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From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 09:42:55 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] A Human Cytome Project ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I was wondering if there is already something going on to set up a sort
of "Human Cytome Project" ? In my opinion the hardware and most of the
software seems to be avaialable to set up such a project ? For the
cellular level, light-microscopy based reader technology would be very
interesting to use ?

Studying and mapping the genome, transcriptome and proteome at the
organisational level of the cell for various celltypes and organ models
could provide us with a lot of information of what actually goes on in
organisms in the spatio-spectro-temporal space ?

I have been thinking (working) about a concept which could provide the
basic framework for exploring and managing this cellular level of
biological organisation research on a large scale, but I would like to
know if there is already some thought/work going on in the direction of
setting up an initiative such as a "Human Cytome Project" ?

This is just an idea, so I am really interested to hear if there is
something in it, or even if it is not worth while whet I just wrote.

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 14:47:53 2003



From: Amy Sillman :      sillman-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 13:46:37 PDT
Subject: [Microscopy] LM need help staining HL-60 cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

New list member here...

I am having difficulty with immunofluorescence staining of DMSO-
differentiated HL-60 cells (a promyelocytic cell line induced to
differentiate to
a neutrophil-like phenotype). The main problem is nonspecific binding of the
secondary reagent--in this case a FITC-labeled donkey F(ab')2 anti-chicken
IgY causing very high background. Since anti-chicken reagents are in limited
availability, I am going to try to get around using a secondary antibody by
biotinylating my primary chicken antibody and then using labeled
streptavidin as my secondary reagent. However, I have a mouse antibody
that I would like to use as well, and my anti-mouse reagent also gives high
background. Does anyone have any helpful pointers on blocking nonspecific
binding (or specific, undesirable interactions i.e. with the Fc receptors) on
these cells? I am currently blocking and doing my staining in a buffer
containing 5% nonfat dry milk and 5% horse serum. I have tried adding in
human IgG to block Fc receptors, and the secondary-only controls seem a bit
lower, but this background is still unacceptably high.

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Amy

Amy Sillman, Ph. D.
Visiting Postdoctoral Scholar
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, CA 94143
http://www.ucsf.edu/barber/lab1.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 15:26:29 2003



From: John Mansfield :      jfmjfm-at-umich.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2003 16:23:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Has anyone else been the LUCKY recipient of what seems to me to be one
of the worst marketing gimmicks I have seen in a long time?
I received a blue plush toy in the mail just before Thanksgiving that
looks like some kind of exotic worm, although I think it is supposed to
be aquatic, anyone else been sent one?

--
John Mansfield PhD MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 USA
Phone: (734) 936-3352
FAX (734) 763-2282
Cell. Phone: (734) 834-3913
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 834-3913)
Email: jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html
Location: Lat. 42° 16' 48" Long. 83° 43' 48"
AIM: thejfmjfm





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 18:55:59 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 16:55:11 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Is it just "materialization" of the virtual worms attacked us every
day? If so, you have to present it to Norton Antivirus team for
identification and including into their antiviral software. Sergey


At 01:23 PM 12/1/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 19:00:19 2003



From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-SHCC.ORG
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 16:55:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] ISI DS-130 specimen stubs needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Microscopists,

I am looking for a vendor to supply specimen stubs for the upper stage
of an ISI DS-130 SEM. They are threaded and about 9 mm in diameter.
Does anyone know of a source?

Thanks in advance,

Doug

---------------------
Doug Keene
Associate Investigator
Imaging Center
Shriners Hospital for Children
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239
503-221-3434



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 19:06:35 2003



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2003 17:04:38 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John;
I got one too, and I loved it. My 1-1/2 year old daughter didn't quite know what to make of it though, so she still prefers to yank my pager and cell phone out of my briefcase and play with them. Maybe when she gets a bit older and learns about microscopy...............

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: John Mansfield [mailto:jfmjfm-at-umich.edu]
Sent: Monday, December 01, 2003 1:24 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Has anyone else been the LUCKY recipient of what seems to me to be one
of the worst marketing gimmicks I have seen in a long time?
I received a blue plush toy in the mail just before Thanksgiving that
looks like some kind of exotic worm, although I think it is supposed to
be aquatic, anyone else been sent one?

--
John Mansfield PhD MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 USA
Phone: (734) 936-3352
FAX (734) 763-2282
Cell. Phone: (734) 834-3913
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 834-3913)
Email: jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html
Location: Lat. 42° 16' 48" Long. 83° 43' 48"
AIM: thejfmjfm







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 22:52:26 2003



From: Robert Molchanov :      rob_molch-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2003 20:51:19 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] LM Need help on Staining Cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,

We are searching for a method in vivo labeling or
staining of bladder epithelium and/or
it can be detectable in tissue samples after
bladder resection.
I would appreciate any recommendations.

Thanks.

Robert Molchanov M.D.

Dpt.of Urology
State Medical Academy
Dniepropetrovsk
Ukraine
Phone/Fax +380 (562) 466563
E-mail: rob_molch-at-yahoo.com


__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
http://companion.yahoo.com/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 1 22:54:49 2003



From: Robert Molchanov :      rob_molch-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 1 Dec 2003 20:53:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] LM Need help on Staining Cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,

We are searching for a method in vivo labeling or
staining of bladder epithelium and/or
transitional-cell carcinoma of bladder so that
it can be detectable in tissue samples after
bladder resection.
I would appreciate any recommendations.

Thanks.

Robert Molchanov M.D.

Dpt.of Urology
State Medical Academy
Dniepropetrovsk
Ukraine
Phone/Fax +380 (562) 466563
E-mail: rob_molch-at-yahoo.com


__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
http://companion.yahoo.com/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 06:50:03 2003



From: Pernilla Nevsten :      pernilla.nevsten-at-materialkemi.lth.se
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 13:52:42 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] negative staining of budded virus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopy Listserver members,

I have done negative staining ( 1% PTA) on a budded virus for TEM and
some of the virus species appears white while other, on the same gridd,
have a darker appearence. Does anyone have any experience of this
phenomenon? Is this depending on if the envelope membrane is lost or not?

Sincerely,
Pernilla

...........................................................................................................................................

Pernilla Nevsten, PhD-student
Materials Chemistry
Lund University, Sweden







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 08:31:29 2003



From: crimp-at-egr.msu.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 08:29:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Postdoctoral opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (crimp-at-egr.msu.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, December 2, 2003 at 08:08:12
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: crimp-at-egr.msu.edu
Name: Marty Crimp

Organization: Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Postdoctoral opening

Question: The Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at Michigan State University has an immediate opening for a postdoctoral level researcher with experience in both transmission and scanning electron microscopy of materials. This position will involve a combination of lab supervision, training, and research. Applicants should possess both strong communications skills and experience with a broad range of electron microscopy techniques. An earned Ph.D. in materials science or related field is required.

Please send cover letter, resume, and a list of three references to:
Prof. Martin A. Crimp, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824-1226. MSU is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Persons with disabilities have the right to request and receive reasonable accommodation.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 08:30:03 2003



From: starovoytov-at-nel-exchange.rutgers.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 08:29:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Hitachi SEM and TEM available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (starovoytov-at-biology.rutgers.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, December 1, 2003 at 13:39:26
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: starovoytov-at-biology.rutgers.edu
Name: Valentin Starovoytov

Organization: Rutgers. The State University of NJ

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: We have two scopes that we are removing from our facility. Does anyone want a "Hitachi S-450" SEM or "Philips EM-300" TEM? Both scopes are available for the cost to relocate them to your facility. Both are in good, operating condition.

PLease e-mail or call Val Starovoytov at 732-445-5308

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 10:56:48 2003



From: Joel Sheffield :      jbs-at-temple.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 11:51:34 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: negative staining of budded virus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

That was pretty common in our studies of the Mammary Tumor
Virus. Are you seeing osmotic artifacts as well? In our studies of
MTV, the virus often appeared as a "head" with a membranous tail.
You can check some of the other ways we prepared the virus in:
Cancer Research 35:740-749 (1975)

Joel


}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------
}
} Dear Microscopy Listserver members,
}
} I have done negative staining ( 1% PTA) on a budded virus for TEM and
} some of the virus species appears white while other, on the same
} gridd, have a darker appearence. Does anyone have any experience of
} this phenomenon? Is this depending on if the envelope membrane is
} lost or not?
}
} Sincerely,
} Pernilla
}
} ......................................................................
} .....................................................................
}
} Pernilla Nevsten, PhD-student
} Materials Chemistry
} Lund University, Sweden
}
}
}
}
}
}


Joel B. Sheffield, Ph.D.
Biology Department, Temple University
1900 North 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
jbs-at-temple.edu
(215) 204 8839, fax (215) 204 0486
http://astro.temple.edu/~jbs



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 11:00:49 2003



From: paul r hazelton :      Paul_Hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 10:58:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: negative staining of budded virus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

pernilla

congratulations, you are about to receive a deluge of comments
recommending different stains. the best advice here is to stick with
what you are familiar with. unless you wish to make a comparative study
of stains. if you wish to do that let me know and i will share my
results from previous studies. the bottom line is that most stains are
inherently similar in results. some are more grainy, some sublimate,
some are reputed to cause damage to the particles. but if you are happy
with what you have, stick with it.

the first question is have you stabilized and inactivated the particles
in any way. we use a final concentration of 0.1% glutaraldehyde. as we
all know, it is a cross-linking fixative, and therefore, may cause
clumping of the material. in our case, we find clumping is not really a
problem in clinical samples. also, at a concentration of 0.1% the
antigenic sites are retained sufficiently to allow immunoEM procedures
to work. alternatively, if you are concerned with clumping you may wish
to treat the particles with 2% paraformaldehyde.

the second question is did you adjust the pH of the PTA. it is usually
used at a pH of 7.0. if the pH is adjusted with KOH the stain is
reported to cause disruption of membranes, whereas adjustment with NaOH
will not. of course, fixation should protect against this disruption.
if the appearance you see is due to disruption of the virion membranes
then the disrupted particles should release the nucleocapsid, which
should then be recognizable on its own.

a more likely explanation for the appearance you are seeing is the
presence and absence of nucleic acid in the particle. as we all
remember, negative staining works by embedding the target particle.
good stains will penetrate well into the interstices of the particles.
cryoEM studies suggest that most of these small spaces are actually
channels which may penetrate ccmpletely into the particle. where there
is nucleic acid present, it fills the interior of the particle and
prevents excess stain from building up. were there is no nucleic acid
present, the stain will fill the inside of the particle. the stain will
then deflect the beam in the internal areas, providing for a dark
appearance. remember, in negative stain, dark=nothing,
white=components.

this appearance is observed with many viruses after gradient
purification. in the case of cubic viruses purified on CsCl, the genome
defective particles band above the genome complete particles, and are
frequently refered to as 'top component'.

if this is not a sufficient explanation, i would be willing to look at a
few micrograps if you wish to forward digitized images.

hope this helps

Paul R. Hazelton
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
University of Manitoba, Faculty of Medicine
531 Basic Medical Sciences
730 William Avenue
Winnipeg, MB Canada, R3E 0W3
phone:
Lab: 204-789-3313
Fax: 204-789-3926
Cell: 204-781-1502
Pager: 204-931-9354
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 11:54:11 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 12:51:56 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: negative staining of budded virus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Pernilla,
What you are probably seeing is both positive (dark virus) and negative
(light virus) staining. True negative staining gives a light particle
surrounded by stain which, due to the scattering of electrons, appears
darker. You will often also see some darker areas of the particle that
have trapped some stain.

Positive staining is when the particle itself has absorbed the stain and
appears dark while the background is light. Usually there is very little
detail in positively stained particles.

Positive staining often occurs when the amount of sample material is
very low. In this case the hydrophobic nature of the film surface results
in the stain just rolling off. You can see this happening if you put a
droplet of stain on the grid and, when you go to wick it off with filter
paper, it all comes off leaving an apparently dry grid behind.

You can reduce this problem by glow discharging the grids in a vacuum
evaporator just prior to making your samples. This acts to change the
charge on the grid surface and make it hydrophilic. This effect does
degrade quickly so grids should be used within a few hours. You can glow
discharge grids more than once.

The alternative is to use a sample with sufficient concentration of
particles so that there is enough material to hold the stain. It is not
unusual to find areas of both positive and negative staining on the same
grid based on where the sample has accumulated. The nice thing about
negative staining is that you have a fairly homogeneous sample so usually
can hunt around for just the right sample and stain distribution.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
On 12/2/03 7:52 AM, "Pernilla Nevsten"
{pernilla.nevsten-at-materialkemi.lth.se} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
} Dear Microscopy Listserver members,
}
} I have done negative staining ( 1% PTA) on a budded virus for TEM and
} some of the virus species appears white while other, on the same gridd,
} have a darker appearence. Does anyone have any experience of this
} phenomenon? Is this depending on if the envelope membrane is lost or not?
}
} Sincerely,
} Pernilla
}
} ..............................................................................
} .............................................................
}
} Pernilla Nevsten, PhD-student
} Materials Chemistry
} Lund University, Sweden
}
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 12:05:12 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 12:03:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: negative staining of budded virus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Virus will appear differently (some darkly stained, some lightly
} stained) for various reasons:

1. Stain penetration: sometimes the integrity of the virion is
disrupted (mechanically, chemically) so that the negative stain can
penetrate the particle and deposit inside the virion giving it a dark
appearance.

2. Defective particles: in most replicating virus there will be a
certain percentage of defective (empty) particles. These are
generally "leaky" and permit stain to penetrate. If the population
contains too many defective (non-infectious) particles, this leads to
a phenomenon called defective interference and could eventually lead
to the loss of viability of the virion (infectious particles).

3. Variability in staining: negative stains are rarely exclusively
negative and there will always be some degree of positive staining
taking place with the stain. Uranyl acetate, for example, often
reacts intensely with DNA if it is accessible and PTA sometimes
stains polysaccharides (external components of membranes).





} Dear Microscopy Listserver members,
}
} I have done negative staining ( 1% PTA) on a budded virus for TEM
} and some of the virus species appears white while other, on the same
} gridd, have a darker appearence. Does anyone have any experience of
} this phenomenon? Is this depending on if the envelope membrane is
} lost or not?
}
} Sincerely,
} Pernilla
}
} ...........................................................................................................................................
} Pernilla Nevsten, PhD-student
} Materials Chemistry
} Lund University, Sweden

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 12:30:05 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 10:43:34 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Dec 1, 2003, at 1:23 PM, John Mansfield wrote:

} Has anyone else been the LUCKY recipient of what seems to me to be one
} of the worst marketing gimmicks I have seen in a long time?
} I received a blue plush toy in the mail just before Thanksgiving that
} looks like some kind of exotic worm, although I think it is supposed
} to be aquatic, anyone else been sent one?
}
Dear John,
No plush toys, but I seem to have won an unbelievably large number of
lotteries.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 14:07:24 2003



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 15:05:34 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 12/2/03 2:50:59 PM, tivol-at-caltech.edu writes:

} No plush toys, but I seem to have won an unbelievably large number of
} lotteries.

And it has been my incredibly good fortune to be selected as the one honest
person to be entrusted with enormous wealth that has found its way by various
ill-gotten means into the hands of numerous persons in various third world
countries, all of whom apparently wish to transfer it into my personal bank
account. Anyone want to share in this windfall?

Of course, I will probably need all that money if I am to take advantage of
the great deals on prescription drugs that I can order on-line, or to visit the
numerous casinos that want my patronage.

Thank goodness for spam-blockers, which reduce the flood somewhat.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 15:14:41 2003



From: Alan Nicholls :      nicholls-at-uic.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:14:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: OK, I'll bite!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John as a long standing customer of that company you should be happy to
have received their M&M 2003 giveaway ... only 3 months late but then that
is pretty good for them! I received one too.

Alan

At 04:23 PM 12/1/2003 -0500, John Mansfield wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Alan W Nicholls, PhD
Director of Research Service Facility (Electron Microscopy)
Research Resources Center - East (M/C 337)
Room 100 Science and Engineering South Building
The University of Illinois at Chicago
845 West Taylor St
Chicago, IL 60607-7058

Tel: 312 996 1227
Fax: 312 996 8091
Office: Room 110

Web site www.rrc.uic.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 2 23:56:20 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 2 Dec 2003 21:54:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: A Human Cytome Project ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Dr. Osta,
I remember vaguely reading about cytomics and what I
remember is that it related to complete protein
profile in relation to functions ( somewhat like
functional genomics) also involving microscopy and
facs etc but of single cells. Never followed it much.
Shashi Singh



--- Peter Van Osta {pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com} wrote:
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi,
}
} I was wondering if there is already something going
} on to set up a sort
} of "Human Cytome Project" ? In my opinion the
} hardware and most of the
} software seems to be avaialable to set up such a
} project ? For the
} cellular level, light-microscopy based reader
} technology would be very
} interesting to use ?
}
} Studying and mapping the genome, transcriptome and
} proteome at the
} organisational level of the cell for various
} celltypes and organ models
} could provide us with a lot of information of what
} actually goes on in
} organisms in the spatio-spectro-temporal space ?
}
} I have been thinking (working) about a concept which
} could provide the
} basic framework for exploring and managing this
} cellular level of
} biological organisation research on a large scale,
} but I would like to
} know if there is already some thought/work going on
} in the direction of
} setting up an initiative such as a "Human Cytome
} Project" ?
}
} This is just an idea, so I am really interested to
} hear if there is
} something in it, or even if it is not worth while
} whet I just wrote.
}
} Best regards,
}
} Peter Van Osta
}
}


__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
http://companion.yahoo.com/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 3 07:38:59 2003



From: Valtcho Jeliazkov (Zheljazkov) Ph.D. :      vjeliazkov-at-nsac.ns.ca
Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 09:37:50 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM- variable pressure advantages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are in a process of purchasing a new Low Vacuum
SEM. One of the suppliers offers LV 1-750 Pa,
while the other has LV system 1-260 Pa.
I have no experience with Low Vacuum (Variable
Pressure) systems. We are trying to decide how
important would be to have up to 750 Pa vs 260
Pa. We would like to be able to look at wet
samples (plant tissue, soils, compost).
I would appreciate your comments.

Thank you for your attention.
Val Jeliazkov
Ph: (902) 893 7859



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 3 12:17:58 2003



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 13:16:38 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] plush toy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I wonder if this plush toy was something I recently saw in the San
Francisco Exploratorium's gift shop - it represented the well-publicized
SEM image purporting to show extraterrestrial bacteria.


--
***************************************************************
Do not publicly post any of my correspondence without permission

Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 845/365-8640
F: 845/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 3 13:19:46 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2003 19:16:15 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM- variable pressure advantages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would get the higher pressure model. I think, however,
you should consider a model which can support 865Pa (6.5
Torr) at 5 degrees C. One could then image water/ fully
hydrated specimens over a long period.

Dave

On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 09:37:50 -0400 "Valtcho Jeliazkov
(Zheljazkov) Ph.D." {vjeliazkov-at-nsac.ns.ca} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} We are in a process of purchasing a new Low Vacuum
} SEM. One of the suppliers offers LV 1-750 Pa,
} while the other has LV system 1-260 Pa.
} I have no experience with Low Vacuum (Variable
} Pressure) systems. We are trying to decide how
} important would be to have up to 750 Pa vs 260
} Pa. We would like to be able to look at wet
} samples (plant tissue, soils, compost).
} I would appreciate your comments.
}
} Thank you for your attention.
} Val Jeliazkov
} Ph: (902) 893 7859
}
}
}
}
} This incoming email to UWE has been independently scanned for viruses and any virus detected has been removed using McAfee anti-virus software
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 3 13:26:26 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2003 13:23:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: SEM- variable pressure advantages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Not all low vacuum SEMs are suitable for observation of
wet specimens. To avoid substantial drying you need a
system that can inject water vapor in the specimen
chamber at pressures from 650 to 850 Pa. Microscope should
have a cooling Peltier stage for bringing specimen temperature
close to a dew point (1-5 Celsius).

Pressure 260 Pa is usually adequate for non-conductive
specimens observation with BSE detector, but for some
specimens charging can occur. The charging can affect
EDS analysis, but for qualitative analysis its usually
not a problem.

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy

}
} We are in a process of purchasing a new Low Vacuum
} SEM. One of the suppliers offers LV 1-750 Pa,
} while the other has LV system 1-260 Pa.
} I have no experience with Low Vacuum (Variable
} Pressure) systems. We are trying to decide how
} important would be to have up to 750 Pa vs 260
} Pa. We would like to be able to look at wet
} samples (plant tissue, soils, compost).
} I would appreciate your comments.
}
} Thank you for your attention.
} Val Jeliazkov
} Ph: (902) 893 7859
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 3 23:21:54 2003



From: jfrosenberg-at-yahoo.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2003 23:21:00 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Ask-A-Microscopist: Storage of Immersion oil Lens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (jfrosenberg-at-yahoo.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday, December 3, 2003 at 13:05:48
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jfrosenberg-at-yahoo.com
Name: Ilana Rosenberg

Organization: International School

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Bellevue, Washington, USA

Question: I just purchased a used Olympus binocular compound microscope with a 100x objective. Does the Type A Immersion oil need to be stored in any special way such as a light free or amber bottle? What is the shelf life of this oil?
Thanks.
Ilana & Julie Rosenberg

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 4 03:05:34 2003



From: Renaat Dasseville :      Renaat.Dasseville-at-UGent.be
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 10:03:26 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM Scenedesmus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

Can anyone tell me how to prepare (fix, dry, ...) Scenedesmus cultures for
SEM. We have a JEOL JSM5600LV with Peltier cold stage, CPD, ...

Thanks,

Renaat Dasseville
Ghent University - Dept. Biology
Sect. Protistology & Aquatic Ecology
Krijgslaan 281 - S8
B-9000 Gent
Belgium
tel.: +32-9-264.85.05
fax.: +32-9-264.85.99

Please note change of email address: renaat.dasseville-at-UGent.be

LAQUAN website = http://allserv.UGent.be/~rdassevi/laquan/index.htm
Protistology website = http://allserv.UGent.be/~rdassevi



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 4 03:18:40 2003



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 10:14:14 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: A Human Cytome Project ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

Here are some links to websites with information about Cytomics, this
will provide you with some information and background about what I mean
with a "Human Cytome Project" (see below in this email).

I got the idea about using massive parallel "readers" on a
"high-throughput" backbone for Cytomics while I visited the Sanger
Center a few years ago where I saw a huge room "buzzing" with
DNA-sequencing machines.

I wanted to design and develop a cell-screening system, based on a
microscopy-based reader which could do for Cytomics what DNA-sequencing
machines did for Genomics.

Websites on Cytomics:

http://www.cytomics.info/

http://www.biochem.mpg.de/valet/cytomics.html

http://www.biochem.mpg.de/valet/cellpot.html

http://www.ipd.anl.gov/biotech/programs/func-genomics/

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

( http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm )

================================================================

shashi singh wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Dr. Osta,
} I remember vaguely reading about cytomics and what I
} remember is that it related to complete protein
} profile in relation to functions ( somewhat like
} functional genomics) also involving microscopy and
} facs etc but of single cells. Never followed it much.
} Shashi Singh
}
}
}
} --- Peter Van Osta {pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com} wrote:
}
} }
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} } Microscopy Society of America





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 4 05:05:24 2003



From: Ken Blight :      Ken.Blight-at-cancer.org.uk
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 11:04:06 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Cryo-sectioning Room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have been given a small room that we would like to convert
to a cryo-sectioning room. I am concerned about the air flow in the
room. I naturally want enough air movement to make it safe for the
operators to cut in the room, but I don't want the air conditioning
to be so strong that it makes sectioning impossible. Is there a
standard (Europe ) air flow rate needed for working with Liquid
nitrogen? Or has anyone set up such a room that might have some hints
or tips for me?
Ken Blight
Senior Scientific Officer
Cancer Research UK
London


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 4 09:37:20 2003



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 10:35:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cryo-sectioning Room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Ken,

How big is the room, and how many instruments will you have
in there?

Some tips from my own experience:

- Have them install an oxygen sensor. But make sure to have it
installed at a reasonable height (level with the operator's head).
The people at Yale would not listen to us and installed the
sensors at floor level. We had to disconnect them as the alarm
rang every time we would just open the lid of a nitrogen tank!

- Install "air socks". This is like a giant sock stretched on the
ceiling that distributes the air evenly over the entire length
of the room. Thanks to this, we have virtually no interference
with sectioning. From my recollection of the time spent at ICRF,
this is an important issue because we ended up taping a plastic
film over the air vent in our sectioning room as the air current
was too strong! I can have some diagrams sent to you if you
need more information about these "air socks".

- Final tip: we had a glass sliding door installed at the entrance
of our sectioning room. This is the best idea we ever had! No
more strong air current anytime somebody walks in, and the
added safety that people inside the room are seen from outside
in case of emergency.

Hope this helps. Best wishes

Marc


On Thursday, December 4, 2003, at 06:04 AM, Ken Blight wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} We have been given a small room that we would like to convert to a
} cryo-sectioning room. I am concerned about the air flow in the room. I
} naturally want enough air movement to make it safe for the operators
} to cut in the room, but I don't want the air conditioning to be so
} strong that it makes sectioning impossible. Is there a standard
} (Europe ) air flow rate needed for working with Liquid nitrogen? Or
} has anyone set up such a room that might have some hints or tips for
} me?
} Ken Blight
} Senior Scientific Officer
} Cancer Research UK
} London
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 4 09:41:00 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2003 09:38:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cryo-sectioning Room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ken,

Regardless of the flow, one should avoid, for all the obvious reasons,
having air venting directly onto a microtome or any other piece of
precision equipment. To this end, I recommend a flow diverter be placed in
front of the vent. This is achieved by suspending from the ceiling a piece
of sheet metal that is slightly larger than the vent. Suspend the sheet
about 15-20 cm below the vent and parallel to the ceiling. Lightweight
chain makes hanging the sheet straightforward.

We routinely use this arrangement wherever needed in our lab.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



Ken Blight
{Ken.Blight-at-cancer.or To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
g.uk} cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Cryo-sectioning Room

12/04/03 05:04 AM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


We have been given a small room that we would like to convert
to a cryo-sectioning room. I am concerned about the air flow in the
room. I naturally want enough air movement to make it safe for the
operators to cut in the room, but I don't want the air conditioning
to be so strong that it makes sectioning impossible. Is there a
standard (Europe ) air flow rate needed for working with Liquid
nitrogen? Or has anyone set up such a room that might have some hints
or tips for me?
Ken Blight
Senior Scientific Officer
Cancer Research UK
London







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 5 04:31:38 2003



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2003 10:30:06 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: Ion Tech ion mills

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have two Ion Tech ion mills, with three chambers, which I wish to dispose
of. Liquid nitrogen, iodine, and relatively low angle (down to 7 degrees)
ion milling is possible, and one of the systems has beam steering. Also
spares, sample holders, shields, etc.
I need the space for lab re-organisation, and if no-one is interested in
them they will go for scrap. Is there anyone out there in the UK still
using these machines? Ah, the happy days (and days) I spent trying to align
the guns...



_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com





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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 5 10:23:49 2003



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2003 11:03:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Advice on Olympus VAS II system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm looking for some advice and I hope someone has some experience with
the Olympus VAS II photographic system. As I understand the operation, I
can capture and store images as a TGA file. These files take up so much
room that only two fit on a 1.4MB floppy. The software has a provision to
convert the files to other formats but these formats aren't readable by
powerpoint or the other viewers I have available. I can't get the VAS II
installed on our network and I can't install a zip drive. (At least that's
what I have been told.)

Any advice on how I can store more files on a floppy, or a reader which
will read the conversion files would be gratefully appreciated.

Thanks for any advice......

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 5 11:45:34 2003



From: Marie E. Cantino :      cantino-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2003 12:44:41 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM staining for cuticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopists,

I am posting this for a graduate student here who is hoping someone has a
technique that will help him out. Please reply to the list (in which case
I will forward) and/or directly to Greg:

"I'm searching for a suitable LM staining protocol for distinguishing
structures in the stigmatic region on the diminutive pistils of Lupinus
perennis. I want to differentiate between the cell walls of the papillae
and their overlying cuticle and, if possible, also the cell contents and a
pool of lipid-rich exudate which accummulates between the cell wall and the
cuticle. The protocol would involve stains that at a minimum differentiate
cell wall (cellulose with some lignin) from cuticle (cutin) and ideally
also lipids and nuclei. Thanks, Greg Shenk University of Connecticut
shenk-at-darwin.eeb.uconn.edu "

Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Director, Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Associate Professor of Physiology and Neurobiology
University of Connecticut Unit 3242
Storrs, CT 06269-3242
Phone: 860-486-3588
Fax: 860-486-6369




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 5 13:34:12 2003



From: Hiromi Konishi :      konishi-at-geofourpeaks.com
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2003 11:32:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] C-nanotube providers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

HI.
I am looking for providers of C nanotube (companies). I need large inner
diameter nanotubes (several 10 nm) with open ends. Please advise.

Hiromi Konishi, Ph.D.
The University of New Mexico




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 5 16:59:04 2003



From: Brian Matsumoto :      matsumot-at-lifesci.ucsb.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2003 14:57:45 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] workshop announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Workshop Announcement

University of California at Santa Barbara





The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and the
Neuroscience Research Institute are sponsoring an advance course on
light microscopy. This 5-day workshop will be offered from March 22
through March 26, 2004 and will consist of lectures and laboratory
exercises that will run from 9 am to approximately 5 pm each day. The
seminar/workshop will be intensive enabling participants to develop
theoretical and hands-on expertise with light microscopes. Attendees
will interact closely with the instructors while using modern research
grade microscopes, cameras, and computers. The seminars and laboratories
will cover basic optical theory and how it pertains to increasing
contrast (signal to noise ratio) in biological samples. Fundamental
techniques such as fluorescence, phase contrast, Nomarski differential
interference contrast, and darkfield imaging will be taught and
attendees will use microscopes equipped with these optical enhancement
accessories. In addition, the theory and practice of electronic image
acquisition (analog and digital) will be discussed and attendees will
work with low-light cameras, digital image processing computers, and
morphometric programs. There are five research grade microscopes, five
electronic imaging cameras, two computer workstations, and one confocal
microscope. With a maximum enrollment of 10 students, there will be
ample opportunity to work with all of the microscopes and cameras. For
those so interested, intensive hands-on instruction and guidance on the
confocal microscope will be provided.



For a fuller description of the workshop, please check the web address
below. Enrollment forms can be completed online and this workshop
provides an opportunity to have a working-vacation in Santa Barbara,
California.



{http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/mcdb/events/imaging_workshop/index.php}


Brian Matsumoto
Adjunct Associate Professor
Dept. MCDB, Neuroscience Research Institute
UCSB
Santa Barbara, CA 93106

voice mail 805-893-8702
FAX 805-893-2005





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 6 08:26:40 2003



From: burtonpierce-at-cox.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2003 08:25:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: ocular micrometer calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (burtonpierce-at-cox.net) from http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, December 5, 2003 at 23:52:48
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: burtonpierce-at-cox.net
Name: Burton Pierce

Organization: San Diego City College

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: City, State, Country

Question: My question is regarding ocular micrometer calibration. Are OCULAR DIVISION and OCULAR UNIT synonymus terms? Or is OCULAR UNIT defined as distance/OCULAR DIVISION?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Dec 7 14:22:28 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Sun, 07 Dec 2003 15:24:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Facility Operations FIG

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Facility managers,

T here was a meeting of facility managers at M&M2003 to discuss the
formation of a Focused Interest Group dealing with topics of interest
related to operating a core multi-user or service microscopy facility.
There was overwhelming support for this and a document will be submitted
shortly to the MSA Council requesting authorization for the formation of the
FIG on Facility Operations.

The mission statement is:
To explore issues regarding management and utilization of microscopy,
imaging and microanalytical facilities.

Many of you are already on the E-mail list for information about this topic.
Please contact me directly if you are not on the list and want to be
included, or want to verify that you are on the list. Future communication
about the FIG will be sent through the E-mail list and not via the MSA
listserve.

Thanks,
Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 04:35:07 2003



From: Goran Drazic :      Goran.Drazic-at-ijs.si
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 11:34:31 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Workshop announcement - EMAS2004

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear colleagues,

The European Microbeam Analysis Society and the Department for
Nanostructured Materials at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana,
Slovenia, are pleased to invite you to participate in the 6th EMAS
Regional Workshop "Electron Probe Microanalysis Today - Practical
Aspects" to be held in Bled, Slovenia, from 8 to 11 May 2004.


Updated information on the workshop and on-line registration can be
found at the EMAS 2004 website: http://emas2004.ijs.si

Please download the First Announcement for the Workshop at:
http://emas2004.ijs.si/EMAS2004_First_Announcement.pdf


Dr. Goran Drazic (chairman)
Jozef Stefan Institute
Department for Nanostructured Materials
Jamova 39
SI-1000 Ljubljana
Slovenia


EMAS 2004 Secretariat
Email: sanja.fidler-at-ijs.si
Fax: +386 1 4263 126



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 08:11:20 2003



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 09:11:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: ocular micrometer calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Burton,
It is unlikely that 'ocular unit' is defined as a
calibrated distance. Generally, 'ocular division' would refer to the
smallest interval in the ocular scale and the the 'ocular unit' would
refer to 10 of those divisions. Nevertheless, the main thing to keep
in mind, is that there are no language police who arrest folks for
incorrect or even unconventional usage. So someone could have defined
'ocular unit' in a sepcific way. If there is no information to
indicate that in what you are reading, then I think you can
reasonably safely assume that no calibration has gone on.

Tobias Baskin
}
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (burtonpierce-at-cox.net) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
} December 5, 2003 at 23:52:48
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: burtonpierce-at-cox.net
} Name: Burton Pierce
}
} Organization: San Diego City College
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: City, State, Country
}
} Question: My question is regarding ocular micrometer calibration.
} Are OCULAR DIVISION and OCULAR UNIT synonymus terms? Or is OCULAR
} UNIT defined as distance/OCULAR DIVISION?
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 08:44:24 2003



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 2003 15:44:16 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] [Fwd: Re: Re: A Human Cytome Project ?]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Message forwarded for Guenter K.Valet:

Hi,

in view of the obvious facts that:
1. the DNA-sequence and functional knowledge on all
biomolecules will not permit the assembly of
living cell from their components
2. the analysis of organ tissue or biopsy specimens by
advanced array technologies typically provides averaged
result for many cells but does not address the discrete reactivity
of specific cell populations being decisevely important
for particular organ or organismic functions

it seems important and promising to address molecular
principles of cell arrangement and interaction in a human
cytome project. Such a project could bundle advanced
microscopy, image analysis and other multiparameter
cytometric techniques as well as single cell or specific cell group
oriented functional genomics arraying and include multidimensional
bioinformatics. The goal of the project would be to systematically
explore multilevel molecular interrelations within
cytomes as they occur in complex diseases like cancers,
leukemias, cardiovascular disease, diabetes or in the
susceptibility to infection including the detailed search for
new pharmacological access points.

Best regards

G.Valet

******************************************************************
Prof.Dr.Guenter K.Valet
Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie
Cell Biochemistry
Am Klopferspitz 18a
D-82152 Martinsried
Germany
Tel: +49/89/8578-2518, -2525, Fax: +49/89/8578-2563
E-mail: valet-at-biochem.mpg.de
Internet: http://www.biochem.mpg.de/valet/cellbio.html
******************************************************************


At 10:14 04.12.03 +0100, Peter Van Osta wrote:
} Hi,
}
} Here are some links to websites with information about Cytomics, this
} will provide you with some information and background about what I mean
} with a "Human Cytome Project" (see below in this email).
}
} I got the idea about using massive parallel "readers" on a
} "high-throughput" backbone for Cytomics while I visited the Sanger
} Center a few years ago where I saw a huge room "buzzing" with
} DNA-sequencing machines.
}
} I wanted to design and develop a cell-screening system, based on a
} microscopy-based reader which could do for Cytomics what DNA-sequencing
} machines did for Genomics.
}
} Websites on Cytomics:
}
} http://www.cytomics.info/
} http://www.biochem.mpg.de/valet/cytomics.html
} http://www.biochem.mpg.de/valet/cellpot.html
} http://www.ipd.anl.gov/biotech/programs/func-genomics/
}
} Best regards,
}
} Peter Van Osta
}
} ( http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm )
}
}





--
Met vriendelijke groet,
Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations (ESO)
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 620
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

http://www.unionbio-eu.com/

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 14:06:52 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 2003 15:13:49 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: ocular micrometer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Burton,

It is unclear as to whether you are referring to the markings on the binocular body or on the reticle inside the eyepiece.

The markings on the binocular body are the "interpupillary distance": literally, the space from the center of one pupil to the center of the other when you have set the binoculars so that you see one, round field of view. This distance is marked in mm. You can measure anyone's IPD simply by having them look straight ahead and, using a small ruler, measuring the center-to-center distance. If you wear eyeglasses, you have already gone through this exercise with your local optometrist.

The markings on the reticle inserted inside the eyepiece have no units in and of themselves. They must be calibrated against a known (stage micrometer) for each optical set-up you use (primarily, each objective. If you have any intermediate magnifiers, such as the Zeiss Optovar, you also need to calibrate for each objective/intermediate set). This calibration is very easy to do:
1. Using the stage micrometer as a sample, set up Koehler illumination.
2. Choose some arbitrary number of eyepiece units which match markings on the stage micrometer. For example: 25 eyepiece units might match up with 400 microns on the stage micrometer.
3. Construct a conversion factor of microns/eyepiece units:
In the example above: 400 microns/25 eyepiece units = 16 microns per eyepiece unit.
4. To measure with a real sample, simply observe how many eyepiece units cover the dimension you wish to measure in the sample, then multiply by your conversions factor.

Do this type of calibration for each objective (or objective/intermediate mag set), write it down, and tape it near the microscope for easy reference. These measurements will not change unless you use something new in the optical path.

You can also take this exercise one step further: To measure objects on your computer monitor, use the stage micrometer as a sample and project the image to the screen. In this case you won't have an eyepiece reticle. To make an equivalent structure for your screen, use an overhead transparency to set up a scale on the screen by marking (magic marker) 10, 50, or 100 microns on your overhead transparency.

Hope this is helpful.

Good hunting!
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education, Inc. (MME, Inc.)
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

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Optimizing Light Microscopy, a valuable text and reference, is still available through MME. For information on ordering single or small quantities, visit our website. For discounts on classroom-sized, call us today.
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&


At 05:25 AM 12/6/03 -0600, burtonpierce-at-cox.net wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 15:05:40 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?B?TWFyaWUtQ2xhdWRlIELpbGFuZ2Vy?= :      mcbelanger6-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 2003 21:07:02 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] LM DMRXA2 motorized scope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

I'd like to get some feedback frome someone who's using a Leica DMRXA2
automatized microscope, with a Marzhauser or a Prior motorized stage. How
would you qualify the quality of optics and motorized pieces?

Thank you!

Marie-Claude Belanger

_________________________________________________________________
MSN Search, le moteur de recherche qui pense comme vous !
http://fr.ca.search.msn.com/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 17:37:07 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 2003 15:39:25 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] [MICROSCOPY] LEO Supra user feedback

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all:

I would appreciate (off-list of course) any
feedback from LEO FESEM users. Under consideration
is a LEO Supra 55VP, 20nA gun. Any similar models including
1550 high vacuum or other VP SEMs is very
appreciated. The application is semiconductor
analysis, with RBSE, EDS and EBSD (EDAX).

thanks,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 20:02:14 2003



From: taylor-at-research.ge.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:03:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Epoxies for embedding ceramic particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (taylor-at-research.ge.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Sunday, December 7, 2003 at 20:40:58
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: taylor-at-research.ge.com
Name: Seth Taylor

Organization: GE Research

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Epoxies for embedding ceramic particles

Question: Hello,

Can anyone out there suggest an epoxy that can be used to embed ceramic particles for TEM analysis? The trick is that I'd like to be able to thin the particle-epoxy sample in an ion-mill, so I'm looking for an epoxy whose hardness (or thinning rate) closely matches that of SiC.

I'd be grateful for any ideas or suggestions you might have.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Seth Taylor
GE Global Research
Niskayuna, NY

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 20:03:02 2003



From: anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:04:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Mold Identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com
Name: Anjeanette Ormonde

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Mold Identification

Question: Hello all - a coworker has brought me something they found in their house that they suspect might be mold. They were wondering if I might be able to let them know what it is (ie is it mold) and then, if possible, figure out what type (genera) the mold is so they can have some idea of what might be involved in cleaning/removing the mold. We don't usually look at mold so any hints/tips of what direction to take would be helpful. The material was collected via tape sampling and that is what I now have. How should I go about looking at it? Is typical SEM imaging an appropriate place to start? Once I have an image is there a good website or book I can use to try and match my sample to the correct genera? Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 20:03:40 2003



From: jasons-at-med.usyd.edu.au (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:05:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Mounting PVDF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: jasons-at-med.usyd.edu.au
Name: Jason Sercombe

Organization: Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Australia.

