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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2005 08:29:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: December Archives now on-line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Happy New Year Colleagues!

The Archives for all of 2004 are now on-line at:

http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers
Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 2 08:48:43 2005



From: innap-at-savion.cc.huji.ac.il (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 08:54:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: imaging of microemulsions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (innap-at-savion.huji.ac.il) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Sunday, January 2, 2005 at 06:56:05
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: innap-at-savion.huji.ac.il
Name: Inna Popov

Organization: The Unit for Nanoscopic Characterization, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Need help in imaging of microemulsions

Question: Dear Listers,
I need your help in imaging microemulsions of types oil-in-water/water-in-oil with oil drops of 10 to 50 nm size.
Do you have any experience in SEM/ESEM/CryoSEM imaging of such objects?

Thank you in advance,
Inna

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 2 13:07:07 2005



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 08:12:28 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] 840 CL alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year

Many thanks to those who replied to my earlier posting regarding CL alignment on a
JEOL 840, but please note that it's the CL alignment specifically (the bit you have to do
after tearing down the column) that I'm having problems with, not the objective aperture
or stigmator adjustment.

I'm still seeking understanding of that part (ie the CL alignment), if anyone has that one
sorted.

thanks and all the best for 2005

cheers

rtch



--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 3 08:19:47 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 08:24:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: imaging of microemulsions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Inna,

If you have access to an SEM with a liquid nitrogen-cooled cryostage and
a way of plunge freezing samples and transferring them frozen into the
specimen chamber, this would be a good way to do it. I have imaged
foamy liquids with great success like this, and the process was very
simple.

Briefly, the liquid to be imaged was shaken violently to form the
bubbles, then a drop of the foam was put on the specimen holder and
plunged into liquid nitrogen. I was using an EMITech cryopreparation
unit, so I took the sample out of the LN2 bath under vacuum and
transferred it to the fracture and coating stage of the unit. Using a
built-in pick, I fractured off a piece of the frozen foam, then coated
the sample with gold before transferring it under vacuum to the SEM
stage. Micrographs were taken with no problems.

This was actually one of the easiest cryo specimens I ever worked with,
and I expect yours would work much the same way. My only concern might
be the size of the droplets you want to image, since cryoSEM, in my
experience, doesn't have the resolution of "normal" SEM work. If you
have any questions, please let me know.

Good luck,
Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu







-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:innap-at-savion.cc.huji.ac.il]

Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2005 8:54 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (innap-at-savion.huji.ac.il) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Sunday,
January 2, 2005 at 06:56:05
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: innap-at-savion.huji.ac.il
Name: Inna Popov

Organization: The Unit for Nanoscopic Characterization, The Hebrew
University of Jerusalem

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Need help in imaging
of microemulsions

Question: Dear Listers,
I need your help in imaging microemulsions of types
oil-in-water/water-in-oil with oil drops of 10 to 50 nm size.
Do you have any experience in SEM/ESEM/CryoSEM imaging of such objects?

Thank you in advance,
Inna

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 3 15:36:23 2005



From: Alberto Diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 22:40:04 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Content Alert: Microscopy Research and Technique 65, 4-5

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Inizio del messaggio inoltrato:

} Da: WileyInterScienceAlerts-at-wiley.com
} Data: 03 gennaio 2005 21:25:06 CET
} A: (alert recipient)
} Oggetto: Content Alert: Microscopy Research and Technique 65, 4-5
}
} Microscopy Research and Technique
} Volume 65, Issue 4-5, 2004.
}
} Online ISSN: 1097-0029
} Print ISSN: 1059-910X
} (Special Issue: A Nanoworld Under the Microscope - From Cell
} Trafficking to Molecular Machines. Issue Edited by Alberto Diaspro.)
}
}
} Copyright © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
} Pages: 167-168
} Introduction: A nanoworld under the microscope - From cell trafficking
} to molecular machines
} Alberto Diaspro
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861800/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20137
}
} Pages: 169-179
} Ensemble and single particle photophysical properties (two-photon
} excitation, anisotropy, FRET, lifetime, spectral conversion) of
} commercial quantum dots in solution and in live cells
} H.E. Grecco, K.A. Lidke, R. Heintzmann, D.S. Lidke, C. Spagnuolo, O.E.
} Martinez, E.A. Jares-Erijman, T.M. Jovin
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861786/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20129
}
} Pages: 180-185
} Super-resolution bright-field optical microscopy based on nanometer
} topographic contrast
} Shu-Wei Huang, Hong-Yao Mong, Chau-Hwang Lee
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861787/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20091
}
} Pages: 186-193
} Single molecule spectroscopic characterization of GFP-mut2 mutant for
} two-photon microscopy applications
} Fabio Cannone, Michele Caccia, Sara Bologna, Alberto Diaspro, Giuseppe
} Chirico
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861788/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20125
}
} Pages: 194-204
} Exploring molecular motors and switches at the single-molecule level
} M. Capitanio, F. Vanzi, C. Broggio, R. Cicchi, D. Normanno, G. Romano,
} L. Sacconi, F.S. Pavone
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861789/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20126
}
} Pages: 205-217
} Polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of DNA-DAPI complexes
} Maria Luisa Barcellona, Seth Gammon, Theodore Hazlett, Michelle A.
} Digman, Enrico Gratton
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861801/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20121
}
} Pages: 218-225
} Diffusion of microspheres in sealed and open microarrays
} B. Rieger, H.R.C. Dietrich, L.R. Van Den Doel, L.J. Van Vliet
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861802/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20128
}
} Pages: 226-234
} Chemical and thermal denaturation of crystalline bacterial S-layer
} proteins: An atomic force microscopy study
} José L. Toca-Herrera, Susana Moreno-Flores, Jacqueline Friedmann,
} Dietmar Pum, Uwe B. Sleytr
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861803/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20127
}
} Pages: 235-245
} Single molecule studies of RNA secondary structure: AFM of TYMV viral
} RNA
} Andrea Giro, Anna Bergia, Giampaolo Zuccheri, Hugo H.J. Bink, Cornelis
} W.A. Pleij, Bruno Samorì
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861804/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20123
}
} Pages: 246-251
} Monitoring of glass derivatization with pulsed force mode atomic force
} microscopy
} Andreas Ebner, Ferry Kienberger, Cordula M. Stroh, Hermann J. Gruber,
} Peter Hinterdorfer
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861805/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20124
}
} Pages: 252-262
} Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics
} from visible to x-ray wavelength regime
} Enzo Di Fabrizio, Dan Cojoc, Valentina Emiliani, Stefano Cabrini,
} Maite Coppey-Moisan, Enrico Ferrari, Valeria Garbin, Matteo Altissimo
} http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109861806/ABSTRACT
}
} Published Online: 3 Jan 2005
} DOI: 10.1002/jemt.20122
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} Copyright (c) 1999-2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------
Alberto Diaspro, Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy
facsimile +39-010314218 - voice +39-0103536426/480/309
URL: http://www.lambs.it
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 3 18:40:56 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 18:45:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: viaWWW: imaging of microemulsions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Inna

The new CytoViva system which debuted last month at Cell Bio, would also give you an interesting approach, with much less sample prep.

The system provides both contrast and high resolution. It retrofits easily to existing light microscopes (research stands) and I've seen it work quite well with colloids on the order of 50nm. The neat thing for emulsions is that you can observe them in real time.

If you are interested, take a look at their website : www.CytoViva.com. Although the applications shown there are biological, I've worked with emulsions before and the imaging principles are very similar. I'd also recommend your contacting Dr. Tom Hasling at Aetos (the manufacturer) and ask him to run a sample for you (+1 334-749-0134). If you can't send him something directly, perhaps you can suggest an emulsion system which is similar to yours.

Hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

Caveat: MME was part of the initial launch team for this product.



At 08:24 AM 1/3/2005, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 3 18:42:58 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 18:47:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: viaWWW: imaging of microemulsions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Inna

The new CytoViva system which debuted last month at Cell Bio, would also give you an interesting approach, with much less sample prep.

The system provides both contrast and high resolution. It retrofits easily to existing light microscopes (research stands) and I've seen it work quite well with colloids on the order of 50nm. The neat thing for emulsions is that you can observe them in real time.

If you are interested, take a look at their website : www.CytoViva.com. Although the applications shown there are biological, I've worked with emulsions before and the imaging principles are very similar. I'd also recommend your contacting Dr. Tom Hasling at Aetos (the manufacturer) and ask him to run a sample for you (+1 334-749-0134). If you can't send him something directly, perhaps you can suggest an emulsion system which is similar to yours.

Hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

Caveat: MME was part of the initial launch team for this product.



At 08:24 AM 1/3/2005, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 3 22:38:47 2005



From: George Theodossiou :      George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 15:44:40 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Etch Solution for Ni

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,

Happy New Year...Hope you are all well and still on holidays instead of
being back at work. I wish I was.

Now to my question....This is probably a silly question but its better to
ask. Can anyone recommend an etch solution to reveal the grain structure of
electro plated Ni. I know of Kalling's No. 2 and Acetic Glyceregia for Ni
based alloys. I expect them to work on Ni but just wanted to be sure and
find out if anyone can recommend at better solution.

Regards
George

George Theodossiou
Physicist / Microscopist
Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory

AMCOR Research and Technology
Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
Mobile: 0409 568 840
email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au


************************************************************************
CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
please notify AMCOR immediately.
Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 00:47:11 2005



From: hanke :      hanke-at-mee-inc.com
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 02:08:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Etch Solution for Ni

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The etchant that I prefer for electoplated nickel is a 1:1 mixture of acetic
and nitric acids.

George Theodossiou writes:

} Can anyone recommend an etch solution to reveal the grain structure of
} electro plated Ni. I know of Kalling's No. 2 and Acetic Glyceregia for Ni
} based alloys. I expect them to work on Ni but just wanted to be sure and
} find out if anyone can recommend at better solution.
}
} Regards
} George
}
} George Theodossiou
} Physicist / Microscopist
} Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory
}



--
Larry D. Hanke, P.E.
Materials Evaluation and Engineering, Inc.
Practical Solutions Through Technology and Innovation
http://www.mee-inc.com (763) 449-8870


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 02:33:17 2005



From: Henrik Kaker :      Henrik.Kaker-at-guest.arnes.si
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 09:38:29 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Etch Solution for Ni

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} From Etchants Database, http://www.kaker.com/Etch/Etch.html :

Material: Nickel and Nickel Alloys
Type: Polishing
Method: Electropolishing
Etchant (Electrolyte): 37 ml H3PO4 (conc.), 56 ml glycerol, 7 ml water.
Procedure: 9-10 A/in2, Pt cathode, water cooled.
Remarks: Nickel 200.
Reference: Metallography, Structures and Phase Diagrams, Metals Handbook, 8th
Edition, Vol. 8, ASM (American Society for Metals), Metals Park, Ohio 44079, USA,
1973, p. 137.

Material: Nickel and Nickel Alloys
Type: Macro
Method: Chemical etching
Etchant (Electrolyte): 25 ml nitric acid (conc.), 75 ml hydrofluoric acid (conc.).
Procedure: Etching time is 3-10 min. Use fume cupboard.
Remarks: Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Fe alloys.
Reference: H. Modin and S. Modin, Metallurgical Microscopy, Butterworths, London,
1973., p. 390.

Material: Nickel and Nickel Alloys
Type: Polishing
Method: Electropolishing
Etchant (Electrolyte): 37 ml H3PO4 (conc.), 56 ml glycerol, 7 ml water.
Procedure: 8-10 A/in2, Pt cathode, water cooled.
Remarks: Duranickel 301.
Reference: Metallography, Structures and Phase Diagrams, Metals Handbook, 8th
Edition, Vol. 8, ASM (American Society for Metals), Metals Park, Ohio 44079, USA,
1973, p. 137.

Material: Nickel Specimens and Nickel Alloys
Type: Micro
Method: Electro polihsing
Etchant (electrolyte): A.) For Ni: 50 % hydrochloric aicd, 25 % water. B.) For Ni
alloys: 75 % hydrochloric acid, 25 % water.
Procedure: No data.
Remarks: Jet electro polishing for discs.
Reference: S.Mader, et.al., J.App.Phys., Vol.34, 1963, p.3376.

Henrik Kaker


George Theodossiou wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi All,
}
} Happy New Year...Hope you are all well and still on holidays instead of
} being back at work. I wish I was.
}
} Now to my question....This is probably a silly question but its better to
} ask. Can anyone recommend an etch solution to reveal the grain structure of
} electro plated Ni. I know of Kalling's No. 2 and Acetic Glyceregia for Ni
} based alloys. I expect them to work on Ni but just wanted to be sure and
} find out if anyone can recommend at better solution.
}
} Regards
} George
}
} George Theodossiou
} Physicist / Microscopist
} Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory
}
} AMCOR Research and Technology
} Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
} Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
} Mobile: 0409 568 840
} email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
}
} ************************************************************************
} CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
} information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
} If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
} notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
} this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
} please notify AMCOR immediately.
} Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
} and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
} ************************************************************************

--
Dr. Henrik Kaker
Metal Ravne
SEM-EDS Laboratory
Koroska cesta 14
SI-2390 Ravne
Slovenia
Phone: +386 2 870 7076
Fax: +386 2 870 7022
GSM: +386 31 380 875




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 05:20:02 2005



From: Gerd Leitinger :      gerd.leitinger-at-meduni-graz.at
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 12:23:00 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] LM prepared slides of animal nervous system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

I am wondering whether anybody can help me obtaining microscopical
slides of the nervous system of classical experimental animals.

I will be teaching students in a course on histology of the nervous
system and am supposed to compare specimens of the human
nervous system with the nervous system of classical experimental
animals. We have many slides of the human nervous system here at
this department, but are lacking slides of other animals.
I myself work on insects, so it will be easy for me to prepare slides with
ganglia of insects, but for comparison, I shall need slides of other
invertebrates (squid, Aplysia, Lymnaea... ?).
Does anybody know a source of spare, prepared slides of parts of the
nervous system of such invertebrates?
Or, does anybody know a source of Aplysia or Lymnaea and have
dissection istructions, so that I can attempt to dissect them myself?

thank you

Gerd Leitinger

Dr. Gerd Leitinger

Institut für Zellbiologie, Histologie und Embryologie
Medizinische Universität Graz
Harrachgasse 21
A-8010 Graz
Austria

Tel. ++43 316 380 4237
Fax. ++43 316 380 9625
Mailto: Gerd.Leitinger-at-meduni-graz.at




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 06:40:49 2005



From: neil-at-young8696.freeserve.co.uk (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 06:46:16 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TEM School, Antwerp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (neil-at-young8696.freeserve.co.uk) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, January 4, 2005 at 05:55:02
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: neil-at-young8696.freeserve.co.uk
Name: Neil

Organization: University of Birmingham

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] TEM School, Antwerp

Question: Hi, just thought I'd see if anyone is attending the winter school at Antwerp this month?

Neil Young
Nanophysics Research Laboratory
University of Birmingham

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 16:03:59 2005



From: jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:09:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view on a tv or

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday, January 4, 2005 at 11:37:24
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us
Name: Jennifer Francis

Organization: Powell County Schools

Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School

Location: Stanton,KY, USA

Question: I am formerly an elementary school teacher, now working with middle school students. I would like to invest in a microscope that we can view on a tv or computer monitor. Can you tell me what equipment I might need to do that? I am not sure what the differences are between a digital microscope, a flex cam, etc. The digital microscopes seem to be less expensive, and I wondering if I connect that to a computer/laptop if I could use a digital projector (already own) to project from there and if that is better than something like the flex cam? Would you have any ideas? Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 16:08:17 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:14:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Final Notice to All Subscribers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


==============================================
Thrid and Final Notice of Microscopy Listserver DataBase Update:
==============================================
Jan 4, 2005

Colleagues, if you have subscribed/resubscribed since Dec. 21st
You may ignore the remainder of this message you will already
be in the new database. The Listserver will begin using the new database
records next week.

=======================================
Second Notice of Microscopy Listserver DataBase Update:
=======================================
Dec. 28, 2004
=======================================
First Notice of Microscopy Listserver DataBase Update:
=======================================
Dec. 21, 2004

Colleagues....

After nearly a dozen years of operation, the master database of the
Microscopy Listserver needs a serious reworking and purging. I have done
the hard work of restructuring the software model but now the
database needs to be "repopulated" with updated/new user information.

The easiest way for me to accomplish this is to simply purge the entire database,
and have each of you resubscribe as if you are a new user.

As a result, I'm asking EACH and EVERY ONE of you to visit the following WWW site
and fill out the new subscription form. Here is the URL:

http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/SubscribeMicroscopy.html

You can do this beginning immediately, the changes will be stored and
I will implement the new system on or about the second week of Jan. 2005.
If all goes well, resubscribing should only take a few minutes of your time,
so please do it as soon as possible.

