly reduce your storage and
procurement problems. A propane tank has to be in sealed compartment in
vehicle or mounted out it and the vehicle should not be parked in a
building. It can legally be installed in vehicles.

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward any links or information you think might be useful to others.



From daemon Sun Mar 23 20:36:22 2003



From: spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 11:22:06 +0900
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM Resolution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
March 22, 2003 at 19:57:07
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com
Name: John Spohnheimer

Organization: Dallas Semiconductor (Commercial)

Education: Graduate College

Location: Dallas, TX

Question: I am an engineer/physicist working with semiconductors &
have used high-quality optical/SEM/TEM microscopes for ~25 years.
Recently, a friend (also a physicist) asked why we can see sub-micron
geometries (sometimes even one-two tenth micron diameter particles
are visible) using optical microscopes with wavelengths nominally in
the 1/2 micron range.

I argued that what we're really seeing is simply a phase interference
pattern generated by the sub-micron particle, not the real particle
itself. That's why most sub-resolution particles appear spherical in
an optical microscope and often-times look completely different under
SEM examination.

I'm curious if a professional in this field has a better/more
accurate explanation.

Thank you.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Mar 24 02:35:02 2003



From: Jimmy Sky :      jimmy-at-jimmysky.com
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 16:24:32 +0800
Subject: Jimmy Sky / Ningbo Genesis Industry Co., Ltd.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear,

I have learned your name from the Internet.
We are the manufacturer&exporter in China, specializing in producing Bathroom Products. Please visit our website www.china-bathroom.com for more information. OEM is available.
Please let me know if I may be of further assistance. ( E-mail: jimmy-at-china-genesis.com )

Yours sincerely,
Mr. Jimmy Sky

Ningbo Genesis Industry Co., Ltd.
Tel: 86-574-87330333
Fax: 86-574-87725245
Location: Ningbo city, Zhejiang province, China ( a port city, 150km from Shanghai )

If you think this is spam, please send email Subject "remove" to jimmy197809-at-hotmail.com.


From daemon Mon Mar 24 02:35:03 2003



From: Jimmy Sky :      jimmy-at-jimmysky.com
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 16:24:33 +0800
Subject: Jimmy Sky / Ningbo Genesis Industry Co., Ltd.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear,

I have learned your name from the Internet.
We are the manufacturer&exporter in China, specializing in producing Bathroom Products. Please visit our website www.china-bathroom.com for more information. OEM is available.
Please let me know if I may be of further assistance. ( E-mail: jimmy-at-china-genesis.com )

Yours sincerely,
Mr. Jimmy Sky

Ningbo Genesis Industry Co., Ltd.
Tel: 86-574-87330333
Fax: 86-574-87725245
Location: Ningbo city, Zhejiang province, China ( a port city, 150km from Shanghai )

If you think this is spam, please send email Subject "remove" to jimmy197809-at-hotmail.com.


From daemon Mon Mar 24 03:38:27 2003



From: Marie Cheynet :      mcheynet-at-ltpcm.inpg.fr
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 11:36:24 +0200
Subject: PEELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Dear all,


To upgrade our old microscope (a double condenser lens VG HB501) we are
looking for a second-hand parallel electron energy loss spectrometer
(PEELS) or a second-hand Gatan Image Filter (GIF).
Please e-mail any information to me if you have one.
Thanks
marie


-----------------------------------------------------------------
Marie-Claude Cheynet
Groupe Physique du métal
LTPCM/ENSEEG/CNRS(UMR-5614)
Domaine Universitaire
BP75 Saint-Martin d'Hčres 38402
e-mail mcheynet-at-ltpcm.inpg.fr
tel : 33 (0)4.76.82.66.14
http://www.inpg.fr/LTPCM/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------




From daemon Mon Mar 24 09:02:20 2003



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 08:51:29 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM Resolution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
This reflects a common misconception about the quantitative
definition of 'resolution' in microscopy. For light microscopy, one
is quite used to hearing that the 'resolution limit' is about 0.25
microns, or thereabouts. So it is natural to wonder how come it is
pretty easy to see things like microtubules, which have a diameter
around 1/10th of that limit. The answer lies in the definitition of
resolution: that limit defines how close two objects can approach and
still be resolved as two objects. When they get closer than the
limit, then they are seen as one single object. However, the
definition says nothing about the smallest object that can give rise
to an image. That is limited only by the sensitivity of the detector.
So objects like microtubules many times smaller than the resolution
limit can be detected. If you measure their diameter, you will find
that they measure up to whatever the diffraction limit is in your
particular scope. When two of them happen to be closer than that
limit, then they are detected as one object.

Hope this helps,
Tobias
}
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
} March 22, 2003 at 19:57:07
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com
} Name: John Spohnheimer
}
} Organization: Dallas Semiconductor (Commercial)
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Dallas, TX
}
} Question: I am an engineer/physicist working with semiconductors &
} have used high-quality optical/SEM/TEM microscopes for ~25 years.
} Recently, a friend (also a physicist) asked why we can see
} sub-micron geometries (sometimes even one-two tenth micron diameter
} particles are visible) using optical microscopes with wavelengths
} nominally in the 1/2 micron range.
}
} I argued that what we're really seeing is simply a phase
} interference pattern generated by the sub-micron particle, not the
} real particle itself. That's why most sub-resolution particles
} appear spherical in an optical microscope and often-times look
} completely different under SEM examination.
}
} I'm curious if a professional in this field has a better/more
} accurate explanation.
}
} Thank you.
}
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
_ ____ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ University of Missouri
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO USA
/ / / \ \ \ 65211-7400
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ voice: 573-882-0173
fax: 573-882-0123
http://www.biosci.missouri.edu/Baskin/baskin_lab__home_page.htm


From daemon Mon Mar 24 09:04:08 2003



From: Anthony J. Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 09:56:58 -0500
Subject: Re: Carriage of liquid nitrogen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I looked around on the US DOT web site, and was a little surprised to find
that it seems there is not, in the United States at least, a class of
hazardous material called "Cryogen". The most useful document I found in
my (brief) search was
http://hazmat.dot.gov/files/registration/0203/regbrch2002.pdf which clearly
lists the classes of materials that require placarding of vehicles and
registration of carriers. My lay reading of this leads me to the
conclusion that liq. N2 would be placarded as "Non-flammable gas" which is
only regulated in quantities over 1000 pounds. It may, naturally, be
different in other countries. Nevertheless, common sense must prevail, and
that tells us that one must be thoughtful about transporting any quantity
of the material. There will be other applicable safety regulations that
apply to liquid nitrogen at all times, whether during transportation or
not, (for example, occupational safety regulations), which I have not even
begun to address here.

Once you add the "W" word to any material, though, the issue is **VERY**
different. Even a microgram of waste is highly regulated (or so it seems!).

Tony.

At 04:07 PM 3/23/2003 -0600, Gordon Couger wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** Manager, CMSE Shared Experimental Facilities
** MIT Rooms 13-1027 or 13-3090
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6478
**




From daemon Mon Mar 24 09:06:37 2003



From: Kestutis Smalinskas :      smalinskas-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 06:59:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LN2 Dewar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


When I was working in a lab with low-overhead -
basically owned by someone with shallow pockets - I
successfully transported LN2 in my car using a
styrofoam cooler. I wasn't too keen on it and I don't
recommend doing it, but I thought this may be worth
mentioning. LN2 thermoses are somewhat expensive... I
believe $200-$500, but worth it for a lab committed to
doing EDS work.

If you must transport by car, keep the windows open or
blower fan on if it's in the passenger cabin. I doubt
that there are DOT issues involved. LN2 is not a
substance one would consider highly hazardous, plus I
believe DOT has jurisdiction only for amounts above a
certain minimum. Only practical issues apply.

