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From: Oldrich Benada :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 12:47:38 +0100 (CET)
Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX DX4 trouble

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,
We have serious troubles with our EDAX DX4. The system does not boot
neither from HDD nor FDD. Moreover, no BIOS beep codes can be heard at the
start of the system. Please, does anybody had to solve similar problem in
the past? Any responses will be welcomed. Thanking everybody in advance.
Oldrich

-------------------------------------------------------
Oldrich Benada
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy
Institute of Microbiology, Acad. Sci. CR
Prague
Czech Republic
-------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 07:47:33 2004



From: Ron Anderson :      randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 08:59:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] embedding soil

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Gordon,

Gordon Vrdoljak wrote an article on preparing soil samples for light and
electron microscopy in the September 2003, vol. 11, no. 5, issue of
Microscopy Today. I'll send you a PDF in a separate email.

Ron Anderson, MT Editor
Free subscription to MT in North America at
http://www.microscopy-today.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gordon Couger [mailto:gcouger-at-provalue.net]
Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 12:23 AM
To: MICROSCOPY BB

I would like to embed soil in place in the field to compare the
disposition of organic matter, roots, microbes, etc in the soil
among various cropping systems with as little disruption to the soil
as possible so it can be studied on both macro and micro levels.

In western Oklahoma I can find the soil when it is extremely dry of
free water nearly every summer. Of course that is a long way from
free of water but I understand there are some embedding resins that
are very tolerant of water.

Does anyone have a protocol that will work for this. I don't expect
to get very much penetration into the face of the soil. A very few
mm would be great.

Thanks

Gordon

Gordon Couger (retried)
Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering
Oklahoma State University
624 Cheyenne Ave gcc (at) couger.com
Stillwater, OK 74075
405 624 2855 cell 405 269 3588
After 3:00 PM Central Time.









From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 08:35:07 2004



From: CrushStone-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 09:46:56 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding soil

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In a message dated 11/1/04 4:35:56 AM Eastern Standard Time,
gcouger-at-provalue.net writes:
I would like to embed soil in place in the field to compare the
disposition of organic matter, roots, microbes, etc in the soil
among various cropping systems with as little disruption to the soil
as possible so it can be studied on both macro and micro levels.

In western Oklahoma I can find the soil when it is extremely dry of
free water nearly every summer. Of course that is a long way from
free of water but I understand there are some embedding resins that
are very tolerant of water.

Does anyone have a protocol that will work for this. I don't expect
to get very much penetration into the face of the soil. A very few
mm would be great.
Gordon:

You should contact Paul Berg of Boston University paulberg-at-bu.edu. He's
developed some methods for making casts and thinsections of soils at archeological
sites.


Steve Stokowski
President-elect
New England Society for Microscopy

Contact Information:
Stone Products Consultants
10 Clark St., Ste. A
Ashland, Mass. 01721-2145
508-881-6364 (ph. & fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 09:10:26 2004



From: Oldrich Benada :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 16:13:36 +0100 (CET)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EDAX DX4 trouble

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thanks for reply.
I am sorry, I did not mentioned the operation system of DX4: It is based
on DOS 6.22 and Win3.11 (wfw).

Now I know, that it is even impossible to enter the BIOS screen on our
DX4.

Oldrich

On Mon, 1 Nov 2004, Warren E Straszheim wrote:

} I have had other EDS systems but not an EDAX. Was the DX4 based on a PDP-11
} or a Windows computer? I used to consider myself quite knowledgeable about
} the PDP-11 and still have one sitting around with some spare parts. I may
} have to refresh my memory some about its procedures.
}
} Warren



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 09:46:35 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 11:02:16 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference-insect structure

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Debby:

A good place to start is "Introduction to the study of insects" by
Borror and DeLong. This is the classic textbook for serious students of
entomology. Your library will have a copy.

Geoff

Debby Sherman wrote:

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mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 11:50:21 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 13:02:59 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM of Haloferax volcanii

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings!
An investigator in my department wishes to have me do TEM on
Haloferax volcanii. I have never worked with an organism that has a
3 M internal salt concentration. Has anyone worked with these? If
so I'd like to know what gives good results or if no good results
have been obtained, please let me know what you tried and did not
work so that I do not make the same mistake.

Thanks for your help,
Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 14:20:19 2004



From: Dohnalkova, Alice :      Alice.Dohnalkova-at-pnl.gov
Date: Mon, 01 Nov 2004 15:25:09 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM of Haloferax volcanii

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi
One of the best books on insect structure is: The Insects: Structure and Function, by R.F. Chapman, 4th edition, 1998, Cambridge Univ. Press. As to Ultrastructure, there is: Insect Ultrastructure, Vol. 1 (1982) and Vol. 2 (1984)By R.C. King and H. Akai, Plenum Press. Hope these will be helpful.
El-Desouky Ammar
Dept. Of Entomology,
The Ohio State University,
Wooster, OH 44691.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}


Hello Pat,

the crucial point at the TEM processing of Haloferax (or any other
extremophil for that matter) is a very gradual desalting and pH
increase. After the initial aldehyde protein crosslinking (we use 2.5%
glut made up in the growth medium), the cells should be brought to the
neutral pH before the dehydration. The rule of thumb is that the
previous solution shouldn't be more than 10x more acidic than the
current wash (~factor of 1). A sadly good indicator of going too fast
is a dramatic pellet size decrease - as the cell membranes rupture due
to the osmotic imbalance.

Good luck,
Alice.


Alice Dohnalkova
Research Scientist
Environmental Microbiology
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
MS P7-50
Richland, WA 99352
(509) 372-0692 office
(509) 376-3654 TEM lab

-----Original Message-----
} From: Pat Connelly [mailto:psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu]
Sent: Monday, November 01, 2004 10:03 AM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com

Greetings!
An investigator in my department wishes to have me do TEM on Haloferax
volcanii. I have never worked with an organism that has a 3 M internal
salt concentration. Has anyone worked with these? If so I'd like to
know what gives good results or if no good results have been obtained,
please let me know what you tried and did not work so that I do not make
the same mistake.

Thanks for your help,
Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 1 18:32:56 2004



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:45:19 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] White Balance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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For a while now I have had a Nikon Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a petrographic
microscope, leading to much user satisfaction.

However, a student just pointed out that the colors aren't quite correct. Initially I couldn't
understand why this could be, as I routinely set the color balance on the camera, using
either a piece of white paper if reflected light is to be used, or a clean glass microscope
slide for transmitted-light work.

But, of course, this student was using the microscope's built-in crossed polars, that's
why she had any colors at all.

Now if the polarising elements are exactly neutral gray I guess all will be well, but if they
aren't, then a color error could be introduced.

No problem, I thought, I'll just set the white balance with the polars in.

Duh.............. no light gets through when the (crossed) polars are in, no light to set the
white balance!

So should I just uncross the polars to set the white balance, then uncross them again
for the petrologist?

Will this be strictly OK?

Or have I, with my very slight understanding of optical microscopy, missed something
else?

Wise (or at least better-informed) counsel, please!

tia

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 02:04:23 2004



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-maia-scientific.com
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 09:15:58 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: CO2 incubator for live cell imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

Doing live cell imaging for a long time while maintaining 37 degrees
Celsius and 5-10% CO2 is a bit cumbersome. However agents such as HEPES
which are used as CO2 buffers to get rid of the excess CO2, increase the
sensitivity of media to the phototoxic effects induced by exposure to
(fluorescent) light.

At my previous job, colleagues did long-time (over the weekend)
time-lapse imaging by using a plexi chamber fitted over the microscope
and a "carbogen" bottle slowly releasing its content inside the incubator.

Beware of the need to refocus the system automaticaly, as temperature
fluctuations will cause a shift of the focus level. It is better not to
cover the entire microsope, but only a small part of it around the cell
culture recipient.

References:

HEPES and other organic buffers can be used effectively with many cell
lines (see Shipman, C. (1969) Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 130: 305).
However, be aware that the compound can be toxic, especially for some
differentiated cell types, so its effects should be evaluated before
routine use (People, C.A., et al., (1982) In Vitro 18: 755).

HEPES has also been shown to greatly increase the sensitivity of media
to the phototoxic effects induced by exposure to fluorescent light:

Zigler, J.S., et al. (1985) Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of
light-exposed HEPES-containing culture medium. In Vitro 21: 282.

Spierenberg, G.T., et al. (1984) Phototoxicity of
N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N-ethanesulfonic acid-buffered culture media
for human leukemic cell lines. Cancer Research 44:2253.

It has been about 4 years since I was involved in this kind of
experiments, so my knowledge may not be up to date anymore.

Regards,

Peter Van Osta

----------------------------------------------
Peter Van Osta, MD

Director Imaging
MAIA SCIENTIFIC
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel, Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 620
Mobile: +32 (0)497 228 725
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621
Email: pvosta-at-maia-scientific.com
Website: www.maia-scientific.com
A Harvard Bioscience Company
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}
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}
} I would like to hear what solutions people have come up with for imaging
} cells for long times while maintaining 37C and 5-10% CO2. We have
} managed to get away with using CO2 Independent medium (Invitrogen) and a
} Bioptechs temp controller for everything up until now. We now have a
} situation where the cells die in this medium but are happy in RPMI in a
} CO2 incubator. I presume that means finding a way to maintain the CO2
} on the stage. I have seen some plexiglass boxes with controllers for
} outrageous $$$ which can do this. Is that the best solution? Any
} suggestions for one to go on a Zeiss Axiovert 200? Thanks- Dave





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 04:38:37 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 07:20:07 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: White Balance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ritchie Sims writes ...

} For a while now I have had a Nikon Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a
} petrographic microscope, ...
}
} However, a student just pointed out that the colors aren't
} quite correct. ..., as I routinely set the color
} balance on the camera, using either a piece of white paper
} if reflected light is to be used, or a clean glass microscope
} slide for transmitted-light work.
}
} But, of course, this student was using the microscope's built-in
} crossed polars, ...
}
} Now if the polarising elements are exactly neutral gray I guess
} all will be well, but if they
} aren't, then a color error could be introduced.
}
} No problem, I thought, I'll just set the white balance with the polars in.
}
} Duh.............. no light gets through when the (crossed) polars
} are in, no light to set the white balance!

I remember, for a Zeiss (POL) Photomicroscope, we never had any problems
by setting the white balance to "tungsten" (i.e., using tungten film and no
filters).

How well do the 2 following settings compare: (1) setting the WB manually
with white paper, and uncrossing the polars slightly, and (2) using the
Coolpix's "tungsten" WB setting (which may be "incandescent")?

hth & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 09:11:15 2004



From: lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 09:21:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Zeiss 109 Film problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,

I was recommended to ask my question to this address from German Neil of
Zeiss.

I just called my local store to order more TP 120 film for my Zeiss 109
TEM. They said the TP 120 film has been discontinued. So I called Kodak
and they said their plant is down and they are no longer going to be making
the TP 120 film. They recommended the TMAX 100 film in 120 size but said
the quality isn't as good as the TP 120. They didn't have any other
compatible film.

Does anyone have any suggestions on film or what to do as I use this film
on a weekly basis to take biopsy images for our local pathologists?

Thank you for your assistance,

Ginger

Ginger R. Hendricks
Electron Microscopy Laboratory Manager & Adjunct Instructor
OSU Center for Health Sciences
Research Department, 1111 W. 17th St., Tulsa, OK 74107
Phone: (918) 561-8232 or lab x8233; FAX: (918) 699-8629
Email: lizard-at-chs.okstate.edu
Website:
http://www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/research/rsp/electronmicroscopy/electron_microscopy_laboratory.htm


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 09:43:23 2004



From: Oldrich Benada :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 16:46:56 +0100 (CET)
Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX DX4 trouble - Thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,
I would like to thank to all, who so kindly respond to my request.
The all replies are on following address:

http://www2.biomed.cas.cz/~benada/DX4_troubles.html

Best regards from Prague
Oldrich



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 11:46:23 2004



From: Stefan Diller :      diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 18:59:16 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Zeiss 109 Film problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Mr. Hendriks,
I would recommend using MACO TP64C. The 120 roll should be available at
around Euro 4 in Germany.
See http://www.mahn.net/PROrth.htm#TP64c
It should be nearly the same quality like Technical Pan.
Sorry but I could not find any data-sheet on the TP64C.
For more information call Mr. Schroeder at Mahn Germany, ++49-40-237008488.

Delivery for the US:
Freestyle Photographic Supplies
5124 Sunset Blvd.
CA 90027 Los Angeles
++1 323 660 3450
++1 323 6663946
info-at-freestylephoto.biz
www.freestylephoto.biz

or
U.S.A. + Canada Gary Bartoloni
1129 Old Sag Harbor Rd.
NY 11932 Bridgehampton
++1 631 7252531
Fax: ++1 631 7258045
gary-at-thelightregistry.com


Best regards,
Stefan Diller



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------
Stefan Diller - Photography
Arndtstrasse 22
D - 97072 Wuerzburg Germany
++49 - 931 - 7848700 Phone
++49 - 931 - 7848701 Fax
++49 - 175 - 717 70 51 Cell-Phone

Websites:
http://www.stefan-diller.com
http://www.assisi.de
Anfahrt: http://www.map24.de/map24/mailMap24.php?mlid=stefan.diller
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 13:25:13 2004



From: yolande.berta-at-mse.gatech.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 14:38:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Manual for an Amray model 1000B SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,
Does anyone have a manual for an Amray 1000B SEM?
Has anyone successfully upgraded an Amray 1000B to acquire images with a
computer (rather than a Polaroid)?

This model SEM has been donated to us, and I'm looking for information, so
that we may decide how to best use it.
Regards,

Yolande Berta
School of Material Science and Engineering
Georgia Institute of Technology
404-894-2545
404-894-9140 FAX





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 15:01:15 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 18:01:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Me again.

It has been suggested to me that the Coolpix may be intrisically incapable of accurately
recording the colors seen in transmitted light from minerals between crossed polars, as
they result from interference phenomena, as opposed to the 'normal' reflected-light
colors of everyday objects for which the camera was designed.

This has a dreadful ring of plausibility to it, and I would welcome the opinions of those
more knowledgeable than I (that's quite a lot of people) as to whether it is likely to be
so; whether 'proper' microscope digital cameras might have the same problem; and
whether this means that film is still king for this application.

cheers

rtch




} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
Organization: Dept of Geology, Univ of Auckland
To: "Listserver" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Date sent: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:45:19 +1300

Colleagues,

Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
And now I would like the information.

The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen - with
a period of about a second. Two questions:

Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
with a simple web search)?

Can anyone tell me whether this really works?

Alwyn
--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 16:58:41 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 16:12:40 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Bethe range

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Rtch
I don't think so. Coolpix may have a hard time trying to interpret
what the colour temperature of such images
is, that is no big surprise, but light is light. Irrespective of the
source, red is red, green is green, etc.
The colour of light transmitted by minerals between crossed polars is
in no way qualitatively different from light of the same intensity and
spectral composition reflected from an "everyday" object, and it would
be surprising if a CCD sensor set to daylight colour balance and a
daylight colour film saw a material difference between them. Having
said that, it is possible that strong polarisation of the
image-forming light is an important issue for CCD imaging. It is
probably irrelevant for film imaging. If your CCD sensor records
different colour-shifts depending on the orientation of the sensor,
then it may be worth experimenting with the insertion of a
quarter-wave plate at 45 degrees to the analyser, or use a circular
polariziing filter as the analyser. (=same thing).

Dr. Chris Jeffree

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
To: "Listserver" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 9:13 PM

Ritchie,

This is indeed a problem with digitals, and, though I'm not in the
minerals-field, a possible solution I came up with now (though I'm not
certain if correct):

Arrange the colours in Photoshop with Hue/Saturation under Image -}
Adjustments -} Hue/Saturation

Here you will change all colours in the same way at the same time by sliding
the spectrum. In other words, if something green has to be red, slide the
first bar over the second one from green to red, all other colours will
follow the same spectrum-shift. Use the spectrum for Master (not seperately
for yellow, green,...). Of course, choosing the new colour depends a lot on
your own observation & interpretation. I'm also a hobby-photographer, and
still prefer the good old negative film...

Best regards,

Sven Terclavers

************************************************
Sven Terclavers
Microscopist - Life Science Imaging
Center for Transgene Technology and Gene Therapy
Campus Gasthuisberg O&N
Herestraat 49
3000 Leuven
Belgium
Tel: +32 (0)16 34 63 71
Fax: +32 (0)16 34 59 90
Email: Sven.Terclaversemed.kuleuven.ac.be
Intranet: http://debian.med.kuleuven.ac.be
Internet: http://www.kuleuven.ac.be/mcm
Internet: http://www.vib.be
************************************************

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 22:14
To: Listserver

Me again.

It has been suggested to me that the Coolpix may be intrisically incapable
of accurately
recording the colors seen in transmitted light from minerals between crossed
polars, as
they result from interference phenomena, as opposed to the 'normal'
reflected-light
colors of everyday objects for which the camera was designed.

This has a dreadful ring of plausibility to it, and I would welcome the
opinions of those
more knowledgeable than I (that's quite a lot of people) as to whether it is
likely to be
so; whether 'proper' microscope digital cameras might have the same problem;
and
whether this means that film is still king for this application.

cheers

rtch




} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
Organization: Dept of Geology, Univ of Auckland
To: "Listserver" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Date sent: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:45:19 +1300

Thanks for your thoughts.

Light is light, but green is not necessarily green, is it?

Aren't there two ways of producing every perceived color?

You can have monochromatic green light, or you can have white light with the
complement of green removed from it, ie there can be (at least) two spectral
compositions that our eyes will perceive as green, red, etc.

And so on for every perceived color.

What I was thinking was that consumer cameras, at least, are made to record the
colors of everyday objects, which are, in general, produced by the latter (subtractive)
process above. But what about the colors in a polarising microscope? Are they
monochromatic or subtractive?

Reminds me a bit of the Asian-printed leaflet that used to come in each packet of those
remarkable 'white' LEDs, which proudly proclaimed the product to produce
"monochromatic white light"!

I think you could well be right about the polarisation affecting a CCD in ways that film
wouldn't be.

cheers


rtch


} From: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk}
To: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
Copies to: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}


On Oct 27, 2004, at 12:24 AM, Sim Kok Swee wrote:

} does anyone know the bethe range and Kanaya Okayama range of carbon
} from
} 20kev to 30kev. Let me know.
}
Dear Sim Kok Swee,
I do have that information in a box in storage--I just moved my stuff
from my old lab in Albany, NY--and I will unpack in due course and give
you the info. Please be patient, and let me know if anyone else has
been able to respond.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 18:05:16 2004



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 18:17:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alwyn,

I too would be very interested in this and I've heard about it also. I
wonder if this would work for someone who does not see stereo, i.e. a person
who uses one eye or the other but cannot fuse the two images.

Damian

-----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 5:02 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Colleagues,

Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
And now I would like the information.

The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen - with
a period of about a second. Two questions:

Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
with a simple web search)?

Can anyone tell me whether this really works?

Alwyn
--
.........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 18:35:21 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 18:47:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alwyn: there was an article on that subject in the September 2004
"Microscopy Today". It's probably out in the archives. The authors
were Nathan and Victor Greenhut, out of Rutgers University. Victor can
be reached at flickerstereo-at-comcast.net, according to the article. I
have no clue whether it works or not, but it would be cool if it did.

Alwyn Eades wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Colleagues,
}
} Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
} And now I would like the information.
}
} The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
} images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen -
} with a period of about a second. Two questions:
}
} Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
} with a simple web search)?
}
} Can anyone tell me whether this really works?
}
} Alwyn


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 18:35:26 2004



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 20:19:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: More on White Balance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

When did color film become capable of that?

John Twilley

Ritchie Sims wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Me again.
}
} It has been suggested to me that the Coolpix may be intrisically incapable of accurately
} recording the colors seen in transmitted light from minerals between crossed polars, as
} they result from interference phenomena, as opposed to the 'normal' reflected-light
} colors of everyday objects for which the camera was designed.
}
} This has a dreadful ring of plausibility to it, and I would welcome the opinions of those
} more knowledgeable than I (that's quite a lot of people) as to whether it is likely to be
} so; whether 'proper' microscope digital cameras might have the same problem; and
} whether this means that film is still king for this application.
}
} cheers
}
} rtch
}
} } From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} Organization: Dept of Geology, Univ of Auckland
} To: "Listserver" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} Date sent: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 13:45:19 +1300
} Subject: [Microscopy] White Balance
} Priority: normal
}
} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} }
} } For a while now I have had a Nikon Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a
} } petrographic microscope, leading to much user satisfaction.
} }
} } However, a student just pointed out that the colors aren't quite
} } correct. Initially I couldn't understand why this could be, as I
} } routinely set the color balance on the camera, using either a piece of
} } white paper if reflected light is to be used, or a clean glass
} } microscope slide for transmitted-light work.
} }
} } But, of course, this student was using the microscope's built-in
} } crossed polars, that's why she had any colors at all.
} }
} } Now if the polarising elements are exactly neutral gray I guess all
} } will be well, but if they aren't, then a color error could be
} } introduced.
} }
} } No problem, I thought, I'll just set the white balance with the polars
} } in.
} }
} } Duh.............. no light gets through when the (crossed) polars are
} } in, no light to set the white balance!
} }
} } So should I just uncross the polars to set the white balance, then
} } uncross them again for the petrologist?
} }
} } Will this be strictly OK?
} }
} } Or have I, with my very slight understanding of optical microscopy,
} } missed something else?
} }
} } Wise (or at least better-informed) counsel, please!
} }
} } tia
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } --
} } Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
} } Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } The University of Auckland
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand
} }
} }





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 18:33:53 2004



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 02 Nov 2004 20:18:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: White Balance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ritchie,

I find it more effective to set the Coolpix' white balance with a neutral grey card rather than a
white surface. Accordingly, for routine transmitted light work, I use partially crossed polars to

set the white balance. For more critical transmitted light, crossed polar work does get
difficult, because the color imbalance seems to be a function of the degree to which the polars
are crossed. I would find a petro slide with minerals at first order grey or ones that are
clouded by inclusions (sercitized feldspars might do, chert, or very fine-grained gypsum with
random orientation. You might also use evenly dispersed particulates of clay or gypsum in
immersion oil), set the polarizers to their crossed position and then rack the stage away to
defocus the subject so that the field is evenly iluminated - then set the white balance.

The final difficulty may be that the CCD doesn't render the monochromatic interference colors
exactly as the eye sees them. For that there is probably no simple solution.

John Twilley



Ritchie Sims wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} For a while now I have had a Nikon Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a petrographic
} microscope, leading to much user satisfaction.
}
} However, a student just pointed out that the colors aren't quite correct. Initially I couldn't
} understand why this could be, as I routinely set the color balance on the camera, using
} either a piece of white paper if reflected light is to be used, or a clean glass microscope
} slide for transmitted-light work.
}
} But, of course, this student was using the microscope's built-in crossed polars, that's
} why she had any colors at all.
}
} Now if the polarising elements are exactly neutral gray I guess all will be well, but if they
} aren't, then a color error could be introduced.
}
} No problem, I thought, I'll just set the white balance with the polars in.
}
} Duh.............. no light gets through when the (crossed) polars are in, no light to set the
} white balance!
}
} So should I just uncross the polars to set the white balance, then uncross them again
} for the petrologist?
}
} Will this be strictly OK?
}
} Or have I, with my very slight understanding of optical microscopy, missed something
} else?
}
} Wise (or at least better-informed) counsel, please!
}
} tia
}
} rtch
}
} --
} Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
} Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
} Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} The University of Auckland
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 18:51:58 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 17:15:03 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM Charge Effect?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Oct 29, 2004, at 2:48 PM, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:

} We have a client looking at various incarnations of carbon (nanotubes,
} etc.) in the TEM and he is very curious about a phenomenon he is
} seeing.
} This involves dark bands traveling rapidly down lengths of carbon
} during
} viewing and is very similar to an effect I have seen commonly when
} looking at crystalline structures. I bet most, if not all, TEM users
} have noted something similar at some point, such as when looking at
} negatively stained specimens when part of the stain has crystallized.
} When the beam hits a new area, there appears to be almost a liquid flow
} within the crystal which stabilizes in a few seconds.
}
} I have never given this much thought, assuming that this is just
} electron flow within the particles somehow affecting the beam to give
} this visual result. Can someone describe the physics, and possibly
} significance, of this?
}
} I know I have probably described this effect very poorly, but if anyone
} wants to take a stab at it, let me know and I will forward a couple
} images to you showing the movement of these bands.
}
} Thanks for any help. Our client seriously wants to understand this,
} and
} I don't have a clue where to start researching it (except to ask you
} guys!).
}
} Happy Halloween,
}
Dear Randy,
I guess this phenomenon can be spooky enough for Halloween.
Diffraction contrast is very dependent on alignment, so when the
lattice is oriented such that many reflections are excited--which
occurs, e.g., along a zone axis--many electrons are scattered and the
image looks dark. Alternatively, for orientations differing by only a
few degrees, few reflections are at the Bragg angle, so there is little
scattering, and the image looks light. Since the beam will heat the
crystal locally and deform it--especially if there are stresses that
have been incorporated into the crystal during its formation--the
orientation can change from one that is strongly scattering to one that
is weakly scattering and vice versa, so dark and light bands will shift
as the local orientations change, then stabilize as these orientations
cease to change. These stripes are called bend contours, and they are
discussed in many EM books. I am still in the process of unpacking my
reference material from Albany or I would be able to give you a few
titles. Without any guarantees, I guess that Electron Microscopy of
Thin Crystals, by several authors of whom Howie and Whelan are two (I
think), and Cowley's Diffraction Physics would discuss this and other
topics of interest to your client.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 19:02:48 2004



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-provalue.net
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 19:15:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: More on White Balance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
: Me again.
:
: It has been suggested to me that the Coolpix may be intrisically
incapable of accurately
: recording the colors seen in transmitted light from minerals
between crossed polars, as
: they result from interference phenomena, as opposed to the
'normal' reflected-light
: colors of everyday objects for which the camera was designed.
:
: This has a dreadful ring of plausibility to it, and I would
welcome the opinions of those
: more knowledgeable than I (that's quite a lot of people) as to
whether it is likely to be
: so; whether 'proper' microscope digital cameras might have the
same problem; and
: whether this means that film is still king for this application.
:

No film or system renders colors exactly as the eye perceives them.
I even have some question if everyone perceives colors the same. It
is well known that some people hear color and see sounds and words
as having color. So there is a lot of room for what perception of
color is. Every part of the system that displays the color has an
effect on the color so it makes things real complicated.

But with digital images if you standardize your lighting, white
balance and lenses, objectives and filters you can apply an
adjustment to all the images as long as it is not too great and
resolve the differences.

You have the same problem with differnet emulsion of color film with
each one giving different results. Doing a 3 negatives set with
filters for yellow, cyan and magenta or red, blue and green and
black and white film are more trouble that most of use are willing
to take. And that still has problems with the chartieriscics of the
filters and inks.

I clearly remember a friend of mine trying to print the cover of a
magazine that was an oil painting and it was impossible to match the
colors with the separation process and inks available to the 4 color
process.

If you can find a fool proof system a better fool is sure to break
it.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcc-at-couger.com

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward any links or information you think might be useful to
others.
Microscope Manual at www.science-info.org





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 2 20:02:47 2004



From: Joan.Sempf-at-med.va.gov (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 20:15:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: :Sorvall TC-2 Tissue Sectioner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Joan.Sempf-at-med.va.gov) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 at 12:00:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Joan.Sempf-at-med.va.gov
Name: Joan Sempf

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:Sorvall TC-2 Tissue Sectioner

Question: To all on the Listserver:

We are interested in doing some preembedding immunogold and do not have a vibratome. We do have a Sorvall TC-2 tissue Sectioner. The problem is we have no instruction manual for it. Is it worth trying to operate this machine? Thanks for your advice in advance.

Joan

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 03:32:20 2004



From: Anna Young :      Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 09:45:01 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?

Thanks,
Anna Young




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 05:55:06 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:52:59 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Anna,
most of the watermarks on negatives are a problem of too fast drying of the
film or use of too less wetting agent (like PhotoFlo from Kodak) in
coherence with calcareous washing water..
Normally - if thegelatine of the film is not disturbed with too hot drying -
you can soak the film again rub it cautiously and do a new drying cycle,
best not above 100° F.

If you are talking about watermarks on the prints the problem is the same.
Use wetting agent as last bath; use a infrared dryer or use a windscreen
wiper blade to get rid of the water on both sides of the prints...

Best regards,
Stefan Diller




----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------
Stefan Diller - Photography
Arndtstrasse 22
D - 97072 Wuerzburg Germany
++49 - 931 - 7848700 Phone
++49 - 931 - 7848701 Fax
++49 - 175 - 717 70 51 Cell-Phone

Websites:
http://www.stefan-diller.com
http://www.assisi.de
Anfahrt: http://www.map24.de/map24/mailMap24.php?mlid=stefan.diller
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Anna Young" {Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 10:45 AM

Becky Holdford writes ...

} Alwyn: there was an article on that subject in the September 2004
} "Microscopy Today". It's probably out in the archives. The authors
} were Nathan and Victor Greenhut, out of Rutgers University. Victor can
} be reached at flickerstereo-at-comcast.net, according to the article. I
} have no clue whether it works or not, but it would be cool if it did.

I believe I also found a reference to a similar e-mail, but as
"flicker_stereo-at-comcast.net". I wrote both and haven't yet heard back.
Perhaps the editors of MT can clear this up(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
{www.micro-investigations.com}



} Alwyn Eades wrote:
}
} }
} }
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -----
} }
} }
} } Colleagues,
} }
} } Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
} } And now I would like the information.
} }
} } The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
} } images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen -
} } with a period of about a second. Two questions:
} }
} } Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
} } with a simple web search)?
} }
} } Can anyone tell me whether this really works?
} }
} } Alwyn
}
}
} --
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
} 972-995-2360
} 972-648-8743 (pager)
} SC Packaging FA Development
} Texas Instruments, Inc.
} Dallas, TX
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 06:30:25 2004



From: Brian.Kirkmeyer-at-iff.com
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2004 22:12:10 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

After seeing this article, I sent an email to this address about three
weeks ago in hopes of learning more about stereo viewing. I have not yet
received a reply. Possibly a more direct mode of contact (i.e. not email)
would be more effective. If I hear something, I'll pass it on.

Kirk

Brian (Kirk) Kirkmeyer, Ph.D.
Research Scientist, Microscopy International
Flavors and Fragrances
732-335-2426 / 732-335-2350 FAX 1515 State Highway
36
brian.kirkmeyer-at-iff.com Union Beach,
NJ 07735-3542





Becky Holdford {r-holdford-at-ti.com}
11/02/2004 07:47 PM


To: Alwyn Eades {jae5-at-lehigh.edu}
cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Alwyn: there was an article on that subject in the September 2004
"Microscopy Today". It's probably out in the archives. The authors
were Nathan and Victor Greenhut, out of Rutgers University. Victor can
be reached at flickerstereo-at-comcast.net, according to the article. I
have no clue whether it works or not, but it would be cool if it did.

Alwyn Eades wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

}
}
} Colleagues,
}
} Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
} And now I would like the information.
}
} The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
} images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen -
} with a period of about a second. Two questions:
}
} Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
} with a simple web search)?
}
} Can anyone tell me whether this really works?
}
} Alwyn


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 06:38:46 2004



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-bwxt.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 06:45:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

It has been a while since I processed negatives, but...
We used to use a wetting agent called "Photoflo" in the final soak/rinse. I
believe it was a Kodak product. Have not tried, but suspect a tiny dose of
(dishwashing) liquid detergent would do the same thing. Use just enough to
cause "sheeting" rather than "beading" of the rinse water. Hang to dry.

Woody



-----Original Message-----
} From: Anna Young [mailto:Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 4:45 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Hello,

I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs once
they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?

Thanks,
Anna Young




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 06:54:59 2004



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 14:10:04 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Software for imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I have here a Sony CCD-camera which is connected to a Matrox Meteor II
framegrabber card. Both in good conditions, no doubt, but is there some
software I can use for live imaging and acquisition? Analysis is a nice
extra, but is not necessary!

I tried to connect to ImageJ, but this did not work out. I need to make it
TWAIN. How does this works/is this possible?

Thanks in advance,

Sven Terclavers



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 07:07:28 2004



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 13:20:44 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Anna,

The books on developing films always recommend using a
rinse agent such as 'Photoflow' to prevent drying marks.

However, in my experience very few people do and very few
have drying problems. It mainly comes down to how you wash
and your water supply. Assuming you are washing in flowing
water for 20-30 minutes with several changes of water during
that time then it is probably 'dirty water'. I assume you
have cleaned the wash tank. Is the water coming from mains
or is it from storage tanks? If the latter try mains water.
Try putting a filter on the tap to remove particulates.

If you really cannot get rid of the problem you may need to
dip the films into a bath of rinse agent before drying.

Good luck,
Ron


On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 09:45:01 +0000 Anna Young
{Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Hello,
}
} I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?
}
} Thanks,
} Anna Young
}
}
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 07:29:38 2004



From: Kestutis Smalinskas :      smalinskas-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 05:42:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Have you tried adding Photoflo to the final rinse
solution? I believe it is made for the purpose of
precluding water marks on film. It's not expensive.
I also use it in the lab as a general wetting agent.