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Mounting PVDF

Question: We are interested in mounting small sections of PVDF protein transfer membrane for light microscopy. Preferably without disruption to any sample resting on the surface of the PVDF. Has anyone done this?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 20:04:14 2003



From: hann.cheryl-at-mayo.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:05:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: his-tag identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: hann.cheryl-at-mayo.edu
Name: Cheri Hann

Organization: Mayo Clinic

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: his-tag identification

Question: I would like to identify an exogenous protein that contains a his-tag that was added to an in-vitro eye culture system. Is anyone familiar with identifying his-tags in tissue?

Thank you

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 8 20:04:30 2003



From: jcarson-at-med.unc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:06:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Balzers freeze-fracture service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: jcarson-at-med.unc.edu
Name: Johnny Carson

Organization: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Balzers freeze-fracture service

Question: Does anyone know who currently services/repairs Balzers freeze-fracture devices (BAF400T)?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 00:32:08 2003



From: tuasonm-at-unbc.ca
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 22:40:30 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Mold Identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You don't need an EM to identify your mold. A brightfield microscope will
do. (But if you want to use an EM, you can too.) You can go by morphology
to identify it - note the type and shape of spore, arrangement, presence
of sac enclosing spores, other structures. If they have a lot of the mold
in the house, they can also note cultural characteristics - color, aerial
hyphae (hairy, fuzzy, powdery, etc.). If it's difficult to observe them as
they're growing in the house, you could take a sample and subculture it on
culture media (potato dextrose agar, saboraud dextrose agar, etc.).
Usually, you can identify the genus just by cultural and morphological
characterization. When it comes to identification down to species level,
it varies. With some molds you can get away with just the above tests,
with some you'd need to do physiological tests.

University libraries would usually have several guidebooks on ID of
filamentous fungi. These books usually provide descriptions and
instructions (and lots of pictures) on characterizing spores.

The EPA and CDC webs provide info on dealing with molds in the
house/buildings:
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/moldresources.html
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/airpollution/mold/moldfacts.htm


Lizette Tuason



anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver) said:
}
} Email: anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com
} Name: Anjeanette Ormonde
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Mold Identification
}
} Question: Hello all - a coworker has brought me something they found in
} their house that they suspect might be mold. They were wondering if I
} might be able to let them know what it is (ie is it mold) and then, if
} possible, figure out what type (genera) the mold is so they can have some
} idea of what might be involved in cleaning/removing the mold. We don't
} usually look at mold so any hints/tips of what direction to take would be
} helpful. The material was collected via tape sampling and that is what I
} now have. How should I go about looking at it? Is typical SEM imaging an
} appropriate place to start? Once I have an image is there a good website
} or book I can use to try and match my sample to the correct genera?
} Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 00:36:40 2003



From: tuasonm-at-unbc.ca
Date: Mon, 8 Dec 2003 22:45:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Mold Identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Comment 2:
You work for Unilever so the Quality Control Lab there should have a
microbiology division. Why don't you just ask them to identify the mold
genus for you?

Lizette Tuason


anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver) said:
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Email: anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com
} Name: Anjeanette Ormonde
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Mold Identification
}
} Question: Hello all - a coworker has brought me something they found in
} their house that they suspect might be mold. They were wondering if I
} might be able to let them know what it is (ie is it mold) and then, if
} possible, figure out what type (genera) the mold is so they can have some
} idea of what might be involved in cleaning/removing the mold. We don't
} usually look at mold so any hints/tips of what direction to take would be
} helpful. The material was collected via tape sampling and that is what I
} now have. How should I go about looking at it? Is typical SEM imaging an
} appropriate place to start? Once I have an image is there a good website
} or book I can use to try and match my sample to the correct genera?
} Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 02:47:28 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 08:47:45 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Mold Identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Speaking as an amateur (as usual).... Whilst it is fun to
use the SEM I suspect light microscopy would be more useful
eg colour and cell wall appearance. I guess you do not
need to know the genera to kill it :)

Dave


On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 20:04:27 -0600 by way of
MicroscopyListserver {anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com}
wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Email: anjeanette.ormonde-at-unilever.com
} Name: Anjeanette Ormonde
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Mold Identification
}
} Question: Hello all - a coworker has brought me something they found in their house that they suspect might be mold. They were wondering if I might be able to let them know what it is (ie is it mold) and then, if possible, figure out what type (genera) the mold is so they can have some idea of what might be involved in cleaning/removing the mold. We don't usually look at mold so any hints/tips of what direction to take would be helpful. The material was collected via tape sampling and that is what I now have. How should I go about looking at it? Is typical SEM imaging an appropriate place to start? Once I have an image is there a good website or book I can use to try and match my sample to the correct genera? Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}
} This incoming email to UWE has been independently scanned for viruses and any virus detected has been removed using McAfee anti-virus software
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 07:06:12 2003



From: Lauren Schroeder :      laschroe-at-zoominternet.net
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 08:08:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM =- manual for Hitachi S450

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear subscribers,

I looking for an operating manual for a Hitachi S450 SEM.

Lauren Schroeder
Department of biology
Youngstown State university
330-757-3022


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 07:55:42 2003



From: Klughammer - Anneliese Schmaus :      schmaus-at-klughammer.de
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 14:55:59 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM DMRXA2 motorized scope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Marie-Claude,

we use the Leica DMRXA2 for upgrading it to a confocal
microscope without using a laser. We are the dealer for
this specially developed up-grade system.
We also developed a motorized filter wheel,
so that you can capture confocal images at different
wavelengths and you can do colocalization with more than 3
wavelengths because you don't need different lasers, instead you
use different filters.

We use the Leica DMRXA2 microscope because
we think its optical quality is excellent.
The motorized parts are also working well.

If you need more information about the Märzhäuser stage
please let me know what you want to know exactly.

If you would like to see confocal images which were captured
with the Leica DMRXA2 and a digital camera, please let me
know.


with best regards

Anneliese Schmaus
Product Manager

klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
info-at-klughammer.de
www.klughammer.de



MCB} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MCB} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
MCB} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
MCB} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
MCB} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MCB} Dear all,

MCB} I'd like to get some feedback frome someone who's using a Leica DMRXA2
MCB} automatized microscope, with a Marzhauser or a Prior motorized stage. How
MCB} would you qualify the quality of optics and motorized pieces?

MCB} Thank you!

MCB} Marie-Claude Belanger

MCB} _________________________________________________________________
MCB} MSN Search, le moteur de recherche qui pense comme vous !
MCB} http://fr.ca.search.msn.com/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 09:07:25 2003



From: Henry Barwood :      hbarwood-at-troyst.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 09:07:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Melt crystallization question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would like to demonstrate crystallization from a melt to my Earth Science
class by projecting a crystallizing melt using a projection microscope. I am
not really familiar with the technique and wonder if anyone could offer some
suggestions. I would like to do a simple crystallization from a melt, as
well as crystallization of a multicomponent melt that would simulate what
happens in an intrusive igneous rock. Are there known multicomponent
mixtures that I can use? Any suggestions for a simple hot (warm?) stage to
control the rate of crystallization? Any help at all is welcome. Thanks.

Henry Barwood
Associate Professor of Science, Earth Science
Department of Math and Physics
MSCX 312G
Troy State University
Troy, Alabama 36082
hbarwood-at-troyst.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 09:14:02 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 09:14:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Glue guns & re-mounting blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We routinely re-mount epoxy and acrylic resin embedded tissues to improve
their orientation by using two part epoxy glue to mount the trimmed down
blocks to wooden dowels. I was wondering if anyone has tried a hot glue
gun with success for this purpose. Recommendations on the appropriate type
of glue stick welcome. I am mainly trying to find a more convenient way of
doing this occasional chore. Thanks, Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 10:37:48 2003



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 11:37:50 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Balzers freeze-fracture service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hey Johnny!

Yes. It is Technotrade International, 7 Perimeter Rd
Manchester, NH 03103 tel 603 622-5011 Ask for Johnny Hagen.
(johnny-at-technotradeinc.com)

Call me if you need any other info.

Happy Hols!

Peter

--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.54.107/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 11:19:27 2003



From: Lois Anderson :      landers-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 12:18:59 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EM Proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Is anybody aware of any standards of proficiency for EM techs? I'm lookinf for something similar to what CAP has for histotechs. Would anybody be interested in paticipating in a survey to develop them?

Lois Anderson
Johns Hopkins University
Dept. of Pathology
Laboratory Manager
Electron Microscopy/Immunofluorescence
600 N. Wolfe Street/Pathology 709 A
Baltimore, MD 21287
(410) 955-2861/fax (410) 614-7110
landers-at-jhmi.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 12:16:55 2003



From: vodolan-at-biomed.cas.cz (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 12:18:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: protein A-gold detection

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: vodolan-at-biomed.cas.cz
Name: Jana Vodolanova

Organization: Institute of Microbiology

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] protein A-gold detection

Question: Dear all,
I have used protein A-gold (5 nm) detection in order to quantitate the antigen on the membrane and detect its distribution.

I have found some useful references concerning protein A-gold detection but not many. I would like to ask you, if you know some good ones, to let me know.

Further, it is believed that protein A-gold binds to primery antibody in a 1:1 ratio under saturation conditions. So, does single protein A-gold particle mean that either one antigen or two antigen at the maximum are detected? Has anyone of you different experience?

Thanks a lot.

Jana

********************
Jana Vodolanova, MSc.
Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Bacterial Pathogens
Institute of Microbiology
Czech Academy of Sciences
Videnska 1083
Prague 4, 142 20
Czech Republic

phone: +420 24106 2380,2770
fax:+420 24106 2152
e-mail: vodolan-at-biomed.cas.cz

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 12:54:02 2003



From: Larry Ackerman :      ackerman-at-msg.ucsf.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 10:55:31 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cryo-sectioning Room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have some information about a room for
cryo-ultramicrotomy from Thomas Keil with the Baumeister
Lab in Germany:
Total volume is ca. 7.4 cubic meters.
Air exchange rate is ca. 60 cubic meters per hour.
Temperature around 23 deg C,
Air humidity around 33 per cent. Over 40 per cent, ice
contamination becomes too high.

This last point about humidity is VERY important if you
hope to look at frozen hydrated sections. They also built
the air exhaust to take air from near the floor.

Larry Ackerman
Advanced Imaging Lab/Dr. John Sedat/Dr. David Agard
Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics
University of California San Francisco
600-16th Street, Box 2140, Room S101
San Francisco, CA 94143

415-476-4441 FAX 415-514-4142


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 13:36:42 2003



From: Ralph Common :      Ralph.Common-at-ht.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 14:28:56 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Glue guns & re-mounting blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

This is an easy one. Use Super Glue or an equivalent cyanoacrylate product.
Application is easy, and if you put the blocks back in the oven after
gluing, they are ready to work on within minutes. Just make sure the sides
of the block face do not have any adhering glue. Super Glue sections
easily, but sections will not lie flat because the glue and the resin have
different textures.

Ralph Common
Electron Microscopist
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology
A608 East Fee Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
517-355-7558; fax 517-432-1053
ralph.common-at-ht.msu.edu


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:phillipst-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2003 10:15 AM
To: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

We routinely re-mount epoxy and acrylic resin embedded tissues to improve
their orientation by using two part epoxy glue to mount the trimmed down
blocks to wooden dowels. I was wondering if anyone has tried a hot glue
gun with success for this purpose. Recommendations on the appropriate type
of glue stick welcome. I am mainly trying to find a more convenient way of
doing this occasional chore. Thanks, Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 16:10:01 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2003 12:09:45 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM Proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Lois-

} Is anybody aware of any standards of proficiency for EM techs? I'm lookinf for something similar to what CAP has for histotechs. Would anybody be interested in paticipating in a survey to develop them?

The Microscopy Society of America established a certification program in
1978. You can navigate to the information from the MSA web site
(http://www.msa.microscopy.com) or jump directly to it at
http://www.cvmbs.colostate.edu/emcenter/msa/certboard/

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 16:51:47 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 14:52:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] protein A-gold detection

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jana
I don't think you could quantitate with any immunochemistry:

- you don't know how many antigenic determinants are available for primary
antibody (AB);
- you don't know the efficiency of AB binding. If it's polyclonal - they
bind differently (different association constant);
- you don't know how many gold particles attached to the protein;
- as far as I remember, protein-A molecule has 4 unequal IgG binding sites
and IgG molecule has two protein-A binding sites (equal).

Sergey

At 10:18 AM 12/9/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 16:57:48 2003



From: Michael Nesson :      nessonm-at-onid.orst.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 14:58:11 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Glue guns & re-mounting blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We find most convenient the use of cyanoacrylic cement (Super Glue)
and the stubs of old ultratome blocks, filed flat, for the mounting of
reoriented resin-embedded samples.
Mike Nesson
Electron Mocroscopy Facility
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331

--
ÐÏࡱá




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 9 17:39:06 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 18:45:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Melt crystallization question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Henry

I know of a number of one-phase systems, especially things like urea or any of the cholesteric materials, but I can't think of a two phase system off-hand. Would really like to know about that when you find it.

Most importantly: do this under polarized light. It really brings out the crystalline formation. We did this with a group of jr and sr. high teachers at a course about 3 years ago at Miami U (Ohio). We used a very inexpensive S-video camera, fed into a typical video monitor. The teachers went crazy!!!

Hope your demo is equally successful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education, Inc. (MME, Inc.)
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&
Optimizing Light Microscopy is still available through MME. For information on ordering single or small quantities, visit our website. For discounts on classroom-sized, call us today.
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&


At 09:07 AM 12/9/03 -0600, Henry Barwood wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 04:50:55 2003



From: Peter van de Plas :      p.vandeplas-at-aurion.nl
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 11:55:47 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: protein A-gold detection

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jana,

Protein A-gold was first introduced by Romano and Romano in 1977
(Immunochemistry 14, 711). Slot and colleagues improved the technology
as described a.o. in J. Cell Biol. (1981), 90, 553.

Some useful information on quantification of protein A-gold labeling
can be found in:
Posthuma et al. (1984) J. of Histochem. and Cytochem. 32, 1028
Posthuma et al. (1986) J. of Histochem. and Cytochem. 34. 203

Hope this is of help.
Do not hesitate to contact me when you have additional questions.

Regards,
Peter




On Tuesday, December 9, 2003, at 07:18 PM, by way of
MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
}
} Email: vodolan-at-biomed.cas.cz
} Name: Jana Vodolanova
}
} Organization: Institute of Microbiology
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] protein A-gold detection
}
} Question: Dear all,
} I have used protein A-gold (5 nm) detection in order to quantitate the
} antigen on the membrane and detect its distribution.
}
} I have found some useful references concerning protein A-gold
} detection but not many. I would like to ask you, if you know some good
} ones, to let me know.
}
} Further, it is believed that protein A-gold binds to primery antibody
} in a 1:1 ratio under saturation conditions. So, does single protein
} A-gold particle mean that either one antigen or two antigen at the
} maximum are detected? Has anyone of you different experience?
}
} Thanks a lot.
}
} Jana
}
} ********************
} Jana Vodolanova, MSc.
} Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Bacterial Pathogens
} Institute of Microbiology
} Czech Academy of Sciences
} Videnska 1083
} Prague 4, 142 20
} Czech Republic
}
} phone: +420 24106 2380,2770
} fax:+420 24106 2152
} e-mail: vodolan-at-biomed.cas.cz
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
}
}

-----------
Peter van de Plas
Aurion ImmunoGold Reagents
Costerweg 5
6702 AA Wageningen
The Netherlands
Phone: +31 317 497676
Fax: +31 317 415955



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 07:30:15 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 08:30:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM Proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Lois,
I imagine that you have already had responses to this question but I
thought to weigh in anyway. I am not familiar with the exact requirements
for the CAP. However are you aware of the certification for biologists
through MSA? This certification is only for TEM and involves both a written
test on theory and a practical exam. The practical requires the preparation
of 3 different tissues with full documentation on procedure, thick and thin
sections and final micrographs. Most of the people who go through the
certification process do so because they or their employer wants
certification as a minimal measure of proficiency. This is, as you no doubt
know, looked on very favorably in the medical world.

For more information on the MSA Certification process, check out the MSA web
site at: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy



On 12/9/03 12:18 PM, "Lois Anderson" {landers-at-jhmi.edu} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
} Is anybody aware of any standards of proficiency for EM techs? I'm lookinf
} for something similar to what CAP has for histotechs. Would anybody be
} interested in paticipating in a survey to develop them?
}
} Lois Anderson
} Johns Hopkins University
} Dept. of Pathology
} Laboratory Manager
} Electron Microscopy/Immunofluorescence
} 600 N. Wolfe Street/Pathology 709 A
} Baltimore, MD 21287
} (410) 955-2861/fax (410) 614-7110
} landers-at-jhmi.edu
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 08:32:52 2003



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 10:34:15 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Fibre optic light source

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, folks -

A colleague is looking to buy a light source for a binocular
microscope and is especially interested in the fibre optic ones with the
long light tubes. With some models, though, these light tubes are "floppy"
and need some sort of support. He'd like to find one with the rigid (though
flexible) light tubes. I suggested he just apply Viagra to the floppy ones,
but, no, he wants a new one. Does anybody have a source or at least a
make/model no. for such a unit?



Frank Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 08:39:38 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 09:37:09 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM Proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

For Biological EM techs, MSA offers a certification exam. Please see
the link on the MSA website.
Lee Cohen-Gould,
MSA Certification Board
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 08:41:01 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 09:48:31 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] AFM/SPM - Technical Applications Position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dynamic, fast growing Scanning Probe company seeks a strongly motivated individual capable of delivering the high level of technical applications and sales support we require. The successful applicant will have extensive practical SPM experience. Strong people and presentation skills, both verbal and written, are essential. A bachelor’s or graduate degree in materials science and/or physics is required. Business experience is a plus.

Duties will include:
· Demonstration support for sales (analyzing samples, and demonstrating instruments to potential customers at an Applications Laboratory or at the customer’s site)
· Technical support for our Marketing Department and at tradeshows, and
· Installation and customer training.

It is expected that this job may entail approximately 30% travel. Starting date: early 2004.

Geographic Base: Northeastern U.S. to Mid-Atlantic region, or Bay Area.

Compensation will be commensurate with training and experience. Interested individuals should send CV, short sample of writing/training materials, and 3 references to:
spm_info-at-earthlink.net

An equal opportunity employer.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 09:23:22 2003



From: Judy Trogadis :      TrogadisJ-at-smh.toronto.on.ca
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 10:23:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] FISH and IF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Fellow Microscopists

Can anyone advise me about a protocol for combined FISH (for mRNA) and
IF (for protein)? Many of the references I have read don't include
fluorescence for mRNA detection but I would really like to use our
confocal microscope. Besides, a fluorescent signal may be easier to
quantify than, say, brightfield alkaline phosphatase product.

As a philosophical issue, apart from amplification of the expression
(prehybridization) or of the signal (post hybridization) has in situ
hybridization itself changed much in the last few years? In other words,
how valid are references to "critical steps" from the early 90's?
I wonder because there seem to be more pure methods papers, carefully
testing each step, from that time then seen currently.

Thank you for any advice and I look forward to opinions.
Judy


Judy Trogadis
Bio-Imaging Coordinator
St. Michael's Hospital, 7Queen
30 Bond St.
Toronto, ON M5B 1W8
Canada
ph: 416-864-6060 x6337
pager: 416-685-9219
fax: 416-864-6043
trogadisj-at-smh.toronto.on.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 09:27:53 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 10:28:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Ernst Ruska

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Got this message today. I think the whole list might be interested if such
exists
} Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 08:35:45 -0600
} From: James Jefferson {James.Jefferson-at-hitachi-hhta.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Ernst Ruska
} To: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
} Reply-to: James.Jefferson-at-hitachi-hhta.com
} X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook CWS, Build 9.0.2416 (9.0.2911.0)
} Importance: Normal
}
} Greetings,
}
} a colleague of mine is looking for a documentary on Ernst Ruska he thought
} he had seen on PBS, but multiple attempts to locate this special have left
} me empty handed. The special dealt with Ernst Ruska winning the Nobel prize
} in relationship to Electron Microscopy.
}
} Any help would be appreciated.
}
} Sincerely Yours,
} James Jefferson
} Hitachi High Technology America
} Staff Engineer

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 14:56:35 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 14:57:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,
I have samples of the same material with suspected
difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.

Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
(EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
of porosity?

Thank you,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 15:52:04 2003



From: Monson, Frederick :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 16:52:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Ernst Ruska

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Nobel lecture in PDF format at:

http://www.nobel.se/physics/laureates/1986/ruska-lecture.pdf

EM in Canada:


http://www.info.library.yorku.ca/depts/smil/filmographies/hist-sci.htm

Ruska mention:

http://media3.iss.indiana.edu/188/cat/mdg812.pdf (Search inside
PDF for "HC1688")

And likely what you want:

http://www.transtel.tv/science/ft244110.htm (search "Ruska")

Cheers, and this is a real gift for technology history buffs,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone/FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI Page and Scheduling
http://darwin.wcupa.edu/CASI/


-----Original Message-----
} From: Greg Erdos [mailto:gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, December 10, 2003 10:29 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Got this message today. I think the whole list might be interested if
such
exists
} Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2003 08:35:45 -0600
} From: James Jefferson {James.Jefferson-at-hitachi-hhta.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Ernst Ruska
} To: gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
} Reply-to: James.Jefferson-at-hitachi-hhta.com
} X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook CWS, Build 9.0.2416 (9.0.2911.0)
} Importance: Normal
}
} Greetings,
}
} a colleague of mine is looking for a documentary on Ernst Ruska he
} thought he had seen on PBS, but multiple attempts to locate this
} special have left me empty handed. The special dealt with Ernst Ruska
} winning the Nobel prize in relationship to Electron Microscopy.
}
} Any help would be appreciated.
}
} Sincerely Yours,
} James Jefferson
} Hitachi High Technology America
} Staff Engineer

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 10 19:50:04 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2003 21:26:03 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fibre optic light source

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

http://www.chiutech.com/

Pay no attention to the less then "corporate" website. They make good
products...


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Thomas, Frank" {FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Wednesday, December 10, 2003 6:34 AM

Fostec (now Schott-Fostec) makes a nice line of
FO sources and ring lights and bifurcated illuminators.
There is also an LBD daylight correction filter
available for each bundle.

gary g.


At 06:34 AM 12/10/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 00:31:22 2003



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 07:34:53 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fibre optic light source

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

Sorry to hear about your floppiness problem - happens to us all from time
to time.

Try Schott - they used to do 'swan-neck' optical fibre illumination with
one or multiple heads - good for macrophotography and other applications.

Find them at
http://www.us.schott.com/english/index.html
Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

***Come to Stockholm in 2004 to the 26th IFBLS congress*** Take a look at
http://www.vardforbundet.se/ifbls2004

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institutet,
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 01:52:27 2003



From: =?iso-8859-2?Q?KJ_H=FCbner?= :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 08:30:17 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] =?iso-8859-2?Q?Conference_=22ADVANCED_MATERIALS_&_TECHNOLOGIES_AMT_'2004?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

New conference
XVII th Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science Conference
"ADVANCED MATERIALS & TECHNOLOGIES AMT '2004

} www.AMT-2004.p.lodz.pl,
}
} or mail to:
} Bogdan WENDLER, D. Sc., Ph. D.
} Associate Professor
} Secreatary AMT-2004
} Head Division Coatings Engineering
} Institute of Materials Engineering (IME)
} Dept. Mechanical Engineering
} Technical University of Lodz
} Ul. Stefanowskiego 1
} 90.924 Lodz
} POLAND
} Tel (+48) 426 312 265
} Mob (+48) 501 292 922
} Fax (+48) 426 366 790
} E-mail: bowe-at-p.lodz.pl
} Web site of IME: http://www.p.lodz.pl/IIM (English version

best regards Chris Hübner




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 03:31:04 2003



From: G.J. Brakenhoff :      brakenhoff-at-science.uva.nl
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 10:31:49 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] FocusOnMicroscopy 2004 Philadelphia Registration, submission

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Focus on Microscopy 2004 Philadelphia, USA, April 4 to April 7, 2004

Dear colleagues,

The FOM 2004 website: www.focusonmicroscopy.org
is now open for registration, submission of abstracts and
accommodation reservation, All further information is available there.

Deadline for the submission of abstracts will be January 30, 2004.

As the next in a series of unique interdisciplinary meetings on
advanced multidimensional light microscopy and image processing, the
2004 meeting will pay special attention to the conjunction of
multidimensional microscopies with the areas of bioinformatics,
bio-nanotechnology and bioengineering.

The 2004 meeting will be hosted by Drexel University, School of Biomedical
Engineering, Science and Health Systems. The conference and exhibition will
be located at the Sheraton University City Hotel, central on the
Philadelphia campus.

Originally the FocusOnMicroscopy FOM2004 international conference
would take place in Singapore but various organizational issues and
travel concerns made a move to Philadelphia, PA, USA, April 4 to
April 7 necessary. Andres Kriete will be the main local organizer in
Philadelphia.

You are cordially invited to participate in this conference on
behalf the FOM 2004
organizing committee: A. Kriete, Pittsburgh; F. Brakenhoff, Amsterdam; P.C.
Cheng, Buffalo; Banu Onaral, Philadelphia.
--
+-----------------------------------------+
Prof. Dr. G.J. Brakenhoff
University of Amsterdam
Institute for Molecular Cell Biology
Section Molecular Cytology
Kruislaan 316
1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Tel. : 31-20-5255189
Fax. : 31-20-5256271
Email: brakenhoff-at-science.uva.nl
+-----------------------------------------+


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 04:57:41 2003



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 11:58:57 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Fibre optic light source

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

Some years ago we used a lightsource from Illumination Technologies with
an optic fiber. It was the CF 1000 model with automated filter wheel and
it could be used either manualy or by RS-232 control. We used it for
an older type of microscope which did not have an automated filter wheel
itself. Illumination Technologies also sells fiber optics for their
lightsources

http://www.illuminationtech.com/

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations (ESO)
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 620
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

http://www.unionbio-eu.com/

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm

===============================================================

Gareth Morgan wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Hi
}
} Sorry to hear about your floppiness problem - happens to us all from
} time to time.
}
} Try Schott - they used to do 'swan-neck' optical fibre illumination with
} one or multiple heads - good for macrophotography and other applications.
}
} Find them at
} http://www.us.schott.com/english/index.html
} Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards
}
} Gareth
}
} ***Come to Stockholm in 2004 to the 26th IFBLS congress*** Take a look
} at http://www.vardforbundet.se/ifbls2004
}
} http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
} e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
}
} Tel +46 8 5858 1038
} Fax +46 8 5858 7730
}
} Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
} Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
} Karolinska Institutet,
} Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, F46
} SE 141 86 Stockholm
} Sweden
}
} OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10.
} Laboratoriet för klinisk patologi och cytologi.
}
} NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
} Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 07:46:38 2003



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 08:47:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Vladimir;

If it is simply pores you are interested in e.g. size, distribution, why not just image your sample in the SEM? Maybe you should elaborate a bit further on your sample and what is of interest about these pores?

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, December 10, 2003 3:58 PM
To: Microscopy (E-mail)

Hello all,
I have samples of the same material with suspected
difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.

Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
(EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
of porosity?

Thank you,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 10:33:41 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 11:39:06 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EM Proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Lois,

I'd suggest you also contact the Royal Microscopical Society (Oxford, UK). They have extensive certifications for various types of microscopy.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

~-at-~-at-~~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-
Optimizing Light Microscopy for Biological and Clinical Labs is available
in individual copies or classroom size orders. Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com
for details.
~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-~-at-


At 08:30 AM 12/10/03 -0500, Debby Sherman wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 11:18:49 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 13:49:42 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM-EDX: Roentec Xflash x-ray detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

SEM-EDX'rs :o)

I'm presently investigating the variety of modern EDX detectors, and I note
(via advertising) the high-throughput Roentec Xflash detectors now approach
the energy resolutions available from most other detectors. However, what
remains a mystery is the counts into the spectrum as a function of beam
current. That is, for a detector with a 5mm window area, Roentec still
boasts of throughputs of 1000k cps. What must the beam current be?

I understand these detectors shouldn't be compared to other types because of
their small processing times, but it doesn't seem to me the difference
between 1-2% DT and 20-30% DT can make up for the number of counts through a
"normal" 10mm detector at normal beam currents (e.g., 2-5nA), and what
Roentec claims would lead me to believe(?)

These modern Roentecs are rare in North America, but I'd enjoy hearing from
someone with practical experience (on or off list)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 11:57:06 2003



From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki :      kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 15:04:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotomy for Material Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Fundamentals of Microanalytical Entomology: A Practical Guide to Detecting
and Identifying Filth in Foods by Alan R. Olsen, Thomas H. Sidebottom is one
of the references used by FDA to identify mold using LM.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=2VQR5YRKV
3&sourceid=00002179849022193388&bfdate=12%2D09%2D2003+10%3A52%3A31&isbn=0849
389259&itm=9

This is not an endorsement.

David A. Foran, chemist
Food and Drug Administration
Kansas City Elemental Analysis Lab
DFORAN-at-ORA.FDA.GOV
913-752-2170
913-752-2727 (voice mail)
913-752-2151 (fax)


----Original Message-----
} From: tuasonm-at-unbc.ca [mailto:tuasonm-at-unbc.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2003 12:41 AM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

Hi,

We are looking around for a ultramicrotome to slice our samples
for TEM. The kind of samples we work are semiconductors substrates (Si,
SiC, GaAs...) with some epitaxial semi layer or poly metal thin films.
What is your experience preparing this kind of sample? Can we prepare
sample with large area view under TEM? And what about dislocation or other
defects introduced in the layer? As you can see, we are in dark. We do
prepare our samples using tripod polishing. What motivated us into looking
in ultramicrotomy is a new set of samples that are polymer (coated and
bulk). The sample is affect by the superglue and the acetone we use in the
polishing process. And it also has a low Tg. And if we can also use
ultramicrotomy to prepare our routine samples it is a plus. Any light will
be appreciated. :)

And we also nail down our search for the ultramicrotome in two
makers, Leica and RMC. Any other you can suggest? And finally, how useful
cryo is for material scientists?

Lots of questions. :) Thanks.

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 16:08:22 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 17:08:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotomy for Material Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If you could microtome Si and other semiconductor specimens the microtome
manufacturers would all be driving Rolls Royces!

The problem is that Si, and the others, cleave. As soon as the knife touches
the Si, the Si cleaves into many small pieces (it doesn't do your knife a
lot of good either). The cleavage is all on [111] planes, which is sort of
nice, BUT the Si chip surfaces are [001] and the cross sections are [011].
So the shattered bits of Si debris that results will not be oriented to
reveal anything about the chip plan-view or its cross sections.

Tripod polishing is good; cleavage, a'la McCafferty in Canada and Scott
Walck at PPG is a lot better; and, of course, FIB, with appropriate
protection for the polymers is best. If you don't have a FIB, cleave them.
Look at the Southbay Tech web site for cleaving kits.

Ron Anderson

-----Original Message-----
} From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki [mailto:kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu]
Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2003 3:04 PM
To: MSA Listserve

Hi,

We are looking around for a ultramicrotome to slice our samples
for TEM. The kind of samples we work are semiconductors substrates (Si,
SiC, GaAs...) with some epitaxial semi layer or poly metal thin films.
What is your experience preparing this kind of sample? Can we prepare
sample with large area view under TEM? And what about dislocation or other
defects introduced in the layer? As you can see, we are in dark. We do
prepare our samples using tripod polishing. What motivated us into looking
in ultramicrotomy is a new set of samples that are polymer (coated and
bulk). The sample is affect by the superglue and the acetone we use in the
polishing process. And it also has a low Tg. And if we can also use
ultramicrotomy to prepare our routine samples it is a plus. Any light will
be appreciated. :)

And we also nail down our search for the ultramicrotome in two
makers, Leica and RMC. Any other you can suggest? And finally, how useful
cryo is for material scientists?

Lots of questions. :) Thanks.

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 18:06:34 2003



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 19:07:10 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotomy for Material Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Carlos, you are correct in that Leica and RMC are the two major
manufacturers of ultramicrotomes. It is also possible to section coatings
on semiconductor substrates, and I have seen many examples done by a
colleague, Phil Swab, of Unity Semiconductor in California. He has even
sectioned diamond coatings on boron nitride on a Si substrate! However, it
is a demanding procedure, plus there is no way you will get large areas for
TEM. While I am proponent of materials ultramicrotomy in general, every
technique has its limits. Ultramicrotomy works best on samples that are
relatively soft, where 'relatively soft' can include many alloys and
composites, and is especially applicable for ultrathin (~10nm thick)
sections of 'soft' nanomaterials. Hard, brittle samples are a challenge.
The fragments produced (think of dropping a sheet of glass on the floor)
will be fairly defect-free, however, as the sectioning then becomes more of
a crack propogation issue than one of shearing.

Have you considered focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning? It is very good for
thin sections of your substrate materials, but it can cause ion damage to
polymeric (and biological) materials. You could consider sending one sample
to someone with a FIB and see what happens.

Finally, have you thought of corresponding with those experienced in tripod
polishing to see if there might be alternatives to your glue/solvent issue?
Ron Anderson, editor of Microscopy Today, comes to mind.

Best of luck,
Tom

Dr. Tom Malis
Scientist Advisor
Natural Resources Canada
Govt. of Canada
Phone: 613-995-7358
cell: 613-371-4577
FAX: 613-947-6606
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca

PS For those of you who have known me as a 'characterization guy', through
and through, over the years, yes, I have succumbed to the lure (read Boss's
orders) of moving into upper management. I am having a pretty decent time,
however, acting as a 'translator' of science issues for the policy folk in
the Canadian government.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki
To: MSA Listserve
Sent: 12/11/2003 3:04 PM

Hi,

We are looking around for a ultramicrotome to slice our samples
for TEM. The kind of samples we work are semiconductors substrates (Si,
SiC, GaAs...) with some epitaxial semi layer or poly metal thin films.
What is your experience preparing this kind of sample? Can we prepare
sample with large area view under TEM? And what about dislocation or
other
defects introduced in the layer? As you can see, we are in dark. We do
prepare our samples using tripod polishing. What motivated us into
looking
in ultramicrotomy is a new set of samples that are polymer (coated and
bulk). The sample is affect by the superglue and the acetone we use in
the
polishing process. And it also has a low Tg. And if we can also use
ultramicrotomy to prepare our routine samples it is a plus. Any light
will
be appreciated. :)

And we also nail down our search for the ultramicrotome in two
makers, Leica and RMC. Any other you can suggest? And finally, how
useful
cryo is for material scientists?

Lots of questions. :) Thanks.

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 11 19:40:23 2003



From: sergey-at-seas.ucla.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2003 19:41:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: books on electron microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Email: sergey-at-seas.ucla.edu
Name: Sergey Prikhodko

Organization: UCLA

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] books on electron microscopy

Question: Dear colleagues:

Could you please recommend me some books on electron microscopy which might have an interesting problems regarding to SEM, TEM and EDS, which might be given to students on undergraduate level for their homework and tests?

Thanks


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 12 02:29:42 2003



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 08:30:09 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotomy for Material Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Carlos,
I think it will be very difficult to get a good cleaved sample of a
polymer layer
on a semiconductor substrate. In my experience of polyimide and polyamide
passivation/dielectric layers, the substrate cleaves while the polymer
remains intact, and you have to pull the two pieces apart, tearing the
polymer (and, as often as not, pulling it off the substrate). There are
similar problems with thick ductile metal layers such as gold - although if
you have a good process they shouldn't delaminate.
The only way to get a good section is to have ion milling as the final
step - either in a FIB or a conventional ion mill.
If you can cleave the samples without too much tearing of the layers, you
might be able to cleave wedges (as Ron Anderson mentioned), and then ion
mill them to get back to virgin material.
I have made 'cold' samples of Pb-Sn solder bumps on Si by using superglue
as the mounting medium and soaking them off, rather than using the
glycophthalate wax I usually use. Metal layers are no problem since they
are resistant to solvents, but your polymers are very tricky.. The only
thing I can think of is that you may be able to deal with these samples
using tripod polishing or similar standard preparation techniques by
changing the mounting media. I have used double-sided sticky tape to hold a
sample for (gentle!) grinding and polishing one side, but I don't know what
you could use to support the sample as you thin it down to only a few
microns.

Good luck!

Richard
_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki [mailto:kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu]
Sent: 11 December 2003 20:04
To: MSA Listserve

Hi,

We are looking around for a ultramicrotome to slice our samples
for TEM. The kind of samples we work are semiconductors substrates (Si,
SiC, GaAs...) with some epitaxial semi layer or poly metal thin films.
What is your experience preparing this kind of sample? Can we prepare
sample with large area view under TEM? And what about dislocation or other
defects introduced in the layer? As you can see, we are in dark. We do
prepare our samples using tripod polishing. What motivated us into looking
in ultramicrotomy is a new set of samples that are polymer (coated and
bulk). The sample is affect by the superglue and the acetone we use in the
polishing process. And it also has a low Tg. And if we can also use
ultramicrotomy to prepare our routine samples it is a plus. Any light will
be appreciated. :)

And we also nail down our search for the ultramicrotome in two
makers, Leica and RMC. Any other you can suggest? And finally, how useful
cryo is for material scientists?

Lots of questions. :) Thanks.

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 12 07:29:41 2003



From: mauduit-at-cemes.fr (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 10:43:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Desktop Microscopic software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Michael and other listers,

It seems appropriate that we, RONTEC, manufacturer of the XFlash
detector make some brief comments on-line regarding the subject.
Some clarification on the technical facts could be of interest to the
community.

First of all, we don't claim 1000 kcps "throughput" but this is the
"input" count rate, i.e. at a pulse load of 1000 kcps a certain XFlash
type (2001) is still capable of producing reasonable spectra provided
a pulse processor with extremely short shaping time constants such
as those offered by RONTEC is used.

Certainly, it won't be possible with every sample in every SEM to
produce 1000 kcps within a solid angle covered by a 5 sqmm
detector area.

It depends of course on the beam current the cathode can generate,
the nature of the sample and the actual size of the solid angle which
is determined not only by the active area but also by the distance
between the sample surface and the detector.

Regarding the solid angle it is important to say that in many cases
it's not true that the solid angle covered by a 5 sqmm XFlash is only
half as big as the one covered by a 10 sqmm Si(Li). Due to the more
compact inner design the distance between the tip of the endcap
and the crystal surface is smaller for the XFlash. Because of the
variety of SEM models and their different detection geometries, it is
not possible to specify a fixed ratio between the size of the solid
angles for 5 sqmm XFlash and 10 sqmm Si(Li) but it may even be
1:1 in some cases.

As for the question of how to generate 1000 kcps, there are certainly
many situations where all conditions together are suitable to produce
such high x-ray intensities.
As a practical example, we see 1000 kcps input from a metallic
sample with beam currents adjusted to 60...80 nA (tungsten
cathode).

In such case the dead time and energy resolution of the XFlash are
comparable with what good conventional Si(Li) detectors would
show at a pulse load of 100 kcps (60% DT, 250 eV FWHM).

With the same XFlash type, at lower count rates, say 1...10 kcps
(using longer shaping times), the energy resolution goes up to
133...135 eV and the dead time goes down to a few percent.

Another XFlash type (3001) provides even better FWHM at lower
count rates (below 130 eV) but the maximum pulse load is limited to
700 kcps (275 kcps into the spectrum or map).


Hopefully, this reply will clarify some of the questions.