For the balance of 2004 the old database will remain in use, but
if you have not resubscribed by ~ the first week of Jan 2005,
you will no longer receive Listserver Email as I will cease using the
old database and only forward Listserver Email to those individuals who have
subscribed and are recorded in the new system.

I'll post this message every Monday through Jan 3, as a reminder and shortly thereafter will
transition away from the old database to the new one.

Thanks in advance for your patience and cooperation.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 16:57:04 2005



From: Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 17:02:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: database of TEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, January 4, 2005 at 08:24:11
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu
Name: Stacey Andringa

Organization: University of Cincinnati

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] image database

Question: My co-worker has a proposal for a massive database of
TEM images. Here it is.

I am interested in finding (or creating) an easily accesible
transmission electron microscopic image database which will
have thousands of images available to preview....without
comments or arrows or descriptions on the actual images....
but with the option to retrieve the article or a description
of the treatment/species/etc on a separate link. There
could be an image preview mode, and a high resolution link
and from there a link to the specifics of species and
treatment etc and/or an article on PubMed or Medline. The
database should be open to the public, and have a mechanism
for adding images to the database (in a particular format)
through fields just like filling out a form. The sorting of
images could be by mesh headings. The databases which I
have been able to access do not appear in this format, and
there is too much in the way of "other links and
descriptors" to allow for a quick visual scan of the images.
Does anyone out there have an interest in such a database...
and would anyone out there be willing to be co-investigator
on a grant to prepare and maintain such a database.
Thanks for your responses.

marian.miller-at-uc.edu




---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 18:04:57 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 18:10:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Database for TEM Images etc....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Stacey

There are alot of possible image databases out there both commerical and public-domain.
None that I know of do exactly what you ask, but then that is why you asked for input isn't it?

I'll point you to the public-domain TPM Electronic Notebook at :

http://tpm.amc.anl.gov

As an electronic notebook, it does alot of what you asked for and technically it is simply
a database with a WWW based GUI front end. As a Notebook it handles not only text but
also images. It is searchable and can be customized with a modicum of effort to incorporate nearly
everything you asked about.

If your interested in fiddling, go to the WWW site, then select ENotebook Button, then choose the
PUBLIC Notebook and "Enter the ENotebook. Both public and private ENotebooks
are available, the difference being simply login requirements.

Each "record" in the Notebook is a seperate page, but the pages can be of unlimited length and data can
be added to any individual pages at any time (dated and time stamped of course).

A customizable thumbnail page can be made to show summary images (Table of Contents). Which will give
you a preview of multiple pages.

There are some example images in the public notebook. Comment fields, form based input,
various file formats supported (JPG/TIF/GIF/BMP/PNG/QT/MOV/MPG/AVI/PDF/DOC/XLS/PPT/ASCII/Binary )
thumbnails and full view images. Links and articles describing the images are appendable to the
page, or can be embedded on the page itself.

The ENotebook is (obviously) WWW based and currently runs on a Linux Server. This is part of the
TelePresence Microscopy Collaboratory Project at Argonne National Lab. A single server
can support multiple private and/or public ENotebooks. In principle the only limitation
to the number of images is the size of your Disk Drive.

Rumor has it I know the developer, so get back to me if you have any questions.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


}
} Email: Stacey.Andringa-at-uc.edu
} Name: Stacey Andringa
}
} Organization: University of Cincinnati
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] image database
}
} Question: My co-worker has a proposal for a massive database of
} TEM images. Here it is.
}
} I am interested in finding (or creating) an easily accesible
} transmission electron microscopic image database which will
} have thousands of images available to preview....without
} comments or arrows or descriptions on the actual images....
} but with the option to retrieve the article or a description
} of the treatment/species/etc on a separate link. There
} could be an image preview mode, and a high resolution link
} and from there a link to the specifics of species and
} treatment etc and/or an article on PubMed or Medline. The
} database should be open to the public, and have a mechanism
} for adding images to the database (in a particular format)
} through fields just like filling out a form. The sorting of
} images could be by mesh headings. The databases which I
} have been able to access do not appear in this format, and
} there is too much in the way of "other links and
} descriptors" to allow for a quick visual scan of the images.
} Does anyone out there have an interest in such a database...
} and would anyone out there be willing to be co-investigator
} on a grant to prepare and maintain such a database.
} Thanks for your responses.
}
} marian.miller-at-uc.edu
}
}
}
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 18:17:31 2005



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 19:22:42 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Olympus BX61 computer control question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have an Olympus BX61 that we are using alternating control of from one
software package to another. One of the software packages is proprietary
and must have the dip switches on the microscope communications hardware
set a certain way.

Does anybody know what these switch setting mean so that we can attempt to
connect with the other software which may be flexible?

I posted images of the problem at
http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/temp/sky/index2.htm

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

-Michael
____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
**This electronic transmission contains information that is privileged.**



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 18:53:24 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 17:11:06 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view on a tv or computer monitor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 4, 2005, at 2:09 PM, by way of Ask-A-Microscopist wrote:

} Question: I am formerly an elementary school teacher, now working with
} middle school students. I would like to invest in a microscope that
} we can view on a tv or computer monitor. Can you tell me what
} equipment I might need to do that? I am not sure what the differences
} are between a digital microscope, a flex cam, etc. The digital
} microscopes seem to be less expensive, and I wondering if I connect
} that to a computer/laptop if I could use a digital projector (already
} own) to project from there and if that is better than something like
} the flex cam? Would you have any ideas? Thanks!
}
Dear Jennifer,
Caroline Schooley is an expert on this; her contact info and the web
site for Project MICRO are:

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates:
http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html

Project MICRO's purpose is to enhance pre-college education, as stated
on the web page.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 4 20:22:03 2005



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 18:27:15 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: database of TEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Stacey
We have such a data base at UBC. Dr. Lacey Samuels instigated it as a
resource for a Bio200 cell biology course and Joseph Dietz designed
it. It just grew from there. Anyone can add images to it, and we
encourage users of this facility to "add a useful image." You can
access it from my website http://www.emlab.ubc.ca On the left hand
side is the link to the BioMedia Database. There is a very easy
search engine.

We have the policy that if the images are to be used for educational
purposes and non-profit then you can download them for free. If they
are to be used for profit, then the copyright stays with the author.

We are at present setting up the link to the protocols pages on the
emlab website for the images in the database.

Let me know if you would like to add images to it and need more information.
Elaine



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 07:44:54 2005



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOhio.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 08:49:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Olympus BX61 computer control question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael:

Seeing that you are in the Bronx, why don't you just call out to Melville and
ask them? They are very freindly and should be able to fax you off the dip
switch info.

Corporate Headquarters:
Olympus America Inc.
2 Corporate Center Drive P.O. Box 9058
Melville, NY 11747-9058
1-800-645-8160


}
} We have an Olympus BX61 that we are using alternating control of from one
} software package to another. One of the software packages is proprietary
} and must have the dip switches on the microscope communications hardware
} set a certain way.
}
} Does anybody know what these switch setting mean so that we can attempt to
} connect with the other software which may be flexible?
}
} I posted images of the problem at
} http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/temp/sky/index2.htm
}
} Any help would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Thank you.
}
} -Michael
} ____________________________________________________________________________
} Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
} Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
} (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} **This electronic transmission contains information that is privileged.**
}
}



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Director
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 11:29:49 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 11:34:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jennifer,

You can actually turn nearly any microscope into a digital microscope by attaching a camera to it. Several companies which come to mind which have cameras that can slip right into the place where a normal eyepiece goes are VideoLab and Ken-a-Vision. I'd also suggest seeing if Swift Instruments has anything.

Several years ago, we taught a week-long course for jr. high school and high school teachers (ironically, chemistry and physics) at Miami University (Oxford, OH). Early in the program, we put these small, inexpensive cameras (I think, at that time, that the VideoLab camera only cost about $258 for a direct feed into a video monitor... maybe another $125 for a card to go into a computer, if you wanted to capture images) on the normal, high-school level microscopes and ran experiments on polarized light, diatoms, and contrast techniques (ex: salt crystals under Darkfield and a technique popular in the 1860's called Rheinberg), as well as calibration experiments and measurements. The teachers were incredibly impressed with the ability to transfer the image from the microscope to the video monitor. (Actually, they all instantly reverted from being mature, in-control adults to enthusiastic 7 year-olds! ... and I mean that in the most complimentary sense).

As for equipment:
For the simplest connection, just the camera and a video monitor. the cameras typically come with some sort of clamping device. Just remove the eyepiece and replace with the camera and adapter.

For the next level up, you can get an analog-to-digital (ADC) video capture card that goes into the computer. The camera then hooks into the back of the card and the card, in conjunction with some special software, captures the images and makes them available for storage and manipulation in the computer.

Although I've not researched the market lately, I think that all of the inexpensive cameras (like the Flexcam), are analog. They require both the electronic interface and software to communicate with a computer and produce digital images.

Once you have the images in digital format, you can use your computer and digital projector to project the still images in the classroom. Alternatively, using the simple set up described above, you can project live moving objects, like pond critters and crystal growth.

I think you will find a web search and the camera manufacturers a wealth of info, but contact me off-line if you have further questions.

Good hunting! .... and have fun!!!

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
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Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.



At 04:09 PM 1/4/2005, jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 12:02:31 2005



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 10:06:52 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view on a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jennifer;
A number of years ago, Intel and Mattel teamed up to produce a
very inexpensive microscope that interfaced to a computer.
Unfortunately, they ceased production, although they can be found on
Ebay. (I just checked-there are 16 on Ebay at this moment, with the
highest price being $40) I regret that I never bought one. Everyone I
know who bought one for their kids was delighted. BTW, I do work for
Intel, but have I no connection at all to this microscope, and as I
said, it is out of production.

John Mardinly

-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist [mailto:jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us]
Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2005 2:10 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Tuesday, January 4, 2005 at 11:37:24
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us
Name: Jennifer Francis

Organization: Powell County Schools

Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School

Location: Stanton,KY, USA

Question: I am formerly an elementary school teacher, now working with
middle school students. I would like to invest in a microscope that we
can view on a tv or computer monitor. Can you tell me what equipment I
might need to do that? I am not sure what the differences are between a
digital microscope, a flex cam, etc. The digital microscopes seem to be
less expensive, and I wondering if I connect that to a computer/laptop
if I could use a digital projector (already own) to project from there
and if that is better than something like the flex cam? Would you have
any ideas? Thanks!

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 12:31:52 2005



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 10:00:14 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Jennifer -

The answer to your question has to start with the politics of
education. Digital microscopes with a computer feed qualify for
"technology" funds, which makes them easier to purchase in many
school districts. Your classroom computer must be new enough to have
a USB port. Yes, the projector will work fine. Flex cams are
available with either analog (TV) or digital (PC) feed, and are a
good choice if you already have a microscope; they start at around
$300. An advantage of the flex cam approach is that it will work
with both compound and dissecting scopes, and many of the things that
middle school students want to observe (bugs, rocks, flowers, etc.)
are best observed with a dissecting scope. A basic monocular
dissecting scope costs $75.

That said, I urge you to think about what your students will see with
that digital projector; another image on a monitor, passively. From
the Project MICRO point of view, I'd like THEM to be the observers!
At the very least, buy a dozen or so "flashlight" style 30x
microscopes (~$10 each) as a supplement, so that each student can
learn to observe. You may find the advice on buying school
microscopes that is part of the MICRO web page helpful (URL below).
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 15:17:28 2005



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 15:22:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view on a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John,

This microscope is still available, now from Digital Blue:
http://www.playdigitalblue.com/products/
There's the old QX3, and a new "improved" QX5. The quote marks are
because the QX5 no longer supports TWAIN, so it can't be run through,
say, Photoshop, like the QX3 can be -- the 5 only runs with the
proprietary software. Pity, that.

Phil

} Jennifer;
} A number of years ago, Intel and Mattel teamed up to produce a
} very inexpensive microscope that interfaced to a computer.
} Unfortunately, they ceased production, although they can be found on
} Ebay. (I just checked-there are 16 on Ebay at this moment, with the
} highest price being $40) I regret that I never bought one. Everyone I
} know who bought one for their kids was delighted. BTW, I do work for
} Intel, but have I no connection at all to this microscope, and as I
} said, it is out of production.
}
} John Mardinly
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist [mailto:jfrancis-at-powell.k12.ky.us]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2005 2:10 PM
} To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we can view on a
} tv or computer monitor
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 16:05:21 2005



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 17:37:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: AskAMicroscopist: microscope that we

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I second this recommendation for the Intel QX3, and if you are a mac
user there is a great freeware app called Mixscope that will capture
jpegs, tiffs, and timelapse quicktime movies from the QX3 on OS X.

http://homepage.mac.com/aireck/qx3/

best regards,
kevin

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Mardinly, John" {john.mardinly-at-intel.com}

I have one of these Intel 'scopes and am very unhappy with it. We never
use it. A cheap video camera and a monitor is so much better.

Here's a really simple and cheap approach (certainly easier than the BX61
we're trying to set up!):
http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/gallery/cheapscope/index.htm
which also shot the pictures, but with a 3 megapixel camera, at
http://www.flushart.com/gla/livinglake/index.htm

Regardless, based on my experience having done a project with two second
grade classes in September, the kids really need to look into the barrel of
the microscope themselves to get excited.

-Michael C.


} Jennifer;
} A number of years ago, Intel and Mattel teamed up to produce a
} very inexpensive microscope that interfaced to a computer.
} Unfortunately, they ceased production, although they can be found on
} Ebay. (I just checked-there are 16 on Ebay at this moment, with the
} highest price being $40) I regret that I never bought one. Everyone I
} know who bought one for their kids was delighted. BTW, I do work for
} Intel, but have I no connection at all to this microscope, and as I
} said, it is out of production.
}
} John Mardinly

____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
**This electronic transmission contains information that is privileged.**



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 16:44:01 2005



From: Cliff Glier :      cglier-at-opelco.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 17:49:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Sales Positions Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,

} Optical Elements Corporation (OPELCO) has current openings for a Light Microscope and a Confocal Microscope Sales Specialist in the Washington, DC region. If interested, please click on the following link or contact me directly.
} http://www.opelco.com/employmentcontact.htm
}
} Best Regards,
} Cliff Glier
} COO
} OPELCO
} 105 Executive Drive Suite 100
} Dulles, VA 20166
} 703.471.0080 x230
} 703.904.9432 (fax)
} cglier-at-opelco.com
} www.opelco.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 16:44:22 2005



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 14:47:17 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi:

I need some expert advice so I can help a user in my lab. He wants to see
some nannoparticles he has synthesized by the following procedure:

} The sample is CdTe, a highly fluorescent NP with a shell of either
} thioglycolic acid or 2-mercaptoethylamine. In theory they should be about
} 2-5nm in diameter, but they are synthesized in aqueous solution, and in
} order to properly seperate the particles I perform a ligand exchange and
} redissolve into organic solvents(ie toluene).

So, he shows up and I put his solution onto a carbon coated formvar grid. I
look around. I don't see much, some junk, but nothing like nannoparticles.
He is disappointed.

I am scratching my head. Is there something there and I can't see it? Would
I see it if it were there?

Maybe you have some ideas?

Would raw CdTe particles at 2 nm size have enough contrast to show up?

Could the solution be so concentrated that it looks like a solid field
rather than separate particles?

The solution he gave me didn't really dry on the grid like I thought it
would. How fast does toluene evaporate and could it mangle the formvar?

Any other helpful hints to get some results?