Stu Smalinskas
SKF
Plymouth, Michigan

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Anna wrote:

Hello,

I've been having problems with water marks being left
on my micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone
know of any way I can minimise this?

Thanks,
Anna Young



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
www.yahoo.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 08:03:42 2004



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 09:15:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Alwyn,
Its called Flicker stereo. There was an articla about it the
September issue of Microscopy Today (Nathan & Victor Greenhut). YOu
can download it for free (for non-for-profit private use) from
flickerstereo-at-comcast.net.
haven't tried it myself, but it sounds fun and intriguing.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 08:04:03 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 15:13:39 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Zeiss 109 Film problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

I used the Agfa APX 100-120 for our old SEM. I bought last batch 3 or 4
years ago, but, with the changes on the BW photo market, I don't know if
it will be longer avaible... On the web int seems to exist, but how long ?
Good quality for SEM work, better and cheaper than the T-max. I never
compared it with TP. Before, I used the Kodak VP, but since years
discontinued !

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

On Tue, 2 Nov 2004 lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
}
}
}
} Hello,
}
} I was recommended to ask my question to this address from German Neil of
} Zeiss.
}
} I just called my local store to order more TP 120 film for my Zeiss 109
} TEM. They said the TP 120 film has been discontinued. So I called Kodak
} and they said their plant is down and they are no longer going to be making
} the TP 120 film. They recommended the TMAX 100 film in 120 size but said
} the quality isn't as good as the TP 120. They didn't have any other
} compatible film.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions on film or what to do as I use this film
} on a weekly basis to take biopsy images for our local pathologists?
}
} Thank you for your assistance,
}
} Ginger
}
} Ginger R. Hendricks
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory Manager & Adjunct Instructor
} OSU Center for Health Sciences
} Research Department, 1111 W. 17th St., Tulsa, OK 74107
} Phone: (918) 561-8232 or lab x8233; FAX: (918) 699-8629
} Email: lizard-at-chs.okstate.edu
} Website:
} http://www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/research/rsp/electronmicroscopy/electron_microscopy_laboratory.htm
}
}
} Confidentiality Statement: The information contained in this electronic
} transmission is privileged and confidential and is intended only for the
} use of the recipient listed above. If you are neither the intended
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} for the delivery of this information, you are hereby notified that the
} disclosure, copying, or use for distribution of this information is
} strictly prohibited. Use of privileged or confidential material may result
} in prosecution to the fullest extent of the law.
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 08:14:46 2004



From: Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:27:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: mouse eyes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 3, 2004 at 07:55:04
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu
Name: Stacey Andringa

Organization: University of Cincinnati

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I was given some mouse eyes in a paraformaldehyde/glutaraldehyde phosphate buffered fix. This is called this "chick fix" because it was used to fix chick embryos. I have used this for over 30 years as our standard fix. The researcher is interested in the cornea. Any suggestions about how to proceed. I would normally post-osmicate in 1% osmium tetroxide in Millonig's phosphate buffer, ethanol dehydrate, propylene oxide/Spurr infuse and embed in Spurr resin.
Will this work or not? What should have been done differently? We do not do paraffin embedding in our lab. Would that have been better? I am not sure if the researcher wants TEM.
Thanks for any help.

Stacey Andringa

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 08:34:12 2004



From: ramos-at-argo-tech.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 09:47:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Anna

I assume that you are washing your film in tap water and then drying. You need to give your film a final rinse with a few drops of detergent to act as a wetting agent. You can use ordinary washing liquid but given the cost of film and time it's probably better just to stick with a commercial film wetting agent such as Kodak Photoflo or Ilford Ilfotol (if it's still available). I generally make up a tank of distilled water (rather than tap water) with a few drops of wetting agent for each film. Agar Scientific or any decent photographic shop should supply a range of wetting agents.

It's also possible to use special squeegee tongs to remove most of the water from film (especially 35mm) and further reduce drying marks but if any grit ever gets onto the rubber pads it would cause more damage than drying marks.

If you have old drying marks it may be possible to remove them from film provided that they aren't on the emulsion side. A nice long soak in distilled water and wetting agent can help, although I'm sure other microscopists may have some magic techniques of their own.

Good luck

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
tel no: 0191 515 2872 / 3468
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk

----- Original Message -----
} From: Anna Young {Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk}

Anna,


Wetting agent(usually about a 1 to 2% solution), and proper constant clean
water flow in rinse tank and sufficient duration of rinse are all going to
prevent marks (from water and residual processing chemicals left on
photos). You could also add to that........use of special squeegee tongs.
These are just tongs with soft, inward facing wiper blade areas, which you
pull down along the film surface to remove any excess water.

Sheet film/photos should be hung from one corner of the film to prevent
drying streaks.

One other comment. When using wetting agent such as PhotoFlo (or
whatever).........you should probably NOT use hard water because it may
still leave drying marks. Use distilled water, or bottled
water.........or any other source of SOFT water is preferred.




Kelly A. Ramos
Metallurgical Engineer / Supervisor
Argo-Tech Materials Laboratories
23555 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44117
216-692-5904 or 216-692-5446
(fax) 216-692-5816
http://www.atclabs.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Anna Young [mailto:Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 4:45 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

---

Hello,

I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs
once
they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?

Thanks,
Anna Young




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:00:46 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:14:48 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The final rinse of your film should be in distilled water for a few
minutes, followed by a distilled water rinse containing Kodak's
"photo-flo" wetting agent or a similar product. If the water marks are
on prints, a final rinse in distilled water should solve the problem
(assuming of course that the negatives are not water-marked).

Geoff

Anna Young wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:03:58 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:15:18 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Alwyn,

it is indeed possible to get a 3D-effect from alternating between two stereo
images. The frequency of 1 Hz or so seems to be right. We use that in our
software, but it is only for getting a 3D impression. As you are changing
between two images, it is very hard to make any measurements or get
quantitative results. For that anaglyphic (red-green or red-blue) images are
better or a full stereo reconstruction.

The images have to be aligned so that they tilt around a common pivot point,
otherwise you will get lateral movement as well, which can destroy the 3D
impression.

I just tried it with one eye closed. I did get a 3D impression. So this
would also probably work for people who cannot fuse stereo images.

Alwyn, let me know if you want to try this. I can send you our software as a
demo and you can see for yourself if it works for you. Please contact me
offline to set this up.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 16:02
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Colleagues,

Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
And now I would like the information.

The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen - with
a period of about a second. Two questions:

Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
with a simple web search)?

Can anyone tell me whether this really works?

Alwyn
--
.........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:10:37 2004



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:22:38 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Software for imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Look into StreamPix - http://www.norpix.com/streampix.htm

if they have a driver for your capture board it should work ..

Bill Miller

At 08:10 AM 11/3/2004, Sven Terclavers wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:09:51 2004



From: Greg Strout :      gstrout-at-ou.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 09:21:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alwyn,
Our old Kevex Delta 8000 x-ray/imaging system did this. Basically, you
would aquire two images at different tilts and put them in two different
pages, then alternate between the two pages. The system would then page
between the images and you could adjust the speed between alternations.
The only caveate is that you need to get the right speed for your
viewing, too fast or too slow and the stereo effect is lost. It wasn't
bad at the "right" paging speed although this speed could be a little
different for different people.

Greg

--
--
==================================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
WWW Virtual Library for Microscopy:
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not necessarily those of
the University of Oklahoma
==================================================================





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:21:20 2004



From: Greg Strout :      gstrout-at-ou.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 09:33:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Anna,
We use Kodak Photo-flo just before hanging the negative to dry. It is a
wetting agent that helps to prevent water spots during drying.
Alternatively, you can do a final wash in distilled or RO water before
hanging the negs to dry.
Greg

Anna Young wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
--
==================================================================
Greg Strout
Electron Microscopist, University of Oklahoma
WWW Virtual Library for Microscopy:
http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/
e-mail: gstrout-at-ou.edu
Opinions expressed herein are mine and not necessarily those of
the University of Oklahoma
==================================================================





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:26:41 2004



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:39:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dr. Greenhut is at Rutgers greenhut-at-alumina.rutgers.edu


At 10:12 PM 11/2/2004, Brian.Kirkmeyer-at-iff.com wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:46:29 2004



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:06:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Anna, and others who have responded,

I gave up on Photoflo and other drying aids a long time ago. Seems like no
matter what you do, they all leave water beading up somewhehere on the film
and all those dissolved minerals in the water leave drying marks. Plus,
stuff starts to grow in a stored working solution after awhile, so if you
still want to use Photoflo, mix it fresh from the concentrate every time you
use it.

So after my final water wash of film, I drain excess water off for 15
seconds, then I use a DISTILLED water rinse (not deionized) and get clear
negs everytime with no water marks at all. I keep a plastic tray with cover
filled deep enough with distilled water so that the TEM negs in rack will be
submerged. Just dip in an out a few times and then dry as usual. I change
the distilled water in the tray periodically, depending on number of negs
processed, as some tap water remains in there as a result of rinsing, tho of
course its much diluted compared to tap water.

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra

} Hello,
}
} I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs once
} they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?
}
} Thanks,
} Anna Young



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:46:00 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 08:57:39 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Software for imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Sven,

Frame grabbers are like most cards you put into a computer, they need
drivers. Most imaging acquisition packages support frame grabber cards, but
not all packages support all cards. So you need to find a program that
supports your card. The Meteor II was or is sold in different flavors. Our
software, analySIS, does support some of the flavors. Let me know exactly
what card you have and I can tell you if we support it.

There is, however, a "general" driver that is supported by many software
packages. It's called "TWAIN" ("Thing without an interesting name"). If your
card comes with a TWAIN driver and the software has a TWAIN interface, you
can use that to communicate with the card. Apparently ImageJ has a TWAIN
interface. You should go to the Matrox web site (www.matrox.com) and find
out if they have a TWAIN driver for the card.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Sven Terclavers [mailto:Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be]
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 06:10
To: Microscopy

Hi all,

I have here a Sony CCD-camera which is connected to a Matrox Meteor II
framegrabber card. Both in good conditions, no doubt, but is there some
software I can use for live imaging and acquisition? Analysis is a nice
extra, but is not necessary!

I tried to connect to ImageJ, but this did not work out. I need to make it
TWAIN. How does this works/is this possible?

Thanks in advance,

Sven Terclavers



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 09:52:26 2004



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:05:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Microscopy Today article is:
Greenhut and Greenhut Flicker Stereo: Digital 3D Viewing for PC & Presentation
The article isn't available on line yet, but I've got the issue at
home and could send a photocopy if needed. I think Ron can provide a
pdf file. HIs email is: microscopytoday-at-tampabay.rr.com

Phil

} Becky Holdford writes ...
}
} } Alwyn: there was an article on that subject in the September 2004
} } "Microscopy Today". It's probably out in the archives. The authors
} } were Nathan and Victor Greenhut, out of Rutgers University. Victor can
} } be reached at flickerstereo-at-comcast.net, according to the article. I
} } have no clue whether it works or not, but it would be cool if it did.
}
} I believe I also found a reference to a similar e-mail, but as
} "flicker_stereo-at-comcast.net". I wrote both and haven't yet heard back.
} Perhaps the editors of MT can clear this up(?)
}
} cheerios ... shAf :o)
} Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
} {www.micro-investigations.com}
}
}
}
} } Alwyn Eades wrote:
} }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----
} } }
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -----
} } }
} } }
} } } Colleagues,
} } }
} } } Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
} } } And now I would like the information.
} } }
} } } The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
} } } images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen -
} } } with a period of about a second. Two questions:
} } }
} } } Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
} } } with a simple web search)?
} } }
} } } Can anyone tell me whether this really works?
} } }
} } } Alwyn
} }
} }
} } --
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
} } 972-995-2360
} } 972-648-8743 (pager)
} } SC Packaging FA Development
} } Texas Instruments, Inc.
} } Dallas, TX
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} }
} }
} }

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 10:12:25 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOhio.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 11:24:11 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Software for imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sven:

The Matrox board should have come with the MIL or MIL-lite software.
Both of which allow for live imaging and basic image capture. If it did not you
need to contact the sales person or Matrox and get a copy.




}
} Hi all,
}
} I have here a Sony CCD-camera which is connected to a Matrox Meteor II
} framegrabber card. Both in good conditions, no doubt, but is there some
} software I can use for live imaging and acquisition? Analysis is a nice
} extra, but is not necessary!
}
} I tried to connect to ImageJ, but this did not work out. I need to make it
} TWAIN. How does this works/is this possible?
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Sven Terclavers
}
}



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Director
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 10:09:58 2004



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 10:23:58 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've read the replies on this topic. I assume that you are using some kind of rack that holds your negative in a vertical position. I agree with the use of photoflo. However, make sure that you don't use too much of it and don't stir it so that it froths when you put it in. I almost cut the recommend amount in half. Wait a little time for it to mix with the water. Too much photoflo will also put marks on the negatives. Pour out the water in the washing tank and let it dry in between use. You should also use a filter on your wash water, especially if you mix it with warm water to keep the temperature constant. Check and change the filters.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)




Anna wrote:

Hello,

I've been having problems with water marks being left
on my micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone
know of any way I can minimise this?

Thanks,
Anna Young






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 12:25:07 2004



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 13:37:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: mouse eyes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Stacey,
I have done a fair amount of rat eye preps and have found that
Epon-Araldite i a medium to soft composition works well with eyes,
especially if you'll be cutting for LM. You also need to draw out
the infiltration: 2:1 PO to resin , then 1:1 then 1:2. do each step
overnight (8 hours) on a rotator then 24 hours in a two changes of
resin without accelerator, then one change with accelerator. Its
long, but it works. Its a method given to me by someone who works
with nothing but eyes.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 12:48:22 2004



From: Thomas, Larry (PNNL) :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 10:59:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There's the pricy glasses-free stereo LCD monitor from Stereographics (www.stereographics.com/), or the much less expensive Crystal Eyes system (uses shuttered glasses to view alternated images) from the same company. Viewing alternated images with both eyes isn't stereo in the sense of binocular depth perception, but could give the sense of depth perception available to one-eyed observers. Alternating multiple images in a suitably aligned tilt series of photos, or just riffling through a stack of these images might be better. Readers intrigued by stereo vision might check out "Foundations of Cyclopean Perception" (U. of Chicago Press, 1971) by B. Julesz.

I often view side-by-side displayed stereo images by putting a simple plastic of glass wedge in front of one eye to overlap images in the visual field. The wedges are easy to make and avoid the eye muscle work that unaided viewing requires.


Larry Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
P.O. Box 999
Mail Stop P8-16
Richland, WA, USA

email: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
phone: (509) 372-0793
fax; (509) 376-6308



} ----------
} From: Leona Cohen-Gould
} Sent: Wednesday, November 3, 2004 6:15 AM
} To: Alwyn Eades; Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Alwyn,
} Its called Flicker stereo. There was an articla about it the
} September issue of Microscopy Today (Nathan & Victor Greenhut). YOu
} can download it for free (for non-for-profit private use) from
} flickerstereo-at-comcast.net.
} haven't tried it myself, but it sounds fun and intriguing.
} Lee
} --
} Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
} Sr. Staff Associate
} Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
} Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
} of Cornell University
} voice (212)746-6146
} fax (212)746-8175
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 13:15:42 2004



From: Ron Anderson :      randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 14:27:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You probably saw the "Flicker Stereo" article in the September Microscopy
Today. By the Greenhuts on pg 46.

Ron Anderson

-----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 6:02 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Colleagues,

Some time ago I received a flyer, which - regrettably - I discarded.
And now I would like the information.

The flyer claimed that one can perceive images in stereo if the two
images making the stereo pair are simply alternated on the screen - with
a period of about a second. Two questions:

Can anyone point me to the company involved (I could not locate them
with a simple web search)?

Can anyone tell me whether this really works?

Alwyn
--
.........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu









From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 13:25:48 2004



From: Kevin Ryan :      kevin-at-mediacy.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 16:15:47 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Mike

This seems to, to me, quite incredible.

Isn't the basis of 3D perception that different images are seen by each eye?

Do you have any idea how you could have gotten a 3D perception with one eye closed?

cheers

rtch





} From: Mike Bode {mb-at-soft-imaging.com}
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
Copies to: "'Alwyn Eades'" {jae5-at-lehigh.edu}

Relative motion is quite useful for generating stereoscopic perception
from your images. I've done this with view pairs, as well as with
multiple views or movies generated from 3D data. As mentioned, playback
or flicker rate can be adjusted to provide the best perception. The
viewing angle between the two (or more) views is also important. I've
found success with about 4 to 8 degrees, depending on the sample. Both
angle and speed for best perception vary from person to person.

What is happening is that you perceive motion cues on portions of your
object, translating those into depth based on that relative motion. I
personally get a better depth perception from motion than I do from
stereo fusion (as with the colored glasses); of course, everyones
mileage will vary.

I seem to recall that ~10% of the population uses primarily motion cues
for depth perception, and find stereo fusion of static images rather
difficult. Motion cueing is very useful for these folks, and doesn't
require glasses or a special monitor.

-- Kevin Ryan

kevin-at-mediacy.com
Media Cybernetics, Inc.
Image-Pro
www.mediacy.com


} From: Leona Cohen-Gould
} Sent: Wednesday, November 3, 2004 6:15 AM
} To: Alwyn Eades; Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing
}
}
} Alwyn,
} Its called Flicker stereo. There was an articla about it the
} September issue of Microscopy Today (Nathan & Victor Greenhut). YOu
} can download it for free (for non-for-profit private use) from
} flickerstereo-at-comcast.net.
} haven't tried it myself, but it sounds fun and intriguing.
} Lee
} --
} Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
} Sr. Staff Associate
} Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
} Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
} of Cornell University
} voice (212)746-6146
} fax (212)746-8175



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 15:03:22 2004



From: Lew Rabenberg :      lew.rabenberg-at-mail.utexas.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 15:17:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Depth perception with one eye

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is another effect that produces the perception of depth even when
viewed with only one eye. Check out the "rotoreliefs" at
http://www.aqualoop.com/aqua_sound/delia/Duchamp.html.
--
Lew Rabenberg
University of Texas at Austin




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 15:33:11 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 13:56:16 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Nov 3, 2004, at 1:45 AM, Anna Young wrote:

} I've been having problems with water marks being left on my
} micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can
} minimise this?
}
Dear Anna,
Have you made up fresh photoflo recently? I had best results by
air-drying overnight at room temp, rather than using a hot air drier.
You could also have problems if your rinse water contains something
that does not wash off during the dip in photoflo, such as high mineral
content. In that case, use the house distilled water to rinse the
negs.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 15:40:21 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 14:03:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Nov 3, 2004, at 4:45 AM, White, Woody N. wrote:

} Have not tried, but suspect a tiny dose of
} (dishwashing) liquid detergent would do the same thing.

Dear Woody,
Photoflo is a polyethylene glycol, which does not damage the gel and
is clear. I would be concerned that the detergent might detach the gel
from the plastic backing--especially since that's what happens when you
wash dishes.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 16:10:59 2004



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 17:16:41 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Binocular vision with one eye closed?????

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

kineopsis - see http://www.hirox-usa.com for many examples

Bill Miller

At 02:37 PM 11/3/2004, Ritchie Sims wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 16:29:18 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 22:39:20 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Binocular vision with one eye closed?????

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I've seen/used the alternating image method very effectively on a
system where you wear 'goggles' with LCD eye-pieces. Left and right
eye-pieces are alternately blanked, synchronised with the images on
the screen. The visualisation software included an 'overlay' which
allowed measurements to be taken. Not sure if this is the same sort
of system that Mike Bode is describing - I seem to remember the
frequency was a lot higher, 25 Hz? I don't recall the details of the
software/hardware but the SPM group in Pharmaceutical Sciences at
Nottingham University, UK use the system extensively.

Stereo vision does require two eyes so that each eye 'sees' the same
field from slightly different angles. In viewing stereo pair images,
traditional stereo viewers just ensure each eye is separately
presented with an image that has already be obtained from different
viewpoints - the brain then parallel processes and puts then together
so that you seem to be seeing a single image, rather than two
different images. I guess the brain can manage a similar trick if the
same date is presented in serial.

The interesting question is whether you could get stereo perception
through one eye if your brain had never learnt to process stereo i.e.
if you were born with vision in only in one eye?
--
Larry Stoter
PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 16:34:25 2004



From: Robert A Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 14:46:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Anna,

This may have been addressed in the other responses but...there are two type of water spots. 1. is
mineral or soap residue and can be washed off. 2. Is permanent due to the water molecules lining up
around the edge of the droplet of water creating a charge that causes the silver to migrate through the
emulsion and form a ring of extra density where the edge of the droplet was. So use a small amoant of
Photoflo diluted in distilled water, agitate the film in this solution for 30 sec. and hang to dry.

Bob


On Wed, 3 Nov 2004, Anna Young wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello,
}
} I've been having problems with water marks being left on my micrographs once they have dried.
Does anyone know of any way I can minimise this?
}
} Thanks,
} Anna Young
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 17:32:56 2004



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=F6ran_Axelsson?= :      axelsson-at-acc.umu.se
Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 00:51:53 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Binocular vision with one eye closed?????

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{snip}

} Stereo vision does require two eyes so that each eye 'sees' the same
} field from slightly different angles. In viewing stereo pair images,
} traditional stereo viewers just ensure each eye is separately
} presented with an image that has already be obtained from different
} viewpoints - the brain then parallel processes and puts then together
} so that you seem to be seeing a single image, rather than two
} different images. I guess the brain can manage a similar trick if the
} same date is presented in serial.
}
} The interesting question is whether you could get stereo perception
} through one eye if your brain had never learnt to process stereo i.e.
} if you were born with vision in only in one eye?


3D information is also gained from visual clues as shading (the brain is
assuming light comes from above) and movement (switching between two
pictures).
Stereo perception is only the brains capability to create a 3D model of
the world. Movement and shading is at work at a deep level in the brain,
if there is only one eye working we still process theese clues. So I
believe that a one eyed person would have stereo perception of the world
around him.

There were an interesting story in Scientific American about ten years
ago on this subject.
/Göran



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 18:16:46 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 17:27:11 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Ritchie,

Of course you can't have binocular vision with only one eye. The normal
depth perception is based on stereo vision. However, in this case we add
movement to the equation. Let's say that you have an object sticking out at
you. When you start tilting the image, the top (the part that is closest to
you) moves with a larger amplitude than parts that are further away.
Apparently our brain is clever enough to interpret this as a change in a
parallax and fills in the missing information.

I am not saying that this is quantitative in any way, but it works.

You can test it for yourself. Close one eye and look at an object. You'll
find that the object appears flat - no 3D information. Now move your head to
the left and right (still one eye closed). You'll immediately see that you
get an impression of the 3-dimensionality of the object from the changes.

I have no problem fusing stereo images. I don't know what happens to people
with neurological problems that can't fuse stereo images. Whether they can
use the oscillation method remains to be seen.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 12:37
To: Mike Bode; Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Check out the review of a Sharp monitor in the recent issue of PC
Magazine:
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1647635,00.asp


John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: Leona Cohen-Gould [mailto:lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 03, 2004 6:16 AM
To: Alwyn Eades; Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com


Alwyn,
Its called Flicker stereo. There was an articla about it the
September issue of Microscopy Today (Nathan & Victor Greenhut). YOu
can download it for free (for non-for-profit private use) from
flickerstereo-at-comcast.net.
haven't tried it myself, but it sounds fun and intriguing.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 19:21:51 2004



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 17:34:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Is the concept of paralax lost on everyone.
what do you think causes the depth of field?
so a one eyed person, no matter what the software and
not see in depth.
john



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
www.yahoo.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 20:20:49 2004



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 20:32:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscopy without stereo vision

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm going to jump in here and add my two cents worth. I was born with
strabismus or crossed eyes and as such, as was explained to me, the neural
pathways could not develop so that the two images could be fused in the
brain to form a 3-D view. Although my eyes were straightened at 2, it was
too late for the stereopsis to develop. Consequently I see or I should say
I focus with one eye or the other but not both simultaneously. I can switch
back and forth between the two eyes and see the parallax or shift in the
position of two objects with respect to one another but don't see 3-D. In
this I am not like someone who has only one eye. Another consequence of
this brain damage :-) is that I have learned to compensate using visual cues
to place objects but that requires a multitude of variables including
lighting, shadows, my position and orientation, and probably others that I
don't know about. There are some situations where I am totally unable to
determine positions. That is why I spend a number of years working at a
1MeV TEM lab where stereo was a capability due to the thick sections used
and specimen rotation then I went on to confocal (among other things). At
least I could get the perception of depth using a rotation software package.
I do recall once visiting a ophthalmologist quite a number of years ago who
used a prism system that gave me the impression of 3-D and it was a very
strange sensation.

Damian Neuberger, PhD


Hello Ritchie,

Of course you can't have binocular vision with only one eye. The normal
depth perception is based on stereo vision. However, in this case we add
movement to the equation. Let's say that you have an object sticking out at
you. When you start tilting the image, the top (the part that is closest to
you) moves with a larger amplitude than parts that are further away.
Apparently our brain is clever enough to interpret this as a change in a
parallax and fills in the missing information.

I am not saying that this is quantitative in any way, but it works.

You can test it for yourself. Close one eye and look at an object. You'll
find that the object appears flat - no 3D information. Now move your head to
the left and right (still one eye closed). You'll immediately see that you
get an impression of the 3-dimensionality of the object from the changes.

I have no problem fusing stereo images. I don't know what happens to people
with neurological problems that can't fuse stereo images. Whether they can
use the oscillation method remains to be seen.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 20:25:22 2004



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-provalue.net
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 20:36:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: water marks on negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I haven't done any developing in long time but re-washing the
negatives won't hurt them and may solve the problem it won't make it
worse.

Test any rubbing on an unimportant area of the negative first. Some
emulsions will take a lot more abuse than others. Kodak T-Max is
really tough compared to Agfa Pan. I accidentally washed some T-Max
in 140 f. water and plunge in 70 f. water with no detectable damage.
I think it is designed to be deviled at 100 f. along with color
film. Don't try that with anything else.

As a final wash I used distilled water or deionized water with a
very little bit of photo flow for 1 or two minutes when I lived in a
hard water area. Make sure there are no drops of water left on the
negative and hang it in a dust free environment to dry at normal
temperature. If you are doing a lot of negatives a cabinet with a
HEPA filter is a very good investment. Getting the water off the
film can be done with your fingers, a chamois, sponge, pair of
windshield wipers or any number of ways but they all run some risk
of scratching the negative. With Distilled water and the right
amount of photo flo the water should run off without the need of any
help. But don't leave any drops of water on the film to dry or you
are very likely to find deposits of stuff in the edges of the drops.

I often used very rapid drying methods that include a substitute sea
water to rapidly remove the fixer followed by a 30 second rinse in
water into to similar rinse in alcohol with a bit of photo flow then
forced drying with hot air. before printing then a proper wash the
next day. Having to make a dead line on a newspaper could be
difficult. But I could print a picture in less than 15 minutes of
taking it every time, 10 minutes if I used a press camera and the
negatives are still good 30 years later.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcc at couger.com

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward any links or information you think might be useful to
others.
Microscope Manual at www.science-info.org


} From: "Ron Doole" {ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk}

:
: Dear Anna,
:
: The books on developing films always recommend using a
: rinse agent such as 'Photoflow' to prevent drying marks.
:
: However, in my experience very few people do and very few
: have drying problems. It mainly comes down to how you wash
: and your water supply. Assuming you are washing in flowing
: water for 20-30 minutes with several changes of water during
: that time then it is probably 'dirty water'. I assume you
: have cleaned the wash tank. Is the water coming from mains
: or is it from storage tanks? If the latter try mains water.
: Try putting a filter on the tap to remove particulates.
:
: If you really cannot get rid of the problem you may need to
: dip the films into a bath of rinse agent before drying.
:
: Good luck,
: Ron
:
:
: On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 09:45:01 +0000 Anna Young
: {Anna.Young-at-warwick.ac.uk} wrote:
:
: }
: }
:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
: } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
: } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------
: }
: } Hello,
: }
: } I've been having problems with water marks being left on my
micrographs once they have dried. Does anyone know of any way I can
minimise this?
: }
: } Thanks,
: } Anna Young
: }
: }
: }
: }
:
: ----------------------
: Mr. R.C. Doole
: Department of Materials,
: University of Oxford.
: Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
: Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
: Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
: ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
: http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
: *********************************
:
:
:
:




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 3 21:23:09 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 12:57:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Summary of stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html






Metropolitan Microscopy Society Fall Meeting 2004
=====================================================



The thread seems long enough already. Maybe I can help summarize.

At 01:37 PM 11/03/04, Ritchie Sims wrote:

} This seems to, to me, quite incredible.
} Isn't the basis of 3D perception that different images are seen by each eye?
} Do you have any idea how you could have gotten a 3D perception with one
} eye closed?
} cheers

Depth perception can sometimes be attained with a single view. Shading cues
can help determine relative position. However, that does require many
assumptions and it is not foolproof. Some may remember some planetary
images that were referenced in this forum some months ago. It was unclear
whether features were bumps or depressions. It depended on the
interpretation and relied on knowledge of the lighting.

Depth perception is usually done via "stereo" imaging. Much of this
discussion has equated stereo with binocular vision. That is not strictly
necessary. _What IS needed are two (or more) images for the brain to
process._ In binocular vision, those images are provided simultaneously
through two different channels. However, the same effect can be achieved
through sequential viewing. That can be done via flicker stereo or by
(closing one eye and) moving one's head back and forth, or by taking
sequential EM images.

Mike Bode had said:
} Of course you can't have binocular vision with only one eye. The normal
} depth perception is based on stereo vision. However, in this case we add
} movement to the equation. Let's say that you have an object sticking out at
} you. When you start tilting the image, the top (the part that is closest to
} you) moves with a larger amplitude than parts that are further away.
} Apparently our brain is clever enough to interpret this as a change in a
} parallax and fills in the missing information.
}
} I am not saying that this is quantitative in any way, but it works.

I don't know why Mike thought that disclaimer necessary. I understand that
stereo depth perception can always be quantitative even though it is often
left as qualitative. Our brains normally learn the spatial relationships
(i.e., trigonometry) that allow us to extend our hand some distance to
grasp an object. (Granted, we often update our estimates via continuous
monitoring of the progress.) Even though it seems "intuitive" to our human
systems, with appropriate measurements, any two images taken at known
angles should be able to lead to quantitative measurements of relative
distance or height. If there is a restriction besides incomplete
information (i.e., unknown angles) that limits it to qualitative
perception, I am not aware of it.

Meanwhile, I have found the various approaches to sensing or achieving the
stereo effect to be interesting.

Warren Straszheim
involved in qualitative and quantitative stereo image for many years



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 14:53:29 2004



From: Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 16:07:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM Manufacturers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm reviewing marketing literature for SEMs and I can't seem to find Hitachi
or Amray. Did I miss something? Did they get absorbed into another
company, get out of the SEM business, or am I just using a bad search
engine?

Thanks for any help,

Diane Ciaburri


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 15:13:47 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 16:25:49 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Summary of stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A few additional notes may be helpful.

Certainly it is possible to apply simple trigonometry to determine the
absolute distances of features using a pair of images taken with a known view angle
or spacing between them. But while that is how stereoscopic measurements are
made, it isn't how humans use two-eye views. That process functions by rotating
the eyes in their sockets so that the same feature is brought to the fovea
(the high resolution center of the retina where the highest density of cones
resides). As the center of attention is shifted from one feature in a scene to
another, the rotation of the eyes in their sockets - in or out - provides a
relative signal as to which feature is closer. Only by sequentially treating a
number of points in the scene and building up a mental list of relative distance
order does our brain construct an overall sense of relative depth. And it is
definitely relative, not absolute. We have no transits or even protractors in
our eye sockets, and there is no evidence that anything in human vision is
quantitative as opposed to relative (comparisons). Indeed, in terms of reaching a
finger out to touch something, or judging the approach of an object, there is
evidence that other cues such as relative size, shadows and precedence (if one
object blocks another, it is closer) are more important than stereo vision.

The use of "sequential stereo" by moving the eye point back and forth - or
flipping between two images - is not quite the same as using vergence (the
rotating of the eyes in their sockets). In the sequential case, the more an object
shifts from one scene to the other (or the more it shifts as our head is
bobbed back and forth) provides a measure of relative distance. Many researchers
believe that snakes "weave" back and forth to judge striking distance in this
way, and the many animals that do not have significantly overlapping visual
fields from eyes placed on the sides of their heads probably use similar
techniques for judging close distances. But again, this provides a relative rather than
an absolute measure, and the visual impression has to be built up
sequentially by viewing many points, which is why the flipping back and forth has to be
repeated.

All of this isn't to say that sequential displays of "stereo" images may not
be useful in some situations. The method has the advantages that 1) it can be
used for color images, which red/blue glasses cannot (although polarized
lenses or side by side viewing can); 2) it works for the significant fraction of
people who don't use both eyes equally and can't fuse stereo; and 3) it is
trivially easy to accomplish with any computer display system (you can do it in
Photoshop by putting the two images in layers, and writing an action to turn the
top layer on and off, and the use of layers makes it easy to align the images
properly as well). My own experience with it suggests that the speed of the
flipping has to be individually adjusted for different viewers, and that a
significant fraction of people find the process more distracting than helpful.