On the matter of occasional EDS use, one can simply
fill LN2 when needed, allowing for proper detector
cooldown (roughly 2-4 hours for my particular model).
This method has to weighed against the thermal cycling
that occurs, which is not good and potentially may -
with time - damage the detector by delamination.

Stu Smalinskas
Metallurgist
SKF NATC
Plymouth, Michigan

Gordon cougar wrote:

Liquid nitrogen should be much less dangerous the
liquid oxygen and I see
trucks that haul live fish with LOX tanks on them.
They may be hauling the
LOX without the proper permits. The people in the bait
fish business are not
particular careful about obeying the law. Artificial
insemination
technicians carry LN2 dewers all over the country as
well.

To pump the LN2 put a pipe that reaches the bottom of
the tank. Just close
the vents and put a little current through a heater
submerged in the
nitrogen and the pressure will pump the LN2 out the
pipe. Four psi should
pump about 10 gallons a minutes or more though a 3/4
inch pipe to a
container the same height as the LN2 tank.

If the temperature of boiling propane is low enough
you could vaporize
propane and dispose ot it in a flame and greatly
reduce your storage and
procurement problems. A propane tank has to be in
sealed compartment in
vehicle or mounted out it and the vehicle should not
be parked in a
building. It can legally be installed in vehicles.

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com

Dr. Chris Jeffree wrote:

} There is really only one way to carry liquid nitrogen
safely by car
} and that is outside it. A pick-up truck, or SUV with
a rear transport
} cage for a dewar would be ideal, but if liquid
nitrogen spills inside
} the car you, your passengers and other road users are
in mortal
} danger. Taylor-Wharton manufacture dry shippers that
can safely
} transported inside cars and aircraft, but
unfortunately they are
} designed as refrigerators, and will not release
liquid nitrogen when
} inverted. They are therefore useless for refilling
your EDS
} detector.
} Chris
}
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} Inveresk Cottage
} 26, Carberry Road
} Inveresk
} Musselburgh
} Midlothian
} EH21 8PR
} Tel: +44 131 665 6062
} FAX +44 131 653 6248
} Mobile 07710 585 401


Gary Gaugler wrote:

} } Can anyone recommend a source of 5-10L
} } LN2 portable dewars? These are for filling
} } a 10L EDS detector. The LN2 will be
} } transported by car.
} }
} } Any ideas?
} }
} } tnx,
} } gary g.


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
http://platinum.yahoo.com


From daemon Mon Mar 24 12:29:45 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 13:51:16 -0800
Subject: Closed loop EDS (was LN2 Dewar)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There's a long answer involving such great party conversation pieces as Rayleigh's criterion and Ernst Abbe's formula for resolution in any optical system by diffraction which is R=0.61 lambda/ n sine alpha.

The important bit in this context is n sine alpha. Where n is refractive index of the medium through which light/electrons pass from the specimen into the lens and sine alpha is the sine of the semi angle of the objective lens This combined figure is generally called the Numeric Aperture (NA) of the lens and even our old teaching microscopes have an NA of 1.28. In other words to make resolution smaller or better you need a high refractive index (eg immersion oil 1.4 or greater) and a big lens as close as possible (eg an oil immersion lens) which give a NA as large as possible.

Some quick maths tells you that a basic light microscope is capable of a resolution of 0.61/1.28 lambda which is less than half the wavelength of light. But in the e.m. with an aperture of 100um diam and focal length of ~3mm you are lucky to get a NA of better than about 0.01. Why the e.m. has such a poor numerical aperture is because of lens aberrations especially spherical which are only corrected by using a small central objective lens aperture.

Basically light microscope lens design is so good that resolution is only limited by diffraction effects whereas electromagnetic lenses are a compromise.

My apologies if I've oversimplified.


Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK


----- Original Message -----
} From: spohnheimer-at-dalsemi.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)


Thanks to many who replied to my post
about LN2 Dewars and transporting them.
It is possible to do this. however,
several have pointed out the issues
surrounding temperature cycling of the
EDS Dewar. The makers claim that this
is not a problem--even with Si(Li)
detectors. And the systems will power
down the amplifier if LN2 is low or
out. And, they will not allow the unit
to power up if LN2 is not correct. But
there seems to be issues surrounding the
window. The makers claim that this is not
so.

OK. Plan B. So what about the closed loop
refrigerated EDS units like EDAX makes?
Does anyone have any direct experience
with these? Good or bad. I need
to detect down to N.

I had heard that these Kleemenko cycle
cryocoolers are notoriously unreliable.
The pumps fail frequently. Perhaps also,
there are sensitivity issues and low Z
detection limits. I had looked at
closed loop WDS systems before and got
the same reliability feedback from users.
How about EDAX EDS units?

Off-list is fine.

Thanks,
gary g.



From daemon Tue Mar 25 01:29:37 2003



From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science :      COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:12:34 +0200
Subject: micro-management blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yeah ;)

This is a rough one. We have just stated a new EM lab (less than two years
operational)
Our TEM (Which is new!) is not functioning due to the SIS camera being away
for repairs under warranty now for some time. The EDS has been sent back
twice now and I hope this time around the repairs will be successful. Being
in Africa does have it pro's to like the weather, the birds and wildlife.
We also have a lot more freedom in research. I am seeing forward to a
prosperous year full of publications with EM input and well trained
motivated users! (my whish list and also the units goal)

Thus if your TEM is running this is already a blessing. This alone (service
contract cost depending) should be enough to motivate for keeping it. We
are in a process to monitoring all publications on all instruments as a
justification to keep it running or to replace it should the kneed arise.

My wife is brilliant at management and she helps me a lot. Her motto is
always: "if you motivate something well enough you can cell ice to an
Eskimo."

This is the most important point of all:
Since she is now directing the facility, please go ask her to give the
Objectives, Goals and mission statement for the facility to you in writing
(Her view). If possible ask her also for a 5, and 10 Year plan for the
facility. Before attempting to motivate anything think things over
carefully. You two must be able to work in peace since strive will destroy
the facility quickly and drive users away! With unity much can be achieved
since her signature is required most likely on all purchase requests,
motivations and budget expenditure.

When you do the motivation, link your instruments to the objectives and
goals of your institute as well as the ones you got from her. Let her see
that you are on her side and you would like to see these goals achieved.

If you can provide a list of publications where each instrument was involved
in over its lifespan as a percentage of the total number of publications
published in your institution it should help to explain the kneed of each
instrument, scanner, SG's etc...

You can probably get a letter from the IT guys to state that your
application, software, set-up and configuration is unique to the institution
and it serve the best to keep it out the hands of ordinary villains to
prevent expensive reconfiguration and repair. I had to fight to keep them
out without driving them away since I kneed there help but not there
software upgrades etc!

If you have a good relationship with your research office ask them for a
opinion in writing.

It is worth it to do a survey in the institute to all relevant users, past
users and possible users including head of departments. Things worth
getting a answer on are questions like: What do you expect from the
facility, What instruments would you like to be present in the unit, Past
usage, usefulness of input in their research. Possible future utilisation
of your unit. Suggestions to improve the service as well as suggestions
wishes for instruments/capability's currently not present. If you can get
postgads promised to instruments and research programs including your
facility the better. I know that is not always possible but if you do not
ask you will not know. We did that at a previous institute where I was
employed. This was a very useful exercise. This helped to direct the unit
and improve on our service. These documents are also a very useful source
for equipment motivation when it is combined into a format top management
can understand.

Hopefully from this information the wise path to follow will be much more
clearer to all.