Thanks


Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 5 21:26:44 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 19:44:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 5, 2005, at 2:47 PM, Jon Krupp wrote:

} I need some expert advice so I can help a user in my lab. He wants to
} see
} some nannoparticles he has synthesized by the following procedure:
}
} } The sample is CdTe, a highly fluorescent NP with a shell of either
} } thioglycolic acid or 2-mercaptoethylamine. In theory they should be
} } about
} } 2-5nm in diameter, but they are synthesized in aqueous solution, and
} } in
} } order to properly seperate the particles I perform a ligand exchange
} } and
} } redissolve into organic solvents(ie toluene).
}
} So, he shows up and I put his solution onto a carbon coated formvar
} grid. I
} look around. I don't see much, some junk, but nothing like
} nannoparticles.
} He is disappointed.
}
} I am scratching my head. Is there something there and I can't see it?
} Would
} I see it if it were there?
}
} Maybe you have some ideas?
}
} Would raw CdTe particles at 2 nm size have enough contrast to show up?
}
} Could the solution be so concentrated that it looks like a solid field
} rather than separate particles?
}
} The solution he gave me didn't really dry on the grid like I thought it
} would. How fast does toluene evaporate and could it mangle the formvar?
}
} Any other helpful hints to get some results?
}
Dear Jon,
I have had a few experiences looking at quantum dots and zeolite
precursors for some of the materials scientists and chemical engineers
here, and I may be able to answer some of your questions. First of
all, these objects are small and inherently hard to see, so it would be
easy to go to a relatively high mag, scan across a grid square or two
and not see much. I used cryofixation and looked at frozen-hydrated
material, which is generally lower contrast than particles on thin
carbon; however, the uniformity of the background could be better for
ice than for a carbon coat, and this would render the particles more
visible. CdTe certainly has more contrast than what I was looking at,
so that is not the problem. It is very unlikely that the material is
too concentrated to see. Especially since the evaporation of the
toluene was not as expected, the particles are much more likely to
aggregate than to form a uniform layer. If you have an oven or even a
warm room, you might try drying the toluene at a somewhat elevated
temperature. If the toluene mangled the formvar, I'd expect to see
prominent, irregular features (as happens when one gets poor formvar
removal using chloroform). If the particles as prepared are
well-dispersed in the aqueous solution, and if you have access to
cryopreparation equipment, you could try looking at plunge-frozen
specimens. Measuring the fluorescence of the solution should allow you
to calculate the number of particles per microliter, so you could
determine roughly how many particles you would expect to see in a field
at the magnification you use. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 06:49:39 2005



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 08:55:03 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Sputter-coater recommendations?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers -

Does anyone have a recommendation for what make/model of sputter
coater to buy, if one was going to buy one? Currently our SEM stub coating
needs are met by an ancient Edwards evaporator (which is still working, by
the way). I know there's a number of other things one can do with an
evaporator that can't really be done with a sputter coater, but we don't do
those things - we really just need something to coat the occasional SEM
stub, in case the old Edwards unit finally buys the farm.
So if I was to have a small amount of capital dumped on me for such
a purchase, how much would I have to spend for a reasonably reliable little
sputter coater, and which one(s) should I consider?

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
GSC Atlantic
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 08:29:24 2005



From: sbledsoe-at-iupui.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 08:34:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Image Database

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (sbledsoe-at-iupui.edu) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 6, 2005 at 07:23:28
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: sbledsoe-at-iupui.edu
Name: Sharon B Bledsoe

Organization: Indiana University, School of Medicine

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Image Database

Question: For a nice image database try Improvison's Volocity.

Volocity has a LE version that is free.

http://www.improvison.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 08:41:58 2005



From: Karen Bovard :      kbovard-at-creighton.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 08:44:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Image grabbing systems for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a JEOL 840A SEM and am interested in upgrading it to digital
photograpy capabilities.

I am aware of the Orion, SIS ADDA II, and the JEOL Orion systems.

Are there any different options (preferably cheaper) to consider?

Karen Bovard
EM Lab
Pathology
Creighton University
Omaha, NE



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 09:07:14 2005



From: Mary Ellen Pease :      MPEASE-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 10:38:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] tissue processing of cryosections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jonathon

I know that individual 5nm gold spheres start to become difficult to
see in a real sample on carbon/formvar grids. This is not so much size
as the density you will get against a relatively thick background
coating (} 50nm). Cd and Te are both lighter than Au and if the
particles are not too symmetrical then I would have thought that they
would be practically invisible.

It sounds like one of those classical e.m. problems where the
resolution of the microscope is not the issue but the resolution and
contrast of the sample may be. I suppose you could play around with the
voltage and aperture size to enhance contrast a bit, as well. Someone
has already mentioned shadowing but I wonder if a simple negative stain
might help - I really have no idea. But I'd be interested to hear how
you get on.

It would certainly be worth trying with the bare particles if you can.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk



----- Original Message -----
} From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)

Hi all,

I am looking for a protocol for epoxy processing of 8-10um previously
sectioned cryoembedded tissue. I last did this about 10 years ago and
can not locate my notes. I recall stepping the slide through the
processing solutions with shortened times in a covered coplin jar until
the final infiltration steps when the plastic was pipetted directly onto
the slide's surface over the section and placed under vacuum. I also
remember embedding by inverting the slide over an over filled beam
capsule, polymerizing, then separating the two by using LN2 to pop the
slide away from the plastic block.

If you have recommendations for the duration of the processing steps,
I'd appreciate hearing them.

Thank you,
Mary Ellen Pease

Mary Ellen Pease, M.S.
Laboratory Manager
Glaucoma Research Lab & Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital
175 Woods Research
600 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, MD 21287
410-955-3337 (phone/voicemail)
443-287-2711 (fax)
mpease-at-jhmi.edu

WARNING: Email sent over the Internet is not secure. Information sent
by email may not remain confidential.
DISCLAIMER: This email is intended only for the individual to whom it
is addressed. It may be used only in accordance with applicable laws.
If you receive this email by mistake, notify the sender and destroy the
email.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 09:54:29 2005



From: Gerroir, Paul :      paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 10:57:27 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Sputter-coater recommendations?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,
Although I may not be able to make an ultimate recommendation for
purchase I would suggest you avoid Cressington. We have their 208HR
model sputter coater with mtm20 thickness controller and have been
generally pleased with the operation of the unit. We use either Pt/Pd or
Cr targets to coat polymeric materials. What has been especially
unsatisfactory about the unit is its 'voracious appetite' for targets.
Typically our Pt/Pd targets (57mm dia. x 0.1mm thick) last 2 to 4 months
and our usage is not heavy. The unit's power is concentrated in a
central ring of about 20mm and when the targets fail a small
crescent-shaped hole remains where the Pt/Pd has been etched away. I
made some measurements of the actual consumption of Pt/Pd upon failure
and found it to be only 8 to 12%. When you are spending approx. $500 US
per target and you are left with about $450 US of waste Pt/Pd you can
see that it is a very inefficient use of your money. Apparently
Cressington have been developing a smaller magnetron head which would
accept a smaller diameter target and hence reduce the amount of waste
target material. One other dislike of the unit in its present
configuration is the inability to maintain vacuum in the chamber once
power is switched off. I am unaware if their newer models reflect
improvements in these two areas.

Good luck in your search.

Regards,
Paul


Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: 905-823-7091, ext.216
FAX: 905-822-7022
e-mail: paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Thomas, Frank [mailto:FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca]
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 7:55 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Listers -

Does anyone have a recommendation for what make/model of sputter
coater to buy, if one was going to buy one? Currently our SEM stub
coating needs are met by an ancient Edwards evaporator (which is still
working, by the way). I know there's a number of other things one can do
with an evaporator that can't really be done with a sputter coater, but
we don't do those things - we really just need something to coat the
occasional SEM stub, in case the old Edwards unit finally buys the farm.

So if I was to have a small amount of capital dumped on me for
such a purchase, how much would I have to spend for a reasonably
reliable little
sputter coater, and which one(s) should I consider?

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152 GSC Atlantic
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, P.O. Box
1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2 Ressources naturelles Canada,
l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 11:12:32 2005



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 09:45:27 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] new sputter coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Mary Mager" {mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca}
To: "Karen Bovard" {kbovard-at-creighton.edu}
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 9:15 AM

Dear Paul,
One solution to your problem is to contact Abe Dayani (tel. 702-368-0579) at
Refining Systems Inc. (http://www.refiningsystems.com/) for new sputtering
targets and a credit on the unused materials in your spent targets. He
prices his targets on the precious metal content and they are usually about
half the price of the targets from the manufacturer.
No financial interest, just a satisfied customer.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Department of Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gerroir, Paul" {paul.gerroir-at-xrcc.xeroxlabs.com}
To: "Thomas, Frank" {FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca} ; {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 7:57 AM

Dear Frank,
I received a used Denton DeskII when I bought a used SEM and it has been a
good, solid performer. It is not fancy, but it is inexpensive, easy to
service and reliable.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Department of Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 12:00:44 2005



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 12:05:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John,

SEM or TEM? For either, we just deposit the particles on Formvar
coated grids, with or without C, directly from the water solution.
Just as long as their are no salts or the like to precipitate. This
works with colloidal particles down to 3 - 5 nm, and composed of Au,
Pt, Pd, Ag, Fe, and combinations and alloys of these.
The particles separate fine without doing anything else. This is also
true for particles conjugated to proteins like antibodies.
I did try to look at some home-made Cd/Se quantum dots that had been
synthesized in toluene (and a couple of other organic solvents, but I
forget which), and it was a no-go. The toluene attacked and either
dissolved or "wadded up" the formvar film. This may be what happened
to your samples.

Phil

} Hi:
}
} I need some expert advice so I can help a user in my lab. He wants to see
} some nannoparticles he has synthesized by the following procedure:
}
} } The sample is CdTe, a highly fluorescent NP with a shell of either
} } thioglycolic acid or 2-mercaptoethylamine. In theory they should be about
} } 2-5nm in diameter, but they are synthesized in aqueous solution, and in
} } order to properly seperate the particles I perform a ligand exchange and
} } redissolve into organic solvents(ie toluene).
}
} So, he shows up and I put his solution onto a carbon coated formvar grid. I
} look around. I don't see much, some junk, but nothing like nannoparticles.
} He is disappointed.
}
} I am scratching my head. Is there something there and I can't see it? Would
} I see it if it were there?
}
} Maybe you have some ideas?
}
} Would raw CdTe particles at 2 nm size have enough contrast to show up?
}
} Could the solution be so concentrated that it looks like a solid field
} rather than separate particles?
}
} The solution he gave me didn't really dry on the grid like I thought it
} would. How fast does toluene evaporate and could it mangle the formvar?
}
} Any other helpful hints to get some results?
}
} Thanks
}
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 14:04:49 2005



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 15:10:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] JB-4 resin stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,
I have a user who wants to stain lignin in JB-4 resin-embedded corn
stalks. He tried Phloroglucinol which works fine in paraffin embedded
samples since the paraffin is removed. However, this stain requires an HCl
treatment to reveal the desired color. The acid treatment interacts
adversely with the JB-4 resin.

The resin embedding gives much better resolution than the paraffin so it is
not an option to go back to the paraffin-embedded tissue.

Does anyone have an alternative stain that will work with this resin?

Thanks in advance,
Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 14:42:37 2005



From: Miller, F. Scott :      smiller-at-umr.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 14:46:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Image grabbing systems for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Karen,

I am currently using the 4pi Revolution system to capture digital images on my JEOL 840 (and two other SEMs as well). You can find the information on the system at:

http://www.4pi.com/

I have been very pleased with the system for a number of years and also would point out that 4pi offers integrated EDS or WDS analysis with the imaging system.

Scott Miller
(No financial interest in 4pi, just a very satisfied customer)


F. Scott Miller, Ph.D.
Advanced Materials Characterization Lab
University of Missouri - Rolla
223 McNutt Hall
Rolla, MO 65409 USA
fax: 573 341 6934
voice: 573 341 4727


} ----------
} From: Karen Bovard
} Sent: Thursday, January 6, 2005 8:44 AM
} To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Image grabbing systems for SEM
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I have a JEOL 840A SEM and am interested in upgrading it to digital
} photograpy capabilities.
}
} I am aware of the Orion, SIS ADDA II, and the JEOL Orion systems.
}
} Are there any different options (preferably cheaper) to consider?
}
} Karen Bovard
} EM Lab
} Pathology
} Creighton University
} Omaha, NE
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 14:54:02 2005



From: Richard Harris :      rjharris-at-uwo.ca
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 15:57:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Imapro QCRZi 35mm Film Recorder for sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Imapro QCRZi 35mm Film Recorder. Comes with 35mm module & instruction
manuals. Utilizes GPIB interface. Has cables, software and instruction
manuals and PCI card from National Instruments. Running on Mac OS 9.2, the
RIP software is
Graphx RasterPlus includes all manuals. Includes Power Mac 8500 computer
and 19" Hitachi monitor.
In excellent working condition $500 USD or best offer.
Please contact Ian Craig directly at:
Ian Craig
Media Specialist
Faculty of Science
The University of Western Ontario
591-661-2111 ext.86778
icraig-at-uwo.ca


Richard Harris
Laboratory Supervisor
Department of Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario CANADA
N6A 5B7
Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
Fax 519-661-3935



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 15:33:05 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 13:38:10 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I think formvar support film is not good for such type of experiment. You
need thin carbon film to reduce scatter from background and enhance
signal-to-noise ratio. I had difficulties to see nanogold particles (about
2 nm in diameter) in bright but dark field. In dark field on 1.8 nm carbon
they are perfectly visible. Your particles has lover density, so it would
be even trickier to see them than gold. Again, sometime it's easier to see
the particles on the film rather on the screen (so you focus on some junk
in hope to have your object nearby). Anyway, I think it's not such easy to
see nanosize object on the any support film. Negative staining would just
complicate the situation because UA staining for instance generated
approximately 0.8 nm granularity of background. I don't think you could
resolve 2 nm object well with 0.8 nm probe at least at the negative
staining condition. Sergey

At 07:12 AM 1/6/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 6 16:15:22 2005



From: hkonishi-at-indiana.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 16:57:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Gatan G1/ Epo-tek Epoxy 353ND

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello

I bought Epo-tek Epoxy 353ND since I heard Gatan G1 and 353ND are the same.
However, no instruction came with the epoxy. On the website I found that Cure
Time: 1 min.at 150°C or 5 min. at 100°C. For embedding materials, what
temperature and time is the best? Please advise.

Thank you,
Hiromi Konishi
Indiana University


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 03:09:05 2005



From: Frank Eggert :      eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 10:14:44 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Image grabbing systems for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Karen,

the best choice is an active system (with scan generator). You are going
to upgrade the electron microscope system to a digital SEM with all
benefits.

From my point of view one of the best systems (regarding the
performance and the costs) is:

http://www.pointelectronic.de/english/diss5e.htm
http://www.pointelectronic.de/english/links/links_sales.htm

.. I have no commercial interests or benefits with this product, only
detailed knowledge about the functionality (from my jobs in former times).

Best regards

Frank



Karen Bovard wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 06:01:47 2005



From: Aarti Harle :      aarti_harle-at-yahoo.co.in
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 04:06:48 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,
Its quit difficult to view the 2nm particles, as such
being very tiny and thin they will have a very little
contrast and it further depend on the atomic weight.

We have successfully viewd 2-3nm CdS particles on
formar film.
Yes you have to play with the aperature and
accelarting voltages and spot size.
According to my personal experience, though at 200kv
you will get the better resolution but for such kind I
maily use the accelarating voltage of 120kv which
gives better contrast.
Moreover the alignment should be perfect.
We use to align the Gun everytime and correct the
astigmata for such kind of samles
moreover one need absolute concentration and patience
for such kind of samples.
Many times I too use to get frusated with such kind of
samples but then slowly i started getting the good
results.
Pl do not hesistate to contact if u need any further
information
Goodluck

Regards
Arti


--- Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I think formvar support film is not good for such
} type of experiment. You
} need thin carbon film to reduce scatter from
} background and enhance
} signal-to-noise ratio. I had difficulties to see
} nanogold particles (about
} 2 nm in diameter) in bright but dark field. In dark
} field on 1.8 nm carbon
} they are perfectly visible. Your particles has
} lover density, so it would
} be even trickier to see them than gold. Again,
} sometime it's easier to see
} the particles on the film rather on the screen (so
} you focus on some junk
} in hope to have your object nearby). Anyway, I think
} it's not such easy to
} see nanosize object on the any support film.
} Negative staining would just
} complicate the situation because UA staining for
} instance generated
} approximately 0.8 nm granularity of background. I
} don't think you could
} resolve 2 nm object well with 0.8 nm probe at least
} at the negative
} staining condition. Sergey
}
} At 07:12 AM 1/6/2005, you wrote:
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } Jonathon
} }
} } I know that individual 5nm gold spheres start to
} become difficult to
} } see in a real sample on carbon/formvar grids. This
} is not so much size
} } as the density you will get against a relatively
} thick background
} } coating (} 50nm). Cd and Te are both lighter than Au
} and if the
} } particles are not too symmetrical then I would have
} thought that they
} } would be practically invisible.
} }
} } It sounds like one of those classical e.m. problems
} where the
} } resolution of the microscope is not the issue but
} the resolution and
} } contrast of the sample may be. I suppose you could
} play around with the
} } voltage and aperture size to enhance contrast a
} bit, as well. Someone
} } has already mentioned shadowing but I wonder if a
} simple negative stain
} } might help - I really have no idea. But I'd be
} interested to hear how
} } you get on.
} }
} } It would certainly be worth trying with the bare
} particles if you can.
} }
} } Malcolm
} }
} } Malcolm Haswell
} } e.m. unit
} } School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
} } University of Sunderland
} } Tyne & Wear
} } SR1 3SD
} } UK
} } e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
} }
} }
} }
} } ----- Original Message -----
} } } From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
} } Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2005 10:47 pm
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Looking for CdTe
} nannoparticles
} }
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } -----------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of
} } } AmericaTo Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } }
}
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserverOn-Line
} Help
} } }
}
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} } }
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ----
} } }
} } } Hi:
} } }
} } } I need some expert advice so I can help a user
} in my lab. He wants
} } } to see
} } } some nannoparticles he has synthesized by the
} following procedure:
} } }
} } } } The sample is CdTe, a highly fluorescent NP
} with a shell of either
} } } } thioglycolic acid or 2-mercaptoethylamine. In
} theory they should
} } } be about
} } } } 2-5nm in diameter, but they are synthesized in
} aqueous solution,
} } } and in
} } } } order to properly seperate the particles I
} perform a ligand
} } } exchange and
} } } } redissolve into organic solvents(ie toluene).
} } }
} } } So, he shows up and I put his solution onto a
} carbon coated
} } } formvar grid. I
} } } look around. I don't see much, some junk, but
} nothing like
} } } nannoparticles.He is disappointed.
} } }
} } } I am scratching my head. Is there something
} there and I can't see
} } } it? Would
} } } I see it if it were there?
} } }
} } } Maybe you have some ideas?
} } }
} } } Would raw CdTe particles at 2 nm size have
} enough contrast to show up?
} } }
} } } Could the solution be so concentrated that it
} looks like a solid field
} } } rather than separate particles?
} } }
} } } The solution he gave me didn't really dry on the
} grid like I
} } } thought it
} } } would. How fast does toluene evaporate and could
} it mangle the
} } } formvar?
} } } Any other helpful hints to get some results?
} } }
} } } Thanks
} } }
} } }
} } } Jonathan Krupp
} } } Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} } } University of California
} } } Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} } } (831) 459-2477
} } } jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
} Los Angeles, CA 90095
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
}
}
}
}
}