RONTEC
Thomas Schuelein


} From: "michael shaffer" {michael-at-shaffer.net}
To: "Microscopy list" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


Email: mauduit-at-cemes.fr
Name: bernadette de MAUDUIT

Organization: CEMES du CNRS - Toulouse (France)

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I would know from which society the Desktop Microscopic software and information about it can now be available because the VIRTUAL LABORATORIES seem to no more exist.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 12 11:52:26 2003



From: Carlos Kazuo Inoki :      kazuo-at-csc.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 12:53:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Ultramicrotomy for Material Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

Thanks for the feedback regarding ultramicrotomy. It is
interesting to know it doesn't work well with semiconductors, specially to
produce large area view samples. This is crucial for us, since we do a lot
of defect analysis (count dislocations). Someone asked if I was planning
to slice SiC with the ultramicrotome (a very hard material). I was just
wondering if ultramicrotomy works with the kind of samples we usually
work. Buying something just to work with soft material should be a waste
of resources for us. Specially because the bulk of our work is done with
semicondutors, or using it as substrate for other materials. :)

About using FIB, we did try with our polymer samples (it is an
acrylate based material). But it just melts under the beam. Low glass
transition temperature (Tg) I imagine. So no heating, at least over 100C.
Also dissolved by solvents and superglue. Cleaving may work, except that
we really need to image a large area. Like we obtain with tripod
polishing. This samples contains some nanoparticles embedded in it, and we
want to count the density and also de distribution. So, this is the
problem that start us into look in ultramicrotomy. :)

Anyway, it was good to hear some ideas and suggestions from the
Wizards of TEM-sample-preparation-archana. :) Thanks again,

Regards,

Carlos

o-------------------------------------------------------o
| Carlos Kazuo Inoki |
| Department of Physics - University at Albany |
| 1400 Washington Ave.- Albany - NY - 12222 |
o-------------------------------------------------------o


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 12 19:07:04 2003



From: JOSE SANCLEMENT :      jsanclement-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 12 Dec 2003 17:08:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM--human mucosa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

SEM--human mucosa
Hi, I'm looking for biofilms on human mucosa. Is
cryostage SEM superior to standard fixations? would my
results be equivalent to using OCT resin? at this
point my samples are in formalin. Any suggestions to
succesfully finding biofilms? appreciaty any input.
Thanks, Jose

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
http://companion.yahoo.com/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 13 01:59:42 2003



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 08:59:07 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Special issue on two photon excitation microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear friends,
it is a pleasure for me to announce that is available on line the new
special issue of Microscopy Research and Technique on TPE.
Please, also start accepting my best wishes for Xmas and for a New Year
aimed to Peace.
All my bets
Alby

------- Special issue content -----------

Volume 63, Issue 1 (1 January 2004)
Special Issue: Two-Photon Microscopy - Part II
.Issue Edited by Alberto
Diaspro.
Published on line, 10 Dec 2003

Articles in the Current Issue:

Rapid dissemination of two-photon excitation microscopy prompts new
applications (p 1-2)
Alberto Diaspro

Antecedents of two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy (p 3-11)
Barry R. Masters, Peter T.C. So


Notes on theory and experimental conditions behind two-photon
excitation microscopy (p 12-17)
Alessandro Esposito, Federico Federici, Cesare Usai, Fabio Cannone,
Giuseppe Chirico, Maddalena Collini, Alberto Diaspro

Practical limits of resolution in confocal and non-linear microscopy (p
18-22)
Guy Cox, Colin J.R. Sheppard

Novel diode-pumped infrared tunable laser system for multi-photon
microscopy (p 23-26)
Nelly Deguil, Eric Mottay, Francois Salin, Philippe Legros, Daniel
Choquet

Ultracompact autocorrelator for multiphoton microscopy (p 27-33)
F. Quercioli, A. Ghirelli, B. Tiribilli, M. Vassalli

Distance measurement by circular scanning of the excitation beam in the
two-photon microscope (p 34-49)
Katarina Kis-Petikova, Enrico Gratton

Probing microscopic diffusion by 2-photon flash photolysis: Measurement
of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion in lens fiber cells (p 50-57)
M.B. Cannell, M.D. Jacobs, P.J. Donaldson, C. Soeller


Fluorescence lifetime imaging by time-correlated single-photon counting
(p 58-66)
W. Becker, A. Bergmann, M.A. Hink, K. König, K. Benndorf, C. Biskup

Live cell ultraviolet microscopy: A comparison between two- and
three-photon excitation (p 67-71)
J. Balaji, R. Desai, S. Maiti

Characterization of two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging
microscopy for protein localization (p 72-80)
Ye Chen, Ammasi Periasamy

Performances of high numerical aperture water and oil immersion
objective in deep-tissue, multi-photon microscopic imaging of excised
human skin (p 81-86)
Chen-Yuan Dong, Betty Yu, Peter D. Kaplan, Peter T.C. So




.......................................................................
........................
Alberto  Diaspro,
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480/309  fax 010314218
e-mail: diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
URL: http://www.lambs.it
.......................................................................
.....................




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 13 09:04:31 2003



From: Donald O'Leary :      donoleary-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 10:04:30 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] PLM Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

New York Microscopical Society

30 North Mountain Avenue

Montclair, NJ 07042



Bernard Friedman Memorial Workshop



Polarized Light Microscopy

May 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2004



An advanced course on polarized light microscopy which will cover the
following topics:

The nature of polarized light

The origin and interpretation of interference colors

Birefringence and crystal orientation, The Indicatrix

Compensation and variable compensators

Interference figures and their interpretation



The workshop will consist of four Consecutive Saturdays of lectures and
hands on labs to cover the theoretical and practical aspects of polarized
light microscopy. The course instructors include Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc.,
Mary McCann of McCann Imaging, John Reffner of SensIR and N.Y.M.S.
Instructor Don O'Leary.



WHEN: May 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2004, from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.



WHERE: 30 North Mountain Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07042. Phone (973) 744-0043



COST: $350 for N.Y.M.S. members, $380 for non-members (includes membership).
Lunch and course materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.



WHO: advanced course for those who have completed "The Use of the
Microscope" or are experienced in microscopy and familiar with the theory of
its use.



HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.

Return form to Don O'Leary, 6 Chittenden Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.



FURTHER INFORMATION:Call D. O'Leary (201)797-8849 e-mail donoleary-at-att.net



PLEASE POST

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Registration Form

Polarized Light Microscopy



N.Y.M.S. Member_________________ ($350) Non-Member__________($380)



Name_____________________________________________________________

Address___________________________________________________________

Phone (W)_________________________(H)______________________________

e-mail________________________________________




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 13 09:43:18 2003



From: Alison_J_Brooks-at-yahoo.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 09:44:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: 35 MM camera on optical microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Email: Alison_J_Brooks-at-yahoo.com
Name: Alison Brooks

Organization: Negative Space Photography

Education: Graduate College

Location: Hayward, CA

Question: Hi- I am trying to get high-quality images from my microscope recorded on film in my 35mm camera. I am working with birefringent crystals at the moment. My 'scope is excellent quality, great optics, images look sharp and clear. THEN, when I put my camera onto my microscope adapter and look thru the camera, the image magnification is greatly increased, focus is nearly impossible, and images are awful. HELP! I also wonder if anything would be different if I was using a trinocular 'scope. Seems I would have the same problem, since the adapter places the camera further away from the object being viewed. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 13 09:51:07 2003



From: pwebster-at-hei.org (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 13 Dec 2003 09:52:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: specimen arc for a ultramicrotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (pwebster-at-hei.org) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, December 12, 2003 at 19:46:21
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pwebster-at-hei.org
Name: Paul Webster

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Does anyone know where I could find a used specimen arc for an Ultracut ultramicrotome?

Many thanks,

Paul Webster

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 15 07:15:17 2003



From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 08:13:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM: Precision World Microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Good morning,
I was asked recently whether I had heard of this manufacturer (Precision
World) out of China that is a OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) for
Leica, Nikon, Zeiss and sells their product through ebay. Since I hadn't I
thought someone out there may have. Has anyone had any experience with this
company or their products?

Regards,
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: 905-823-7091, ext.216
FAX: 905-822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 15 09:43:40 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 15:46:39 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM--human mucosa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am basing my comments on work on biofilms on urinary
catheters. Bacteria are easier to find after conventional
preparation. Processing removes the extracelluar
polysaccharides exposing the bacteria. If you want to see
their real enviroment then cryoSEM is good. One can
sublime off the water and extracellular material (mostly
water) eventually. ESEM is good for biofilms but harder,
(in my experience; tungsten gun) to get a good image an
individual bacterium for various reasons.

Dave

On Fri, 12 Dec 2003 17:08:24 -0800 (PST) JOSE SANCLEMENT
{jsanclement-at-yahoo.com} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} SEM--human mucosa
} Hi, I'm looking for biofilms on human mucosa. Is
} cryostage SEM superior to standard fixations? would my
} results be equivalent to using OCT resin? at this
} point my samples are in formalin. Any suggestions to
} succesfully finding biofilms? appreciaty any input.
} Thanks, Jose
}
} __________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
} http://companion.yahoo.com/
}
}
}
} This incoming email to UWE has been independently scanned for viruses and any virus detected has been removed using McAfee anti-virus software
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 15 14:45:40 2003



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 13:49:03 -0700 (MST)
Subject: [Microscopy] XE 150 lifetime?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Quick survey here for anyone using XE lamps: for how long do you run a
lamp/bulb? Osram claims that the 150W XE has an expected lifetime of 3000
hours, which would be nice BUT I don't know that I trust the lamp not to
go pop before 3000h. A new lamphouse would be nice, but lab explosions are
such a hassle! Could we (fairly) safely run one for 1500-2000 hours?

Our microscope rep is checking into it, but so far has come up with
nothing about the 150W XE, so I thought I'd ask the real experts.

Thanks!

Tamara

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 05:11:35 2003



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 07:15:32 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Hg lamps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, folks -

I'm not sure, but this question may have been on the List a year or two
ago....What is the procedure for changing an HG lamp? I understand there is
a right way and a wrong way to do this; unfortunately I know neither one....

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 07:37:36 2003



From: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 07:49:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: LM slide drying time.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov
Name: Sue Tyler

Organization: Dept. of Commerce NOAA, Cooperative Oxford Lab, Oxford Maryland

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:LM slide drying time.

Question: Could you give me a reference, or a rule of thumb, for
good laboratory practice regarding microscope slide
drying time before presenting the slide to the pathologist?

Thank you,
Sue

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 08:24:59 2003



From: rmark-at-nmsu.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 08:36:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: blade holder for holding blades derived from

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: rmark-at-nmsu.edu
Name: Mark Robertson

Organization: NMSU

Education: Graduate College

Location: New Mexico

Question: I was wondering where to get blade holder for holding
blades derived from multi-edged razors, as these do very fine thin
sections, normal single-edge razors blades are useless. This thing
resembles a credit card into which you can insert the razor blade
extracted from multi-edge shaving razors. The ends of teh blade are
then gripped, similar in fashion to jewellers saw.
Do you have any idea where such a blade holder could be found. It is
for preparing thin sections of creosotebush(Larrea tridentata)and the
twigs are 1mm in diameter, and covered in resin, so normal
single-edge razors blades just mash up specimens.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 12:16:09 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 13:26:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: blade holder for holding blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would try:

Carolina Biological Supply
Thomas Scientific
Ward's Scientific
Textbooks of botanical microtechnique

Geoff

by way of Ask-A-Microscopist wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}
} Email: rmark-at-nmsu.edu
} Name: Mark Robertson
}
} Organization: NMSU
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: New Mexico
}
} Question: I was wondering where to get blade holder for holding blades
} derived from multi-edged razors, as these do very fine thin sections,
} normal single-edge razors blades are useless. This thing resembles a
} credit card into which you can insert the razor blade extracted from
} multi-edge shaving razors. The ends of teh blade are then gripped,
} similar in fashion to jewellers saw.
} Do you have any idea where such a blade holder could be found. It is
} for preparing thin sections of creosotebush(Larrea tridentata)and the
} twigs are 1mm in diameter, and covered in resin, so normal single-edge
} razors blades just mash up specimens.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 15:06:05 2003



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 16:17:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers,
I'm looking for feedback on different contemporary brands/models for:
1. Vacuum evaporators
2. Sputter coaters
3. Critical point dryers
Reliability, serves the needs, bang for the buck, etc....
Thanks for any help!
Dee

--
***************************************************************
Do not publicly post any of my correspondence without permission

Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 845/365-8640
F: 845/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 17:03:06 2003



From: mganger-at-optonline.net
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:14:22 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM/CCD Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings all,
}
} I have a question regarding the necessary resolution that would be best
} for routine operation. Let me state that I work for a renal path
} service where most of the images generated are rather low magnifications
} (x1000) to upwards of 100K, although the bulk of photography usually
} max's out around 30K or so. We are in the market for a new TEM/CCD
} system and were looking at the 2K cameras as an option. My question is
} the following:
}
} For a service such as this, is there any advantage between operating a
} 2K camera vs one that is higher (3 or 4K)? If there is no real
} difference, does anyone see in the future a move towards the higher res
} cameras as prices may or may not come down as the technology becomes
} more available? We would like to make our purchase based upon not only
} our current needs but thinking of what our needs will be 10 yrs down the
} road.
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Mike Ganger
} EM Technicial
} Dept. of Surgical Pathology
} Weill Cornell Medical College
} New York, NY 10021
} 212-746-6437



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 17:17:17 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:43:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Dec 16, 2003, at 1:17 PM, Dee Breger wrote:

} I'm looking for feedback on different contemporary brands/models for:
} 1. Vacuum evaporators
} 2. Sputter coaters
} 3. Critical point dryers
} Reliability, serves the needs, bang for the buck, etc....
} Thanks for any help!
}
Dear Dee,
We are happy with the Cressington evaporator we got from Pella; you
can also get a sputter coater with the same vacuum parts. We had the
same criteria as you, but we have not had the unit long enough to say
anything about reliability beyond that it has worked very well since we
got it.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 19:43:13 2003



From: John Brealey :      john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 12:25:11 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM Hitachi H-600 HT cable problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ho Ho Ho,

Finally I can report we are back in operation!
The problem was in the HV tank. The HV cable was not contacting one of the
three leaf spring contacts in the cable housing, therefore, there was an
open circuit to the filament. By physically adjusting the position of the
leaf spring we now have good contact.
Unless there is an incredible co-incidence here, I believe we may have
created the second problem (ie, open circuit to filament) when we were
trying to find the first problem (faulty integrated circuit on the HV
Stabilzer board). Before we found the faulty IC we had removed the HV cable
twice from the tank. Doing this probably moved the leaf spring contact.

Thankyou to Geoff Douglas (Meeco Holdings) for his expert assistance in
isolating our problem.
Also, thankyou to Terry Fitton and Tony Morgan here at the IMVS, Kerry
Gascoigne

____________________________
John Brealey
Medical Scientist
Electron Microscopy Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
IMVS - TQEH Pathology
Woodville, 5011
South Australia
(08) 82226612



Earlier correspondence...



Hello again,

Still no electron beam.
We believe the HV Stabilzer board (new capacitors) and the cable are OK.
Gun vacuum is 10 (-5) Torr. Column and camera are 10 (-2) Torr.
Gun and camera green lights are on.
Can anyone advise on interlocks within the system?
We think there are at least four... the gun valve, specimen airlock, camera
shutter and camera valve. Something in the system is preventing the
filament from switching on.
Is there anything else that will prevent the filament turning on?
We have tried several filament setups.

Thanks again,

John Brealey

-----Original Message-----
} From: John Brealey [mailto:john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au]
Sent: Tuesday, 11 November 2003 01:15 PM
To: John Brealey

Hi all,

Our Hitachi H-600 TEM is failing to provide an HV reading at any kV (ie 25,
50, 75, 100).
As the microscope is 20 years old I believe the HT cable is the problem.
Do you agree?
What's the best plan of attack from here?
Apart from the HT cable and a dirty gun chamber, are there any other
potential causes of this failure?
I have never attempted to isolate the HT cable.
The vacuum system is fine.
I've turned the microscope completely on and off a few times and have vented
all compartments to air and back to high vacuum but this has had no effect.

Two days ago I reassembled the rear cosmetic guard that encases the upper
vacuum system and the HT cable. Could a slight knock to the cable be enough
to finish it off? The microscope was working yesterday, though. I've tried
gently wiggling the cable but that gave no response.

The microscope has not been hissing and the HV has appeared quite stable.
The only sign that something was not quite right was that some mornings the
HV would fail to read at 25kV (but would always read at 50, 75 and 100kV).

In the light of problems encountered by Sarah Ellis (refer to archives) a
few months ago I am tempted to clean the gun chamber first (however I doubt
if this will fix anything).

Any advice would be gratefully accepted before I contact our institution's
electrical engineers.

John Brealey
EM Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Institute of Medical & Veterinary Science
Adelaide
Australia
(08) 8222 6612
john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 19:46:12 2003



From: John Brealey :      john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 12:28:16 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM Hitachi H-600 HT cable problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ho Ho Ho,

Finally I can report we are back in operation!
The problem was in the HV tank. The HV cable was not contacting one of the
three leaf spring contacts in the cable housing, therefore, there was an
open circuit to the filament. By physically adjusting the position of the
leaf spring we now have good contact.
Unless there is an incredible co-incidence here, I believe we may have
created the second problem (ie, open circuit to filament) when we were
trying to find the first problem (faulty integrated circuit on the HV
Stabilzer board). Before we found the faulty IC we had removed the HV cable
twice from the tank. Doing this probably moved the leaf spring contact.

Thankyou to Geoff Douglas (Meeco Holdings) for his expert assistance in
isolating our problem.
Also, thankyou to Terry Fitton and Tony Morgan here at the IMVS, Kerry
Gascoigne at Flinders Medical Centre, and all respondents who provided so
much help and advice.

____________________________
John Brealey
Medical Scientist
Electron Microscopy Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
IMVS - TQEH Pathology
Woodville, 5011
South Australia
(08) 82226612



Earlier correspondence...



Hello again,

Still no electron beam.
We believe the HV Stabilzer board (new capacitors) and the cable are OK.
Gun vacuum is 10 (-5) Torr. Column and camera are 10 (-2) Torr.
Gun and camera green lights are on.
Can anyone advise on interlocks within the system?
We think there are at least four... the gun valve, specimen airlock, camera
shutter and camera valve. Something in the system is preventing the
filament from switching on.
Is there anything else that will prevent the filament turning on?
We have tried several filament setups.

Thanks again,

John Brealey

-----Original Message-----
} From: John Brealey [mailto:john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au]
Sent: Tuesday, 11 November 2003 01:15 PM
To: John Brealey

Hi all,

Our Hitachi H-600 TEM is failing to provide an HV reading at any kV (ie 25,
50, 75, 100).
As the microscope is 20 years old I believe the HT cable is the problem.
Do you agree?
What's the best plan of attack from here?
Apart from the HT cable and a dirty gun chamber, are there any other
potential causes of this failure?
I have never attempted to isolate the HT cable.
The vacuum system is fine.
I've turned the microscope completely on and off a few times and have vented
all compartments to air and back to high vacuum but this has had no effect.

Two days ago I reassembled the rear cosmetic guard that encases the upper
vacuum system and the HT cable. Could a slight knock to the cable be enough
to finish it off? The microscope was working yesterday, though. I've tried
gently wiggling the cable but that gave no response.

The microscope has not been hissing and the HV has appeared quite stable.
The only sign that something was not quite right was that some mornings the
HV would fail to read at 25kV (but would always read at 50, 75 and 100kV).

In the light of problems encountered by Sarah Ellis (refer to archives) a
few months ago I am tempted to clean the gun chamber first (however I doubt
if this will fix anything).

Any advice would be gratefully accepted before I contact our institution's
electrical engineers.

John Brealey
EM Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Institute of Medical & Veterinary Science
Adelaide
Australia
(08) 8222 6612
john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 20:10:33 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 21:21:50 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have been quite happy with our Bal-Tec critical point dryer and our
Denton sputter coater. Both have been in service for several years now and
have survived users of all levels of expertise.

At 06:43 PM 12/16/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 21:15:17 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 19:26:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM/CCD Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Mike
Digital cameras is fast growing area, so you could not predict what will
happens 10 years later. In my point of view, EM digital camera's
technology is still under developing: major manufacturers offered to us
new (technologically new, not only next model) models nearly every year and
it's not only about amount of pixels in it. It's about new CCDs with
bigger/smaller pixels, faster readout systems, better coupling etc. Another
thing, which comes to my mind: modern scientific grade CCD's life is about
5 years, so, perhaps, you need a new camera sooner than in 10 years... As
for "resolution" - this issue has been discussed in this forum many, many
times (you may need to check our archive). Camera itself does not provide
"resolution". Resolution comes from the microscope and camera is just
instrument to transfer it into some amount of discrete pixels. How many
pixels you need? It depends. Standard resolution in the pictures
published by Science or Nature is 72 dpi. So, if you need your picture
will be published 1:1 in those magazines - you actually don't nee too
much. Seriously speaking, editors commonly ask for 300 dpi resolution for
submitted pictures (to be able to edit image if necessary). If your image
is 5x5", at 300 dpi you will have nearly exact 2 megapixels. So, it means,
2K camera is OK for such type of job. What about 2K vs 4K cameras? If you
have modern microscope controlled by computer, most camera's manufacturers
offered software for "digital montage". So, your camera automatically took
a couple of images, then assembled them into a single large image. You
may find that this option may work to you (may not at low magnification or
drift etc). Another thing to consider: as more pixels you have, as slower
camera. It means, that you probably will not have a good TV mode on 4K
cameras. Returning back to the resolution issue: the beauty of the digital
camera is that you could took as many pictures as you want. So, I usually
took a few pictures with different magnification. If you need good
detail's resolution on your digital image - you need to go to the higher
mag. In this terms, you may have image with very good resolution of
details even on 1K camera - you need to use higher magnification and price
would be the size of the field. Another thing, which I always recommend:
ask manufacturers for demo, use your own samples and took pictures by
yourself, then compare side-by-side. You may be surprised to see how
different cameras may be.

I hope, it helps. Sergey

At 03:14 PM 12/16/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 22:10:34 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:22:47 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


After some considerable research, I replaced
my long standing Anatech Hummer VII sputter
coater with a Denton Desk II coater. After
about four months of use, I am really happy
with it. Very reliable, easy to use. Fast.
Compact (Cressington has a large foot print)
and easy to use.

I looked at the Cressington 208FE and found
the Denton to be preferable. But of course,
your criteria may vary. Anyway, I like the
Denton.

gary g.

Oh...no financial interest one way or the other.



At 01:17 PM 12/16/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 16 22:29:55 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 22:41:16 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Many thanks for a number of replies.
Unfortunately I formulated my question too fuzzy. I am not interested in the
measurements of porosity utilizing EDS. What I am interested in is the
effect of porosity (or nanoporosity) on EDS measurements. It seems
that an increase in porosity should lead to a decrease in the intensity of X-rays,
and that this dependence should not be linear. It's only my gut feeling,
I do not want to carry out calculations. I am sure all these calculations were
done a long time ago, and I'll appreciate any lead to a proper publication
and/or a short explanation of the problem.

Thanks,

Vladimir


________________________________

} From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
Sent: Wed 12/10/2003 2:57 PM
To: Microscopy (E-mail)

Hello all,
I have samples of the same material with suspected
difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.

Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
(EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
of porosity?

Thank you,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 03:35:08 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?KJ_H=FCbner?= :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 10:20:42 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Fw: IASTED Newsletter on Modelling and Simulation - Dec 2003 (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Subject: [Microscopy] IASTED Newsletter on Modelling and Simulation - Dec 2003
}
} IASTED International Newsletter on Modelling and Simulation
} December 15, 2003
}
} UPCOMING MODELLING AND SIMULATION CONFERENCES
} 1. The IASTED International Conference on Applied Simulation and
Modelling - ASM 2004
} June 28-30, 2004, Rhodes, Greece
}
} Important Deadlines:
} Submissions Due: Feb. 15, 2004
} Notification of Acceptance: Apr. 1, 2004
} Registration Deadline: May 1, 2004
}
} To submit a paper, tutorial or special session or for more information
visit our website at http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/greece/asm.htm
}
} 2. The 4th IASTED International Conference on Modelling, Simulation, and
Optimization - MSO 2004
} August 16-18, 2004, Kauai, Hawaii, USA
}
} Important Deadlines:
} Submissions Due: Mar. 5, 2004
} Notification of Acceptance: Apr. 15, 2004
} Registration Deadline: June 1, 2004
} To submit a paper, tutorial or special session or for more information
visit our website at http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/hawaii/mso.htm
}
} UPCOMING DEADLINES
} The submission deadline for the 15th IASTED International Conference on
Modelling and Simulation - MS 2004 being held March 1-3, 2004 in Marina Del
Rey, CA, USA has passed. Delegates without papers (attendees) are welcome
to register until Jan. 15, 2004.
}
} For registration information visit our website at
http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/marina/ms.htm
}
} **Tutorial Announcement**
} "Simulation-Based Engineering of Complex Systems Using EXTEND+OpEMCSS"
} Presented by Dr. John R. Clymer - California State University, Fullerton,
USA
} For additional information visit
http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/marina/ms-tutorial1.htm
}
} **Special Session**
} "Intelligent Reconfigurable Simulation" Organized by Dr. Tudor
Niculiu -University "Politehnica" of Bucharest, Romania. For additional
information visit
http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/marina/ms-specialsessions.htm
}
}
} FUTURE CONFERENCES
} Mark your calendars! The IASTED International Conference on Environmental
Modelling and Simulation - EM&S 2004 will be held Nov. 22-24, 2004 in St.
Thomas, Virgin Islands, USA.
}
}
} MODELLING AND SIMULATION JOURNAL FROM ACTA PRESS
} The International Journal of Modelling and Simulation - First published in
1981, this journal covers all aspects of modelling, simulation, languages,
software, hardware, methodology, numerical and graphical methods, virtual
reality, statistical techniques, tutorials, surveys, and applications. It
also includes book reviews, conference notices, call for papers, and new
publications.
} Editor-in-Chief: Prof. A. Houshyar
} Frequency: 4 issues per year
} 2003 Rate: US$256.00
} Postage & Handling: US$25.00
} ISSN: 0228-6203 (205)
} http://www.actapress.com/journals/journals.htm#Modelling
}
} It pays to be a member! One of the benefits of your IASTED membership is
a complimentary subscription to an ACTA Press journal. Become a member
today! http://www.iasted.org/member/OnlineMembershipForm.pdf
}
}
} CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS AVAILABLE
} Past conference proceedings in the area of modelling and simulation are
available for purchase from ACTA Press -
http://www.actapress.com/proceedings/proceedings.htm
}
} For more information, to be removed from our mailing list, or to join one
of the following mail groups: Power, Telecommunication, Bio-Medicine, Signal
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Engineering, Education, Databases and Knowledge Engineering, Internet and
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 04:03:06 2003



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-UDel.Edu
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 05:14:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Vladimir,

I assume you are talking about area analysis which provides a display of
average composition of the scanned area. As you know, dark regions in SEM
image are where the e-detector sees less SE/BSE due to a) less generation
and/or less survival of them. Reasons for above a) and b) include when the
primary beam hits a hole or a pore. Likewise, depending on the size and
shape of a pore and the nature of the material, X-rays may not be
generated or less may be generated when the primary e-beam has difficulty
reaching there or may not survive well (absorbed) in the location of the
pore. That is precisely the reason why a reliable quantitative analysis
should start with a flat sample surface and why the detector has an
important parameter, take-off angle, for quan-routine.

X-ray mapping of a homogeneous but uneven sample should provide some
insight into this.

****************************************
Chaoying Ni, PhD
The W.M. Keck Electron Microscope Facility
Facility location: 022 Spencer Laboratory
Mailing address:
201 duPont Hall
Dept of Matls Sci & Eng
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8354 (O); -2318(L); -4545(Fax)
http://eml.masc.udel.edu
*****************************************

On Tue, 16 Dec 2003, Dusevich, Vladimir wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Many thanks for a number of replies.
} Unfortunately I formulated my question too fuzzy. I am not interested in the
} measurements of porosity utilizing EDS. What I am interested in is the
} effect of porosity (or nanoporosity) on EDS measurements. It seems
} that an increase in porosity should lead to a decrease in the intensity of X-rays,
} and that this dependence should not be linear. It's only my gut feeling,
} I do not want to carry out calculations. I am sure all these calculations were
} done a long time ago, and I'll appreciate any lead to a proper publication
} and/or a short explanation of the problem.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Vladimir
}
}
} ________________________________
}
} } From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
} Sent: Wed 12/10/2003 2:57 PM
} To: Microscopy (E-mail)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello all,
} I have samples of the same material with suspected
} difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
} a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.
}
} Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
} (EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
} Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
} of porosity?
}
} Thank you,
}
} Vladimir
}
} Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} 3127 School of Dentistry
} 650 E. 25th Street
} Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
}
} Phone: (816) 235-2072
} Fax: (816) 235-5524
} Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy
}
}
}
}
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 08:00:42 2003



From: David Vowles :      djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 14:11:39 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis Poster

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,

We have a copy of a classic wall poster called 'Murphy's Immutable Laws of
Microanalysis' which was published in 1989 by Kevex. Does anyone out there
know if these are still available anywhere.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 334325
Fax: +44 (0)1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 08:31:16 2003



From: Pmtl :      mtl-at-njcc.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 21:43:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A simple way of confirming your proposed relationship of porosity to the EDS values
would be to actually measure the porosity of the sample both in terms of total
porosity and the size range the porosity occurs in. Nitrogen adsorption is used for
porosity less than 30 nm and mercury intrusion for the porosity range of 7 nm to 300
µm. Non-mercury intrusion is used for well characterized materials. Molecular probe
techniques are used to characterize size and shape of pores less than 1 nm.

J. Roy Nelson, Ph.D.
Material Testing Lab.
Pennington, NJ
(609) 730-0575

"Dusevich, Vladimir" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Many thanks for a number of replies.
} Unfortunately I formulated my question too fuzzy. I am not interested in the
} measurements of porosity utilizing EDS. What I am interested in is the
} effect of porosity (or nanoporosity) on EDS measurements. It seems
} that an increase in porosity should lead to a decrease in the intensity of X-rays,
} and that this dependence should not be linear. It's only my gut feeling,
} I do not want to carry out calculations. I am sure all these calculations were
} done a long time ago, and I'll appreciate any lead to a proper publication
} and/or a short explanation of the problem.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Vladimir
}
}
} ________________________________
}
} } From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
} Sent: Wed 12/10/2003 2:57 PM
} To: Microscopy (E-mail)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello all,
} I have samples of the same material with suspected
} difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
} a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.
}
} Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
} (EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
} Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
} of porosity?
}
} Thank you,
}
} Vladimir
}
} Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} 3127 School of Dentistry
} 650 E. 25th Street
} Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
}
} Phone: (816) 235-2072
} Fax: (816) 235-5524
} Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 10:07:00 2003



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 09:16:34 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM/CCD Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Mike,

Sergey is right, in that the resolution of a TEM CCD camera is not really
determined by the number of pixels. Every TEM camera uses a Phosphor or YAG
to convert the electrons into light, and this determines the resolution of
the camera. This resolution depends on the thickness of the phosphor and
the acceleration voltage, but is on the order of a few microns to a few tens
of microns. Each camera, regardless of the number of pixels, can be
engineered to resolve this, through optical elements or fiber optics. Once
you realize this, the advantage of cameras with more pixels becomes clear:
field of view.
In most cases, field of view can also be enlarged, as Sergey correctly
mentions, by acquiring several images and stitch them together. Many
software packages allow to do this multiple image alignment procedure
automatically (if you have a motor stage), or semi-automatically.
And another point, where Sergey is correct is the readout speed. Most
"large" CCD chips have a fairly slow readout speed, due to the electric
capacity of their pixels. This reduces the readout in many cases to around 1
frame per second or less. These cameras are replacements for film, but you
need to work with the binoculars to find an area and focus. Many of these
cameras have partial readouts, which help somewhat. Using "smaller" CCDs
with smaller pixel sizes allows a much faster read-out. For example, our
KeenView, which uses a smaller chip and a tapered fiber-optic to match the
phosphor resolution, allows about 12 frames per second in full resolution
(1330x1024). This speed is sufficient to also work with the camera for
location and focusing.
In other words: There is, like anywhere else in live, pros and cons for each
camera, and in the end it depends on your application and your budget that
determines the best camera for your TEM.

If you want to discuss specifics about your application, please contact me
off line.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Sergey Ryazantsev [mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 20:26
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Mike
Digital cameras is fast growing area, so you could not predict what will
happens 10 years later. In my point of view, EM digital camera's
technology is still under developing: major manufacturers offered to us
new (technologically new, not only next model) models nearly every year and
it's not only about amount of pixels in it. It's about new CCDs with
bigger/smaller pixels, faster readout systems, better coupling etc. Another
thing, which comes to my mind: modern scientific grade CCD's life is about
5 years, so, perhaps, you need a new camera sooner than in 10 years... As
for "resolution" - this issue has been discussed in this forum many, many
times (you may need to check our archive). Camera itself does not provide
"resolution". Resolution comes from the microscope and camera is just
instrument to transfer it into some amount of discrete pixels. How many
pixels you need? It depends. Standard resolution in the pictures
published by Science or Nature is 72 dpi. So, if you need your picture
will be published 1:1 in those magazines - you actually don't nee too
much. Seriously speaking, editors commonly ask for 300 dpi resolution for
submitted pictures (to be able to edit image if necessary). If your image
is 5x5", at 300 dpi you will have nearly exact 2 megapixels. So, it means,
2K camera is OK for such type of job. What about 2K vs 4K cameras? If you
have modern microscope controlled by computer, most camera's manufacturers
offered software for "digital montage". So, your camera automatically took
a couple of images, then assembled them into a single large image. You
may find that this option may work to you (may not at low magnification or
drift etc). Another thing to consider: as more pixels you have, as slower
camera. It means, that you probably will not have a good TV mode on 4K
cameras. Returning back to the resolution issue: the beauty of the digital
camera is that you could took as many pictures as you want. So, I usually
took a few pictures with different magnification. If you need good
detail's resolution on your digital image - you need to go to the higher
mag. In this terms, you may have image with very good resolution of
details even on 1K camera - you need to use higher magnification and price
would be the size of the field. Another thing, which I always recommend:
ask manufacturers for demo, use your own samples and took pictures by
yourself, then compare side-by-side. You may be surprised to see how
different cameras may be.

I hope, it helps. Sergey

At 03:14 PM 12/16/2003, you wrote:


} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 10:18:10 2003



From: ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 11:28:54 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microanalysis Poster

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I recently got a smaller size version (11 X 17) after alot of pleading,
from a Noran serviceman. But I don't know how available they are. Try
contacting Noran at
www.thermo.com

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





David Vowles {djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk}
12/17/03 09:11 AM

To
microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
Microanalysis Poster








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear All,

We have a copy of a classic wall poster called 'Murphy's Immutable Laws of
Microanalysis' which was published in 1989 by Kevex. Does anyone out there
know if these are still available anywhere.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 334325
Fax: +44 (0)1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 10:38:33 2003



From: Admon Uri :      uadmon-at-netvision.net.il
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 18:39:16 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All, and best wishes for a happy New Year,

I shall appreciate advise on how to connect a Nikon Coolpix 995 to a
Reichert-Jung MEF3 (inverted) Light Microscope, and yet be able to
photograph the whole field of view, or at least close to it, as is viewed
and photographed through the Polaroid or 35mm cameras. I tried to replace
the original 35mm camera, normally positioned on the down-left-hand side of
the MEF3, by a Coolpix 995 equipped with a x0.63 C-mount and a home-made
short adapter, the latter used for matching. But with or without the
adapter, and regardless of the position of the Coolpix relative to the
microscope port, the field of view was much smaller than the one
photographed in the 35mm camera (in other words, the aparent magnification
was much higher). In order to get a similar field of view I had to use a
lower power objective of the MEF3. This limits the minimal attainable
magnification. If the optical magnification of the Coolpix is reduced to a
minimum, to get a larger field of view, only a partial, circular field is
exposed in the center, the rest is blocked out, like looking through a tube.

Has anyone faced the same problem? can a different C-mount and adapter solve
it?

Thanx,

Dr. Uri Admon
Beer-Sheva
Israel




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 10:38:41 2003



From: Hiromi Konishi :      konishi-at-geofourpeaks.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 08:50:04 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] microscope slide storage (slide mailer)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would like to know where I can buy microscope slide storage (slide mailer)
for petrographic thin sections. I am looking for storage in which I can put
a glass slide (1x2 inch).

I can find the provider of slide mailer for biological glass slide (1x 4
inch ?) at:
http://www.omni-optical.com/micro/sm320.htm

I need such case for 1x 2 inch thin sections.
Please advise.

Thank you,
Hiromi Konishi
The University of New Mexico



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 11:38:40 2003



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-bwxt.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 11:44:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis Poster

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A few years ago, I was able to obtain a smaller version of the large poster
from Noran which purchased Kevex sometime back.

Also, there is a so-so copy on my web site which can be downloaded. It was
from multiple flatbed scans (with permission) of the larger poster and the
match-up is less than perfect. My web address is below.

Regards,
Woody
-----------------------------
Woody White
BWXT Services:
http://www.bwxt.com/bwxt.html
My Site:
http://woody.white.home.att.net


-----Original Message-----
} From: David Vowles [mailto:djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 9:12 AM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

Dear All,

We have a copy of a classic wall poster called 'Murphy's Immutable Laws of
Microanalysis' which was published in 1989 by Kevex. Does anyone out there
know if these are still available anywhere.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 334325
Fax: +44 (0)1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 12:50:52 2003



From: Ellery Frahm :      frah0010-at-umn.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 13:02:16 CST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microanalysis Poster

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've never seen a copy anywhere -- not even at eBay. Mine is actually just
a touched-up digital image that someone had scanned and posted on the web.

Ellery

David Vowles wrote:
} We have a copy of a classic wall poster called 'Murphy's Immutable
} Laws of Microanalysis' which was published in 1989 by Kevex. Does
} anyone out there know if these are still available anywhere?

---------------
Ellery E. Frahm
Research Scientist/Manager
Electron Microprobe Laboratory
Department of Geology & Geophysics
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Lab Website: http://probelab.geo.umn.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 13:27:42 2003



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 13:41:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] cost of operating as SEM/TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

All: I'm submitting this for Dr. Stan Trauth of Arkansas
State University. Please reply to Dr. Trauth off-line:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Would you mind sending me just a few names of EM techs or
labs that might be
willing to share information regarding the cost of operating
a TEM or an SEM--hourly or otherwise?

I would sincerely appreciate the assistance.

Thanks,

Stan Trauth
strauth-at-astate.edu


Dr. Stan Trauth
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
P.O. Box 599
State University, AR 72467-0599
Ph. 870.972.3082
FAX 870.972.2638
http://biology.astate.edu/faculty/strauth/Dr_%20Stanley%20Trauth.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 13:53:11 2003



From: Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 15:04:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Microanalysis Poster

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Wasn't this discussed some years ago? If memory serves me someone found it
posted on the internet. If you are that interested a search of the archives
is in order.

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com



ekomarnicki-at-Mac
Dermid.com To: David Vowles {djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk}
cc: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
12/17/2003 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microanalysis Poster
11:28 AM








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I recently got a smaller size version (11 X 17) after alot of pleading,
from a Noran serviceman. But I don't know how available they are. Try
contacting Noran at
www.thermo.com

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





David Vowles {djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk}
12/17/03 09:11 AM

To
microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
Microanalysis Poster








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear All,

We have a copy of a classic wall poster called 'Murphy's Immutable Laws of
Microanalysis' which was published in 1989 by Kevex. Does anyone out there
know if these are still available anywhere.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 334325
Fax: +44 (0)1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk









From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 15:34:14 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 16:55:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microscope slide storage (slide mailer)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We certainly are not totally impartial but for reliability, ease of use and
longevity you should look at the Ladd 30000 Vacuum Evaporator.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research sells a variety of vacuum equipment and other EM
supplies

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dee Breger" {micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 4:17 PM

Hiromi,

Try the sample prep companies, especially Buehler. Also, Carolina Biological often carries storage like this. Make sure that they understand that these are petrographic slides, not regular microscope slides.

Good hunting!
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education, Inc. (MME, Inc.)
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&
Optimizing Light Microscopy is still available through MME. For information on ordering single or small quantities, visit our website. For discounts on classroom-sized, call us today.
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&

At 08:50 AM 12/17/03 -0800, Hiromi Konishi wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 17:31:02 2003



From: William J Mushock :      wim5-at-lehigh.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 17:42:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microspec Manuals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am currently trying to resurrect a 1985 vintage Microspec WDX-2A
wavelength spectrometer. The system is mounted on a Philips 535 SEM
and seems to be working but I don't have any manuals for it. If
anyone has a set a manuals laying around they wouldn't mind parting
with or copying they can respond by contacting me directly at
wim5-at-lehigh.edu

Thanks,
Bill


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 17 22:36:02 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 20:48:10 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The 990 and 995 do a good/decent job of microphoto.
However, don't be surprised by many types of aberrations and
distortion. Get an Optem coupler and set the camera
at infinity...wide open. I think that this is about
the best that you will get. It should be very close to
1:1 relative to oculars and digicam. A real digital
microscopy camera produces dramatically different results.
But the CoolPix price is very attractive. It is a good
place to start.

gary g.