Good luck.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Rick Harris [mailto:raharris-at-ucdavis.edu]
Sent: Friday, March 21, 2003 1:08 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


After 24 years of managing our small facility as a collaborative effort
with interested faculty, I now have a new supervisor with little technical
expertise. Our facility consists of an older TEM, a new SEM, a new
deconvolution scope, and a Lieca SP1 confocal. I don't want to air our
dirty laundry but I need a little help in justifying our equipment to the
new boss. Now, she is proud of the fact that she still uses PhotoShop 3.0
and states that the best way to get a good picture is to take a good
picture and then don't mess with it. While there is certainly some truth
in the second fact, it is also very naive. And the first fact classifies
her as a Luddite. Her research centers around the confocal and the
deconvolution scope. So the move is on to dump the TEM and give the
Digital Darkroom to the department Network Admin. This will free me up to
tackle confocal projects for her and spend more time dusting. Yes, after
24 years of managing the facility on my own my new boss has actually given
me a dusting schedule. However, she is quick to point out that this is not
micro-managing. Alright, I digress. I need to justify having a couple
graphics workstations, a slide scanner, a flat bed scanner with
transparency tray, and a photo-quality printer. She would give this
equipment to the Network Admin who would integrate it with the common
computer room. I treat this equipment like I do optical equipment. I am
concerned that once relocated to a common room, with no supervision, it
will rapidly deteriorate. I also take exception with the apparently
wide-spread belief that the computer support staff is the best source of
information on digital imaging. I guess because it is digital?

So how do I keep those pieces of equipment I deem necessary for the
facility? I think we should have a photo-quality printer. I think we need
the scanner with tray for those increasingly rare occasions that we need to
scan in a TEM neg or an illustration for a PowerPoint slide or
publication. I find that I am not good at making an argument for what
seems blindingly obvious to me. I just sputter and fume and ask, "... how
can anyone have an Imaging Facility without a couple workstations and
printers?". Or a TEM.

And then there is always the possibility she is right. Maybe we don't need
to do this stuff to the standards I embrace. Should I convert to her
mantra: "Do more, less well."?

Any good arguments out there that have worked for any of you?



Rick H.



From daemon Tue Mar 25 07:46:48 2003



From: Renaat Dasseville :      renaat.dasseville-at-rug.ac.be
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:16:38 +0100
Subject: SEM of Chrysophyta

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,

Can anyone tell me how to prepare chrysophytes (Mallomonas) for SEM?

Thanks

Renaat Dasseville

Lab of Protistology & Aquatic Ecology
Dept. Biology, Ghent University
Krijgslaan 281, S8
B-9000 Gent, Belgium

tel: +32 9 264 85 05
fax +32 9 264 85 99
e-mail: renaat.dasseville-at-rug.ac.be
website: http://allserv.rug.ac.be/~rdassevi



From daemon Tue Mar 25 08:50:28 2003



From: Anthony J. Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 09:40:57 -0500
Subject: Re: Closed loop EDS (was LN2 Dewar)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the past I have thermally cycled several detectors without ill effect,
but not enough times to be absolutely confident. Several vendors have told
me that modern detectors should be far more stable to thermal cycling than
older ones.

I have a detector from EDAX with a small cryostat designed for cooling on
demand. This works fine, but we find the 1-2hr cool-down time is a
nuisance in our facility for users who see a feature, then decide it would
be good to do EDX analysis on it. We still tend to keep the detector cool
except during the weekend. If you were more sure of when you would and
wouldn't be using the EDX (and if the occasions when you would be using it
are relatively few) then I would say this would be a good way to go. I
have had one window failure (in 3.5 years), but then I have had window
failures at about this rate with other detectors that are not cycled regularly.

If you are thinking of new technology, you might consider the silicon drift
detector from Rontec. To the casual user this works just like a
conventional EDX, but it only needs cooling to -15C or thereabouts; this is
done easily with a thermoelectric cooler. Since the temperature change is
small, it also cools fast if it is not already on - it can be used 15 mins
or less after being switched on. On standby, the amplifiers are left on
but the detector is allowed to warm up. I don't know if I got a
particularly good one, but its resolution is comparable to that of a
premium Si(Li) of a few years ago, and it is sensitive to x-rays down to
C. It also will count happily at 160,000 counts/sec. It does have a few
minor disadvantages, so it may not be for everyone, but I was attracted by
the lack of need for Liq. N2, and I have been a happy customer. (I have
no connection with Rontec except as a customer, but I should mention that
the terms of the purchase allow Rontec to use my installation for
demonstration purposes).

Cheers,

Tony.


At 01:51 PM 3/24/2003 -0800, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** Manager, CMSE Shared Experimental Facilities
** MIT Rooms 13-1027 or 13-3090
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
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** USA
**
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From daemon Tue Mar 25 08:50:33 2003



From: R.M. Carr :      BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:41:04 +0000
Subject: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



dear sir or madam,
i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern developments
in microscopy and their advantages over traditional methods and machines

--
*******************************
This message was sent from an ISS public cluster at the University of
Leeds using Netscape Communicator. Its authenticity cannot be
guaranteed.




From daemon Tue Mar 25 10:30:53 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 10:18:41 -0600
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It would seem this request has reached the ultimate in vague and general
questions. I suppose the only improvement on it would be to avoid the
mention of microscopy altogether.

At 02:41 PM 3/25/03 +0000, you wrote:
} Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:41:04 +0000
} From: "R.M. Carr" {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
} Reply-To: noreply-at-leeds.ac.uk
} Organization: University of Leeds
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: modern microscopy
} Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
} Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
}
} dear sir or madam,
} i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern developments
} in microscopy and their advantages over traditional methods and machines
}
} --
} *******************************
} This message was sent from an ISS public cluster at the University of
} Leeds using Netscape Communicator. Its authenticity cannot be
} guaranteed.




From daemon Tue Mar 25 10:51:56 2003



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 08:43:48 -0800
Subject: Arabidopsis infiltration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "Richard Edelmann" {edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU}
} Date: Tue Mar 25, 2003 5:15:32 AM US/Pacific
} To: Kim Rensing {krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca}
} Subject: Re: Arabidopsis infiltration
} Reply-To: edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
}
} Rick:
}
} Arabidopsis is evil - pure and simple. Having worked with a variety
} of
} plants, arabidopsis (the tiny parking lot weed) takes 4 - 8x longer
} for ALL
} fixation steps than normal plants 10-20x the size - But short answer is
} LONGER IS BETTER. I can find you a reference for our protocols if you
} want but basically (yes these numbers are right):
}
} 1) aldehyde fix 8-10hrs -at- rt
}
} 2) rinses 4x -at-20-30min each
}
} 3) Osmium fix 2-4 hr -at-rt (this one is short who knows why . . )
}
} 4) rinse
}
} [ U acetate en bloc if wanted - over night]
}
} 5) dehydrate 25-75% -at-30-60 mins, 95, 100, 100, 100, 100 60-120 + mins
}
} 6) Infiltration (with Spurr's, Quetol 651, or LR White) on rotator at
} RT.
}
} 1/2 day steps: 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 100%, {- no catalyst
}
} 1 -day 100% {- no catalyst
}
} 100% 1/2-day to overnight with catalyst
}
} Molds w/catalyst
}
}
} What age plants? Seedlings 1-6 days old mostly, but works with
} mature/maturing plants (including infloresence) as well.
} } On Thursday, March 20, 2003, at 02:02 PM, Rick Harris wrote:
} } }
} } } I have a group looking at very early germinated Arabidopsis sp. They
} } } are having problems with good infiltration of the Epon-Araldite
} } } epoxy.
} } } While they are out searching the literature for solutions, I thought
} } } I'd drop a note to the list. Any suggestions for an infiltration
} } } protocol for these tiny plants? Spurr's? Dice up those little
} } } seeds?
} } }
} } } TIA
} } }
} } }
} } } Rick A. Harris, Director
} } } Microscopy and Imaging Facility
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
} Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} 350 Pearson Hall
} Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
} Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
} E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
} http://www.emf.muohio.edu
}
} "RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."
}



From daemon Tue Mar 25 16:36:41 2003



From: BLACKFORD, Mark :      mgb-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 09:27:03 +1100
Subject: JEMS software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I have just started using the JEMS image and diffraction simulation software. Is there a users group / listserver dedicated to JEMS? If so how do I join? Cheers,

Mark Blackford
ANSTO, Materials and Engineering Science
PMB 1,
Menai, N.S.W., 2234
Australia

Phone 61 2 9717 3027
Fax 61 2 9543 7179

Disclaimer:
The views expressed in this E-mail message do not necessarily represent the official views of ANSTO from which this message was conveyed.