John Russ
=======

In a message dated 11/4/04 2:57:02 PM, wesaia-at-iastate.edu writes:

} I don't know why Mike thought that disclaimer necessary. I understand that
}
} stereo depth perception can always be quantitative even though it is often
}
} left as qualitative. Our brains normally learn the spatial relationships
}
} (i.e., trigonometry) that allow us to extend our hand some distance to
}
} grasp an object. (Granted, we often update our estimates via continuous
}
} monitoring of the progress.) Even though it seems "intuitive" to our human
}
} systems, with appropriate measurements, any two images taken at known
} angles should be able to lead to quantitative measurements of relative
}
} distance or height. If there is a restriction besides incomplete
} information (i.e., unknown angles) that limits it to qualitative
} perception, I am not aware of it.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 17:02:21 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 17:14:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM Manufacturers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Diane: Hitachi can be found at http://www.hitachi-hhta.com/. Amray was
bought by someone but I can't remember who. I'm not even sure there
still in the SEM business. Surely someone on the list will know their
fate.

Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 17:18:55 2004



From: pgrover-at-bilbo.bio.purdue.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 18:46:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: stereo scope collimation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Diane
Hitachi very definitely alive.
British and American contacts for Hitachi below:

http://www.hitachi-hitec-uk.com/elecmicro/index.php
http://www.hitachi-hta.com/pageloader.aspx?type=product&id=62&orgid=42

Amray? no idea, sorry.

Chris

Dr. Chris Jeffree


----- Original Message -----
} From: {Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 9:07 PM

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (pgrover-at-bilbo.bio.purdue.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, November 4, 2004 at 09:05:34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pgrover-at-bilbo.bio.purdue.edu
Name: Paul Grover

Organization: Purdue University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] stereo scope collimation

Question: A colleague of mine who works at a stereo dissecting scope much of the day complained of fatigue resulting from his use of the microscope. I did the test I had learned to check the collimation of binoculars, and found the scope significantly out of whack. Can anyone direct me to an article or other resource on this problem/associated dangers/repair?

Paul

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 18:46:00 2004



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 20:18:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: SEM Manufacturers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks, John.

Couldn't have said it better :-)

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 14:26
To: wesaia-at-iastate.edu; Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

As noted, Hitachi is still around. Amray was bought for their FE gun
technology by KLA-Tencor, an American manufacturer of semiconductor
manufacturing equipment. As soon as they bought Amray (around 3 years
ago), KLA let non-FE customers know that they weren't going to provide
service for their instruments anymore. They claimed that they would still
support the FE instruments, I don't know if they still do. They may have
continued producing laboratory SEMs for awhile as Amray's stock was
depleted, but I'm sure they are out of that business now. They do make
specialized SEMs for wafer inspection.

Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Thursday, November 04, 2004 5:15 PM, Becky Holdford
[SMTP:r-holdford-at-ti.com] wrote:
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
}
} Diane: Hitachi can be found at http://www.hitachi-hhta.com/. Amray was
} bought by someone but I can't remember who. I'm not even sure there
} still in the SEM business. Surely someone on the list will know their
} fate.
}
} Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com wrote:
}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
} }
} } I'm reviewing marketing literature for SEMs and I can't seem to find
Hitachi
} } or Amray. Did I miss something? Did they get absorbed into another
} } company, get out of the SEM business, or am I just using a bad search
} } engine?
} }
} } Thanks for any help,
} }
} } Diane Ciaburri
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
} 972-995-2360
} 972-648-8743 (pager)
} SC Packaging FA Development
} Texas Instruments, Inc.
} Dallas, TX
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 4 22:23:04 2004



From: BioMicroWorld 2005 :      applmicro-at-formatex.org
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 05:35:34 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Call for Abstracts - Microscopy of Cells and Biomolecules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

1st International Conference on Environmental, Industrial and Applied
Microbiology (BioMicroWorld-2005)
"Fostering Cross-disciplinary Applied Research in Microbiology and Microbial
Biotechnology"
Badajoz, Spain, March 15-18th, 2005
http://www.formatex.org/biomicroworld2005

Dear colleague,

On behalf of the organizers, you are cordially invited to send abstracts of
your best research for presentation at the forthcoming 1st International
Conference on
Environmental, Industrial and Applied Microbiology (BioMicroWorld-2005),
that will take place in March 2005 in Badajoz (Spain).

Modern microbiology includes a broad variety of scholarly approaches leading
to a better understanding of all living things at the macroscopic,
microscopic/single-cell and nanoscopic/molecular level, producing beneficial
applications in medicine, agriculture, industry, and ecology. Therefore, the
Conference will specially welcome papers reporting interdisciplinary
researchers, relating Microbiology with other Sciences as Physico/chemistry,
Materials Science, Polymer Science, Environmental Sciences, Genetics,
Pharmacology, Microscopy/Imaging Science, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology,
etc. In other words, we are specially (but not exclusivelly) interested in
reports applying the techniques, the training, and the culture of
Microbiology to research areas usually associated with other scientific and
engineering disciplines, from an applied perspective.

Main topics of the Conference are

- Environmental Microbiology, Marine Microbiology, Water/Aquatic
Microbiology, Geomicrobiology
- Industrial Microbiology - Future Bioindustries
- Food Microbiology
- Cell Engineering
- Pharmaceutical Microbiology
- Agriculture, Soil, Forest Microbiology
- Structure and Morphogenesis
- Analytical Techniques, Imaging Techniques, Microscopy
- Microbial Physiology, Metabolism and Gene Expression
- Microbial Biotechnology
- Aerospace Microbiology, Astro(micro)biology
- Quantitative Models and Bioinformatics in Microbiology
- Methods in Basic and Applied Microbiology
- Medical Microbiology
- Microbiology Education

IMPORTANT DEADLINES

Submission of abstracts: November 22th, 2004 (at least for oral
presentations; some more time will be given to abstracts for posters)
Submission of Full Papers for publication: On site

CONFERENCE PUBLICATION - PROCEEDINGS

1. Proceedings Book
A multi-volume book entitled "Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Applied
Microbiology. Biological, Physical, Chemical and Engineering Aspects" will
be published
including Full papers of works (oral, posters) presented at the conference.
The book will be published by an international publisher (now in
negotiations with Elsevier Science), in order to give it a broad
international distribution.

2. Abstracts Book
A separate Abstracts Booklet will be published with abstracts of works
presented at the Conference. It will be distributed at the beginning of the
conference.

3. International Journals special issues
Agreements are being arranged with several international journals, in order
to produce special issues based on very good papers presented at the
Conference.
Manuscripts must be delivered during the Conference, according to the
instructions we will give in due course for each journal. All papers will be
strictly reviewed and treated as regular papers. High quality and high
impact special issues should be produced. Please refer to the conference
website for details.

4. 2005 Current Reviews on Applied Microbiology
A call for mini-reviews on topics covered by the conference will be made by
the end of October. Accepted reviews will be collected in a comprehensive
publication. Authors will receive a free copy of the publication, and its
content will be made freely available shortly after the conference.
Proposals for mini-reviews are welcome from qualified researchers,
irrespective they attend the conference or not.

SPECIAL SESSIONS - WORKSHOPS

- Workshop on Modern Microscopy Techniques in Applied Microbiology
- MICROFACTORIES - Microbial Production of Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals
- Workshop on Biotechnologically Relevant Enzymes and Proteins
- Workshop on Studies on Extracellular Matrix: Biology and Physico/chemistry
- Workshop on Biosurfactants: Purification, Mass production, Applications
- Workshop on Yeast and Bacterial Flocculation: Fundamentals and Industrial
interest
- Worskhop on Microbial Biosensors
- Methods in Cell, Proteins, Enzymes and other Biomolecules Immobilisation
- Workshop on Biohydrogen - Hydrogen production by Microorganisms, as a
Novel Source of Renewable Energy
- Workshop on Bioremediation
- Workshop on Microbial Biopolymers: Synthesis, Characterization and
Applications
- Methods in Cell Adhesion: Classical and Novel Methods, from Macroscopic to
Nanometer scale, from Biochemistry to Nano(bio)technology

PLENARY LECTURES

Plenary talks include:

"Biomarkers to define interactions in the environment and health"
David C. White, Director of the Center for Biomarker Analysis, University of
Tennessee, USA

"Novel time-resolved Fluoresecence based Immunoassays and Real-time PCR
assays in Microbiological Applications"
Timo Lövgren, Department of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry/Biotechnology,
University of Turku, Finland

"The genetics and biochemistry of malonate and 2,4-D biodegradation by
Burkholderia cepacia strain 2a"
Ian James Bruce, Nanobiotechnology Research Group, Istituto di Scienze
Chimiche, Universita degli Studi di Urbino, ITALY / School of Science,
University of
Greenwich, UK

Alexander Steinbuchel, Institut fur Molekulare Mikrobiologie und
Biotechnologie, Munster, GERMANY
[titletobeannounced]

SEARCHING FOR PARTNERS FOR TRANSNATIONAL COLLABORATION PROJECTS?

One of the major goals of this International Meeting is promoting contacts
among researchers and research groups for the creation of Multinational
Thematic and
Research Networks, as well as promoting the future presentation of
collaborative joint projects within some of the EU Operational Programs and
Iniciatives (for
example, the EC Sixth Framework Program). Presentation of results of already
executed or under developement European Projects are highly encouraged,
specially in the case of Interdisciplinary projects. Also initial proposals
for future EU projects are welcome. All ideas/proposals for collaboration
will be included in a booklet entitled "Scientific/Tecnological Offer for
Collaborative Projects", to be distributed at the beginning of the
Conference. If your group wants to be included, please download the form
available at the conference website and send it to the conference
secretariat.

If you have any question or suggestion, please do not hesitate to contact
us.

We hope you find it interesting to present your work(s) at the Conference,
and we certainly hope to receive your abstract(s) by November 22th!

Best regards,

Fatima Penya
BioMicroWorld-2005 Secretariat
Formatex Research Centre
C/Zurbaran, 1 2º Office 1
06001 Badajoz, SPAIN
Phone/Fax: +34 924258615
E-mail: applmicro-at-formatex.org
http://www.formatex.org/biomicroworld2005




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 08:05:15 2004



From: jose.maria.manero-at-upc.es (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 08:18:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: How to prepare samples to see barcteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (jose.maria.manero-at-upc.es) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 5, 2004 at 07:34:24
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jose.maria.manero-at-upc.es
Name: Jose M Manero

Organization: UPC

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] How to prepare samples to see barcteria?

Question: Dear Colleagues

I have samples of tooth decay. My goal would be to have a look on the existing bacteria in the caries through an electron microscopy. Samples were observed by me by means of an ESEM (without any kind of preparation), as well as I have observed them by a SEM (just gold coated samples) and I have never been able to see them. Has anyone experience in how to prepare samples to see the bacteria? Do I have to use conventional methods: deshydratation, fixation, critical points, conductive coatingsÖ?

Than you in advance for your co-operation!

Dr. Jose M Manero
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Departament of Materials Science
UPC. Av Diagonal 647. Barcelona. Spain

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 08:04:53 2004



From: steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 08:17:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: metallographic etchants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 5, 2004 at 07:19:48
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com
Name: Steven Obenour

Organization: GE Aircraft Engines

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for metallographic etchants for Ruthenium and Kovar.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 08:30:53 2004



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 08:44:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: October Archives now on-line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

The October Archives are now on-line at:

http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 08:40:24 2004



From: Mike Nesta :      MNesta-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Fri, 05 Nov 2004 09:52:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM Manufacturers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Diane,

As you have already learned via the list, Hitachi is alive and well and
still very much manufacturing Microscopes. Amray however, was purchased
by KLA-Tencor a number of years ago and has not been in the Lab SEM
business since. There are several Companies around the country who
specialize in retrofitting and re-selling used Amray Microscopes. If
you are interested in them please contact me off-list.

Michael R. Nesta
General Manager
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
800 992-9037
mnesta-at-ebsciences.com
www.ebsciences.com
"Adding Brilliance to Your Vision"



Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I'm reviewing marketing literature for SEMs and I can't seem to find Hitachi
} or Amray. Did I miss something? Did they get absorbed into another
} company, get out of the SEM business, or am I just using a bad search
} engine?
}
} Thanks for any help,
}
} Diane Ciaburri
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 09:54:35 2004



From: Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 11:08:10 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Summary: SEM Manufacturers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks for all your responses!

Summary of SEM Manufacturers:

Amray was absorbed by KLA -Tencor and only makes SEM's for the Semiconductor
industry.
Hitachi SEMs can be found under http://www.hitachi-hta.com/
Leo is back to being Zeiss - http://www.smt.zeiss.com/
Jeol is still http://www.jeol.com/
CamScan now includes Tescan - - http://www.camscan-usa.com
RJ Lee is now Aspex - http://www.aspexllc.com
FEI (was Philips, Electroscan)- http://www.feicompany.com


I have to admit, JEOL gets a gold star in my book. I still love my old 35C
(vintage 1978), and the best part is that JEOL service has kept it up and
running all these years. (No financial interest - just a satisfied
customer.) If anyone has had good or poor service on other brands of SEM,
I'd be interested in hearing about it.

Thanks!

Diane Ciaburri


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 11:39:55 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 13:06:41 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





I'm in the funny position of suddenly and quickly needing to purchase a EDS
system. I have a detector from Thermo Noran and I am considering both the
Noran System 6 and PGT's Avalon 8000. I need imput!

Has anyone experence difficult with either system? Any horror stories I
should know about? Anyone in love with their EDS system? Should I look at
another vendor?

Here's the catch.... I gotta place the order by Dec 1 2004....

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 12:06:03 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Fri, 05 Nov 2004 10:18:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] metallographic etchants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Steven:

I can offer the following suggestions:

Material: Ruthenium (Ru)
Type: Microetching
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (electrolyte): 80 ml distilled water, 20 ml hydrochloric acid, 1
ml hydrogen peroxide (3 %).
Procedure: Few minutes.
Remarks: Ru rich alloys and Ru-Mo alloys.
Reference: G. Petzow, Metallographic Etching, ASM (American Society for
Metals), 1978, p. 45.

Material: Ruthenium and alloys (Ru), osmium and alloys (Os), rhodium and
alloys (Rh)
Type: Macroetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 50 ml lactic acid, 20 ml HNO3, 30 ml HF.
Procedure: Few minutes.
Remarks: Grain contrast.
Reference: Practical Metallography, Vol. 7, No. 6, 1970, p. 314-324.

Material: Kovar, cemented carbides (Fe)
Type: Microetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 100 ml distilled water, 20 g ammonium persulfate.
Procedure: No data.
Remarks: Kovar, Cemented carbides with Co base.
Reference: Practical Metallography, Vol. 10, No. 7, 1973, p. 407-413.

Material: Kovar alloy (Fe)
Type: Microetchant
Method: Electrolytic etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 10 ml HCl (conc.), 90 ml alcohol.
Procedure: 6-10 V.
Remarks: Kovar alloy.
Reference: Practical Metallography, Vol. 10, No. 7, 1973, p. 407-413.

This data was extracted from a Metallographic Etch Database that we
offer. You can get more details on it by typing in the search term
"MED" on our website at www.southbaytech.com. Alternatively, contact me
off-line and I can email the information to you.

DISCLAIMER: South Bay Technology produces equipment and supplies as
described above and, therefore, has a vested interest in promoting their
use.

Best regards-

David

by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 5, 2004 at 07:19:48
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com
Name: Steven Obenour

Organization: GE Aircraft Engines

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for metallographic etchants for Ruthenium and Kovar.


--
David Henriks

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 40 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for Metallogaphy, Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is privileged and confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or disclose this communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling +1-949-492-2600 and delete this message from your system.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 12:50:26 2004



From: Thomas, Larry (PNNL) :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Fri, 05 Nov 2004 11:01:47 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Re: Summary of stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hopefully this isn't 'the last word' because experience suggests that the notion of eye convergence being vital to stereoscopic depth perception is mistaken. Stereo viewing of side-by-side photos with the eyes unconverged (i.e., pointed straight ahead) and essentially kept in fixed positions is easily learned and is practiced by many microscopists and other photointerpreters. Maybe there's research showing that the brain also processes eyeball rotation information, but simply presenting the appropriate (suitably matched and aligned) images containing horizontal parallax to each eye seems sufficient. The essential information is parallax, as is easily demonstrated with stereo imagery that lacks any secondary depth cues such as shadows, occlusion or familiar subjects that we associate with size. Stereo images taken of thin-slice or foil samples in TEM are good examples.

On the subject of depth measurements from stereo images, these can of course be absolute if the projection geometry and magnification are known. The relative depth sense of stereoviewing is not essential for measuring the parallax shifts in stereo images, but it helps a lot for correctly matching corresponding image features in relation to their heights in the perceived stereo model.

Larry


Larry Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
P.O. Box 999
Mail Stop P8-16
Richland, WA, USA

email: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
phone: (509) 372-0793
fax: (509) 376-6308




} ----------
} From: Mike Bode
} Sent: Thursday, November 4, 2004 4:57 PM
} To: 'DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com'
} Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Summary of stereo viewing
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Thanks, John.
}
} Couldn't have said it better :-)
}
} mike
}
}
} Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} Soft Imaging System Corp.
} 12596 West Bayaud Avenue
} Suite 300
} Lakewood, CO 80228
} ===================================
} phone: (888) FIND SIS
} (303) 234-9270
} fax: (303) 234-9271
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} web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} ===================================
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
} Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 14:26
} To: wesaia-at-iastate.edu; Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Summary of stereo viewing
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America To



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 13:25:49 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 14:37:56 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Re: Summary of stereo viewing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Viewing side-by-side images with eyes pointed "straight ahead" turns out not
to be a counter-example. Your eyes don't stay "straight ahead." They move. If
they didn't, your brain wouldn't get any information about most of the scene.
In fact, when looking at any scene your "fovea point" or point of interest
jumps around all the time, very rapidly (and short of using drugs, you can't
suppress this motion). Tests that track eye motion by bouncing a light off the eye
while a scene is being viewed study the "interesting points" that are
selected, and confirm that the consciously remembered information in the scene only
comes from the places that your vision "visited." Even by trying very hard, it
is difficult to get very much information from portions of a scene that appear
only in your peripheral vision. The "jumping around" process also fills in
the blind spot in your retina, where the optic nerve connects, and where there
are no light sensors. So the point-by-point sequential comparison of depths
determined by vergence of the eyes (even if the motion is slight, and even if the
nominal viewpoint of the eyes is straight ahead towards two side-by-side
images) is in fact the way human vision uses stereo. It is fundamentally different
than the measurement of parallax from a set of stereo images as performed by
a computer.

In a message dated 11/5/04 2:02:06 PM, Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov writes:

} Hopefully this isn't 'the last word' because experience suggests that the
} notion
} of eye convergence being vital to stereoscopic depth perception is mistaken.
} Stereo viewing of side-by-side photos with the eyes unconverged (i.e.,
} pointed
} straight ahead) and essentially kept in fixed positions is easily learned
} and is
} practiced by many microscopists and other photointerpreters


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 13:38:02 2004



From: Sandra Masur :      sandra.masur-at-mssm.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Nov 2004 14:51:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Friday, November 5, 2004, at 01:06 PM, Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
}
}
}
}
} I'm in the funny position of suddenly and quickly needing to purchase
} a EDS
} system. I have a detector from Thermo Noran and I am considering both
} the
} Noran System 6 and PGT's Avalon 8000. I need imput!
}
} Has anyone experence difficult with either system? Any horror stories
} I
} should know about? Anyone in love with their EDS system? Should I
} look at
} another vendor?
}
} Here's the catch.... I gotta place the order by Dec 1 2004....
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
}
}
} 330-668-2235 Ext. 238
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 5 14:09:47 2004



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 15:20:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: metallographic etchants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I looked this up in #5 of the Edington Monograph series

Ru:
electropolish
78g CaCl2.2H2O
200 ml water
6ml conc hydrochloric acid
10V reduced to 7V, 0C (200 and 100 mA/mm^2, respectively)

Since this is a chloride, you might want to check with South Bay Technology and looked up Bernie Kestel's acid free electrolyte for polishing.

Kovar is approximately 53%Fe-29%Ni-17%Co.
I can't find one specifically for Kovar. I would look to the literature. there is one for 18%Ni-Co-Mo maraging steels which is 10% perchloric and 90% ascetic.

I would try some of the perchloric-acetic acid etches, for Fe-Ni alloys or perhaps the chromium trioxide-acetic acid ones for steels. Again, the acid-free electrolyte might work.



-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com
[mailto:steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com]
Sent: Friday, November 05, 2004 9:18 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 5, 2004 at 07:19:48
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: steven.obenour-at-unison.ae.ge.com
Name: Steven Obenour

Organization: GE Aircraft Engines

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for metallographic etchants for Ruthenium and Kovar.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 05:29:52 2004



From: Kart Padari :      kartp-at-ut.ee
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 13:45:23 +0200 (EET)
Subject: [Microscopy] LM-mounting medium!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

I would like to know what mounting medium is used for araldite or epon
semithick sections (2-5 micrometer).
We have used canadian balsam so far but this causes wrinkles of sections
under the cover glasses.
So, my question is:
Is there known anything else beside canadian balsam for mounting semithick
epon/araldite sections to study with LM?


Kärt Padari
kartp-at-ut.ee
University of Tartu
Estonia





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 07:26:15 2004



From: somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 07:42:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: breaking seed dormancy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, November 8, 2004 at 02:26:04
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com
Name: kheiri

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] break seed dormancy

Question: I am doing experiments on seed growth on verbascum.
does anybody know how to break the dormancy of the seeds?
many thanks
Somayyeh

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 07:54:00 2004



From: Beth Richardson :      beth-at-plantbio.uga.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 10:11:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] trackball not tracking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Why not use the same resin?
We do. Put some left-over resin from an embedding run into a 1ml syringe.
Ideal for controlled dropwise delivery.
You can seal with Parafilm and keep a stock syringe or two in the freezer
for future use.

Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Kart Padari" {kartp-at-ut.ee}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Monday, November 08, 2004 11:45 AM

Hi all,
I have a problem with my TEM. It has a trackball system but the system
is not tracking. I think the sensors are not working.
Here's a description of the system - it resides in a little black box
and is connected to the electronics via a cord that snaps into the box
very much like a telephone cord snaps into a phone:
The X and Y coordinates consist of two separate bars.
The trackball sits between the bars .
On each bar is a wheel that has small holes in it.
As the ball is turned it turns the bars that turn the wheels.
A sensor sits in front of each wheel and coordinates the movement of
the sample. The bars turn, the wheels turn, but there is no specimen
movement.

I want to understand how it works to better understand why it failed
and mainly how it might be fixed.

thanks in advance for any help.
best,
Beth

**********************************************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Plant Biology Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-7271

Phone - (706) 542-1790 & FAX - (706) 542-1805
http://www.plantbio.uga.edu/emlab

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
*******************************************************************

"And it's only the giving that makes you what you are".
Wond'ring Aloud, Jethro Tull (Aqualung)

************************************************************************
***




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 08:55:12 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 10:13:09 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM-mounting medium!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Xlyene-based mounting media often cause wrinkles in 'thick' sections.
Lots of labs just use a drop of the same embedding meduim (with
accelerator) the section is in, epon, araldite or Spurr.

Geoff

Kart Padari wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 09:56:34 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 11:12:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM-mounting medium!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I simply use Permount.

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Center for Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org



-----Original Message-----
} From: Kart Padari [mailto:kartp-at-ut.ee]
Sent: Monday, November 08, 2004 6:45 AM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com


Dear All,

I would like to know what mounting medium is used for araldite or epon
semithick sections (2-5 micrometer).
We have used canadian balsam so far but this causes wrinkles of sections
under the cover glasses.
So, my question is:
Is there known anything else beside canadian balsam for mounting semithick
epon/araldite sections to study with LM?


Kärt Padari
kartp-at-ut.ee
University of Tartu
Estonia






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 10:05:42 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 11:21:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM: Canada Balsam replacement candidates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Kärt Padari wrote:
============================================================
I would like to know what mounting medium is used for araldite or epon
semithick sections (2-5 micrometer).
We have used canadian balsam so far but this causes wrinkles of sections
under the cover glasses.
So, my question is:
Is there known anything else beside canadian balsam for mounting semithick
epon/araldite sections to study with LM?
============================================================
I would call your attention to the products called "Meltmount™ Thermoplastic
Liquid
Mounting Media" as described on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/ltmic/melt-therm.shtml
and in particular, product Meltmount 1.539 Code 53 which is a direct
replacement for Canada Balsam. I have not heard of any of our customers
experiencing such problems with the Meltmount product.

The product is also available in a second form, Quick-Stick™ Thermoplastic
Liquid
Mounting Media, see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/ltmic/quickstick.shtml

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers these two products as plug in replacements
for Canada Balsam and therefore has a vested interest in seeing more people
using them.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 12:36:18 2004



From: Robert A Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 10:50:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM-mounting medium!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
We have used immersion oil sealed with nail polish and it has worked very nice.

Robert Underwood
U of Washington


On Mon, 8 Nov 2004, Kart Padari wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Dear All,
}
} I would like to know what mounting medium is used for araldite or epon
} semithick sections (2-5 micrometer).
} We have used canadian balsam so far but this causes wrinkles of sections
} under the cover glasses.
} So, my question is:
} Is there known anything else beside canadian balsam for mounting semithick
} epon/araldite sections to study with LM?
}
}
} K�rt Padari
} kartp-at-ut.ee
} University of Tartu
} Estonia
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 15:22:00 2004



From: Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 16:37:15 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Need Basic EDS from outside lab

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hey folks we need to have a sample analyzed. This is a ceramic chip
capacitor with some foreign material on the top surface (metallic). Can any
one recommend a local service for just basic EDS analysis. Thank you

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 17:42:00 2004



From: K.N. Bozhilov :      bozhilov-at-ucr.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 15:57:06 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Desktop Microscopist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I am trying to find info about possible upgrade of "Desktop Microscopist"
for the Mac OSX system. The web site of Virtual Labs/ Lacuna Labs which was
distributing the software seems to be hacked and I cannot get any contact
info.

Krassimir Bozhilov.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 18:24:33 2004



From: amarjit.s.brar-at-seagate.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 2004 18:40:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Gold Etch needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (amarjit.s.brar-at-seagate.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, November 8, 2004 at 11:01:39
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: amarjit.s.brar-at-seagate.com
Name: Amarjit S. Brar

Organization: ASM International

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Chemical etchant for Gold

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 8 21:00:08 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 19:15:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Gold Etch needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Amarjit:

I have shown below some chemical etch data for gold and gold alloys
extracted from a Metallographic Etch Database that we offer for sale.
You can get more details on it by typing in the search term "MED" on our
website at www.southbaytech.com. Alternatively, contact me off-line and
I can email the information to you.

DISCLAIMER: South Bay Technology produces equipment and supplies as
described above and, therefore, has a vested interest in promoting their
use.

Best regards-

David

--
David Henriks

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 40 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for Metallogaphy, Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.


Material: Gold-Silver-Platinum (Au-Ag-Pt)
Type: Microetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 20 ml KCN (10 %), 20 ml (NH4)2S2O8 (10 %).
Procedure: Use in a hood. Immerse at room temperature for 10-30 s.
Remarks: Electric contact material.
Reference: Metallography, Structures and Phase Diagrams, Metals
Handbook, 8th Edition, Vol. 8, ASM (American Society for Metals), Metals
Park, Ohio 44079, USA, 1973, p. 118.

Material: Gold alloys (Au), palladium alloys (Pd), silver alloys (Ag)
Type: Microetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 1 part 10 % aqueous solution of ammonium
persulphate, 1 part 10 % aqueous solution of potassium cyanide. With
extremely resistant alloys use 20 % solutions.
Procedure: The solution must be used within a few minutes after mixing.
It is very toxic and hence etching should be carried out under a fume
extraction hood.
Remarks: Extremely toxic.
Reference: H. Modin and S. Modin, Metallurgical Microscopy,
Butterworths, London, 1973., p. 392.

Material: Gold (Au), platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd)
Type: Macroetching
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (electrolyte): 66 ml hydrochloric acid, 34 ml nitric acid.
Procedure: Few minutes. Use hot and fresh!.
Remarks: Au, Pt alloys and Pd alloys.
Reference: G. Petzow, Metallographic Etching, ASM (American Society for
Metals), 1978, p. 43.

Material: Gold (Au), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt)
Type: Microetching
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (electrolyte): 100 ml hydrochloric acid, 1-5 g chromium (VI) oxide.
Procedure: Seconds to minutes.
Remarks: Pure Au and Au-rich alloys. Pd and Pd alloys.
Reference: G. Petzow, Metallographic Etching, ASM (American Society for
Metals), 1978, p. 45.

Material: Gold (Au), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt)
Type: Microetching
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (electrolyte): 30 (50) ml distilled water, 25 (100) ml
hydrochloric acid, 5 (10) ml nitric acid.
Procedure: 1-5 min. Use hot.!. Remove precipitate of gold chloride with
ammonia water.
Remarks: Pure Pt and Pd. Au alloys. Proportions in parentheses
especially useful for Pt.
Reference: G. Petzow, Metallographic Etching, ASM (American Society for
Metals), 1978, p. 45.

Material: Gold (Au), Pt alloys (Pt), Pd alloys (Pt)
Type: Macroetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 66 ml HCl, 34 ml HNO3.
Procedure: Hot, few minutes.
Remarks: Grain contrast.
Reference: Practical Metallography, Vol. 7, No. 6, 1970, p. 314-324.

Material: Gold (Au) and precious metals.
Type: Microetchant
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 1 part HNO3 (conc.), 10 parts HCl (conc.).
Procedure: Etching temperature 30-35 C (86-95 F). Use a fume cupboard.
Remarks: Gold and precious metals.
Reference: H. Modin and S. Modin, Metallurgical Microscopy,
Butterworths, London, 1973., p. 392.



by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 05:14:16 2004



From: Aarti Harle :      aarti_harle-at-yahoo.co.in
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 03:30:03 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] embedding with durcupan water soluble kit

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


hello,
Earlier I use to use the araldite kit and blocks were
} soft and good but now we have ordered the :
} "Durcupan water soluble kit" for embedding the
} tissue/culture whatever the mixture i try the
} resultant blocks are brittle and remain
unpolymerize.
} The standard procedure which came along with the kit
} is
} Durcupan A Resin - 27 g
} DDSA - 65 g
} DMP-30 - 6.6 g
} DPB - 2.2 g
}
} Since with this mixture even over a week of
} polymerization at 60 deg blocks are not completly
} polymerize therefore,
}
} I increase the concentration of DDSA, DMP-30 and DBP
} propertionately and tried three different
combinations
} but still i find the incomplete polymerization.
}
} I didnt understad why blocks are not plymerizing
} completly.
} May I have your suggestions comment please.
}
} I thank you in advance

Regards
Arti Harle
Scientist




__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
www.yahoo.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 07:16:39 2004



From: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 07:32:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
Name: Mike Ingram

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays

Question: All,

Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found any problems?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 07:36:21 2004



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Nov 2004 08:52:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] New DVD's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The following tutorials from the MSA meeting in Savannah are now available
on DVD. See the video catalog at this url for details

http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/newtape00.htm

# 266 - Techniques for Electron Tomography. by M. Marko $15.00
#267 - Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry in SEM. By Dale Newbury $15.00
# 268 - Introduction to Electron Holography - by Molly McCartney - $15.00
# 269 - Introduction to Fluorescence and Image Correlation Spectroscopy -
by P. Wiseman $15.00



Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 08:10:55 2004



From: Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
Date: Tue, 09 Nov 2004 15:23:23 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Software for imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Sven,

Matrox does not support TWAIN. You can buy a twain driver; the demo version is
free: http://www.ebbosoft.com/Products/Demoversion/demoversion.html

There are some drivers for Linux: http://www.emlix.com/index.php?id=163

For Windows, Matrox frame grabbers need the drivers of the Matrox Imaging Library
(MIL), which comes in different versions. MIL is a programming environment. If you
are a good C++ programmer, this is the right thing for you. If not - you are screwed.
Well, these frame grabbers are for machine vision, anyway.

Other imaging packages depend on the MIL redistribution, which has to be installed
before installing the other software. Mathworks Matlab Image acquisition toolbox
does support your frame grabber. There are even drivers for National Instruments
IMAQ for the Matrox Meteor II.

More or less no programming is needed for other packages, like Mediacybernetics
Image Pro Plus, Optimas, AnalySIS, Matrox Inspector, Rauscher GrabIT, Streampix,
Fabrimex QuickView Software QView-C/M, and others:
http://www.matrox.com/imaging/third/3rdparty.cfm


The problem is: all these solutions are quite expensive (except Linux), or the software
does not more than any video freeware.

:-) Torsten

P.S. If somebody has drivers for Active Silicon Snapper-Dig16, please send me an
email. The company is not responding to emails (www.activesilicon.co.uk).