At 09:39 AM 12/17/2003, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 01:56:56 2003



From: Klughammer - Anneliese Schmaus :      schmaus-at-klughammer.de
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:07:01 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi ,

you should try it with a 1.0x C-Mount Adapter which has no
optics. Then you should be able to capture a larger field of
View.

mfg / regards

Anneliese Schmaus
klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
info-at-klughammer.de
www.klughammer.de



AU} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AU} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
AU} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
AU} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
AU} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AU} Dear All, and best wishes for a happy New Year,

AU} I shall appreciate advise on how to connect a Nikon Coolpix 995 to a
AU} Reichert-Jung MEF3 (inverted) Light Microscope, and yet be able to
AU} photograph the whole field of view, or at least close to it, as is viewed
AU} and photographed through the Polaroid or 35mm cameras. I tried to replace
AU} the original 35mm camera, normally positioned on the down-left-hand side of
AU} the MEF3, by a Coolpix 995 equipped with a x0.63 C-mount and a home-made
AU} short adapter, the latter used for matching. But with or without the
AU} adapter, and regardless of the position of the Coolpix relative to the
AU} microscope port, the field of view was much smaller than the one
AU} photographed in the 35mm camera (in other words, the aparent magnification
AU} was much higher). In order to get a similar field of view I had to use a
AU} lower power objective of the MEF3. This limits the minimal attainable
AU} magnification. If the optical magnification of the Coolpix is reduced to a
AU} minimum, to get a larger field of view, only a partial, circular field is
AU} exposed in the center, the rest is blocked out, like looking through a tube.

AU} Has anyone faced the same problem? can a different C-mount and adapter solve
AU} it?

AU} Thanx,

AU} Dr. Uri Admon
AU} Beer-Sheva
AU} Israel



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 02:46:11 2003



From: Timo Junker :      timojunker-at-holografie.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:58:12 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Philips EM300 Manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I need the complete Philips EM 300 manual. Does anyone could help?

Thanks,
Timo Junker




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 04:21:18 2003



From: =?iso-8859-2?Q?KJ_H=FCbner?= :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 11:14:09 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From: Christian Ronse {cronse-at-dpt-info.u-strasbg.fr}
}
} INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY:
} 40 YEARS ON
}
} Monday 18th to Wednesday 20th April 2005, Paris, France
}
}
} This symposium is the seventh of a series of conferences devoted to
} mathematical morphology and its applications in image processing. It
} will be held at 40 years after mathematical morphology was born
} through the collaborative work of Jean Serra and the late Georges
} Matheron in the summer of 1964. It is thus a great opportunity to
} present the most recent developments in this field, and to assess its
} relevance in image processing, signal processing and computer science.
}
} The theme of the conference will be mathematical morphology in the
} broad sense, around the notion that pictures represent geometrical
} objects with luminance (or colour) profiles, that can be analysed by
} their interactions with other geometrical objects. More specifically,
} the following topics are eligible for submissions:
}
} Morphological theory:
} - lattice theory and algebraic models of images and operators
} - combinatorial topology and discrete geometry in image processing
} - metrics and topologies for shapes and pictures
} - PDEs, level set methods and geometrical scale space
} - discrete and continuous geometrical measures, integral geometry
} - random sets and geometrical probability
} - image connectivity and connected operators
} - relations of morphology with signal processing and computer science
} Morphological image processing:
} - geometrical image analysis
} - order-statistics image filtering
} - geometrical and topographical segmentation
} - colour and multi-channel morphology
} - morphological pattern recognition
} - motion analysis
} - texture analysis
} - shape analysis
} - image coding
} - algorithms and data structures for morphology
} Applications of morphology in:
} - geoscience and remote sensing
} - bio-medical imaging
} - materials science
} - quality control
} - document processing
} - data analysis
}
} The scientific program will include invited talks and contributed
} papers (no posters). They will appear in the proceedings volume.
} This volume will be available at the beginning of the conference.
}
} This ISMM will be held in honour of Jean Serra, on the occasion of his
} 65th birthday. Its venue will follow that of DGCI in Poitiers (from
} Wednesday the 13th to Friday the 15th April 2005).
}
}
} INFORMATION / CONFERENCE WEB SITE:
} ---------------------------------
}
} A conference web site (hosted by esiee.fr) will be available shortly,
} check http://ams.jrc.it/mdigest/calendar.html
}
} It will contain information about submission, registration, invited
} speakers, accommodation, etc. For additional information, you can also
} contact the organising committee.
}
}
} SUBMISSION PROCEDURES:
} ---------------------
}
} Prospective authors are invited to submit a full paper using the
} electronic procedure described in the conference web site. The
} manuscript file should be in the PDF format.
}
} In case of problems with the electronic procedure, it is possible to
} submit a paper by sending 5 printed copies of the manuscript to any
} one of the 3 conference chairs. Email submissions should be avoided.
}
} The manuscript title header should include the names, institutions and
} addresses of the authors, an abstract of up to 200 words, and
} keywords. The submission procedure requires providing full postal and
} e-mail addresses, phone and fax numbers of the contact author.
}
} Acceptance of papers is based on appropriateness of the topic and on
} quality, novelty, and clarity of exposition. Each paper will be
} reviewed by at least two members of the Program Committee (or referees
} chosen by them), and their reviews will be returned to the author.
}
} Accepted papers will appear in the proceedings volume. The final paper
} has to be prepared in LaTeX according to the style file provided by
} the organisers (see conference web site). The size should be limited
} to 10 pages including artwork and references. Authors are strongly
} advised to adopt that LaTeX style already for the initial submission.
}
}
} IMPORTANT DATES:
} ---------------
}
} 10 September 2004: Submission of full paper
} 12 November 2004: Notification of acceptance
} 14 January 2005: Camera-ready full paper
}
}
} CONFERENCE CHAIRS:
} -----------------
}
} Christian Ronse
} LSIIT UMR 7005 CNRS-ULP
} Parc d'Innovation, Boulevard Sébastien Brant
} BP 10413
} 67412 ILLKIRCH CEDEX
} FRANCE
} Tel: +33 3 90 24 45 00
} Fax: +33 3 90 24 44 55
} Email: cronse at dpt-info.u-strasbg.fr
}
} Laurent Najman
} Laboratoire A2SI
} Groupe ESIEE
} Cité Descartes - BP 99 - 2, Bd Blaise Pascal
} 93162 NOISY LE GRAND CEDEX
} FRANCE
} Tel: +33 1 45 92 66 72
} Fax: +33 1 45 92 66 99
} Email: l.najman at esiee.fr
}
} Etienne Decencière Ferrandière
} CMM - Ecole des Mines
} 35, rue Saint Honoré
} 77305 Fontainebleau CEDEX
} Tel: +33 1 64 69 48 09
} Fax: +33 1 64 69 47 07
} Email: Etienne.Decenciere at cmm.ensmp.fr
}
}
}
} PROGRAM COMMITTEE:
} -----------------
}
} Christian Ronse (Head), Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France
}
} Junior Barrera, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
} Gilles Bertrand, ESIEE, Noisy-Le-Grand, France
} Isabelle Bloch, ENST, Paris, France
} Gunilla Borgefors, Uppsala Universitet, Sweden
} Jose Crespo, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
} Etienne Decencière, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau, France
} John Goutsias, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USA.
} Frederic Guichard, Vision IQ & DO Labs, Boulogne-Billancourt, France
} Henk Heijmans, CWI, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
} Dominique Jeulin, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau, France
} Renato Keshet, HP Labs, Israel
} Ron Kimmel, Technion, Haifa, Israel
} Petros Maragos, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
} Fernand Meyer, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau, France
} Jean-Michel Morel, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Cachan, France
} Laurent Najman, ESIEE, Noisy-Le-Grand, France
} Ioannis Pitas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
} Gerhard Ritter, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
} Jos Roerdink, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands
} Philipe Salembier, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona,Spain
} Michel Schmitt, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau, France
} Pierre Soille, EC Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy
} Hugues Talbot, CSIRO, Sydney, Australia
} Rein van den Boomgaard, Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands
} Marc Van Droogenbroeck, Université de Liège, Belgium
} Luc Vincent, Soligence Corporation, Palo Alto, CA, USA
} Joachim Weickert, Universität Saarland, Saarbrücken, Germany
}
}
} ORGANISING COMMITTEE:
} --------------------
}
} Laurent Najman, ESIEE, Noisy-Le-Grand, France
} Isabelle Bloch, ENST, Paris, France
} Petr Dokladal, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Fontainebleau, France
} Christian Ronse, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France
}
}
}
} ------------------------------
} =======================================================
} 3 ICIAR 2004: ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR PAPERS
} =======================================================
}
} From: ICIAR 2004 {iciar04-at-fe.up.pt}
}
} INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON IMAGE ANALYSIS AND RECOGNITION (ICIAR 2004)
} September 29 - October 1, 2004, Porto, Portugal
}
} General Chair
} Aurelio Campilho
} campilho-at-fe.up.pt
}
} General Co-Chair
} Mohamed Kamel
} mkamel-at-uwaterloo.ca
}
} Paper submission deadline: April 16, 2004
}
} ICIAR - International Conference on Image Analysis and Recognition aims to
} bring together researchers in the fields of Image Processing, Analysis and
} Recognition. It will be organized annually, alternating between Europe and
} North America. In 2004, the conference is held in Porto, Portugal.
ICIAR -
} 2005 will take place in Toronto, Canada.
} The conference is a result of discussion between researchers in Portugal
and
} Canada to encourage collaboration and exchange between the two Countries
} with participation of experts and researchers from other Countries.
} The conference will address recent advances in theory, methodologies and
} applications. The scientific program will include invited speakers and
fully
} refereed contributions that will be published in the conference
proceedings.
}
} Please find the call for papers and more information at the webpage
} http://www.iciar.uwaterloo.ca
}
} ------------------------------
}
} =======================================================



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 08:28:31 2003



From: jherna2-at-po-box.mcgill.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 08:40:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: SEM was moved

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jherna2-at-po-box.mcgill.ca
Name: Juan Hernandez

Organization: MATERIALIA

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Recently, Our SEM was moved, It was working OK.

Noe, after being installed there is no power on the CRT and the
filaments are burning due to high voltage.

Any help would be really appreciated!!


Thanks

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 08:26:54 2003



From: yinli-at-uchc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 08:38:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: yinli-at-uchc.edu
Name: Yingcui Li

Organization: U.Conn.Health Center

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera

Question: I have a couple of general questions for using Nikon
Collpix Digital Camera system, since I am very interested in setting
up this system for my photographing to both whole mount embryos and
immunostained parrafin slides as a replacement of the conventional
films
The questions are:

1. What is the advantage of using Nikon Coolpix camera but not other
possible digital cameras for the microscopes?
2. I was told to choose Coolpix 5000 over 5700, since the 5700 will
give rise to blak periphery field due to the naroow field of view. Is
this true? How do I find out what size of chip in different Coolpix
Cameras?

Any information is greatly appreciated!

Yingcui Li, Ph.D

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 10:01:52 2003



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:53:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Information Wanted TEM filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In the past everyone has been very helpful so once again I am returning to
the well of knowledge for advice:

I have a Philips 400 series TEM (used) currently being installed. To my
surprise I found out it has a LaB6 filament. It has been suggested that I
consider a CeBix filament. In either case it was suggested I use either
the Mini Vogel or Denka style.

I'm light / SEM microscopist, TEM is a largely explored country to me. I
anticipate using the TEM for particle sizing and polymer phase studies and
I don't expect to exceed 100K magnification at 80 to 100 kv. I would like
to get the best value in terms of performance, ease of use, working life
for the money. Any advise, experience, recommendations on type, filament
material, tip configuration, special awareness of problems or advantages
would be welcome.

PS: where can I get a passport to TEM land? :-)

Thanks . . . . .

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 10:19:55 2003



From: Mike Dufraine :      MDufraine-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 11:30:25 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dee Breger wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Energy Beam Sciences is the US distributor for the Polaron Range of SEM
prep equipment.

The E6700 benchtop evaporator is one option that offers ease of use,
along with choice of options to fit
any of your sample preparation needs.

Your welcome to contact me by email MDufraine-at-ebsciences.com, or Tel.
1-800-992-9037 X340, to learn more about the Polaron line of
evaporators, coaters, and CPD equipment we offer.


Mike Dufraine
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.









From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 10:42:19 2003



From: James Talbot :      james-at-ktgeo.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 10:54:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microscope slide storage (slide mailer)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

This company makes cardboard boxes for petrographic slides The one I have
here holds 25 1X2 slides.

Palouse Petro Products
452 Sand Road
Pullman, WA 99163-9620
(509) 332-3695
(800) 632-3695
(509) 332-3606 fax

James Talbot

K/T GeoServices, Inc.
Bulk and Clay Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction
www.ktgeo.com
(940) 597-9076


At 08:50 AM 12/17/03 -0800, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 10:47:37 2003



From: Monson, Frederick :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 11:58:22 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] XE 150 lifetime?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've had bulbs crack, and I have changed them because they became so
discolored that they would light but not 'show up for work'. I have
also had them, finally, not start and then crumble when I begin to
remove them. Now these are the mercury bulbs. I had one 150 XE that
ran for 200 hours over three years and still seemed to be OK, so I left
it alone. I did not follow it after I left it behind.

Unless there is a quantitative reason for swapping out bulbs, that is,
they lose intensity because of the discoloration of the glass or they
lose power because they have a micro-leak (or whatever it might be), my
own practice has been to keep the bulb until I don't get sufficient
fluorescence. Anyway, most published operational durations are only
indications of how long the manufacturer feels the bulb SHOULD operate
at specs, but we all know from home that many 2000 hr bulbs don't last
that long. I just let my high intensity bulbs go, thus, I have Hg bulbs
for my old Leitz in their original boxes that are a decade old, because
my use has been down of late.

I have NEVER had a bulb explode, so I don't have any advice about that
phenomenon.

Cheers and Merry Christmas,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone/FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI Page and Scheduling
http://darwin.wcupa.edu/CASI/


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tamara Howard [mailto:thoward-at-unm.edu]
Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 3:49 PM
To: Confocal Microscopy List; Microscopy Server

Quick survey here for anyone using XE lamps: for how long do you run a
lamp/bulb? Osram claims that the 150W XE has an expected lifetime of
3000 hours, which would be nice BUT I don't know that I trust the lamp
not to go pop before 3000h. A new lamphouse would be nice, but lab
explosions are
such a hassle! Could we (fairly) safely run one for 1500-2000 hours?

Our microscope rep is checking into it, but so far has come up with
nothing about the 150W XE, so I thought I'd ask the real experts.

Thanks!

Tamara

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 11:13:52 2003



From: Jim Haley :      haley-at-mvia.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 13:06:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Bill,
I have manuals for the WDX-3PC, which was the first PC-computer-controlled
Microspec. I believe the spectrometers were similar but the controller was very
different. Which is it you are having trouble with? I might suggest you contact
Joe Carr of Oxford Instruments (e-mail carr-at-oxford.usa.com). He is their
Microspec specialist and might know if there are any old manuals available.
Good luck,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "William J Mushock (by way of MicroscopyListserver)" {wim5-at-lehigh.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 3:42 PM

Dr. Uri Admon,

We have an adapter for the Coolpix for your microscope that will correct this
and allow you to image the entire field of view.

You can remove your C-mount and mount directly to the microscope port using our
optics that are specifically designed for the Coolpix cameras to give you a
large portion of the zoom range of the Coolpix cameras.

If you take a look at the following page you can find the details:
http://www.mvia.com/Coolpix/clpxadpt.htm

Specifically for mounting to your microscope, this section should help:
http://www.mvia.com/Coolpix/clpxadpt.htm#Leica,_Leitz,_Wild

Thanks And Happy Holidays!
Jim Haley

******************************
Jim Haley
Applications Engineer
MVIA, Inc.
125 Sherwood Drive
Monaca, PA 15061
voice: (724) 728-7493
fax: (412) 291-1709
e-mail: haley-at-mvia.com
webpage: http://www.mvia.com
******************************

Admon Uri wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear All, and best wishes for a happy New Year,
}
} I shall appreciate advise on how to connect a Nikon Coolpix 995 to a
} Reichert-Jung MEF3 (inverted) Light Microscope, and yet be able to
} photograph the whole field of view, or at least close to it, as is viewed
} and photographed through the Polaroid or 35mm cameras. I tried to replace
} the original 35mm camera, normally positioned on the down-left-hand side of
} the MEF3, by a Coolpix 995 equipped with a x0.63 C-mount and a home-made
} short adapter, the latter used for matching. But with or without the
} adapter, and regardless of the position of the Coolpix relative to the
} microscope port, the field of view was much smaller than the one
} photographed in the 35mm camera (in other words, the aparent magnification
} was much higher). In order to get a similar field of view I had to use a
} lower power objective of the MEF3. This limits the minimal attainable
} magnification. If the optical magnification of the Coolpix is reduced to a
} minimum, to get a larger field of view, only a partial, circular field is
} exposed in the center, the rest is blocked out, like looking through a tube.
}
} Has anyone faced the same problem? can a different C-mount and adapter solve
} it?
}
} Thanx,
}
} Dr. Uri Admon
} Beer-Sheva
} Israel

--


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 12:20:53 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 15:01:37 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: WWW: Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yingcui Li writes ...

} ...
} The questions are:
}
} 1. What is the advantage of using Nikon Coolpix camera but
} not other possible digital cameras for the microscopes?

Cost, availability of Coolpix adapters, and number of peers.

} 2. I was told to choose Coolpix 5000 over 5700, since the
} 5700 will give rise to blak periphery field due to the
} naroow field of view. Is this true? How do I find out what
} size of chip in different Coolpix Cameras?

Use the "buying guide" comparison presentation available at
http://www.dpreview.com ...

Both Coolpix models use the same size CCD, but there may be other
considerations. However, if the 5700 is configured with the correct adapter
relative to the same C-mount for the 5000, there should be no vignetting.
My experience is with a CP5000, so I stand to be corrected. On the other
hand, I see no clear advantage for one over the other, so you may as well
same your money regarding the difference in cost.

hth & happy holidays ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 12:21:43 2003



From: Lois Anderson :      landers-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 13:32:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EM proficiency

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks for all of your responses regarding EM proficiency. Many of you suggested MSA certification and other similar programs which are excellent resources. More specifically, we are a clinical pathology lab with technicians of varying degrees of skill and experience. As the lab is expanding I need standards that will not only determine competency as a em technician but proficiency with regard to quantity and quality of work. Some of you have expressed and interest in developing the same.

If you have suggestions as to how we can collect and evaluate that data I would certainly be willing to hear them. This is something I am committed to working on in the coming year so I will certainly be in touch with those of you that have expressed the same.

Thanks


Lois Anderson
Johns Hopkins University
Dept. of Pathology
Laboratory Manager
Electron Microscopy/Immunofluorescence
600 N. Wolfe Street/Pathology 709 A
Baltimore, MD 21287
(410) 955-2861/fax (410) 614-7110
landers-at-jhmi.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 12:57:09 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 14:08:15 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Really, any camera will do, even a really cheapie one, if you can tolerate
the aberrations & low resolution. See
http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/gallery/cheapscope/index.htm




At 08:48 PM 12/17/2003 -0800, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 14:26:53 2003



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 15:38:12 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: WWW: Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Coolpix 990/995/4500 cameras were popular due to the
fact that their lens design was easily adaptable to a low cost
microscope coupler. This undoubtedly contributes to the
popularity of the Coolpix cameras.
Couplers are now available to fit a wide assortment
of cameras from many manufacturers. Thales Optem
http://www.thales-optem.com/DigitalCameraCouplers.html has couplers
that will fit many still or video cameras, either directly or
via low cost adapters.

Nikon USA lists their digital cameras at
http://www.nikonusa.com/template.php?cat=1&grp=2 where you can
find various models listed as well as PDF specifications, etc.

Canon USA http://www.powershot.com/powershot2/home.html also
has a number of compact digital models. One feature of many
Canon cameras is the inclusion of software to operate the camera
while tethered to a computer.

Some of the Olympus "C" series cameras can be mounted as well.
http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_digital_cseries.asp

I hope this is helpful.

George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
800.223.7130 x3109
scisales-at-ngscorp.com






1. What is the advantage of using Nikon Coolpix camera but not other
possible digital cameras for the microscopes?
2. I was told to choose Coolpix 5000 over 5700, since the 5700 will
give rise to blak periphery field due to the naroow field of view. Is
this true? How do I find out what size of chip in different Coolpix
Cameras?




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 14:57:10 2003



From: Jim Haley :      haley-at-mvia.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:07:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yingcui,

} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Nikon Coolpix Digital Camera
}
} Question: I have a couple of general questions for using Nikon
} Collpix Digital Camera system, since I am very interested in setting
} up this system for my photographing to both whole mount embryos and
} immunostained parrafin slides as a replacement of the conventional
} films
} The questions are:
}
} 1. What is the advantage of using Nikon Coolpix camera but not other
} possible digital cameras for the microscopes?

Availability of adapters specifically designed for a particular camera line.

} 2. I was told to choose Coolpix 5000 over 5700, since the 5700 will
} give rise to blak periphery field due to the naroow field of view. Is
} this true? How do I find out what size of chip in different Coolpix
} Cameras?

It is true. Due to the optics used in the 5700, the optics must me mounted
further from the lens and this results in SEVERE vigneeting. The only way to
correct this is to use the digital zoom mode of the camera at maximum zoom.
This severly degrades images quality. With the 5000, you only need to use
optical zoom, which does not degrade imaeg quality.

There is a small write up of this in the Frequently Asked Questions section on
our Nikon Coolpix to microscope adaper webpage:
http://www.mvia.com/Coolpix/clpxadpt.htm#FAQ

Thanks And Happy Holidays!
Jim Haley

******************************
Jim Haley
Applications Engineer
MVIA, Inc.
125 Sherwood Drive
Monaca, PA 15061
voice: (724) 728-7493
fax: (412) 291-1709
e-mail: haley-at-mvia.com
webpage: http://www.mvia.com
******************************

} Any information is greatly appreciated!
}
} Yingcui Li, Ph.D
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

--


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 15:15:07 2003



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 15:27:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Information Wanted TEM filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Frank,

Given that you admit to being new to the TEM biz, I'd suggest you carefully
box up and shelve your LaB6 filament for awhile, and buy a box of tungsten
fialments from FEI/Philips or an EM vendor who sells same for your 400. I
think that operating with tungsten would make your (new) life on a TEM
easier while you are getting used to it and learning things such as gun
alignments, column alignments, filament saturation, spot size control,
vacuum system operation. These things are just a bit more complicated on a
TEM than an SEM, I think.

Later, when you have your "sea legs", or you discover that you really need
the brighter and more coherent beam that LaB6 gives for your work, put in
the LaB6 and build on your experience using that. But make sure you get good
operating info on LaB6, how to saturate it, prevent oversaturation, whether
to leave it on or slightly desaturated when not in use, etc. It takes a bit
more care to operate properly, but you can look into that while you are
using the tungsten. Do a search in the Microscopy archive to pull up past
discussions on this subject.

I have an FEI/Philips CM-12, so I'm extrapolating back to your machine here,
but whichever filament type you use, check your Modes/Configuration menus
and select either "tungsten" or "Lab6", as that tells the vacuum system
which one you are using, as vacuum requirements are more stringent for LaB6
operation.

Just my 2-pence worth, Good Luck!

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra

} I have a Philips 400 series TEM (used) currently being installed. To my
} surprise I found out it has a LaB6 filament. It has been suggested that I
} consider a CeBix filament. In either case it was suggested I use either
} the Mini Vogel or Denka style.
}
} I'm light / SEM microscopist, TEM is a largely explored country to me. I
} anticipate using the TEM for particle sizing and polymer phase studies and
} I don't expect to exceed 100K magnification at 80 to 100 kv. I would like
} to get the best value in terms of performance, ease of use, working life
} for the money. Any advise, experience, recommendations on type, filament
} material, tip configuration, special awareness of problems or advantages
} would be welcome.
}
} PS: where can I get a passport to TEM land? :-)
}
} Thanks . . . . .
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
}
}
} 330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 15:16:32 2003



From: Joel Sheffield :      jbs-at-temple.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:25:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Coolpix on a Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The problem that you are having is because the detector of a digital
camera is much smaller than the size of the 35mm film that was
used in the original. As a result, the image that once covered an
entire film, is now much too big for the chip on the microscope. I
went to my local optometrist and got a set of concave lenses, and
inserted them in the light path. After trial and error, we found one
that worked for our system. Nikon makes an adapter for its
microscopes, but charges about $1000 for it. I don't know if that
would work with your Reichert-Jung.
}

} AU}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------- AU} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America AU} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver AU} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html AU}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------
}
} AU} Dear All, and best wishes for a happy New Year,
}
} AU} I shall appreciate advise on how to connect a Nikon Coolpix 995 to
} a AU} Reichert-Jung MEF3 (inverted) Light Microscope, and yet be able
} to AU} photograph the whole field of view, or at least close to it, as
} is viewed AU} and photographed through the Polaroid or 35mm cameras. I
} tried to replace AU} the original 35mm camera, normally positioned on
} the down-left-hand side of AU} the MEF3, by a Coolpix 995 equipped
} with a x0.63 C-mount and a home-made AU} short adapter, the latter
} used for matching. But with or without the AU} adapter, and regardless
} of the position of the Coolpix relative to the AU} microscope port,
} the field of view was much smaller than the one AU} photographed in
} the 35mm camera (in other words, the aparent magnification AU} was
} much higher). In order to get a similar field of view I had to use a
} AU} lower power objective of the MEF3. This limits the minimal
} attainable AU} magnification. If the optical magnification of the
} Coolpix is reduced to a AU} minimum, to get a larger field of view,
} only a partial, circular field is AU} exposed in the center, the rest
} is blocked out, like looking through a tube.
}
} AU} Has anyone faced the same problem? can a different C-mount and
} adapter solve AU} it?
}
} AU} Thanx,
}
} AU} Dr. Uri Admon
} AU} Beer-Sheva
} AU} Israel
}
}


Joel B. Sheffield, Ph.D.
Biology Department, Temple University
1900 North 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
jbs-at-temple.edu
(215) 204 8839, fax (215) 204 0486
http://astro.temple.edu/~jbs



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 16:33:11 2003



From: Calvert, Dave - Voridian :      dcalvert-at-voridian.com
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:35:56 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sem prep equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dee - I reply privately because I don't want to get involved in vendor
promotion issues on the list. But here's my experience. Evaporator -
Edwards Auto306 - had it 10 years. Excellent machine. Very clean vacuum,
easy operation. Reliable machine. I believe that the cost is higher than
their competition - but in my 30 years of EM lab work - this was the
only evaporator that wasn't troublesome and didn't contaminate delicate
samples, especially good at corona treatment.
Sputter coater - Edwards scancoat 6. Good machine, coats well. I bought
it because I also needed corona (etch) treatment capability (new lab set
up when company split) and it was the cheapest with that capability. Had
to do 2 fixes in the 2 years I've had it - but they were not major. If
you don't need etching capability, you have a wider set of choices.
Don't like the "automatic" coating operation setup - modified the
machine adding an additional argon bleed valve to suit my preferred
coating method.

Good luck - and happy holidays.

Dave Calvert
Voridian Division
Eastman Chemical Co.
P.O. Box 1972
Kingsport, Tennessee
Voice: 423-229-4943
Fax: 423-224-7550



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Dufraine [mailto:MDufraine-at-ebsciences.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 11:30 AM
To: Dee Breger
Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Dee Breger wrote:

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America

Energy Beam Sciences is the US distributor for the Polaron Range of SEM
prep equipment.

The E6700 benchtop evaporator is one option that offers ease of use,
along with choice of options to fit
any of your sample preparation needs.

Your welcome to contact me by email MDufraine-at-ebsciences.com, or Tel.
1-800-992-9037 X340, to learn more about the Polaron line of
evaporators, coaters, and CPD equipment we offer.


Mike Dufraine
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.











From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 18 20:37:51 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 18:48:49 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleques
My congradulations with comig Holidays Season and Happy New
Year! Accroding Russian tradition I wish, everyone will be healthy and
happy in coming year! I also wish, our microscopes will do well! Have a
great Holidays Season!
Sergey


_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 07:38:09 2003



From: Joanne Etheridge :      joanne.etheridge-at-spme.monash.edu.au (by way of
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 07:49:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Postdoc position in electron diffraction

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
in
ELECTRON DIFFRACTION

Structure Factor Determination using Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral research fellowship of up
to 3 years duration in the above area funded by the Australian
Research Council.

The post will involve the theoretical and experimental development of
a new method for the direct measurement of both the phase and
amplitude of crystal structure factors from convergent beam electron
diffraction patterns. The position is based at the School of Physics
and Materials Engineering, Monash University, in Melbourne, but is
likely to involve travel to the University of Cambridge and McMaster
University for collaborative work.

Applicants should have, or have nearly completed, a doctorate in
physics or a related discipline and have experience in advanced
transmission electron microscopy. A background in electron scattering
theory and/or convergent beam electron diffraction is highly
desirable.

Monash University is a member of Australia's leading "Group of Eight"
research-intensive universities and is to be the site of The
Australian Synchrotron. The School of Physics and Materials
Engineering has an annual research income of ~$4.5million with strong
research groups in diffraction physics and its application to
materials science. Its electron microscope facilities include 3 TEMs
and 2 SEMs, with a UHV LEEM and advanced, energy-filtered FEG-TEM to
be acquired in 2004.

The appointment will be made at Academic Level B (AUD $54,864 -
$65,152 per annum) or Academic Level A (AUD $48,554 - 52,121),
depending on experience.

Enquiries and formal applications, including a full CV with the
contact details of at least two referees, should be addressed to Dr.
Joanne Etheridge, School of Physics and Materials Engineering,
Building 69, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia. Tel: +61
(0)3 9905 1836, Fax: +61 (0)3 9905 4940 or
joanne.etheridge-at-spme.monash.edu.au. The closing date for applications

_______________________________________________


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 09:45:25 2003



From: Mike Nesta :      MNesta-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 10:55:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Information Wanted TEM filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Frank,

Welcome to TEM land. I don't know if I have a passport for you but I'll try
to be some help.

First, I have to second the comment of Gib Ahlstrand. You would probably be
best served by starting with tungsten and working your way up to LaB6. I'm
not certain that CeBix would offer much in the way of advantages for your
application but that would be a topic for the FEI folks to weigh in on. At
EBS we can provide 3 levels of tungsten filament as well as Denka LaB6.

In tungsten we offer standard loop, AR loop and pointed filaments. The
standard loop is a good choice but the AR loop will provide greater
stability, which might be good for you being that you're just starting out.
Once you've mastered the AR, you could then move up to our SG (pointed)
model. These filaments are much brighter but are also more delicate. The
cost for tungsten in all cases is a fraction of the cost for LaB6.

Once you're comfortable with tungsten, you can then go on to LaB6, if you
feel you need them. That is a choice you will make based on the
requirements of the work you're doing. For TEM applications sharp LaB6 tips
are generally recommended. The best choice in a sharp is a 60 degree cone
angle, 10 degree tip radius. We also offer 5 degree tip radius for a
brighter beam. But again, you might want to start with a standard (round)
LaB6 tip that won't be as bright but will be more forgiving. Just remember
that in the case of both tungsten and LaB6, the sharper the tip/the brighter
the beam/the shorter the lifetime.

I hope this helps.

Michael R. Nesta
General Manager
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Tel: 413 786-9322
Fax: 413 789-2786
{mailto:mnesta-at-ebsciences.com}
{http://www.ebsciences.com}
"Adding Brilliance to Your Vision"



-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com [mailto:Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2003 10:53 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

In the past everyone has been very helpful so once again I am returning to
the well of knowledge for advice:

I have a Philips 400 series TEM (used) currently being installed. To my
surprise I found out it has a LaB6 filament. It has been suggested that I
consider a CeBix filament. In either case it was suggested I use either
the Mini Vogel or Denka style.

I'm light / SEM microscopist, TEM is a largely explored country to me. I
anticipate using the TEM for particle sizing and polymer phase studies and
I don't expect to exceed 100K magnification at 80 to 100 kv. I would like
to get the best value in terms of performance, ease of use, working life
for the money. Any advise, experience, recommendations on type, filament
material, tip configuration, special awareness of problems or advantages
would be welcome.

PS: where can I get a passport to TEM land? :-)

Thanks . . . . .

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 13:34:27 2003



From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-jax.org
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2003 14:45:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Dec 21 09:59:37 2003



From: zhaoyu-at-biochem.ualberta.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 10:13:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: immunogold staining of EM with anti-phospholipids antibody

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: zhaoyu-at-biochem.ualberta.ca
Name: Zhaoyu Li

Organization: Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: immunogold staining of EM with
anti-phospholipids antibody

Question: I am trying to do immunogold staining of EM with
anti-phospholipids antibody for liver tissues. But some lipids
staining steps(OsO4) and/or ethonal dehydration steps seemed blocked
or reduced the binding sites of anti-phospholipids antibody. I cann't
get specific binding. For sure, the antibody works well in the
fluorescent staining. So, my question is how to skip or replace these
steps? or any other methods could be used in this case?

Thanks.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 22 00:40:16 2003



From: Frank Eggert :      Eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 07:49:06 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microanalysis of porous material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Vladimir,

the self absorption of X-rays in the specimen is (in most cases) the
main process of all influences to generate the X-rays with electron
excitation. If the fine focused electron beam is directed to an unknown
surface tilt, the absorption effect will be unknown. Quantitative
results vary, if there is no estimation of the changed absorption path
in specimen.

Operators are thinking very common, if scanning across a larger area of
an irregular surface (rough or porous), all regions with more absorption
are going to adjust with these regions, which are characteristic for
lower absorption. The result should be an spectrum with same absorption
(and same results) like the polished specimen of identical element content.

But this isn't true!!!

Because of the not linear effects of absorption (e-function), these
regions, which have higher absorption, influence the final spectrum more
than the others. Because of that, higher absorption always occur for
rough (and porous) surfaces, compared to a flat specimen with same
element concentrations. It's possible to prove this fact with
mathematics, but not trivial to understand.

The opposite is with particles on top of a surface. There it is more
easy to understand, that excited X-rays have lower absorption effects,
in most cases.

Frank



Frank Eggert

http://www.microanalyst.net
eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de



"Dusevich, Vladimir" schrieb am 17.12.03 08:54:39:
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Many thanks for a number of replies.
} Unfortunately I formulated my question too fuzzy. I am not interested
in the
} measurements of porosity utilizing EDS. What I am interested in is the
} effect of porosity (or nanoporosity) on EDS measurements. It seems
} that an increase in porosity should lead to a decrease in the
intensity of X-rays,
} and that this dependence should not be linear. It's only my gut feeling,
} I do not want to carry out calculations. I am sure all these
calculations were
} done a long time ago, and I'll appreciate any lead to a proper
publication
} and/or a short explanation of the problem.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Vladimir
}
}
} ________________________________
}
} } From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
} Sent: Wed 12/10/2003 2:57 PM
} To: Microscopy (E-mail)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Microanalysis of porous material
}
}
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello all,
} I have samples of the same material with suspected
} difference in porosity, size of pores could be from
} a few nanometers to a few hundred nanometers.
}
} Is it possible to detect porosity with microanalysis
} (EDS)? How intensity could change because of porosity?
} Is it possible to calculate the "detection limit"
} of porosity?
}
} Thank you,
}
} Vladimir
}
} Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} 3127 School of Dentistry
} 650 E. 25th Street
} Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
}
} Phone: (816) 235-2072
} Fax: (816) 235-5524
} Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy
}
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 22 08:33:28 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 08:46:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: immunogold staining of EM with

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The real question is wether the lipids are still there. The dehydration
and infiltration steps are well known to result in significant loss of
lipids. You may be forced to use cryo-fixation followed by low temperature
freeze-substitution and embedding or conventional chemical fixation
followed by cryo-sectioning.

At 10:13 AM 12/21/2003 -0600, you wrote:



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Dec 22 16:01:34 2003



From: charles-at-3dcircuits.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 16:15:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] \viaWWW: SEM Image Quality Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: charles-at-3dcircuits.com
Name: Charles R

Organization: Apex Technologies

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Jeol 5400 SEM Image Quality Questions

Question: Hello,
We have recently installed a Jeol 5400 SEM with a Voyager EDS system
(have not installed the harware for the EDS yet).
The image quality on the SEM begins to degrade significantly above
aroun 5000x (unable to focus and the "jaggies" begin to show up
significantly). The image quality up to about 2500x is good.
These jaggies appear to be at 60 hz. Everything is plugged into a
single outlet 215V with a stepdown transformer to 100v.

I would assume that nothing can be done to asess any other
imagining issues with the scope until this power/field disturbance is
corrected? The circuit for the power source runs a considerable
distance (probably 100'+) from the SEM to the breaker box through
metal conduit.

Related to the above, does anyone have any "preferred"
procedures/sequences for aligning and adjusting this scope, with
regard to the selectable apertures and tilt/shift. The manuals
methods do not seem to be very effective.

Thanks in advance for your help.
Charles
Apex Technologies Inc.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 23 08:14:36 2003



From: michael.didie-at-gmx.de (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 08:28:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Cryotome Cuts Without Foldings?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: michael.didie-at-gmx.de
Name: Michael DidiÈ

Organization: Pharmakology/Hamburg

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Cryotome Cuts Without Foldings?

Question: Hello everyone,

We just got a nice and shiny new Leica Cryotome
and i tried to make some cuts. Most of the time
i'll cut whole hearts with tissue implants. I
usually embed the hearts in Tissue Tec before
cutting them. The thickness of the cuts ranges
between 5 and 10 µm. Now i had the problem, that
the cuts start to fold and neither using a new
blade nor changing the angel of the blade
produced better results. Has anyone any idea hoe
to solve that problem?

Merry Christmas

Michael DidiÈ

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 23 12:11:21 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 13:22:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: Cryotome Cuts Without Foldings?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,
You don't say whether you use an anti-roll plate or if you guide your
sections, as they are cut, with brushes. Either method should help.
I have switched to freezing my samples in a 1:1 mixture of OCT and
20% sucrose (in PBS) (based on Barthel & Raumond (1990) J Histochem
Cytochem 38(9) 1383-1388). It gives wonderful histology and cuts
very smoothly. You may need to cut at a slightly colder temp, since
the blocks tend to be softer than plain OCT. We usually cut at about
-20.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 23 14:42:09 2003



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:55:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] nylon SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Materials micromavens,

We have a user doing SEM of nylon, with embedded bits. We'd like to
chemically etch the nylon, which is something of an entertaining
problem, since nylon is used to mask things against etchants.
Does anyone have a recipe for something that will etch nylon and not silica?
Thanks.

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 23 15:16:34 2003



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 21:29:19 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: \viaWWW: SEM Image Quality Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Most probable causes are:

1. Ground loop - you may have more than one line to ground, forming a
loop which acts as an aerial to pick up mains frequency. Can be
difficult to locate. I would first check the conduit for the power
cable for being grounded at both ends. Also check any fluorescent
lights in the vicinity - a not infrequent problem is neutral wires,
trapped in the fittings and connecting to ground.

2. There might be a field being radiated from something in the area
which cannot be fixed. In this case, there are field cancellation
systems, which have one or more sensors on the SEM and X/Y/Z field
coils on the walls of the SEM room to generate an opposing field.

I would suggest you contact your local JEOL customer support office for advice.

Best regards,
--
Larry Stoter
JEOL (UK) Ltd
NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Dec 23 16:22:46 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:57:43 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM of filled nylon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Charles

It sounds as if you have a magnetic field problem, but it could be
vibration, this you will be able to check this out yourself. In the US 60
cycles main supply means that ALL problems tend to be of 60 cycles.

1. Run the microscope at the highest kV and place the sample 5mm from the
final lens (WD 5mm)
2. Observe the image quality
a) in TV mode does a wave float up or down the screen (evidence of
a field)?
b) are you able to see the raged edges in the image at a slow
scan(evidence of a field or vibration or an electronics problem)?
3. Move the specimen down to 25mm from the lens (WD 25mm) and repeat a
and b above.

Problems at a short working distance, where the specimen is partly protected
by the lens field, are to be considered gross. If the problem is vastly
reduced at a short working distance then you have a field problem. If the
problem is exactly the same at the two levels you have an electronics or
vibration problem.

Almost any building which houses large equipment is likely to cause field
problems. HOWEVER I have seen this type of problem in a laboratory where,
in a newly operational adjoining office building, investigation found most
plugs were incorrectly wired causing the main input cable to overheat. This
cable ran alongside the input cable to the building housing the EM, we fixed
one problem that fixed the other!

If you are lucky the property of a field to fall off by the inverse square
law will enable you to find the best position for your new SEM within the
desired room. "Simply" moving the column by a few feet may help? Another
route is to take your input from a clean supply, that is one where you are
the only user. I would also make sure that your earth is not shared by any
other equipment.