From daemon Tue Mar 25 16:36:46 2003



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 17:27:41 -0500
Subject: Re: Carriage of liquid nitrogen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Over the years we have had visitors use our Liquid Nitrogen and found
it very convenient to purchase a refill for our tank to replace what
they used and the convenience of having the Liq N2 on site. This
avoided the problem of transporting the nitrogen accross the city etc.
Pat Connelly
Dept. of Biology
Univ. of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018


From daemon Tue Mar 25 19:13:55 2003



From: darryl krueger :      dkruege-at-Clemson.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 09:59:55 +0900
Subject: MT-2B Block Chucks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm in need of some new specimen block chucks for an old Sorval MT-2B
ultramicrotome. Can any one give me a source for such items new or
used. I'm also looking for some extra stainless steel camera plate
film (31/4 X 4) carriers for a Hitachi 7000 TEM. TIA

Darryl Krueger RA
Clemson University


From daemon Tue Mar 25 19:34:06 2003



From: darryl krueger :      dkruege-at-Clemson.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 09:59:55 +0900
Subject: MT-2B Block Chucks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you ever been in this situation? You are representing a client
who is supposed to receive a monthly payment. On some months, that payment
has been made on time, but on other months it has been paid late and
often not at all. Your client is entitled to interest on amounts owing,
but figuring out how much interest precisely is another matter.

In these situations, our Interest Wizard can reliably help you determine
the correct amounts owed. Whether your client is owed Child Support, Rent,
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Simply enter the monthly obligation and any payments actually received.
Click on the Calculate button and you have a chart reflecting the total
obligation owed, every payment actually received, the amount due after
each payment, and the accrued interest. When you're done, you can print
your chart and save the file under your client's name.

Give our Interest Wizard a try today. It's just $69.95, and it's guaranteed
to satisfy or your money back. To place an order, visit our website at:
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Join the thousands of attorneys that already use our legal software!
Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
David James Thorpe, Esq.
Offices of David Thorpe Legal Software


* To be removed from this mailing list please visit
http://www.thorpeforms.com/mlist.php.



From daemon Tue Mar 25 19:34:11 2003



From: darryl krueger :      dkruege-at-Clemson.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 09:59:55 +0900
Subject: MT-2B Block Chucks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you ever been in this situation? You are representing a client
who is supposed to receive a monthly payment. On some months, that payment
has been made on time, but on other months it has been paid late and
often not at all. Your client is entitled to interest on amounts owing,
but figuring out how much interest precisely is another matter.

In these situations, our Interest Wizard can reliably help you determine
the correct amounts owed. Whether your client is owed Child Support, Rent,
or any judgment or debt payable in monthly, weekly, or yearly installments,
our Interest Wizard can help you calculate what's owed and generate
a professional looking report to attach to a court filing.

Simply enter the monthly obligation and any payments actually received.
Click on the Calculate button and you have a chart reflecting the total
obligation owed, every payment actually received, the amount due after
each payment, and the accrued interest. When you're done, you can print
your chart and save the file under your client's name.

Give our Interest Wizard a try today. It's just $69.95, and it's guaranteed
to satisfy or your money back. To place an order, visit our website at:
http://www.ThorpeForms.com/lib/mrktAds.php?ad=iwiz022003
Join the thousands of attorneys that already use our legal software!
Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
David James Thorpe, Esq.
Offices of David Thorpe Legal Software


* To be removed from this mailing list please visit
http://www.thorpeforms.com/mlist.php.



From daemon Tue Mar 25 23:28:28 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 21:17:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject: ImmunoEm for plated cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,
Could some one give me tips on how to process plated
cells for immuno gold using LG gold or white.
and also
I have been processing some rabbit aortas with S Steel
stent in it for semi thick sections using
glycol-methacrylate. For some reason some blocks have
turned out be verysoft. Is it true that they cannot be
re processed and reembedded. Can I do some thing to
get sections of the region containing the stent
without disturbing the structure.
Shashi Singh
CCMB Hyderabad
INDIA

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
http://platinum.yahoo.com


From daemon Wed Mar 26 04:31:02 2003



From: Hans van Hirtum :      hvanhirtum-at-hsbb.nl
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 11:18:50 +0100
Subject: Reminder international post-graduate short-course on

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear list servers,

I would like to remind you of our international post-graduate
short-courses on histological techniques. Please note that you can still
register for the Multiple Staining in Immunohistochemistry course,
starting April 2nd.

We offer these international post-graduate short-courses on the
histological techniques:
- FISH Techniques in Molecular Pathology (16-20 June 2003)
- Confocal Light Microscopy: fundamentals and biological applications
(12-16 May 2003)
- Tissue micro-array (18-20 June 2003)
- Multiple Staining in Immunohistochemistry (2-4 April 2003)
All these courses are organized in close collaboration with experts in
the field of interest.

Please visit our website http://www.novaknowledge.nl/english.htm for
detailed information about these courses and other courses that we offer
(e.g. quantitative PCR and strategic protein purification).

Best regards,
Hans van Hirtum


Ing. J.P. van Hirtum
Hogeschool Brabant Nova Knowledge
P.O.box 5690
4801 EB Breda, the Netherlands
T: +31 (0) 76 572 2644
F: +31 (0) 76 572 2640
E: hvanhirtum-at-hsbb.nl
W: http://www.novaknowledge.nl


From daemon Wed Mar 26 04:35:42 2003



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 08:45:17 -0600
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Maybe so, but why shouldn't someone feel able to post on a microscopy forum
in order to gain information about microscopy?

Perhaps it would be more helpful for those well versed in the subject to
suggest literature which covers the field of microscopy more gererally than
is practicable here, or to offer advice on how the question might be made
more specific.

If there's one thing that puts people off from beginning to learn a subject,
it's being sneered at by those already in the know.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Warren E Straszheim {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: R.M. Carr {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 4:18 PM


I find the contrast between "modern" and "traditional" somewhat amusing.

Who determines when something changes from "modern" to "traditional".

For example, a brand new Olympus, Nikon or other "high end" optical
microscope with all the trimmings and a digital camera could certainly
be called a "modern" microscope, but I suspect it would be classified as
"traditional" (in some cases "obsolete"?).

Sorry, I couldn't resist spending the bandwidth to share my amusement.

John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Warren E Straszheim [mailto:wesaia-at-iastate.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 10:19 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: R.M. Carr


I agree with Justin. We need to be careful how we word our comments on
e-mail. E-mail is especially harsh, as we don't have the help of voice
inflection or gestures to help us communicate the sentiment we really
mean. Having said that, in order to answer the question, you do need to
clarify what you mean by modern microscopy.