}
} Hi all,
}
} I have here a Sony CCD-camera which is connected to a Matrox Meteor II
} framegrabber card. Both in good conditions, no doubt, but is there
} some software I can use for live imaging and acquisition? Analysis is
} a nice extra, but is not necessary!
}
} I tried to connect to ImageJ, but this did not work out. I need to
} make it TWAIN. How does this works/is this possible?
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Sven Terclavers
}
}




Dipl. Biol. Torsten Fregin

Universität Hamburg - Biozentrum Grindel (ZIM)
Abt. Neurophysiologie
Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3
20146 Hamburg, Germany
Telefon *49-(0)40-42838-3931
Fax *49-(0)40-42838-3937
eMail Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 08:26:53 2004



From: Joseph P Neilly :      joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 08:40:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We used to monitor 2 SEMs and 2 TEMs and never found any leakage so we
stopped several years ago.

Joe Neilly, Research Investigator
Abbott Laboratories
R4R9, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Voice: 847-938-5024
Fax: 847-938-5027
E-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com




mingram-at-rohmhaas.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
11/09/2004 07:32 AM


To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM and X-rays




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
Name: Mike Ingram

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays

Question: All,

Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found any
problems?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 09:26:15 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Tue, 09 Nov 2004 09:40:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Mike,

The state of Illinois used to require radiation surveys, but they deemed
that SEMs pose no risk for leakage. Vacuum requirements to turn on the beam
ensure that you don't have a major mechanical breach.

Alan Stone
ASTON


At 07:32 AM 11/9/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services Co., Inc.
200 Larkin Drive Ste A
Wheeling, IL 60090
847/353-8100
www.astonmet.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 11:23:06 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 09:49:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Desktop Microscopist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Nov 8, 2004, at 3:57 PM, K.N. Bozhilov wrote:

} I am trying to find info about possible upgrade of "Desktop
} Microscopist"
} for the Mac OSX system. The web site of Virtual Labs/ Lacuna Labs
} which was
} distributing the software seems to be hacked and I cannot get any
} contact
} info.
}
Dear Krassimir,
You might ask Scott Davilla of 4Pi Systems.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 12:25:43 2004



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 13:41:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] digitizing by cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,
This question concerns the way cameras digitize gray levels.
I have two cameras in my lab, one is an analog CCD camera (meaning it
puts out an NSTC composite video signal), about a dozen years old,
and connected to a frame grabber card in a computer; the other is a
new digital ccd camera (meaning built in "frame grabber") with
acquisition software on the computer. When I look at the image
histograms of the same object taken with the two cameras, the
histograms are different. In particular, while the older camera
generates a more or less smooth curve, the newer one generates a
really noisy curve with the number of pixels at adjacent gray levels
differing substantially. To put this intuatively, the new camera
seems to be noisy in gray-level space. Does anyone know why the two
set ups should digitize so differently?

Now (just to confuse matters) it is true that the new camera
captures 12-bit images and the old one just 8-bit, but I don't see
why having more gray levels should substantially increase the
digitization noise. (the increase is not small, it really obvious).

Thanks for any insight into this.

Tobias
--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \ University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \ Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/
Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533 Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 13:01:32 2004



From: Bentley, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-URMC.Rochester.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 14:17:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LKB Nova Part needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Hello Listers:
}
} Does anyone out there know where I could get a part for a LKB NOVA
} ultramicrotome? The part needed is 90-00-0047 which is the band attached
} to the specimen arm of the microtome. I used to be able to get parts from
} Norman J. Woodside but can't find him anymore. He lived in Catonsville,
} MD. Anyone out there able to help?
}
} Thanks!
}
} Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
} Associate Scientist & Project Manager
} Electron Microscope Research Core
} University of Rochester Medical Center
} Rochester, NY 14642
} 585-275-1954
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 13:12:54 2004



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-vancouverbc.net
Date: Tue, 09 Nov 2004 11:28:04 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding with durcupan water soluble kit

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I used to use Durcupan water-miscible resin, or Aquembed which is the same
thing, all the time. I found the best way to use it is as a dehydrating
agent only (just the Durcupan A component), and then put the tissue through
graded mixtures of Durcupan A with Epon mix - Epon substitute plus DDSA and
NMA. After at least two changes of 100% Epon mix, infiltrate with the Epon
mix plus DMP30 before embedding and polymerising.

Lesley Weston.



on 09/11/2004 3:30 AM, Aarti Harle at aarti_harle-at-yahoo.co.in wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
}
} hello,
} Earlier I use to use the araldite kit and blocks were
} } soft and good but now we have ordered the :
} } "Durcupan water soluble kit" for embedding the
} } tissue/culture whatever the mixture i try the
} } resultant blocks are brittle and remain
} unpolymerize.
} } The standard procedure which came along with the kit
} } is
} } Durcupan A Resin - 27 g
} } DDSA - 65 g
} } DMP-30 - 6.6 g
} } DPB - 2.2 g
} }
} } Since with this mixture even over a week of
} } polymerization at 60 deg blocks are not completly
} } polymerize therefore,
} }
} } I increase the concentration of DDSA, DMP-30 and DBP
} } propertionately and tried three different
} combinations
} } but still i find the incomplete polymerization.
} }
} } I didnt understad why blocks are not plymerizing
} } completly.
} } May I have your suggestions comment please.
} }
} } I thank you in advance
}
} Regards
} Arti Harle
} Scientist
}
}
}
}
} __________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} Check out the new Yahoo! Front Page.
} www.yahoo.com
}
}
}





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 13:55:54 2004



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 16:11:37 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've had our ESEM checked every year by the "radiation inspectors", as per
Canadian government requirements, but they never find any leaks.

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
GSC Atlantic
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada


-----Original Message-----
} From: Alan Stone [mailto:as-at-astonmet.com]
Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 11:41 AM
To: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
Cc: microscopy-at-microscopy.com



Mike,

The state of Illinois used to require radiation surveys, but they deemed
that SEMs pose no risk for leakage. Vacuum requirements to turn on the beam
ensure that you don't have a major mechanical breach.

Alan Stone
ASTON


At 07:32 AM 11/9/2004, you wrote:


} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services Co., Inc.
200 Larkin Drive Ste A
Wheeling, IL 60090
847/353-8100
www.astonmet.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 9 19:44:32 2004



From: mikeraj-at-streamyx.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 2004 20:00:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: quantitative VS semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (mikeraj-at-streamyx.com) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 9, 2004 at 09:53:42
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mikeraj-at-streamyx.com
Name: Mike Marks

Organization: Seagate

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I would like to understand the difference between quantitative and semi-quantitative EDS analysis ? What are the differences between them ? Thanks !

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 02:14:58 2004



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-maia-scientific.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:28:41 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: digitizing by cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

My personal experience is mostly with analog cameras, so my answer is
may be not complete.

In a CCD camera which provides an analog videosignal (NTSC or PAL) the
pixel-grid of the camera is resampled into a video signal, where NTSC is
525/60 Lines/Field and PAL is 625/50 Lines/Field.

So even if one line of the CCD-grid has more than 525 individual
elements, this will be resampled to 525 lines in a NTSC video signal.
The discrete pixelation of the image is smoothed into an analog
representation.

The framegrabber resamples this analog signal back into an digital image
with 525 lines (NTSC). An 8-bit framegrabber will resample the voltage
range of the videosignal into values ranging from 0 to 255. This
approach was done to make digital CCD cameras compatible with old analog
video systems.

This is one component which contributes to what you may see in an image
from your analog camera.

In the digital camera this back an forth conversion from digital to
analog and back to digital does not happen and what you get is the "raw"
pixelation at the CCD-grid.

If you sample the CCD-pixels at 8- or 12-bit, you express the dynamic
range of the CCD into a different subsampling. If you sample a CCD with
the same physical characteristics at 12-bit (4096 levels) or 8-bit (256
levels) you will have a finer or coarser redout for the same dynamic
range. The 8-bit readout will average adjacent grey levels into 1/128
size steps of the 12-bit system.

From what I understand the digital 12-bit image may look "uglier", but
better represents what a CCD-grid "sees".

Regards,

Peter

===================================================================================
Tobias Baskin wrote:
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Greetings,
} This question concerns the way cameras digitize gray levels. I have
} two cameras in my lab, one is an analog CCD camera (meaning it puts out
} an NSTC composite video signal), about a dozen years old, and connected
} to a frame grabber card in a computer; the other is a new digital ccd
} camera (meaning built in "frame grabber") with acquisition software on
} the computer. When I look at the image histograms of the same object
} taken with the two cameras, the histograms are different. In particular,
} while the older camera generates a more or less smooth curve, the newer
} one generates a really noisy curve with the number of pixels at adjacent
} gray levels differing substantially. To put this intuatively, the new
} camera seems to be noisy in gray-level space. Does anyone know why the
} two set ups should digitize so differently?
}
} Now (just to confuse matters) it is true that the new camera
} captures 12-bit images and the old one just 8-bit, but I don't see why
} having more gray levels should substantially increase the digitization
} noise. (the increase is not small, it really obvious).
}
} Thanks for any insight into this.
}
} Tobias






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 04:08:58 2004



From: David Patton :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:24:32 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Please continue with radiation checks on electron microscopes. Our SEM
started leaking (30KV only) after 22 years. We are now constructing a
lead bucket (inverted!) to contain the leak.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:mingram-at-rohmhaas.com]
Sent: 09 November 2004 13:33
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday,
November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
Name: Mike Ingram

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays

Question: All,

Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found any
problems?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---



This incoming email to UWE has been independently scanned for viruses
and any virus detected has been removed using McAfee anti-virus software



This email has been independently scanned for viruses and any virus detected has been removed using McAfee anti-virus software




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 04:35:46 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 07:20:04 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: viaWWW: quantitative VS semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Mike Marks writes ...

} Question: I would like to understand the difference between
} quantitative and semi-quantitative EDS analysis ? What are the
} differences between them ? Thanks !

My 1st response is that "quantitative" numbers come with an error analysis
.. but hardly any EDS analysis does. In the context of EDS, qunatitative
would imply "each element measured against its reference standard" ... and
"semi-quantitative" would only imply an attempt to convert x-ray counts to
weight percent ... either by some standardless method, or by at least
scaling the spectrum with a minimum of standards (usually one).

hth & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 05:57:50 2004



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:14:40 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] digitizing by cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

There might be a very simple explanation for what you see.

First: Is the histogram really noisy or is it spiky?

I'm assuming that neighboring values in the histogram are very different but
in a systematic way.

In that case it could simply mean that you've digitized the image twice by
the time it reaches the computer, once to 12 bits in the camera and then to
8 bits to import it into the software you use for calculating the histogram.

What you see could be an effect of this two-step rounding procedure, which
can make every second 8-bit value more frequent than the neighboring one, if
the quantization levels don't happen to be exactly matched.

For (the extremest) example let's say you have output values 0, 1, 2, 3, 4
etc. from the first digitization and you requantize these at the levels 0,
1.5, 3, 4.5 etc. to produce new output values 0, 1, 2, 3 etc.
The inputs 0 and 1 will both be output as 0,
The input 2 will be output as 1,
The inputs 3 and 4 will both be output as 2,
and so on.

You see that even outputs will be twice as frequent as odd ones.

Maybe it's that.

Philip


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tobias Baskin [mailto:baskin-at-bio.umass.edu]
Sent: 09 November 2004 19:41
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Greetings,
This question concerns the way cameras digitize gray levels.
I have two cameras in my lab, one is an analog CCD camera (meaning it
puts out an NSTC composite video signal), about a dozen years old,
and connected to a frame grabber card in a computer; the other is a
new digital ccd camera (meaning built in "frame grabber") with
acquisition software on the computer. When I look at the image
histograms of the same object taken with the two cameras, the
histograms are different. In particular, while the older camera
generates a more or less smooth curve, the newer one generates a
really noisy curve with the number of pixels at adjacent gray levels
differing substantially. To put this intuatively, the new camera
seems to be noisy in gray-level space. Does anyone know why the two
set ups should digitize so differently?

Now (just to confuse matters) it is true that the new camera
captures 12-bit images and the old one just 8-bit, but I don't see
why having more gray levels should substantially increase the
digitization noise. (the increase is not small, it really obvious).

Thanks for any insight into this.

Tobias
--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \ University of
Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \ Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/
Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533 Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 06:22:28 2004



From: leem-at-unorth.ac.za (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 07:29:02 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dave
These things do not just happen spontaneously.
Presumably some change in the shielding has occurred since
manufacture. Can this be put down
to wear and tear, or has some critical item of the original shielding
been damaged or removed?
Chris

Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh

----- Original Message -----
} From: "David Patton" {David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2004 10:24 AM

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (leem-at-unorth.ac.za) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 06:15:43
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za
Name: Mike

Organization: University of the North

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative or it is qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a differing degree of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not exist.
Regards
Mike Lee

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 08:14:28 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 15:25:57 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Where does it leak ? I suppose it is diffusion, but with the beam current
used in a SEM (a few pA up to a few 100 nA), I don't imagine what
measuable leaks you may have. Doing the X-ray generators control in our
lab, I'm quite familiar with these questions. But on a SEM, I don't see
what is possible. What kind of counter do you use to check the leakage ?



J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004, David Patton wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Please continue with radiation checks on electron microscopes. Our SEM
} started leaking (30KV only) after 22 years. We are now constructing a
} lead bucket (inverted!) to contain the leak.
}
} Dave
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:mingram-at-rohmhaas.com]
} Sent: 09 November 2004 13:33
} To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM and X-rays
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
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} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from
} http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday,
} November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
}
} Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
} Name: Mike Ingram
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays
}
} Question: All,
}
} Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found any
} problems?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
}
}
}
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 08:19:12 2004



From: Alan Nicholls :      nicholls-at-uic.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 08:42:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MMMS SEM Workshop 19th November 2004

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Meeting Announcement

SEM WORKSHOP
November 19th 2004
Presented by:
Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society
Affiliate of the Microscopy Society of America and the Microbeam Analysis
Society of America

RSVP to:

Mr. Arvid Casler
Federal Mogul Sealing Systems
7450 N. McCormick Blvd.
Skokie, IL 60076-8103
Tel: 847-568-2016
Fax: 847-568-1925
Email: arvid_casler-at-fmo.com

Note: Respondents will be responsible for registration fees

8:00AM 5:00PM

Baxter Corporate Headquarters
Deerfield, IL
(Directions below)

Registration Fees

MMMS members: before Nov. 12th - $ 25.00 after Nov. 12th - $ 35.00
Non-members: before Nov. 12th - $35.00, after Nov 12th -$ 45.00
(MMMS membership included in fee)
Students: before Nov. 12th - $15.00, after Nov 12th - $ 25.00 (MMMS
Student membership $5)

8:00AM 8:45AM Setup and registration

8:45 10:15AM James Pawley, University of Wisconsin,
What FE does for SEM?

Abstract Nowadays operation of the SEM at 1.5 kV or even 500v for high
resolution topographic imaging has become so commonplace that it is easy to
forget that it was not always thus. High resolution SEM at low beam voltage
is poses a number of important technological challenges.

This talk we will review the rationale for making the effort to overcome
these obstacles: Why is it worth it? It will also outline the technological
developments that were needed to make it a reality.

10:15 10:45AM Break

10:45AM 12:15PM John Mackenzie, North Carolina State University,
From Grains to Pixels: Digital Imaging Today

Abstract Digital imaging continues to encroach on the tasks formally
performed using wet silver halide photography. The improvements in inkjet
technology continue to advance with no sign yet of a ceiling. Although
still a fair way from matching photographic resolution at the grain level,
the inkjet resolution has matched the photographic resolution at the visual
level. Although cameras are available for the TEM are available, they are
extremely costly and inferior to film. Flatbed scanners do offer a
strikingly inexpensive alternative. The performance of these is currently
remarkable and they also show little sign of reaching a ceiling. Finally,
the core software for digital imaging is Adobe Photoshop. Photoshop
continues to in ways that may improve it's utility to scientists in the future.

12:15PM 1:15PM LUNCH Included

1:15PM 2:45PM Alwyn Eades, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
EBSD: An established technique and some new results.

Abstract Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has, historically, had two
great strengths in the characterization of materials. The power of the
instrument to form images of the sample, up to very high resolution, has
provided excellent information on the morphology of samples. The addition
of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) has made local chemical
analysis of samples possible and, indeed, routine. This information on the
shape and composition of samples has only more recently become complemented
by crystallographic information on the samples through electron
backscattering diffraction (EBSD).

The importance of this third facet of the characterization of materials is
so great that EBSD has become a standard technique in a very few
years. For scanning electron microscopes that are to be used for the study
of materials, it will very soon be (if it is not already) standard to order
an SEM with EBSD just as it is standard to order it with EDS.

The applications of Electron Backscattering Diffraction may currently be
separated into two groups. On the one hand, EBSD may be used to identify
an unknown phase within the sample. On the other hand, when the sample
consists of a known phase or phases, EBSD can be used to make orientation
maps, which, in turn, can be used to determine: texture, grain size,
strain, crystal quality, the character of grain boundaries, and other more
complex aspects of the microstructure.

As a new field, EBSD is still rapidly expanding in the tasks that can be
performed. It is also the case that aspects of the technique have not been
fully explored. Work at Lehigh has been extending the ability of EBSD to
determine local strain in samples and eliminating artifacts from the
standard analysis methods. Recent work has shown that there is potential
benefit in EBSD work from using an energy filter so that the patterns are
formed using only those electrons that have energies close to the energy of
the incident beam.

2:45 3:15PM Break

3:15 4:45PM Dennis Ward, Federal Bureau of Investigation,
Microanalysis A New Tool in Combating Terrorism

Abstract All of the intelligence agencies in the US have been tasked with
the unprecedented challenge of shifting their focus from traditional
criminalistics to investigating threats of terrorism. Some have been
reorganized under the umbrella of the Department of Homeland Security and
others, such as the FBI, continue to provide investigative services
independently. To succeed in the effort, we have had to identify and
implement enhancements that would benefit our investigative capabilities.
Locally, these include construction of an archival utility for
microanalysis, a rapid response initiative for elemental analysis, and
establishment of a mechanism for technical communications.

As our need to provide characterization of potential weapons of mass
destruction (WMD) has increased, we have realized the potential of
"signature analysis" direct spectral comparisons for providing
presumptive identification of questioned materials. Today's advances in
computer technology have permitted construction of a relational database of
reference materials. The core data of each record is the x-ray spectrum,
but also includes pertinent manufacturer data, laboratory and instrumental
data, reference material data, and other information. A "stand-alone"
utility (Spectral Library Identification and Classification
Explorer SLICE) has been completed, and we currently are considering a
networking utility to permit data sharing between all forensic
laboratories. We have successfully used this resource for presumptive
identification of materials purported to be WMD, and in these cases have
provided significant investigative direction.

The FBI laboratory is required to provide immediate, remote assessment of
materials of forensic significance at crime scenes and disaster sites.
Elemental analysis is not presently available in a mission-oriented,
portable configuration. We have an initiative established to interface
SLICE to recently developed mini XRF in order to provide presumptive
identification of a variety of materials in the field. It is anticipated
that this configuration will offer an important resource to evidence
recovery operations.

In order to provide a platform for rapid, technical communications between
investigators using these related technologies, a secure listserve was
established. It provides a link between every forensic laboratory in the
Western world.

We anticipate that these initiatives may also be useful in the non-forensic
arena, and therefore look forward to establishing mutually productive
collaboration with other federal and private agencies.

Directions to Baxter Corporate Headquarters: 1 Baxter Parkway, Deerfield
Illinois, 60015.

From South (O'Hare Airport): I-294 (Tri State Tollway) north to the merge
with I-94 (west) towards Milwaukee. North on I-94 to Lake Cook Road exit
(50 cents exact change toll). Turn left (west) to first light, Saunders
Road. Turn right on Saunders to Baxter Parkway. Turn right on Baxter
Parkway . Turn right. Follow sings to Visitor parking in garage. See
Deerfield Campus Map and proceed to "Cafeteria, Auditorium, Reception"
building on ground level.

From South (Edens): North to the merge with I-94 (west) towards Milwaukee
on Edens Spur. Exit on Deerfield Road. Turn left (west), then take left on
Saunders Road. Turn left on Baxter parkway. Turn right. Follow sings to
Visitor parking. See Deerfield Campus Map and proceed to "Cafeteria,
Auditorium, Reception" building on ground level.

From North (Milwaukee): From I-94 east, going south towards Chicago exit
at Lake Cook Road exit (50 cents exact change toll). Turn right (west) to
first light, Saunders Road. Turn right on Saunders to Baxter Parkway. Turn
right on Baxter Parkway. Turn right. Follow sings to Visitor parking. See
Deerfield Campus Map and proceed to "Cafeteria, Auditorium, Reception"
building on ground level.

There is a special rate at the Holiday Inn and Suites available for this
meeting, the rate is $ 79.99(ask for the Baxter rate)

Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites
CHICAGO-DEERFIELD/LINCOLNSHIRE
2600 LAKE COOK ROAD
RIVERWOODS, IL 60015
UNITED STATES
Tel: 1-847-3740260
Fax: 1-847-3740535



Alan W Nicholls, PhD
Director of Research Service Facility (Electron Microscopy)
Research Resources Center - East (M/C 337)
Room 100 Science and Engineering South Building
The University of Illinois at Chicago
845 West Taylor St
Chicago, IL 60607-7058

Tel: 312 996 1227
Fax: 312 996 8091
Office: Room 110

Web site www.rrc.uic.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 08:23:06 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:38:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Radiation leak

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

David Patton wrote:
====================================================
Please continue with radiation checks on electron microscopes. Our SEM
started leaking (30KV only) after 22 years. We are now constructing a lead
bucket (inverted!) to contain the leak.
=====================================================
Could you tell us more about this leak, which microscope and model you have,
where the leak is occurring, and help others assess whether that kind of
problem could be occurring on their instruments as well.

Conventional wisdom (I think) has suggested that this is something that
would not be happening. The hypothesis I have always been told is that for
an SEM to leak radiation, it would have to be so misaligned that you would
have a vacuum leak and therefore no beam in the first place....and you are
suggesting this is misguided thinking. The exception to this was the case
where there were radiation leaks at the column adjustment knobs and the
exposure would be confined to one's fingers.

Chuck

PS: Please remember that we are nearly 100% paperless and we would ask
that any reply to this message be by way of the "reply" feature on your
software, so that the entire string of correspondence can come back to us
and all be in one place.

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 09:06:59 2004



From: Tomic, Peter \(Peter\) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:21:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I agree. It's either quantitative or it isn't. Degree of uncertainty
in quantification is a function of many things. There may be some
confusion with "semi-quantitative" and "standardless" quantification.
Again, there is no semi-quantitative analysis.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:leem-at-unorth.ac.za]
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2004 8:29 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (leem-at-unorth.ac.za) from
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 06:15:43
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za
Name: Mike

Organization: University of the North

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Quantitative versus
semi-quantitative

Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative
or it is qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a
differing degree of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not
exist. Regards Mike Lee

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 09:29:46 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 16:41:10 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Some explanation, with the hands :

Castaing basis for microanalysis tells us that the ratio between

(UnknownConcentration / StandardConcentration) = Something *
(UnknownIntensit / StandardIntensity)

U% UI
- = STh -
S% SI


for each element.

Standards are samples from a known concentration acquired with the same
beam conditions (Primary energie, beam current, counting time, beam
geometrie) than the unknown sample.

"Something" is the matric correction, ZAF or phirhozed, etc. It describe
what hapends in the sample between electrons and atomes, giving photons,
and the relation between what has been measured and what has been emited
in the sample under these conditions. There is a directe proportionality
between the number of atoms from one element and the number of photons
emited, but the emited photons are not the detected ones.


Quantitative will perform the former completely. You need the standards,
for each element and much time to do the measurments, and much care and
much more....

In a Semi-quantitaive analysis, the standard will be replaced by a false
standard, a computation which takes in account all parameters/performences
of the theorie and hardware, to give the "best" result possible. That
result will always give a total concentration of 100%, even if you have
forgotten one element in the quantification list ! If you forget the Mo in
a 316l-stainless steel, the total will be 100%, without the 3% Mo. If you
have forgotten the iron... No comments

In quantitative analysis, the total will be... the reality of what you
have detected, declared, convolutated with the care in the measurements
and the accuracy on the standards. If you forget the Mo in that
316l-stainless steel again, you'll have a total of 95-99% and not 98-102%.


Something more : in quantitative analysis, the standards are measured with
the same hardware than the unknown. So a part of the hardware parameters
(and defects, such as tailing or non linearity of the detector) are the
same for both and don't play much in the computation. That will give
better accuracy in the result, and is not the case in semi-quantitaive.

Hope it helps

Lister, correct me if some is wrong or unclear !

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

On Wed, 10 Nov 2004, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za
} Name: Mike
}
} Organization: University of the North
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Quantitative versus semi-quantitative
}
} Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative or it is qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a differing degree of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not exist.
} Regards
} Mike Lee
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 10:47:22 2004



From: Roy :      MTLab-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 12:02:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We paid a yearly radiation fee to New Jersey ($106/SEM). The Radiation
Physicist who did our original radiation survey told me that he has
never found a leaky SEM. Apparently some R&D people at Bell Labs used
their SEM to study electron beam lithography and this triggered all
this fuss. I have been informed after our last inspection that our lab
will not have any further NJDEP inspections unless we purchase another
SEM.

FYI: NJDEP regulations exclude TV. TV often will run at 3,000,000
times the current of a tungsten filament SEM and at 25-30 kV.

Dr. J. Roy Nelson
Material Testing Lab
Pennington, NJ 08534

On Nov 9, 2004, at 8:32 AM, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from
} http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday,
} November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
} Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
} Name: Mike Ingram
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays
}
} Question: All,
}
} Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found
} any problems?
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 11:28:08 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:42:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] New DVD's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greg;
What happened to the DVD of David Muller's superb tutorial on
STEM presented in Savannah?

John Mardinly
Intel

-----Original Message-----
} From: Greg Erdos [mailto:gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, November 09, 2004 5:52 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

The following tutorials from the MSA meeting in Savannah are now
available
on DVD. See the video catalog at this url for details

http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/newtape00.htm

# 266 - Techniques for Electron Tomography. by M. Marko $15.00
#267 - Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry in SEM. By Dale Newbury
$15.00
# 268 - Introduction to Electron Holography - by Molly McCartney -
$15.00
# 269 - Introduction to Fluorescence and Image Correlation Spectroscopy
-
by P. Wiseman $15.00



Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 11:56:37 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 10:09:49 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: New DVD's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I was in the front row. There was one person who was livid, almost out
of control. I did not sense any disturbing comments by David Muller, but
if there were, they were not bad enough to warrant the reaction, and he
was just as critical of his own past misunderstandings as he was of
anyone else's. Besides, he was commenting on science, not running for
office. To withhold this DVD would be a travesty. Should one person's
overreaction warrant this action? I think not.

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: Greg Erdos [mailto:gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2004 9:53 AM
To: Mardinly, John




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 12:02:41 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:45:33 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: viaWWW: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Peter writes ...

} I agree. It's either quantitative or it isn't. Degree of uncertainty
} in quantification is a function of many things. There may be some
} confusion with "semi-quantitative" and "standardless" quantification.
} Again, there is no semi-quantitative analysis.

I'd agree as well ... but there does need be a term for any
attempt to quantify, but does not provide confidence versus error
analysis. You cannot call it "quantitative", nor can you call
it "qualitative". "Semi-quantitative" does seem to fit(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
{www.micro-investigations.com}


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (leem-at-unorth.ac.za) from
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
} Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 06:15:43
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
}
} Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za
} Name: Mike
}
} Organization: University of the North
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Quantitative versus
} semi-quantitative
}
} Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative
} or it is qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a
} differing degree of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not
} exist. Regards Mike Lee
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 13:18:01 2004



From: Giles, Bill :      William.Giles-at-TIMET.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 12:33:26 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Strange emails from Faerber Jacques [Jacques.Faerber@ipcms.u-stra

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I seem to be getting emails that I assume are supposed to go to the
listserver directly from this gentleman. Perhaps someone could help him post
correctly?

I get this message every time and included is some sort of text attachment.

"This message uses a character set that is not supported by the Internet
Service. To view the original message content, open the attached message.
If the text doesn't display correctly, save the attachment to disk, and then
open it using a viewer that can display the original character set."

William Giles
Senior Electron Microscopist
Metallography Lab Coordinator
P.O. Box 2128
Henderson, Nevada 89009
(702) 566-4436
(702) 564-9038 (Fax)
William.Giles-at-timet.com



*


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 13:31:34 2004



From: Oparowski, Joseph :      Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 16:12:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Vacuum Evaporators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Of course there is the school of thought that holds that, as all elements are present in
all samples, it's only a question of whether the level of any particular element is above
or below the detection limit of whatever technique you happen to be using at the time.

So that kinda rules out 'qualitative' as a term or concept..................

cheers

rtch





} From: "michael shaffer" {michael-at-shaffer.net}
To: "Tomic, Peter (Peter)" {ptomic-at-agere.com} ,
{microscopy-at-microscopy.com}

Greetings,

We are looking to replace our very old Denton Vacuum Evaporator with a new
system. Our main use will be for SEM prep (carbon and Au/Pd), but we also
want explore thicker organic and metal deposits for R&D studies. I would
like to hear from folks that have recent systems. Do you like them? What
would you recommend? What don't you like. Thanks much in advance.

Joseph M. Oparowski
Center for Materials Science - Consulting and Failure Analysis
Bose Corporation Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
The Mountain, M/S 415 Phone: (508) 766-1371
Framingham, MA 01701-9168 Fax: (508) 766-1313




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 15:05:38 2004



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 15:21:11 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Strange emails from Faerber Jacques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bill

I received his posting just fine and there was no attachment.
My guess is that your Email service is creating the attachment
to report the error.

Just a reminder to all subscribers:

You will never get an attachment of any kind from the Microscopy Listserver
all such items are filtered out. If you do receive an Email with an
attachment that "says" it is from the Microscopy Listserver it is
likely that this is a forged email and probably contains a virus or is spam.

I recommend you immediately delete any Email that says it is from
the Listserver
that has any attachment, regardless of the apparent sender (even if it appears
to be me!).


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
===========================================
Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
Argonne National Lab
Materials Science Division/Bldg 212
9700 S. Cass Ave
Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
===========================================
TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
NEESLab: http://neestpm.mcs.anl.gov
MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
===========================================

The box said ...
"This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
So I bought a G3 Mac !

===========================================


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 15:13:26 2004



From: William J Mushock :      wim5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 16:28:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM and X-rays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I suspect radiation leaks are rare on SEM's. However, I do remember a
leak on an SEM which had been modified by the manufacturer to do beam
blanking. The glass liner tube installed with the beam blanker had a
line of sight through one of the wire feedthroughs on the column. As I
recall this was discovered during a state radiation inspection.



Bill

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

We paid a yearly radiation fee to New Jersey ($106/SEM). The Radiation
Physicist who did our original radiation survey told me that he has
never found a leaky SEM. Apparently some R&D people at Bell Labs used
their SEM to study electron beam lithography and this triggered all
this fuss. I have been informed after our last inspection that our lab
will not have any further NJDEP inspections unless we purchase another
SEM.

FYI: NJDEP regulations exclude TV. TV often will run at 3,000,000
times the current of a tungsten filament SEM and at 25-30 kV.

Dr. J. Roy Nelson
Material Testing Lab
Pennington, NJ 08534

On Nov 9, 2004, at 8:32 AM, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (mingram-at-rohmhaas.com) from
} http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday,
} November 9, 2004 at 07:07:37
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
} Email: mingram-at-rohmhaas.com
} Name: Mike Ingram
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM and X-rays
}
} Question: All,
}
} Has anyone who has been monitoring their SEM for X-ray leakage found
} any problems?
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 15:16:00 2004



From: William P. Sharp :      wsharp-at-asu.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:31:02 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Quantitative vs Semi Quantitative EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

As a minion in a strictly life science EM facility, I probably ought not to
express an opinion on EDS analysis - on the other hand, we have been doing
it on "life science" specimens in one way or another since 1979, so I CAN
speak to what we used to (pre flood) call "Semi Quantitative EDS". There
are times when you don't need or simply can't figure out how to get
accurate gram atom amount quantitation in specimens (ie - virtually any LS
sample) BUT you need to know the relative amount of some element or another
and need to have a portable or comparable number to assess a range of
specimens.

To make a longish story short, we have taken as an internal "standard" an
element whose peak area above background remains steady when analysed under
as nearly identical instrument and speciman prep conditions as possible -
say, the calcium level of the thylakoid region of the algal component of a
lichen. Knowing that the potassium levels of the same region of the cells
is extremely variable when the lichen is exposed to any detectable amount
of sulfur derivative stack gasses (or volcano emissions), one can then set
up a ratio of the background subtracted potassium peak to the background
subtracted calcium peak and then compare the RATIOS across specimens
collected from various areas as normalized spectra - say, known distances
from a sulfur-containing gas source. You can then build curves that are
sort of like dose-response curves and have a baseline to use when assessing
the amount of sulfur containing gas that may be/have been present in an
area where these lichens grow. Lots of variables, hard to control,
certainly NOT quantitative, but more useful that just looking at randomly
collected spectra and guessing - hence, the epithet Semi - Quantitative EDS.