Hope this helps? Seasons Greetings.

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com




----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {charles-at-3dcircuits.com}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 10:15 PM

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Philip Oshel wrote:
========================================================


Materials micromavens,

We have a user doing SEM of nylon, with embedded bits. We'd like to
chemically etch the nylon, which is something of an entertaining problem,
since nylon is used to mask things against etchants. Does anyone have a
recipe for something that will etch nylon and not silica? Thanks.
=======================================================
I am assuming this is a nylon that has been filled to some degree with
"bits" of silica and your objective is to see the uniformity of dispersion
of the silica "bits" as well as any orientation they might be exhibiting.

This is easily done in a plasma etcher such as the SPI Plasma Prep™ II
plasma etcher, as shown and described on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/instruments/etchers1.shtml [Note: This can
not be done with sputter etching.]

Using an oxygen plasma, the nylon will be etched away, leaving the silica
"bits" protruding over the surface of the polymer, giving excellent
topographical variation for good contrast.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is the manufacturer of the Plasma Prep™ II plasma
etcher/asher/cleaner.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 24 11:21:38 2003



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 11:34:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM of filled nylon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Chuck,

Thanks.
Samples of the material have been sent to the plasma folks on campus,
but they haven't as yet come back. Which is why we're looking for a
chemical etchant.
Oxygen plasma etching was an early thought -- seems like the best way
to go, if ...

Phil

} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Philip Oshel wrote:
} ========================================================
}
}
} Materials micromavens,
}
} We have a user doing SEM of nylon, with embedded bits. We'd like to
} chemically etch the nylon, which is something of an entertaining problem,
} since nylon is used to mask things against etchants. Does anyone have a
} recipe for something that will etch nylon and not silica? Thanks.
} =======================================================
} I am assuming this is a nylon that has been filled to some degree with
} "bits" of silica and your objective is to see the uniformity of dispersion
} of the silica "bits" as well as any orientation they might be exhibiting.
}
} This is easily done in a plasma etcher such as the SPI Plasma Prep™ II
} plasma etcher, as shown and described on URL
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/instruments/etchers1.shtml [Note: This can
} not be done with sputter etching.]
}
} Using an oxygen plasma, the nylon will be etched away, leaving the silica
} "bits" protruding over the surface of the polymer, giving excellent
} topographical variation for good contrast.
}
} Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is the manufacturer of the Plasma Prep™ II plasma
} etcher/asher/cleaner.
}
} Chuck
}
} ============================================
}
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
} President 1-800-2424-SPI
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
} Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
} Look for us!
} ########################
} WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} ########################
} ============================================

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, AMFSC and BBPIC microscopy facilities
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 27 18:19:35 2003



From: Hbrinkies-at-groupwise.swin.edu.au (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 18:33:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: High Vacuum/Variable Pressure SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Hbrinkies-at-groupwise.swin.edu.au
Name: Hans G Brinkies

Organization: Hawthorn (Australia)-Universtity of Technology

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] High Vacuum/Variable Pressure SEM

Question: I am finding myself in a very difficult position to advise
important people at the university (who are in charge of
giving money to needy electron microscopists) and ask you for
some assistance from experienced operators of SEMs,
which are being used in a variable pressure mode
(not manufacturers or agents please).

We are in the process of purchasing a new SEM.
Having been successful to obtain a research grand,
other departments interested in microscopy need to
'cough up' additional funds. They are only willing to
do so, if they can use the new SEM for their research
projects, whenever it is required.

The problem: one group (the majority) wants to use the SEM
in the high vacuum, high resolution mode
(approximately. 2 to 8 nm), the other group needs
variable pressure applications for relatively moist
(oil, water, tar containing samples). And the third group
wants to carried out micro-lithography in a SEM

With now more than 35 years experience in SEM applications
I still believe that one can only make the SEM available
on short notice if one has dedicated units for above
applications. I am worried that one needs a lot of
'elbow grease' to clean a SEM after having used it for
'dirty' samples (or let's say industrial specimens) before
one can use it again for high resolution work.

I know what my decision would be having two operational
SEMs in my laboratory, one JSM840 and an old
ETEC Autoscan (believe me, it is still working).

X-mas cheers etc.

Hans Brinkies
Professional Officer, Electron Microscopy and Metallography
Swinburne, University of Technology
School of Engineering and Science
Industrial Microscopy Laboratory
P.O.Box 218 - Hawthorn - Vic -3122 - Australia
Phone: +61 3 9214 8657
Fax: +61 3 9214 8264
Email: Hbrinkies-at-swin.edu.au


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Dec 27 19:25:05 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 17:39:41 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jim
I don't see any religious content in my message. Is "Holidays Season" and
"New Year" has religious content to you? If so, I am apologize and I
could take back my good wishes. Have a good what? Holidays are religious,
OK, DAY! Sergey.

At 08:59 AM 12/19/2003, you wrote:
} Sergey -
}
} Is the listserv really appropriate for religious messages?
}
} JQuinn
}
}
} } From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 01:28:31 2003
} } X-Authentication-Warning: ns.microscopy.com: mail set sender to
} MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com using -f



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2003 20:12:54 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: High Vacuum/Variable Pressure SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sergey,



I would say JQuinn's confusion about a classic American dilemma and the
Microscopy ListServer regs have caused his snit.



Microscopists I know revere with pantheistic fervor forces that keep their
EM(s) producing heavenly results.



Krepkogo zdorovia, schastia, lubvi.



Vsego Nailuchego,



Vincent & Alla

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Saturday, December 27, 2003 5:39 PM

Hans
Of course your ETEC is still working! No reason why it shouldn't be..
They are also very tolerant of dirty samples, but you can't get
variable pressure. I'm not terribly familiar with the variable
pressure/ESEM in practice, but I think your e-beam lithography folks are
not going to want to do a lot of sharing. They may want a cleaner
vacuum than the hi res folks. Hopefully others can give you first hand
experience on the trade-offs between low vac and clean operation.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: Hbrinkies-at-groupwise.swin.edu.au
} Name: Hans G Brinkies
}
} Organization: Hawthorn (Australia)-Universtity of Technology
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] High Vacuum/Variable Pressure SEM
}
} Question: I am finding myself in a very difficult position to advise
} important people at the university (who are in charge of
} giving money to needy electron microscopists) and ask you for
} some assistance from experienced operators of SEMs,
} which are being used in a variable pressure mode
} (not manufacturers or agents please).
}
} We are in the process of purchasing a new SEM.
} Having been successful to obtain a research grand,
} other departments interested in microscopy need to
} 'cough up' additional funds. They are only willing to
} do so, if they can use the new SEM for their research
} projects, whenever it is required.
}
} The problem: one group (the majority) wants to use the SEM
} in the high vacuum, high resolution mode
} (approximately. 2 to 8 nm), the other group needs
} variable pressure applications for relatively moist
} (oil, water, tar containing samples). And the third group
} wants to carried out micro-lithography in a SEM
}
} With now more than 35 years experience in SEM applications
} I still believe that one can only make the SEM available
} on short notice if one has dedicated units for above
} applications. I am worried that one needs a lot of
} 'elbow grease' to clean a SEM after having used it for
} 'dirty' samples (or let's say industrial specimens) before
} one can use it again for high resolution work.
}
} I know what my decision would be having two operational
} SEMs in my laboratory, one JSM840 and an old
} ETEC Autoscan (believe me, it is still working).
}
} X-mas cheers etc.
}
} Hans Brinkies
} Professional Officer, Electron Microscopy and Metallography
} Swinburne, University of Technology
} School of Engineering and Science
} Industrial Microscopy Laboratory
} P.O.Box 218 - Hawthorn - Vic -3122 - Australia
} Phone: +61 3 9214 8657
} Fax: +61 3 9214 8264
} Email: Hbrinkies-at-swin.edu.au
}
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Dec 29 21:12:47 2004



From: charles-at-3dcircuits.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2003 21:12:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: EDS SEM Noran Voyager Setup - Image Calibration Files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: charles-at-3dcircuits.com
Name: Charles Rudisill

Organization: Apex Technologies, Inc.

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] EDS SEM Noran Voyager Setup - Image Calibration Files

Question: Hello everyone,
We are currently installing a Jeol 5400 with a Noran Voyager running
Version 3.7 software.
We had to obtain the Sparc Station and install the software from
scratch, since the Sparc box
had been removed from the system when we purchased it. I cannot say
enough GOOD things about the
folks at Noran regarding supporting their product and license
agreement. Since we had the original
documentation, hardware and work orders, they have provided the
software (v 3.7), manuals, etc. for
minimal cost and answered numerous harware questions on this used
instrument. The technical staff
also seems to have a lot of knowledge about the hardware and software
(thanks Philip, are helpful,
prompt and friendly.

We have installed the software on the sparc and checked out the
voyager cpu box as much as possible.
(we have not yet installed the detector). We intend on getting a
field engineer to look at the system
but were tryin to debug it as much as possible beforehand.

My question is regarding installation and setup of the Voyager
software with regard to the "Image
Calibration". It appears that there is NO image calibration file present when
the software is installed "from scratch". We assume this prevents any sort of
image acquisition at all. I was told by the technical rep that this
was best left to the field
engineer. However being curious and stubborn, I was wondering if
this file is something we can create.
We have a printout that lists all the original calibration parameters
(a whole list of about 30 items).
The calibration file is apparently entitled "wima.column1.cal" in the
"usr/voyager/tbles" directory
(there is no such file or directory when voyager v3.7 is installed
from scratch).
Does anyone have a "template" that could be used for this file, or
suggestions on creating one.

As a related question, can the voyager software be used to acquire
standard SEM images without the EDS
detector being installed.

Thanks in advance for any help. Also thanyou to everyone who helped
with the Jeol 5400 "jaggies" question.
Charles
Apex Technologies, Inc.
919-463-7585



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 30 04:09:15 2004



From: Richard Leapman :      leapman-at-helix.nih.gov
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 11:49:23 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Post-doctoral Fellowships at NIH

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Have a good holey day. (for those using holey carbon film)

for continuous carbon film users and other occultists: Have a good
unholiday.

In Sweden you hear the mysterious "Good continuation (god fortsaettning)"
(of whatever you are doing at the moment, I guess.)

So: God fortsaettning to everybody,

Philip

Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290
http://www.biosci.ki.se/em

'This winter I am giving courses to three students, of whom one is only
moderately prepared,
the other less than moderately, and the third lacks both preparation and
ability.
Such are the burdens ...' Carl Friedrich Gauss (1810)
______________________________________________


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 2:39 AM

Two Postdoctoral Fellowships are now available in the Supramolecular
Structure and Function Group of the Division of Bioengineering and Physical
Science at the National Institutes of Health. This program develops EM
methods, including electron tomography, cryo-EM, energy-filtered imaging,
STEM and EELS, and applies them to biomedical research in collaboration
with NIH scientists.

Currently, our laboratory is focusing on (1) electron tomography to
visualize 3-dimensional subcellular structures, and (2) electron
spectroscopic imaging of cells and macromolecular assemblies.

The positions provide an excellent opportunity to work with
state-of-the-art instrumentation, including a 300 kV field-emission TEM
(Tecnai TF30) equipped with an energy-filter.

Applicants should send their curriculum vitae to:

Dr. Richard Leapman
Division of Bioengineering & Physical Science
Building 13, Room 3N17
National Institutes of Health
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, MD 20892
Tel: 301-496-2599
Fax: 301-435-4699
email: leapman-at-helix.nih.gov

http://www.nih.gov/od/ors/dbeps/ssfr/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Dec 30 12:00:21 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 18:57:14 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In Italy we have

Auguri di Buone Feste e Felice Anno Nuovo

Alby
On Martedì, dic 30, 2003, at 11:08 Europe/Rome, Philip Koeck wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Have a good holey day. (for those using holey carbon film)
}
} for continuous carbon film users and other occultists: Have a good
} unholiday.
}
} In Sweden you hear the mysterious "Good continuation (god
} fortsaettning)"
} (of whatever you are doing at the moment, I guess.)
}
} So: God fortsaettning to everybody,
}
} Philip
}
} Philip Koeck
} Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
} Karolinska Institutet
} Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
} S-14157 Huddinge
} Sweden
} phone: +46-8-6089186
} fax: +46-8-6089290
} http://www.biosci.ki.se/em
}
} 'This winter I am giving courses to three students, of whom one is only
} moderately prepared,
} the other less than moderately, and the third lacks both preparation
} and
} ability.
} Such are the burdens ...' Carl Friedrich Gauss (1810)
} ______________________________________________
}
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 2:39 AM
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Greetings
}
}
} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----
} ----
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----
} -----
} }
} } Jim
} } I don't see any religious content in my message. Is "Holidays Season"
} } and
} } "New Year" has religious content to you? If so, I am apologize and I
} } could take back my good wishes. Have a good what? Holidays are
} religious,
} } OK, DAY! Sergey.
} }
} } At 08:59 AM 12/19/2003, you wrote:
} } } Sergey -
} } }
} } } Is the listserv really appropriate for religious messages?
} } }
} } } JQuinn
} } }
} } }
} } } } From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 01:28:31 2003
} } } } X-Authentication-Warning: ns.microscopy.com: mail set sender to
} } } MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com using -f



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 21:23:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Hans,
I have been running a Hitachi S-3000N for the last year and I will say that
it will do most SEM jobs, both high vacuum and variable pressure, very well
with no compromises. We regularly look at wet samples, high-resolution, then
high-res, low kV and back to wet in a single day. However, if you want
field-emmission-type resolution, you will have to get a field-emmission
microscope. Mine resolves 3 nm. The variable-pressure mode converts in two
mouse clicks and takes no more time than a sample change. The
variable-pressure mode keeps the scope clean and can be used overnight to
clean-up after any dirty samples. I would recommend a cold stage for true
water-containing samples.
We have been using it for every type of sample, hi-res, low kV, x-ray
mapping and I couldn't imagine doing without its capabilities now. If I
could only have one SEM, this would be it. If I could have two, I would also
get a field-emmission for higher resolution.
Good luck and congratulations on a new baby. PS I used to run an ETEC, too.
MM
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng.
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fas: 6004-822-3619
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Hbrinkies-at-groupwise.swin.edu.au}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Saturday, December 27, 2003 4:33 PM

While we're at it...:
Bonne année 2004 à tous et à toutes!

Marc

On Tuesday, December 30, 2003, at 12:57 PM, diaspro wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} In Italy we have
}
} Auguri di Buone Feste e Felice Anno Nuovo
}
} Alby
} On Martedì, dic 30, 2003, at 11:08 Europe/Rome, Philip Koeck wrote:
}
} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} } Have a good holey day. (for those using holey carbon film)
} }
} } for continuous carbon film users and other occultists: Have a good
} } unholiday.
} }
} } In Sweden you hear the mysterious "Good continuation (god
} } fortsaettning)"
} } (of whatever you are doing at the moment, I guess.)
} }
} } So: God fortsaettning to everybody,
} }
} } Philip
} }
} } Philip Koeck
} } Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
} } Karolinska Institutet
} } Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
} } S-14157 Huddinge
} } Sweden
} } phone: +46-8-6089186
} } fax: +46-8-6089290
} } http://www.biosci.ki.se/em
} }
} } 'This winter I am giving courses to three students, of whom one is
} } only
} } moderately prepared,
} } the other less than moderately, and the third lacks both preparation
} } and
} } ability.
} } Such are the burdens ...' Carl Friedrich Gauss (1810)
} } ______________________________________________
} }
} }
} } ----- Original Message -----
} } } From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
} } To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 2:39 AM
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Greetings
} }
} }
} } }
} } }
} } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } -----
} } ----
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } -----
} } -----
} } }
} } } Jim
} } } I don't see any religious content in my message. Is "Holidays
} } } Season" and
} } } "New Year" has religious content to you? If so, I am apologize and
} } } I
} } } could take back my good wishes. Have a good what? Holidays are
} } religious,
} } } OK, DAY! Sergey.
} } }
} } } At 08:59 AM 12/19/2003, you wrote:
} } } } Sergey -
} } } }
} } } } Is the listserv really appropriate for religious messages?
} } } }
} } } } JQuinn
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } } From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 01:28:31
} } } } } 2003
} } } } } X-Authentication-Warning: ns.microscopy.com: mail set sender to
} } } } MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com using -f



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=22Michael_Didi=E9=22?= :      Michael.Didie-at-gmx.de
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 09:41:52 +0100 (MET)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

And this is from Germany:

Einen guten Rutsch!

Michael
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} While we're at it...:
} Bonne année 2004 à tous et à toutes!
}
} Marc
}
} On Tuesday, December 30, 2003, at 12:57 PM, diaspro wrote:
}
} }
} }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} }
} } In Italy we have
} }
} } Auguri di Buone Feste e Felice Anno Nuovo
} }
} } Alby
} } On Martedì, dic 30, 2003, at 11:08 Europe/Rome, Philip Koeck wrote:
} }
} } }
} } }
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } --------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---------
} } }
} } } Have a good holey day. (for those using holey carbon film)
} } }
} } } for continuous carbon film users and other occultists: Have a good
} } } unholiday.
} } }
} } } In Sweden you hear the mysterious "Good continuation (god
} } } fortsaettning)"
} } } (of whatever you are doing at the moment, I guess.)
} } }
} } } So: God fortsaettning to everybody,
} } }
} } } Philip
} } }
} } } Philip Koeck
} } } Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
} } } Karolinska Institutet
} } } Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
} } } S-14157 Huddinge
} } } Sweden
} } } phone: +46-8-6089186
} } } fax: +46-8-6089290
} } } http://www.biosci.ki.se/em
} } }
} } } 'This winter I am giving courses to three students, of whom one is
} } } only
} } } moderately prepared,
} } } the other less than moderately, and the third lacks both preparation
} } } and
} } } ability.
} } } Such are the burdens ...' Carl Friedrich Gauss (1810)
} } } ______________________________________________
} } }
} } }
} } } ----- Original Message -----
} } } } From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
} } } To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } } Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 2:39 AM
} } } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Greetings
} } }
} } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } -----
} } } ----
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } } America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } } On-Line Help
} } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } -----
} } } -----
} } } }
} } } } Jim
} } } } I don't see any religious content in my message. Is "Holidays
} } } } Season" and
} } } } "New Year" has religious content to you? If so, I am apologize and
} } } } I
} } } } could take back my good wishes. Have a good what? Holidays are
} } } religious,
} } } } OK, DAY! Sergey.
} } } }
} } } } At 08:59 AM 12/19/2003, you wrote:
} } } } } Sergey -
} } } } }
} } } } } Is the listserv really appropriate for religious messages?
} } } } }
} } } } } JQuinn
} } } } }
} } } } }
} } } } } } From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 19 01:28:31
} } } } } } 2003
} } } } } } X-Authentication-Warning: ns.microscopy.com: mail set sender to
} } } } } MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com using -f
} } } } } } X-Sender: sryazant-at-pop.bol.ucla.edu
} } } } } } X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Version 5.2.0.9
} } } } } } Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2003 18:48:49 -0800
} } } } } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } } } } From: Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}
} } } } } } Subject: [Microscopy] Greetings
} } } } } } Mime-Version: 1.0
} } } } } } Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
} } } } } } X-Probable-Spam: no
} } } } } } X-Spam-Hits: -5.4
} } } } } } X-Old-X-Probable-Spam: no
} } } } } } X-Old-X-Spam-Hits: -5.4
} } } } } } X-Old-X-Scanned-By: vscan.smtp.ucla.edu
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } }
} } } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } -----
} } } ----
} } } } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } } } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } } }
} } } }
} } } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } -----
} } } -----
} } } } } }
} } } } } } Dear Colleques
} } } } } } My congradulations with comig Holidays Season and Happy New
} } } } } } Year! Accroding Russian tradition I wish, everyone will be healthy
} } } and
} } } } } } happy in coming year! I also wish, our microscopes will do well!
} } } Have a
} } } } } } great Holidays Season!
} } } } } } Sergey
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } } } } _____________________________________
} } } } } }
} } } } } } Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} } } } } } Electron Microscopy
} } } } } } UCLA School of Medicine
} } } } } } Department of Biological Chemistry
} } } } } } 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
} } } } } } Los Angeles, CA 90095
} } } } } }
} } } } } } Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} } } } } } (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} } } } } } FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} } } } } } mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } } } }
} } } }
} } } } _____________________________________
} } } }
} } } } Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} } } } Electron Microscopy
} } } } UCLA School of Medicine
} } } } Department of Biological Chemistry
} } } } 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
} } } } Los Angeles, CA 90095
} } } }
} } } } Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} } } } (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} } } } FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} } } } mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } .......................................................................
} } ...................................
} } .. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
} } ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
} } Alberto "Alby" Diaspro
} } INFM-Dept. of Physics, Univ.Genoa
} } Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
} } voice: +39-0103536426/480 fax 010314218
} } diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
} } http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} Marc Pypaert
} Department of Cell Biology
} Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
} Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
} Yale University School of Medicine
} 333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
} New Haven, CT 06520-8002
} TEL 203-785 3681
} FAX 203-785 7446
}
}
}

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+++ GMX - die erste Adresse für Mail, Message, More +++
Neu: Preissenkung für MMS und FreeMMS! http://www.gmx.net




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 31 11:25:24 2004



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 08:51:16 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: More Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sergey;

There are lots of ridiculous protests against Christmas celebrations that make that of JQuinn pale:

In Dec, 2001, a group of animal rights protestors in Cambridge announced that they intended to sue "Christianity as a whole" and anyone who celebrates Christmas. The shock announcement comes after years of protesting against Christmas which, they say, causes unnecessary cruelty to turkeys.

In November 2003, the Colorado ACLU threatened to sue to ban Christmas because it claimed it made Jews 'uneasy'.

And best of all:

Cincinnati attorney Richard Ganulin filed a lawsuit on 1998-AUG-4 in U.S. district court, 6 asking that the federal government be required to not declare future DEC-25 holidays. He feels that "Christmas is a religious holiday and the Congress of the United States is not constitutionally permitted to endorse or aid any religion, purposefully or otherwise, or [promote] entanglement between our government and religious beliefs." Judge Susan Dlott dismissed the suit. Judge Dlott decided "that Christmas can be observed as a federal holiday because non-Christians also mark the holiday by celebrating the arrival of Santa Claus. Since nonreligious people also observe the holiday, giving federal workers a day off for Christmas does not elevate one religion over another."

So, it looks like we need to be grateful to a US District Judge for saving Christmas. From a devout Raelian (only kidding) MERRY CHRISTMAS and HAPPY NEW YEAR!

John Mardinly
Intel





-----Original Message-----
} From: vcrvince [mailto:vcrvince-at-sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Sunday, December 28, 2003 12:18 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; Sergey Ryazantsev


Hau'oli Makihiki Hou!

Tina
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Dec 31 21:10:43 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 19:11:25 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all:

Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
stability.

I need two contact probes.

gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 1 22:02:03 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:04:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] ISTFA/FA list

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Would someone point me to the listserver
for failure analysis discussion of metallurgical and
integrated circuit devices?

tnx,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 1 22:29:41 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:30:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: ISTFA/FA list

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary:

The information is as follows:

====================== EDFAS Discussion List
=============================
This E-mail forum is a service exclusively for members of the
Electronic Device Failure Analysis Society, http://www.edfas.org

To reply or post a message to the whole group, send to:
edfas-at-mh.databack.com

To unsubscribe, send a message to: leave-edfas-at-mh.databack.com

For problems or questions, send an email to:
owner-edfas-at-mh.databack.com

Best regards-

David



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1120 Via Callejon
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FAX: +1-949-492-1499

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The information contained in this message and any attachments is privileged and
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If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling +1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.


Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Would someone point me to the listserver
} for failure analysis discussion of metallurgical and
} integrated circuit devices?
}
} tnx,
} gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 10:09:20 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 08:11:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] temperature controlled SEM stages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all:

I've seen hot/cold stages from Deben that
look like they could hold a standard pin
stub specimen. However, they seem to
be optimized for low temperature work.
Does anyone know of some other supplier
that makes SEM specimen holders that will
heat up to about 200C and perhaps cool
to -25C?

The unit would need to mate to the stage
on a LEO Supra 55VP's specimen interchange
stage or on a FEI Sirion 400, under similar
circumstances.

Gatan makes a series of heated stages but
they seem more for stress testing and bulk
specimens. I will have an IC chip thermal
expoxy'd to a 12mm diameter Al pin stub. I need
to be able to heat this specimen in the SEM
and at any tilt and WD that the SEM will support.
Temperature stability could be as bad as +-5C.
That is OK.

Specimen holder and specimen changeout via
slide out chamber door is OK. Specimen interchange
lock does not have to be used.

thanks for any ideas and leads,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 11:27:25 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:27:42 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In the latest issue of Microscopy Today there is an article on
pseudo-coloring of images. Since this is not something that I normally
do, I read the article with interest. I was surprised to find that the
author says that biologists nearly always use the "spectrum" color table
for the pseudo-coloring of grayscale images. I had thought that those
who study visual perception had found that among pseudo-color scales the
"thermal" scale is much better than all the others at providing a good
intuitive reading of the image. This is, I think, the scale that
Photoshop calls "Black Body". Can someone please clear up my confusion.
--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 11:58:48 2004



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:59:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscopy Today Jan/Feb Table of Contents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers,

Here is the table of contents for the January/February 2004 issue of
Microscopy Today.

New Subscriptions via http://www.microscopy-today.com only, please.
New subscriptions will close on Thursday 8 January for this issue.

There has been a major change in subscription policies coming out of the MSA
Winter Council meeting.

Briefly: Canadians and Mexicans are now offered free subscriptions along
with microscopists in the USA.

MSA members anywhere have free subscriptions.

Non-MSA, non-North American subscriptions have been reduced from $80 or
$110US to $35US. Additional details in the magazine or on our web site.

THIS WILL BE THE LAST ISSUE NON-MSA MEMBER, NON-NORTH AMERICAN, UNSUBSCRIBED
OR NOT-CURRENTLY-SUBSCRIBED INDIVIDUALS WILL RECEIVE!

Listers,

Here is the table of contents for the November/December 2003 issue of
Microscopy Today. This issue is mailed with the Call for Papers for the 2004
Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting

New Subscriptions via http://www.microscopy-today.com only, please
New subscriptions will close on Tuesday 11 November for this issue.

There has been a major change in subscription policies coming out of the MSA
Winter Council meeting.

Briefly: Canadians and Mexicans are now offered free subscriptions along
with microscopists in the USA.

MSA members anywhere have free subscriptions.

Non-MSA, non-North American subscriptions have been reduced from $80 or
$110US to $35US. Additional details in the magazine or on our web site.

PURGING OF NON-MSA MEMBER, NON-NORTH AMERICAN, UNSUBSCRIBED OR
NOT-CURRENTLY-SUBSCRIBED INDIVIDUALS IS UNDERWAY!

January/February 2004
Carmichael: Correlating Fluorescence Microscopy with Electron Microscopy
P.E. Batson: Electron Microscopy Enters a New Era Using Aberration
__Correction
Paula Allan-Wojtas: Microscopy and Imaging of Foods— The Whys and Hows
Jerry Sedgewick: Image Stitching Using Photoshop
Michael Bode: A Few Thoughts About Image File Storage
Paul Beauregard: Behavior of Particle Size Distributions, Means and BET
__Values in Ideal and Non-Ideal Morphology Systems in a TEM
Katerina Moloni: The Moving Finger Writes: Carbon Nanotubes as AFM Probe
__Tips
Robert M. Zucker: Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial Resolution
Shane Roberts, Daniel Flatoff: Enhanced Sample Preparation of Cu Low-k
__Semiconductors via Mechanical Polishing and Ion Beam Etching
Luc Harmsen: The Year That Was! Microscopy in Southern Africa
Robert P. Apkarian: Comments on Cryo High Resolution Scanning Electron
__Microscopy
Jose A. Mascorro: Propylene Oxide: To Use or Not to Use in Biological
Tissue __Processing
M. T. Postek & A. E. Vladár: Is Low Accelerating Voltage Always the Best for
__Semiconductor Inspection and Metrology?


Ron Anderson, Editor
Microscopy Today




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 12:10:04 2004



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 13:09:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes it is unfortunately true that many (most?) biologists do use the
"spectrum" color scale, largely because it makes "prettier-looking"
images. It the cases where they are trying to illustrate
quantitative contrast this is not only grossly misleading but it is
usually plain wrong and can produce horrific artifacts! The worst
offenders are chiefly light microscopists who are trying to represent
weak flourescence contrast and for some reason think it shows up
"better" with a spectrum scale. In the STEM/X-Ray/EELS biological
microanalysis field most of us use some variation of the "black Body"
scale which of course more closely parallels the greyscale that is
intuitively quantitative anyway (black = 0, shades of grey through
white represent more positive values). Relative contrast or
non-linear scaling can be achieved by manipuating the scale either
continuously or by introducing discontinuities to other scales; of
course color then becomes essential (a) because the human eye can
perceive considerably more colors than levels of grey, and (b) one
can extend the scale over a far greater dynamic range(s); most
monitors only display 8-bit levels of grey (24-bit color) but data
are often 32-bit or more in dynamic range.

The topic of visual perception of data is a fascinating one indeed
and has been addressed in several treatises over the years. However
in my experience, I have found the most (subjectively) pleasing
results to come from visual artists (painters) who seem to have a
natural instinct for such representations. A visit to any good art
museum should convince most people of this!

Sorry if this is a rather brief and simplistic answer to your
question but maybe it helps some!

Peter


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.54.107/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 12:41:52 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 11:41:04 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Alwyn,

happy new year!

the most common use of Pseudo color is to enhance the contrast of the images
and make small details more visible.

A little background:

Computer monitors are normally set to "True Color". On most graphics cards
that means 32 bit of information per pixel, or "Millions of colors" as they
say. However, each pixel is represented by 3 colors (Red, Green, and Blue),
and each of these colors can take on an 8 bit value. 8 bits mean, that there
are 256 shades of each color available, which can be combined to give you
the "millions of colors" (256 x 256 x 256). What is not so obvious, that for
gray levels you need to combine the 3 colors in at the same strength, i.e.
black is 0,0,0, medium gray is 128,128,128 and white is 255,255,255. This
shows, that even if your monitor can display millions of colors, it can
usually only show 256 levels of gray. Take into account, that the human eye
can distinguish perhaps 50 or so levels of gray and modern cameras can
provide anywhere from 4000 to 64,000 levels of gray, and the need for
different color schemes becomes obvious.

Enter the pseudo colors.

There are as many pseudo color schemes as you can think of. Several have
become "standards". Among them definitely the "black body" scheme, and the
"spectrum" color scheme. The "black body" is perhaps more intuitive, as it
basically goes from Red to White. This provides a linear scale, which is
easy to understand to anybody who has seen a metal heated (and perhaps
burned himself or herself), and it is probably easier to discern small
contrasts both in the red and the bright parts of the spectrum than in b/w
images. However, it does not make full use of the capabilities of a monitor.
The "spectrum" pseudo color, on the other hand, makes full use of the
availble color spectrum, perhaps at the price of an intuitive understanding.
It may be better suited to images that have "many" gray levels, which all
need to be discerned. If used wrongly, however, the spectrum pseudo color
can also lead to misleading coloring.

I hope this helps.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:28
To: MSA listserver

In the latest issue of Microscopy Today there is an article on
pseudo-coloring of images. Since this is not something that I normally
do, I read the article with interest. I was surprised to find that the
author says that biologists nearly always use the "spectrum" color table
for the pseudo-coloring of grayscale images. I had thought that those
who study visual perception had found that among pseudo-color scales the
"thermal" scale is much better than all the others at providing a good
intuitive reading of the image. This is, I think, the scale that
Photoshop calls "Black Body". Can someone please clear up my confusion.
--
.........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 07:27:59 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 09:57:28 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Peter writes ...

} ...
} ... In the STEM/X-Ray/EELS biological microanalysis field
} most of us use some variation of the "black Body" scale
} which of course more closely parallels the greyscale that
} is intuitively quantitative anyway (black = 0, shades of
} grey through white represent more positive values).

I remember an M&M '99 session, which introduced a pseudo-color scale for
quantitative images (e.g., elemental distributions, maps). That is, ranges
of color for representing "orders of magnitude" ... or ranges we might refer
to as "major", "minor", "trace", or "undetected". The session was intended
to be its introduction, such that its color ranges would become familiar to,
and used by all, as so that quantitative images could be actually compared.
I thought it was interesting concept at the time, but also felt it needed
some refinement. Unfortunately my inadequate notetaking didn't allow for me
to ever find the color table and download it.

I have no idea if it was mentioned in the MT article, but the people who
had introduced the color scheme were from NIH (or, was it NIST?). I believe
it is too bad the color scheme never did rise to common use. That is, even
if I did feel it still needed some refinement, it would be a good thing if
quantitative images could all be compared.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 10:27:30 2004



From: cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:27:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} In Dec, 2001, a group of animal rights protestors in Cambridge announced that
} they intended to sue "Christianity as a whole" and anyone who celebrates
} Christmas. The shock announcement comes after years of protesting against
} Christmas which, they say, causes unnecessary cruelty to turkeys.

And ignore the use of reindeer as beasts of burden? Or use of swine as ham?
Sounds pretty discriminatory to me.

Some people think the New Year is when it is because it was the celebration of
Jesus's circumcision. If we think this is bad (e.g. castration ritual), do we
refuse to follow the calendar? BTW, the holiday of New Year has become almost
global.

This is a time of year when we should take some time off and relax. This
message is apropos to this bboard specifically because for a few days I didn't
think about microscopy at all. I read novels, slept, ate ham and argued with
family over the Iraq war and mostly trivial stuff. This is happy holidays.

Now, can we get back to microscopy and drop the holiday stuff? Even if some
of us won't be completing our Christmas celebrations until the 6th?




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 11:40:17 2004



From: faj-at-highway1.com.au (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:40:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
Name: Faye Taylor

Organization: Amateur

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Perth, Western Australia

Question: Hello there,
I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.

I recently aquired a second hand
"MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.

Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
hardware that I possess?
I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.

I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it impossible
with my present configuration?
i would appreciate any comments please

Happy New Year Faye

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 13:32:14 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:31:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
} Name: Faye Taylor
}
} Organization: Amateur
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: Perth, Western Australia
}
} Question: Hello there,
} I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
} world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
} purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
} 192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.
}
} I recently aquired a second hand
} "MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
} use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.
}
} Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
} hardware that I possess?
} I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
} to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.
}
} I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it
} impossible with my present configuration?
} i would appreciate any comments please

Faye -

You don't say WHY you can't take photos with your equipment! I
suggest that you contact microscopeworld.com. They sell many Motic
scopes under the U.S. brand name "National", plus camera connectors,
so you should be able to get specific advice on your problem.

You'll find abundant microscopy resources for the grandkids at the
MICRO website; URL below.

Caroline

--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 15:23:11 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 22:22:38 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] special on MIcroscopy in the Nanobiosciences

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Friends,
here is the table of content of the last 2003 issue of J.Microscopy
(OXF)
on Microscopy in the Nanobioscience.

215
Foreword
A. Diaspro


217
Polysaccharide properties probed with atomic force microscopy
N. I. Abu-Lail, T. A. Camesano


239
Encapsulated yeast cells inside Paramecium primaurelia: a model system
for protection capability of polyelectrolyte shells
S. Krol, O. Cavalleri, P. Ramoino, A. Gliozzi, A. Diaspro


244
Insights into the regulation of transcription by scanning force
microscopy
R. T. Dame, C. Wyman, N. Goosen

254
Monitoring enzymatic reactions in nanolitre wells
I. T. Young, R. Moerman, L. R. Van Den Doel, V. Iordanov, A. Kroon, H.
R. C. Dietrich, G. W. K. Van Dedem, A. Bossche, B. L. Gray, L. Sarro,
P. W. Verbeek, L. J. Van Vliet

264
The molecular machines of DNA repair: scanning force microscopy
analysis of their architecture
A. Janiijevi, D. Ristic, C. Wyman

273
TectoRNA and 'kissing-loop' RNA: atomic force microscopy of
self-assembling RNA structures
H. G. Hansma, E. Oroudjev, S. Baudrey, L. Jaeger

280
The nacre protein perlucin nucleates growth of calcium carbonate
crystals
S. Blank, M. Arnoldi, S. Khoshnavaz, L. Treccani, M. Kuntz, K. Mann,
G. Grathwohl, M. Fritz

292
Atomic force microscopy study of living diatoms in ambient conditions
I. C. Gebeshuber, J. H. Kindt, J. B. Thompson, Y. Del Amo,
H. Stachelberger, M. A. Brzezinski, G. D. Stucky, D. E. Morse, P.
K. Hansma

300
Self-assembly and recrystallization of bacterial S-layer proteins at
silicon supports imaged in real time by atomic force microscopy
E. S. Györvary, O. Stein, D. Pum, U. B. Sleytr

307
Fluorescent resolution target for super-resolution microscopy
P. R. H. Stark, L. J. Rinko, D. N. Larson


I hope is of interest

All my best
ALby



.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 4 17:50:49 2004



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 18:53:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Mike!

I meant the "visual perception" of quantitation which is what
Alwyn's initial observation referred to. Of course I agree totally
with you that its easer to distinguish different colors from one
another than shades of any color or grey. The question is rather "is
bright green more or less than yellow?" Any quantitative color scale
must also have factored in parameters such as Hue, Saturation abd
Brightness; this is one of the main failings of the "spectrum scale"
- it doesn't!

Cheers etc

Peter



} Hello Peter,
}
} in actuality, the situation is a bit more complex than that. I am looking at
} the LUT right now that we have in our analySIS software, and you are of
} course right that a pixel with no intensity (intensity 0) is displayed as
} black (0,0,0). However, the intensity "1" is displayed as (R:41, G:0, B:0).
} Technically, it goes from black to white, but realistically, it goes from
} "dark red" to white.
}
} The situation becomes mor complex at the other end. To make yellow, you have
} to add in a green component, and to make white you also have to add in blue.
} So, it is not straightforward "black to white" or "red to white". Other
} colors get mixed in at the higher intensities to make yellow to white.
}
} As for qantitation: I am not sure, what you are referring to. Quantitaion is
} best done on the b/w images with the help of a computer, which has no
} problems distinguishing intensity 2976 from 2977. For the display of small
} contrasts for the human eye I agree with you, but there an even better
} choice is the spectrum LUT. It's easier to distinguish yellow from green
} than it is to distinguish "dark orange" from "darker orange".
}
} mike
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Peter Ingram [mailto:p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu]
} Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 12:03
} To: Mike Bode
} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Psuedo color
}
}
}
} Actually the "black body" scale goes from black to white, albeit
} through red, orange and yellow, not simply red to white - a vital
} distinction when quantitation is involved!
}
} Peter
}
}
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
DURHAM NC 27708-0319

Tel: 919 660-2695
Fax: 919 660-2671
Email: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Web: http://152.3.54.107/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 08:44:39 2004



From: Ervin, Matt (Civ, ARL/SEDD) :      mervin-at-arl.army.mil
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 09:47:25 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary-
I have been using a dual microprobe I purchased from Ernest F.
Fullam Inc.:

900 Albany Shaker Rd.
Latham
NY 12110-1491
800-833-4024, 518-785-5533

Part #15855 dual, o-ring sealed manipulator. They had suggested that I
purchase micromanipulators that had metal bellows rather than o-ring
seals since I have a FE-SEM, but since all of the other seals on my
specimen chamber were o-rings, including detectors that run in and out,
I opted for the less expensive o-ring sealed option, and I have had no
trouble with them. I cannot say if the microprobes I have will meet
your positioning accuracy requirements as I am currently using fairly
blunt tips. I also do not have verniers to check reproducibility. I
just watch where I am placing them using the SEM. The probes are
essentially the same as one might find on an electrical probe station
for testing devices. The one problem I do have with them is that since
I work with the probe tips near the pole piece, the probes induce a
significant aberration. I do not know if the set screws holding the tips
in are magnetic, making the problem worse or not. I do know that there
are magnetic knurled nuts about 2" up the shaft. You may need to
specify the materials you want the probe arms made out of, as well as
working at longer WD/higher kV. I haven't bothered to correct this, or
to move the probes further from the pole piece, as the resolution is
adequate for my experiments. I have found Fullam to be very helpful and
open to customizing their products for individual needs. They have a
web site at: http://www.fullam.com/. Good luck.

Sincerely,
Matthew Ervin, Ph.D.
(301)394-0017 phone, (301)394-1559 fax
MErvin-at-ARL.Army.mil

M/S: AMSRL-SE-RL
US Army Research Laboratory
2800 Powder Mill Road
Adelphi, MD 20783-1197

Disclaimer: The opinions and views expressed above are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army Research
Laboratory or any other government agency



-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 10:11 PM
To: MSA listserver

Hi all:

Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
stability.