As for modern microscopy, do you mean techniques for biology that use
immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy that allows for imaging of
live cultured cells with incorporation of dyes and markers, scanning
tunneling microscopes and field emission microscopes that allow
imaging beyond the standard electron microscopes? Some on this stuff
isn't that "new", but it is all more modern than standard histologic
techniques, SEM of carbon or platinum coated materials and TEM of
heavy metal stained, epoxy embedded tissues. Are you more interested
in nonbiological (materials) microscopy? Please clarify and you may get
more responses.

Karen Pawlowski


Justin Ritherdon wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Maybe so, but why shouldn't someone feel able to post on a microscopy forum
} in order to gain information about microscopy?
}
} Perhaps it would be more helpful for those well versed in the subject to
} suggest literature which covers the field of microscopy more gererally than
} is practicable here, or to offer advice on how the question might be made
} more specific.
}
} If there's one thing that puts people off from beginning to learn a subject,
} it's being sneered at by those already in the know.
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: Warren E Straszheim {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Cc: R.M. Carr {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
} Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 4:18 PM
} Subject: Re: modern microscopy
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } It would seem this request has reached the ultimate in vague and general
} } questions. I suppose the only improvement on it would be to avoid the
} } mention of microscopy altogether.
} }
} } At 02:41 PM 3/25/03 +0000, you wrote:
} } } Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 14:41:04 +0000
} } } From: "R.M. Carr" {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
} } } Reply-To: noreply-at-leeds.ac.uk
} } } Organization: University of Leeds
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: modern microscopy
} } } Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
} } } Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
} } }
} } } dear sir or madam,
} } } i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern developments
} } } in microscopy and their advantages over traditional methods and machines
} } }
} } } --
} } } *******************************
} } } This message was sent from an ISS public cluster at the University of
} } } Leeds using Netscape Communicator. Its authenticity cannot be
} } } guaranteed.
} }
} }
} }



From daemon Wed Mar 26 10:34:56 2003



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-uni-koeln.de
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 17:41:40 +0100
Subject: Looking for an epon embedding of isolated centrosomes/centrioles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Justin,

There was a thread like this a while ago, where the merits of answering this
type of questions was discussed. The result was in favor of what you are
saying, however, I think it was assumed that the questions were of a certain
quality. Questions like "Can you tell me about microscopy" or similar will
not provoke many answers, because frankly, most people can use their time
better than answering these basic questions. I am sure, nobody on the list
would object if you answered with a few pointers to books, but I wouldn't
hold my breath for a large response.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Justin Ritherdon [mailto:J.Ritherdon-at-liverpool.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 3:28 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Maybe so, but why shouldn't someone feel able to post on a microscopy forum
in order to gain information about microscopy?

Perhaps it would be more helpful for those well versed in the subject to
suggest literature which covers the field of microscopy more gererally than
is practicable here, or to offer advice on how the question might be made
more specific.

If there's one thing that puts people off from beginning to learn a subject,
it's being sneered at by those already in the know.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Warren E Straszheim {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: R.M. Carr {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 4:18 PM


Is there anybody out there who has an epon embedding of isolated
mammalian centrosomes/centrioles (or basal bodies) and might be willing
to let me have a few of sections?

Thanks,

Stefan



From daemon Wed Mar 26 10:54:39 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 11:45:59 -0800
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear R. M,

A great deal has been published by many companies and individuals over the years in American Lab. The Focus on Microscopy column, appearing over the past 8 years (typically appears in April and November, occasionally in July/August issues), emphasizes new directions (www.iscpubs.com).
See also "Microbrew" column which appeared periodically in Advanced Imaging (a Cygnus publication).

Other key publications:
Microscopy Today, BioPhotonics, R&D (ww.rdmag.com), Semiconductor International, Advanced Materials and Practices (published by the Am. Soc. for Materials).

Our firm tracks new develops. From our perspective, the hottest new areas include
-the convergence of microscopy and spectroscopy (especially FT-IR and Raman, but there are interesting new techniques in X-ray emerging),
-evolution of new chip technologies for cameras
-push into nanotechnology from multiple directions (especially EM, interferometry).

Your question is worthy of a MAJOR publication... far beyond the scope of this response. Please feel free to contact me off-line if you are interested in something specific.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education, Inc
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com


"Why didn't they teach us that sooner?" ... probably because no one thought to call MME about customized, on-site courses. Offered in all areas of microscopy, sample prep,and image analysis, they make an immediate impact on your productivity.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-






At 02:41 PM 3/25/03 +0000, R.M. Carr wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Mar 26 12:37:05 2003



From: Andrew Ochalski :      AOCHALSK-at-science.uottawa.ca
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 13:25:41 -0500
Subject: Re:modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hello all,

I agree with Warren Straszheim. The question as posed sounds like
an essay topic and would require a several-thousand word reply once
one did define terms. There was no evidence that the person solicitng
aid had done any research that might have allowed them to pose the
question in a more easy-to-answer form. I think people whose time
and energy are being solicited deserve some respect.


From daemon Wed Mar 26 13:13:52 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 07:32:46 +1200
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


One clear technical revolution in microscopy occurred in the 1960s
with the advent of scanning electron microscopy. Up to that point, all
microscopes used lenses, either optical or electron-optical, to
generate a magnified image of an object. The scanning electron
microscope was the first type of microscope to generate magnified
images without the use of lenses. It was a hugely important advance in
the characterization of surface morphology of materials. More recently
the optical analogue of that technology has appeared in the form of
the laser scanning confocal microscope, which again has had a major
impact, particularly in the life sciences. Yes, both these
microscopes use lenses, but the purpose of the lenses is solely to
generate a probe of electrons or light radiation, and not to generate
the image itself. Since the principle of scanning or raster
microscopy was introduced in the SEM, pure non-optical scanning
microscopes have appeared in the forms of the scanning tunnelling
microscope, the atomic force microscope and their relatives.

Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Karen Pawlowski" {kpawlow-at-swbell.net}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 2:45 PM


Oh, come on!

rtch


}
}
} Maybe so, but why shouldn't someone feel able to post on a microscopy
} forum in order to gain information about microscopy?
}
} Perhaps it would be more helpful for those well versed in the subject
} to suggest literature which covers the field of microscopy more
} gererally than is practicable here, or to offer advice on how the
} question might be made more specific.
}
} If there's one thing that puts people off from beginning to learn a
} subject, it's being sneered at by those already in the know.
}


} } }
} } It would seem this request has reached the ultimate in vague and
} } general questions. I suppose the only improvement on it would be to
} } avoid the mention of microscopy altogether.
} }


} } }
} } } dear sir or madam,
} } } i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern
} } } developments in microscopy and their advantages over traditional
} } } methods and machines
} } }
} } } --

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
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From daemon Wed Mar 26 17:20:52 2003



From: KHDowning-at-lbl.gov
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 16:41:34 -0800
Subject: 3-D EM Gordon Conference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ditto, Justin - maybe something can be dug up web-wise for our friend?:

http://www.google.com/search?as_q=&num=10&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&btnG=Googl
e+Search&as_epq=history+of+the+microscope&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=&as_ft=i&as_filet
ype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&safe=images

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=modern+improvements+i
n+microsopes&btnG=Google+Search

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=chronology+of+the+mic
roscope&btnG=Google+Search

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=modern+developments+i
n+microscopy&btnG=Google+Search

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=invention+of+the+
microscope&btnG=Google+Search

Good Luck -

Marc Helvey
Strategic Accounts Manager
VLSI Standards, Inc.
3087 North First Street
San Jose, CA 95134-2006

E-Mail: marc.helvey-at-vlsistd.com {mailto:marc.helvey-at-vlsistd.com}
Internet: http://www.vlsistandards.com {http://www.vlsistandards.com/}


-----Original Message-----
} From: Justin Ritherdon [mailto:J.Ritherdon-at-liverpool.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 2:28 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Maybe so, but why shouldn't someone feel able to post on a microscopy forum
in order to gain information about microscopy?