=====
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REGIONAL SOPHISTICATED INSTURMENTATION CENTER
INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY-BOMBAY
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 12:00:25 2005



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 12:44:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Gatan G1/ Epo-tek Epoxy 353ND

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The lower the temp, the longer the time. It will not cure at room temperature. However, if you go too hot, the stuff fumes a bit, so be careful. I use a hot plate at 120C, but I can't tell you the time since I use a small vise and it takes time for the vise to get up to temperature. There is a color change with this epoxy. I use a small dollop on a piece of Teflon that I can take off to tell me when it is done. The color goes from a clearish yellow to a deep brownish red. I would test it with your process. Use a sharp Exacta blade or a razor blade and poke it when you think that it looks done. When it is done, it will be hard.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: hkonishi-at-indiana.edu [mailto:hkonishi-at-indiana.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 4:57 PM
To: message to: MSA list

Hello

I bought Epo-tek Epoxy 353ND since I heard Gatan G1 and 353ND are the same.
However, no instruction came with the epoxy. On the website I found that Cure
Time: 1 min.at 150°C or 5 min. at 100°C. For embedding materials, what
temperature and time is the best? Please advise.

Thank you,
Hiromi Konishi
Indiana University



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 12:24:18 2005



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 12:29:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Medal analysis in NY area

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I worked with a client earlier this week using SEM/EDS to characterize some
WW-II medals. The client wanted to determine the nature of authentic medals
so that forgeries might be easily detected.

I thought the session to be fairly straightforward. We looked at both the
paint and the metals involved and were able to clearly show a few things
that had never been seen before. That is, it appears that nobody had ever
looked at such items by SEM and EDS before. That seems strange to me, but I
guess there are still a lot of things that have not been examined.

Well, now I have been contacted by another collector from the NY area who
is wondering if labs are available there to do similar work. I have
forwarded his request below so that interested parties may contact him
directly. I suppose you may also contact me for more details about the work.

Warren

} } From popserve Wed Jan 5 13:39:02 2005
} Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 11:32:21 -0800 (PST)
} From: Marc Garlasco {marc-at-garlasco.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Tom Hansen
} To: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} X-PMX-Version: 4.7.0.111621, Antispam-Engine: 2.0.0.0, Antispam-Data:
} 2005.1.5.1
} X-Perlmx-Spam: Gauge=IIIIIII, Probability=7%, Report='__CT 0,
} __CT_TEXT_PLAIN 0, __HAS_MSGID 0, __MIME_VERSION 0, __SANE_MSGID 0'
}
} Mr. Straszheim,
}
} I am a friend of Tom's and I am amazed at the
} cutting-edge work you guys did on the crosses
} yesterday! I would like to enlarge the pool of data
} by getting my crosses analyzed here in the NY area.
} Can you suggest good departments to contact?
}
} Regards,
} Marc Garlasco

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
46 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 12:47:20 2005



From: Ron Anderson :      randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 13:52:25 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscopy Today January 2005 Table of Contents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers,

Here is the January 2005 Microscopy Today table of contents. I will close
the subscription list for this issue on Tuesday 11 January 2005.

THIS ISSUE CONTAINS THE MT SALARY SURVEY RESULTS

Microscopists in North America and MSA members anywhere can subscribe for
free. Anyone else may subscribe for US$35 per year (to PARTIALLY cover
postage). All subscriptions at http://www.microscopy-today.com Thank you.

Unfolding and Folding Proteins
Stephen W. Carmichael, Mayo Clinic

Spiral Powder Overlays
P. Fraundorf and Shuhan Lin

TEM Morphometry Reveals Membrane Deficits in Parietal Cells Lacking Specific
Ion Transporters
Miller ML, Gawenis LR, Andringa A, Shull GE

Color Matching to Ink Jet Printers from a Computer Screen, Part 2
Jerry Sedgewick

Electron Tomography in the Study of Bacterial Structure and Function
Kenneth H. Downing,* Haixin Sui,* Luis R. Comolli* and Hoi-Ying Holman

Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: A Procedure for Obtaining Plan View and
Cross Section TEM Images from the Same Site
R.B. Irwin, A. Anciso, P.J. Jones, and C. Patton

Confocal Scanning Laser Holography: A Tool for Non-Invasive Internal
Measurement
RA McLeod, P Jacquemin, S Lai, RA Herring

Dehydration and Rehydration Issues in Biological Tissue Processing for
Electron Microscopy
Christian T. K.-H. Stadtländer

Microscopy Today 2004 Salary Survey Results
Ron Anderson and Barbara Foster

Funding Opportunities for Acquiring Major Equipment from Federal Granting
Agencies M&M 2004 Core Facility Management – Part I: NIH
Organizer: Debby Sherman

Specimen Capsules For Critical-Point Drying
Sol Sepsenwol

Industry News

NetNotes

Ron Anderson, Editor
Microscopy Today





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 12:53:54 2005



From: Carol Heckman :      heckman-at-bgnet.bgsu.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 14:00:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Looking for CdTe nannoparticles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jon-
We have successfully imaged 1 nm particles under even more adverse
conditions. That is, in 70-nm thick sections of epoxy resin.

One has to collect two digital images and subtract them. The one is
run through a 3x3 kernel to smooth it, and the 1-nm gold image drops
out of that one.

I don't know whether you have digital image collection and
processing, but if you have, this would be an easy way to solve your
problem.


} X-Authentication-Warning: ns.microscopy.com: mail set sender to
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} Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 14:47:17 -0800
} To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Looking for CdTe nannoparticles
} X-UCSC-CATS-MailScanner: Found to be clean
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--
__
Carol A. Heckman, Ph.D.
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Center for Microscopy & Microanalysis
Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403
fax: (419) 372-2024 email: heckman-at-bgnet.bgsu.edu
http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/biology/facilities/MnM
___________________________________________________________________________


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 7 15:37:29 2005



From: rebecca.burgin-at-onsemi.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 07:36:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW:looking for a used SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hiromi,

As my experience shows it may be additional benefits in terms of strength is
you can increase a little bit humidity during the curing. Water vapour, for
example, placing an open bottle filled with water at some place closer to
your bonding. Hope it will help.

Victoria


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Walck, Scott D." {walck-at-ppg.com}
To: {hkonishi-at-indiana.edu}
Cc: "MicroscopyListserver (E-mail)" {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 07, 2005 9:44 AM

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (rebecca.burgin-at-onsemi.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 7, 2005 at 11:34:19
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: rebecca.burgin-at-onsemi.com
Name: Rebecca Burgin

Organization: ON Semiconductor

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: We are in the market for a used Hitachi S4800/S4700 SEM (or comparable). Please contact me at 602-244-5775 (phone) or rebecca.burgin-at-onsemi.com (email)if you have one available or have any leads. Thanks in advance.



Rebecca

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 8 08:58:25 2005



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com (by way of
Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 09:03:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] How do I calculate a tubelength compensating lens ? LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Microscopists !

A while back I tried to locate a 21X BF/DF objective for an antique Bausch
& Lomb Research Metallograph that I am bringing back to life. So far, the
solution hasn't come into coincidence with my limited budget. However, I
am getting "close enough" by adapting a short-barrel Carl Zeiss 21X objective
which gives excellent images on the Kodak MDS 100 digital camera that I've
adapted to the metallograph.

However, the Zeiss objective was designed for a tube length of 190 mm, but
the metallograph uses a tube length of 215 mm. The images are good
enough that I really ought to accept the present situation. However, I am
nevertheless trying to do it right by adding a compensating lens in the light
path. However, I have not yet found out how to do the math. I understand
that a negative lens is needed to stretch the image distance from 190mm to
215mm. I even have the Bausch & Lomb compensating lens that comes with
their vertical-illuminator attachment for transmitted-light microscopes, but
that lens is designed to shift the image distance by 55mm, i.e., the extra
optical path length introduced by the vertical illuminator.

Can anyone steer me to a suitable on-line or library reference that shows
how to do the calculation ?


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 8 19:38:41 2005



From: Bob Sunley :      rosunley-at-shaw.ca
Date: Sat, 08 Jan 2005 19:46:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: How do I calculate a tubelength compensating lens ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

On 8 Jan 2005, at 9:03, George Langford, Sc.D. wrote:
}
} Hello Microscopists !
}
} A while back I tried to locate a 21X BF/DF objective for an antique Bausch &
} Lomb Research Metallograph that I am bringing back to life. So far, the
} solution hasn't come into coincidence with my limited budget. However, I am
} getting "close enough" by adapting a short-barrel Carl Zeiss 21X objective
} which gives excellent images on the Kodak MDS 100 digital camera that I've
} adapted to the metallograph.
}
} However, the Zeiss objective was designed for a tube length of 190 mm, but the
} metallograph uses a tube length of 215 mm. The images are good enough that I
} really ought to accept the present situation. However, I am nevertheless
} trying to do it right by adding a compensating lens in the light path.
} However, I have not yet found out how to do the math. I understand that a
} negative lens is needed to stretch the image distance from 190mm to 215mm. I
} even have the Bausch & Lomb compensating lens that comes with their
} vertical-illuminator attachment for transmitted-light microscopes, but that
} lens is designed to shift the image distance by 55mm, i.e., the extra optical
} path length introduced by the vertical illuminator.
}
} Can anyone steer me to a suitable on-line or library reference that shows
} how to do the calculation ?

Sorry, can't help you with the math, but the following link will show the tolerance of
dry objectives to changes in tube length based on the n.a of the lens.

http://f5.grp.yahoofs.com/v1/EILgQXu2eDH9tzkIFZ29JBzTdWL8PPKzbGdV05LJ_UN
VpTr3-X8gRRhMZAwxybzrOrHorfSEvpxBT-
63eDW6F4wGig/Microscope%20Theory%20and%20Figures/Tube%20length%20devi
ation.JPG

or go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Microscope, on the left side of the page,
click on Files, scroll down to folder named "Microscope Theory and Figures"
click and then click on Tube length deviation.jpg

Unless your objective has an n.a. } 0.5 you won't introduce any measurable
distortion in the image.
You might have to piece the long link back together in your browser.

Bob Sunley


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 03:56:31 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 05:04:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Digital Image System for SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Karen Bovard wrote:
=======================================================================
I have a JEOL 840A SEM and am interested in upgrading it to digital
photograpy capabilities.

I am aware of the Orion, SIS ADDA II, and the JEOL Orion systems.

Are there any different options (preferably cheaper) to consider?

Karen Bovard
EM Lab
Pathology
Creighton University
Omaha, NE
==========================================================================
The "cheapest" option, which was offered by SPI Supplies for many years was
Spectrum Mono (previously known in some parts of the world as Image Slave).
However it is no longer being offered by the manufacturer.

We are now offering the ORION™ Digital Image System for SEMs, or in simple
words, the Orion "frame grabber". See URL
http://www.2spi.
com/catalog/instruments/ORION_Digital_Image_Acquisition_System.html
Various optional modules are also available to extanding the software's
capabilities.

It is a passive image capture system, is easy to operate and easy to install
We use it all the time in our own laboratory and have found it to be
quite easy to learn to use as well. An active image capture system it is
not, but then again, there are many who do not need the benefits of an
active capture system (which is much more expensive as well).

This system should not be confused with the JEOL Orion system. It is
unfortunate that two firms are using the same trade name since it is bound
to cause confusion in the marketplace. These are most certainly not the
same product.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 08:08:16 2005



From: diller-at-stefan-diller.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 08:16:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Name: Stefan Diller

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,
does anyone out there have experience in SEM on lubricates or grease?
I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of lubricates growing old...
My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this not having one?

Thanks for your help.
Stefan Diller

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 10:12:09 2005



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:20:51 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Stefan,

Try www.quantomix.com

} From their Web site:
'QuantomiX develops and commercializes breakthrough
solutions based on its proprietary wetSEM™ technology which
enables direct scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wet
samples.'

I have no experience of using the holders or any connection
with the company. I've just seen them advertising.

Ron

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 08:16:53 -0600 by way of
MicroscopyListserver {diller-at-stefan-diller.com} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Society of America } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html
on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34 }
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com } Name: Stefan Diller } }
Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: } }
Question: Hello, } does anyone out there have experience in
SEM on lubricates or grease? } I need to do SEM on
nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of
lubricates growing old... } My first idea is using a
coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac
SEM) to work around this not having one? } } Thanks for
your help. } Stefan Diller } }
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 11:50:28 2005



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 09:58:12 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I think you may need to do frozen imaging or cryoSEM. It might work doing
a freeze-fracture-etch and then image with a high resolution coating.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
} Name: Stefan Diller
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Hello,
} does anyone out there have experience in SEM on lubricates or grease?
} I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of lubricates growing old...
} My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this not having one?
}
} Thanks for your help.
} Stefan Diller
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 12:18:15 2005



From: Kestutis Smalinskas :      smalinskas-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:26:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM on lubricants or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Stefan:

I have experience looking at greases and lubricants in
the SEM (JEOL JSM-5800LV). One such request had
nanoparticles in the grease. Unfortunately, my
results aren't promising.

I don't really see how a lubricant can be imaged
without using an environmental chamber SEM. I had
limited success when the lubricant thinned out enough
to where I can begin to see the nanoparticles. It
also helped that the particles were tungsten-based for
backscatter image contrast. Resolution was poor. EDS
analysis was somewhat doable.

Can you perhaps separate or concentrate the particles
by using solvent and centrifuge techniques before
imaging? This may help.

Stu Smalinskas, P.E.
SKF USA
Plymouth, Michigan
(734) 414-6862

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stefan wrote:

Question: Hello,
does anyone out there have experience in SEM on
lubricates or grease?
I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as
well as various states of lubricates growing old...
My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any
possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this
not having one?

Thanks for your help.
Stefan Diller

Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Name: Stefan Diller



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search.
http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 12:41:44 2005



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 12:23:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Stefan

In do have a cheap and cheerful way to overcome your problem. One feature
however may make my explanation null and void! You need a microscope that
has a manifold directly pumped by a diffusion or turbo pump, not a manifold
that bleeds the specimen vacuum to the gun? You also need a backscattered
electron detector. In this procedure we are taking advantage of a poor
vacuum bleeding away surface charge and reducing media evaporation from the
specimen.

If you have a manifold system and a backscattered detector the following
works very well for up to 20 minute working periods. Take a rubber
bung/stopper, that will fit into the pumping line at the rear of the
specimen chamber, freeze it in liquid nitrogen and drill a 0.5mm hole in the
bung/stopper. Prepare your specimen and place it in to the microscope at
the same time fitting the bung/stopper in to the pumping line. Pump down
and switch off the SE detector bringing the BSE detector into play. Use the
BSE detector to observe the specimen in the "poor vacuum" environment that
you have created. I have used this technique many times, the only drawback
is that the many manufacturers took us away from a decent vacuum system when
they decided to pump the column through the specimen chamber, rather than
pumping the microscope through a manifold.

So users of older microscopes have the cheapest possible "VP System", but
those caught in the middle era in SEM development miss out on this one I am
afraid!