I need two contact probes.

gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 09:42:19 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:45:01 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:02:05 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 10:04:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: nylon SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Phil,

I suggest that you check out "Polymer Microscopy", 2nd edition, by Sawyer &
Grubb. I believe that they addressed this issue.

Cheers,

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



Philip Oshel
{peoshel-at-wisc.edu} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] nylon SEM
12/23/03 02:55 PM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Materials micromavens,

We have a user doing SEM of nylon, with embedded bits. We'd like to
chemically etch the nylon, which is something of an entertaining
problem, since nylon is used to mask things against etchants.
Does anyone have a recipe for something that will etch nylon and not
silica?
Thanks.

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:34:32 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 12:37:02 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:44:59 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:54:09 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:52:17 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 10:55:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Administrivia: Archives for 2003 Now On-Line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nestor,

Many thanks to you for all your hard work over the past years. I very much
appreciate the service that you provide for the microscopy/microanalysis
community.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"Nestor J. Zaluzec"
{zaluzec-at-microscopy.c To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
om} cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Archives for
2003 Now On-Line
01/01/04 10:37 AM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Happy New Year Colleagues :


The Archives for all of 2003 are now on-line at:


http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers...

Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
Nestor







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:35:40 2004



From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 12:38:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Kathleen,

I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
Philips TEM).

Here is the contact info:

Doug Wagner
Haskris Co.
100 Kelly Street
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
847-956-6595 (fax)
doug-at-haskris.com

Good luck!
Ann

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Mailstop: LSC-314
Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
f. 860-297-2538
www.trincoll.edu/~alehman


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to

Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another

company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:39:32 2004



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:42:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Check out Haskris. I believe that they are the best on the market, in my
opinion, and they would make a model which would easily handle the Zeiss 10.

http://www.groupeinterconnexion.com/LaboratoryListingsAddPages/Chiller_Cryog
entics_Adds/HaskrisWaterChillerHA2953.htm


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:41:30 2004



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:44:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

sorry, that website is: www.haskris.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 12:28:56 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 13:31:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hakris is a reasonably reliable chiller. I've had several on EM diff pumps. They also make a 115V version that I used on a Hitach S4500 FESEM since my lab had no chilled water supply. Unless strapped for cash, junk the old one. If it fails it can make a nasty mess of things. I think I spent 2K$ [American] for the one I bought 6 years ago.

Happy new year. [Can I say that?]

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA



-----Original Message-----
} From: Lehman, Ann [mailto:Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 12:39 PM
To: Kathleen Roberts; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Dear Kathleen,

I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
Philips TEM).

Here is the contact info:

Doug Wagner
Haskris Co.
100 Kelly Street
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
847-956-6595 (fax)
doug-at-haskris.com

Good luck!
Ann

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Mailstop: LSC-314
Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
f. 860-297-2538
www.trincoll.edu/~alehman


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to

Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another

company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:07:58 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:17:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ann-

Oooh, thank you! You just made things a lot easier for me. :o) I
guess I should talk to LEO as well to see what options I need, unless
your Zeiss and mine are similar enough?

God, how I love listservs....thank you, Nestor!

Thanks again-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Lehman, Ann wrote:

} Dear Kathleen,
}
} I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
} 2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
} Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
} Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
} Philips TEM).
}
} Here is the contact info:
}
} Doug Wagner
} Haskris Co.
} 100 Kelly Street
} Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
} 847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
} 847-956-6595 (fax)
} doug-at-haskris.com
}
} Good luck!
} Ann
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Ann Hein Lehman
} Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
} Mailstop: LSC-314
} Trinity College
} 300 Summit Street
} Hartford, CT 06106
} v. 860-297-4289
} e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
} f. 860-297-2538
} www.trincoll.edu/~alehman
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:11:23 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:20:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Pat-

Yes, Dr. Bonder is still at Rutgers-I just did a search for him on
Rutgers' website. I don't know him personally, though, as he is on the
Newark campus, where I have never been, and I am on the New Brunswick
campus. Worlds apart... :o)

Kathleen

Pat Connelly wrote:

} Kathleen,
} WE have been using a Haskris Co. water chiller (RO 75) since 1996 for
} my Phillips 200 TEM. It works very well and the only complaint that I
} have had is that we use a timer to shut down our ancient scope at
} night and the one on the chiller keeps dying - it just stays on.
}
} This company was recommended to me when our previous chiller, also a
} Haskris,died after 25 years or so, by a refrigeration specialist who
} does some contract work here.
}
} Do you know if Dr. Ed Bonder is still at Rutgers? He was in EM the
} last time I had heard from him but I do not know the exact department
} - Biology? He was a grad student here at Penn a few decades ago!
}
} Pat Connelly
} Research Specialist




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:21:08 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:30:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To all who wrote in reply to my question-
}
} Thank you for the information, you all have made my life much easier. :o)
}
} Now I can sit down with my boss and be able to give him some real
} information about replacing this poor thing, instead of "I'm still
} searching for a source..."
}
} Thanks again-
} Kathleen
} Neurotoxicology Labs
} Rutgers University




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:26:57 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:36:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ouch! That is an expensive repair...would LEO install a temp. sensor on
a 'scope that is so old? My impression was that LEO didn't service
Zeiss 'scopes anymore.

Thanks for the information-
Kathleen

Ken Tiekotter wrote:

} Dear Kathleen,
}
} I just had a major life change as my Coolwell went down, was repaired, and
} crashed again for the third and final time. The issue was exasperated by a
} series of facilities failures. The outcome was about an $18k repair bill to
} include a new Haskris chiller (~$5600.00)
}
} Unfortunately, the Zeiss EM 10CA does not a temperature sensor to determine
} glycol temperature, but rather only flow rate. The repair included a
} complete overhaul of the column because oil vapors were not condensing in
} the diffusion pump and consequently went everywhere in the column.
}
} After almost 20 years with my beloved EM10, the hospital decided to donated
} the scope and close my lab. You may want to check with Zeiss (LEO) about
} installing a temperature sensor and automatic relay to shut the HV value if
} the circulator temperature gets too high.
}
} Best wishes to you and your EM10!
} Ken
}
} _______________________________________
} Kenneth L. Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
} The University of Portland
} Department of Biology
} 5000 N Willamette Blvd.
} Portland, OR 97203 USA
}
} Director, MicroImaging Dx Center
} Legacy Portland Hospitals
} Legacy Holladay Park Medical Center
} 1225 NE 2nd Avenue
} Portland, OR 97232 USA
}
} Tel.: 503.413.5391
}
}
}
}
}
} On 1/5/04 8:54 AM, "Kathleen Roberts" {kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu} wrote:
}
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:40:57 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:50:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Joel-

I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's an
overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
reading way above the overtemp limit.

There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.

I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
old anyway.

Thanks,
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

McClintock, Joel wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} I take care of a Zeiss 902 with a coolwell chiller. I have fixed this thing several times. What is the problem with it? Often the temp sensor goes haywire. I have found it is often the switch. I have replaced it for around $7. As others have recommended Haskris is my favorite. If money is tight I may be able to direct you to a used one.
}
} Joel McClintock
} EM Specialist
} U of Kentucky
} 859-257-1242
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 11:54 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc:
} Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi, all-
}
} We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
} ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
} dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
} Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
} under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
} possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
} much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
} course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
} company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
} EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
} sources that I can try.
}
} Hope you all had a happy holiday!
}
} Thanks in advance-
} Kathleen Roberts
} Principal Lab Technician
} Neurotoxcology Labs
} Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
} Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} Rutgers University
} 41 B Gordon Rd
} Piscataway, NJ 08854
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:47:21 2004



From: jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 13:49:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary,
I have seen presentation on two micro-manipulator type systems: Zyvex - a MEMS based system (www.zyvex.com), and Klendiek (http://kleindiek.com, http://www.ascendinstruments.com/product_nanoprober.asp) a micro-motor based system distributed in USA by Ascend Instruments. They are geared to manipulate specimen inside a FIB or SEM chamber and both can be used for electrical measurements. The problem is that they are expensive (~100K). Since I have not actually used either one of them I cannot recommend them. We are thinking of a versatile solution that would allow TEM sample extraction, transfer, in DB-FIB and also allow us to perform occasional electrical measurements on powered devices.

Regards and Happy New Year to all.

Jerzy

PS: If you get other replies, please post them since I would also be interested in a less expensive system but with less flexibility. I do not have any vested interest in either company, we only had sales presentations from both distributors.

******************************************************
Jerzy Gazda, Ph.D. Advanced Micro Devices
Supervising Engineer 5204 E. Ben White Blvd. - MS 512
PCAL - AIM Section Austin, TX 78741
TEL: 1-800-538-8450, Ext. 51453
jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
******************************************************



-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:11 PM
To: MSA listserver

Hi all:

Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
stability.

I need two contact probes.

gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:05:53 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:11:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Another source is Omniprobe, http://www.omniprobe.com/. Click the Products nav button. They can do electrical testing, TEM lift-out, mechanical testing, etc.
I have no financial interest in the company.

jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Gary,
} I have seen presentation on two micro-manipulator type systems: Zyvex - a MEMS based system (www.zyvex.com), and Klendiek (http://kleindiek.com, http://www.ascendinstruments.com/product_nanoprober.asp) a micro-motor based system distributed in USA by Ascend Instruments. They are geared to manipulate specimen inside a FIB or SEM chamber and both can be used for electrical measurements. The problem is that they are expensive (~100K). Since I have not actually used either one of them I cannot recommend them. We are thinking of a versatile solution that would allow TEM sample extraction, transfer, in DB-FIB and also allow us to perform occasional electrical measurements on powered devices.
}
} Regards and Happy New Year to all.
}
} Jerzy
}
} PS: If you get other replies, please post them since I would also be interested in a less expensive system but with less flexibility. I do not have any vested interest in either company, we only had sales presentations from both distributors.
}
} ******************************************************
} Jerzy Gazda, Ph.D. Advanced Micro Devices
} Supervising Engineer 5204 E. Ben White Blvd. - MS 512
} PCAL - AIM Section Austin, TX 78741
} TEL: 1-800-538-8450, Ext. 51453
} jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
} ******************************************************
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:11 PM
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi all:
}
} Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
} contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
} positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
} stability.
}
} I need two contact probes.
}
} gary g.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:34:46 2004



From: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 16:37:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: unstained blood smears

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net
Name: Elizabeth Colvin

Organization: Homeschool

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Pearblossom, CA-L.A. county

Question: I have obtained several unstained blood smears. I have
Wright's stain and methylene blue available. Can you please tell me
how long to leave the stain on the slide before rinsing. And do I
rinse with distilled water. Thank you.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:52:04 2004



From: Kenneth Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 14:52:15 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen,

Good question from Joel. The alarm (buzzer)you are hearing more than
likely is the chiller fluid flow indicator on the EM10. The pressure
must be maintained at 1.5 - 2liters per minute. The flow indicator is
located on the right-hand side of the column inside the gray hinged
'door'. These is a small glass window to show where the float is in
relationship to the flow of fluid: the higher the float, the greater
the number of liters/minute.

On the front of the Coolwell chiller is also a flow indicator, which
should be adjusted to meet the 1.5 - 2 liter flow on the microscope.
Also check to see if the temperature gauge on the Coolwell remains the
same or fluctuates. It could be the chiller is fine, but the pump is
going out.

Ken


Kathleen Roberts wrote:


}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

---------------------------------------
Kenneth L, Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000 N Willamette Blvd,
Portland, OR 97203 USA


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:16:32 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 15:35:19 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Image processing position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,
I am posting the following for Dr. Jensen, the head of our cryo-EM
group:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------
I'm looking for an image processing scientist/computer programmer to
help with our expanding biological electron tomography projects here at
Caltech. We are currently imaging many specimens including cells,
viruses, and purified protein complexes with a state-of-the-art 300kV,
helium-cooled, energy-filtered, automated, FEG TEM. We are in the
process now of purchasing a large new supercomputer for the structural
biology groups. Duties would include applying existing programs as well
as developing new software for image processing needs, handling large
amounts of image data, managing processes on our supercomputer, working
with students to help them solve image processing problems, and being a
creative member of a growing scientific team. Minimum qualifications
are a bachelor’s degree, strong programming skills, mathematical
aptitude, an ability to work well with others, and enthusiasm for
biology research. Graduate education or extended experience in related
fields is preferred. Interested persons seeking either a post-doctoral
position or a permanent staff position are encouraged to apply. Salary
will be commensurate with qualifications. CalTech is located in
Pasadena, California (a suburb of Los Angeles) next to the San Gabriel
mountains, and offers an extraordinarily rich intellectual environment
for computationally-inclined scientists, all within a sunny, affordable,
diverse community that will make you want to stay. Please send CV and
three letters of reference to jensen-at-caltech.edu or

Dr. Grant Jensen
California Institute of Technology
Biology Division, Mailcode 114-96
1200 E. California Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91125
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------

Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:40:32 2004



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:45:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen,

Just to add to what Ken said just below, if the flow alarm is in fact what
you are hearing, then just check the various filters in the cooling water
system, probably one in the chiller tank, probably another one on the input
side to the microscope. Or, the lines may be plugged up somewhere with crud
such as algae or corrosion products. After checking the filters and cleaning
or replacing them, if problem persists may have to have scope and/or
delivery lines flushed to clear them. I had to do that once for in an SEM's
interior cooling lines.

Hope this helps!
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} Kathleen,
}
} Good question from Joel. The alarm (buzzer)you are hearing more than
} likely is the chiller fluid flow indicator on the EM10. The pressure
} must be maintained at 1.5 - 2liters per minute. The flow indicator is
} located on the right-hand side of the column inside the gray hinged
} 'door'. These is a small glass window to show where the float is in
} relationship to the flow of fluid: the higher the float, the greater
} the number of liters/minute.
}
} On the front of the Coolwell chiller is also a flow indicator, which
} should be adjusted to meet the 1.5 - 2 liter flow on the microscope.
} Also check to see if the temperature gauge on the Coolwell remains the
} same or fluctuates. It could be the chiller is fine, but the pump is
} going out.
}
} Ken
} } Kathleen Roberts wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } Joel-
} }
} } I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
} } know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
} } hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
} } what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's
} an
} } overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
} } reading way above the overtemp limit.
} }
} } There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
} } was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
} } however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
} } is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.
} }
} } I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
} } resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
} } without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
} } managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
} } name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
} } the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
} } help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
} } old anyway.
} }
} } Thanks,
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }

} ---------------------------------------
} Kenneth L, Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
} Dept. of Biology
} The University of Portland
} 5000 N Willamette Blvd,
} Portland, OR 97203 USA



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:41:59 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:48:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Peter,

I did not want to imply that the "spectrum" scale is "perfect". There are
many color scales and depending on what you want to see or show, one or the
other might be better.

You bring up a good point, though: familiarity with the scale. Everybody can
interpret a black and white scale, and the thermal scale is also very
intuitive. Once we get to more colors, I would say that the spectrum scale
is familiar to most people, red on one end, blue on the other. Other scales
need more explanation or a color scale bar on the Image.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Peter Ingram [mailto:p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu]
Sent: Sunday, January 04, 2004 16:54
To: Mike Bode
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time, not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have. Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 01:59:15 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:00:31 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Mon, 5 Jan 2004, Mike Bode wrote:

} You bring up a good point, though: familiarity with the scale.

And one (little) cent more : I had a look a few weeks ago to the biology
manual
from my daughter (secondary school, french 3°, i. e. 15 years old), an all
the EM and SEM pictures were in pseudo color, whith different color rules
from one picture to an other and without any mention that it was "false
colors" and that the true signal was a monochrome level variation ! I've
than understood why a student asked my once, why we dont't have color
images on the SEM ... " Not enough monney to pay it ?" asked he !
Familarity with a "false" color scale, can be an obstacle to understand
the way the images was obtained (and to understand the image itself,
perheps).

So pseudo color, why not of coarse, but with a color scale along a border
of the picture, like the micron bar, as is often done on AFM images.


J. Faerber
IPCMS
Strasbourg France




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 03:36:16 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 01:41:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John
I was thinking, it's only my family is "so creative". When we came to US
my kids very quickly figured out what to do: ever since we do celebrate
everything. Catholic Christmas, New Year, then Russian Christmas, then
Russian "Old" New Year... The whole point there was to have gifts for
every holiday... As far as I remember my kids also enjoyed some Jewish
holidays when they had school off... I really like you description: "the
spirit of Christmas". I think, good spirit should unify us, not separate
by religious believe... Sergey.


At 11:48 PM 1/5/2004 -0800, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 05:30:26 2004



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 07:33:09 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen -

I'll also put in my $.02 worth (Cdn) for Haskris chillers. I've
owned both Haskris and Neslab ones over the years, but what I really like
about the Haskris models I've used is the fact that the water tank/reservoir
has a removable lid, so you can always look inside and visually inspect the
condition of the water. The Neslab one we have now, though reasonably
reliable and all, has a completely sealed water tank with just a narrow
little filler neck, so you can never see what's going on inside.
Interestingly, both companies use the same water pumps supplied by a third
company somewhere in Indiana, I believe. These pumps are rebuildable and
replaceable of course, as are the electric motors that power them, so it's
often possible to keep a chiller running for a very long time before it
actually has to be replaced.
To choose an appropriate model for your particular application you
just need to know how much water (usually gallons/minute) and at what
temperature your particular instrument needs it, then match that up to the
model listing. There's not much point in greatly exceeding the needs of your
instrument with a bigger chiller than necessary, since the motor/pump will
be running constantly anyway.
Some folks will let one big chiller cool several instruments. No
doubt this is pretty cost-effective, but the down-side is apparent when the
chiller craps out and you now have several instruments down instead of just
one.......

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 12:54 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 05:50:44 2004



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=22Michael_Didi=E9=22?= :      Michael.Didie-at-gmx.de
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:53:37 +0100 (MET)
Subject: [Microscopy] Feather Blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello everyone,

I'm searching for some decent disposable blades for our Leica Microtome to
get sections of living hearts.
I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience with
getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?

Thanks

Michael Didié

--
+++ GMX - die erste Adresse für Mail, Message, More +++
Neu: Preissenkung für MMS und FreeMMS! http://www.gmx.net




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 07:29:15 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:32:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time, not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have. Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:12:53 2004



From: lookerr-at-battelle.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:15:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microchemical tests

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: lookerr-at-battelle.org
Name: Ron Looker

Organization: Battelle

Education: Graduate College

Location: Columbus, OH

Question: I am looking for procedures for various microchemical tests
such as protein. Where would be a good resource for finding such
procedures? Thanks you for your time,


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:21:43 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:04:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How can I resist!

A number of years ago I took a SEM course and I was told the following:

It seems a number of students comment to their professor that they would
like a real time false color display on the SEM. At the time this was not
a inexpensive request or total practical. The next day the students found
a coffee mug full of Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."

Stay Safe................

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:36:44 2004



From: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US :      RafaelPena-at-kemet.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:39:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All, I know we are not a theological forum ( and I'm not one, I'm
just a SEM tech)
I agree with the last mail about unifying us.
This is only a way as we can Unify Religion with Science including
Microscopy
Microscopy and Science has discovered a world full of distinctive marks
of intelligent design so we can not deny the chance of the existence of a
creator, so if we want to give honor to him we have to make sure that we
are worshipping him in a good way.

As much of us are from different cultures, we also have to be united,
an example of unity is the language, in this case English. But What about
religions, does exist a language in which we agree about belief? Even
when some religious people have influenced wars, Yes, does exist : is the
True. And I'm not being ambiguous I'm talking about the true about the
date of Christ birth ( where Christmas is originated), the true about
Mexican traditions, I mean all of them over the world, dates, even about
the origin of the live (because religions talk about the creator).
Knowing the true about our own traditions and beliefs and talk about
them to others will unify us.



I agree about giving gifts, I enjoy accepting them and I deeply appreciate
when people give them at any day of the year, without expectation.


Sincerely

Rafael Peña
SEM Tech
Process Enginering
Tel 83297100
Ext 4721
Monterrey Nl Mexico

----- Forwarded by Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US on 01/06/04 08:29 AM
-----


"Tomic, Peter (Peter)" {ptomic-at-agere.com}
01/06/04 07:32 AM


To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} , (bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US)
bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Dec. 25




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not
the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of
remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I
celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is
Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We
are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the
fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they
loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I
celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed
marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and
Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that
it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just
Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time,
not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not
just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just
Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just
Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a
special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas
does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes
of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared
that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have.
Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas
Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:36:44 2004



From: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US :      RafaelPena-at-kemet.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:39:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All, I know we are not a theological forum ( and I'm not one, I'm
just a SEM tech)
I agree with the last mail about unifying us.
This is only a way as we can Unify Religion with Science including
Microscopy
Microscopy and Science has discovered a world full of distinctive marks
of intelligent design so we can not deny the chance of the existence of a
creator, so if we want to give honor to him we have to make sure that we
are worshipping him in a good way.

As much of us are from different cultures, we also have to be united,
an example of unity is the language, in this case English. But What about
religions, does exist a language in which we agree about belief? Even
when some religious people have influenced wars, Yes, does exist : is the
True. And I'm not being ambiguous I'm talking about the true about the
date of Christ birth ( where Christmas is originated), the true about
Mexican traditions, I mean all of them over the world, dates, even about
the origin of the live (because religions talk about the creator).
Knowing the true about our own traditions and beliefs and talk about
them to others will unify us.



I agree about giving gifts, I enjoy accepting them and I deeply appreciate
when people give them at any day of the year, without expectation.


Sincerely

Rafael Peña
SEM Tech
Process Enginering
Tel 83297100
Ext 4721
Monterrey Nl Mexico

----- Forwarded by Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US on 01/06/04 08:29 AM
-----


"Tomic, Peter (Peter)" {ptomic-at-agere.com}
01/06/04 07:32 AM


To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} , (bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US)
bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Dec. 25




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not
the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of
remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I
celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is
Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We
are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the
fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they
loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I
celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed
marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and
Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that
it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just
Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time,
not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not
just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just
Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just
Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a
special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas
does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes
of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared
that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have.
Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas
Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:49:58 2004



From: Bruce Girrell :      bigirrell-at-microlinetc.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:55:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} The next day the students found a coffee mug full of
} Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
} a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."


Ah, yes... Interactive computer graphics.


Bruce Girrell


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:54:27 2004



From: MICHAEL J DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:03:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] re:holey carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To the listserver,
Is there an easier way to make holey
carbon (small 1.5 um) films, other than
steaming formvar/evaporating carbon and
dissolving formvar with solvents? If not
who sells good small holed pure carbon
films.

thanks
mike d



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:58:33 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:01:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Feather Blades/living hearts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael Didié wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience with
} getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
} supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?
}
} Thanks
}
} Michael Didié
}
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 09:40:53 2004



From: hagglund.kw-at-pg.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 10:22:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: microchemical tests

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Handbook of Chemical Microscopy, Vol II. (1940) E. M. Chamot and C. W. Mason

(1989 Reprints available from McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL.)

Karl Hagglund
(513) 634-0146


} From: lookerr-at-battelle.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist) on 01/06/2004 02:15 PM
GMT

lookerr-at-battelle.org To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
(by way of Cc: (bcc: Karl Hagglund-KW/PGI)
Ask-A-Microscopist) Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist:
microchemical tests

01/06/2004 09:15 AM









------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Email: lookerr-at-battelle.org
Name: Ron Looker

Organization: Battelle

Education: Graduate College

Location: Columbus, OH

Question: I am looking for procedures for various microchemical tests
such as protein. Where would be a good resource for finding such
procedures? Thanks you for your time,


---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:01:17 2004



From: gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 16:01:05 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Feather Blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,
Assuming your message has lost a little in translation you might like to
go to the Leica's own web site www.leica-microsystems.com.
They their own (feather) microtome blades but are you actually using a
vibratome?

I have just seen an ad in Microscopy and analysis Jan 2004 for a new live
cell cutting module for their microdissection kit for live tissue
cultures.
(I have no commercial interest)


Gill Brown

GlaxoSmithKline Medicines Research Centre,
STEVENAGE,






""Michael Didié"" {Michael.Didie-at-gmx.de}

06-Jan-2004 11:53




To: Microscopy

cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Feather Blades



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello everyone,

I'm searching for some decent disposable blades for our Leica Microtome to
get sections of living hearts.
I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience
with
getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?

Thanks

Michael Didié

--
+++ GMX - die erste Adresse für Mail, Message, More +++
Neu: Preissenkung für MMS und FreeMMS! http://www.gmx.net











From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:04:41 2004



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 11:07:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] theomicroscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is a thoughtful, well-presented magazine called Science & Spirit
that addresses the intersection under discussion, which may be an
appropriate venue for this dialogue. (It might make a good article for
them if anyone wants to pursue it!)



--
***************************************************************
Do not publicly post any of my correspondence without permission

Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 845/365-8640
F: 845/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:10:32 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 11:19:43 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Joel-

Well, knowing my boss, he will want to start with the smaller stuff -all
the suggestions of what to check on the Coolwell that you and everyone
else has been sending me (thank you oh so VERY much, everyone!)-and then
when all those have been exhausted, go buy a Haskris. So, if it is not
too much trouble, could you please dig up & send me that Grainger part
number, just in case?

I will check everyone's suggestions and see if they work. At the very
least, it would be nice to be at least somewhat functional until we get
the new chiller in, assuming that the Facilities people here can figure
the Coolwell out without diagrams. :o)

Muchas gracias,
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

McClintock, Joel wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} This sounds real familiar. I suspect the switch is your problem with this chiller. No matter what chiller you have the compressor comes on then off, back and forth. On the front of this chiller right in the middle should be a temp adjustment, don't recall exact wording, but if you take a flat blade screw driver and move it around you should hear the cmpressor come on. If you do watch the temperature and see if it goes down. If so the compressor is working. Your problem then is something is not telling it ot come on properly. In my experience it is the switch from the thermocouple. Coolwells are really sensitive and when operating correctly keep the water temp pretty steady. THe compressor comes off and on, on and off quite often. The thermocouple initiates this. The thermocouple is stuck in the water and a copper line with a flat copper plate at it's end. This plate buts up to a switch. The switch has a little button on it and is pretty sensitive. As the water temp changes the copper swells and shrinks turning the switch off and on respectively. If the switch is sticky or fails things don't work. Doesn't take much as you might imagine the copper moves very little. I can dig up the number for this switch if you need it as I got it through a company called Grainger. Sound like you are going with a new one though. Good luck.
}
} One thing to keep in mind is whether you have a Haskris chiller or coolwell over time maintenance and/or repair will be necessary. Over the years I have called Haskris many times and their phone support is very very good. The only way to get any help on a Coolwell is if you had a time machine and even then I would not be hopeful. The design of Haskris is service friendly.
}
} Joel
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 2:50 PM
} To: McClintock, Joel; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc:
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
} Joel-
}
} I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
} know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
} hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
} what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's an
} overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
} reading way above the overtemp limit.
}
} There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
} was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
} however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
} is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.
}
} I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
} resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
} without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
} managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
} name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
} the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
} help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
} old anyway.
}
} Thanks,
} Kathleen
} Neurotoxicology Labs
} Rutgers University

}
} McClintock, Joel wrote:
}
} } Kathleen,
} }
} } I take care of a Zeiss 902 with a coolwell chiller. I have fixed this thing several times. What is the problem with it? Often the temp sensor goes haywire. I have found it is often the switch. I have replaced it for around $7. As others have recommended Haskris is my favorite. If money is tight I may be able to direct you to a used one.
} }
} } Joel McClintock
} } EM Specialist
} } U of Kentucky
} } 859-257-1242
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} } Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 11:54 AM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Cc:
} } Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } Hi, all-
} }
} } We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
} } ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
} } dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
} } Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
} } under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
} } possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
} } much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
} } course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
} } company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
} } EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
} } sources that I can try.
} }
} } Hope you all had a happy holiday!
} }
} } Thanks in advance-
} } Kathleen Roberts
} } Principal Lab Technician
} } Neurotoxcology Labs
} } Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
} } Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} } Rutgers University
} } 41 B Gordon Rd
} } Piscataway, NJ 08854
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:05:49 2004



From: Moninger, Thomas :      thomas-moninger-at-uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:08:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Free Kevex Equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Group,
FYI, I have posted the availability of a Kevex Sigma Gold EDS processor and
a Kevex 4855 Digital Beam Control Interface to the surplus equipment list.
Cheers,
Tom


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:07:24 2004



From: Monson, Frederick :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:09:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: unstained blood smears

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Morning Elizabeth,
If you have Wright's Stain you should do the following.
1. find two glass rods that will reach across a dish/bowl on
which you can support a slide with smear up.
2. Wright's Stain is dissolved in methanol (or should be! - 0.5g
Wright's in 100ml (~ { 3oz) - mixed by 'trituration' (grinding with the
end of a round-bottom test tube) in small amounts of the alcohol until
all is dissolved!). It is delivered on the horizontal dry smear slowly,
with a dropper, so that a puddle of stain covers the smear (& perhaps
the entire slide). Leave for 2.5 min.
3. Add water dropwise to the surface of the stain until IT forms
a puddle that covers about 1/2 of the slide. Then blow gently,
back-and-forth, on the surface of the water-stain until the two are
mixed well. Total time should be about 4.5 min.
4. Rinse the water-stain off the slide in gently running water
and stand the slide against an inverted glass to dry - with smear down.
[If at home, DO ALL staining, rinsing and drying on aluminum foil. The
dye will stain Formica surfaces. Removal requires another email.] When
completely dry, a coverglass can be applied using appropriate care with
a permanent mountant.
5. You can also view the smear directly with an oil immersion
lens (that's the way it is done in pathology labs). Oil is placed
directly on the smear and then differential counting is performed.
Count 100 white blood cells, identifying each, and record the
distributions. A normal smear will show something like the following:
1 basophil, 2 eosinophils, 38 neutrophils (each of the previous
identified by cytoplasmic granules that are dark blue, bright red and
the latter pink with a segmented nucleus respectively), and 59
lymphocytes (small cells with a round nucleus and a thin rim of
cytoplasm). All red blood cells should be orange and without nuclei.

The theory is this.
Methylene blue (base) and eosin (acid) are mixed in water (1:1) and
combine to form a precipitate. The precipitate is dried and then
dissolved(?) in methanol. After the dye thoroughly penetrates the cells
in the smear, the water causes the precipitate to dissociate (based on
mass action). The methylene blue and eosin are then simultaneously
accessible to cellular constituents and are attracted according to their
individual affinities. The rinse in excess water then removes all
unbound dye. Applying the dyes separately requires much more work and
gives much less satisfactory results. The above dyes belong to a group
of blood dyes called "Romanovsky Stains".

Coverslipping.
If you do not have an oil immersion lens, you can do the following
so that you can view cells with a 40X dry objective. This will work
though you will have to remove the coverslip and the oil to store the
smear. To keep an oiled smear, absorb the excess oil with the tip of a
piece of paper towel.

Try this site:

http://www.mcl.tulane.edu/classware/pathology/Krause/Blood/Blood.html

DO NOT use alcohol (will leach dyes!) to remove the rest. Wrap the
slide once with good quality paper and NO Scotch tape!

DO NOT try to look at the cells when dry. The image will be saturated
with diffraction rings that arise through the interaction of the
microscope light and the curved surfaces of the cells - which are whole
in a smear (remember?).

Hope this helps,

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone/FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI Page and Scheduling
http://darwin.wcupa.edu/CASI/


-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist [mailto:letitsnow-at-antelecom.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:38 PM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------
--

Email: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net
Name: Elizabeth Colvin

Organization: Homeschool

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Pearblossom, CA-L.A. county

Question: I have obtained several unstained blood smears. I have
Wright's stain and methylene blue available. Can you please tell me
how long to leave the stain on the slide before rinsing. And do I
rinse with distilled water. Thank you.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:58:33 2004



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:01:32 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

All right! I can't TAKE it anymore!

Please, PLEASE, can the next person to add to this thread spell PSEUDO correctly!
..please...
(if it's not too much to ask...)
(whimper)
:-)

Mike O'Keefe

Bruce Girrell wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} } The next day the students found a coffee mug full of
} } Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
} } a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."
}
} Ah, yes... Interactive computer graphics.
}
} Bruce Girrell



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 12:12:03 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 14:14:35 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film
which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .

We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
Although
we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
"mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
the previous formulation.

These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
"New
Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our

digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
lines.
We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
positions on
our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
negative.

Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Catherine Powell



Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
Division of Surgical Pathology
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 12:55:28 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:58:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

We've been through the ringer with this film and have finally come to
terms with it. However, during the last three changes of D-19 developer
we have gotten significantly darker negatives (including the data bar,
which is added by the scope independently of negative exposure in our
JEOL 1200EX), for some reason we don't yet understand. We didn't change
anything in the way we mixed our developer or exposed our films, and we
have no reason to think the developer has been changed. We solved this
in the meantime by diluting the developer, since the first batch of
negatives had already been exposed and it's not a good idea to shorten
already short developing times---four minutes in our case. We added
about 25% more water (i.e., another quart per gallon of developer), ran
a couple test negatives, then proceeded normally with regard to
time/temperature/agitation. This worked well for us. Of course,
changing developer dilutions can affect the tonal response of films, but
in this case the results were fine. If you try this, always run your
own tests, of course.

We've had no problems with "scan lines". That's puzzling. They must be
coming from the scanner, itself, which maybe indicates that some of the
scanning elements (sorry, I forget the terminology---are they called
pixels?) aren't doing their thing and are causing lines in the digitized
image.

Good luck.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/





-----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 12:15 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:19:33 2004



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 13:24:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re:TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Catherine,

Regarding the denser negs, anytime you change film in any camera system you
usually need to re-calibrate camera exposure and film development. Sounds
like you have done that and are getting a less dense neg that can be nicely
digitized.

Regarding the scan lines flaw, you didn't mention if you are using an actual
negative scanner, or a flatbed scanner to digitize the negs. But in either
case, you may just need to lubricate the moving parts. In my case, I use a
UMAX Vista-S8 and about once a year I need to pull the glass surfaces off to
get inside and lubricate the metal bar that the scanner heads move on. They
just get dry, so then they don't slide smoothly and "skip" a line here and
there. Use a clean lint-free cloth with a dab of a fine oil on it, or 3-in-1
oil is what I use. In fact, I just did this lube job yesterday, and it
worked!

Good luck!

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra

} Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
} Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
} film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .
}
} We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
} Although
} we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
} "mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
} the previous formulation.
}
} These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
} However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
} "New Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our
} digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
} lines.
} We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
} positions on
} our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
} time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
} negative.
}
} Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
} negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?
}
} Thank you in advance for your assistance.
}
} Catherine Powell
} Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
} Division of Surgical Pathology
} Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
} P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
} phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
} email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:32:52 2004



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:35:44 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I haven't had any issues scanning in the darker negatives. We have an
Agfa Duoscan T2500 that works well enough with these newer negatives at
1000 and 2500 ppi (the two resolutions I've tried). Before the holiday
break I put together a group of images (digitally scanned ones) that had
both new and old negatives included with no discernable differences
between them. Other than having the scanner support discontinued its
been a great and reliable scanner for lecture slides and TEM negatives
(if anyone has a driver for it that works with the latest Mac OS 10.3 I
would be very interested in hearing about it). As you have mentioned,
it would probably be worth trying a emulsion setting series to see if
that improves your results. But alas I cannot say that I've tried this
yet to attempt to get the old and new density similar on the negatives.

HTH,

Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor

Central Michigan University Biology Department Microscopy Facility
http://www.cst.cmich.edu/centers/microscopy/

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 1:15 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} ----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} -----
}
} Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
} Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
} film
} which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .
}
} We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
} Although
} we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
} "mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
} the previous formulation.
}
} These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
} However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
} "New
} Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in
our
}
} digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
} lines.
} We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
} positions on
} our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
} time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
} negative.
}
} Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
} negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?
}
} Thank you in advance for your assistance.
}
} Catherine Powell
}
}
}
} Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
} Division of Surgical Pathology
} Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
} P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
} phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
} email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:34:03 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:36:41 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Pseudo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks, Mike, for pointing out the proper spelling. The correct pronunciation
of ‘psuedo’ is as in ‘blue psuedo shoes.’ And there’s nothing all that
astonishing about using colored markers on the screen. When we first introduced a
computer (one of the original upright Macs) in the department office a couple
of decades ago, to a secretary firmly set in the old ways, we had to take
turns each night cleaning the whiteout correction fluid off the screen. {;-)

Anyway, to the use and abuse of pseudo color;...

It is certainly true that human vision can only distinguish a few dozen
shades of grey brightness on a display screen, as compared to a few hundred colors.
Note that both of these values are far less than the 256 shades of brightness
or “millions” of colors that the hardware typically controls. It is also
true that trying to direct someone’s attention to the “kind of darkish grey
spot” is a lot less helpful than “the yellow-orange spot” in an image (but of
course, human words for colors aren’t terribly consistent or widely agreed,
either - look at any set of paint chips in the turquoise-teal-seagreen-etc.
family). Pseudo- or false-color certainly has some valid uses. But it is also easily
misunderstood, widely abused, and often hides more in the image than it
reveals. And if the viewer is one of the 5-10% of men (or the very tiny percentage
of women) who have defective color vision, it is inappropriate in any case.

Firstly, of course, the table must be shown along with a numerical scale that
translates it. But even then, simple spectrum lookup table is rarely if ever
a good choice. The problem is that the table is typically constructed with
uniform steps in hue, going around the color wheel. But human vision is notably
insensitive to changes in hue in the green part of the spectrum, and much more
so at the red and blue ends and through the red-to-blue purples. A
perceptually uniform hue scale (which I have never seen used) would stretch these out and
compress the greens and could probably produce more than a hundred
discernible colors.

More colors could be seen if they were NOT fully saturated. Changing
saturation and hue in a spiral pattern, or also altering brightness along with hue and
saturation, can produce color tables that varied in a gradual way and
produced greater ability to distinguish changes. The gradual part is important - if
the colors jump around too much in discontinuous ways, the image is badly
broken up (camouflaged, in effect) and the overall sense of structure, the gestalt
of the image, is hidden. To some extent this happens even with a good, gradual
table. The use of the “heat” or “thermo” scale is an example of a gradual
and visually attractive scale, which does not break up the content of the
image. But it does not actually add very much to the ability to visually
distinguish small changes - perhaps a 20-40% improvement over straight grey scale (which
is why color tints are also used in photographic printing, to gain the same
increase). Note that the brightness increases monotonically in this scale, and
that it is by contributing more steps at the dark end that the increase is
obtained.

For selected purposes, carefully constructed color scales can be useful to
help the viewer perceive subtle differences or make comparisons from one part of
an image to another. But they need to be documented, and in most cases it is
also important to show the original data as well in case the color scale can
produce misinterpretation or hide other information.

It has been my experience that people are not generally assisted very much by
pseudo color scales, as compared to other ways to reveal subtle detail. One
of the best of these is to render the surface with elevation representing the
original grey scale value. We have millions of years of evolution in our brain
wiring that knows how to interpret surface images, in terms of shape and
roughness. Using computer graphics to generate properly rendered images with
correct perspective, and adjustable viewpoints, surface characteristics, and
illumination is easy with current technology and communicates very effectively. The
AFM folks use this trick too, along with color scales, although in most cases
in only limited ways.

John Russ
(see www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming workshops on image
analysis)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:50:49 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:53:36 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Seeing Things...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The recent thread about the use and abuse of pseudo color is only one of many
issues that have to do with an important topic that underlies just about
everything that we as microscopists do - namely, we LOOK AT images. But while we
are typically very concerned with the performance and specifications of our
microscopes, we take for granted the performance of our visual systems, to our
peril.

Over the past 5 years or so I have been invited several times to give a talk
on human vision and how it impacts what microscopists see (and fail to see) in
images. At the repeated urging of many people, I’ve prepared the lecture in
written form. Anyone who wants to read it can download the "Seeing the
Scientific Image" pdf file from my website (www.DrJohnRuss.com). If someone thinks
there is a logical place to publish it (too long for Microscopy Today, and not a
research paper for Microscopy and Microanalysis) please let me know.