Author's note - we haven't done this in anger since the first (in our life
times) Mt. St. Helen's eruption - around 20 plus years ago -

Bill Sharp


William P. Sharp
Arizona State University
School of Life Sciences, box 4501
Tempe, AZ 85287-4501
Phone - (480)-965-3210
Fax - (480)-965-6899



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 16:34:39 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 15:00:47 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Vacuum Evaporators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Nov 10, 2004, at 1:12 PM, Oparowski, Joseph wrote:

} We are looking to replace our very old Denton Vacuum Evaporator with a
} new
} system. Our main use will be for SEM prep (carbon and Au/Pd), but we
} also
} want explore thicker organic and metal deposits for R&D studies. I
} would
} like to hear from folks that have recent systems. Do you like them?
} What
} would you recommend? What don't you like. Thanks much in advance.
}
Dear Joseph,
We bought the Cressington 208 about a year and a half ago for
evaporation of carbon and metals, so we needed two power supplies--one
for each substance. I like the turbopump feature and the fact that it
is a desktop unit, and we have had good performance with it. It takes
the unit about half an hour to reach the low 10^-5 range, which can be
problematic if you need to evaporate onto many specimens and cannot do
them all at once. I cannot say much about long-term reliability, since
the unit is still pretty new, but there have been no problems so far.
I have no affiliation with either the manufacturer or distributer (Ted
Pella) of this equipment except as a satisfied customer.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 17:09:29 2004



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 10:25:37 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Quantitative EDS analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We do quantitative x-ray analysis of frozen plant tissues, by using
standards which are frozen droplets of known element (ion) concentrations,
and analysing them in exactly the same way as we analyse the vacuole or
cytoplasm of the plant cells. Both plant tissues and droplets are planed
flat in a cryomicrotome, they are given the same etching to remove frost,
then coated with Al. Each sample/cell is counted for the same (live-)time,
and we check that all SEM parameters are the same each time and as steady as
possible. The SEM (JEOL 6400) is usually pretty stable after the first
hour. We can go down to about 20 mM for most biologically relevant
elements, which is less sensitive than we'd like, but still very useful.
The main limitation is the time required to do this....

This method was developed by a colleague, Cheng Huang, who, fortunately for
us, works just nearby.

cheers,
Rosemary Whtie

Dr. Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre ph. 61-2-6246 5475
CSIRO Plant Industry mob. 61-0402 835 973
GPO Box 1600 fax. 61-2-6246 5000
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 19:23:59 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 17:39:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Radiation leak

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I survived Radiation Safety people attack, because it's considered now that
my "poor" JEM1200-EX TEM is "X-ray machine"... So, they applied all
requirements for radiation safety work on it... This is a bad news, the
good news - they excluded SEMs from that black list recently...

X-rays should be detected by special counter, Geiger counter does not react
on X-rays.
Sergey

At 06:38 AM 11/10/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 19:31:17 2004



From: Vetrano, John S :      john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov (by way of
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 19:47:20 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] FW>MicroscopyListserver:NYT article on preservation of electronic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi all;

The New York Times had an article this morning about the preservation of electronic data. Since this has been discussed here I thought some of you might be interested in the story. The link is http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/10/technology/10archive.html?hp&ex=1100149200&en=0b6f57f06554be78&ei=5094&partner=homepage

Unfortunately a registration is required (no money, just info). I could have cut and pasted the article but that would likely violate a copyright. It is not a technical article but lists some resources.

cheers, John

********
John S. Vetrano
Sr. Research Scientist
Materials Structure and Performance Group
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
MSIN P8-16
P.O. Box 999
Richland, WA 99352
Phone: (509)372-0724 Fax: (509)376-6308
Email: mailto:john.vetrano-at-pnl.gov


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 21:20:51 2004



From: Tomic, Peter \(Peter\) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 22:35:12 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: viaWWW: Quantitative versus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Paul & Co.;

I believe the EDX hardware vendors do use the words "standardless
quantification." Whether someone understands where the errors may come
from in standardless analyses is the real issue, in my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gerroir, Paul [mailto:paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2004 2:47 PM
To: michael shaffer; Tomic, Peter (Peter); microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Peter writes ...

} I agree. It's either quantitative or it isn't. Degree of uncertainty

} in quantification is a function of many things. There may be some
} confusion with "semi-quantitative" and "standardless" quantification.
} Again, there is no semi-quantitative analysis.

I'd agree as well ... but there does need be a term for any attempt to
quantify, but does not provide confidence versus error analysis. You
cannot call it "quantitative", nor can you call it "qualitative".
"Semi-quantitative" does seem to fit(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
{www.micro-investigations.com}


} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} -------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (leem-at-unorth.ac.za) from
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
} Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 06:15:43
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} ---
}
} Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za
} Name: Mike
}
} Organization: University of the North
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Quantitative versus
} semi-quantitative
}
} Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative

} or it is qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a
} differing degree of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not
} exist. Regards Mike Lee
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} ---
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 10 21:45:37 2004



From: Tomic, Peter \(Peter\) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:00:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Quantitative vs Semi Quantitative EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bill;

Perhaps we're taking the semantics too far but I might distill this down
by saying that if I were in a court of law testifying as an expert
witness I would state that the "quantitative analysis" has caveats
similar to what you stated below for LS samples. If one can compare two
results under identical analytical conditions one derives a quantity.
That, in my opinion, is different than saying an element is there or is
not there.

It was just said that a school of thought is that every sample contains
an atom of everything [entire periodic table], to paraphrase the
statement. That, of course, is a matter of detection limits or
sensitivity. I think Deepak Choprah said we all have an atom of Gandhi
in our bodies simply due to recycling. If so, I'm not sure the one I
have has imparted much wisdom to me in particular. Other atoms from
Gandhi may behave differently.

Cheers,

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems



-----Original Message-----
} From: William P. Sharp [mailto:wsharp-at-asu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2004 4:31 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

As a minion in a strictly life science EM facility, I probably ought not
to
express an opinion on EDS analysis - on the other hand, we have been
doing
it on "life science" specimens in one way or another since 1979, so I
CAN
speak to what we used to (pre flood) call "Semi Quantitative EDS". There

are times when you don't need or simply can't figure out how to get
accurate gram atom amount quantitation in specimens (ie - virtually any
LS
sample) BUT you need to know the relative amount of some element or
another
and need to have a portable or comparable number to assess a range of
specimens.

To make a longish story short, we have taken as an internal "standard"
an
element whose peak area above background remains steady when analysed
under
as nearly identical instrument and speciman prep conditions as possible
-
say, the calcium level of the thylakoid region of the algal component of
a
lichen. Knowing that the potassium levels of the same region of the
cells
is extremely variable when the lichen is exposed to any detectable
amount
of sulfur derivative stack gasses (or volcano emissions), one can then
set
up a ratio of the background subtracted potassium peak to the background

subtracted calcium peak and then compare the RATIOS across specimens
collected from various areas as normalized spectra - say, known
distances
from a sulfur-containing gas source. You can then build curves that are
sort of like dose-response curves and have a baseline to use when
assessing
the amount of sulfur containing gas that may be/have been present in an
area where these lichens grow. Lots of variables, hard to control,
certainly NOT quantitative, but more useful that just looking at
randomly
collected spectra and guessing - hence, the epithet Semi - Quantitative
EDS.

Author's note - we haven't done this in anger since the first (in our
life
times) Mt. St. Helen's eruption - around 20 plus years ago -

Bill Sharp


William P. Sharp
Arizona State University
School of Life Sciences, box 4501
Tempe, AZ 85287-4501
Phone - (480)-965-3210
Fax - (480)-965-6899





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 01:29:31 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Incharge_-_TEM_Laboratory?= :      tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 13:17:15 +0530 (IST)
Subject: [Microscopy] =?iso-8859-1?Q?Low_temperature_stage_for_JEOL_2010_UHR_Model?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,
We would like to purchase one low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for our
JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP 22 pole piece). I am aware of GATAN make and have
contacts from them. I am wondering whether are there any other
manufacturer who can supply low-temperature stage for our machine?
Information may be given off-line also.
Best regards
Satyam
--
Dr. P. V. Satyam
TEM Laboratory
Institute of Physics
Sachivalaya marg
Bhubaneswar - 751005
India
Fax:+91-674-230 0142
Tel:+91-674-230 1058 extn 229
email:tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 02:36:27 2004



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:52:07 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

'Semi-quantitative analysis' is an expression we have been
using for several years to ensure that our students
appreciate the limitations of standardless analyses. It is
a very useful shorthand expression to distinguish between a
full quantitative analysis and a less rigorous standardless
analysis.

This does not affect the argument that an analysis is
either qualitative or quantitative with different degrees
of accuracy (or uncertainty) associated with the
quantitative analyses.

Most of our users accept the limitations of using a
semi-quantitative analysis technique instead of making up
reference standards but at least they should understand the
limitations and they can take steps to improve their
results. It is too easy for an unaware user to accept the
computer's 'quantiative' analysis to several decimal places
without questioning it.

Regards,
Ron



On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 07:29:02 -0600 by way of
MicroscopyListserver {leem-at-unorth.ac.za} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
Society of America } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver }
On-Line Help
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}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (leem-at-unorth.ac.za)
from
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 06:15:43
}
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: leem-at-unorth.ac.za } Name: Mike } } Organization:
University of the North } } Title-Subject: [Microscopy]
[Filtered] Quantitative versus semi-quantitative } }
Question: As I understand this issue, "Either a method is
quantitative or it is qualitative". Two methods could be
quantitative with a differing degree of uncertainty.
Therefore semi-quantitaive does not exist. } Regards } Mike
Lee } }
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 02:37:13 2004



From: L.Tetley :      l.tetley-at-bio.gla.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:52:36 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] 32nd Scottish Microscopy Group Symposium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

32nd Scottish Microscopy Group Symposium


Wednesday 17thNovember 2004, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Penicuik,
nr Edinburgh

Late registration for this meeting via

http://www.abdn.ac.uk/emunit/smg2004.htm

also a programme is available at

http://www.gla.ac.uk/ibls/II/SMGSymp2004.pdf

and the directions for getting there by road are at

http://www.gla.ac.uk/ibls/II/map.pdf

There are over 20 companies represented in the Trade Exhibition
accompanying this meeting.


All welcome but registration forms should be FAXed to Stephan Helfer at
0131 248 2901 to assess numbers for catering.
This can be followed by payment made on arrival.

Dr Laurence Tetley
Division of Infection & Immunity, IBLS,
Integrated Microscopy Facility
Joseph Black Building
University of Glasgow
Glasgow G12 8QQ

l.tetley-at-bio.gla.ac.uk
tel 0141 330 4431
FAX 0141 330 3516

Integrated Microscopy
Facility: http://www.gla.ac.uk/Acad/IBLS/II/em/mcb-em.htm
Cryo Microscopy Group: http://www.cryomicroscopygroup.org.uk
Royal Microscopical Society: http://www.rms.org.uk



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 07:05:16 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 08:20:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Vacuum Evaporators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bill,
We have the 208 and our pump time is much shorter than 30 min. In fact
it can be as short as 5-10 min if we do not have the bell jar open for an
extended period of time. Are you fighting high humidity in your lab that
could account for the long pump-down time?

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy


On 11/10/04 6:00 PM, "Bill Tivol" {tivol-at-caltech.edu} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
}
} On Nov 10, 2004, at 1:12 PM, Oparowski, Joseph wrote:
}
} } We are looking to replace our very old Denton Vacuum Evaporator with a
} } new
} } system. Our main use will be for SEM prep (carbon and Au/Pd), but we
} } also
} } want explore thicker organic and metal deposits for R&D studies. I
} } would
} } like to hear from folks that have recent systems. Do you like them?
} } What
} } would you recommend? What don't you like. Thanks much in advance.
} }
} Dear Joseph,
} We bought the Cressington 208 about a year and a half ago for
} evaporation of carbon and metals, so we needed two power supplies--one
} for each substance. I like the turbopump feature and the fact that it
} is a desktop unit, and we have had good performance with it. It takes
} the unit about half an hour to reach the low 10^-5 range, which can be
} problematic if you need to evaporate onto many specimens and cannot do
} them all at once. I cannot say much about long-term reliability, since
} the unit is still pretty new, but there have been no problems so far.
} I have no affiliation with either the manufacturer or distributer (Ted
} Pella) of this equipment except as a satisfied customer.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol, PhD
} EM Scientist and Manager
} Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
} Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
} California Institute of Technology
} Pasadena CA 91125
} (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 17:49:35 2004



From: Doug Baldwin :      dougbaldwin-at-mindspring.com
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 17:05:15 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz Ergolux Repair Sources Needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a Leitz Ergolux with a broken focus mechanism and needs repairs.
Given the 20 year age of this model, Leica USA says it must go to Leica
Germany for repairs. Does anyone on the list have any qualified US
third-party repair sources?

I'm expecting a repair manual for the Ergolux any day so I should be able to
identify the parts for the repair. The replacement parts are still available
from Leica Germany.

Thanks for your help.

Doug Baldwin



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 20:05:53 2004



From: somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 20:21:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: thank you for replying me for breaking seed dormancy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, November 11, 2004 at 12:39:42
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com
Name: somayyeh

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] thank you for replying me for breaking seed dormancy

Question:

hello all
I would like to thank all the people who answered me
And gave me the solution for breaking seed dormancy of verbascum.

Dr cal lemke, Dr Brbara lotocka, Dr Robert Mcdonald,
Dr Fabian Tricarico and Dr valerie lycnch and Dr Lara sciaraffa and others.
Sincerely
Somayyeh



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 11 20:06:40 2004



From: rmwang-at-berkeley.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 2004 20:22:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: amira for visualization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (rmwang-at-berkeley.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, November 11, 2004 at 19:00:20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: rmwang-at-berkeley.edu
Name: Rongming Wang

Organization: National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for some person who know how to use the software ìamiraî. I want to do tomography of some nanoparticles. I have used the TOM software and got files with .em and .vol extension and want to use amira for visualization. Or if the amira software can deal with all these from the series images taken from TEM?


---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 05:05:47 2004



From: Sim Kok Swee :      kssim-at-mmu.edu.my
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 19:21:35 +0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Spatial frequency, noise and magnification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,

I have problem as following:- I need to know the relationship between
spatial frequency, noise and SEM magnification. I am not sure the following
is true, please kindly correct me. Thanks

When typical specimen elements of an image occupy several image pixels, the
image itself will have suitable spatial components, i.e. rich information in
low spatial frequency element. Usually digital filtering imaging system
itself is in fact a low pass filter process, and high frequency component
will be treated as noise. Therefore in an image with high magnification, the
signal's spatial elements located at low frequency, it is then easier to
filter out high frequency element - noise. In another trend for an image
with low magnification while the signals will distribute at the high
frequency side. That is to say, some signals of useful information will be
considered as noise, in particular in actual high SNR case.

Pleaes kindly comment with many thanks
Ks.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 05:29:19 2004



From: A.G.Cullis :      A.G.Cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 11:44:23 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] MSMXIV Conference: Final Call for Papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Royal Microscopical Society

Institute of Physics

Materials Research Society


14th International Conference on


MICROSCOPY OF SEMICONDUCTING MATERIALS


11 - 14 April 2005, University of Oxford, UK


************************************************

Final Call for Papers

************************************************


This international conference will focus on the state-of-the-art in the

study of the structural and electrical properties of semiconductors

by the application of transmission and scanning electron

microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, X-ray techniques and all

related assessment methods.


Special conference sessions will concentrate on recent

developments in high-resolution imaging and analytical (S)TEM,

advances in SPM and SEM applications, the important

characteristics of epitaxial layers (including III-nitrides), quantum

nanostructures (dots, wires and wells), the effects of advanced

device processing treatments (especially for silicon technology),

metal-semiconductor contacts and silicides, together with critical

device properties, FIB applications and failure analysis. Prominent

invited speakers will introduce each topic area: full details are given

at the conference web site:

{underline} {color} {param} 0000,8000,0000 {/param} http://www.rms.org.uk/MSMXIV {/underline} {/color}


The Proceedings of the conference will be published and the final

call for papers has now been issued. Abstracts (deadline 3

DECEMBER 2004) should be submitted by E-mail to
{underline} {color} {param} 0000,7F00,0000 {/param} lucy-at-rms.org.uk {/underline} {/color} .


Additional general conference information can be obtained from the

Secretariat at the RMS ( {underline} {color} {param} 0000,7F00,0000 {/param} lucy-at-rms.org.uk {/underline} {/color} ). The conference

Chairmen are Prof Tony Cullis ( {underline} {color} {param} 0000,8000,0000 {/param} a.g.cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk {/underline} {/color} ) and Dr

John Hutchison ( {underline} {color} {param} 0000,8000,0000 {/param} john.hutchison-at-materials.ox.ac.uk {/underline} {/color} ), who may be
contacted with any scientific programme enquiries.


************************************************


{nofill}
Professor Tony Cullis FRS
Dept of Electronic and Electrical Eng
University of Sheffield
Mappin Street
Sheffield
S1 3JD, UK

Tel: +44-114-222-5407
Fax: +44-114-272-6391
E-mail: a.g.cullis-at-sheffield.ac.uk


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 06:42:06 2004



From: Frank Eggert :      eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 13:56:47 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To Mike Marks and all, who have interest to this topic!

I agre with Mike Lee:
/As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative or it
is
/qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a differing
/of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not exist.

My contribution:
There is no 'semiquantitative analysis'. The reasons are:

First:
Even, there does not exists really a pure qualitative analysis. In any
case 'qualitative' results should be reported only together with some
remarks for which elements are not detectable (e.g. Carbon if EDX with
Be-window is used) and that all other elements are below the detection
limit (e.g. between 0.1 to 0.3 % with EDX in EPMA / sometimes more /
depends from acquisition time, element overlaps, ...). If not, incorrect
decisions are risked, because the results-user may be is not informed,
that the detection limits are not in order of magnitude of ppm or ppb,
possible to analyze with other analytical techniques.

Second:
In the past, 'semiquantitativ anaysis' was used for 'stanardless
analysis'. But this is wrong because there is the indication, that
standardless is not really quantitative. But, both principle methods
(with or without standards) have errors sources. The advantages are with
standard comparison analysis in case of well defined specimens (flat,
polished) and a good known set of standards. Finally, if the standard is
with identical concentrations, the errors are reduced only to statistic
and systematic errors of data acquisition. But if the analyst has to
analyze rough surfaces, particles or other not well defined specimens
(in most cases given in SEM), the standardless method is the first
choice even from the point of view of errors. In such cases no standards
are really available. The errors of standardless analysis are possible
to get 3% and less (relatively, concentrations } 5% absolute), even in
case of irregular surfaces (P/B-method). And, using P/B methods, even an
absolut determination of element concentrations is given. No
normalization to 100% is necessary. The normalization to 100 per cent is
truly bad, like Jacques has indicated. But modern standardless analysis
has no longer an automatical normalization of results.

Third:
May be some analysts are using 'semiguantitative analysis' for EDX
systems, because the WDX has better detection limits and (sometimes not
ever) results with higher accuracy and precision. They claim, only WDX
analysis results are 'quantitative'. But the detection limits are only
better of factor ten. Then, all spectrometry methods in electron
microscopes are 'semi quantitative' from the point of view of other
analytical methods (XRF, HPLC, optical spectrometry, ...), because 0.01
per cent (or 100 ppm) are bad from their point of view.

Finally:
We should not longer use the term 'semi-quantitative'. It was used to
discredit EDX or standardless analysis, as well.
If an EPMA-result is reported, an error should be given for each
element concentration result (calculated errors with error propagation
with all statistical and systematical errors). The true errors of so
called 'only quantitative' method of standard comparison procedure can
be much higher than standardless. It depends e.g. from acquisition time
and other influences (see above). Unfortunately most commercial programs
does not have a proper error calculation (most cases only the statistic
error of net counts). That is why Ron wrote:
/It is too easy for an unaware user to accept the
/computer's 'quantiative' analysis to several decimal places
/without questioning it.
But whatever, standardless is quantitative. Errors are a little bit
higher in comparison to well defined standard-comparison, but not in any
cases! If there is a not well defined specimen, the analyst can rely on
standardless methods much more (without 100 per cent normalization!).
The normalization e.g. of net counts to 100 per cent and reporting
of these results... is simple wrong. The non-linear excitation and
absorption interactions in specimen are the reasons, that simple
normalization does not match. These kind of results are never
quantitative, from all point of view. Better is, to have no analysis
results or only qualitative list of elements (but take into mind:
chapter 'First').

Best regards


Frank Eggert

-------------------------------------------------
http://www.microanalyst.net
-------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 07:44:20 2004



From: Bruce Girrell :      bigirrell-at-microlinetc.com
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 09:00:59 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Spatial frequency, noise and magnification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You are correct. It is inappropriate to use the same filter for the two
different images. A filter should be tuned to the frequency content of the
information contained in the image. If the image components and noise are of
similar spatial frequencies then at least some noise will necessarily be
passed along with the image components. Otherwise, your other choice is to
attenuate the noise to a greater degree at the expense of the high frequency
components of the image.

Simple low pass filtering is not the only option, though. Pattern noise,
such as diagonal bands, can be effectively removed in the frequency domain
without destroying the high frequency content of the entire image, for
example. Also, for spike noise, median filters can be very effective at
maintaining high frequency image information (edges) while dramatically
reducing the noise.

Bruce Girrell


} Usually digital filtering imaging system
} itself is in fact a low pass filter process, and high frequency component
} will be treated as noise. Therefore in an image with high
} magnification, the
} signal's spatial elements located at low frequency, it is then easier to
} filter out high frequency element - noise.

} In another trend for an image
} with low magnification while the signals will distribute at the high
} frequency side. That is to say, some signals of useful information will be
} considered as noise, in particular in actual high SNR case.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 11:46:00 2004



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 10:01:06 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Vacuum Evaporators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We also purchased a 208, at least 2 yrs ago now in my previous
position. Our pump down time was quite short compared to 30 min.
indicated by Bill Tivol in his note. The unit was easy to use i.e. user
friendly, and required only minimum maintenance. We had one carbon, and
two metal evaporation sources for high and low angle. We ordered a
rotary accessory however never received that. This was important to us
for SEM biological samples or any samples with very rough topography.
We had many users, and still had no problems. This was in general one
of the best evaporators I've purchased over the many years of my
microscopy career. I have no affiliation with the manufacturer of this
equipment except as a satisfied customer.

Cheers,
Judy Murphy
Stockton, CA



Oparowski, Joseph wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 12:31:16 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 10:45:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz Ergolux Repair Sources Needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Doug;
I know of two:
Optotek
Box 2140
Los Gatos, CA 95031-2140
Contact Klaus Ryser, (800) 924-6023

SERCO Technical Services, Inc.
12520 Morgan Territory Road
Livermore, CA 94551
Contact Emile Meylan, 800 (483) 0508

John Mardinly
Intel

-----Original Message-----
} From: Doug Baldwin [mailto:dougbaldwin-at-mindspring.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 4:05 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I have a Leitz Ergolux with a broken focus mechanism and needs repairs.
Given the 20 year age of this model, Leica USA says it must go to Leica
Germany for repairs. Does anyone on the list have any qualified US
third-party repair sources?

I'm expecting a repair manual for the Ergolux any day so I should be
able to
identify the parts for the repair. The replacement parts are still
available
from Leica Germany.

Thanks for your help.

Doug Baldwin





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 13:50:48 2004



From: Carina Cintia Ferrari :      CFerrari-at-Leloir.org.ar
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 17:03:23 -0300
Subject: [Microscopy] LVEM5

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are interesting in buying a LVEM 5 microscopy. I really appreciate
anyinformation or any advice about it
I am sending you the web page of it:
http://www.lv-em.com/
Thank you in advance

Dr. Carina Ferrari







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 12 17:51:58 2004



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 2004 16:06:24 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EM Technician Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The following is forwarded from San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton, CA.
Sorry for the short notice, I just received it myself. Briefly, this is a
technical position at a community college. Lots of interaction with
students. Twelve months a year, they list salary at $ 3034 - 3687/mo.
Follow the link below for the details.


}
} Hi folks,
}
} I believe that the best way to advertise for our open EM Technician
} Position is through the EM community itself. So I'm asking you to
} forward this email to anyone who might be interested in applying for the
} position.
}
} Links to the job description and application forms can be found at:
}
} http://www.deltacollege.edu/dept/hr/classified.html
}
} The application deadline is December 3, so there isn't much time.
}
} Thanks for your help!
}

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 13 08:57:09 2004



From: cherry.greiner-at-tufts.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 09:13:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Non infinity corrected microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (cherry.greiner-at-tufts.edu) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 12, 2004 at 16:04:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cherry.greiner-at-tufts.edu
Name: Cherry Greiner

Organization: Tufts University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:Non infinity corrected microscope

Question: I have a used Leica Orthoplan UV microscope, a non-infity corrected microscope that I am aligning. I'd like to understand what the optics are doing for reflected illumination. The instruction manual only describes transmission illumination.

I am coupling a collimated beam from a lamp (+condenser). First element my input beam encouters in the microscope is a lens with a focal length of } 100 mm, 2nd element is a smaller lens and an aperture diaphragm followed by a field diagphragm, splitter then objective. The 2nd smaller lens is only 90 mm from the first lens. Not sure why this is located { focal lenght of first lens. I am assuming that because they have 2 lenses, I'm suppose to have a collimated beam after my 2nd lens which is not true in this case. Can anyone give me any idea what the purpose of each lens and if these lenses are at the correct location? Anyone familiar with this microscope?

Thanks
Cherry Greiner

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 13 08:58:07 2004



From: pollingmel-at-aol.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 09:14:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Optical Microscopy - Olympus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (pollingmel-at-aol.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Saturday, November 13, 2004 at 08:33:46
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pollingmel-at-aol.com
Name: Mel Pollinger

Organization: New York Microscopical Society

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Optical Microscopy - Olympus

Question:
I am looking for an Olympus MTV-S video adapter with lens. I also would like to find an NFK 6.7x LD. for the Olympus trinocular head for the BHT system. Does anyone have either or both of these items for sale or swap?

Mel Pollinger
H: 201-791-9826



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 13 08:57:42 2004



From: Bstud-at-yandex.ru (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 09:13:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: monte CArlo SImulation of electroN trajectory in sOlids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Bstud-at-yandex.ru) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Saturday, November 13, 2004 at 05:32:28
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Bstud-at-yandex.ru
Name: Andrey

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] monte CArlo SImulation of electroN trajectory in sOlids

Question: Please, help me to use this program. It has a strange option "Surface radius of BE". Answer, if you know, what it means.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 13 08:56:48 2004



From: kssim-at-mmu.edu.my (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 09:12:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: spatial frequency, noise and SEM magnification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (kssim-at-mmu.edu.my) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, November 12, 2004 at 05:06:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kssim-at-mmu.edu.my
Name: kssim

Organization: mmu

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Dear All,

I have problem as following:- I need to know the relationship between spatial frequency, noise and SEM magnification. I am not sure the following is true, please kindly correct me. Thanks

When typical specimen elements of an image occupy several image pixels, the image itself will have suitable spatial components, i.e. rich information in low spatial frequency element. Usually digital filtering imaging system itself is in fact a low pass filter process, and high frequency component will be treated as noise. Therefore in an image with high magnification,the signal's spatial elements located at low frequency, it is then easier to filter out high frequency element - noise. In another trend for an image with low magnification while the signals will distribute at the high frequency side. That is to say, some signals of useful information will be considered as noise, in particular in actual high SNR case.

Pleaes kindly comment with many thanks
Ks.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 08:58:32 2004



From: Robert Fitton :      fittonro-at-luther.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:15:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Xenopus eye prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,

I'm looking for advice from anyone with experience in the preparation of
Xenopus eyes for TEM. Specifically interested in your favorite protocol for
basic anatomy.

Thanks, Robert
--
Robert Fitton
Teaching Associate/Director of Laboratories
Luther College
Department of Biology
700 College Drive
Decorah, IA 52101

Voice 563-387-1559
FAX 563-387-1080




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 11:35:34 2004



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:53:39 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Xenopus eye prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Robert,
Back some 25 yrs ago, we worked on TEM for Xenopus for 3 yrs or so. For
the eye, we used either Epon 812 (could substitute Embed 812 or any
successful Epon substitute) or LR White. The important part however was
the vacuum infiltration which we used at every step. Most of the
protocol was standard except we extended the times.

3% Glut or 3%Glut2.5%Paraformaldehyde - 3 hrs
Wash
2% OsO4 - 1.5 hrs
Wash
Dehydration in 25,50,75,95,100 EtOH
For Epon
PropOxide 2X
PO:Epon (2:1,1:1,1:2) 12 hrs each
Pure Epon 2 changes
Let sit in capsules 12 hr before polymerization in oven

LRWhite: same up to PropOxide
No PO
No ratio infiltration
Pure LRWhite - 5 changes
Polymerize

We also often did an en bloc uranyl acetate stain after the OsO4.

If I did it today, would use microwave protocols with cold stage and
vacuum unit in microwave.

Cheers,
Judy Murphy
Stockton, CA

Robert Fitton wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 12:43:12 2004



From: Salamon, Daniel :      Daniel.Salamon-at-nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:01:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM snorkel lens second crossover

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,

I am currently working on a Hitachi S4800 FESEM with a snorkel-type
objective lens. I noticed that other than the beam crossover used for
imaging (which corresponds to the displayed working distance), there is a
second crossover that produces a half-decent image (probably larger spot).

I haven't looked into the electron optics (this should read: I was too
lazy), but I believe this has something to do with either the magnetic field
in the final lens or the field of the lower SE detector.

Can anyone explain this phenomenon?

Thanks,
Daniel Salamon
Technical Officer, Electron Microscopy

National Institute for Nanotechnology, NRC
W6-081 ECERF Bldg
9107-116 Street
Edmonton, AB. T6G 2V4

Phone: Office (780) 492 8878
Lab (780) 492 8872
DocuFax: (780) 492 8632



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 13:02:26 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:35:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EDS information!!!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





I really want to thank everyone, including all the sales reps, who have
answered my request for information on EDS systems.

I was out of town for a week and I was not able to access my E-mail or
office phone, for this I apologize. The information and literature has
been very helpful!


Thanks again to everyone who chipped in and contributed!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 13:25:09 2004



From: Robert Harries :      reh-at-dataVinci.ca
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:43:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Continuing Education [CE] Courses for Microscopists

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Do CE courses exist for microscopists?

If yes, could someone pls direct me to a site that has some.

Thank you,

Robert Harries


Robert E. Harries, PEng. MBA
General Manager
data Vinci, Inc
6362 First Line Road
Kars Ontario K0A2E0 Canada

Phone 613-489-2581
Fax 613-489-0739
Email reh-at-dataVinci.ca




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 15:53:23 2004



From: Valery Ray :      vray-at-partbeamsystech.com
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 14:12:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] DSM 960 manuals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear listers,

I am searching for manuals and electronic drawings for
ZEISS DSM 960 SEM that I am trying to revive. Any
information pointing to the possible source of such
documentation will be greatly appreciated.

Please respond directly, unless you think that this is
something what may be of general interest.

Thank you very much beforehand,
Valery Ray


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 16:06:39 2004



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 16:24:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Continuing Education [CE] Courses for

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Robert

There are several sources of courses, and most of them offer some sort of
CE credit:
Check out the LeHigh program (Charlie Lynch and team) and the program at
North Carolina State U (John Russ, et. al)
The Royal Microscopical Society in the UK has an on-going educational
program and also offers two levels of certifications.
McCrone Institute in Chicago also has a wide range of courses. I don't
know what their certification standard is but a good case could be made for
"CE" equivalencies.

Then, of course, if you are interested in more customized programs, MME
offers on-site courses. We follow the IACET guidelines for Continuing Ed
credits. If you are interested in this direction, please contact me off-line.

Thanks and good hunting!
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website
to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available
through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

Caveat: MME has a commercial interest in providing customized, on-site
short courses



At 01:43 PM 11/15/2004, Robert Harries wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 17:14:44 2004



From: Don H :      morningstar-at-att.net
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 18:33:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Continuing Education [CE] Courses for Microscopists

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Barbara Foster wrote:

} McCrone Institute in Chicago also has a wide range of courses. I don't
} know what their certification standard is but a good case could be made
} for "CE" equivalencies.

I have taken three McCrone courses and they granted CEUs. I highly
recommend MCRI. Expensive, but well worth it; very hands-on, Chicago is
a fun town, the instructors are great, and the whole experience is very
motivating.


Don J. Halterman, Jr.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 17:57:24 2004



From: ptibbits-at-emerson-ept.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 2004 18:16:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: blue-green powder in Chiller

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (ptibbits-at-emerson-ept.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, November 15, 2004 at 07:43:29
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ptibbits-at-emerson-ept.com
Name: Patrick Tibbits

Organization: Emerson Power Transmission

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Dear Microscopists,

I'm seeing that blue-green powder again on the bottom of my Haskris chiller tank. Previous discussions on this list identified it as a corrosion product from the Copper coolant lines.

Can anyone suggest a corrosion inhibitor?

I run 10% ethylene glycol in distilled water. The closed-loop Haskris chiller maintains about 68 degrees F, 14 psi.