Perhaps it would be more helpful for those well versed in the subject to
suggest literature which covers the field of microscopy more gererally than
is practicable here, or to offer advice on how the question might be made
more specific.

If there's one thing that puts people off from beginning to learn a subject,
it's being sneered at by those already in the know.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Warren E Straszheim {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: R.M. Carr {BMB2RMC-at-leeds.ac.uk}
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 4:18 PM


Posted on behalf of Ken Taylor, chair of the 2003 Gordon Conference on
Three-Dimensional Electron Microscopy of Macromolecules


This is a heads up about application to this years Gordon Conference on
3-D Electron Microscopy of Macromolecules. The conference will be closed
to new applications at the end of March. Attendance to the conference is
by invitation only based on your application. Application does not
guarantee acceptance but if you want to attend, you have to apply.

Application takes only a few minutes and can be done on-line at the
following URL:

https://www.grc.org/scripts/dbml.exe?Template=/Application/apply1.dbm

The conference program can be found at

https://www.grc.org/programs/2003/3d.htm

I hope to see you at the conference.

Cheers -- Ken (Taylor)




From daemon Wed Mar 26 18:58:38 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 16:58:08 -0800
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Tuesday, March 25, 2003, at 06:41 AM, R.M. Carr wrote:

} i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern developments
} in microscopy and their advantages over traditional methods and
} machines
}
Dear RM,
Two modern developments are the scanning probe microscopies, which can
look at signals previously unseen, and cryoscopic methods. The first
development includes atomic force microscopy (with its several modes),
near-field optical microscopy, Hall probe microscopy, and many
more--some of which I'm sure I've not heard of. The advantages are the
ability to measure the rigidity of surfaces on the atomic level, the
ability to get much better resolution than a wavelength of light, and
the ability to measure magnetic field variations on the micrometer
scale. The second development enables the observation of biological
materials without the necessity of chemical fixation and staining, so
the unperturbed biological molecules themselves can be measured. As
others on the list have suggested, you should find the appropriate
materials in your library or on the web to get the latest details.
Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Wed Mar 26 19:53:16 2003



From: wang-at-verrillon.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 09:38:50 +0900
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wang-at-verrillon.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
March 26, 2003 at 14:54:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wang-at-verrillon.com
Name: Chih-Hao Wang

Organization: Verrillon

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grafton, MA, 01721

Question: I want to measure the thickness for a very thin layer
(20nm) of coating on the glass surface.
I tried SEM but the resolution is not good enough for this.

Please advise!

Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Mar 27 00:51:58 2003



From: Roberto Olayo Valles :      olayo-at-cems.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 00:41:37 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mr, Wang,
A few suggestions I have are using ellipsometry, profilometry, and/or X-ray
reflectivity. We have obtained best results using X-ray reflectivity (GIXR)
for polymer thin films. I hope this helps.

Roberto Olayo-Valles
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
University of Minnesota

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListServer [mailto:wang-at-verrillon.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 6:39 PM
To: MicroscopyListserver


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wang-at-verrillon.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
March 26, 2003 at 14:54:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wang-at-verrillon.com
Name: Chih-Hao Wang

Organization: Verrillon

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grafton, MA, 01721

Question: I want to measure the thickness for a very thin layer
(20nm) of coating on the glass surface.
I tried SEM but the resolution is not good enough for this.

Please advise!

Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Thu Mar 27 01:57:09 2003



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 09:04:30 +0100
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is actually an inexpensive book that might answer the question:
Light and Electron Microscopy by Elizabeth and Henry Slayter, Cambridge
University Press 1992
ISBN 0-521-33948-0

It contains a few chapters describing microscopy using about anything you
can imagine,
light, electrons, neutrons, X-rays, ions, sound or nothing at all.
I think that should give an overview, although it's strongest side is light
microscopy in my opinion.

Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290
http://www.biosci.ki.se/em

The phrase 'We have always done things this way.'
is as much a reason to change as a reason not to.
- Dartwill Aquila
_______________________________________
} dear sir or madam,
} i was wondering whether you could inform me of the modern developments
} in microscopy and their advantages over traditional methods and machines




From daemon Thu Mar 27 08:24:12 2003



From: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 15:11:43 +0100
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Chih-Hao Wang,

You don't tell us what the composition is of your very thin layer. But if
the average Z value is not too low, you can use the X-ray spectrometer on
the SEM to measure the thickness. There are today optional programs for
that. If you don't possess such a program, you can follow the procedure
described by Bishop and Poole in J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., vol. 6 (1973)
1142. Using this procedure I have once measured the thickness of gold layers
in the nm range on holmium.

Best regards,
Jorgen.

{:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::}

Joergen B. Bilde-Soerensen
Senior Research Scientist, Ph. D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 4677 5802 (direct)
phone: +45 4677 4677 (switchboard)
fax: +45 4677 5758
website: http://www.risoe.dk/afm/Personal/jqbi/jqbi.htm



-----Original Message-----
} From: wang-at-verrillon.com [mailto:wang-at-verrillon.com]
Sent: 27. marts 2003 01:39
To: MicroscopyListserver


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wang-at-verrillon.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
March 26, 2003 at 14:54:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wang-at-verrillon.com
Name: Chih-Hao Wang

Organization: Verrillon

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grafton, MA, 01721

Question: I want to measure the thickness for a very thin layer
(20nm) of coating on the glass surface.
I tried SEM but the resolution is not good enough for this.

Please advise!

Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Mar 27 11:21:56 2003



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 12:11:21 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


One of the easiest ways to do this is with optical modeling. If you can find someone with an ellipsometer, it would be relatively straightforward. Making cross section on glass that can measure films that thin in the TEM are not real easy, but can be done. You can use the normal dimple and ion milling approach or the Tripod polish approach. Phil Swab published an article on how to prepare a sample with ultramicrotomy that is fairly straitforward. I dug out a response to a previous question that he answered here and have copied it below.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)

____From Phil Swab:

Glass is readily microtomed with a diamond knife and may be a suitable
inexpensive technique for you to consider. Particularly if the materials
of your sample are sufficiently dissimilar in reaction to the chemical and
ion etching of some techniques. I've been embedding and sectioning coated
glass, optics, and other hard materials for 18 years (even diamond coated
silicon in Microscopy Research and Technique, vol. 31, p. 308, 1995). The
imaging and analysis of nano-structures in micron sized areas near the
surface of glass is routine, fast, and inexpensive for physical
microstructure and chemistry. Mechanical artifacts generated in
ultramicrotomy tend to be quite large, readily visible, and easily ignored
but may interfere with the analysis of naturally occurring deformation
features (i.e. twinning, slip, etc.). Any good diamond knife will work
with meticulous and careful technique, but experience has shown that 35
degree knives yield the best results with hard and ultra-hard materials.

The critical elements for microtomy of hard, non-porous materials include:
1. Minimize the cross-sectional area to be sectioned. An easy way is to do
this is to pop concoidal micro-chips from the surface. These tend to be
very thin at the edges and may be further broken to form very pointed thin
samples. [Time = ~20 minutes]
2. Optimize sample orientation for sectioning and preferred orientation.
Some physical microstructures are anisotropic and are difficult to
interpret when viewed in the wrong orientation. [Time = ~10 minutes]
3. Maximize adhesion to the resin through the selection of an appropriate
resin (low viscosity and non-reactive with your sample), meticulous and
contamination-free sample prep, and the addition of adhesion promoters
(such as Dow Corning Z-6040). [Time = ~1 hour, with an over night epoxy
cure]
4. Section using standard procedures, but minimize the sectioning speed
(optimize cutting speed). [Time = ~1 hour]

These times are approximate for 1 sample, and there could be economy in
numbers. As always, each case will require individual attention.
Cheers,

Phil Swab
Engineering Development
Deposition Sciences Inc.
Santa Rosa, CA
707-566-3718
phil.swab-at-depsci.com





-----Original Message-----
} From: wang-at-verrillon.com [mailto:wang-at-verrillon.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 7:39 PM
To: MicroscopyListserver


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wang-at-verrillon.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
March 26, 2003 at 14:54:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wang-at-verrillon.com
Name: Chih-Hao Wang

Organization: Verrillon

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grafton, MA, 01721

Question: I want to measure the thickness for a very thin layer
(20nm) of coating on the glass surface.
I tried SEM but the resolution is not good enough for this.