Good luck

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For electron microscopy consultancy and training world wide
www.emcourses.com tel +44 1280 816512 fax +44 1280 814007

PS I probably should not point out that we once used this system to watch
paint dry!


----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {diller-at-stefan-diller.com}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 10, 2005 2:16 PM

One of my colleagues many years ago at Lockheed, George Hopple, had
excellent success critical point drying greases. He was then able to
image the thickener and the oil, and the quite striking differences in
the greases were successfully tied to bearing failures in gyroscopes. I
don't have any contact information for George at this time, as he left
Lockheed over a decade ago, but maybe somebody out there can find him.

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:diller-at-stefan-diller.com]
Sent: Monday, January 10, 2005 6:17 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday,
January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Name: Stefan Diller

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,
does anyone out there have experience in SEM on lubricates or grease?
I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various
states of lubricates growing old...
My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without
a low vac SEM) to work around this not having one?

Thanks for your help.
Stefan Diller

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 18:02:54 2005



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:11:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] inverted microscope imaging algae

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,
I was reading over some things about diatoms and wanted to get a good
light microscope image of some organisms from a biofilm/water. I was
wondering what is a good way of imaging live microbes with an inverted
light microscope? Just use a coverslip, slide and place it upside down on
the inverted stage? I read about using modified petrie dishes too.
Any advice appreciated.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:22:07 2005



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:11:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] inverted microscope imaging algae

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Hello,
I was reading over some things about diatoms and wanted to get a good
light microscope image of some organisms from a biofilm/water. I was
wondering what is a good way of imaging live microbes with an inverted
light microscope? Just use a coverslip, slide and place it upside down on
the inverted stage? I read about using modified petrie dishes too.
Any advice appreciated.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:38:34 2005



From: diller-at-stefan-diller.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 08:16:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Name: Stefan Diller

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,
does anyone out there have experience in SEM on lubricates or grease?
I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of lubricates growing old...
My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this not having one?

Thanks for your help.
Stefan Diller

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:39:09 2005



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 09:58:12 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I think you may need to do frozen imaging or cryoSEM. It might work doing
a freeze-fracture-etch and then image with a high resolution coating.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
} Name: Stefan Diller
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Hello,
} does anyone out there have experience in SEM on lubricates or grease?
} I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of lubricates growing old...
} My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this not having one?
}
} Thanks for your help.
} Stefan Diller
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:40:41 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 05:04:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Digital Image System for SEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Karen Bovard wrote:
=======================================================================
I have a JEOL 840A SEM and am interested in upgrading it to digital
photograpy capabilities.

I am aware of the Orion, SIS ADDA II, and the JEOL Orion systems.

Are there any different options (preferably cheaper) to consider?

Karen Bovard
EM Lab
Pathology
Creighton University
Omaha, NE
==========================================================================
The "cheapest" option, which was offered by SPI Supplies for many years was
Spectrum Mono (previously known in some parts of the world as Image Slave).
However it is no longer being offered by the manufacturer.

We are now offering the ORION™ Digital Image System for SEMs, or in simple
words, the Orion "frame grabber". See URL
http://www.2spi.
com/catalog/instruments/ORION_Digital_Image_Acquisition_System.html
Various optional modules are also available to extanding the software's
capabilities.

It is a passive image capture system, is easy to operate and easy to install
We use it all the time in our own laboratory and have found it to be
quite easy to learn to use as well. An active image capture system it is
not, but then again, there are many who do not need the benefits of an
active capture system (which is much more expensive as well).

This system should not be confused with the JEOL Orion system. It is
unfortunate that two firms are using the same trade name since it is bound
to cause confusion in the marketplace. These are most certainly not the
same product.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:46:08 2005



From: Kestutis Smalinskas :      smalinskas-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 10:26:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM on lubricants or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Stefan:

I have experience looking at greases and lubricants in
the SEM (JEOL JSM-5800LV). One such request had
nanoparticles in the grease. Unfortunately, my
results aren't promising.

I don't really see how a lubricant can be imaged
without using an environmental chamber SEM. I had
limited success when the lubricant thinned out enough
to where I can begin to see the nanoparticles. It
also helped that the particles were tungsten-based for
backscatter image contrast. Resolution was poor. EDS
analysis was somewhat doable.

Can you perhaps separate or concentrate the particles
by using solvent and centrifuge techniques before
imaging? This may help.

Stu Smalinskas, P.E.
SKF USA
Plymouth, Michigan
(734) 414-6862

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Stefan wrote:

Question: Hello,
does anyone out there have experience in SEM on
lubricates or grease?
I need to do SEM on nanoparticles in lubricates as
well as various states of lubricates growing old...
My first idea is using a coolstage, but is there any
possiblity (without a low vac SEM) to work around this
not having one?

Thanks for your help.
Stefan Diller

Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com
Name: Stefan Diller



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search.
http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 10 20:46:35 2005



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2005 16:20:51 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM on lubricates or grease

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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Stefan,

Try www.quantomix.com

} From their Web site:
'QuantomiX develops and commercializes breakthrough
solutions based on its proprietary wetSEM™ technology which
enables direct scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wet
samples.'

I have no experience of using the holders or any connection
with the company. I've just seen them advertising.

Ron

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 08:16:53 -0600 by way of
MicroscopyListserver {diller-at-stefan-diller.com} wrote:

}
}
}
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Society of America } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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On-Line Help
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}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(diller-at-stefan-diller.com) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html
on Monday, January 10, 2005 at 03:22:34 }
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: diller-at-stefan-diller.com } Name: Stefan Diller } }
Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: } }
Question: Hello, } does anyone out there have experience in
SEM on lubricates or grease? } I need to do SEM on
nanoparticles in lubricates as well as various states of
lubricates growing old... } My first idea is using a
coolstage, but is there any possiblity (without a low vac
SEM) to work around this not having one? } } Thanks for
your help. } Stefan Diller } }
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 11 08:35:17 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 08:47:20 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Nestor is testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Testing the server links. The access file is no longer writable.

Please ignore this message

Nestor


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 11 08:50:48 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 08:59:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Possible duplicate Emails

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues...

Some of you may be experiencing duplicate Email deliveries.
It is not obvious why this is happening. I am looking into the problem.


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 11 15:12:22 2005



From: Lehman, Ann R :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 16:13:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EM400 OL current

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

A colleague has a Philips EM400T TEM that is exhibiting odd behavior as
the user mags up and down. At certain mags, the OL current goes way out,
but to a reproducible figure, as follows:

At 100kV with Z-axis corrected, the OL current at true focus reads 6.66.
When tracking from the upper mags toward the lower, at the transition
between 130kX to 100kX, the OL current jumps to 6.44. If the user
corrects back to true focus (again with an OL reading of 6.66 or 6.67),
then tracking down to the next mag step causes the OL to jump again back
to 6.44. This jump proceeds at every mag until the user reaches 2800X,
when the OL goes to (or stays at) 6.66.

Also confusing, this sequence doesn't happen 100% of the time, and not
always at every mag within the mag range described, but it does so more
often than not. My guess is that a certain board that defines lens
correlations in the middle-mag range has a fluky relay. Does anyone have
an idea which board(s) we should be looking at to test this theory? Or
does anyone have a better idea on how to address this issue?

We do have access to another EM400 that we can use for parts. Any help
on how to proceed would be very helpful, and gratefully acknowledged!

Thanks all,

Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
f. 860-297-2538
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
w. http://www.trincoll.edu/~alehman





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 11 16:07:05 2005



From: K.N. Bozhilov :      bozhilov-at-ucr.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 16:42:37 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Depth of focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello Karen,

Just a piece of information to help with your decision (hopefully not to
confuse you):

A PASSIVE system such as the one Mary mentions essentially takes the data
generated by the SEM and digitizes them. Basically, you work with your SEM
and when you see an image that you want to record, you push a button and the
PC records the image. This also means, that you are limited to what the SEM
can provide. If the SEM scan generator can only provide a 1000 line image,
the highest resolution will be something like 1300x1000. On the other hand,
passive systems can be a bit less expensive.

An ACTIVE system basically replaces the scan generator with one that is
controllable by the PC. Again, you would work with your SEM normally until
you see an image that you want to record. You then push a button, and the PC
records an image. Different from the passive system, though, the scanning is
now controlled by the PC and you can acquire the images at a higher
resolution (up to 4ooox4ooo in case of our ADDA). An active system also
provides control over dwell-time (noise reduction) and synchronization with
60Hz noise signals, generally resulting in better images. Furthermore, with
additional hardware you can also easily acquire elemental distribution maps.
An active system is usually a bit more expensive.

Disclaimer: We produce and sell the ADDA II system mentioned in Karen's
original email, which is both passive and active.


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mary Mager [mailto:mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca]
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 10:18
To: Microscopy


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Mary Mager" {mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca}
To: "Karen Bovard" {kbovard-at-creighton.edu}
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 9:15 AM

According to the established TEM literature the depth of focus is:

Dfocus = Dfield x Magnification x Magnification.

With depth of field around 50 nm, which is typical imaging condition,
according to the above relation the depth of focus should be about 500
meters at magnification of 100,000.

We have a CCD camera and a TV camera mounted beneath the CCD on one of
our TEMs. Well, the image focused on the TV is not in perfect focus on
the CCD and vice versa at magnifications in the range of 100,000 and
above.

What is wrong or is there something I am missing in the Depth of focus
equations?

Krassimir N. Bozhilov



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 02:55:16 2005



From: Michel Ribardiere :      m.ribardiere-at-jeol.fr
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 10:00:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Depth of focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

dear Krassimir,

I feel that one of the 2 cameras is not well focused
Find the focus of the image on fluorescent screen and compare with both
cameras; you will find the one in fault
Usually the CCDs cameras have a focus adjustment. Refer to your provider for
the procedure
The focus should be same on all cameras and fluo screen. the depth is always
enough to get good focus on axial cameras.

The only cameras which usually needs to change focus are those mounted after
an EELS system.
best regards
Mic





----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

According to the established TEM literature the depth of focus is:

Dfocus = Dfield x Magnification x Magnification.

With depth of field around 50 nm, which is typical imaging condition,
according to the above relation the depth of focus should be about 500
meters at magnification of 100,000.

We have a CCD camera and a TV camera mounted beneath the CCD on one of
our TEMs. Well, the image focused on the TV is not in perfect focus on
the CCD and vice versa at magnifications in the range of 100,000 and
above.

What is wrong or is there something I am missing in the Depth of focus
equations?

Krassimir N. Bozhilov



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 09:22:05 2005



From: Rhonda Stroud :      stroud-at-nrl.navy.mil
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 10:21:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: ion mill comparisons

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm looking for user feedback on low angle ion mills.
Please email me directly with your experience on
reliability and relative advantages of the different
vendors' models.

Thanks,

Rhonda




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 09:39:40 2005



From: James M. Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mta.ca
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 11:39:14 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Etec Autoscan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I'm looking at a paper that did some work with and Etec Autoscan. I'm not
very familiar with the instrument, and no model number is given. Can anybody
fill me a bit on the history of this SEM? What is it's vintage, W, Lab6
or FE, etc.?
Does the company exist under another name? All the images and info I can
find
on the web look to be a 70s to 80s type instrument, but...

Gee, a "History of Microscope Manufacturers: Intrigue, Bankruptcy and
Hostile Takeovers"
web site would be handy...

As usual, thanks in advance!

Jim

--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
www: http://www.mta.ca/dmf



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 14:59:33 2005



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 15:59:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Replacement lamp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking for a source for replacement lamps for an ancient Leitz
Orthoplan microscope (ca. 1965 I think). I would appreciate any hints as
to where I might purchase such.
Thanks, Greg


Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 16:05:23 2005



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-bwxt.com
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 15:56:11 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Replacement lamp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greg,

I don't know the bulb number, but you might try:
www.bulbdirect.com

At least they carry some Leitz bulbs...

Woody



-----Original Message-----
} From: Greg Erdos [mailto:gwe-at-ufl.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 12, 2005 3:59 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

I am looking for a source for replacement lamps for an ancient Leitz
Orthoplan microscope (ca. 1965 I think). I would appreciate any hints as
to where I might purchase such.
Thanks, Greg


Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 12 16:51:29 2005



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2005 22:29:15 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Depth of focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Can you actually focus the image on both cameras?

If either or both of the cameras is lens coupled, then there may be a
problem with the focusing of the camera itself on the scintillator.

Having said that, yes, I think that there can often be small focus
differences between cameras and phosphors at different levels.,
especially between a wide-filed CCD mounted above the viewing chamber
and a high mag CCD beneath the viewing chamber.
--
Larry Stoter
JEOL (UK) Ltd
tel: +44-(0)1707-377117, fax: +44-(0)1707-373254, e-mail: larrys-at-jeoleuro.com

PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 03:07:54 2005



From: Gordon Couger :      gcc-at-couger.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 03:07:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Help on Goerz 3D Condenser

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




I have a C. P. Goerz 3D Condenser for a microscope labeled Goerz
MOM Hungary in a box marked Goerz American Optical Company, New
York and a tag Universal had written and stuck on the box with a
hand written number 1060 on it.

I can find no reference at all to it on the Internet. It appears
to be manufactured in the Post war years from the look of the
labels, box, materials and workmanship. So I suspect it was made
in the 50's or 60's in Hungary and imported by American Optical.

It is fully working and in fine working condition and I would
like to know any thing you have about it. Of course a copy of
operating manual would be my ultimate objective.

Thanks
Gordon
Gordon Couger

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward anything you think might be useful to others.
Microscope Documentation is at www.science-info.org



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 08:24:07 2005



From: mingram-at-rodel.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:24:03 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Third Party Support for LEICA Ergoplan microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (mingram-at-rodel.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 07:18:54
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mingram-at-rodel.com
Name: Michael Ingram

Organization: Rohm and Haas Electonic Materials

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: All,

I have two LEICA Ergoplan defect review microscopes configured for 200 mm wafers. I am looking for third party service and support. The OEM charges are too high.

Both systems are running VisconNT defect review software. One is a manual load system and the second has a wafer handling robot attached. The manual load systems is having some startup errors, which might be eprom errors. The auto load systems has just been moved to my lab, and I am looking for someone to come in to install and check out the system. I can supply pictures for both tools.

Does any one know of third party support for these type of tools.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 08:34:54 2005



From: jwilkinson-at-seton.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:34:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Leica specimen trimmer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (jwilkinson-at-seton.org) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at 09:45:18
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jwilkinson-at-seton.org
Name: Joyce Wilkinson

Organization: Brackenridge Hospital

Education: Graduate College

Location: Austin, Texas USA

Question: The EM lab at Brackenridge in Austin Texas is considering a purchase of Leica specimen trimmer. I would appreciate your opinion of the valus of the trimmer. I have hear Pro's and con's and would value your experience.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 11:03:30 2005



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 12:03:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz bulb

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks to every one who responded to my query about a replacement bulb. I
found one at donsbulbs.com. I am going to check out all of the other
suggested sources as Don does not accept credit cards.

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 11:32:41 2005



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 13:46:27 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Etec Autoscan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear James,
I operated an ETEC Autoscan (Manufacturer: "ETEC", model: "Autoscan") that
was purchased in 1973, before I started here. It was renowned for beautiful
images, very low mag capability and was a favourite SEM of its time. I
believe many of David Scharf's brilliant poster images are recorded on an
modified ETEC Autoscan. The Perkin-Elmer company bought ETEC up in the early
'80s for their electron-beam lithography system and shut down the SEM
division. There are still some running, including my old one that I sold to
the military. To answer your questions: it was a conventional W filament
SEM, mag. 5 to 200,000X. No FE, no VP-SEM, no computer, etc., just a good,
solid SEM with top resolution about 6.0 nm. They were good for their day,
but a small company that maybe couldn't keep up when more companies started
to manufacture SEMs.
I'm sure others know more, but no one seemed to be answering.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Department of Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca

----- Original Message -----
} From: "James M. Ehrman" {jehrman-at-mta.ca}
To: "Microscopy Listserv" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 12, 2005 7:39 AM

Hey Jim!

Yes. I have owned directly or indirectly about 4 of these
instruments over the past 30+ years. They were conceived in about
1969 by a company in California (ETEC Corp) and were the first
serious challenge to the Cambridge Stereoscan and JEOL U2. They were
considered the "Rolls Royce" of SEMs in their day until Jim Dow (I
think that was his name) sold the company in the early 1980s. I
believe Perkin-Elmer purchased it in order to make the first electron
beam lithography devices The company (ETEC) still exists today as
far as I am aware for this purpose. They no longer make SEMs.

It was innovative for its time in that it was of a completely
modular design where whole functionalities could be exhanged
overnight as nim-bin modules. As an SEM it only used W filaments.