Patrick


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 15 21:27:19 2004



From: :      Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 14:45:52 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Evaporating Platinum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

A colleague wants to make some Pt mirrors and has asked me to produce
them. I am having a great deal of difficulty evaporating the Pt though.
I have tried tungsten baskets, wires and boats, but when the Pt melts,
before it begins to evaporate the wire or boat breaks.

I have tried heating it up slowly and also quickly but with no luck!
Can anyone give me any clues as to how I might get the Pt films done?
Unfortunately evaporation is the only method I can use.

Thank you very much

Colin Veitch

Electron Microscopist

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology

PO Box 21, BELMONT, Vic. 3216. Australia.

E-mail: colin.veitch-at-csiro.au

Web: http://www.tft.csiro.au

Tel: +61 (0) 3 5246 4000
Mob: 0438 538 475
Fax: +61 (0) 3 5246 4811



The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may
not copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
received this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Textile and Fibre
Technology on +61 3 5246 4000.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 16 03:57:06 2004



From: James Chalcroft :      jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 11:15:11 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Evaporating Platinum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colin,

Have you tried evaporating the Pt alone, i.e. without involving
tungsten?
Perhaps one or several lengths of 1mm diameter Platinum wire spanning
the two boat electrodes might still give off enough metal to make the
mirror before melting through.
Alternatively, you could remain with tungsten because of its high
melting point. The fragility of tungsten may be due to some amalgamation
with the Pt, which will also perhaps add to your problem by depositing W
also on the mirror. To avoid this, could you perhaps try placing some
inert material between the boat and the Pt? I have never tried this, but
you might try using a thin bed of sand (or pure silica or even a small
piece of coverslip) beneath the Pt. An indirectly heated tiny porcelain
crucible with the Pt inside might also work within a tungsten basket.
The last and possibly most effective way might be to go to electron beam
evaporation (with the gun pointing upwards) because here the substrate
and evaporant do not have to bear any mechanical stresses. If you have
access to suitable EB electrodes and the associated controller
electronics this would be a logical choice
Good luck,

Jim Chalcroft

-----Original Message-----
} From: Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au [mailto:Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au]
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 4:46 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Hi,

A colleague wants to make some Pt mirrors and has asked me to produce
them. I am having a great deal of difficulty evaporating the Pt though.
I have tried tungsten baskets, wires and boats, but when the Pt melts,
before it begins to evaporate the wire or boat breaks.

I have tried heating it up slowly and also quickly but with no luck!
Can anyone give me any clues as to how I might get the Pt films done?
Unfortunately evaporation is the only method I can use.

Thank you very much

Colin Veitch

Electron Microscopist

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology

PO Box 21, BELMONT, Vic. 3216. Australia.

E-mail: colin.veitch-at-csiro.au

Web: http://www.tft.csiro.au

Tel: +61 (0) 3 5246 4000
Mob: 0438 538 475
Fax: +61 (0) 3 5246 4811



The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may
not copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
received this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Textile and Fibre
Technology on +61 3 5246 4000.







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 16 05:14:34 2004



From: Frank Eggert :      eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 14:14:33 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Quantitative versus semi-quantitative

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colin

I normally only use platinum for simple shadowing so the quantities may be a bit less than you need for mirrors, but it should work if you're using a reasonably thick tungsten wire filament (0.5 to 1mm diam) and reasonably thin platinum wire (0.1 to 0.2mm diam) for evaporation. I make the filament by slowly bending a V-shape by hand (not too sharp a V perhaps more like a U) then making two more bends to give me the filament shape ( ___/\___ ). If you bend the tungsten too sharply it tends to greatly weaken it.

The other thing to be careful about is that the tungsten wire is not under any tension when it's held in the electrode connectors of the evaporator. If you can't adjust the filament holder then re-bend the wire until it fits. I would then carefully wrap a length of platinum around the pointed tip as tightly as possible. When heating up the filament keep an eye on it through smoked/dark glass and you should be able to see that the platinum is dark as the tungsten glows yellow/white then it will glow and form a droplet at the tip of the tungsten and with very little extra heat it should disappear over a few seconds. If you rush this final stage the platinum can heat unevenly and may even drop/ping off.

Even if you're careful you may only get 1 or 2 goes out of a tungsten filament especially if you move or adjust it.

Good luck

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK

e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk


----- Original Message -----
} From: Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au

Hi Colin:

The melting point of Pt is well below that of W; 1174 vs. 3410 degrees C and
is recommended for evaporation of Pt. The difference in melting points would
preclude any W contamination of your mirror. I would use a Tungsten boat
rather than a basket because of its robust nature. Maybe the baskets you
are using are getting stressed when they are being fixed into the evaporator
causing breakage when heated. A Carbon crucible is really required for Pt
evaporation by the indirect heating method rather than a ceramic vessel
mentioned. James is correct that EB evaporation would give you the best
results, not only the quality of the thin film but better control of the
final thickness too. However, they are very expensive and you may not have
access to them at present.

Best,

Al Coritz
Electron Microscopy Sciences
----- Original Message -----
} From: "James Chalcroft" {jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de}
To: {Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au}
Cc: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 5:15 AM

michael shaffer wrote:

} Frank Eggert writes ...
}
}
}
} } To Mike Marks and all, who have interest to this topic!
} }
} } I agre with Mike Lee:
} } /As I understand this issue, "Either a method is quantitative or it
} } is
} } /qualitative". Two methods could be quantitative with a differing
} } /of uncertainty. Therefore semi-quantitaive does not exist.
} }
} }
}
} I agree that all methods which produce absolute values along with
} uncertainty, any uncertainty, should be considered a "quantitative" method.
}
Every quantitative method is charged with uncertainties. Yes, sometimes
these uncertainties are not known or possibly more than 100 per cent.
That is, if one has measured 5% of an element, the element concentration
is between 0..10% (an enormously intervall for confidence), but not
50%... That is quantitative, too. There are analytical methods which
have never better results.
The uncertainties should be distinguish between 'precision' and
'accuracy'. Sometimes it is very easy to measure very precise an
element-concentration (low deviation of different measure results) but
the mean value of all measurements is far away from the truth. You can
determinate an element concentration very precisely, but the result is
wrong. Simply, use a wrong standard or a standard with a false known
element content and that would be happen. Or a quantification of a rough
specimen surface with flat polished standards is the same. At other
hand, the precision can be bad (e.g. using P/B-methods, because of the
low count rate of the Bremsstrahlung background, always directly used).
The results are with higher fluctuations, but the mean value is near to
the truth. You have a statistical uncertainties, but you can rely in the
mean result.

} However, what would you call a method which made no attempt at including
} uncertainty at all?
}
Standardless and standard comparison analysis methods in EPMA as well
have uncertainties (errors always exist). It is not always common
decided, which of both methods have lower uncertainties. That depends
from different influences. The problem of normalization to 100 per cent
with common-used elderly standardless analysis is a source of wrong
results, that is true. Such a method made no attempt at including
uncertainity. It is possible, e.g. if there is a not detectable element
in specimen (or a wrong element identification), all element
concentration results are going to become wrong per definition. I would
call such methods as 'not quantitative' or the results are given with
'draft estimations'.

} There will always be those of us who believe a
} quantitative value includes an error analysis. That is, to be
} "quantitative" is to be "confident". Anything else is "something less than
} quantitative", and we don't care what it is called.
}
} my C&0.02 & cheerios ... shAf :o)
} Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
} www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)
}
}
It doesn't matter, I can be confident with an quantitative result and an
qualitative result, as well. The entire uncertainties should be known
(rough common estimations or direct output of the computer program - but
not only statistical error of net counts!) and added to the quantitative
results (to have a confidence intervall). If not, only qualitative
results should be given together with the detection limits for all
elements and the elements, which are not possible to detect.

Finally there are only quantitative results (with different
uncertainties depend from data acquisition time, the selected evaluation
method, the kind and behavior of specimen...) and qualitative analysis
(all 'detected' elements). Semi-quantitative is somewhat between
quantitative results and reporting the detected elements only, I'm not
able to imagine what it is?


Best regards

Frank Eggert
-------------------------------------------------
http://www.microanalyst.net
-------------------------------------------------










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 16 12:57:15 2004



From: Evelyn York :      eyork-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 11:15:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] I need help finding comparative rates for SEM, TEM, XRD, EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear fellow Microscopists,

I have been asked to assemble a comparison list of usage rates for SEM,
EM, TEM, XRD, XRF, ICP-OES, ICP-MS, and for Stable Isotope MS. This
is a huge task and I am appealing to members of the forum for any related
information you can provide.

I am interested in College/University recharge rates as well as private
service
organization charges.

Your help would be most appreciated - Thank you,
Evelyn



Evelyn York

Analytical Facility
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0208

(858) 534-2438




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 16 15:24:40 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:45:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Evaporating Platinum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colin
Last time I did Pt shadowing was many years ago. So, I don't remember all
details. What I remember is that I was able to evaporate Pt from the
basket or V-shaped filament. You need to use at least 0.5 mm W wire and
less than 0.1 mm Pt (2-3 cm long). You need to heat up filament very slow
until you melt Pt. At this point you'll see that Pt disappeared... it's
because surface tension - Pt spread on W surface. Than you need slightly
increase current, so Pt will start evaporate. It's just slightly above the
melting point. If you increase current too much or too "sharp" Pt will
splash. For some reason filament may be damaged at this point as well. I
think, with excessive heat, Pt just dissolved filament, it increases
current and finally blow filament out... This is a good news.

The bad news is that as far as I do remember, using "filament" technique,
you could not evaporate much Pt (most Pt will stick to the filament and
will not evaporate). Overloading with Pt will destroy filament (as it
happens in your case). So, you could not produce mirror from one
evaporation (I was trying, it does not work). You need to do multiple
evaporation using fresh pre-heated filament every time. Even than, mirror
would not be perfect: Pt tends to condense on the surface in huge
aggregates, which made surface very rough. The best I had was something
looks like polished graphite surface: silvering black. You better may try
Al or Cr. Good luck, Sergey

P.S. Another trick: you need to use pre-heated filament.
At 02:45 PM 11/16/2004 +1100, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 16 16:28:42 2004



From: patricia.miller-at-loctite.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 2004 19:34:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Al,
The difference in melting temperatures doesn't necessarily mean you won't
get any W contamination, after all W-Al dendrites is a resolution sample for
SEM. Metals do, very literally, dissolve in one another below their melting
points.

Ken Converse

owner 
QUALITY IMAGES
Servicing Scanning Electron Microscopes
Since 1981
16 Creek Rd.
Delta, PA 17314
717-456-5491
Fax 717-456-7996
kenconverse-at-qualityimages.biz
qualityimages.biz


-----Original Message-----
} From: Sample Prep [mailto:sampleprep-at-earthlink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 7:51 AM
To: James Chalcroft; Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au
Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Hi Colin:

The melting point of Pt is well below that of W; 1174 vs. 3410 degrees C and
is recommended for evaporation of Pt. The difference in melting points would
preclude any W contamination of your mirror. I would use a Tungsten boat
rather than a basket because of its robust nature. Maybe the baskets you
are using are getting stressed when they are being fixed into the evaporator
causing breakage when heated. A Carbon crucible is really required for Pt
evaporation by the indirect heating method rather than a ceramic vessel
mentioned. James is correct that EB evaporation would give you the best
results, not only the quality of the thin film but better control of the
final thickness too. However, they are very expensive and you may not have
access to them at present.

Best,

Al Coritz
Electron Microscopy Sciences
----- Original Message -----
} From: "James Chalcroft" {jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de}
To: {Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au}
Cc: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 5:15 AM

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (patricia.miller-at-loctite.com) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 16, 2004 at 13:03:28
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: patricia.miller-at-loctite.com
Name: Patricia Miller

Organization: Henkel Corp.

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Question: I have a scanning electron microscope and use carbon adhesive tabs for mounting specimens. I image a lot of particulates so the background of the mounting tab is visible in the images. I have tried several different suppliers and have not been able to find tabs with the mirror smooth surface I desire. The company I formerly purchased them from is no longer able to supply them. Has anyone recently purchased such tabs, and if not, are there any suggestions what to do about the pitted background my current tabs show?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 01:03:33 2004



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 01:22:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Leitz Ergolux Repair Sources Needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have been very happy with my dealings with Terry Anderson at.
Advanced Instrument Mfg. LLC
15650 Vineyard Blvd.
Unit B
Morgan Hill, CA 95037
phone (408) 779-4240
Fax (408) 779-8492
{}


} From: "Mardinly, John" {john.mardinly-at-intel.com}

} Doug;
} I know of two:
} Optotek
} Box 2140
} Los Gatos, CA 95031-2140
} Contact Klaus Ryser, (800) 924-6023
}
} SERCO Technical Services, Inc.
} 12520 Morgan Territory Road
} Livermore, CA 94551
} Contact Emile Meylan, 800 (483) 0508
}
} John Mardinly
} Intel
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Doug Baldwin [mailto:dougbaldwin-at-mindspring.com]
} Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2004 4:05 PM
} To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz Ergolux Repair Sources Needed
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
}
} I have a Leitz Ergolux with a broken focus mechanism and needs repairs.
} Given the 20 year age of this model, Leica USA says it must go to Leica
} Germany for repairs. Does anyone on the list have any qualified US
} third-party repair sources?
}
} I'm expecting a repair manual for the Ergolux any day so I should be
} able to
} identify the parts for the repair. The replacement parts are still
} available
} from Leica Germany.
}
} Thanks for your help.
}
} Doug Baldwin
}
}
}
}
}
}






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 01:57:45 2004



From: Orkun Ersoy :      oersoy-at-hacettepe.edu.tr
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 10:16:13 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] RE:viaWWW: SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

At which magnification, you see the pittings on adhesive? I use
adhesives from SPI and I have no problems about background? Can you send
me a photo of pitting occured at the background? I want to compare it
with background of my images...



Thanks...







Orkun ERSOY

Hacettepe University

Department of Geological Engineering

Beytepe-Ankara / TURKEY

06532

Ph: +90 312 2977700 / 126





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 06:40:24 2004



From: Mary Ellen Pease :      MPEASE-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 07:58:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] KMR2 knifemaker service?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

We have a 5 year old Leica KMR2 knifemaker that is in need of service.
The scoring wheel has been changed, but it appears that the clamp arm
and pressure swing arm are loose and thus insufficient clamping is
available to create a break. Apparently LEICA doesn't do field service
on knifemakers in our area and requires return to their shop for repair
as many of their techs have limited experience on this instrument. Is
there anyone else in the Maryland area who services these onsite and has
access to LEICA parts?

If anyone knows Pat Capagrossi, our former LKB, then LEICA service
engineer, tell her we miss her and her expertise!

Thanks,
Mary Ellen Pease



Mary Ellen Pease, M.S.
Laboratory Manager
Glaucoma Research Lab & Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital
175 Woods Research
600 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287
410-955-3337 (phone/voicemail)
443-287-2711 (fax)
mpease-at-jhmi.edu

WARNING: Email sent over the Internet is not secure. Information sent
by email may not remain confidential.
DISCLAIMER: This email is intended only for the individual to whom it
is addressed. It may be used only in accordance with applicable laws.
If you receive this email by mistake, notify the sender and destroy the
email.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 07:02:49 2004



From: Gerroir, Paul :      paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 08:20:17 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Patricia,
This matter was discussed some time ago so may be archived. I too have
observed "cracking" or "wrinkling" of the double-sided carbon adhesive
which makes for a very distracting background. I remember many
microscopists previously commented on this topic, however, I can't
recall whether a reliable solution to the problem was ever put forward.

Paul


Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: 905-823-7091, ext.216
FAX: 905-822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver
[mailto:patricia.miller-at-loctite.com]
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 8:35 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (patricia.miller-at-loctite.com) from
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, November 16, 2004 at 13:03:28
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: patricia.miller-at-loctite.com
Name: Patricia Miller

Organization: Henkel Corp.

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Question: I have a scanning electron microscope and use carbon adhesive
tabs for mounting specimens. I image a lot of particulates so the
background of the mounting tab is visible in the images. I have tried
several different suppliers and have not been able to find tabs with the
mirror smooth surface I desire. The company I formerly purchased them
from is no longer able to supply them. Has anyone recently purchased
such tabs, and if not, are there any suggestions what to do about the
pitted background my current tabs show?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 07:56:34 2004



From: vincent.otieno-alego-at-afp.gov.au (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 08:15:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM Interfaced with a Raman

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (vincent.otieno-alego-at-afp.gov.au) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 17, 2004 at 00:03:41
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: vincent.otieno-alego-at-afp.gov.au
Name: Vincent

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM Interfaced with a Raman

Question: We are considering the posibility of interfacing a Raman spectrometer with an SEM. I know Renishaw has a commercial unit (SCA) that can be used to achieve this interface.

Does anyone know if there are any alternative suppliers of such an interface?

Are there any 'home-made' types that are in use?

Thanks.

Vincent

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 08:10:26 2004



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 09:58:54 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: viaWWW: SEM carbon adhesive tabs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Just a suggestion, but Ag tape works very nicely. It has higher electrical conductivity and hence less specimen charging. It also has the advantage of being less "sticky" which facilitates removing the specimen from the tape/stub if that is required. The only caveat is that it is much more expensive. However, if used sparingly, it seems to pay for itself in time. I ruined many fragile samples trying to pry them loose from carbon tape and even the carbon "dots."

I won't endorse any specific vendor since I'm sure everyone can find silver tape vis-à-vis the web.

Regards to everyone,

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gerroir, Paul [mailto:paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2004 8:20 AM
To: by way of MicroscopyListserver; microscopy-at-microscopy.com

I have had a problem with these as well and have returned to double sticky
scotch tape, which can be sputter coated. If I wanted a really smooth
background I use glass cover slips. There are round ones that fit a
Cambridge type stub. If stuff doesn't stick I will charge the glass with
poly-lysine or coat it with "grid glue". Grid glue is made by taking one
inch of scoth tape and dissolving off the sticky in 5 mls of
chloroform. (Some one will correct me if my recipe is wrong) dip the
coverslip in it and let it dry.

Greg



} -----Original Message-----
} } From: by way of MicroscopyListserver
} [mailto:patricia.miller-at-loctite.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 8:35 PM
} To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM carbon adhesive tabs
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 10:33:31 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 11:53:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a question about the focus precision at different wavelengths using
an Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 Phase 3 objective.

Has anybody noticed a difference in focal plane between images collected at
465 to 490 nm and images collected at 530 to 560 nm?

We thought we might be having a registration problem in our images of CFP &
YFP expressing cells. To confirm this, we looked at 0.1 um Tetraspeck
beads and 2.5 um beads with a broad 488 absorbing dye. (BTW, the
cells/beads are in 2X PBS, viewed through a 1.5 coverslip and using Cargill
Labs type DF oil.) In all the cases, the focal shift appears to be between
0.3 and 0.5 um in Z.

Just wondering if anybody else has seen this with the same type of objective?

Thanks.
____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
**This electronic transmission contains information that is privileged.**



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 11:33:41 2004



From: Brian Matsumoto :      matsumot-at-lifesci.ucsb.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 09:52:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Digital Imaging and Light Microscopy course in Santa Barbara

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Workshop Announcement
University of California at Santa Barbara


The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and the
Neuroscience Research Institute are sponsoring an advance course on light
microscopy. This 5-day workshop will be offered from March 20 through March
25, 2005 and will consist of lectures and laboratory exercises that will run
from 9 am to approximately 5 pm each day. The seminar/workshop will be
intensive enabling participants to develop theoretical and hands-on
expertise with light microscopes. Attendees will interact closely with the
instructors while using modern research grade microscopes, cameras, and
computers. The seminars and laboratories will cover basic optical theory and
how it pertains to increasing contrast (signal to noise ratio) in biological
samples. Fundamental techniques such as fluorescence, phase contrast,
Nomarski differential interference contrast, and darkfield imaging will be
taught and attendees will use microscopes equipped with these optical
enhancement accessories. In addition, the theory and practice of electronic
image acquisition (analog and digital) will be presented and attendees will
work with low-light cameras, digital image processing computers, and
morphometric programs. There are five research grade microscopes, five
electronic imaging cameras, two computer workstations, and one confocal
microscope. With a maximum enrollment of 10 students, there will be ample
opportunity to work with all of the microscopes and cameras. For those so
interested, intensive hands-on instruction and guidance on the confocal
microscope will be provided.

For a fuller description of the workshop please check the web address below.
Enrollment forms can be completed online and this workshop provides an
opportunity to have a working-vacation in Santa Barbara, California.



http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/mcdb/events/imaging_workshop/index.html

Brian Matsumoto
Adjunct Associate Professor
Dept. MCDB, Neuroscience Research Institute
UCSB
Santa Barbara, CA 93106

voice mail 805-893-8702
FAX 805-893-2005




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 12:41:26 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 14:00:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: NESM's 38th Annual Fall Symposium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The 38th Annual Fall Symposium of the New England Society for Microscopy (NESM)
will again be held on the campus of Gordon College in Wenham, MA. The Symposium
runs from 12Noon - 8pm on Thursday, December 2nd. There will be 2 scientific
sessions with 5 invited speakers, as an after-dinner speaker. Details can be
found on NESM's website (http://prism.mit.edu:8083) under "current newsletter".

Advance registration for this meeting is REQUIRED. The registration form is
included in the newsletter and the registration fee (as well as dinner choice &
registration form) should be sent to: Paul Bain, NESM Treasurer, HMS-Countway
212, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. If you have any questions, please
contact Paul at 617-432-3236 or via email: paul_bain-at-hms.harvard.edu. The
deadline for registration is Monday, November 29th.

There has been one change to the program listed: the after-dinner speaker will
now be Dan Gibson of Worcester Polytechnic Institute who will speak on
"Horseshoe Crabs-Lessons from a Living Legend). Dan is currently a Biological
Director of NESM's Board and is running for President-Elect for 2005.

Please mark your calendars and plan to attend this most interesting meeting.

Peggy Sherwood
Corresponding Secretary & Newsletter Editor, NESM




Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Center for Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 13:39:40 2004



From: Joel Sheffield :      jbs-at-temple.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 14:58:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have wondered about this too, with other lenses. Do you think
that there might be some wavelength dispersion in the specimen
optical system (that is the sample, its mounting medium, the glass
cover slip, and the oil)?



}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------
}
} I have a question about the focus precision at different wavelengths
} using an Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 Phase 3 objective.
}
} Has anybody noticed a difference in focal plane between images
} collected at 465 to 490 nm and images collected at 530 to 560 nm?
}
} We thought we might be having a registration problem in our images of
} CFP & YFP expressing cells. To confirm this, we looked at 0.1 um
} Tetraspeck beads and 2.5 um beads with a broad 488 absorbing dye.
} (BTW, the cells/beads are in 2X PBS, viewed through a 1.5 coverslip
} and using Cargill Labs type DF oil.) In all the cases, the focal
} shift appears to be between 0.3 and 0.5 um in Z.
}
} Just wondering if anybody else has seen this with the same type of
} objective?
}
} Thanks.
} ______________________________________________________________________
} ______ Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein
} Coll. of Med. Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave.
} Bronx, NY 10461 (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL:
} http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} **This electronic transmission contains information that is
} privileged.**
}
}


Joel B. Sheffield, Ph.D.
Biology Department, Temple University
1900 North 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
jbs-at-temple.edu
(215) 204 8839, fax (215) 204 0486
http://astro.temple.edu/~jbs



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 15:00:32 2004



From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 16:18:12 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Evaporating platinum

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colin,

We agree with Sergey on his assessment concerning the difficulties of
coating with platinum.

We coat substrates with PT/IR wire and have a little better success. You
might also consider a tungsten/alumina crucible, perhaps a medium size.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research sells microscopy supplies and accessories,
including tungsten/alumina crucibles

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: ladres-at-att.net






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 16:15:02 2004



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 2004 16:33:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Wrinkles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I often have a problem with ultrathin sections of non decalcified bone.
Regions of mineralized tissue have a lot of wrinkles and folds so that
the whole grids could be not usable. Regions of soft tissue on the same
sections are flat. What is the possible cause and how to avoid it?
Thank you,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 18:34:10 2004



From: :      Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 11:52:45 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Pt evaporation thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thank you very much to all of those who replied to my question on Pt
evaporation. It looks like we'll go down the path of sputtering, with
the help of a colleague nearby.

Cheers


Colin Veitch

Electron Microscopist

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology

PO Box 21, BELMONT, Vic. 3216. Australia.

E-mail: colin.veitch-at-csiro.au

Web: http://www.tft.csiro.au

Tel: +61 (0) 3 5246 4000
Mob: 0438 538 475
Fax: +61 (0) 3 5246 4811



The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may
not copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
received this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Textile and Fibre
Technology on +61 3 5246 4000.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 17 23:30:21 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 00:48:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Problems with carbon discs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Paul Gerroir wrote:
==========================================================
This matter was discussed some time ago so may be archived. I too have
observed "cracking" or "wrinkling" of the double-sided carbon adhesive which
makes for a very distracting background. I remember many microscopists
previously commented on this topic, however, I can't recall whether a
reliable solution to the problem was ever put forward.
==========================================================
The adhesive used for carbon tape and the die cut discs "ages" like any
pressure sensitive acrylic-based adhesive. As time goes on, two things seem
to be happening:

1. The bond between the adhesive and release paper seems to increase so
that when separated, the surface comes out somewhat mottled in appearance
and

2. The adhesive seems to lose some of its "tac" and when this happens, the
surface seems to become more sensitive to the beam.

We advise our customers to not purchase more than a year's requirements for
the best results. And if someone does end up with a large amount, we
advise heatsealing the tape/discs into a plastic polybag followed by
refrigerated storage.

Fresh tape and die cut discs should have a reasonably smooth surface and
should be reasonably resistant to cracking in the beam but it still can be
made to crack, given a high enough beam intensity.

So one might ask: Would an SEM lab be using "old" adhesives? And I can
assure you that the answer is a resounding "yes". I have had the personal
experience of visiting laboratories where the tape they were trying to use
was more than ten years old and they wondered why they were having problems
! Also tape left on a window ledge ,sitting in bright sunlight, will age
in a few months what would otherwise take some number of years.

So the point is, when comparisons are made, keep this in mind so that you
are comparing apples with apples. Do the comparisons with fresh tapes or
discs.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is a major supplier of double sided conductive
adhesive tapes, discs, and sheets so we have a major interest understanding
how these materials age. See URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/cond_adhes.html

Chuck



===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 00:51:04 2004



From: klughammer gmbh :      schmaus-at-klughammer.de
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 08:07:46 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

what you see seems to be chromatic aberration. Here is
some explanation from the Nikon pages
http://www.microscopyu.com/tutorials/java/aberrations/chromatic/

The focal length f varies with the wavelength of light
as illustrated in the tutorial window and Figure 1(a),
which demonstrates the effects of chromatic aberration
on a beam of white light passing through a simple lens.
The component colors (wavelengths) are focused at varying
distances from the lens (Figure 2) to produce an image
having an arbitrary blur radius approximately 0.3 millimeters
in diameter.

Blue light is refracted to the greatest extent followed
by green and red light, a phenomenon commonly referred
to as dispersion. The inability of a lens to bring all
of the colors into a common focus results in a slightly
different image size and focal point for each predominant
wavelength group. This leads to colored fringes surrounding
the image. When the focus is set for the middle of the
wavelength band, the image has a green cast with a halo of
purple (composed of a mixture of red and blue)surrounding it.



When you go to the link mentioned above you will find more
information about "chromatic aberration" as well as
interesting images which explain the result without many words.

The better the objectives are corrected the better the
result of your images with less chromatic aberration.

mfg / regards

Anneliese Schmaus
Product Manager

klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
info-at-klughammer.de
www.klughammer.de



JS} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
JS} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
JS} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
JS} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
JS} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

JS} I have wondered about this too, with other lenses. Do you think
JS} that there might be some wavelength dispersion in the specimen
JS} optical system (that is the sample, its mounting medium, the glass
JS} cover slip, and the oil)?



} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} } I have a question about the focus precision at different wavelengths
} } using an Olympus 60X N.A. 1.4 Phase 3 objective.
} }
} } Has anybody noticed a difference in focal plane between images
} } collected at 465 to 490 nm and images collected at 530 to 560 nm?
} }
} } We thought we might be having a registration problem in our images of
} } CFP & YFP expressing cells. To confirm this, we looked at 0.1 um
} } Tetraspeck beads and 2.5 um beads with a broad 488 absorbing dye.
} } (BTW, the cells/beads are in 2X PBS, viewed through a 1.5 coverslip
} } and using Cargill Labs type DF oil.) In all the cases, the focal
} } shift appears to be between 0.3 and 0.5 um in Z.
} }
} } Just wondering if anybody else has seen this with the same type of
} } objective?
} }
} } Thanks.
} } ______________________________________________________________________
} } ______ Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein
} } Coll. of Med. Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave.
} } Bronx, NY 10461 (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL:
} } http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} } **This electronic transmission contains information that is
} } privileged.**
} }
} }


JS} Joel B. Sheffield, Ph.D.
JS} Biology Department, Temple University
JS} 1900 North 12th Street
JS} Philadelphia, PA 19122
JS} jbs-at-temple.edu
JS} (215) 204 8839, fax (215) 204 0486
JS} http://astro.temple.edu/~jbs



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 06:31:47 2004



From: Mary Ellen Pease :      MPEASE-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 07:46:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: KMR2 knifemaker service?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

It has been brought to my attention that I may have implied that LEICA
service was not helpful to me. Please let me correct that
mis-impression by clearly stating that I received great help from one of
the engineers via phone call later that day, thus eliminating the need
for either field service or returning the instrument for repair. I am a
big fan of Leica products and have been very happy with their
instruments over the past 20 years.

Mary Ellen

} } } Mary Ellen Pease 11/17/04 07:58AM } } }
Hi all,

We have a 5 year old Leica KMR2 knifemaker that is in need of service.
The scoring wheel has been changed, but it appears that the clamp arm
and pressure swing arm are loose and thus insufficient clamping is
available to create a break. Apparently LEICA doesn't do field service
on knifemakers in our area and requires return to their shop for repair
as many of their techs have limited experience on this instrument. Is
there anyone else in the Maryland area who services these onsite and has
access to LEICA parts?

If anyone knows Pat Capagrossi, our former LKB, then LEICA service
engineer, tell her we miss her and her expertise!

Thanks,
Mary Ellen Pease



Mary Ellen Pease, M.S.
Laboratory Manager
Glaucoma Research Lab & Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital
175 Woods Research
600 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287
410-955-3337 (phone/voicemail)
443-287-2711 (fax)
mpease-at-jhmi.edu

WARNING: Email sent over the Internet is not secure. Information sent
by email may not remain confidential.
DISCLAIMER: This email is intended only for the individual to whom it
is addressed. It may be used only in accordance with applicable laws.
If you receive this email by mistake, notify the sender and destroy the
email.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 08:15:10 2004



From: m.serracino-at-igag.cnr.it (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 08:33:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Link exl computer graphics board

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (m.serracino-at-igag.cnr.it) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 08:04:33
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: m.serracino-at-igag.cnr.it
Name: marcello serracino

Organization: Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Link exl computer graphics board

Question: Nestor:
Thank you very much for having set up this Listserver,
without it i could not have resolved my Exl problem, and
many many special thanks to you for your courtesy and
patience in helping to replace the board.

I want to add that, besides my specific problem,I really enjoy the listserver for the many advices, hints and infos i always find on it.

Marcello Serracino
Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria - CNR
c/o Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra
Universita' "La Sapienza"
p.le A. Moro 5
00185 Roma
Italy

tel. +39 06.4991.4793
fax +39 06.446.8632
e-mail: marcello.serracino-at-igag.cnr.it

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 08:21:47 2004



From: Gregory Goodlet :      goodlg-at-matthey.com
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 14:39:09 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM/SEM Job Vacancy U.K.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listservers,

I am pleased to announce that a vacancy for an Electron Microscopist
has arisen here at Johnson Matthey (Sonning Common, near Reading, U.K.).
The successful candidate will work in an extremely well equipped
department.

Please apply directly to Georgie Floyd (see address below).

Thank you for your attention.

Dr Gregory Goodlet
Electron Optics
Johnson Matthey Technology Centre

VACANCY

TECHNOLOGY CENTRE - SONNING COMMON (U.K.)

Electron Microscopist

Johnson Matthey PLC is a world leader in advanced materials technology.
The Technology Centre, based at Sonning Common, undertakes research
work for the group

A vacancy has arisen at the Technology Centre for an Electron
Microscopist to join our team working with both Scanning and
Transmission microscopes. The precise duties will depend on the
experience of the successful candidate but will include sample
preparation, microscopy work, interpretation, reporting and
collaboration with other project scientists. Some technique development
work will also be involved

The successful candidate will be educated to minimum HNC/Degree level
and should possess a sound knowledge of electron microscopy in materials
characterisation.