John Russ




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 14:12:58 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 15:22:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tina-

Silly me, in all my crabbing about this chiller, I didn't give the
model? The model # is SE-075W CZ. I got some diagrams from Eckhart
Dorneich, and a manual is on the way from Joel McClintock (thank you
both!), but I'll take yours too, if they match my chiller. I figure you
can never have too much information, and it's always good, in this lab,
to have extra copies. :o)

Thank you very much-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Tina Carvalho wrote:

} Hi-
}
} What model chiller do you have? I might have the wiring and plumbing
} diagrams.
}
} I have a 10/A and have struggled to keep the chiller going. The scope was
} down for a couple of years - oil and then water in the column! - while we
} used our new LEO 912 EFTEM. The expensive new instrument can be very
} frustrating, and was down once for nearly 5 months! So we got the 10/A
} going again, including the chiller. We all had forgotten what a gem it is,
} and right now I'd sell the new one and keep the old if I had a
} choice.
}
} We have Hakris chillers on our other two instruments, and they are
} fine. We got the very first one that Haskris built for Zeiss/LEO, and they
} had a fit trying to include both a pressure and flow gauge plus that
} interlock that keeps it going to cool down the diff pump after you turn
} off the scope, but they are quite used to it, now. They're pretty reliable
} and, fortunately, not prone to that temperature sensor screwing up like
} the Coolwell.
}
} Over the years I've found out there are a whole lot of closet Zeiss 10s
} out there - the most reliable backup even if you have a fancy new
} instrument! Keep it going. My next trick is to outfit it with a digital
} camera.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 15:03:50 2004



From: Bob Grassucci :      bobg-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 16:08:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Catherine,
I found the new formulation film was more sensitive and adjusted my auto
settings in the TEM to compensate.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dr. Catherine Powell" {POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 10:14 AM

Scanning very dense negatives can cause problems related to the scanner if
your scanner is using a CCD rather than a PMT. With a CCD you can not
crank up the current to boost the signal like you can with a PMT. The
result is that there is not enough light i.e. signal getting to the camera
array. If that is the case then you must either slow down the scan speed
so that the camera can collect enough signal or if this is impossible make
your negatives less dense. Our ZI Photoscan 2000 has problems with
negatives above an OD of 2.3 or so. Above this lines like what you
described appear. I hope this helps. Good luck.

Bob Grassucci

At 02:14 PM 1/6/04 -0400, Dr. Catherine Powell wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Robert Grassucci
Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Wadsworth Center
Empire State Plaza
Albany, NY 12201-0509
Phone: (518)474-5821
Fax: (518)486-2191
E-Mail: bobg-at-wadsworth.org


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 17:31:44 2004



From: alchung-at-ucla.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 17:34:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: silicon monoxide film tearing in the TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (alchung-at-ucla.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
January 6, 2004 at 16:51:57
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: alchung-at-ucla.edu
Name: Albert Chung

Organization: UCLA

Education: Graduate College

Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

Question: I am having issues with the silicon monoxide film tearing
in the TEM. I have called Ted Pella about this problem and they are
making a new batch as we speak, but I have about 50 silicon monoxide
films on copper grids for which I cannot use. Any suggestions on how
to approach this problem is greatly appreciated. I am operating the
JEOL 100CX and the typical current saturation is about 80 mA.

If you need additional information, please let me know.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 18:13:31 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 16:16:31 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: re:holey carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is another one:
you may bombard thin nylon film by some heavy ions (argon may be good) in
the accelerator. It will produce very uniform holes. The size of holes
strictly dependent from the energy and type of particle used. But, still:
you need to eveporate carbon over and dissolve nylon (have no idea how to
do so). As a matter of fact this technology widely used to produce filters
for ultrafiltration.

Sergey

At 07:03 AM 1/6/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 19:20:48 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 04 20:23:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SiO/SiO2 films tearing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1a ] --

Albert Chung wrote:
========================================================================
Question: I am having issues with the silicon monoxide film tearing in the
TEM. I have called Ted Pella about this problem and they are making a new
batch as we speak, but I have about 50 silicon monoxide films on copper
grids for which I cannot use. Any suggestions on how to approach this
problem is greatly appreciated. I am operating the JEOL 100CX and the
typical current saturation is about 80 mA.
========================================================================
Support films of SiOx can be too thick or too thin or could have other
features about them that render them unstable in the electron beam. This is
of course exactly the same for carbon coated grids. That is why it is
imperative to have in-house, as part of the grid coating process, a TEM for
batch inspection purposes so that the customer does not end up being
responsible for their own QC. And does not end up preparing a large number
of grids only to find them unusable.

In the case of carbon replica films that were prepared but which are too
thin, we have in the past, been able to resurrect them by applying another
coating of carbon to strengthen them and to make grids that were once
unstable, now stable. We have never done this with SiOx filmed grids but in
theory, it might work the same way.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies produces SiOx firmed grids as a part of our
business and to our knowledge, we have not had any problems with film
stability in the electron beam. On occasion, we do make a batch that
flunks our own in-house TEM inspection process but those grids never make it
into the hands of customers.

Chuck

PS: Remember that we are 100% paperless and the only way we can keep track
of this kind of correspondence is if you reply using the reply feature of
your e-mail software. That way the entire string of correspondence will be
in one place.

============================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 00:09:32 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 22:12:22 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

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Catherine;
One of my favorite web sites, Imaging Resources http://www.imaging-resource.com
has reviewed numerous film scanners. Scanning extremely dense film has always been an acid test for a scanner. The following link is to a negative scanned with a Minolta Dimage Scan Elite II Film & Slide Scanner that failed the acid test in some dark regions, and the effect there seems similar to what you describe. The site tests many other scanners with the same negatives, and many do not exhibit this artifact.
http://www.imaging-resource.com/SCAN/DSEII/DSETRAA602PS.HTM

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 10:15 AM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film
which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .

We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
Although
we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
"mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
the previous formulation.

These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
"New
Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our

digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
lines.
We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
positions on
our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
negative.

Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Catherine Powell



Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
Division of Surgical Pathology
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 06:34:24 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 07:37:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] available EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Posting this for a friend.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




Hi All,

I am doing some housecleaning & have the following EDS Systems free to
anyone:

Kevex 8000
Kevex Delta
PGT System 4
Tracor 5500

Happy New Year All.


Earl Weltmer
eweltmer1-at-cox.net
Scanservice Corp.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 08:12:53 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 15:14:06 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] EDS avaible too

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all

We have too 2 Kevex Delta avavaible, one complete, with detector (10mm2,
138 eV, warm, but was working in July)), the other only the electronic,
for spares, with 8" and 5"1/4 Bernouilli.

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 08:23:57 2004



From: Ron L'Herault :      lherault-at-bu.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 09:29:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] available EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If anyone has a mechanical lab balance they would like to dispose of, I
could use one. I collect/repair antique phonographs as a hobby and would
like to be able to true up governor weights from time to time. I've looked
at E-bay but I am leery since, if a balance moves up and down, the general
public thinks it works. Some units offered are missing parts. etc.

Thanks,

Ron

-----Original Message-----
} From: qualityimages [mailto:qualityimages-at-netrax.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 7:37 AM
To: Microscopy

Posting this for a friend.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




Hi All,

I am doing some housecleaning & have the following EDS Systems free to
anyone:

Kevex 8000
Kevex Delta
PGT System 4
Tracor 5500

Happy New Year All.


Earl Weltmer
eweltmer1-at-cox.net
Scanservice Corp.








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 09:29:29 2004



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 14:42:09 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers

As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our paper
last year would know?

Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and finding
examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
demonstrates poor quality control!

To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
surface detail.

First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught that
by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance surface
features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)

Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping back
again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?

As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream of
our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
not about time that we woke up to these facts?

There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
think?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
www.emcourses.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 10:49:04 2004



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 11:51:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: kV, metal coat vs sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve,
Your post (whose spirit I agree with totally) prompted a
question. If I have a biological sample sputter coated with metal,
isn't all the contrast coming from the metal? Does the underlying
carbon based material scatter anything much? If the carbon isn't
scattering much then wouldn't the problem you used for illustration
matter only at high mags where distances on the order of the coat
thickness are being resolved?

As ever,
Tobias



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 12:39:30 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 13:42:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve,
I agree entirely with you in that training (perhaps educating is a
better word) is key to good and reliable results. The example you sited
happens constantly. I take great pains to not only lecture about, but prove
through lab exercises, the effects that varying microscope parameters have
on the final image.

Unfortunately many "trained" people ask to use our facility and are denied
because their training was inadequate. They are either retrained so they
have the theory to go along with twiddling the knobs or rely on our
"service" option (trained staff does the actual imaging). The reputation of
our facility is very important.

We cannot guarantee to get perfect results with every research system on the
first try but we do our best and learn from our mistakes. At least if we
understand our instruments we can concentrate on sample prep to get the best
possible final results...not what the investigator thinks is there but what
is ACTUALLY there.

Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy


On 1/7/04 9:42 AM, "Steve Chapman" {protrain-at-emcourses.com} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
} Hi Listers
}
} As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
} wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
} interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our paper
} last year would know?
}
} Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and finding
} examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
} demonstrates poor quality control!
}
} To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
} described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
} But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
} information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
} surface detail.
}
} First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught that
} by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance surface
} features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
} sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
} null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
} 5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)
}
} Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
} should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
} paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
} problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
} back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
} did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping back
} again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
} Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
} problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
} not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?
}
} As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream of
} our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
} following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
} will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
} not about time that we woke up to these facts?
}
} There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
} think?
}
} Steve Chapman
} Senior Consultant Protrain
} Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
} Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
} www.emcourses.com
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 14:28:28 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 20:27:30 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: silicon monoxide film tearing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Put into TEM at low mag but still with an objective aperture in
place, and 100 kV. Really spread the beam and turn up slowly. You may
find that by gradually increasing the electron dose, you'll "harden"
the film. This approach certainly works with formvar films and
biological resin sections but I've never tried it with silicon
monoxide, so I can't guarantee it'll work.
--
Larry Stoter
NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:12:05 2004



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:16:57 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz lamp supply circuit please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year

Does anyone have a circuit diagram for an oldish Leitz microscope lamp power supply
Type 301-314.001?

It's a beige box with an analog voltmeter, a mains switch, and a brighness adjust knob
on the front panel.

cheers

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:24:34 2004



From: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 15:10:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com
Name: jamie lange

Organization: university of wisconsin

Education: Graduate College

Location: milwaukee, wi. usa

Question: we used a spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes,
after staining and heat-fixing the sections, we see dark ribbon-like
structures on several specimens. Are these artifacts caused by air
bubbles and can they be avoided? thank you,
jamie

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:59:17 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 17:20:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Re: Silicon monoxide film

We believe the problem may have been caused by weak film. Silicon monoxide
film should be as fresh as possible. Some of our customers have requested
thicker coatings but this doesn't help. We make our film up the day it is
requested by the customer to insure this problem doesn't occur. We suggest
you purchase the minimum amount required at one time because new batches can
be made up in a day or so.

John Arnott
Disclaimer: Ladd Research produces a wide variety of EM supplies including
substrates, such as silicon monoxide.

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Larry Stoter" {larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk}
To: "by way of Ask-A-Microscopist" {alchung-at-ucla.edu} ;
{Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 3:27 PM

Steve, et al.:

I agree there is a definte problem in terms of (some of) the microscopy
work being used and published. Steve hits a very good case where failure to
understand the technique can easy lead to poor data. (by microscopy I mean
in the broadest sense: SEM, TEM, LM, SPM, etc. . . Anyone dealing with
molecular biolgists labling molecules and wanting to use a confocal
microscope already knowing exactly what kind of "picture" they want to get
knows what I mean)

One of the really frightening aspects is that very very few people wish to
learn microscopy - become microscopists - today. I have been watching this
trend for several years now where users (students and faculty in my case)
simple want images. They want to push a button out comes an image - that's
all. If they could have the microscope automatically load the sample that
would be even better. Now granted there are times when a simple click image
will sufice - but more and more often researchers are failing to realize how far
they are trying to push the capabilities of a microscopy technique. I have
been told specifically they do NOT want to learn the microscope they want an
image. And then you try and turn around and tell them the data they are
collecting is bad science?

} Next back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the
} scientist; did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit?
} Stepping back again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they
} receive help? Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome
} this type of problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators
} produce are not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?
}

There is a time you can attempt to argue with the "users" over scienfic
quality, but running and EM Lab you can not dictate it - certainly not in
academia, and not even in industry - yes, you can be asked for an evaluation
of the data (and that is what peer review also does) but no one can really
control what the data is used for after it leaves the lab.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 16:48:19 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 16:49:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are having one of those debates that we microscopists seem to obsess
about. The question is whether to store our saturated uranyl acetate
solution (in dH2O) at room temp or at 4 C. Opinions, especially those
backed by data, would be welcome. Happy New Year. Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:36:49 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 15:39:40 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Richard

With huge headache I've established procedure in my Lab that everyone, who
uses equipment in the Lab should go through mandatory training. Without
this training, person just could not enter the facility (digital lock). My
training course includes intense training on data collection,
interpretation and sample preparation. So, it does not insure from the
"bad science", but at least I felt people knows what they doing. It means,
if they will present "bad data" I know, they did it on purpose... My
course is about week long (2h/day) and people's reaction are very
different. Nevertheless, I noticed that majority of the users finally
enjoyed "good electron microscopy", because it save them time and the
quality of their images is good (and confidence is great). In general, I
do agree: people becomes more and more "lazy" - they want to have results
doing nothing (best scenario - machine will do). It's very pity and made
me very skeptical on quality of many data published. Sergey

P.S. Knowledge is power.

At 02:20 PM 1/7/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:48:07 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 15:50:59 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

More important - to store in the dark! At +4oC you will have lower
concentration because of solubility. I prefer to store most of the
chemical solutions at cold temperature.
Sergey

At 02:49 PM 1/7/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:54:43 2004



From: John W. Raffensperger, Jr. :      johnr-at-helwigcp.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 17:52:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
important than ever.

Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"

The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
thinks the thing is broken...

If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
the world, because the problem is pretty universal.

John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 03:26:44 2004



From: Sousan Abolhassani :      sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:28:51 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 04:32:18 2004



From: Antonio Molina :      ifrm111-at-if.csic.es
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 23:33:25 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] LM - Webcams for video recording directly from a microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our old camera has to be replaced and I am offered a new one for 1200 euros.
This may not be too expensive but I wonder if I can get the same results
with a cheaper webcam attached to the microscope. I understand it is just a
question of removing the camera objective lense or to make it focus
infinity.

My question is: can I expect a really better performance from a more
expensive, purpose-built camera? Quite likely the camera will not be the
limiting factor in the quality of micrographs, but other factors in the
microscope and the preparation...

And, which factors should I cosider in the camera? I am thinking of
sensitivity to poor light, gain, and so.

Thanks for all your comments,

Antonio D. Molina-García
Inst. del Frio (CSIC) Madrid, Spain

PD. My main purpose for video recording from a microscope is to study ice
crystal evolution during growth and recrystallization. Image is so, not too
sharp ever, as the contrast between ice crystals is small. Also the sample
thickness is larger than when using other sample types and, when the size
of
crystals is small, it is even difficult to get any light through...




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 04:54:16 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 11:23:07 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Practical and Intensive School on Confocal, Genoa, February 9-11, 2004

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Second Announcement
From Microscopy to Nanoscopy, Genoa, 9-11 February 2004.
The 5th Practical and Intensive Workshop on 3D Confocal Microscopy will
be held in Genoa, at LAMBS, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33,
16146 Genoa.
The aim of the workshop, as usual, is to introduce researchers to
Confocal Microscopy and related methods. This year we would like to
show how it is possible to move from Microscopy to Nanoscopy, according
to a Stefan Hell’s recent paper (Natur.Biotech., 21 (11), 2003, p.1347).
2004 Program includes: lessons on basic aspects of fluorescence and
confocal microscopy (February 9th, 10 a.m.- 1 p.m.), lectures on
applications of confocal microscopy and related methods (February 9th,
2 p.m.-7 p.m. with coffe break), experimental sessions on confocal and
multiphoton architectures, experimental sessions with image analysis,
processing, visualization and deconvolution software, roundtables with
speakers (February 10th-11th, 8,30 a.m. - 7 p.m., including lunch
break). Lecturers: Tony Wilson, Erik Manders, Alberto Diaspro, Mario
Faretta, Cesare Usai.
The workshop is limited to 20 students served on first-in-first-out
basis. Only Monday afternoon lectures are open.
The workshop fee is 250 Euros. Some grants will be available on the
basis of real need.
Please register or request information sending an e-mail to
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it using "confocal 5 - genoa" as subject. Please,
specify if you want to attend the Workshop or only Monday afternoon
lectures. Logistic help can be provided upon request. Poster can be
sent upon request in pdf format.
Main sponsor of the Workshop is Nikon Italia, SpA, Firenze. News on the
workshop can be found at www.lambs.it, from January 13th 2004.
Further sponsorship can be proposed to diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it using as
subject "confocal 5 - sponsor".
All my best
Alberto Diaspro
.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 06:43:27 2004



From: Dr. Richard Knight :      knightr-at-cbis.ece.drexel.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 07:46:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Electron Microscopist/Laboratory Manager Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Electron Microscopist/Laboratory Manager Position
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19010

We are seeking a candidate to supervise a microscopy laboratory,
which includes an FEI/Phillips XL30 field emission environmental
scanning electron microscope with an EDAX-EDS and TSL-OIM, an Amray
1830/D4, and a basic TEM (we outsource most TEM work), optical
microscopes, sample preparation facilities, two X-ray
diffractometers, etc. We are moving towards a centralized facilities
model for the entire university and anticipate the move of many of
our laboratories to a new research building by 2005. In addition to
instrument maintenance, user scheduling, supervising and training
users, the person in this position is expected to participate in the
planning and execution of tasks related to the centralized materials
testing and characterization facilities and the relocation of the
labs to the new building. Candidates should have demonstrated
experience with electron microscopy and preferably a degree in
Materials, Physics or Biology. Salary will be commensurate with
qualifications and experience.

The successful candidate will join a technical staff of three within
the department. Detailed information about the department can be
found at http://www.materials.drexel.edu, a copy of our recent
newsletter can be found at
http://www.materials.drexel.edu/Newsletter/fall_03.pdf and our last
annual report at
http://www.materials.drexel.edu/annualreports/Annual%20Report%202002.pdf.
Candidates interested in this position should please submit a CV and
a short career plan to: Microscopy Hiring Committee, Drexel
University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 3141
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104.



Dr. Richard Knight
--
"And the men who hold high places, must be the ones to start..."

Richard Knight, Ph.D., FASM, Auxiliary Professor,
Center for the Plasma Processing of Materials [CPPM],
Drexel University, Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering,
3141 Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19104

"A Ben Franklin Center of Engineering Excellence"

Tel: [215] 895-1844; FAX: [215] 895-2332;
E-mail: knightr-at-drexel.edu [Slow]; knightr-at-coe.drexel.edu [More Reliable]
Web: http://www.materials.drexel.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 06:54:50 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 07:57:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A most interesting thread, and one that is near and dear to my heart.......

I frequently get people new to SEMs, either through personnel changes at
a customer's site or through someone's acquisition of a "new" (used)
SEM. Half of my business is still servicing ETEC Autoscans and as the
new systems get more and more automated, I get more and more comments on
how user unfriendly the Autoscan is. My standard reply is that it is
not at all unfriendly if you understand how an SEM works.

I always start a new user out by building an SEM on paper and guess
what? A scanning electron microscope is not a microscope at all! The
only image formed in its optics is a DEmagnified image of the tip of the
filament! So, what is it? It's a signal generator with one or more
signal processors attached. What I really love about SEMs, especially
with an EDS attached, is that you can tell me what you want to see and I
can probably show it to you. Then we have to sit down and have a long
talk about what is real. Don't tell me, "the computer said...". The
computer doesn't know squat. And I haven't even gotten to specimen
preparation!

The problem goes beyond the need for instant gratification, but may be
related to the definition of success. People aren't interested in
becoming microscopists because organizations no longer hire
microscopists. One must pay too much for the knowledge and experience.
Most are looking for "machine operators" that can be transferred
between different pieces of equipment at will or they simply equate a
microscope with a copier or personal computer. It's merely another tool
to be used in getting the job done. We no longer have someone
designated as the "copier specialist" in the office and having a degree
in computer science is not a prerequisite for operating a computer on
your desktop.

In part, there is simply so much more to know about any piece of
equipment or area of interest, and the areas of interest and expertise
are so intertwined, that one cannot be an expert in all areas, and in
part it is the "Walmartization" of the world. The dive to the bottom,
the least common denominator, the lowest cost, the lowest price. Of
course, if everyone worked for Walmart, no one could afford to do much
shopping............

I don't have any answers. I've always liked to understand any equipment
that I use, whether it's a microscope or an automobile or a dishwasher,
but then, I repair things for a living. I make a living this way
because other people have different interests and drives (and that often
does NOT include an interest or ability to repair things). A hundred
years ago, most people who owned an automobile also had a mechanic in
their employ, and the mechanic often traveled with, or even drove, the
car.

I believe our problem in science will also get worked out. It's
probably going to take some disaster related to bad science to get
people's attention, but in the end, some kind of accommodation will be
worked out. It will be interesting to watch it unfold.

In the mean time, we can all keep trying to spread our knowledge and our
concerns. We subscribe to this listserver because we care. Keep caring!

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 07:15:40 2004



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 14:18:29 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - Webcams for video recording directly from a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Antonio,

I would be careful with using a webcam for professional microscopy. Indeed,
you can adjust a webcam this way that it can be attached to a microscope
(remove the lens and put the ccd in the focuspoint of the lightbeam), but
most webcams are very limited. Limited in shutterspeed, colorrange and fo
sure in pixelresolution. Webcams are often used for amateur-microscopy and
astronomy and give nice results, but if you really want to start analysing
the (live) images or use them for publication, I'm afraid you might get
dissapointed. Also: more expensive, professional camera's will last longer
,give you nicer resultes and a better support after sale will be offered.
Best regards,

Sven Terclavers



On 08-01-2004 23:33, "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Our old camera has to be replaced and I am offered a new one for 1200 euros.
} This may not be too expensive but I wonder if I can get the same results
} with a cheaper webcam attached to the microscope. I understand it is just a
} question of removing the camera objective lense or to make it focus
} infinity.
}
} My question is: can I expect a really better performance from a more
} expensive, purpose-built camera? Quite likely the camera will not be the
} limiting factor in the quality of micrographs, but other factors in the
} microscope and the preparation...
}
} And, which factors should I cosider in the camera? I am thinking of
} sensitivity to poor light, gain, and so.
}
} Thanks for all your comments,
}
} Antonio D. Molina-García
} Inst. del Frio (CSIC) Madrid, Spain
}
} PD. My main purpose for video recording from a microscope is to study ice
} crystal evolution during growth and recrystallization. Image is so, not too
} sharp ever, as the contrast between ice crystals is small. Also the sample
} thickness is larger than when using other sample types and, when the size
} of
} crystals is small, it is even difficult to get any light through...
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 07:31:01 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 08:33:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I very much agree with Sousan about what drives students and their reward systems. However, consider the fact that universities often reflect what is going on in private industry. I would bet that many researchers, scientists and engineers report to people that have scant knowledge of the science they ostensibly oversee. I call this the "MBA Phenomenon." I've observed this trend not only in microscopy. How often must someone in the lab. explain to their "management" exactly what an image is telling them? Quality should start with quality management and that means the management ought to know what they are managing.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

Disclaimer: I am happy to report that the above conditions do not apply to me at the moment.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Sousan Abolhassani [mailto:sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 4:29 AM
To: John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
Cc: microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:13:05 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 09:25:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com (by way of
MicroscopyListServer)

The power of semantics

I am convinced that one of the reasons for a decline in the quality of
microscopy, especially in industry, is semantic. Over the last few
years it has become fashionable for managers to refer to instruments as
"tools". They no longer distinguish between different kinds of
equipment - they are all tools. Tools include: lathes, electron
microscopes, fork lift trucks, x-ray diffraction units,.....

When a person using a tool leaves or is promoted, you need another
person to operate the tool. So you take a person from this tool and put
them on to that tool. Give them a couple of hours to read the manual
and away you go.

I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:39:34 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:42:15 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:

} I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
}
} the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten "smarter"
in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it possible
for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD programs
(which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the machining
process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just keep watch
over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
material. As the microscopes have evolved, they have for the most part not become
easier to operate. Oh sure, some "little" things like adjusting astigmatism,
saturating filaments, even focusing, have been automated. But not the "big" things
like taking a meaningful picture. In fact, it has arguably become more
complicated to use the modern microscopes because they offer a much broader range of
possibilities than the old ones did. More imaging modes, more types of
detectors, etc., create a greater demand for insight and knowledge on the part of
the operator.

John Russ
(visit www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming image analysis workshops
and other information)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:50:32 2004



From: Blackwood, Andrew :      ablackwood-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:53:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Holey Carbon Support Films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

8 January 2004

Mike Delannoy asked whether there is an easier way to make holey carbon
films than Formvar, steam, create the holes in the damaged Formvar film,
carbon coat the holey Formvar and dissolve the Formvar away to leave the
holey carbon film. If there is, we'd like to know about it! This is the
easiest method about which we know.

I must stress, however, that making holey and lacey carbon coated grids is
pure art. People who have decades of experience making support films still
have difficulty at times with the reproducibility of the method, and the
details are entirely a matter of getting the "feel" of the method. Details
of our methods are described on

http://www.2spi.com/catalog/grids/cusctgrd.html

and the pages linked to it.

An easier way to obtain holey carbon support films with a known and precise
distribution of holes is the Quantifoil Micromachined Holey Carbon Grids,
described on

http://www.2spi.com/catalog/grids/quantifoil-carbon-films.html

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies has a very active business making coated grids for
customers throughout the world. We also sell grids and other supplies for
customers who prefer to coat their own grids, and we sell the Quantifoil
Holey Carbon Grids.

Andy

Andrew W. Blackwood, Ph.D.
Vice President, Technical
SPI Supplies
P.O. Box 656
West Chester, PA 19381-0656
Ph: 1 610 436 5400 X108
FAX: 1 610 436 5755
e-mail: ablackwood-at-2spi.com
WWW: http://www.2spi.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:25:16 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 09:27:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,

While I see your point, it is much easier to at produce something with
today's "tools", even your "tools". We can now use PhotoShop or some other
application, load up some Image Tool filters and away you go with image
analysis. My first IA package was very cumbersone and it took some major
training just to load the images and navigate through the software.
Presumably, you would pick some understanding of the subject matter through
osmosis, solid state diffusion or entropy while learning how to operate the
software. Now the software is so easy, anyone can sit down and after a few
minutes start cranking out numbers.... for as meaningful or meaningless as
they may be.

With SEMs, my first one filled a room and producing a photo was a real
chore. You had to have an intimate knowledge of the controls and operating
conditions to get even a poor quality photo. Now you can train a chipmunk
(borrowed from one of my associates) to run an SEM. We have seen PhD's
operate the SEM as a machine and have absolutely zero fundamental knowledge
of the images or EDS data. I am thankful that I can sit down at my SEM and
get a great photo in 5 minutes, but that means anyone else can too.

Al Stone
ASTON

ps. no offense to anyone with a PhD, the point is that just because you can
drive a car doesn't mean you understand the rules of the road or know how
to travel cross country





At 08:42 AM 1/8/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:25:52 2004



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 10:28:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My favorite quote fits well in this discussion:
"It is not enough to believe what you see. You must also understand
what you see.
- Leonardo da Vinci"

I think it has to do a bit with what John just brought up in regards to
the evolution of the microscopes. They have become "easier" to operate,
and in doing so (computer control, mouse operated saturation...) there
is a great disconnect with how the 'system' works. Users learning on an
old EM300 for example have more interactions with the parameters on the
microscope and thus are in a better position to 'understand' what they
are doing in the process of collecting an image.

It is difficult to stress integrity, understanding when teaching. Even
harder is the problem educators have in providing evaluation of the
process, esp when there is a definitive end product (a lab report with
images for example). I would much prefer to be able to grade students
on their process than on the end results, and to provide an objective
progress evaluation that translates onto a final grade. The biggest
problem is that each student is different, has different learning
speeds, different ways of coming to the same end point. So many
variables to deal with. I find that the most effective and simple
question I can present to students and faculty using the facility is
"How do you know [ That ] is what you are looking at?" And sometimes it
becomes a significant frustration level when the individual cannot
convince me. But when they CAN convince me they wind up becoming much
more confident and it forces them to find supporting evidence that they
were too lazy or busy to look for earlier, and then they (more often
than not) are much better at looking (literature sourcing) BEFORE
starting their next project.

Well it is a new year and for some of us a new Semester. Time to start
doing what ever we can do to reverse the trend!

Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor

Central Michigan University Biology Department Microscopy Facility
http://www.cst.cmich.edu/centers/microscopy/

} -----Original Message-----
} From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
} Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 9:42 AM
} To: jae5-at-lehigh.edu; microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} ----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} -----
}
}
} In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:
}
} } I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline
in
} }
} } the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} } must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.
}
} Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
} "smarter"
} in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it
} possible
} for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD
} programs
} (which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the
} machining
} process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just
keep
} watch
} over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
} material. As the microscopes have evolved, they have for the most part
not
} become
} easier to operate. Oh sure, some "little" things like adjusting
} astigmatism,
} saturating filaments, even focusing, have been automated. But not the
} "big" things
} like taking a meaningful picture. In fact, it has arguably become more
} complicated to use the modern microscopes because they offer a much
} broader range of
} possibilities than the old ones did. More imaging modes, more types of
} detectors, etc., create a greater demand for insight and knowledge on
the
} part of
} the operator.
}
} John Russ
} (visit www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming image analysis
} workshops
} and other information)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:28:16 2004



From: John W. Raffensperger, Jr. :      johnr-at-helwigcp.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:25:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-----Original Message-----
} From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 8:42 AM

In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:

} I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
}
} the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
"smarter"
in recent years.

-Reply:

I agree with Alwyn. This is the exact phenomenon I was referring to,
and Machine Tools are one of the specific examples I had in mind with my
original comments to this thread.

As you stated, there are shops where those involved truly understand
what's going on, and things work very well.

In other shops, while these "tools" have indeed become "smarter", the
quality of the output has decreased. This is because, as another post
stated, these newer machines are viewed as a "tool", and an "operator"
is assigned. Because of the intelligence of the machine, the "operator"
who is no longer a "machinist" can get a result. It is often not an
optimal result, either in terms of quality, and/or in terms of
production rate. But a result was obtained. Compounding this,
management has seen this situation "evolve" gradually, so they don't
realize how much the "lower priced" help is actually costing them vs. a
"real" machinist.

Add CAM instructions coming from an engineer who has never even operated
a machine, and things get even more fun. Ask me about the $100,000+
damage one of these "wonder kids" did when they crashed a brand new
machining center. The simulation ran perfectly. Too bad the engineer
forgot that something had to hold the work piece, and this something was
2" think...


John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:36:59 2004



From: Owen, T. Page (Botany) :      tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 10:39:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have a Zeiss 109 TEM available. Scope includes the unique SEM attachment (gives SEM capability with two SEM stages that fit standard Zeiss pin mounts). Turbo pumped; extra gun assembly, filaments, water chiller, manuals, and original orange paint on column included. Has been under full Zeiss/Leo service contract and in use until last month.

Needs to be removed as soon as possible to make room for a new scope.

Preference given to academic institutions. If you want it, you need to make arrangements for shipping, or pick it up in New London, CT. Contact me offline for further information.

Page Owen


************************
T. Page Owen, Jr., Chair
Department of Botany
Connecticut College
New London, CT 06320
860-439-2147
tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:46:30 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:49:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: spurr's resin prep on a sample of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Jamie:

Without a picture of what you are seeing advice is difficult. My
guess is that the section is not flat on the slide and water/stain is
getting underneath a wrinkle in the section and the result is the
"ribbon" you are seeing. Suggestions to solve the problem:

1. A sharp knife. If you are using glass knives use only knives made
"fresh". Glass, being a super-cooled liquid, flows and older knives are
less sharp. Try it!
2. De-wrinkle the sections with 1,2 dicholorethane or chloroform.
3. Float the sections on a larger drop of water on a hot plate. The
larger drop will take longer to evaporate and give the section more time
to be expanded/dewrinkled by heat.
4 Thinner sections? I don't know how thick your sections are but 1-2
microns is the range to shot for.

Geoff

by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:

} Email: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com
} Name: jamie lange
}
} Organization: university of wisconsin
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: milwaukee, wi. usa
}
} Question: we used a spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes, after
} staining and heat-fixing the sections, we see dark ribbon-like
} structures on several specimens. Are these artifacts caused by air
} bubbles and can they be avoided? thank you,
} jamie
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:52:27 2004



From: John :      jmontara-at-earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 23:40:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

This certainly is a f.a.q.!

First of all EVERYONE must realise that the image that they see (even though
they pressed the SE or SEI button) is a mixed SE+BSE image. This means
surface detail from the SE and sub surface detail from the BSE. As you put
the kV up the BSE dominates more and of course as you take the kV down the
BSE are reduced allowing the SE to dominate. I should point out that you
will often see BSE information even at 2kV or less; this being the result of
the SE3 contribution.

Place a thin coating on the surface of a specimen and you increase the
coefficient of emission, the metal being the SE emitter rather than the
original biological material. You do image the specimen surface as that
topography has been followed by the coating procedure. However the BSE come
from a far greater depth below the surface and at any kV, under the wrong
circumstances of WD and spot size, these electrons will contribute to the
image. Should there be structure of differing density, by way of the BSE,
this will show as "shadows" in the background or may even dominate the
image.

In a field emission instrument, of the type where the above lens detector is
available, it is possible to screen out the BSE contribution and display a
pretty pure SE image. I have to say in my 40 years in the business we have
more often gone for "information" rather than "resolution" therefore I do
try to include a degree of BSE to add contrast to the image.

Hope this helps?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Tobias Baskin" {baskin-at-bio.umass.edu}
To: "Steve Chapman" {protrain-at-emcourses.com} ;
{microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 4:51 PM

It appears we have a change in how quality is monitored over the years of
SEM evolution. As may be the case where older SEMs require understanding of
how a SEM works to get an image, to the extent that newer SEMs do not
require this, those operating newer SEMs may not require the prior extent of
knowledge to produce images. Where once the decision to take images were
made by those who knew enough to understand and self monitor quality, that
appears not to be the case anymore. Advances in technology have allowed
images to be taken by operators who do not understand what they are looking
at; one can not expect an unknowing individual to monitor quality.

We can address the quality issue with education or attitude (as proposed by
others on this board). This is a head on approach; a less direct method
would be to change the decision rights or incentives. For example, operators
should not be given the decision right of what to take an image of. For
example, operators should not be rewarded simply on the number of images
taken.

The point is that monitoring of quality has changed, so we should consider
changing decision rights and incentives/rewards. If these three components
of organizational architecture are not in balance, results will be
unsatisfactory.

Sincerely,
John Moore
Montara Industries
919-434-8457

Disclaimers:
1) This framework is described in a book titled "Managerial Economics and
Organizational Architecture", a text that I studied while obtaining my MBA
at the University of Rochester, Class of 2000.

2) In defense of my education and this technique, I cite first that the
poster from Agere on this topic reported not suffering certain difficulties,
and second that in my recent job search I found Agere to be hiring MBA's
(see monster.com directemployers.com, hotjobs.com or flipdog.com).

3) I am not a SEM expert, nor do I have direct experience in this field. I
began following this message board in the interest of selling a defect
review tool that I made a speculative investment in: a SEMVision by Applied
Materials.

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Sousan Abolhassani" {sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch}
To: "John W. Raffensperger, Jr." {johnr-at-helwigcp.com}
Cc: {microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 4:28 AM


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 10:39:09 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 11:48:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-

OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller, and
here is what I have.

I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the column:
about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no gauge for the
chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on the front of the
chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading did not change through
the entire test, and neither did the EM flowmeter.

Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It needs
to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the "Cool" light
was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light, were off.

I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second time....still
no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor light turned on, and
the temperature started to drop, finally. The temperature went all the
way down to 53 degrees F, at which point the "Lo Temp" light went on,
the "Compressor" light went off, and the "Heat" light went on. I turned
up the temp screw a little bit.

At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and the
"Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light never turned
off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to rise. I let it get
to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never turned back on. I tried
turning the screw back to the left to drop the temp setting...it never
went back on.

At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the flow
rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The temperature
gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after turning the 'scope
off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I left to come write all of
you.

Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally came
on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light is on, and
the "Compressor" light is off.

So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I have
no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did circuits in
Physics class...). What do you all think?

Thank you all so much for your help-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 12:23:55 2004



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 13:26:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me that it
would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test the
chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a diffusion
pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell if the Coolwell
has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on another heat load (the carbon
evaporator) then your problem is in the TEM.

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills

At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 13:00:36 2004



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 18:58:50 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers

Well some interesting stuff, I was particularly taken by Peter Tomic's
comments

"Quality should start with quality management and that means the management
ought to know what they are managing."

Via MSA and mostly privately I have had mail from, judging by the mailers
enthusiasm, pretty good EM units. However I have probably visited more EM
units in the world than most of you and I have to say in very many cases
they are just not up to the standards that I would set. Here Peter's
comment hits home to me! You see, as an example, in most units people were
trained when the SEM, TEM or EDS system first arrived in the lab. Now they
have new equipment and I bet they have rarely been trained to operate using
the techniques opened up by the new SEM or TEM? Once trained you know how
to use them is what I see. Guess what, a customer born on a Cambridge 100
SEM still used their new sexy Field Emission SEM in just the same way. A
thick gold coating and 20kV plus was the way to do it, quote "we have
always done it this way". We produced amazing results uncoated at 150,000X
at 1.5kV! Do I make my point? This was a very highly rated government
research laboratory that by perception would be rated as in the top 5 in a
country very well respected for its EM work!

We all believe we run a good unit, my point would be "how do you know?" Do
you have management procedures that are up to date, do you routinely check
the performance of your staff, do you look at the output your users produce,
etc etc? Take a look at www.iaaem.com/mppa1 here you will find a quality
procedure that has been proposed by a group of scientists and Quality
experts from across the world. Answer the questions and total up the points
for your laboratory and lets see how far you area away from Total Quality
Management. What would you suggest is included and maybe together we will
be able to develop procedures that would help sort out what you all, almost,
seem to agree is a bit of a mess!

I am working overseas (Egypt) for the next week so have fun on your own for
a little while.

Regards

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 13:44:05 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:46:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Film processing racks & tanks available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers,

I want to give away the following to a university or non-profit lab or
group:

Plexiglass racks for holding 3.25" x 4" (TEM) and 4" x 5" (Polaroid)
negative film; and
hard rubber tanks for processing negatives.

Interested parties should contact me off-line. Commercial/industrial users
need not respond.

Thanks,

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:04:04 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 15:13:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Owen-

Good idea, except that I don't have a carbon evaporator. :o)

Thanks anyway,
Kathleen
Neurotox Labs
Rutgers University

Owen P. Mills wrote:

} I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me
} that it would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test
} the chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a
} diffusion pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell
} if the Coolwell has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on another
} heat load (the carbon evaporator) then your problem is in the TEM.
}
} Owen
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}
} At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-
} }
} } OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller,
} } and here is what I have.
} }
} } I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the column:
} } about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no gauge for
} } the chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on the front of
} } the chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading did not change
} } through the entire test, and neither did the EM flowmeter.
} } Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It
} } needs to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the
} } "Cool" light was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light,
} } were off.
} }
} } I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
} } No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second
} } time....still no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor
} } light turned on, and the temperature started to drop, finally. The
} } temperature went all the way down to 53 degrees F, at which point the
} } "Lo Temp" light went on, the "Compressor" light went off, and the
} } "Heat" light went on. I turned up the temp screw a little bit.
} }
} } At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and
} } the "Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light never
} } turned off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to rise. I
} } let it get to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never turned
} } back on. I tried turning the screw back to the left to drop the temp
} } setting...it never went back on.
} }
} } At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the flow
} } rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The temperature
} } gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after turning the 'scope
} } off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I left to come write all
} } of you.
} }
} } Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally
} } came on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light is
} } on, and the "Compressor" light is off.
} } So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
} } both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
} } connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I
} } have no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did circuits
} } in Physics class...). What do you all think?
} }
} } Thank you all so much for your help-
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }
} }
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:12:46 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 14:30:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In my experience, CCTV cameras as used in security applications work better than
webcams, but the resolution of both is not that great and you may spend considerable
time on the mechanical aspects of the interfacing and be disappointed with the result.

1200 euros may be well worth it for something that you can just unpack from the box
and be using in a few minutes.

cheers

rtch



Send reply to: "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es}
} From: "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}

Most people store UA in the refrigerator perhaps without
understanding why. UA is photosensitive and degraded by light
(especially fluorescent lighting that contains UV). If you store
aqueous solutions in the light they will eventually precipitate
--first long the sides of the container and then on the bottom. I
have no data, just based on observation.