Also, as far as I know, there are still a fair number of
operating models out there. All mine I am afraid have been replaced
and/or donated but one I gave to Puerto Rico was working (with a lot
of TLC) until about 2 years ago. FYI, there is a person who has a
company who deals in spares and rebuilds ETECs - his name is Gary
Easton and his company is "Scanners Company" in Maryland somewhere
(Google to find out!) Also another fellow is Hank Bebe who works for
the Rich Lee Group who knows as much as anyone about the Autoscan.

I haven't checked Google to verify my memory of all the above
but I don't believe I am far off!

Please feel free to give me a call if you would like to
discuss more. There are some fun anecdotes concerning this
instrument and the ETEC company!

Cheers etc

Peter



} -
}
} Hi all,
}
} I'm looking at a paper that did some work with and Etec Autoscan. I'm not
} very familiar with the instrument, and no model number is given. Can anybody
} fill me a bit on the history of this SEM? What is it's vintage, W,
} Lab6 or FE, etc.?
} Does the company exist under another name? All the images and info I can find
} on the web look to be a 70s to 80s type instrument, but...
}
} Gee, a "History of Microscope Manufacturers: Intrigue, Bankruptcy
} and Hostile Takeovers"
} web site would be handy...
}
} As usual, thanks in advance!
}
} Jim
}
} --
}
} James M. Ehrman
} Digital Microscopy Facility
} Mount Allison University
} Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
} CANADA
}
} phone: 506-364-2519
} fax: 506-364-2505
} email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
} www: http://www.mta.ca/dmf


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.54.136/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 13:15:50 2005



From: James M. Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mta.ca
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:15:21 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Etec Autoscan - thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

Thanks to all who sent the many detailed descriptions of the Etec
Autoscan. I have more
than enough information for what I was curious about. But it's always
good to read about
scopes that people have known and loved. This looks to be true for the
Autoscan. I think the
subject has come up before, but it would be nice to have a repository of
images and specifications
for the various instruments through the ages. Oops! Sounds like I just
volunteered. But if those
interested would like to forward me info about their favorite (or most
dreaded) scope and interesting
anecdotes, horror stories, etc. I'll see what I can do about putting a
"Rogue's Gallery" on my
website. Any interest out there?

Thanks again,

Jim

--

James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
www: http://www.mta.ca/dmf



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 13:24:17 2005



From: Ephram Shizgal :      shizgal-at-lv-em.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 14:21:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LKB Ultramicrotome III

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Would anyone know around when the LKB Ultramicrotome III was introduced ?

Thanks,


Ephram Shizgal
LVEM Technology Team

Delong Instruments/Delong America
In USA: 1-866-DELONGUSA (1-866-335-6648)
International: +514-904-1202
www.lv-em.com
info-at-lv-em.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 14:09:18 2005



From: Fred A Hayes :      fahayes-at-comcast.net
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:08:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] used microtome and knifemaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking to buy a used cryo ultramicrotome and glass knife maker that
work. Please respond off line.

Fred A Hayes
Ann Arbor MI
734-996-2012



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 14:19:15 2005



From: Allen Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 14:20:03 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Etec Autoscan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The website idea isn't bad, but it would be very frustrating to put
together, much less maintain. I'd host it, though, if anyone wants to
help.

ETEC is a company that grew in the 70's, started by some engineers from MAC
(you can still see some MAC microprobes around). They were very successful
and made some solid, well engineered SEMs. One of the more interesting
aspects is the wide range of accessories they had available. These
instruments were extreme research machines and anything they could think of
making for it, they did. There was another model, the Omniscan, that had
some cute ideas but ended up being a maintenance nightmare. For the most
part, they used tungsten cathode, although LaB6 became available around the
end (the first to offer it that I know, the tips didn't last long, though).
They were also developing a variable pressure SEM that never made it to
market.

The end, by the way, was around 1983. ETEC had been developing Electron
Beam Lithography (EBL) for years. In 1979, they were bought by
Perkin-Elmer, who wanted the EBL component, but didn't care about the
laboratory instruments. They simply let the SEM manufacturing die a slow
death, selling off existing inventory, without ever really letting
customers know.

The ETEC EBL was a raster-based device. An elaborate table supported by
air bearings held the wafer, which was stepped around to allow the beam to
expose each small square area of the wafer. Since it had to store the
pattern for an entire wafer at a resolution of less than 100nm, large
amounts of memory were needed. Shortly after being bought by Perkin-Elmer,
some Japanese manufacturer's came in with vector based EBL systems and
pretty well trounced ETEC.

ETEC lives on today as an independent (I think) manufacturer of EBL.

I left ETEC in 1982. It was becoming obvious that they were winding down
the SEM business and trying to pressure me into the EBL lines. They
virtually sold you a service engineer along with the instrument - he'd move
where the instrument went and be on 24/7 call. Now, some SEM customers can
be rather demanding, but a semiconductor manufacturer loosing millions of
dollars every hour an instrument is down can be a real pain. Didn't sound
like too much fun to me.

Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Wednesday, January 12, 2005 9:39 AM, James M. Ehrman
[SMTP:jehrman-at-mta.ca] wrote:
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
}
} Hi all,
}
} I'm looking at a paper that did some work with and Etec Autoscan. I'm not
} very familiar with the instrument, and no model number is given. Can
anybody
} fill me a bit on the history of this SEM? What is it's vintage, W, Lab6
} or FE, etc.?
} Does the company exist under another name? All the images and info I can
} find
} on the web look to be a 70s to 80s type instrument, but...
}
} Gee, a "History of Microscope Manufacturers: Intrigue, Bankruptcy and
} Hostile Takeovers"
} web site would be handy...
}
} As usual, thanks in advance!
}
} Jim
}
} --
}
} James M. Ehrman
} Digital Microscopy Facility
} Mount Allison University
} Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
} CANADA
}
} phone: 506-364-2519
} fax: 506-364-2505
} email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
} www: http://www.mta.ca/dmf
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 13 17:20:59 2005



From: Peter McSwiggen :      PMcS-at-McSwiggenAssoc.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 17:20:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Job posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all.

This position has come to my attention, and I thought it might be of
interest to the broader SEM community.

Regards,

Peter

Peter McSwiggen
McSwiggen & Associates, P.A.
2855 Anthony Lane South, Suite B1
St. Anthony, MN 55418
phone: 612.781.2282
fax: 612.781.7540
e-mail: PMcS-at-McSwiggenAssoc.com



_________________________
Guidant is seeking a SEM/EDS technician to operate a Scanning Electron
Microscope (SEM). This is a full time, 1st shift position in Guidant's
Corporate laboratory. Minimum requirements include: A two year
technical degree and 2 - 4 years of experience in Scanning Electron
Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Ability to
work independently and in a team oriented environment. Good writing
skills with an ability to independently write reports using standard
and custom software. Preferred qualifications include experience with
surface and failure analysis of electronic components in a FDA
regulated environment. Knowledge of material properties and
characteristics is a plus.

For more information or to apply contact:

Bruce Peacock
Sr. Scientist, Corporate Lab
Guidant Corporation
4100 Hamline Ave N.
St. Paul, MN 55112
Telephone: 651.582.2075
bruce.peacock-at-guidant.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 03:55:37 2005



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 15:10:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] JB-4 resin stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hi all,
I have a user who wants to stain lignin in JB-4 resin-embedded corn
stalks. He tried Phloroglucinol which works fine in paraffin embedded
samples since the paraffin is removed. However, this stain requires an HCl
treatment to reveal the desired color. The acid treatment interacts
adversely with the JB-4 resin.

The resin embedding gives much better resolution than the paraffin so it is
not an option to go back to the paraffin-embedded tissue.

Does anyone have an alternative stain that will work with this resin?

Thanks in advance,
Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 04:05:19 2005



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 15:26:36 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: LKB Ultramicrotome III

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ephram

I thought that it was about mid 60's and Norma Reid's text on
ultramicrotomy cofirms that it was 1965. It was an improvement on
the 'Ultratome I' because it had finer manual cutting range and
extended cutting stroke as well as upgraded optics and a few other
things. There was never an 'Ultratome II' because this was the
designation for the upgrade kit for the I which turned it into
something like a III. We still occasionally use a I with a part II kit
modification.

Ref
Ultramicrotomy, Norma Reid (1975) (Part II of Vol 3 Practical Methods
in Electron Microscopy - Ed Audrey M. Glauert).

Hope this answers your question without giving you too much
information.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk


----- Original Message -----
} From: Ephram Shizgal {shizgal-at-lv-em.com}

Hi

Interesting about the Ultratome III coming out in '65. We bought one around
1978 I think and then after I had changed jobs, a IV in about 1984. So the
III was around for a long time.

Gareth



At 11:05 2005-01-14, Malcolm Haswell wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


With best wishes,

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institute,
Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 08:47:53 2005



From: lbalakrishnan-at-medicine.nodak.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:47:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: visualize SV40 chromatin using TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (lbalakrishnan-at-medicine.nodak.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 11:03:29
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: lbalakrishnan-at-medicine.nodak.edu
Name: Lata Balakrishnan

Organization: University of North Dakota

Education: Graduate College

Location: Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA

Question: Hi,
I have been trying to visualize SV40 chromatin using TEM. Our department does not have a glow discharge apparatus. So I am unable to do a glow discharge before applying my samples to the carbon coated formavar grid. Is there any other method that alternates the glow discharge so that the chromatin will adhere to the grid. At this point I am unable to pick up any chromatin just by rotary shadowing and tungsten coating. Also during tungsten coating sometimes the grid fries up and is compeletely broken. Any suggestions?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 08:48:52 2005



From: fahayes-at-comcast.net (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:48:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: used cryo ultramicrotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (fahayes-at-comcast.net) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 12:50:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: fahayes-at-comcast.net
Name: Fred Hayes

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am interested in buying a used cryo ultramicrotome and glass knife maker that work. Please respond off line to fahayes-at-comcast.net

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 08:49:28 2005



From: derek.dunfield-at-gmail.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 08:49:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Long Distance DIC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (derek.dunfield-at-gmail.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 19:28:08
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: derek.dunfield-at-gmail.com
Name: Derek Dunfield

Organization: Brain Research Centre - UBC

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Long Distance DIC?

Question: Hello all,
Currently my lab is looking for a long distance (around 13mm or more depending on the shape of the objective - the longer the better) DIC or phase lens with high magnification (50X - 100X, again bigger is better). The idea is to use this lens with electrophysiology tools -hence the need for the long working distance. Do they exist? Any help would be most appreciated!

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 15:38:20 2005



From: David Hall :      hall-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2005 16:37:38 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] archive quality DVDs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are buying DVDs from a "namebrand" manufacturer for storing copies
of our digital data. I know that this discussion has gone around
before, but I am still curious.

I can buy "4X" speed DVD-Rs for about $1 each. The same namebrand
offers "8X" speed DVD-Rs for half the price, which presumably would
allow us to write or read the data twice as fast. And of course
off-brand DVDs are sold for much less.

I want to write data safely and reliably, so I'm paying for the
namebrand. Is it logical to also buy the slower access time DVD-Rs
at the higher price? I have heard horror stories about losing data
on cheaper media, or on media with the wrong style of writing
implement used to mark the contents.

Is 8X a safe bet, or should I stay with slower media?

Have a good weekend.
--
David H. Hall, Ph.D.
Center for C. elegans Anatomy
Department of Neuroscience
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
1410 Pelham Parkway
Bronx, NY 10461

www.wormatlas.org
www.aecom.yu.edu/wormem

phone 718 430-2195
fax 718 430-2514


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 14 16:44:29 2005



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2005 09:22:19 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: archive quality DVDs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

The act of having an image in focus in the TEM is when the objective lens
places the image on the exact plane being viewed by the diffraction lens.
Once these two lenses have been brought to this value the image will stay in
focus no matter how many lenses we place between this point, known as the
first image
plane, and any viewing device. Possible solutions are outlined below

1) I suggest that you set focus on your viewing screen (which matches the
two lenses as described above) and then adjust the other devices to bring
them into focus. I am not sure how difficult this may be but the problem is
not an instrument (microscope) focus problem.

2) The viewing device with the shorter specimen to device distance provides
you
with a lower magnification image than the device further away from the
specimen. As this is the case the lower device would be more critical of
the focus setting and maybe it is this that goes some way to that device
appearing out of focus. If you focus the image on the screen at say
200,000X with a 10X binocular and then display it upon the TV camera at
100,000X does the more critical image focus solve the problem? This assumes
that there is not a diffraction lens change between these two
magnifications. Such a change would change the desired objective lens
setting.

Good luck

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For electron microscopy consultancy and training world wide
www.emcourses.com tel +44 1280 816512 fax +44 1280 814007


----- Original Message -----
} From: "K.N. Bozhilov" {bozhilov-at-ucr.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 12, 2005 12:42 AM

David Hall writes ...

} I can buy "4X" speed DVD-Rs for about $1 each. The same namebrand
} offers "8X" speed DVD-Rs for half the price, which presumably would
} allow us to write or read the data twice as fast. And of course
} off-brand DVDs are sold for much less.
}
} I want to write data safely and reliably, so I'm paying for the
} namebrand. Is it logical to also buy the slower access time DVD-Rs
} at the higher price? I have heard horror stories about losing data
} on cheaper media, or on media with the wrong style of writing
} implement used to mark the contents.

You are correct regarding "cheap" media, and you are somewhat safe buying
name brands, but not entirely, because you can buy the same name brand one
month and realize it is made in Japan, and buy the same again the next month
and realize after it is made by a different process in Taiwan.

Many will also imply the safest write speed is the slowest, ... e.g., to
purchase any reputable media and always write at 2.4x ... with patience, and
enable verification after the write. It's your data!

Here is a reputable and informative website:

http://www.videohelp.com

hth & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 16 18:22:28 2005



From: Sally Stowe :      Sally.Stowe-at-anu.edu.au
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2005 11:24:55 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,
We have a position available shortly in our unit - see details below. The
selection criteria etc should be available at the given web address next
week, or email Alanah.McCann-at-anu.edu.au
Briefly, we are a campus-wide unit doing approximately 60% materials work
and 40% biological, 3 TEMs, 4 SEMs, a FIB/SEM, 3 EDXAs and light
microscopes, cryo-gear. The work will involve user support, instrument
maintenance and development.

Regards
Sally Stowe

Dr SJ Stowe
Facility Coordinator
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
The Australian National University
www.anu.edu.au/EMU/index.htm
sally.stowe-at-anu.edu.au
GPO Box 475,Canberra ACT 2601 Australia
ANU CRICOS#00120C


//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
Technical Officer

ANU OFFICER GRADE 4/5

Salary Package: $39,341 - $47,861 pa plus 17% Super

We are seeking a highly motivated person to join the staff team in a
cross-disciplinary microscopy facility. Knowledge and expertise in fields
relevant to scientific instrumentation such as electronic or mechanical
engineering, computing and image analysis would be an advantage, as would
direct experience with electron microscopy.
The web address for the unit is www.anu.edu.au/EMU/index.htm
Selection Criteria:
http://info.anu.edu.au/hr/Jobs/General_Positions/_PDF/QESS .pdf or
email: Alanah.McCann-at-anu.edu.au, phone 6125 4138.

Further Enquiries: Sally.stowe-at-anu.edu.au

Closing date: 18 February 2005

___________________________________________________________________________


Information to applicants available from
http://info.anu.edu.au/hr/Jobs/How_To_Apply/_Academic_Info.pdf.

Please complete the compulsory cover sheet and attach it to your application
- http://info.anu.edu.au/policies/Forms/Human_Resources/HR86.asp




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 16 21:42:55 2005



From: ronpeters-at-integraonline.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2005 21:45:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Oil vs Homogenous Immersion Lenses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ronpeters-at-integraonline.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Sunday, January 16, 2005 at 16:01:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ronpeters-at-integraonline.com
Name: Ron Peters

Education: Graduate College

Location: Prior Lake, MN, USA

Question: I am confused about the exact difference between objectives
marked "Oil" immersion and those marked Homogenous Immersion ("HI").
What exactly are the differences in applying these two different
objectives? Does an HI objective use a cover slip? Does an HI
objective use the same immersion oil as an "Oil" objective?

Thanks for your help.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 16 21:44:47 2005



From: ronpeters-at-integraonline.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2005 21:47:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Oil vs Homogenous Immersion Lenses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ronpeters-at-integraonline.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Sunday, January 16, 2005 at 16:01:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ronpeters-at-integraonline.com
Name: Ron Peters

Education: Graduate College

Location: Prior Lake, MN, USA

Question: I am confused about the exact difference between objectives
marked "Oil" immersion and those marked Homogenous Immersion ("HI").
What exactly are the differences in applying these two different
objectives? Does an HI objective use a cover slip? Does an HI
objective use the same immersion oil as an "Oil" objective?