Applications must be made in writing with full CV and current salary
details to:
Georgie Floyd, Personnel Officer, Johnson Matthey Technology Centre,
Blounts Court, Sonning Common, Reading, RG4 9NH or e-mail
hrjmtc-at-matthey.com

Closing date for applications: Tuesday 30th November 2004



**********************************************************************************************
If the reader of this email is not the intended recipient(s), please be advised that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this information is strictly prohibited. Johnson Matthey PLC has its main place of business at 2-4 Cockspur Street, London (020 7269 8400). Whilst Johnson Matthey aims to keep its network free from viruses you should note that we are unable to scan certain emails, particularly if any part is encrypted or password-protected, and accordingly you are strongly advised to check this email and any attachments for viruses. The company shall NOT ACCEPT any liability with regard to computer viruses transferred by way of email.

Please note that your communication may be monitored in accordance with Johnson Matthey internal policy documentation.
**********************************************************************************************

This message has been scanned for viruses by MailControl - www.mailcontrol.com


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 08:26:18 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Ra=FAl_Pozner?= :      rpozner-at-darwin.edu.ar
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 11:47:30 -0300
Subject: [Microscopy] Ralph knives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello !
Does anybody know if Spurr embedded biological material can be sectioned
with a Ralph knife for light microscopy (1-2 µm thick)? (Technical
handbooks usually relate Raplh knives only with metacrilate sections).
Thanks

Raúl Pozner
Instituto de Botánica Darwinion
CC 22, B1642HYD San Isidro
Buenos Aires - ARGENTINA
rpozner-at-darwin.edu.ar



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 17:11:30 2004



From: sargenkn-at-westminster.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 17:30:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Imaing Venus Flytraps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (sargenkn-at-westminster.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 13:32:50
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: sargenkn-at-westminster.edu
Name: Kristen Sargent

Organization: Westminster College

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: New Wilmington, Pa 16172

Question: I am taking an electron microscopy course where we are in charge of creating our own project. My pet interest are Venus Flytraps, so I chose to work with that. I'm looking at the trap leaves and the spines. My probelm is identifying what I'm seeing. Are there any hints you can give me, or can you point me to some good sources for this.

Thankyou
Kristen Sargent

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 18 23:40:05 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Nov 2004 21:58:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Ralph knives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You could cut Spurr resin with glass knife. I don't think, the geometry of
knife is much important here. Sergey

At 06:47 AM 11/18/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 04:48:14 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Incharge_-_TEM_Laboratory?= :      tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 15:29:31 +0530 (IST)
Subject: [Microscopy] =?iso-8859-1?Q?Low_temperature_stage_for_JEOL_2010_UHR_Model___-_Repeat_request?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,
I was not successful in my first attemt (message sent on nov 11) to get
a response from the list. Is the low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for
JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP22 pole piece) available from GATAN only? I.e., is
this a proprietary item of Gatan?

Best regards
Satyam


} Message sent to the list on November 11, 2004

} Dear All,
} We would like to purchase one low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for
} our JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP 22 pole piece). I am aware of GATAN make and
} have contacts from them. I am wondering whether are there any other
} manufacturer who can supply low-temperature stage for our machine?
} Information may be given off-line also.
} Best regards
} Satyam

--
TEM Laboratory
Institute of Physics
Sachivalaya marg
Bhubaneswar - 751005
India
Fax:+91-674-230 0142
Tel:+91-674-230 1058 extn 124



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 05:11:14 2004



From: James Chalcroft :      jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 12:28:58 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Imaing Venus Flytraps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Kristen,

You could perhaps look at the research work published by the Heidelberg
botanist, Eberhard Schnepf, who did a lot of pioneering TEM work on
plant secretory cells (including Nepenthes, Drosera etc.) years ago. He
may also have described structures in the Venus Fly-trap.
Best wishes,

Jim

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist [mailto:sargenkn-at-westminster.edu]
Sent: Friday, November 19, 2004 12:30 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (sargenkn-at-westminster.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 13:32:50
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: sargenkn-at-westminster.edu
Name: Kristen Sargent

Organization: Westminster College

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: New Wilmington, Pa 16172

Question: I am taking an electron microscopy course where we are in
charge of creating our own project. My pet interest are Venus Flytraps,
so I chose to work with that. I'm looking at the trap leaves and the
spines. My probelm is identifying what I'm seeing. Are there any hints
you can give me, or can you point me to some good sources for this.

Thankyou
Kristen Sargent

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 06:23:08 2004



From: Kevin Mackenzie :      k.s.mackenzie-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 12:41:44 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Carbon support film question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I normally use an old Edwards 306A Coating unit with carbon rods to produce
support films. But have read that carbon fibre will give a much thinner
coating when compared to carbon string or cord. Therefore is it possible to
use carbon fibre to produce carbon support films for TEM using a carbon
attachment with a sputter coater?



many thanks

Kevin






------------

Kevin Mackenzie
Histology and EM Core Facility
Institute of Medical Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Foresterhill

k.s.mackenzie-at-abdn.ac.uk

01224 555822

www.abdn.ac.uk/ims/h-em



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 11:28:08 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 09:45:12 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Low temperature stage for JEOL 2010 UHR Model -

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We purchased one from Oxford Instruments. The design was much different
than Gatan's, and did not use the hex-ring. It also had a much better
drift performance, but then Gatan bought Oxford Instruments holder
division, so now it is a Gatan.

John Mardinly
Intel

-----Original Message-----
} From: Incharge - TEM Laboratory [mailto:tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in]
Sent: Friday, November 19, 2004 2:00 AM
To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
Cc: tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in

Dear All,
I was not successful in my first attemt (message sent on nov 11) to
get
a response from the list. Is the low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for
JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP22 pole piece) available from GATAN only? I.e.,
is
this a proprietary item of Gatan?

Best regards
Satyam


} Message sent to the list on November 11, 2004

} Dear All,
} We would like to purchase one low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for

} our JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP 22 pole piece). I am aware of GATAN make
and
} have contacts from them. I am wondering whether are there any other
} manufacturer who can supply low-temperature stage for our machine?
} Information may be given off-line also.
} Best regards
} Satyam

--
TEM Laboratory
Institute of Physics
Sachivalaya marg
Bhubaneswar - 751005
India
Fax:+91-674-230 0142
Tel:+91-674-230 1058 extn 124





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 12:24:28 2004



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 16:42:12 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re:carbon filter packs for desk-top hoods

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Short answer is yes, it can be done. But...you will have to experiment with
the formula (as with any thermoset resin). The goal is to make the final
hardness flexible enough to cut large areas at 2-3 microns thickness. I used
to work at an Eye Institute at the Univ of SoCal and the ocular pathologist
was very interested in embedding hemispherical cut human autopsy eyes in a
suitable plastic for whole sections containing pupil/optic nerve, hence the
name PO sections. We were able to do this successfully by altering the
ingredients in the Spurr formula and sectioning the eye as a whole mount on
a ralph glass knife. We chose Spurr resin because of its toughness under the
electron beam and low viscosity for infiltration through the sclera wall.
The idea here was to use the embedded sample for light microscopy histology
with routine H&E stains (another revised protocol), immunohisto and if
desired, selected areas for further study by TEM. It took some
experimenting with but we were successful in coming up with a soft enough
formula to allow the whole sectioning for histo and still use the block for
TEM. The big tradeoff was thin sectioning for TEM. The formula tended to be
too soft for 80-90nm sections but was doable with patience and practice.
Sections from what I remember did have a some compression issues. I imagine
if you could cryo the sample at say -60C, you would be more successful with
regard to sectioning artifact.

Good luck

Fred Hayes
Ann Arbor MI
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Raúl Pozner" {rpozner-at-darwin.edu.ar}
To: {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2004 9:47 AM

Hi All,
We have an old "Fume-Gard" portable hood in our lab that we use for
slide staining. Lerner Labs (the manufacturer) seems to be defunct.
We need to replace the vapor absorbent (activated carbon?) filter
pack for it. The old cat. # is 906. The filter pack measures 11.25
long x 5.75 high and 1 3/8 deep (all inches).
does anyone have an idea where an equivalent filter can be found?
Our Office of Environmental Safety is having puppies over how old
this filter is!
Thanks,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 19 21:03:50 2004



From: John Lovell :      j_lloyd-at-letterboxes.org
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 19:22:17 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] LM- Wanted: TriPix RGB microscope camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm an artist seeking to buy an ElectroImage/Tetracam TriPix RGB
microscope camera in any condition, as long as it's functioing properly.
Used would be ideal.
Camera is a small blue case with "TRIPIX" in white, lens mount is C
mount- may have a
lens on it but it's a microscope camera. There are three models- I only
seek the RGB model.
Any ideas, leads would be most appreciated.
Thanks all.

John Lovell
--
John Lovell
j_lloyd-at-letterboxes.org



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 20 08:02:50 2004



From: padmashree-at-excite.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 20 Nov 2004 08:21:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: sony DSC 717 digital camera on optical scope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (padmashree-at-excite.com) from http://www.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday, November 20, 2004 at 06:42:59
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: padmashree-at-excite.com
Name: Rajesh

Organization: Shenoy

Education: Graduate College

Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Question: Sir/madam,
we have a sony DSC 717 digital camera and we have also have a suitable adapter for it to be fixed to the microscope we are not able to get sharp images of the stained histology sections, kindly let me know as to what settings should be kept for such camera to take images from a binocular microscope.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 20 14:09:05 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 20 Nov 2004 15:27:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] carbon coating and TEM support films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Kevin Mackenzie wrote:
==============================================================
I normally use an old Edwards 306A Coating unit with carbon rods to produce
support films. But have read that carbon fibre will give a much thinner
coating when compared to carbon string or cord. Therefore is it possible to
use carbon fibre to produce carbon support films for TEM using a carbon
attachment with a sputter coater?
==============================================================
Two things:

1. I have never heard of an instance where a "carbon attachment" to
anyone's sputter coater (with a rotary vane pump) could be used to make
carbon films of an acceptable quality such that they could be used as TEM
support films. Carbon films meeting the standard for TEM support films have
to be made in a diffusion pump or better pumped system, done in a vacuum
evaporator.

2. The terms, carbon "string", "cord", "thread" and "fiber" seem to have
developed their own meanings in different markets and sometimes the same
word means different things in different markets.

At one time there were two diameters, "thick" and "thin". The "thick"
material was called carbon "fiber" in North America and "braid" in most of
Europe. In some countries it was called "cord". This was typically
material that was about 2 mm diameter.

The "thin" material, which typically had a diameter closer to 1 mm, was
called "string" in North America and "thread" in Europe.

Many people now use these terms all interchangeably without regard to this
history of the terms. So when communicating it is always going to be better
to talk in terms of "carbon fiber diameter" and possibly also, the origin
(brand) of the carbon fiber being described. For further information see
URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/carbon-fiber.shtml

Carbon fiber does not all come from the same place.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is one of the main manufacturers of high purity
carbon fiber of all diameters so we have a vested interest in making sure
that product is described in an unambiguous way.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 09:43:21 2004



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 16:06:32 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] S520 SEM available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

We have an operating Hitachi S520 SEM that is no longer
required and will be disposed of in the coming months. If
anyone has an interest in this machine please let me know.

Regards,
Ron
----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 13:27:43 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:00:13 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: blue-green powder in Chiller

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Nov 15, 2004, at 4:16 PM, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
} Email: ptibbits-at-emerson-ept.com
} Name: Patrick Tibbits
}
} Organization: Emerson Power Transmission
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Dear Microscopists,
}
} I'm seeing that blue-green powder again on the bottom of my Haskris
} chiller tank. Previous discussions on this list identified it as a
} corrosion product from the Copper coolant lines.
}
} Can anyone suggest a corrosion inhibitor?
}
} I run 10% ethylene glycol in distilled water. The closed-loop Haskris
} chiller maintains about 68 degrees F, 14 psi.
}
} Patrick
}
Dear Patrick,
On the East Coast, we used AquaTreet 42 from Aqua Laboratories; on the
West Coast, we are using TST303 from Skasol, Inc. Both are
molybdenum-based and work very well. Call the appropriate company for
your location to get more info. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 13:40:57 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Incharge_-_TEM_Laboratory?= :      tem_iopb-at-iopb.res.in
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 01:34:50 +0530 (IST)
Subject: [Microscopy] =?iso-8859-1?Q?Thank_you_note_-_Low_temperature_stage_for_JEOL_2010_UHR_Model___-_Repeat_request?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Responses for: Low temp stage for JEOL 2010

Dear friends
This time, I have got good suggestions (many of them were written
privately). Thanks for your help.
Best regards
Satyam
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
}
} Dear All,
} I was not successful in my first attemt (message sent on nov 11) to
} get
} a response from the list. Is the low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for
} JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP22 pole piece) available from GATAN only? I.e.,
} is this a proprietary item of Gatan?
}
} Best regards
} Satyam
}
}
} } Message sent to the list on November 11, 2004
}
} } Dear All,
} } We would like to purchase one low-temperature stage (LN2 cooled) for
} }
} } our JEOL 2010 UHR (with URP 22 pole piece). I am aware of GATAN make
} } and have contacts from them. I am wondering whether are there any
} } other manufacturer who can supply low-temperature stage for our
} } machine? Information may be given off-line also.
} } Best regards
} } Satyam
}
} --
} TEM Laboratory
} Institute of Physics
} Sachivalaya marg
} Bhubaneswar - 751005
} India
} Fax:+91-674-230 0142
} Tel:+91-674-230 1058 extn 124


--
TEM Laboratory
Institute of Physics
Sachivalaya marg
Bhubaneswar - 751005
India
Fax:+91-674-230 0142
Tel:+91-674-230 1058 extn 124



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 14:06:48 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:22:14 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Low temperature stage for JEOL 2010 UHR Model

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gatan currently still make both the 'Oxford' CT3500 and 'Gatan' Model
626 Cryotransfer version.

I am not aware of any other supplier of TEM cold/cryotransfer holders
although it might be worth contacting Fischione.

--
Larry Stoter
JEOL (UK) Ltd
tel: +44-(0)1707-377117, fax: +44-(0)1707-373254, e-mail: larrys-at-jeoleuro.com

PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 15:34:26 2004



From: Nicol Aitken :      nicol-at-semiconductor.com
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 16:57:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] FA etching for semiconductor members

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear listers,

I have a question concerning etching metals in a failure analysis lab. We
have an oxford ICP etcher that we normally run fluorine based chemistries
in. We are considering the advantages of running chlorine gas as well. Will
running the two chemistries (at different times) be problematic as far as
change over? The etcher is not used for production or manufacturing, but
only for Failure analysis. What are the recommendations for trying to run a
system in this manner.
Thanks for your time
Nick


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 18:57:49 2004



From: Tomic, Peter \(Peter\) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:18:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] FA etching for semiconductor members

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Nicol;

You may want to query the manufacturer of the system. Chlorine, as you
may know, is very corrosive. There may also be some guidance from
people that use gas assisted FIB's.

If I may ask, what metals are you trying to etch and is there a problem
with wet chemistry?


Regards,
Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA


-----Original Message-----
} From: Nicol Aitken [mailto:nicol-at-semiconductor.com]
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 4:57 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com



Dear listers,

I have a question concerning etching metals in a failure analysis lab.
We have an oxford ICP etcher that we normally run fluorine based
chemistries in. We are considering the advantages of running chlorine
gas as well. Will running the two chemistries (at different times) be
problematic as far as change over? The etcher is not used for production
or manufacturing, but only for Failure analysis. What are the
recommendations for trying to run a system in this manner. Thanks for
your time Nick




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 22 21:24:28 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 19:46:17 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: carbon coating and TEM support films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Charles, great response!
The only thing I want to add is that best way to produce the carbon film is
to do so in oil-free high vacuum (2*10-6 torr) with electron gun. Mica
should be highest quality as well (natural one without oil). Sergey


At 12:27 PM 11/20/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 06:40:44 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 08:16:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





I'm looking for additional information and experience from the microscopy
community. I am quickly moving towards installing a basic EDS detector on
my Phillips 400 TEM. I have no intention of installing the STEM or other
electron detectors for imaging. My limited understanding is I should be
able to collect element information about my sample. My grid holder has a
beryllium insert to hold the grid and I anticipate needing to use beryllium
grids or get use to copper peaks.

what am I missing?

Do Be grids require special disposal? I know the overall count rate will
be low, but are their problems or factors I should be aware of? I am
especially concern that the installation of the EDS probe will not
significantly degrade my image (I typically work under 100KX) .

Any thoughts and suggestions would be welcome!

Season greetings to all..............

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 07:20:01 2004



From: Victoria :      Victoria-at-rms.org.uk (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 07:41:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] FW>MicroscopyListserver: Quantitative Imaging Meeting Univ. of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tuesday 11 January 2005
University of Oxford, Department of Materials
A one-day meeting organised by the Royal Microscopical Society (RMS)
Organisers: Dr Angus Kirkland and Dr Crispin Hetherington

The arrival of aberration correctors for transmission electron microscopes and the recent developments in exit-wave restoration have highlighted the importance of quantitative imaging. However, the factors causing the mismatch between experimental and simulated images are still poorly understood. This conference will address experimental techniques and theories available for obtaining quantitative structural information from images, holograms and diffraction patterns.
The programme will include the following speakers:
Professor Henny Zandbergen, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Professor Hannes Lichte, Dresden University, Germany
Professor Dirk Van Dyck, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Professor Laurence Marks, North Western University, Chicago

The organisers are also planning to hold an informal discussion workshop on the following day, Wednesday 12th January 2005, to which delegates are invited.

Registrants are invited to submit abstracts for consideration as oral presentations. A maximum of 300 words, to be emailed to Victoria at the RMS office. The abstract deadline is Friday 10th December 2004.

Further information can be obtained from:
Royal Microscopical Society, 37/38 St Clements, Oxford OX4 1AJ, UK
Tel: + 44 (0) 1865 248 768, Fax: + 44 (0) 1865 791237
victoria-at-rms.org.uk
You can also register online at www.rms.org.uk


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 08:49:58 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 10:10:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EDS EM 400

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


EDS in the EM 400 without a STEM unit.

There should be no problem doing this but there are some points to look
out for. The EM 400 was built at a time when EDS was still quite new
and it is not as fully optimized for EDS as a newer microscope would be.
In particular the EDS spectrum is likely to have spurious peaks,
corresponding to electrons and x-rays generating a signal from areas far
from where you think the beam is hitting.

First you should check the apertures you have installed. Both the fixed
apertures as well as the alignable apertures. You should talk to a
Philips (FEI) service engineer and consider changing the fixed apertures
for a set designed to improve the EDS signal and you should start using
"top hat" apertures in the aperture holders.

Even if you do a good job of cleaning up the beam in this way, you will
find that you still have a rather high set of systems peaks, if you
operate the microscope in the normal way (which Philips call
microprobe). You will get better data if you go to the configuration
used for STEM (Philips call it nanoprobe), which you can do even if you
have no STEM unit. There is a little switch to the left of the column,
next to the "Intensity" knob.

The problem with this is that, when you go to nanoprobe, you have to
realign the microscope. With this system the advantage of having a STEM
unit (even if you have no STEM detectors and have no intention of ever
making a STEM image) is that you can leave the microprobe alignment on
the microscope and leave the nanoprobe alignment on the STEM unit, and
hence switch easily between them. It would be worth your while to try
to pick up a second hand STEM unit for this purpose. As STEM units they
were not very useful, so they should be cheap.


Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}
}
}
} I'm looking for additional information and experience from the microscopy
} community. I am quickly moving towards installing a basic EDS detector on
} my Phillips 400 TEM. I have no intention of installing the STEM or other
} electron detectors for imaging. My limited understanding is I should be
} able to collect element information about my sample. My grid holder has a
} beryllium insert to hold the grid and I anticipate needing to use beryllium
} grids or get use to copper peaks.
}
} what am I missing?
}
} Do Be grids require special disposal? I know the overall count rate will
} be low, but are their problems or factors I should be aware of? I am
} especially concern that the installation of the EDS probe will not
} significantly degrade my image (I typically work under 100KX) .
}
} Any thoughts and suggestions would be welcome!
}
} Season greetings to all..............
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
}

--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 09:31:01 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 09:52:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: LR White and cell cultures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

I'm checking with the collective microscopy mind for favorite techniques
of using LR White for embedding cell culture layers. What we want to do
is use the "pop-off" technique of snapping the cover slip off the end of
a resin block after immersion in liquid nitrogen. For regular
ultrastructure work this is by far the easiest and most relliable method
I've tried, but it's been a problem with immuno samples.

We are experimenting somewhat successfully with using flat molds with
circular cover slips on the top, covered in turn with large rectangular
coverslips to seal out the oxygen. Our next tests will be with
polymerization chambers filled with nitrogen, argon, or some gas other
than pesky oxygen.

If anyone has any pet techniques for this they might be willing to
share, I'd love to hear them. This has been a recurring problem for us
and we seem to be getting more cell cultures for immuno work all the
time. I'd be happy to share the results of our tests, as well.

Finally, on an entirely different note, we have an office pool going on
whether or not a set of car keys with a remote door/window/etc. opener
will function after having been flushed down a toilet, rescued, and
subjected to a bleach bath for 24 hours. I say no, and lab-mate Cheryl
says yes (after putting in a new battery). Before investing a whole
buck in this, I need opinions.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist {/}
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu {http://www.emc.missouri.edu/}








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 10:06:22 2004



From: Jinguo Wang :      jqw11-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 11:28:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] preparing TEM specimen from the micrometer Ta powders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,

I am trying to preparing TEM specimen from the micrometer Ta powders, here
is my procedure

"The powder was mixed with Gatan G1 epoxy resin in a Teflon cup and then
the mixture was transferred to a Cu tube with a diameter of 3 mm. After
curing at 373 K the tube was sliced into a series of 500 micrometer thick
discs using a low speed diamond saw, Finally, the discs were mechanically
ground to a thickness of 20 micrometer prior to ion thinning to electron
microscopy transparency in the PIPS. As I tried to polish it thinner, the
particles started to pull out.
"PIPS operating conditions were: acceleration voltage of the ion gun 3.4
keV, rotation frequency 3 rpm, and incidence angle of the two ion beams on
both sides of the sample 3-4 deg.

Due to the different milling rate between G1 epoxy and Ta particle, I got
very few particles electron transparent. my questions are

1. If anyone had experience on embedding particles on different matrixes
(such as Al, Ag), please give me some advices

2. Since I was using low angle and low voltage to mill the specimen, I got
redeposition from the Cu grid, how to avoid the redeposition at low angle
milling?

Any advice on the sample prep. of this material would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks a lot


Jinguo Wang

Jinguo Wang, Ph.D
The Pennsylvania State University
Materials Research Institute
194 Materials Research Institute Building
University Park, PA 16802
Tel: (814) 865-9285
Fax: (814) 863-8561, 814) 863-0637
Email: jqw11-at-psu.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 13:21:20 2004



From: paul r hazelton :      paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 15:31:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: TEM: LR White and cell cultures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A lot of unspecified variables here, Randy. Seems to me you need more
practice getting
your experiments peer-reviewed. How many replicates? Has the toilet
been, like, used? And
what is the recovery mode? Fishing them out of the sewage treatment
plant could take a little time.
The concentration of the bleach? And what make is the car? I'm willing
to bet that a set from a
Mercedes S-class would survive that, no problem. Don't know about Ford
though.

Best wishes
Chris

Dr. Chris Jeffree

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Tindall, Randy D." {TindallR-at-missouri.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2004 3:52 PM

hey randy, it's only a buck US. it's not like it's real money.

paul

Paul R. Hazelton, PhD
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Manitoba
Department of Medical Microbiology
531 Basic Medical Sciences Building
730 William Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3E 0W3
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Work Phone: 204-789-3313
Pager: 204-931-954
Home Phone: 204-489-6924
Cell: 204-781-1502
Fax: 204-789-3926/204-489-6924



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 18:23:37 2004



From: bert.reuss-at-tufts.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 18:45:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Cambridge 100S parts available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (bert.reuss-at-tufts.edu) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, November 23, 2004 at 12:46:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: bert.reuss-at-tufts.edu
Name: Bert Reuss

Organization: Tufts University Geology Department

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:Cambridge 100S parts available

Question: We have a non-functional 1985 Cambridge 100S SEM that is
available for parts. We have no means of shipping this
unit so you should be willing to pick it up at our Medford, MA
campus. The SEM was operational until last April but was shut
down because of problems with the scans, stage, and roughing pump.

Please contact off-line:

Bert Reuss email bert.reuss-at-tufts.edu
Geology Department
Medford, MA 02155

617-627-3494



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 21:33:01 2004



From: henry-at-cmsp.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 21:54:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: looking for old EM prints and negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (henry-at-cmsp.com) from http://microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday, November 23, 2004 at 09:29:33
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: henry-at-cmsp.com
Name: Henry Schleichkorn

Organization: Educational Pictures

Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School

Location: Chicago, Illinois USA

Question: Hello,
I am looking for old EM prints and negatives that EM Departments want to discard. I'll pay for shipping expenses. SEMs, EM, TEM, etc. I'll take boxes, binders, files, whatever. Thanks, Henry 773-267-3100
henry-at-cmsp.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 23 23:23:43 2004



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 21:45:19 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM: LR White and cell cultures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Randy,
Regarding the LR White question: I had great success with completely
filled flat bottom BEEM capsules and also with a small vacuum oven that
I flushed with nitrogen gas and pumped down 3 times then left pumped
down overnight at 60 degrees. I polymerized lots of material in open
dishes that way.

Regarding the remote opener: I successfully revived mine after doing a
wet exit from a kayak with my keys on my belt. It was fun watching the
car lock and unlock itself while the remote was drying out at the other
side of the house. I opened it and washed it with clean water then
allowed it to dry and all was well. I never dried bleaching it, though.
Good luck.

Kim
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Kim Rensing PhD
Research Associate
Wood Science, UBC
2424 Main Mall
Vancouver BC, Canada
V6T 1Z4
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}

On 23-Nov-04, at 7:52 AM, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Dear Listers,
}
} I'm checking with the collective microscopy mind for favorite
} techniques
} of using LR White for embedding cell culture layers. What we want to
} do
} is use the "pop-off" technique of snapping the cover slip off the end
} of
} a resin block after immersion in liquid nitrogen. For regular
} ultrastructure work this is by far the easiest and most relliable
} method
} I've tried, but it's been a problem with immuno samples.
}
} We are experimenting somewhat successfully with using flat molds with
} circular cover slips on the top, covered in turn with large rectangular
} coverslips to seal out the oxygen. Our next tests will be with
} polymerization chambers filled with nitrogen, argon, or some gas other
} than pesky oxygen.
}
} If anyone has any pet techniques for this they might be willing to
} share, I'd love to hear them. This has been a recurring problem for us
} and we seem to be getting more cell cultures for immuno work all the
} time. I'd be happy to share the results of our tests, as well.
}
} Finally, on an entirely different note, we have an office pool going on
} whether or not a set of car keys with a remote door/window/etc. opener
} will function after having been flushed down a toilet, rescued, and
} subjected to a bleach bath for 24 hours. I say no, and lab-mate Cheryl
} says yes (after putting in a new battery). Before investing a whole
} buck in this, I need opinions.
}
} Happy Thanksgiving!
}
} Randy



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 04:58:01 2004



From: Robert H. Olley :      hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com (by way of
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 07:59:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Thickness of sputtered gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

About the car key problem - my own experience is that if you go
swimming in salt water with the keys to your new Saab in your bathing suit
pocket, you won't be able to disable the alarm later and your car won't
start, no matter what you do. Boy, did I find that out the hard way....

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
GSC Atlantic
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada


-----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Jeffree [mailto:c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk]
Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2004 3:42 PM
To: Tindall, Randy D.
Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com



Could anyone please tell me a ** simple ** way to estimate the thickness of
sputtered gold, for example by light or IR absorbance of a film on glass?
All my searches so far have turned up apparatus like the Hummer thickness
monitor.

-----------------------------------
Robert H. Olley
Reply to: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/~spsolley
-----------------------------------





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 12:43:23 2004



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 13:53:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Thickness of sputtered gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A simple method is to use a color spectrophotometer in a transmission or reflectance mode and use thin film modeling techniques. See any book on spectrophotometry of thin films or ellipsometry. There are commercial thin film programs available. Two that I am familiar with are TFCalc and FilmStar. You can also write your own. The principles are straightforward and you can implement them even in Excel. The optical properties of gold, n and k, as a function of wavelength are well known and can easily be found.

You might want to try to get your hands on some back issues of Vacuum Technology and Coatings. Peter Martin from Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has a regular series in it and he had one on optical coatings and how they are characterized. The basics were covered in his articles. Sorry, I do not hve the issue numbers, but you might want to either contact the editor or Peter directly.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Robert H. Olley [mailto:hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 8:59 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com



Could anyone please tell me a ** simple ** way to estimate the thickness of
sputtered gold, for example by light or IR absorbance of a film on glass?
All my searches so far have turned up apparatus like the Hummer thickness
monitor.

-----------------------------------
Robert H. Olley
Reply to: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/~spsolley
-----------------------------------






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 12:56:55 2004



From: Evgenia Pekarskaya :      pekarskaya-at-mail.pse.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 14:18:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Thickness of sputtered gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We used AFM to measure the thickness of sputtered coatings.

========================
Evgenia Pekarskaya
Keck Electron Microscopy Laboratory
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Tel. 413 545 2261
E-fax 325 202 7338
http://www.umassmicroscopy.com/
========================

-----Original Message-----
} From: Robert H. Olley (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
[mailto:hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 8:59 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com



Could anyone please tell me a ** simple ** way to estimate the thickness
of
sputtered gold, for example by light or IR absorbance of a film on glass?
All my searches so far have turned up apparatus like the Hummer thickness
monitor.

-----------------------------------
Robert H. Olley
Reply to: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/~spsolley
-----------------------------------








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 14:22:25 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 20:33:34 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM400 EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Although now working for JEOL, I used to work for Philips and know
the EM400 series fairly well ...

You don't say if this is a new or used EDS detector but absolutely
critical to successful operation of the EDS is the right collimator.
This must have been designed to work with your specific model of 400
and EDS detector. Otherwise, any data will probably be useless.

The collimator should also have some sort of electron trap or shield.
In the main mag ranges, the field of the objective lens completely
contains the electrons coming down the column. When you go into the
low mag range, the objective lens goes to a very low current. You can
then get significant scattering of primary electrons into the ED
detector - this will, in the short term swamp the detector which will
then take some time to recover. Longer exposure or repeated
short-term exposure will trash the Si(Li) crystal. Some collimators
have a mechanical shutter which uses the objective field to open and
close it. Permanent magnet systems have also been used. Of course,
you can physically retract the detector if you are going to go into
low mag mode but that is a bit of a pain.

You can do a lot of useful EDS with Cu or Al grids but don't forget
Cu has low-energy L lines. I never used Be grids - principally
because of cost, which also meant that throwing them away wasn't an
issue since they had to be recycled! I'm sure there are now health
and safety regulations but I doubt that disposing of such small
amount of metalic Be is a real problem.

Check your condenser apertures - although a matter for debate, I
always used 'top-hat' apertures. These have a thick section around
the hole and reduce X-rays coming down the column which may result in
misleading spectra or spurious peaks.

Don't forget - you can only do decent ED analysis with the object
aperture 'out' otherwise BS electrons from the objective aperture
also hit the sample and completely mess up the spectra.

There should be an adjustable 'bar' which goes under the ED dewar and
braces it against the main frame of the TEM. There is a threaded
collar to adjust which should be set fairly tight. Depending on the
age of your 400, there may or may not be a hole in the panelling,
just to the left of the column for the lower end of this bar to pass
through, to brace against the frame. If this bar is not used, you
'may' get vibration problems affecting the image at higher
magnification.

Also be aware that any build up of water ice in the dewar might also
cause sufficient noise to cause problems with both the ED spectra and
the TEM image.

Hope that is useful.
--
Larry Stoter
JEOL (UK) Ltd
tel: +44-(0)1707-377117, fax: +44-(0)1707-373254, e-mail: larrys-at-jeoleuro.com

PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 17:22:55 2004



From: wqsm-at-hotmail.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 21:34:02 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: stain the ultrathin HDPE sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Robert,
I always told my students who wanted to know the thickness of the sputtered
gold to weight the glass piece before and after deposition and work it out.
That usually convinced them that they didn't really need to know. Most times
I just tell them what I think it is, about ten nanometers; who's to say it
isn't right. I used to have a chart from Hummer with a curve showing the
thickness of deposition vs. time for a specified voltage and current.
Good luck,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Department of Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Robert H. Olley (by way of MicroscopyListserver)"
{hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 5:59 AM

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (wqsm-at-hotmail.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 16:20:14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wqsm-at-hotmail.com
Name: Ming

Organization: University of Alberta

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I wanna stain the ultrathin HDPE sample(after section) using RuO4 vapour. Could anyone give me some idear about the suitable stain time?
Thans!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Nov 24 21:13:05 2004



From: wall1-at-llnl.gov (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 21:34:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: software that will create a single in-focus image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (wall1-at-llnl.gov) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 16:45:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wall1-at-llnl.gov
Name: Mark Wall

Organization: LLNL

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for software that will create a single in-focus image (tiff image files) from a series of images that are taken at different (known) focus settings/heights. The application is for imaging metallography samples that are not very flat or have considerable roughness to them.