} We are having one of those debates that we microscopists seem to
} obsess about. The question is whether to store our saturated uranyl
} acetate solution (in dH2O) at room temp or at 4 C. Opinions,
} especially those backed by data, would be welcome. Happy New Year.
} Tom
}
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu


--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:31:49 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:34:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Steve;

Thank you for the honorable mention. If my boss is on this listserver I'll have to polish up the old resume. It's so much fun to be quoted. I feel like Hemingway.

Once again, I don't have ANY of these issues HERE.

I needed a good laugh today.

Peter Tomic
Unknown Corporation, Inc.
Anytown, USA

-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Chapman [mailto:protrain-at-emcourses.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 1:59 PM
To: MSA

Hi Listers

Well some interesting stuff, I was particularly taken by Peter Tomic's
comments

"Quality should start with quality management and that means the management
ought to know what they are managing."

Via MSA and mostly privately I have had mail from, judging by the mailers
enthusiasm, pretty good EM units. However I have probably visited more EM
units in the world than most of you and I have to say in very many cases
they are just not up to the standards that I would set. Here Peter's
comment hits home to me! You see, as an example, in most units people were
trained when the SEM, TEM or EDS system first arrived in the lab. Now they
have new equipment and I bet they have rarely been trained to operate using
the techniques opened up by the new SEM or TEM? Once trained you know how
to use them is what I see. Guess what, a customer born on a Cambridge 100
SEM still used their new sexy Field Emission SEM in just the same way. A
thick gold coating and 20kV plus was the way to do it, quote "we have
always done it this way". We produced amazing results uncoated at 150,000X
at 1.5kV! Do I make my point? This was a very highly rated government
research laboratory that by perception would be rated as in the top 5 in a
country very well respected for its EM work!

We all believe we run a good unit, my point would be "how do you know?" Do
you have management procedures that are up to date, do you routinely check
the performance of your staff, do you look at the output your users produce,
etc etc? Take a look at www.iaaem.com/mppa1 here you will find a quality
procedure that has been proposed by a group of scientists and Quality
experts from across the world. Answer the questions and total up the points
for your laboratory and lets see how far you area away from Total Quality
Management. What would you suggest is included and maybe together we will
be able to develop procedures that would help sort out what you all, almost,
seem to agree is a bit of a mess!

I am working overseas (Egypt) for the next week so have fun on your own for
a little while.

Regards

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com












From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:48:50 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 14:19:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes, alas, we have also seen the "take the picture and run" mentality
here as well.

Like most microscopists who came up through the system, most of us
eagerly learned everything related to microscopy (specimen prep,
knife making, ultramicrotomy, alignment, optimization of the scope,
darkroom, image interpretation, etc). It was fun and we enjoyed
learning and making discoveries. Now, it seems the thrill is gone and
the object is to get into the job market and make big bucks....

MONEY is the motivator and it can be used to influence people. For
example, I point out that microscopy is a marketable skill and I
prove it by giving the names of our former students (in biological
and physical sciences) who got jobs in their discipline since they
could do microscopy. An employer will generally hire the individual
with the better set of skills. Unless they are incredibly naive or
just plain stupid (in which case you wouldn't want them using your
equipment anyway) they will realize the value in learning the
discipline.

More immediately, I point out that it is CHEAPER for them to do their
own microscopy than to hire it out.

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:10:24 2004



From: Fatima Merchant :      merchant-at-adires.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:13:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microphotometry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello:

I was wondering if someone knows where I can find an
monochromator for spectral scanning 400-700 nm
that can be attached to a Zeiss microscope (Axioskop) for
transmitted light imaging ( scanning microphotometry).

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Fatima


{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}

Fatima Merchant, Ph.D.
Lead Research Engineer
Advanced Digital Imaging Research, LLC (Formerly PSI, Inc.)

2450 South Shore Blvd., Suite 305
League City, Texas 77573

Telephone: (281) 535-1889 Ext. 425

Facsimile: (281) 538-7596
Email: merchant-at-adires.com

{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:14:05 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:32:53 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 8, 2004, at 6:42 AM, DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com wrote:

} Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
} "smarter"
} in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it
} possible
} for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD
} programs
} (which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the
} machining
} process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just
} keep watch
} over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
} material.
Dear John,
So now the machine tools are capable of performing as well as the
automated tomography packages we use? In our case, we have to watch
the progress of the program carefully to see that the auto-tracking,
auto-focussing, etc. is working properly, and lately we have also found
that the file made from the tilt series has values that do not match
the exposure we set (to the extent that some of the images were blank).
The take-home lesson is that there still must be knowledgeable
oversight, especially with regard to automated processes, to assure the
quality of the results.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:14:33 2004



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:11:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A lab user has asked me to find some place he can get freeze fracture work
done. Close to San Francisco bay area would be best. Reply to me and I will
pass on the contact info.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:34:44 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 17:07:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Kathleen,
I have had good luck getting a local HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air
conditioning) or Air Conditioning repair shop to fix my Haskris water chillers.
Haskris are good but they do occasionally break down. Sounds like one of your
sensors or accuators is stuck.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Kathleen Roberts" {kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 8:48 AM

Thank you for the advice...I figure $10 isn't too much to spend to try
and fix this thing....if the repair cost starts to escalate, we'll junk
it and call Haskris. :o)

Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Webster, Paul wrote:

} Hi Kathleen,
}
} A word of warning if you plan to try to fix the chiller. We spent nearly $7,000 in a year of repairing our Coolwell chiller before it finally failed for good and we had to buy a new machine. When the second one started giving problems, we used the repair money to buy a new one immediately.
}
} The first one started by developing a leak in the compressor, then the pump failed and finally the thermostat switch. Getting a similar thermostat switch to the one that failed was impossible. We searched through Grainger, talked with refrigeration engineers and could only come up with a close approximation of what we needed.
}
} We had to suffer as the less sensitive thermostat switch attempted to hold the water temperature steady but with much less control. In the end it was when some other part of the machine failed that we decided to replace it. Looking back, the time and expense needed to repair the machine was not worth it.
}
} If you do find your chiller has only a small problem then try fixing it and hope the costs don't escalate.
}
} Regards,
}
} Paul Webster.
}
}
}
}
} Paul Webster, Ph.D.
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles
} CA 90057
} phone (213) 273 8026
} fax (213) 413 6739
} email: pwebster-at-hei.org
}
}
}
}
} } ----------
} } From: Kathleen Roberts
} } Sent: Thursday, January 8, 2004 12:13 PM
} } To: Owen P. Mills
} } Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 16:00:34 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 17:09:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Owen-

Nope, no SEM and no BIG waterbath. I'm going to call Facilities here at
RU-they may be able to devise something to test it.

Thanks-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Owen P. Mills wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} Any heat source that can be water cooled will work, anything with a a
} diffusion pump. SEM? Got a BIG hot water bath? Coil copper tubing
} in the bath, turn the bath heat way up, connect the chiller lines to
} the ends of the coil of copper tubing. Should be a low tech test of
} the chiller.
}
} Owen
}
} At 03:13 PM 1/8/2004 -0500, you wrote:
}
} } Owen-
} }
} } Good idea, except that I don't have a carbon evaporator. :o)
} } Thanks anyway,
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotox Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }
} } Owen P. Mills wrote:
} }
} } } I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me
} } } that it would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test
} } } the chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a
} } } diffusion pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell
} } } if the Coolwell has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on
} } } another heat load (the carbon evaporator) then your problem is in
} } } the TEM.
} } }
} } } Owen
} } }
} } } Owen P. Mills
} } } Electron Optics Engineer
} } } Materials Science & Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } PH 906-369-1875
} } } FAX 906-487-2934
} } } mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} } } http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
} } }
} } } At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:
} } }
} } }
} } } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } }
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } } America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } } On-Line Help
} } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-
} } } }
} } } } OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller,
} } } } and here is what I have.
} } } }
} } } } I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the
} } } } column: about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no
} } } } gauge for the chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on
} } } } the front of the chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading
} } } } did not change through the entire test, and neither did the EM
} } } } flowmeter.
} } } } Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It
} } } } needs to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the
} } } } "Cool" light was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light,
} } } } were off.
} } } }
} } } } I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
} } } } No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second
} } } } time....still no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor
} } } } light turned on, and the temperature started to drop, finally. The
} } } } temperature went all the way down to 53 degrees F, at which point
} } } } the "Lo Temp" light went on, the "Compressor" light went off, and
} } } } the "Heat" light went on. I turned up the temp screw a little bit.
} } } }
} } } } At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and
} } } } the "Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light
} } } } never turned off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to
} } } } rise. I let it get to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never
} } } } turned back on. I tried turning the screw back to the left to drop
} } } } the temp setting...it never went back on.
} } } }
} } } } At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the
} } } } flow rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The
} } } } temperature gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after
} } } } turning the 'scope off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I
} } } } left to come write all of you.
} } } }
} } } } Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally
} } } } came on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light
} } } } is on, and the "Compressor" light is off.
} } } } So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
} } } } both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
} } } } connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I
} } } } have no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did
} } } } circuits in Physics class...). What do you all think?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you all so much for your help-
} } } } Kathleen
} } } } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } } } Rutgers University
} } } }
} } }
} } } Owen P. Mills
} } } Electron Optics Engineer
} } } Materials Science & Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } PH 906-369-1875
} } } FAX 906-487-2934
} } } mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} } } http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
} }
} }
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 16:02:07 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 17:04:41 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 1/8/04 4:44:05 PM, tivol-at-caltech.edu writes:

} The take-home lesson is that there still must be knowledgeable
} oversight, especially with regard to automated processes, to assure the
} quality of the results

You'll get no argument from me about that! The point I was trying to make is
that as the tools have become more complex, many of the tasks that we once
dealt with manually (I learned electron microscopy on a Siemens 1A, right on the
Caltech campus, back in the '50's - and as a result I really know what
alignment means, not just how to push a button) are now so automated that they are
hard to control. We may (but may not) be able to spot problems, but the casual
user (shudder) will not know how to correct them.

I think this thread has been interesting primarily in that everyone who has
commented has been in basic agreement that far too many people who use
microscopes understand them, or the ancillary techniques of specimen preparation,
image analysis, etc., well enough to keep out of trouble or get really optimum
results. Clearly they have other priorities than learning all that stuff. I've
taught image analysis courses now to something approaching 3500 people. Even
assuming they all learned everything I wanted them to, that is a drop in the
bucket. And the people who really need it most don't come - at best they send a
technician whom they can subsequently tell to do the work. But that's another
rant.

John Russ


John Russ




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 17:36:30 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:55:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 8, 2004, at 1:11 PM, Jon Krupp wrote:

} A lab user has asked me to find some place he can get freeze fracture
} work
} done. Close to San Francisco bay area would be best. Reply to me and I
} will
} pass on the contact info.
}
Dear Jon,
If Kent McDonald does not have freeze-fracture, he probably knows
someone in or near Berkeley who does. I don't have his email address
immediately at hand.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 03:06:04 2004



From: Frank Eggert :      Eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 2004 10:03:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve and to all other Listers

The same is with EPMA (Electron Probe Microanalysis) with EDS.
Unfortunately m o s t manufacturers moved their goals and tried to
develop calculation machines as 'black box'. Because of the giant
improvements in calculation speed of our computers (in last decades),
only one button hit is necessary to display the complete analysis result
(in most cases computer needs a tiny part of a second). The unskilled or
less skilled operators believe in these results, without any concern.
Even element concentration result errors of 0.1% and less are taken from
the computer display as the truth. But such a very high 'accuracy' must
be only the statistical part! The computer speed and modern easy to use
software interfaces cover the very complex and not linear relations
between measured signal and element concentration in specimen. The
iteration process to get result convergence and the systematic and
statistic errors with their error propagation during computing process
are not visible.

I think for future, a more open software is going to be a trend. There
must be a possibility to interact between the knowledge of the
microanalyst and the computer program. A visible and easy
understandable feedback for all computing steps is necessary. Of course,
a higher skilled level of the operator is then necessary. This makes
sense only, if the software give the possibility to share the knowledge
with the operator, which is then really become a microanalyst.

A couple of years ago, I found in a very old German book of C. Remigius
Fresenius "Anleitung zur Qualitativen Chemischen Analyse" ("Guidance to
the Qualitative Chemical Analysis") - Braunschweig 1874:

"Es muss daher ein Halbwissen, wie überall
so ganz besonders hier, für schlimmer als ein Nichtwissen erachtet
und vor oberflächlicher Beschäftigung mit der chemischen Analyse
ganz vorzüglich gewarnt werden."

Translation (I hope the feeling is transfered):
Therefore a partial knowledge, like everywhere so particularly here,
must be worse than even ignorance. It should be warned before
superficial concern with the chemical analysis completely and
excellently here.

These words are still valid and can be used nowadays for EPMA and
Electron Microscopy including image interpretation, as well.

Frank Eggert

Steve Chapman wrote:

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 05:35:11 2004



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 05:36:39 -0800
Subject: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My two cents worth on a subject that has quite a few here tossing their own
around.

Having spent 25 years in this area, I've had the opportunity to see the
initial investigations of this practical application of sub-atomic particle
physics in basic research labs as well as its resultant spread to a wide
variety of industries. The use of SEM analysis has become a commodity
because it is so successful in so many areas. Decades ago, many were
researching the potential applications, and in virtually each case, they
found the usefulness.

I can't begin to tell you the variety of areas where my customers have
found the SEM useful. From missle guidance systems to electron beam
lithography. Particulate analysis of howitzer oils to particulate
contaminant analysis of sausage casings. The taxonomical classification of
emerging bacterial species to process control for the laser produced
hologram labels used for software copyright and federal IDs.

The fact is that the SEM has perhaps been too successful. We still hold in
reverence the atomic physicists who can design an atomic bomb or understand
the results from particle accelerators. But the SEM is a child of these
processes that has found wide spread use and the demands for its
application greatly exceed the number of those who really understand the
underlying processes, much less the proper application of the various
subtleties of its application.

I've had to deal with this over the years as the operators I deal with have
changed from those individuals who first brought an SEM into a lab to the
'checklist' operators who know nothing about the instruments other than the
written sequence of actions to turn it on and get an image. One of the
challenges in my work is to try to encourage the SEM operators to learn and
think more about the consequences of each turn of a knob or click of a
mouse. As a maintenance provider, it certainly helps me if my customers
have some understanding of their machines - but more importantly, it helps
them do better work. SEMs aren't the only problems here - x-ray
spectroscopy in fluorescence or the SEM based microanalysis is another area
where operators are often fooled into thinking that results are a simple
matter of a set routine.

The computerization of the instruments is furthering the problem. While
the manufacturers are seeking only to play to the market, how many
operators really understand what's happening when they tell their computer
to bring up an FE gun? It really started with simple improvements such as
electronic gun adjustments. When an operator had to physically move the
gun assembly around, it made some sense that the position of the gun was
important to aim the beam down the column. How many really understand the
use of magnetic fields in the gun to tilt and shift the beam to alignment?
Most that I see at first only know that they have to tweak these knobs and
watch for an improvement in the signal.

Like it or not, this trend will continue. But it is not selective to SEMs
- I see similar trends in every analytical instrument. As these
instruments become more 'user friendly', they are actually lulling users
into thinking that all that is needed is a brief glimpse at the user
manual, which usually only describes how to push the buttons. IR, GC, LC,
MS, ICP and many other techniques that involve complex physics have been
reduced to a simplicity that masks their proper use primarily because those
using them and buying them want simple answers. A material scientist
investigating ceramics doesn't want to have to learn the sub-atomic
particle interactions involved, he just wants pretty pictures that explain
a manufacturing fault and justify the expense of the SEM, not to mention
his job.

'Ease of use' is a marketing tool, and as such, it is a primary goal of
manufacturers. I don't mean to focus on them, because it is a vicious
circle - the customers are demanding it, the manufacturers simply provide
it. In this process, though, what gets lost is that the proper use and
interpretation of these instruments requires more than the customers are
wanting to afford and more than the manufacturers are wanting to admit to.

Now Steve's attention is a little more esoteric - the quality control of a
reviewed paper. But doesn't that just follow from the above? The results,
rather than the process, are what matter most now. More and more we see
examples in studies that are published, only to be later refuted. NASA's
claim a couple of years ago about evidence of ancient bacteria in Mars
based rock found in the Antarctic has, last I knew, been lost in dispute.
Pons and Fleischman, and Gallo, are of course extremes, but how much of
what is accepted as reputable science has later fallen as poor science. A
brief look at medical headlines over the past decade or two can give a good
glimpse. Science itself is supposed to ensure honest and accurate results,
and the assumption of most people, scientists included, is that anything
purporting to be science, promoted by supposed scientists, has some truth.
Innocent until proven guilty, so to say.

Whether authored by lack of knowledge of instrumental techniques, lack of
personal integrity or poor selection of measured variables, many papers get
published that should have been caught by reviewers. That's assuming that
those reviewers are well versed in all aspects of a particular paper. But
given the wide variety of instrumental techniques available today, it can
be a daunting task to find a single person expert in all of the
instrumental techniques presented in a paper, not to mention the basic
field of the paper and mathmatical aspects. If a reviewer isn't well
versed in all aspects and techniques of a particular paper, can he be
expected to catch the kind of cross-discipline problem in your example?
Since much goes unsaid in virtually any paper, should reviewers be
required to request all details of sample provenance - the collection,
preparation and analysis?

By the way, Steve, was there any mention, in the example you cited, whether
the sample was coated or not, or is it an assumption of yours that is
wasn't?



Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174
ph. (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 web http://www.sem.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Chapman [SMTP:protrain-at-emcourses.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 6:42 AM
To: MSA

Hi Listers

As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our
paper
last year would know?

Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and
finding
examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
demonstrates poor quality control!

To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
surface detail.

First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught
that
by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance
surface
features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)

Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping
back
again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?

As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream
of
our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
not about time that we woke up to these facts?

There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
think?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
www.emcourses.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 08:38:55 2004



From: Klughammer :      schmaus-at-klughammer.de
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 15:38:56 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Faye,

I cannot help you with your MAC and the software but
if you need an adapter for your Fuji S602Z and a microscope
I can help you. We have adapters for all kind of digital
cameras either for C-Mount or eye-pieces. Let me know if
you want to know more about it.

Unfortunately our web site is not in english yet. However
you can find the list of digital cameras we support here:

www.klughammer.de - enter the german pages, then open
"Kameraadapter" - "für dig. Kameras" - go to the bottom of
this page there you find "Kameraübersicht (PDF)", open it
and then you get an overview of cameras.


mfg / regards

Anneliese Schmaus
Product Manager

klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
info-at-klughammer.de
www.klughammer.de



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bwoAAM} Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
bwoAAM} Name: Faye Taylor

bwoAAM} Organization: Amateur

bwoAAM} Education: Undergraduate College

bwoAAM} Location: Perth, Western Australia

bwoAAM} Question: Hello there,
bwoAAM} I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
bwoAAM} world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
bwoAAM} purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
bwoAAM} 192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.

bwoAAM} I recently aquired a second hand
bwoAAM} "MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
bwoAAM} use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.

bwoAAM} Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
bwoAAM} hardware that I possess?
bwoAAM} I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
bwoAAM} to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.

bwoAAM} I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it impossible
bwoAAM} with my present configuration?
bwoAAM} i would appreciate any comments please

bwoAAM} Happy New Year Faye

bwoAAM} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 12:46:37 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 11:05:25 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Re: Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jon,
Caroline sent this to me; please pass it along to your colleague.

Begin forwarded message:

} Bill -
}
} Kent gave my old machine to a woman in SF who is running it for hire;
} I don't know anything about her or the quality of her work. Look at
} www.nanoanalytical.netfirms.com .
}
} Caroline
}
} --
} Caroline Schooley
} Project MICRO Coordinator
} Microscopy Society of America
} Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
} Caspar, CA 95420
} Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
} Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
}
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 14:49:55 2004



From: srw6y-at-virginia.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 14:52:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Scion Image "Set Scale"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: srw6y-at-virginia.edu
Name: Steven

Organization: UVA School of Medicine

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Scion Image "Set Scale"

Question: The lab where I currently work uses Scion Image, a freeing
distributed graphical editing program. I have been having a problem
with the "Set Scale" option under the "Analyze" tab. After taking a
snapshot of a known scale under the microscope, I set the scale
accordingly by typing in the known distance and setting the units to
micrometers. When I switch to a different image and wish to use the
same scale, the scale I have just calibrated has been reset to the
default. Also, I have gone under the "file" tab and clicked on
"record preferences," which seems to do nothing. No save box opens,
and I am left with my cursor. In addition, the "revert to save
option," also under the "file tab" is never illuminated.

How can I set the scale so it will be calibrated for all images open
in the editing session?

Thanks and I hope someone out there has some answers.

Steven


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 23:48:35 2004



From: Evelyn Kaplan :      ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 09:55:28 +0400
Subject: [Microscopy] plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Good morning,

I am trying to help a plant biology student with some plant histology on
mango saplings. She is interested in looking at paraffin sections of the
woody stems (LM). Does anyone have suggestions for a processing schedule? I
have my processor set up for human tissues but I could easily extend the
programmes to accomodate the cellular nature of the material. Having some
suggestions would greatly cut down my trial and error!

Many thanks,

Evelyn Kaplan,
Dept of Pathology,
College of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Sultan Qaboos University,
Oman



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 10 00:57:39 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 07:59:11 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Italian Master on Microscopy, last call

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear friends,
the Italian Master on Microscopy at University I Level is starting on
February 2nd, 2004. Only few positions are still available due to a
delayed registration on January 19th, 2004.
Details can be found at "Master Universitario di I livello in
Microscopie ed Analisi Microscopiche in Biologia"
http://www.studenti.unige.it/corsi/master.html and at www.lambs.it.
All my best
Alby

p.s. for further information, please e-mail to diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
using "microscopy master 2004" as subject.



.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 10:11:10 2004



From: hiswayt-at-earthlink.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 10:16:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Electron Microscopy Book-The Cell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} }
} } Does anyone have a copy of the book "The Cell", 2nd Edition, by Don
} } Wayne Fawcett, MD that they are willing to cell. This is a classic book
} } full of electron micrographs. I am a graduate student and I will be
} } taking an electron microscopy lab this semester and I am looking for 1
} } or more copies of this book.
} }
} } Please reply to hiswayt-at-earthlink.net
} }
} } Thank you.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 10:33:04 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 11:38:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Evelyn,

We occasionally embed plant samples for LM and make a few changes over
what is customary for animal tissue. First of all plant samples do not get
as brittle if dehydrated in a TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol)/ETOH series
ending with 100% TBA.

Start with 15 min in each of 25 and 50% ETOH.
Dehydrate for ~ 2-4hrs in each of the following percents:
90 ETOH - 10 TBA
80 ETOH - 20 TBA
65 ETOH - 35 TBA
45 ETOH - 55 TBA
25 ETOH -75 TBA
100% TBA - 3 changes for at least 4hrs total time

Infiltration is helped along by the following:
Put samples into an oven set at a sufficiently high temperature to melt your
paraffin. (I put all the cassettes into a beaker large enough to hold them
so they are completely covered by TBA and then add room for the paraffin.
Add solid paraffin (paraplast) to container and allowing it to gradually
melt and mix with TBA. The TBA gradually evaporated. The paraplast is then
changed a total of 3x over a period of a couple of days prior to embedding
tissue in molds.


It is also advisable to use subbed slides or slides coated with poly
L-lysine (100µg/ml in 10mM tris at pH 8.0). Plant cell walls tend to lift
from the slide surface during staining.

Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy



On 1/10/04 12:55 AM, "Evelyn Kaplan" {ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
}
}
} Good morning,
}
} I am trying to help a plant biology student with some plant histology on
} mango saplings. She is interested in looking at paraffin sections of the
} woody stems (LM). Does anyone have suggestions for a processing schedule? I
} have my processor set up for human tissues but I could easily extend the
} programmes to accomodate the cellular nature of the material. Having some
} suggestions would greatly cut down my trial and error!
}
} Many thanks,
}
} Evelyn Kaplan,
} Dept of Pathology,
} College of Medicine and Health Sciences,
} Sultan Qaboos University,
} Oman
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 12:40:08 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 10:45:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Electron Microscopy Book-The Cell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} }
} } } Does anyone have a copy of the book "The Cell", 2nd Edition, by Don
} } } Wayne Fawcett, MD that they are willing to cell. This is a classic book
} } } full of electron micrographs. I am a graduate student and I will be
} } } taking an electron microscopy lab this semester and I am looking for 1
} } } or more copies of this book.
} } }
} } } Please reply to hiswayt-at-earthlink.net
} } }
} } } Thank you.

If you look at the used book search site www.abebooks.com you'll find
10 copies at prices from $9-$75.
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 09:54:06 2004



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 07:59:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] re: plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Evelyn,

I have used these old protocols with success on woody materials. Put
plant material always requires greatly extended times compared to
animal tissue. Also, if you have problems with tearing of the embedded
tissue during sectioning you can soften the embedded material in
Gifford's solution (below). The difficulty is trying to get the harder
tissue soft enough so it doesn't tear the softer tissue during
sectioning.

The details we used are as follows:
Fixation for 12 to 48 hours in FAA (you might also try Navashin's
fixative which contains chromic acid)
Infiltrate through TBA series (Johansen series) for 2 hours each step
3 changes of pure TBA over 24 hours
3 changes of Paraplast over 24 hours
Embed

Soften the blocks by soaking overnight to 7 days in water at up to 38°C
If this doesn't work try 2 days to 2 weeks in Gifford's (room temp in
fume hood):
20 ml glacial acetic acid
80 ml 60% ethanol
5 ml glycerine
You will have to try the softening times with your own tissue. If you
leave it too long the soft tissue will become macerated. Let me know if
you need more detail.

Good luck,

Kim



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:00:07 2004



From: Shannan Little :      littlesm-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 11:04:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
on this.

Shannan Little
Research Technician/Technicien de recherche
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis /
Microscopie électronique et Analyse d'images
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 403-317-3446
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 403-382-3156
P.O. Box 3000 / CP 3000
Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 4B1
littlesm-at-em.agr.ca
http://res2.agr.ca/lethbridge/emia/index_e.htm



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:00:47 2004



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:05:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] EBSD systems - Users comments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,
We would be interested in users comments about EBSD systems. In
particular, we are looking at the systems offered by HKL and by TSL/EDAX.
Please comment on some of the following points:


* Ease of use

* Robustness/reliability of indexing when dealing with low symmetry
structures

* Calculation of GB misorientations and display of crystallographically
equivalent misorientations

* Possibilities for generating different types of map (e.g. orientation,
GB misorientation, phase)

* Correlation with EDXS data or maps / generation of combined maps


I look forward to hearing from you. Please copy all responses to myself
and to Martin Lee {m.lee-at-earthsci.gla.ac.uk}

Thanks and best wishes

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material- und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany
http://www.tu-darmstadt.de/fb/ms/fg/sf/projekte/maclaren-Dateien/maclaren.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:32:46 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 11:17:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:46:04 2004



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 16:51:23 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,
I suspect that these variations are in the grating itself, not your
TEM. They can be a bit variable, depending on stretching and buckling from
the preparation process. We have a record of measurements of semiconductor
standard samples going back 8 years on our Jeol 120CX TEM, and find a
reproducibility better than 1% over this time.
There is a change in magnification from the centre to the edge of the
micrographs on our machine of about 1%, but our microscope is now pretty
ancient and I would hope that newer machines are much better than this.
We are about to embark on a full gauge capability test on the machine,
which should be interesting. I can let you know the results of the study if
you like.

Richard

_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com [mailto:Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com]
Sent: 12 January 2004 16:18
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238





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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:13:40 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:18:34 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists

In my experience, successful microwave fixation
depends mainly upon the size of the specimen.
How big are these insects? Second, if the larvae
are difficult to penetrate (I have no idea),
longer times may be required. You might also
consider Karnofsky's fixative instead of
Glutaraldehyde (I found that it improved results
in many cases over a wide variety of specimen
types, although I didn't try insects). I would
try lengthening the primary fixation time before
adjusting any of the other processing variables.
Fixation temperatures should never exceed 50°C (I
don't know what this translates to in watts on
your Biowave), or you will get "crispy critters".

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

At 11:04 AM -0500 1/12/04, Shannan Little wrote:
} We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} on this.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:46:35 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:52:27 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Kodak Rapid Fixer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

FYI
I just opened a new supply of Kodak Professional Rapid Fixer and
found larger boxes. After the film switch not so very long ago, I
decided to check the ingredients. "Solution A" now has Ammonium
Sulfite, Sodium bisulfite and Sodium acetate added to what was
printed on the old box. The mixing directions are the same 1999
version. "Solution B" and the CAT # 146 4106 appear to be the same.

Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:53:21 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.

We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper PCI
card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've poked around
the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.

Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera simultaneously?




____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 12:01:24 2004



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 13:06:52 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would recommend the Mag-I-Cal sample for calibrating your TEM. You can do a much larger range of Magnification settings than using a replica. I think that the error is 1 to 2%. In addition, you can do rotation and camera constant calibrations with the same sample.

One thing to minimize the variation in the microscope is to always changed the lenses in the same direction to avoid hysterisis and to make sure that you are at the eucentric point so that the obj lens is the same. Again, you should bring the focus from the same direction.

If the goniometer has not bee removed or the column split, the values that you get from time to time should be very close. We had to run calibration twice a year on the TEM. I can't remember the range specifically, but I think that the variation in mag was less than 0.5% and may have been better than 0.1% when the above criteria was met.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com [mailto:Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:18 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 12:53:50 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 15:15:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

When we manufacture TEM or SEM gratings we make them from a replica of a
master grating. When you dissolve away the replication material there is
some shrinkage, but it should be very limited. The shrinkage is inherent in
the manufacturing, but we cull any which show problematic shrinkage.
It is very similar to our carbon substrate manufacturing.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research manufactures and sells the gratings, replicating
materials and substrates mentioned in this email.

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: {Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com}
To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:17 AM

Frank,
If you are using film, a second variation in measurement may come
from the enlarger when you print the picture. If the negative is not
supported on glass, it can bow in the center and distort the
measurement a bit.

It was a surprise to me to find that if I had set my "MAG. ZERO"
early in the morning and then checked it later in the day, there was
frequently a slight change. It was explained to me that in an old
building, when there was a greater draw of electricity, a change
could be expected and for really important work, I should
re-calibrate. Am I just gullable?

My favorite goof has been the result of not adjusting my tilting
specimen holder to read 0 degrees!

Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
}
} When we manufacture TEM or SEM gratings we make them from a replica of a
} master grating. When you dissolve away the replication material there is
} some shrinkage, but it should be very limited. The shrinkage is inherent in
} the manufacturing, but we cull any which show problematic shrinkage.
} It is very similar to our carbon substrate manufacturing.
}
} John Arnott
}
} Disclaimer: Ladd Research manufactures and sells the gratings, replicating
} materials and substrates mentioned in this email.
}
} Ladd Research
} 83 Holly Court
} Williston, VT 05495
} On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com
} tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
} fax: 1-802-660-8859
} e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: {Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com}
} To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:17 AM
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question
} -----------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
}
} } I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
} } replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
} } 80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
} } where I select my stop and start marks.
} }
} } How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
} } voltage and current?
}
} } Frank Karl



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 15:39:11 2004



From: rahul padmakar panat :      panat-at-students.uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 15:44:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: [Microscopy] vapor pressure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear friends,

I wanted to know the vapor pressure of alumina (Al2O3) at 1200 C.
I know that it will be very low, but an estimate would also
be helpful. I looked at various places (such as CRC handbook of
Physics and Chemistry, Handbook of thermophysical properties of solid
materials, ASM handbook, Vol. 5), but got values above 1950C (e.g.
10^-3 torr at 1950 C).

I want to know the answer to this question since I work at vacuum
levels of 10^-6 to 10^-8 torr and at 1200C. I am interested in knowing
if the aluminum oxide layer on my samples evaporates under these
conditions. One company representative said that it wont, but he did not
have vapor pressure values to support the assertion.

thanks in advance

Rahul Panat
Univ of Illinois
Urbana, IL





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 17:23:47 2004



From: hadden-at-wingate.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:29:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Kodak 4489 EM film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: hadden-at-wingate.edu
Name: Lee Hadden

Organization: Wingate University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Kodak 4489 EM film

Question: Can anyone use some left-over Kodak 4489 electron
microscopy film? I was about to throw out 5 boxes [2 x 10 in. 100
strips per box] during "housecleaning" the other day, but thought
there might be someone who could use it. It has been refrigerated
and unopened for about 12 years. [I used to use it in our old RCA EMU
3G TEM.]
If someone wants it send me your mailing address and I'll ship it out
to you. Otherwise, it will be recycled or trashed.

Lee Hadden
Department of Biology
Wingate University
Wingate, NC 28174

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 17:24:33 2004



From: ryan.davis-at-hydro.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:30:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: quantitative analysis training

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: ryan.davis-at-hydro.com
Name: Ryan Davis

Organization: Metallurgical Engineer

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am interested in getting quantitative analysis training
for analyzing aluminum alloys and oxides. In our lab, we have an
Hitachi S-3500N equipped with an Oxford EDS Spectrometer (model#
7021)that has the INCA and ISIS software packages installed on the
computer. I would like to visit an independent laboratory or
university for a week or two for training. If someone could assist me
I would appreciate it.


Regards,

Ryan Davis

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 18:21:33 2004



From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-stanford.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 16:26:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Microwave fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} } Hello Shannan.
}
} I have some experience with microwave fixation of Drosophila larval
} salivary glands for TEM. First, I run my cold spot -at- 15-18 degrees (this
} removes the heating effect) I fix them in Karnovsky's fix power level
} 1(100 watts on my MW) for 1 minute on-1minute off-1 minute on). Then I
} turn the power up to 450 watts (power level 4 on my machine) and pulse for
} 30 seconds on-30 seconds off-30 seconds on 3 times.They should not get
} hot! I let sit on the bench in fixative for 5 minutes. I have also tried
} this protocol on zebrafish larvae (with vacuum) and they are well fixed.
} The insect probably has a cuticle which may hinder the penetration of the
} fixative. If you can find a way to partially remove this, or inject the
} fix then MW, you might have better results.
} For osmium fix, I repeat the above timetable. I dehydrate under vacuum 45
} seconds -at- power level 3(350 watts) 50, 70,95% once each. I do 100%
} ethanol 3 times followed by 100% acetone before infiltration in resin.
} Hope this helps, JoAnn Buchanan
}
}
} } We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} } acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} } of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} } back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} } information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} } adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} } ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} } times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} } results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} } wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} } on this.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305
650-723-5856




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 19:07:09 2004



From: gregor barclay :      gbarclay-at-hotmail.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 01:12:44 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,
Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the same adventure
when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did not
get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did some
card swapping.

Let me know how you get on.

Greg



Dr. G. F. Barclay
Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
University of the West Indies
St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
West Indies
Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
Fax: 868 645 7132





} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_________________________________________________________________
Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 20:02:39 2004



From: Richard Easingwood :      richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 15:21:11 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Shannan,
Below is a method we have used for a few different insect types, for TEM
not SEM, but the fixing steps we use might provide a useful comparison at
least.

With SEM I assume you won't want to dissect your samples prior to
processing (as we did) so penetration of the solutions may be more of a
problem, but then the requirements for fixation for SEM are also less
stringent. The microwave conditions may be useful guidelines but of course
you'll have to determine the conditions for your own microwave and samples.
If you haven't already got them, I strongly recommend Gary Login's text
(Login, G. R., & Dvorak, A. M. (1994) " The Microwave Toolbook A Practical
Guide for Microscopist" Boston: Beth Israel Hospital) and Kok and Boon's
book "The Microwave Cookbook for Microscopists", Boon and Kok, Coulomb
Press Leiden, 1992.


Method:
Primary fix: 3% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M Na cacodylate, pH 7.4.
Samples dissected out and placed into the primary fix solution (in a small
plastic petri dish).

They were then put into fresh fixative (specimen containers for a Leica AFS
were
used inside the petri dish) and microwave irradiated as follows:

EMS lab microwave oven setup:
-a dummy load of 100ml dw at 20degC in a 250 glass beaker was used (always
in the same place - right rear corner for us)
-temperature limiting off
-100% 'power' (ie magnetron on continuously)
-sample volume for all the fixing steps was 4.0ml
-magnetron was pre-warmed for 2 minutes with a load of 500-600ml water
before each step (unless the oven was used less than 2 minutes earlier).

1) Microwave Primary Fixation:

The sample in 4 ml of primary fix is irradiated for (7s) to give a final
temperature of about 50degC - check the temperature after irradiation (and
obviously before you use your actual samples if you're doing this for the
first time) and alter subsequent run times if necessary. (We use the spot
in the oven we deem to be receiving a steady, high level of radiation).

Allow sample to sit in fume cupboard in fix container for 3 minutes to cool
it to room temp before removing fix.
Replace fix with fresh and repeat the irradiation process twice.
A cool dummy load must used with each run.

Leave samples in fume cupboard for 30 minutes at room temperature.

2) Rinse the samples:

Three X 10 minutes in 0.1M cacodylate buffer.

3) Secondary fixation:

Place 2% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate buffer into fix dish with specimens.
Irradiate for 7s
Leave for 40 minutes in the OsO4.

4) Rinse with 0.1M cacodylate buffer

Three X 10 minutes

The remainder of my method is for TEM preparation so you could do your
usual pre-drying and drying steps then.


Regards,

Richard

}
} We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} on this.
}
} Shannan Little

Richard Easingwood
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago
PO Box 913, Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND
Telephone: 0064 3 479 7301
Facsimile: 0064 3 479 7254
GSM: 0064 21 222 4759
mailto:richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Web site: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 21:28:45 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 22:34:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We swapped cards all over the place. The one in the lowest slot gets
recognized, but not the other. Also, the Roper card doesn't seem to
work in the highest slot, even alone. We could get either card to work
with a firewire camera in another slot, but the Retiga we have isn't low
noise enough for this application.
I think we'll have to temporarily get a second computer in the room.
Thanks.

On Tue, 13 Jan 2004, gregor barclay wrote:

} Michael,
} Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the same adventure
} when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did not
} get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did some
} card swapping.
}
} Let me know how you get on.
}
} Greg
}
}
}
} Dr. G. F. Barclay
} Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
} University of the West Indies
} St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
} West Indies
} Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
} Fax: 868 645 7132
}
}
}
}
}
} } From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} } To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} } Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.
} }
} } We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper PCI
} } card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've poked around
} } the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.
} }
} } Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera simultaneously?
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } ____________________________________________________________________________
} } Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of
} } Med.
} } Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
} } (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} }
} }
}
} _________________________________________________________________
} Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
} http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 22:57:10 2004



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 16:06:42 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] adapters for Leitz M8

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

We have an old Wild M8 dissecting microscope with a 1.0x objective that can
be converted to 0.4x or 1.6x by clipping adapter lenses onto the bottom of
the 1.0x objective. We'd like to get a second set for another M8 because
they get used so much now that they are sometimes needed by both
microscopes. Unfortunately, these are no longer available from Leica,
instead you have to get an adapter and rather more expensive 0.4x and 1.6x
objectives. These new objectives are better quality than the old adapters,
but for our work, the ease of switching with the adapters and low cost
outweighs the marginal increase in quality at the magnifications we're
using.

Anyone willing to part with their adapters, or know of a source? I've
tried ebay and several other used equipment sites with no luck so far.

0.4x adapter lens part no. 367898
1.6x adapter lens part no. 367916

Thanks much,
Rosemary White


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 07:23:25 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:28:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists

Richard makes some good points here. I second
his reading recommendations, and want to let
everyone know that there is a brand new edition
of Kok and Boon, Microwaves for the Art of
Microscopy, Coulomb Press, Leiden, 2003, which
has some very useful new information.

I believe that the use of a dummy load is not
needed in the Biowave, which has a recirculating
water cooler. In any event, the end temperature
of 50°C is the key, and Richard's 3 x 7 minutes
should give Shannon a good starting point for
time in the fixative. I would be a little
concerned about using such a small volume of
fixative as Richard did (4.0 ml), both because of
a fear of exceeding the temperature set point and
because a greater volume of fixative to specimen
ratio seems prudent based upon my experience with
light microscopy specimens. I generally work
with about 11.0 ml of fixative.

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 07:44:35 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:49:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Question for Microtek 2500F scanner users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

O.k., folks following the various recommendations from the list for flatbed
scanners we got an Microtek AtrixScan 2500f.

So now, anyone out there with a Microtek 2500f what is the part number
and where do you get the bulbs from?

Microtek offical position is "There are no user servicable parts. You have
to ship it back - at your cost - to Microtek in California for repair". Now, I am
not shipping a 100lb scanner back to California for a $20 bulb replacment - let
alone doing it every 6-8 months. Surely someone else out there has already
come across this (especially since the bulbs never power down).

Thank you in advance for any help.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."






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