Thanks for your help.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 16 22:18:51 2005



From: Joe Kulik :      juk12-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2005 16:46:38 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -- Job Opening for Technician

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I found from experience that the side port (35mm port) on most TEMs is not
parfocal with the plate camera film or the bottom port. Some TEMs are close
enough, others are not. There are a few exceptions, most notably the
JEOL-100C (and 200C), which have side ports that are dead-on parfocal with
the focusing screen, plate camera film, and bottom port.

The whole issue arises in the following cases:

1) A side mounted CCD camera (instead of binoculars and focusing screen) is
used to focus for a film plate camera (a bad idea unless the camera is low
view angle and side port is parfocal with the plate film).

2) A TEM focusing screen with binoculars is used to focus for a side mounted
slow scan camera that has no live focus capability.

3) A bottom mounted TV camera is used as a focusing aid for a side mounted
slow scan CCD. Such configuration is not common.

Of course, cases (2) and (3) are no problem for a 1K x 1K or fewer pixel
count side mounted CCD camera with a wide viewing angle, but a side mounted
camera of more than 2 megapixels had better have a live focus capability.
Otherwise, some focus correction will probably be required compared to the
focusing screen or bottom mounted TV camera. The higher the pixel density
is, the more noticeable a focus difference becomes.

I know that the entire space below the final projector lens is considered to
be parfocal (including several floors below the TEM :-). In practice,
however, this is not always the case. I should confess that I didn't study
this condition beyond accumulating TEM brand/model- specific statistics.

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane
Duluth, GA 30096
Tel. (770)232-7785
Fax (770)232-1791
Mobile (678)467-0012
www.sia-cam.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "K.N. Bozhilov" {bozhilov-at-ucr.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2005 7:42 PM


Electron Microscopy Technician

The Materials Characterization Laboratory, part of Penn State's
Materials Research Institute, has an immediate opening for an
experienced electron microscopy technician. Responsibilities will
include overseeing the maintenance on three transmission electron
microscopes (TEM), one focused ion beam (FIB) and a variety of support
equipment. Applicants should have hands-on experience operating and
repairing electron columns, vacuum systems and electronics. Other
responsibilities will include maintaining sample preparation equipment
such as diamond saws, ion thinners, polishing equipment as well as
training users in the operation of that equipment.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Associate's degree in a technical or administrative program, or
equivalent knowledge, plus 1 year related work experience.

Send resume and cover letter (by e-mail, USPS, or courier) to:
Joe Kulik
The Pennsylvania State University
194 Materials Research Institute Building
University Park, PA 16802-7003

e-mail: juk12-at-psu.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 19 04:36:10 2005



From: Beaurega :      beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2005 14:11:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: RE: RE: SEM: gun saturation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Michael,

Did anyone ever answer your question?
You asked, "Why don't we see the monotonic rise as described by
"self-biasing", but instead hills and valleys?"

I would be interested in reading the answers you received to this question.

Since we can't post attachments, I looked for some slides on the internet
for me to discuss how this circuit works (between looking for a position in
microscopy). I was pleasantly surprised to find a PDF file at my old alma
mater, Ohio State University, in the geology department no less. See pages
17 and 18 below.
http://www.geology.ohio-state.edu/~bhattiprolu/GS675/notes/lecture1.pdf

This PDF file shows a general characteristic curve shape on page 18.

My background in electronics, as related to microscopy and other areas, is
below.

Paul Beauregard
Chemist (Ohio State) & Microscopist.
Electronics, University of Akron, Summa Cum Laude.
FCC licensed commercial radiotelephone license holder.
FCC extra class license holder, station call sign is KC8O /3.
• — • — • • • • — • —





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 19 10:01:44 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2005 10:04:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MM2005 Submission Deadline - Feb 15th 2005

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

Just a friendly reminder that the deadline for submission of Manuscripts
for Microscopy & Microanalysis 2005 if Feb 15th, just under a month away.


On behalf of the MM2005 Program Committee

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 19 10:48:58 2005



From: Franklin Bailey :      jfb-at-uidaho.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2005 08:57:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: RE: RE: SEM: gun saturation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I don't know how much stock I would place in the Ohio State set of notes
since they name wavelength as the chief factor in SEM resolution instead of
probe size.

Franklin Bailey
University of Idaho
Electron Microscopy Center


-----Original Message-----
} From: Beaurega [mailto:beaurega-at-westol.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 18, 2005 11:11 AM
To: michael shaffer; MSA listserver

Dear Michael,

Did anyone ever answer your question?
You asked, "Why don't we see the monotonic rise as described by
"self-biasing", but instead hills and valleys?"

I would be interested in reading the answers you received to this question.

Since we can't post attachments, I looked for some slides on the internet
for me to discuss how this circuit works (between looking for a position in
microscopy). I was pleasantly surprised to find a PDF file at my old alma
mater, Ohio State University, in the geology department no less. See pages
17 and 18 below.
http://www.geology.ohio-state.edu/~bhattiprolu/GS675/notes/lecture1.pdf

This PDF file shows a general characteristic curve shape on page 18.

My background in electronics, as related to microscopy and other areas, is
below.

Paul Beauregard
Chemist (Ohio State) & Microscopist.
Electronics, University of Akron, Summa Cum Laude.
FCC licensed commercial radiotelephone license holder.
FCC extra class license holder, station call sign is KC8O /3.
• — • — • • • • — • —






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 19 11:35:44 2005



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2005 14:07:04 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: RE: RE: RE: SEM: gun saturation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Franklin Bailey writes ...

} I don't know how much stock I would place in the Ohio State set of notes
} since they name wavelength as the chief factor in SEM resolution
} instead of probe size.

One of the primary factors which minimize the spot size is "diffraction
aberration", a function of wavelength ... is it not(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
{www.micro-investigations.com}

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Beaurega [mailto:beaurega-at-westol.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 18, 2005 11:11 AM
} To: michael shaffer; MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: RE: RE: SEM: gun saturation
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} ---
}
} Dear Michael,
}
} Did anyone ever answer your question?
} You asked, "Why don't we see the monotonic rise as described by
} "self-biasing", but instead hills and valleys?"
}
} I would be interested in reading the answers you received to this
} question.
}
} Since we can't post attachments, I looked for some slides on the internet
} for me to discuss how this circuit works (between looking for a
} position in
} microscopy). I was pleasantly surprised to find a PDF file at my old alma
} mater, Ohio State University, in the geology department no less.
} See pages
} 17 and 18 below.
} http://www.geology.ohio-state.edu/~bhattiprolu/GS675/notes/lecture1.pdf
}
} This PDF file shows a general characteristic curve shape on page 18.
}
} My background in electronics, as related to microscopy and other areas, is
} below.
}
} Paul Beauregard
} Chemist (Ohio State) & Microscopist.
} Electronics, University of Akron, Summa Cum Laude.
} FCC licensed commercial radiotelephone license holder.
} FCC extra class license holder, station call sign is KC8O /3.
} • — • — • • • • — • —
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 19 19:20:43 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2005 17:23:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Holey film references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleague
I am working on article regarding holey film preparation technique I
succesfully use for two decades. I want to present historical data on this
issue and sort of summary on different techniques used in EM.
Unfortunately, most of the work on holey film preparation done in 50-60es
and is not indexed in modern databases and my personal archive was lost
when I moved to US. So, I could not restore some important references. I
would greatly appreciate your help in pointing on old references/articles
on holey film preparation I could cited/used in my work. I would be happy
to share the information with EM community. Thanks for your help in
advance, Sergey

P.S. Any suggestions where I could publish such work (with detailed
instruction how to make holey films) would be greatly appreciated also.
Have a great day.

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 20 17:12:49 2005



From: John Shields :      jpshield-at-uga.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2005 18:15:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] tired of re: re:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm not even opening those...
John P. Shields
Center for Ultrastructural Research
151 Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

706-542-4080


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 20 21:31:05 2005



From: kssim-at-mmu.edu.my (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2005 21:33:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: petrographic microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (kssim-at-mmu.edu.my) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 20, 2005 at 20:31:36
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kssim-at-mmu.edu.my
Name: kssim

Organization: mmu

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Dear All,

I have a feew question regarding petrographic microscope. does anyone know the process of preparing petrographic sample for imaging ? Please kindly share with me your valubale knowledge.

Thanks
Dr. Ks Sim


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 20 21:54:07 2005



From: vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 12:56:47 +0900
Subject: [Microscopy] Facility Manager Position - UC Merced

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,

We are hiring a facility manager for the Imaging and Microscopy Facility at UC Merced (primarily for electron microscopy). UC Merced is the newest campus in the University of California system, located approximately 2 hours SE of the San Francisco Bay Area, and will open to 1,000 students in the Fall of 2005. Eventual enrollment is expected to be 25,000 students. Please see the job posting below for more details.

http://jobs.ucmerced.edu/view_staff_position.faces?positionId=52

--------------------------------------------------------
Valerie J. Leppert, Assistant Professor
University of California, Merced
School of Engineering

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2039
Merced, CA 95344

Physical Address (for couriers/parcels):
4225 N. Hospital Road, Bldg 1200
Atwater, CA 95301

tel: (209) 724-4365
fax: (209) 724-2912
em: vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 21 08:34:15 2005



From: Phaedra McGuinness :      scanning-at-fams.org
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 09:36:34 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SCANNING 2005 Call for Papers Invitation and Meeting Information

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Friends:

***Mark your calendar now and plan to attend SCANNING 2005 in beautiful
Monterey, California, Tuesday April 5 through Thursday April 7.***
The following information is available on the SCANNING website at
www.scanning.org.

• 2nd Call for Papers and Abstract Preparation Details
• The Preliminary Program for SCANNING 2005 including speakers and
abstract titles
• Complete Short Course Descriptions
• Official Registration Form
• 3 Days of Forensics including An Evening with Skip Palenik
• Brand New Sessions!
• Schedule of 10 MUST-SEE Vendor Tutorials at SCANNING 2005

Schedule of TUTORIALS
Vendor Date Time
CamScan USA, Inc. Tuesday, April 5 10:00am-10:30am
Oxford Instruments Tuesday, April 5 12:30pm-1:30pm
Piezosystem Jena, Inc. Tuesday, April 5 3:00pm-3:30pm
BioForce Nanosciences Inc. Wednesday, April 6 10:00am-10:30am
Carl Zeiss SMT, Inc. Wednesday, April 6 12:30pm-1:30pm
EDAX/TSL Wednesday, April 6 3:00pm-3:30pm
IXRF Wednesday, April 6 5:00pm–6:00pm
PI Thursday, April 7 10:00am-10:30am
Soft Imaging System Thursday, April 7 12:30pm-1:30pm
xk, Inc. Thursday, April 7 3:00pm-5:00.pm (in forensics meeting
room)

• Hotel and Airline Accommodations Available (Official carrier offering
domestic and international discounts is United Airlines)
• Book and Software Exhibit Application
• Monterey Bay Aquarium Outing and Other Social Events
• Listing of SCANNING 2005 Sponsors and Contact Information

We thank you all for your past support of the SCANNING meetings and
look forward to greeting you in Monterey. Please don't hesitate to
contact us direct with queries or to request additional information.


Best regards,


Phaedra McGuinness
Managing Editor
SCANNING, The Journal of Scanning Microscopies
P.O. Box 485
Mahwah, NJ 07430
Tel: (201) 818-1010 * Fax: (201) 818-0086 *email: scanning-at-fams.org *
Web: www.scanning.org




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 21 09:34:39 2005



From: Michal Jarnik :      M_Jarnik-at-fccc.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 10:37:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Neurons on membranes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We need to Epon embed and section neurons growing attached to a
membrane. In the past (relatively long ago), we used to use millipore
membrane inserts treated with poly-Lys. The neurons stuck very well to
the membrane and more over, the membrane "curled" nicely during the
processing giving us effectively larger surface cut on each section and
so better chance to find what we needed. Currently, our neurons refuse
to stay on the membrane and in addition, the membrane stays flat. I
remember a discussion about the topic some time ago, but have problems
to find it in the archives. Does anybody have a good idea?

Thanks,

Michael Jarnik,
FCCC, Philadelphia



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 21 11:31:07 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 11:32:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: petrographic microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

The simple answer is that, typically, a slab of rock is cut off with a diamond saw, glued to a petrographic slide, then ground and polished to an appropriate thickness (ex: 30microns). If it is a mineral that contains quartz, the 30micron thickness is evaluated by its color between crossed polars (146nm retardation). For more complete information and tips regarding specific minerals, I'd recommend your contacting
Buehler, Struers, Logitech, or Mark V Labs. They all have the necessary equipment, supplies and expertise.

One other note: petrographic slides are not the same size as normal 1"x3" microscope slides.

Hope this was helpful,

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.



At 09:33 PM 1/20/2005, kssim-at-mmu.edu.my wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 21 20:16:25 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 18:18:23 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Holey film references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Sergey,
Do you have access to Desmond Kay's Techniques for Electron Microscopy,
2nd edition, 1965?
If so, Chapter 3 was written by D. E. Bradley , pg 58-74, on The
Preparation of Specimen Support Films and has early references for it.
It covers several of the early techniques.

Kay, Desmomd (Ed), 1965, Techniques for Electron Microscopy, F. A.
Davis, Co., Philadelphia, PA

If you do not have access to it, I can scan in the references for you
and send them to you off line.

If it is a new technique for making holey grids, then perhaps the
Microscopy and Microanalysis Journal which is the official journal of
the Microscopy Society of America (see microscopy.com and follow
information to the journal). Also, you might consider Journal of
Microscopy Research and Techniques. If it is just a short article, you
might consider Microscopy Today (information also available at
microscopy.com).

Best of Luck,
Judy Murphy
Stockton, CA


Sergey Ryazantsev wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Dear Colleague
} I am working on article regarding holey film preparation technique I
} succesfully use for two decades. I want to present historical data on
} this issue and sort of summary on different techniques used in EM.
} Unfortunately, most of the work on holey film preparation done in
} 50-60es and is not indexed in modern databases and my personal
} archive was lost when I moved to US. So, I could not restore some
} important references. I would greatly appreciate your help in pointing
} on old references/articles on holey film preparation I could
} cited/used in my work. I would be happy to share the information with
} EM community. Thanks for your help in advance, Sergey
}
} P.S. Any suggestions where I could publish such work (with detailed
} instruction how to make holey films) would be greatly appreciated
} also. Have a great day.
}
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
} Los Angeles, CA 90095
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
}
}
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 22 03:33:22 2005



From: Elisabeth Albert :      elisabethalbert32-at-plugin.com.br
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 10:18:01 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Tadalafil Soft Tabs - Great results!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi!

We have a new product that we offer to you, C_I_A_L_I_S soft tabs,

Cialis Soft Tabs is the new impotence treatment drug that everyone is talking
about.Soft Tabs acts up to 36 hours, compare this to only two or three hours
of Viagra action! The active ingredient is Tadalafil, same as in brand Cialis.

Simply disolve half a pill under your tongue, 10 min before sex, for the best
erections you've ever had!

Soft Tabs also have less sidebacks (you can drive or mix alcohol drinks with them).

You can get it at: http://onlinegenericshop.com/soft/





No thanks: http://onlinegenericshop.com/rr.php



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 22 11:48:15 2005



From: germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 11:50:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: reprocessing specimens from paraffin blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 21, 2005 at 13:07:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com
Name: Germaine Boucher

Organization: Pfizer

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Does anyone out there have a protocol for reprocessing specimens from paraffin blocks for TEM?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 22 17:51:37 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 15:53:16 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: reprocessing specimens from paraffin blocks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Reprocessing paraffin blocks

Hi Germaine,
Normally we dealt with sections of paraffin blocks as we wanted a
specific area.

For fiber and mineral content:
1. We used a conventional 6 micron section from a paraffin block.
2. We mounted it on a glass slide treated it with xylene and alcohol to
remove the wax.

For fiber and mineral content:
If we were doing fiber analysis in the sample, we allowed it to dry,
ashed it in a muffle furnace at 450 degrees C until the tissue was
completely ashed.
3. Added polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution to the specimen area, and
allowed it to dry.
4. Peeled off the hardened film.
5. Placed hardened film upside down on a slide.
6. Evaporated carbon on upper face of hardened film.
7. Floated carbonized specimen onto the surface of hot water. This
dissolves the water-soluble plastic and leaves the carbon film and the
contained ashed tissue floating on the surface.
8. Gently, broke up the film into 3 mm squared pieces.
9. Picked up pieces on EM grid and examined

This was used way back in the seventies by F.C.Pooley and details
published by
Langer, A.M. et al, 1972. Chemical Characterization of Uncoated
Asbesots Fibers from the lungs of Asbestos Workers by Electron
Microproble Analysis. J. Histochem. Cytochem 20:735.