An additional bonus for us is to be able to have a 3-D plot of the surface topography as well.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 25 05:10:56 2004



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 03:32:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] AFM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear listers,

I would like to know if somebody has experienced high
amplitude low frequency noise in tapping mode and
hence no images. Whereas in contact mode images are
okay if we lower the gains.
Shashi Singh
Hyderabad
India



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today!
http://my.yahoo.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Nov 25 12:28:02 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 07:48:39 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Errgrh - Please READ!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Please check out our website
(http://www.soft-imaging.com/rd/english/416.htm) for our EFI (Extended Focal
Imaging). It does precisely what you are looking for. If you need further
information, please contact me by email or call me.

Thanks.

Mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: wall1-at-llnl.gov [mailto:wall1-at-llnl.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 20:35
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Please check out our website
(http://www.soft-imaging.com/rd/english/416.htm) for our EFI (Extended Focal
Imaging). It does precisely what you are looking for. If you need further
information, please contact me by email or call me.

Thanks.

Mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: wall1-at-llnl.gov [mailto:wall1-at-llnl.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 20:35
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

There have been a number of requests, including from Nestor but ...

{Rant mode on :-))

IF YOU ARE NOT COLLECTING YOUR E-MAIL, UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST.

DO NOT JUST SET UP AN 'OUT OF OFFICE' AUTO REPLY.

OTHERWISE ANYBODY POSTING TO THE LIST GETS DELUGED WITH 'OUT OF
OFFICE AUTO REPLIES'.

(because the default reply address for the list is the originator)

To such an extent, that I am tempted to not only not post to the list
anymore but permanently unsubscribe.

IF ANY SUBSCRIBERS CAN'T UNDERSTAND THIS, PLEASE CONTACT ME AND I
WILL TRY TO EXPLAIN EVEN MORE SIMPLY.

{Rant Mode Off :-))

Thank you,
--
Larry Stoter
PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 26 10:00:38 2004



From: Peter Lundh :      peter.lundh-at-ucl.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 16:22:34 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Fourier domain analysis of cell-size and shape

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi-

This is my first post to the Microscopy list and it concerns an image
processing problem that I need help with. I am looking
at cell-size and morphology in an epithelial cell-structure. To help
illustrate my problem I have put some images on a webpage and I will
be referring to those images below:
{http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~smgxro1/page1.html}

The cell-structure is imaged with a fluorescent Microscope at 40x. To
determine the individual cell size I look at a region-of-interest
(ROI) in the Frequency domain where the peak spatial frequency can
easily be converted into the average cell-size (top-right corner of
image 4 and 5). The tissue sample is around 5 cm square and it is
quite a delicate process to prepare and flat-mount it (image 1). To
get the Fourier transform to register a distinct peak frequency I use
the
following pre-processing steps (results can be seen on the left of
image 4 and 5):
1) Blind deconvolution - to improve image resolution and compensate
for out-of-focus areas of the flat-mounted tissue.
2) Uniform local histogram equalisation (CLAHE) - to optimally enhance
image contrast.
3) Gaussian low-pass filtering - to eliminate low-frequency changes
(due to uneven illumination, tissue thickness etc.).

Once I have the peak frequency of a given ROI and I know the image
px/µm ratio I can derive the mean cell-size. Finally, I plot the mean
cell-size and the standard deviation against the distance from the
centre of the tissue (the cell-size increases with distance from
centre). In the centre of the tissue the cells are tightly packed in a
hexagonal lattice, which makes it ideal for an isotropic Fourier
analysis (image 2 and 4). However, towards the extreme periphery
several morphological changes take place: The cell shapes becomes
severely deformed, the cell contents change (and hence, the pixel
brightness, edge gradients etc.) and none-RPE cells are mixed into the
lattice. Image 3 illustrates but one of countless and random cell
configurations and as a consequence the frequency spectra becomes even
harder to evaluate (top-right of image 5).

These are my two questions:
1) How can I improve on the pre-processing of the microscopic images
to enhance the cell-walls, or edges and eliminate other non-continues
cell artefacts?
2) The mean cell size and it's standard deviation give a very accurate
measurement of the central and highly regular lattice, but when the
cell structure becomes more irregular, it is less meaningful. Are
there better spatial descriptors - and methods to measure them - for
the random cell shapes that I encounter at the periphery of the
tissue?

Thanks!

-Peter
--
Peter Lundh
E: peter.lundh-at-ucl.ac.uk
T: +44 (0) 207-608 4049
M: +44 (0) 788-195 2645
F: +44 (0) 207-608 6909

Visual Science Department
Institute of Ophthalmology
11 - 43 Bath Street
EC1V 9EL London





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 26 14:22:55 2004



From: Gerroir, Paul :      paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com
Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 15:43:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM - Texture Analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Good Afternoon,
I have samples that when viewed by reflected light have an undulating
surface with fine texture on both the high and low areas. I would like
to quantify areas of the sample according to texture. Any suggestions
how this might be done? Is there software available for such an
application?

Thanks,
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: 905-823-7091, ext.216
FAX: 905-822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Nov 26 15:27:36 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 16:47:28 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - Texture Analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 11/26/04 4:38:38 PM, paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com
writes:

} I have samples that when viewed by reflected light have an undulating
} surface with fine texture on both the high and low areas. I would like
} to quantify areas of the sample according to texture. Any suggestions
} how this might be done? Is there software available for such an
} application?

There are quite a few ways to convert textural differences to brightness
differences that can be used to threshold the image for measurement of areas. Most
image processing programs include at least things like the calculating the
variance of a neighborhood centered on each pixel, or the range between the
brightest and darkest pixel. Also useful is the local neighborhood entropy, the
loca fractal dimension, etc. If you can either mail me an example image or the
address of an ftp site to get it, I will see which of the routines in Fovea Pro
work best for your particular images.

John Russ


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Nov 27 12:17:31 2004



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com
Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 12:35:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Using a Kodak MDS100 on a B&L Research I metallograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our Extended Dept of Focus provides not only the in-focus image, but also
the anaglyph image, and the 3D surface plot. Please visit our web:

http://www.laboratory-imaging.com/index.php?lang=en&inc=3DFocus

If you would like to get more detailed information please contact me.

Regards,

Josef Mikes
Laboratory Imaging, s.r.o.
Prague, Czech Republic
Tel: +420 272 081 400
Fax: 420 271 732 657
E-mail: josef.mikes-at-lim.cz
Web: www.laboratory-imaging.com






Please check out our website
(http://www.soft-imaging.com/rd/english/416.htm) for our EFI (Extended Focal
Imaging). It does precisely what you are looking for. If you need further
information, please contact me by email or call me.

Thanks.

Mike

----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {wall1-at-llnl.gov}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 4:34 AM

Some time ago, wishing to break the instant film photography stranglehold
on microscopy, I purchased a Kodak MDS100 digital camera on eBay. The
camera has been working quite well, but I recently made a discovery (for
myself, at least) that a blue filter dramatically improved its image quality.
My original application, on an Olympus SZH stereomicroscope, does not
permit the practical recording of images with a blue filter because of the
dramatic reduction in transmitted light, but the Bausch & Lomb Research
(I) 'scope about which I recently gloated does. This metallograph uses a
patented system of vertical illumination that greatly increases the image
brightness, so enough light gets to the MDS100's CCD sensor to overcome
its low sensitivity to the shorter wavelengths of visible light. What a
difference the blue filter makes in comparison to the usual dichroic green
filter that one usually uses for greyscale imaging ! I puzzled over this at
first, but then I realized that the image color that the MDS100 sensed with
the green filter is still somewhat reddish, whereas the blue filter gives a
bright blue image. And the focal distance changes dramatically as well.
That gives away the secret of the blue filter - it blocks the longer
wavelengths. On the other hand, the bias in sensitivity of the CCD for long wavelengths is
able to overcome the lesser ability of the green filter to
block the red & IR light. On the Olympus stereomicroscope I use an IR
filter, and that works well enough if I adjust the colors after making the
images.

George Langford, Sc.D.
amenex-at-amenex.com
http://www.amenex.com/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Nov 28 18:15:03 2004



From: Bob Sunley :      rosunley-at-shaw.ca
Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:39:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Errgrh - Please READ!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Larry et all,

Most end users have no control when out of office(OOF) replies are sent.
Microsoft mail servers(which are the biggest cause of this problem) default to
send OOF messages to the internet instead of only to "local" users.

Last time I posted, 99% of the OOF replies I received were from MS mail
servers. This stupid default option cannot usually be altered by the end user,
it can only be changed by the network/mail administrator.

Bob


On 26 Nov 2004, at 7:48, Larry Stoter wrote:

}
}
} There have been a number of requests, including from Nestor but ...
}
} {Rant mode on :-))
}
} IF YOU ARE NOT COLLECTING YOUR E-MAIL, UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST.
}
} DO NOT JUST SET UP AN 'OUT OF OFFICE' AUTO REPLY.
}
} OTHERWISE ANYBODY POSTING TO THE LIST GETS DELUGED WITH 'OUT OF
} OFFICE AUTO REPLIES'.
}
} (because the default reply address for the list is the originator)
}
} To such an extent, that I am tempted to not only not post to the list
} anymore but permanently unsubscribe.
}
} IF ANY SUBSCRIBERS CAN'T UNDERSTAND THIS, PLEASE CONTACT ME AND I
} WILL TRY TO EXPLAIN EVEN MORE SIMPLY.
}
} {Rant Mode Off :-))
}
} Thank you,
} --
} Larry Stoter
} PLEASE NOTE
} 1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
} 2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
} netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
} 3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Nov 28 19:31:30 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 09:15:03 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: stain the ultrathin HDPE sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, but the suggestion I made a few months ago after receiving a flood of autoreplies
would work, ie subscribe to the list with a different email address, even a hotmail
account.

cheers

rtch

Date sent: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:39:24 -0600
} From: Bob Sunley {rosunley-at-shaw.ca}

I have had little success in ruthenium tetroxide staining thin sections of
polyethylene or any other polyolefin. Recommend that you check out the
following reference for staining of polyolefins for SEM or TEM:

G.M. Brown and J.H. Butler, Polymer, 38 (15), 3937, 1997.

Cheers,

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



wqsm-at-hotmail.com (by
way of To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
MicroscopyListserver) cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: stain the ultrathin HDPE sample

11/24/04 09:34 PM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wqsm-at-hotmail.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 16:20:14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: wqsm-at-hotmail.com
Name: Ming

Organization: University of Alberta

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I wanna stain the ultrathin HDPE sample(after section) using RuO4
vapour. Could anyone give me some idear about the suitable stain time?
Thans!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 08:58:10 2004



From: Edwina Westbrook :      ewestbro-at-vsu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 10:17:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello, Everyone,

I am testing various soil samples for Phosphorus content. Any suggestions given the fact that P is very low in content and silicon is everywhere.

Your suggestions, please. I am not a soil scientist.

Thanks.
Winnie

Edwina W. Westbrook
Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Agricultural Research Station
M. T. Carter Building, room 129
P.O.Box 9061
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
(804)-524-5659
fax (804)-524-5622
ewestbro-at-vsu.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 09:19:16 2004



From: paul r hazelton :      paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 09:43:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] digital imaging system retrofits

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

It has become essential that we retrofit a CM10 TEM with a digital
camera system. I am trying to get information together for a grant
application. The microscope currently has a 35mm camera system, with no
other imaging system installed other than the viewing screen, of
course. We have received a quote from FEI for a system which would
entail modifying the column. I am aware of one alternate supplier.
However, I believe there must be more out there. Could anyone advise as
to alternative suppliers? Both who they are and what experiences you
may have had with them? As someone who has been forced to become more
realistic in life, I realize some responses will come from suppliers of
equipment. If you are a supplier, could you please tell me what you
have that would entail column modifications, what you have that would
not, performance specifications, and provide a rough idea of the cost.
I am not be asking for a quote today, just general ranges of cost.

Obviously, since we do not want to get into advertising and
testimonials, perhaps off the list
server would be best.

Thanks

paul

Paul R. Hazelton, PhD
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Manitoba
Department of Medical Microbiology
531 Basic Medical Sciences Building
730 William Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3E 0W3
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Phone:204-789-3313
Pager:204-931-954
Cell:204-781-1502
Fax:204-789-3926



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 10:02:39 2004



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 08:25:51 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Errgrh - Please READ!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

ok i never get many out od office replies, if i do I
know where the delete button is, rather than rasie an
issue that only contributes to the excess junk email.
i allso have a bulk mail folder where everything goes
that i don't care about.
john
--- Ritchie Sims {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Yes, but the suggestion I made a few months ago
} after receiving a flood of autoreplies
} would work, ie subscribe to the list with a
} different email address, even a hotmail
} account.
}
} cheers
}
} rtch
}
} Date sent: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 18:39:24 -0600
} } From: Bob Sunley {rosunley-at-shaw.ca}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Errgrh -
} Please READ!
} To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} Send reply to: rosunley-at-shaw.ca
} Priority: normal
}
} }
} }
} }
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor:
} The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} }
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} } Larry et all,
} }
} } Most end users have no control when out of
} office(OOF) replies are
} } sent. Microsoft mail servers(which are the
} biggest cause of this
} } problem) default to send OOF messages to the
} internet instead of only
} } to "local" users.
} }
} } Last time I posted, 99% of the OOF replies I
} received were from MS
} } mail servers. This stupid default option cannot
} usually be altered by
} } the end user, it can only be changed by the
} network/mail
} } administrator.
} }
} } Bob
} }
} }
} } On 26 Nov 2004, at 7:48, Larry Stoter wrote:
} }
} } }
} } }
} } } There have been a number of requests, including
} from Nestor but ...
} } }
} } } {Rant mode on :-))
} } }
} } } IF YOU ARE NOT COLLECTING YOUR E-MAIL,
} UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST.
} } }
} } } DO NOT JUST SET UP AN 'OUT OF OFFICE' AUTO
} REPLY.
} } }
} } } OTHERWISE ANYBODY POSTING TO THE LIST GETS
} DELUGED WITH 'OUT OF
} } } OFFICE AUTO REPLIES'.
} } }
} } } (because the default reply address for the list
} is the originator)
} } }
} } } To such an extent, that I am tempted to not only
} not post to the
} } } list anymore but permanently unsubscribe.
} } }
} } } IF ANY SUBSCRIBERS CAN'T UNDERSTAND THIS, PLEASE
} CONTACT ME AND I
} } } WILL TRY TO EXPLAIN EVEN MORE SIMPLY.
} } }
} } } {Rant Mode Off :-))
} } }
} } } Thank you,
} } } --
} } } Larry Stoter
} } } PLEASE NOTE
} } } 1. Any mail other than plain text will be
} automatically deleted. 2.
} } } Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or
} actually from hotmail,
} } } netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be
} deleted. 3. Mail
} } } with no subject or without a clear subject will
} be ignored :-)
} } }
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
} Microanalyst Fax : 64 9
} 3737435
} Department of Geology email :
} r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} The University of Auckland
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}
}




__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free!
http://my.yahoo.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 11:23:04 2004



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 11:46:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Winnie,

Soil is such a heterogeneous material, I wonder if x-ray microanalysis is
the right method to use when one ends up looking at such a small sample
size.

Damian Neuberger, Ph.D.
Tel: (847) 998-8574
email: neuberger1234-at-comcast.net {mailto:neuberger1234-at-comcast.net}


Hello, Everyone,

I am testing various soil samples for Phosphorus content. Any suggestions
given the fact that P is very low in content and silicon is everywhere.

Your suggestions, please. I am not a soil scientist.

Thanks.
Winnie

Edwina W. Westbrook
Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Agricultural Research Station
M. T. Carter Building, room 129
P.O.Box 9061
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
(804)-524-5659
fax (804)-524-5622
ewestbro-at-vsu.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 11:36:29 2004



From: Little, Shannan :      LittleSM-at-AGR.GC.CA
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 12:59:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: software that will create a single

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have recently been researching this same software. Also, check out
Auto-Montage from Syncroscopy.
www.auto-montage.com

Shannan Little
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis Lab
Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
Lethbridge AB Canada

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:wall1-at-llnl.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 8:35 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (wall1-at-llnl.gov) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, November 24, 2004 at 16:45:37
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: wall1-at-llnl.gov
Name: Mark Wall

Organization: LLNL

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for software that will create a single in-focus
image (tiff image files) from a series of images that are taken at
different (known) focus settings/heights. The application is for imaging
metallography samples that are not very flat or have considerable
roughness to them.

An additional bonus for us is to be able to have a 3-D plot of the
surface topography as well.



------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 11:54:05 2004



From: Allan-Wojtas, Paula :      AllanWojtasP-at-AGR.GC.CA
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 13:18:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Can you re-use HMDS?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, all,
 
A colleague has prepared some plant samples using HMDS. For the final step, he removed the samples from the bath and let them air dry. But the HMDS in the last bath is left over.
 
Depending on his results, he may want to process the rest of his samples using HMDS, and would expect to use quite abit. He has asked me whether it is possible to reuse what is left at the last step. Is there any reason why he can't do this? Should it be filtered to get rid of any small pieces of sample which broke off during handling?
 
Please let me know, and I'll forward the replies to him.
 
Thanks in advance for your help.
 
Regards,
 
Paula.
 
Paula M. Allan-Wojtas
Research Scientist - Food Microstructure/chercheur scientique - microstructure des aliments
Food Safety and Quality team/ Salubrité et qualité des aliments
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 902-679-5566
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 902-679-2311
32 Main Street/ 32, rue Main
Kentville, Nova Scotia/ Kentville (Nouvelle-Écosse)
B4N 1J5 
 
allanwojtasp-at-agr.gc.ca
 

 



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 12:04:55 2004



From: Barbara :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 12:27:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - Texture Analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Paul,

Three approaches come to mind, depending on the size of the fine structure:
a. Simple interferometry - several of the manufacturers carry small
Michelson or Tolansky interferometers which typically fit 10x objectives
but, in some cases, go up to 50x objectives. Interferometry is one of
those forgotten techniques that is very useful in this sort of application.
b. More advanced interferometry - companies such as Zygo and the Wyko part
of Veeco make scanning white light interferometers which will automatically
calculate a number of parameters which can be used to characterize the
surface. Visit either www.zygo.com or www.veeco.com and look up their
interferometry tools.
c. Atomic force microscopy also provides a number of topography
measurements. We've been working a lot lately with NTMDT (distributed
through Nanotech-America... new website is due to go up shortly at
www.nt-america.com, but you can also visit www.ntmdt.com - caveat... we do
have a commercial interest in this product), but there are also a number of
other AFM/SPM companies in the field.

Hope this was helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website
to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available
through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

At 02:43 PM 11/26/2004, Gerroir, Paul wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 12:54:14 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 13:18:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have looked at soils from time to time. I don't think I would want to
try to analyze phosphorus by EDS. You could try doing a shotgun analysis,
but you will have some problems unless you have a thick, smooth layer of
soil. The phosphorus may not be uniformly distributed and even through you
analyze at low magnification, you run a risk of finding a few grains in any
given field that would skew the results.

The content is generally quite low and EDS is limited to a detection limit
of about 0.3%. Even then, you wouldn't have very good sensitivity for
comparing samples.

In short, I would probably look for an x-ray fluorescence unit or some
other means better suited to bulk analysis at low concentrations.

Warren

At 09:17 AM 11/29/04, you wrote:

} Hello, Everyone,
}
} I am testing various soil samples for Phosphorus content. Any suggestions
} given the fact that P is very low in content and silicon is everywhere.
}
} Your suggestions, please. I am not a soil scientist.
}
} Thanks.
} Winnie
}
} Edwina W. Westbrook
} Electron Microscopy Laboratories
} Agricultural Research Station
} M. T. Carter Building, room 129
} P.O.Box 9061
} Virginia State University
} Petersburg, VA 23806
} (804)-524-5659
} fax (804)-524-5622
} ewestbro-at-vsu.edu

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
46 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 13:06:08 2004



From: Lois Anderson :      landers-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 14:29:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

FYI. If you are interested please visit the site or contact me directly
with your resume.

Thanks

The Johns Hopkins Medical Laboratories

Employment Opportunities


The Johns Hopkins Department of Pathology is searching for a several
outstanding individuals to fill the following positions:

Electron Microscopy Technician I/II (requisition 14523)
Bachelor's degree, or equivalent, in the sciences plus two years of
training as an Electron Microscopy technician required. Comparable
experience may be substituted for degree requirement.

Sr. Histology Technician II (requisition 17869)
Bachelor's degree, or equivalent, in the sciences plus two years of
histology experience required. Comparable experience may be substituted
for degree requirement. HT(ASCP) eligible with recommended registry
within one year of employment.

Sr. Histology Technician III (requisition 17868)
Bachelor's degree, or equivalent, in the sciences plus two years of
histology experience required. Comparable experience may be substituted
for degree requirement. HT(ASCP) certification required.

Senior Histology Technician III/Lab Coordinator (requisition 16180)
Bachelor's degree, or equivalent, in the sciences plus five years of
histology experience required. Comparable experience may be substituted
for degree requirement. HT(ASCP) certification preferred.

We have a comprehensive salary program and excellent benefits,
including tuition remission at the University, in a smoke/drug free
workplace located at the main hospital campus in Baltimore, MD. For
consideration, please apply on-line at http://jobs.jhu.edu
EOE/AA/D/V.; www.jhu.edu






Lois Anderson
Johns Hopkins University
Dept. of Pathology
Laboratory Manager
EM/IF/Reference Histology
600 N. Wolfe Street/Pathology 709 A
Baltimore, MD 21287
(410) 955-2861/fax (410) 614-7110
landers-at-jhmi.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 13:13:22 2004



From: Edwina Westbrook :      ewestbro-at-vsu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 14:32:52 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I should have been a bit more detailed. Remember, I am not the soil scientist, however, wet chemistry is the method of testing...spectroscopy (ICP) and chromatography. Those methods are performed in the soil lab. My task is simply to place a dbl sticky SEM stub into a soil sample, coat with carbon and view in the SEM (randomly selected areas), generate a spectra and maps. SEM/EDAX is in addition to the well documented soil analysis methods.

Wanted to get some feedback or direction from all of you who are far more knowledgeable and generate discussion that may benefit others as well.

Thank you.

Winnie


Edwina W. Westbrook
Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Agricultural Research Station
M. T. Carter Building, room 129
P.O.Box 9061
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
(804)-524-5659
fax (804)-524-5622
ewestbro-at-vsu.edu


} } } "Edwina Westbrook" {ewestbro-at-vsu.edu} 11/29/04 10:17AM } } }


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello, Everyone,

I am testing various soil samples for Phosphorus content. Any suggestions given the fact that P is very low in content and silicon is everywhere.

Your suggestions, please. I am not a soil scientist.

Thanks.
Winnie

Edwina W. Westbrook
Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Agricultural Research Station
M. T. Carter Building, room 129
P.O.Box 9061
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
(804)-524-5659
fax (804)-524-5622
ewestbro-at-vsu.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 13:29:29 2004



From: Kevin Ryan :      kevin-at-mediacy.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 14:54:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: viaWWW: software that will create a single in-focus image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Image-Pro from Media Cybernetics has all these features, among a great
many others.

http://www.mediacy.com/ipp/imageproplus.htm

Disclaimer - I write the software; naturally, I'm biased.

-- Kevin Ryan
kevin-at-mediacy.com


----------------------------------------

Email: wall1-at-llnl.gov
Name: Mark Wall

Organization: LLNL

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for software that will create a single in-focus
image (tiff image files) from a series of images that are taken at
different (known) focus settings/heights. The application is for imaging
metallography samples that are not very flat or have considerable
roughness to them.

An additional bonus for us is to be able to have a 3-D plot of the
surface topography as well.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 14:40:37 2004



From: Thomas Sadowski :      tommy91779-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 16:04:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Conversion of Veeco Images to TIFF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

My Name is Tom Sadowski and I am currently a student at Southern Connecticut
State University. I am currently involved in a project that is using a
Digital Instruments AFM microscope. Unfortunately, all of the images are
stored in their own proprietary format. I wish to do a batch conversion of
these images to a more standard format, especially uncompressed TIFF. Does
anyone know of a method I can use to do this? Any help would be greatly
appreciated


Thank you once again
Thomas Sadowski
Southern Connecticut State University




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 14:44:38 2004



From: Joseph P Neilly :      joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:07:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Free Microscopy Journals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Due to space constraints, our department must part with bound copies of
the following journals. If you can provide a good home for these journals
please contact me off-line by email or phone.

Scanning Electron Microscopy 1972-1986
Proceedings of the Electron Microscopy Scociety of America (a.k.a. MSA)
1967-1999, and 2002.

Regards,
Joe Neilly, Research Investigator
Abbott Laboratories
R4R9, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Voice: 847-938-5024
Fax: 847-938-5027
E-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 15:28:39 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 15:53:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Errgrh - Please READ!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I understand your frustration. I have been the recipient of such messages
numerous times.

But there really is no need to unsubscribe. As you noted, the replies go
back to the poster rather than the list. (That would be really messy.)
Therefore, if you never post, you would never get an OUT OF OFFICE reply. {g}
However, I think most of us hope that you would stick around _and_ continue
posting.

Warren Straszheim
Iowa State University

P.S. So far I have only gotten one of these infernal replies to my recent
posting. I expect more will be on the way. Then there will also be the crop
that results from this posting.


At 01:48 AM 11/26/04, you wrote:

} There have been a number of requests, including from Nestor but ...
}
} {Rant mode on :-))
} IF YOU ARE NOT COLLECTING YOUR E-MAIL, UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST.
} DO NOT JUST SET UP AN 'OUT OF OFFICE' AUTO REPLY.
} OTHERWISE ANYBODY POSTING TO THE LIST GETS DELUGED WITH 'OUT OF OFFICE
} AUTO REPLIES'.
} (because the default reply address for the list is the originator)
} To such an extent, that I am tempted to not only not post to the list
} anymore but permanently unsubscribe.
} IF ANY SUBSCRIBERS CAN'T UNDERSTAND THIS, PLEASE CONTACT ME AND I WILL TRY
} TO EXPLAIN EVEN MORE SIMPLY.
} {Rant Mode Off :-))
}
} Thank you,
} --
} Larry Stoter



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 16:48:32 2004



From: jean-paul.bailon-at-polymtl.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 17:13:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: monte CArlo SImulation of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (jean-paul.bailon-at-polymtl.ca) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, November 29, 2004 at 12:18:24
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jean-paul.bailon-at-polymtl.ca
Name: Jean-Paul Bailon

Organization: Ecole Polytechnique Montreal (QC) canada

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Re: monte CArlo SImulation of electroN trajectory in sOlids

Question: The "surface radius of BE" generated by CASINO is in fact a simple histogram : "Number of backscattered electrons - vs - Radius". Here, "Radius" is defined as the distance at which a given BE is exiting the specimen. The origin of this distance is taken at the entry point of the electron probe (primary electrons).
If you simulate the trajectories for a large number of primary electrons, this histogram gives you an good approximation of the size of the specimen surface emitting the BE. This information may be useful if you want to known, at least as a first approximation, the spatial limit of resolution of a BE image.

Jean-Paul BaÔlon
Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (QC) Canada

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 17:05:13 2004



From: Brent Neal :      brent-at-reindeergraphics.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 22:27:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

______________________________________________________________________

(11/29/04 14:32) Edwina Westbrook {ewestbro-at-vsu.edu} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


While I certainly understand that you've been asked to do a particular test, I think the point that Damian was making is that it seems to some of us to be the wrong test to do. As Warren pointed out, XRF would be the first choice for this kind of analysis, but you're telling us that your analytical chem folks are already doing bulk analysis.

Maybe a better question to ask would be why someone thinks that an EDX spectrum would be useful in this situation? Doing randomly selected areas at a low mag might give you a decent bulk value, but XRF will give you the same information with better sensitivity - on the order of parts per million. If they want close ups - i.e., high mag, then the question is how they plan to eliminate the sampling bias? You're not guaranteed to sample all the species in the sample.

Brent

--
Brent Neal, Ph.D.
Reindeer Graphics, Inc.
brent-at-reindeergraphics.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Nov 29 21:24:03 2004



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 19:48:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Sadowski
You can save veeco images in their soft ware only.
After doing offline correction, the images can be
saved ib tiff, jpeg or any other format by going to
utilities.
Shashi singh
CCMB
Hyderabad
INdia

Hello,

My Name is Tom Sadowski and I am currently a student
at Southern
Connecticut
State University. I am currently involved in a project
that is using a
Digital Instruments AFM microscope. Unfortunately, all
of the images
are
stored in their own proprietary format. I wish to do a
batch conversion
of
these images to a more standard format, especially
uncompressed TIFF.
Does
anyone know of a method I can use to do this? Any help
would be greatly
appreciated


Thank you once again
Thomas Sadowski
Southern Connecticut State University




DeleteReplyForwardSpam Move...

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 30 03:33:49 2004



From: Oldrich Benada :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 10:58:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EDAX DX4 trouble - Thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,
Our problem is solved. It was caused by PS2 power supply. The PC part of DX4
was completely without any energy.
If you like to see PS2 power supply, the image is on following page:

http://www2.biomed.cas.cz/~benada/DX4_troubles.html

Oldrich

P.S. Many thanks again for all advices and suggestions.

On 2 Nov 2004 at 13:35, Jim Quinn wrote:

} Oldrich
}
} Please remember to post your final outcome.
} We can all learn from it.
}
} regards,
}
} Jim



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 30 07:04:35 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 08:29:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Monte Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I think that the recent post on this subject from Jean-Paul BaÔlon is
misleading - sorry Jean-Paul. I started to look into this but have not
had time to finish the investigation but...

The size of the region from which backscattered electrons come is much
bigger than the resolution in the image.

The resolution in a secondary electron image corresponds to a distance
much smaller than the size of the area from which the secondary
electrons are emitted. This is well known. See for example, page 197
of the latest edition of the Goldstein et al book.

Something similar happens with backscattered electrons, though this is
more controversial. The plot that Jean-Paul refers to is a plot of
number of backscattered electrons against distance. If instead the
graph is made to plot number of electrons against position (divide the
first plot by 2pi times the radius) then the situation looks quite
different.

The number of backscattered electrons per unit area from the surface is
sharply peaked at the center and details in the image can be seen at
lengths related to this sharpness rather than the size of the whole area
from which electrons come.

This is the explanation for the fact that backscattered images show
details much smaller than a simple Monte Carlo result would suggest.

Alwyn
--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 30 07:39:46 2004



From: bbandli :      bbandli-at-mvainc.com
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 09:06:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Soil Analysis SEM EDAX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If I understand your problem, what you (or your colleagues) are tying to
determine is what mineral phase the P is present in. This would require
that you analyze individual particles, and enough particles enriched
with P to say something about the sample. If you are making maps of
your sample you must be interested in some spatial features of P
distribution in your sample. While X-ray mapping is a way to get at
this, you might want to try a different prep technique to improve the
mapping results. I recall reading an article on preparing polished
cross sections of soil samples in the July 2004 Microscopy and Analysis
that dealt with archaeological soil samples and might be of some use.

Hope this helps,

Bryan Bandli

Edwina Westbrook wrote:

} I should have been a bit more detailed. Remember, I am not the soil scientist, however, wet chemistry is the method of testing...spectroscopy (ICP) and chromatography. Those methods are performed in the soil lab. My task is simply to place a dbl sticky SEM stub into a soil sample, coat with carbon and view in the SEM (randomly selected areas), generate a spectra and maps. SEM/EDAX is in addition to the well documented soil analysis methods.
}
} Wanted to get some feedback or direction from all of you who are far more knowledgeable and generate discussion that may benefit others as well.
}
} Thank you.
}
} Winnie
}
}
}
}
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 30 07:48:38 2004



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 09:12:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Conversion of Veeco Images to TIFF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thomas,
My experience with proprietary software formats has been that the
vendor (in your case Digital Instruments) provides a means to
"export" your data from their format into others. I would be
surprised if they did not, since most of their end-users would want
to take data from the microscope work with it either with analysis
software or simply put it into Photoshop or PhotoImpact etc. which
handle TIF.
Check the manual and/or help menu for the AFM or call Digital
Imaging. If they don't supply a conversion method, they should.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Nov 30 08:50:51 2004



From: Susheng Tan :      sstan33-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 07:14:31 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Conversion of Veeco Images to TIFF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom,

you should find the TIF export function through the
menu of Utility in the Nanoscope offline data
processing program bundled with the realtime software.

Hope it helps,

Susheng Tan

--- Thomas Sadowski {tommy91779-at-hotmail.com} wrote:

}
}
}
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} On-Line Help
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello,
}
} My Name is Tom Sadowski and I am currently a student
} at Southern Connecticut
} State University. I am currently involved in a
} project that is using a
} Digital Instruments AFM microscope. Unfortunately,
} all of the images are
} stored in their own proprietary format. I wish to do
} a batch conversion of
} these images to a more standard format, especially
} uncompressed TIFF. Does
} anyone know of a method I can use to do this? Any
} help would be greatly
} appreciated
}
}
} Thank you once again
} Thomas Sadowski
} Southern Connecticut State University
}
}
}
}


=====
Susheng TAN, D.Sc.
Department of Chemistry, Oklahoma State University
107 Physical Science
Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078
Phone: (405)744-4835 Fax:(405)744-6007
eMail:tsushen-at-okstate.edu sstan33-at-yahoo.com



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