Please advise!

Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Mar 27 12:00:36 2003



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 09:52:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: ImmunoEm for plated cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Here is a method I have used for processing cell culture monolayers into
LRWhite for subsequent immunolabeling:

LRWhite Cell monolayer Processing
Cells ar grown in thermanox petri dishes.

1. Fload cells with Zambonies fixative 4 degrees: 5 min- 24hr...test.
For 50 ml...Heat and stir 16.5ml water to 55 degrees C, add 4 drops 2M
NAOH.
Add 1g paraformaldehyde (prills) for 2% or 2g for 4%...It will take about
5 minutes to clear. Do not let the temperature exceed 60 degrees. Cool on
ice.
Add 25 ml 2x Sorensons.
Add 7.5 ml Picric acid.
pH to 7.4 using the pH indicator strips.
Store at 4 degrees. Good for 2 weeks.

2. Rinse in PBS 3x 5 minutes.
3. 35% EtOH 1 min.
4. 50% EtOH 1 min.
5. 70% EtOH 2 min.
6. 95% EtOH 2 min.
7. 2:1 100% EtOH/LRWhite 5 min. (Rotator).
8. 1:1 100% EtOH/LRWhite 10 min. (Rotator).
9. 1:2 100% EtOH/LRWhite 20 min. (Rotator).
10. Pure LRWhite (overnight). (Rotator).
11. Change into fresh LRWhite. 1 hr (Rotator)
12. Change into fresh LRWhite.
13. Place into Vacuum Oven 50-55 degrees, flushed several times with dry
nitrogen and allow to polymerize for 24-48 hr.
I have about 3-5 lbs. of vacuum to keep the door sealed.
Note: Steps from fixation to 70% can be carried out at 4 degrees.
and steps from 70% to the polymerization can be carried out at
temperatures down to -20.

Hope this helps.
Bob Underwood
Derm Research Center
U of Washington


On Tue, 25 Mar 2003, shashi singh wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear listers,
} Could some one give me tips on how to process plated
} cells for immuno gold using LG gold or white.
} and also
} I have been processing some rabbit aortas with S Steel
} stent in it for semi thick sections using
} glycol-methacrylate. For some reason some blocks have
} turned out be verysoft. Is it true that they cannot be
} re processed and reembedded. Can I do some thing to
} get sections of the region containing the stent
} without disturbing the structure.
} Shashi Singh
} CCMB Hyderabad
} INDIA
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
} http://platinum.yahoo.com
}
}



From daemon Thu Mar 27 13:33:22 2003



From: Karl Garsha :      garsha-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 13:54:57 -0600
Subject: Re: modern microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Well, if you're gonna go this route, I cannot help but waste more bandwidth.
"Traditional" microscopy probably refers to simple compound light
microscopy. Putting a camera on microscope would be the first transition
to "modern". "Modern" would refer to developments in the mid-20th C to
the present, or 15-20 years ago (includes EM, mass produced infinity
corrected optics, etc.). "Contemporary" (the term "postmodern" is loaded
and banned and should only be used in an ironic fashion under erasure)
microscopy would include the use of computers for image creation via
mathematical convolutions of data collected by modern methods.

Practically, the person making the original question should be referred to
an intro to microscopy course or Slayter's book, as already recommended.

-Michael
---------------------------------------------------------------------------




I find the contrast between "modern" and "traditional" somewhat amusing.

Who determines when something changes from "modern" to "traditional".

For example, a brand new Olympus, Nikon or other "high end" optical
microscope with all the trimmings and a digital camera could certainly
be called a "modern" microscope, but I suspect it would be classified as
"traditional" (in some cases "obsolete"?).

Sorry, I couldn't resist spending the bandwidth to share my amusement.

John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Warren E Straszheim [mailto:wesaia-at-iastate.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, March 25, 2003 10:19 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: R.M. Carr


I'm not sure if it is possible draw the line between modern
and traditional approaches to microscopy, but it seems that the advent
of relatively cheap, user accessable computing power is one of the main
differences between microscopic imaging today and what was involved a
few years ago. Traditional photographic techniques and darkroom time
are giving way to digital image capture because of considerations
including cost, speed and ability to extract data from multidimensional
data sets. We see this as a trend for retrofitting of existing
"traditional microscopes" and for the development of new microscopies
which are dependant on computing technology.
Another factor that may be taken to separate modern microscopies
from traditional methods are the advent of new illumination sources and
sources of contrast. Lasers have revolutionized approaches towards
microscopy, so have electron beams, so have light bulbs. Modern
microscopes use modern physics.
A third thing that comes to mind is the type of information that
modern microscopes provide. Traditional microscopies may be thought of
as providing structural information whereas modern methods also probe
chemical properties, electro-magnetic properties, etc. at the microscale.
-Karl G.

R.M. Carr wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Office: B650J
Phone: 217.244.6292
Fax: 217.244.6219
Mobile: 217.390.1874
www.itg.uiuc.edu




From daemon Thu Mar 27 14:37:54 2003



From: Evelyn York :      eyork-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 12:24:44 -0800
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wasn't Bishop and Pooles procedure written for micro-probe systems and not SEM?


At 03:11 PM 3/27/2003 +0100, j.bilde-at-risoe.dk"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} wang-at-verrillon.com



From daemon Thu Mar 27 15:55:34 2003



From: Teplitsky, Mark :      MTeplitsky-at-amsuper.com
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 16:45:21 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: thickness measurement by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




If the film is transparent interferometry can be used for the thickness
measurements. Another promising approach is Rautherford Backscattering
(RBS).

Mark


-----Original Message-----
} From: wang-at-verrillon.com [mailto:wang-at-verrillon.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2003 7:39 PM
To: MicroscopyListserver


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wang-at-verrillon.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
March 26, 2003 at 14:54:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wang-at-verrillon.com
Name: Chih-Hao Wang

Organization: Verrillon

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grafton, MA, 01721

Question: I want to measure the thickness for a very thin layer
(20nm) of coating on the glass surface.
I tried SEM but the resolution is not good enough for this.

Please advise!

Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Thu Mar 27 17:56:21 2003



From: iyarkinwet-at-nm.ru (VENNERS RAKOVSKY)
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2003 18:46:47 -0600
Subject: microscopy,

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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From daemon Fri Mar 28 09:48:34 2003



From: Hong Yi :      hyi-at-emory.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2003 10:34:54 -0500
Subject: WORKSHOP ANNOUNCEMENT

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



WORKSHOP ANNOUNCEMENT

Dear Researcher:

Emory Neurology Microscopy Core Laboratory is hosting a week-long
workshop on Cryo-technique and immunogold labeling from May 4, through
May 9, 2003 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The workshop curriculum will
include the latest advances on cryo-fixation and substitution of
biological samples, cryo-ultramicrotomy, and pre- and post-embedding
immunogold labeling. Internationally well known experts in the fields,
Dr. Kent McDonald (EM Laboratory at the University of California,
Berkeley), Dr. Jan Luenissen (Aurion Immunogold Reagent & Accessories)
and Mr. Helmut Gnaegi (Diatome) will be the instructors for the
workshop. The workshop will include lectures, hands-on training, round
table discussions, and presentations on applications. Also,
participants of the workshop will be able to work on their own samples
during the workshop. The industrial sponsors for the workshop are Leica
Microsystems Inc., Aurion, EMS, and Diatome U.S.

The workshop will limit the number of participants to 15. Registration
deadline is April 15. If you are interested in attending or need more
information about the workshop, please contact the workshop technical
coordinator Hong Yi by phone (404-712-8491) or email (hyi-at-emory.edu),
or log on www.em-preparation.com.

Hong Yi
Emory EM



From daemon Fri Mar 28 15:10:28 2003



From: Hong Yi :      hyi-at-emory.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Mar 2003 14:54:20 -0500
Subject: Searching for End Plates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have some resin embedded skeletal muscle samples, and we are looking
for end plates. However, end plates are usually aggregated along
muscle fibers. Without knowing which blocks have end plates, or where
in a block, we have to search on semi-thin sections first before
cutting thin sections for EM. Can any one recommend a dye that stains
end plates on epon semi-thin sections? It is very inefficient to
search this way. Can anyone recommend a better approach? The samples
have been treated, so somewhat precious.

Thank you very much for your input.

Hong Yi
Emory EM



From daemon Mon Mar 31 06:03:07 2003



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 13:37:18 +0200
Subject: JEOL alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
Our JEOL3010 alignment has got into a bad state, and I can't seem to get it
back with the normal alignments described in the handbook. Probably a user
has accidently altered a gun or condensor alignment. Does anybody have a
set of instructions for a complete gun and column alignment, and not just
the everyday procedures in the standard blue ring-binder?

(I can't get a beam on the phosphor screen at all in SA, in LM I see the
beam but get weird caustic shapes and the best is with beam shifts way over
on one side). There are no instructions in the manual about what to do
with Gun deflectors or condensor deflectors, although playing with the Gun
deflector did improve things slightly.

Thanks for any help you can give.

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material-und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany



From daemon Mon Mar 31 06:52:12 2003



From: ROSSCAC-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 07:42:23 EST
Subject: EM Quality Control

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Good morning all in the listserver,
I had a question - how does on go about doing quality control on EM - both
TEM and SEM. In other words, other than giving techs unknown samples and
checking the end results - or just looking over their shoulders checking
thicks and thin quality - is there another way?
Thanks in advance,
Connie Cummings


From daemon Mon Mar 31 07:30:03 2003



From: Michael Herron :      herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 07:18:14 -0600
Subject: divided coverglass chamber?

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All,

I was wondering if there exists a divided coverglass chamber where the
chambers are close enough so that two chambers can be observed
simultaneously with a 20 x objective. Has anyone seen such a thing?

Mike
--

Michael J. Herron, U of MN, Entomology
herro001-at-umn.edu
612-624-3688 Office, 624-3212 Lab, 625-5299 FAX


From daemon Mon Mar 31 09:44:24 2003



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 07:31:27 -0800
Subject: Images needed

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Listers:

Here's a request for micrographs that's worth your attention; please
respond directly to Alisia.

Wanted: images for NIH booklet
We are looking for a handful of TEM, SEM, and laser scanning confocal
micrographs to illustrate a science education booklet on cell biology. The
booklet, a revised version of "Inside the Cell," is part of a series on
basic biomedical topics published by the National Institute of General
Medical Sciences (see http://www.nigms.nih.gov/news/science_ed/ for a list
and online versions). The award-winning booklets are extremely popular with
science teachers and are used in classrooms across the country.

We are primarily interested in images of cells, cell components, microbes,
and other samples that relate to biomedicine. In addition, we would
appreciate images of a single sample at a range of magnifications and/or as
viewed through different types of scopes (light, TEM, SEM).

We will provide photo credits next to the images. Although we usually
obtain images free of charge from scientists we fund, we are also willing to
pay modestly for some images. As for all NIGMS publications, this booklet
will be non-copyrighted and distributed free of charge. If you would like
to submit images that have been previously published, please include
complete publication reference information. We will give preference to
unpublished images.

Please e-mail candidate images as low-resolution jpegs to
alisa.machalek-at-nih.gov. For printing, we will need images of 300 dpi at a
printed size of about 5"X5" (the size will vary depending on the image).
We hope to obtain all images by April 17. For additional questions, feel
free to contact Alisa Zapp Machalek at alisa.machalek-at-nih.gov or (301)
496-7301.

_________________________
Alisa Zapp Machalek
Science Writer, NIH/NIGMS
45 Center Dr. Room 3AN.32
Bethesda, MD 20892-6200
(301) 496-7301 phone
(301) 402-0224 fax




From daemon Mon Mar 31 09:49:06 2003



From: Heike Gabrisch :      hgabrisc-at-uno.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 09:46:29 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral Position/ TEM

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The Advanced Materials Research Institute (AMRI) at the University of New
Orleansis looking for a post-doctoral scholar to work on a project about
the characterization of transition metal oxides used as electrode material
in rechargeable batteries. The successful candidate should have a background
in crystallography and TEM. The position is to be filled immediately.


contact : Heike Gabrisch
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Material Sciences
University of New Orleans
College of Sciences
Department of Chemistry/AMRI
New Orleans, LA 70148

hgabrisc-at-uno.edu... phone (504 )280-1122 ... fax (504) 280-3185 ...



From daemon Mon Mar 31 11:10:24 2003



From: Robert Kayton :      kayton-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 13:57:49 -0800
Subject: Fwd: Searching for End Plates

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Hi Ian

Are you sure you have ONLY an alignment problem?

If the objective lens has gone down you may have a similar problem. As the
instrument is aligned round a normally working objective lens the problems
you describe could be attributed to that!

Look at you objective lens current - does it change when you change the
focus controls or is it static? If it is static switch off and take a look
at the objective lens output power transistors on the cooled board.

Alternatively your illumination alignment TILT is out of shape which would
move the final image alignment well off centre. What worries me is the
caustic that you are seeing on LM1. I do not know if JEOL use the objective
just a little under these conditions, I would guess not, so we have to start
suspecting the high voltage or the lens/high voltage standard levels are
wrong it could be the EPROM?

You do not have a simple problem, maybe others have seen this before and
know the route that the engineers took?

Come back with more detailed information and I would be pleased to help.

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007
www.emcourses.com



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ian MacLaren" {maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de}
To: "Microscopy Listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: "Ralf Theissmann" {ralf-at-steno.st.mw.tu-darmstadt.de} ; "Gerhard Miehe"
{miehe-at-eddy.st.mw.tu-darmstadt.de}
Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 12:37 PM




The following is a response from one of the researchers working on a MD model in mice, who does EM of end plates .
-----------------

The only way I can tell where the end plates are is to trim the muscle at the synaptic zone before I process it, because you can see the nerves with a dissecting scope. Then when I embed the muscle, I orient the square-trimmed end that I know has synapes to the top (or tip) of the resin block. Once the tissue has gone through Osmium, I think it is impossible to discern the synaptic zone.
Thomas Proctor
proctoth-at-ohsu.edu
-------------------

Bob Kayton, PhD
Histo/EM Core
503-494-2504-Lab
503-703-3938-Cell



From daemon Mon Mar 31 16:44:25 2003



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 14:35:50 -0800
Subject: Third party microscope repairs and service

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As part of our restructuring, we will not renew the service contract on our
trusty old Philips410LS. Can anyone recommend third party service in
Northern California? I understand Ron Veil is no longer in business.


Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu







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