To re-embed for TEM:
After 1 and 2 above
3. Once in alcohol, changed 2 or 3 times to be sure it was dehydrated
in 100% EtOH.
4. For Epon Resin Mixture: further dehydrated in propylene oxide, 2
times 10 min each on the slide.
5. Added graded series of PO:Epon replacement mix(2:1; 1:1; 1:2) for 30
min each
6. Changed to pure epon mix with 2 changes for 30 min each, on the slide
7. Took off excess resin from slide with sample, and put a full
capsule (full of epon mix) over the slide.
8. Put in oven (60C) and hardened it.
9. After hardening, can pop it off by putting in liquid nitrogen
quickly and one gets the section at the tip of the capsule.
10. We developed a slide holder (sold yrs ago by Polysciences) to hold
the slide while it was easily popped off, but anything will do just so
it is held so the pressure point is at the capsule/slide interface.

NOTES:
A. If LRWhite is used, the propylene oxide was not used and we
prevented air from getting to the mixture when being polymerized. Have
occasionally used propylene oxide by mistake over the yrs and that seems
to work as well with LR White but generally do not use it with LR
White. With LR White, we hardened at 52C if we were not in a hurry or 1
hr at 90C, if we had to do the same day.
B. Most EM Supply companies sell Epon substitute (Ted Pella, EMS,
Fullam, SPI, etc.) We used Glauerts medium mix for hardness. All Epon
mixes had the catalyst in them when used.
C. In later yrs , we used the microwave for the later stages after the
paraffin was gone. Paraffin is transparent to microwaves so doesn't
melt in the microwave, just like a dry ice cube doesn't melt because it
also is transparent to the microwaves! (As an aside, that is a great
bar trick! - before you bet, just be sure the ice cube is dry of
moisture which acts as a catalyst for melting). If you use a microwave,
use one with a cooled specimen stage. The microwave speeds up the
process tremendously and it is done in no time and one can section and
do the analysis the same day easily with time to spare.

I have not tried the entire paraffin block as usually I had specific
areas I was looking for so had to section the paraffin block to find out
where I wanted to look. It would seem that the same process would work,
however I would think the times would have to be increased somewhat. Of
course, as you know, section or block, the ultrastructure is only as
good as the fixation and preparation was initially when the sample was
fresh!!!

Hope that is helpful,
Judy

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy & Imaging Consultant
Stockton, CA
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net



by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 22 19:30:06 2005



From: pilttdownman-at-wmconnect.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 19:32:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: cardioid condensor vs star

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (pilttdownman-at-wmconnect.com) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday, January 22, 2005 at 18:06:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pilttdownman-at-wmconnect.com
Name: Ron Joyner

Organization: Mississippi Gulfcoast community college

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Gautier, Mississippi

Question: what advantage does a cardioid condensor have over a star diaphragm?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 22 20:41:38 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2005 18:43:16 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: viaWWW: reprocessing specimens from paraffin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
This is a post script for the procedure below for deparaffinization of
materials.

If one is doing morphology the below procedure which is listed below
will work however for quantitative numbers of fibers which must be
identified particularly by diffraction, plasma ashing should be used to
prevent the asbestos from changing its crystallinity structure which of
course prevents a correct diffraction pattern.

It is good to have good friends that help point out missing information
especially important missing information. Thanks Chuck,

Judy Murphy

Judy Murphy wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Reprocessing paraffin blocks
}
} Hi Germaine,
} Normally we dealt with sections of paraffin blocks as we wanted a
} specific area.
}
} For fiber and mineral content:
} 1. We used a conventional 6 micron section from a paraffin block.
} 2. We mounted it on a glass slide treated it with xylene and alcohol
} to remove the wax.
}
} For fiber and mineral content:
} If we were doing fiber analysis in the sample, we allowed it to dry,
} ashed it in a muffle furnace at 450 degrees C until the tissue was
} completely ashed.
} 3. Added polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution to the specimen area, and
} allowed it to dry.
} 4. Peeled off the hardened film.
} 5. Placed hardened film upside down on a slide.
} 6. Evaporated carbon on upper face of hardened film.
} 7. Floated carbonized specimen onto the surface of hot water. This
} dissolves the water-soluble plastic and leaves the carbon film and the
} contained ashed tissue floating on the surface.
} 8. Gently, broke up the film into 3 mm squared pieces.
} 9. Picked up pieces on EM grid and examined
}
} This was used way back in the seventies by F.C.Pooley and details
} published by
} Langer, A.M. et al, 1972. Chemical Characterization of Uncoated
} Asbesots Fibers from the lungs of Asbestos Workers by Electron
} Microproble Analysis. J. Histochem. Cytochem 20:735.
}
} To re-embed for TEM:
} After 1 and 2 above
} 3. Once in alcohol, changed 2 or 3 times to be sure it was dehydrated
} in 100% EtOH.
} 4. For Epon Resin Mixture: further dehydrated in propylene oxide, 2
} times 10 min each on the slide.
} 5. Added graded series of PO:Epon replacement mix(2:1; 1:1; 1:2) for
} 30 min each
} 6. Changed to pure epon mix with 2 changes for 30 min each, on the slide
} 7. Took off excess resin from slide with sample, and put a full
} capsule (full of epon mix) over the slide.
} 8. Put in oven (60C) and hardened it.
} 9. After hardening, can pop it off by putting in liquid nitrogen
} quickly and one gets the section at the tip of the capsule.
} 10. We developed a slide holder (sold yrs ago by Polysciences) to
} hold the slide while it was easily popped off, but anything will do
} just so it is held so the pressure point is at the capsule/slide
} interface.
}
} NOTES:
} A. If LRWhite is used, the propylene oxide was not used and we
} prevented air from getting to the mixture when being polymerized.
} Have occasionally used propylene oxide by mistake over the yrs and
} that seems to work as well with LR White but generally do not use it
} with LR White. With LR White, we hardened at 52C if we were not in a
} hurry or 1 hr at 90C, if we had to do the same day.
} B. Most EM Supply companies sell Epon substitute (Ted Pella, EMS,
} Fullam, SPI, etc.) We used Glauerts medium mix for hardness. All
} Epon mixes had the catalyst in them when used.
} C. In later yrs , we used the microwave for the later stages after
} the paraffin was gone. Paraffin is transparent to microwaves so
} doesn't melt in the microwave, just like a dry ice cube doesn't melt
} because it also is transparent to the microwaves! (As an aside, that
} is a great bar trick! - before you bet, just be sure the ice cube is
} dry of moisture which acts as a catalyst for melting). If you use a
} microwave, use one with a cooled specimen stage. The microwave speeds
} up the process tremendously and it is done in no time and one can
} section and do the analysis the same day easily with time to spare.
}
} I have not tried the entire paraffin block as usually I had specific
} areas I was looking for so had to section the paraffin block to find
} out where I wanted to look. It would seem that the same process would
} work, however I would think the times would have to be increased
} somewhat. Of course, as you know, section or block, the
} ultrastructure is only as good as the fixation and preparation was
} initially when the sample was fresh!!!
}
} Hope that is helpful,
} Judy
}
} Judy Murphy, PhD
} Microscopy & Imaging Consultant
} Stockton, CA
} murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
}
}
}
} by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} } submitted by (germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com) from
} } http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday,
} } January 21, 2005 at 13:07:37
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Email: germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com Name: Germaine Boucher
} }
} } Organization: Pfizer
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
} }
} } Question: Does anyone out there have a protocol for reprocessing
} } specimens from paraffin blocks for TEM?
} }
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 23 08:45:24 2005



From: PETER HEIMANN :      peter.heimann-at-uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 11:48:10 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] formula/composition for Ilford PERCEPTOL B/W developer ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,

Thanks for clarify my about the petrographic microscope. It is valuable
information.

Again thanks for helping me
Ks
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Barbara Foster" {bfoster-at-mme1.com}
To: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {kssim-at-mmu.edu.my} ;
{microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2005 1:32 AM

Colleagues,
can anybody provide the
formula/composition for Ilford PERCEPTOL B/W developer ?
Obviously the photochemical department of ILFORD (UK) has filed
{se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=file} a {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=a}
petition {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=petition} in
{se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=in} bankruptcy and I can't get / order the
above cited developer anymore here in Germany.
{se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=bankruptcy}
I need this developer for developing ("tenderize") the B/W ortho-films I
use with my ZEISS EM109 TEM.
Thanks for any advice!
Peter Heimann



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 08:29:34 2005



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 08:35:20 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: POST-DOCTORAL POSITION in AEM at PSU

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (ecd10-at-psu.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.org/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 24, 2005 at 08:15:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Penn State

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Post-doc Opening at Penn State

Question:
POST-DOCTORAL POSITION in Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy
at The Pennsylvania State University



A postdoctoral position is available in the area of analytical transmission electron microscopy beginning March 1, 2005. The research project focuses on understanding structure and chemistry of amorphous metal oxides for capacitor and IR sensor applications. Through a variety of electron imaging, spectroscopy and diffraction (e.g. fluctuation EM) techniques we aim to quantify structure and chemistry of amorphous metal-oxide layers to help establish processing/structure/property relationships for this class of materials. Furthermore, we aim to understand the microstructural and microchemical evolution under applied bias. Most of the research will be conducted on a JEOL 2010F Field Emission TEM/STEM outfitted with an EDAX energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS), Gatan Enfina electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS), high-angle annular dark field STEM detector, and acquisition hardware and software for spectrum imaging. The ideal candidate for this position will have experience in HREM, STEM, EDS and EELS. The salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. Exceptionally qualified candidates may be considered at the Research Associate level.

Please forward questions or send applications to:

Professor Elizabeth Dickey
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
The Pennsylvania State University
223 Materials Research Building
University Park, PA 16802
USA

tel: (814) 865-9067
FAX: (814) 865-2326
email: ecd10-at-psu.edu



---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 09:09:33 2005



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 10:13:56 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: formula/composition for Ilford PERCEPTOL B/W

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There was a well-known British photographer who died suddenly last year
at a relatively young age, worked mostly (exclusively?) in B&W, can't
remember his name, Barry something or other? I have his book at home, I
think he used his own version of Perceptol, I will check at home
tonight. I did not find Perceptol in Steve Anchell's books.

Geoff

PETER HEIMANN wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Colleagues,
} can anybody provide the
} formula/composition for Ilford PERCEPTOL B/W developer ?
} Obviously the photochemical department of ILFORD (UK) has filed
} {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=file} a {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=a}
} petition {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=petition} in
} {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=in} bankruptcy and I can't get / order the
} above cited developer anymore here in Germany.
} {se?lp=ende&p=/Mn4k.&search=bankruptcy}
} I need this developer for developing ("tenderize") the B/W ortho-films
} I use with my ZEISS EM109 TEM.
} Thanks for any advice!
} Peter Heimann
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 09:44:11 2005



From: :      mcmullen1218-at-sbcglobal.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 09:49:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist : scanning electron microscopy of Protein

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My name is Erin Wagner. I am currently a graduate student at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Ca. Recently, I have been reviewing the literature for my graduate project and have found some difficulty in retrieving the information I am looking for. While researching on-line I ran across your website. I was wondering if you would be willing to help me find the information I have been looking for.

For my project I am studying a protein that may be involved in cross-linkage and we would like to confirm this using SEM. However, the protein is embeded in a fiber and the only way to expose the protein is to solubilize the fiber in guanine-HCL. The fiber can be transferred to a solution less harsh such as 50 mM Tris-HCL by dialysis but the fiber is not soluble in water. I was wondering if SEM is possible under such conditions and if so whether you might know a protocol or where I could find a protocol to conduct the experiment. All the papers I have found discuss growing tissue on a slide, since my sample is a protein on a fiber that can only be exposed in guanine-HCL I can not grow it on a slide. Also, I think I would need to bind the primary antibody (which is a polyclonal antibody) in the tris-Hcl then bind a secondary antibody with the gold, maybe after fixation. I am unsure which fixation technique would be best and what size of gold to use.

Any help you could give me would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Erin Wagner
{mailto:e_wagner-at-pacific.edu} e_wagner-at-pacific.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 11:01:40 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 11:07:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Perceptol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Go to the following URL for a discussion of Perceptol. One nugget is
that it is apparently very similar to Kodak D-23. Good luck.

http://largeformatphotography.info/lfforum/topic/500271.html

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 18:11:23 2005



From: Delilah F. Wood :      wood-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:16:45 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] MT-2 microtome service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Anyone have any idea who might service my 1963 Sorvall Porter-Blum MT-2
microtome in the Berkeley-San Francisco area?

Thanks

Delilah Wood
USDA - ARS - WRRC
800 Buchanan St.
Albany, CA 94710




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 19:09:15 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 17:14:41 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist : scanning electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Erin
It would be much easier to answer your questions if will be more specific:
what is the protein, which fibril - how your protein "embedded" into
fibril? Does fibril formed from the protein?

Basically, I think the best technique in your case would be TEM with
negative staining. Antibodies (AB) will not interact with specific antigen
in guanidine-HCl - this chemical is strong denaturing agent, it'll equally
denature (read deactivate) most of the ABs. If your protein somehow
present on fibril or part of the fibril- then ABs will react and you may
visualize the complex by negative staining. You may also enhance the
signal using gold-conjugated secondary ABs (10 nm would be OK). Basically,
SEM may be useless based on information you provided.

Have a good day, Sergey

At 07:49 AM 1/24/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 24 21:47:05 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:52:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Perceptol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Many years ago, this was treated as Kodak
Microdol-X. I used either one interchangeably.
They were pretty much the same to me. Temperature
and freshness were critical.

I figure that all b/w developers (other than
Microdol, et. al.) are variances of the basic
chemistry of b/w developers. Check out the
following links...

http://www.photococan.com/itm00487.htm


http://www.ilford.com/html/us_english/pdf/powder_dev.pdf

Ilford b/w film seemed to turn out better with
Microdol for either FP4+ or HP4+. But the difference
for results was the Zone treatment. In this case,
over exposure and underdevelopment resulted in
astonishing results. There is a huge amount of
discussion about this that lingers to this day.
The stated ISO of these films were not what I used.

If you want to see what Ilford FP4+ and HP5 do,
relative to fine art, navigate your way through

http://www.photoweb.net

You will find a large set of photo images that are
b/w and all shot using Ilford.

Why not underexpose and over develop? Well, if the
info is not on/in the neg, over developing is not going
to bring it out. This brings out the S curve about
which Ansel Adams made history. For SEM, this is
pre-collection LUT/gamma. No info at collection cannot
be made up later on. And blown out highlights cannot
be reduced to fact later on.

I guess that film is not dead yet. But the principles
slowly migrate to digital.

gary g.



At 09:07 AM 1/24/2005, you wrote:


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 02:56:58 2005



From: vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 18:02:32 +0900
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM hard-soft specimen preparation question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues,

I am passing along a question regarding SEM sample preparation of a hard-soft specimen that I am hoping to get advice on. A colleague has implanted a collagen/titanium sample into bone and now removed it, and wishes to observe the interface of the bone with collagen, collagen with titanium, titanium with skin in the SEM. Any suggestions on sample preparation methods would be greatly appreciated. Further details of the sample are below.

It is 5 cm wide by 2 cm deep and the length is as follows:

/bone/collagen/titanium/skin
{2 cm} / {5cm} / {4cm} (titanium and skin)

Thank you,
Valerie
--------------------------------------------------------
Valerie J. Leppert, Assistant Professor
University of California, Merced
School of Engineering

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2039
Merced, CA 95344

Physical Address (for couriers/parcels):
4225 N. Hospital Road, Bldg 1200
Atwater, CA 95301

tel: (209) 724-4365
fax: (209) 724-2912
em: vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 03:02:12 2005



From: Delilah F. Wood :      wood-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:16:45 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] MT-2 microtome service

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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Anyone have any idea who might service my 1963 Sorvall Porter-Blum MT-2
microtome in the Berkeley-San Francisco area?

Thanks

Delilah Wood
USDA - ARS - WRRC
800 Buchanan St.
Albany, CA 94710





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 03:02:23 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:52:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Perceptol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Many years ago, this was treated as Kodak
Microdol-X. I used either one interchangeably.
They were pretty much the same to me. Temperature
and freshness were critical.

I figure that all b/w developers (other than
Microdol, et. al.) are variances of the basic
chemistry of b/w developers. Check out the
following links...

http://www.photococan.com/itm00487.htm


http://www.ilford.com/html/us_english/pdf/powder_dev.pdf

Ilford b/w film seemed to turn out better with
Microdol for either FP4+ or HP4+. But the difference
for results was the Zone treatment. In this case,
over exposure and underdevelopment resulted in
astonishing results. There is a huge amount of
discussion about this that lingers to this day.
The stated ISO of these films were not what I used.

If you want to see what Ilford FP4+ and HP5 do,
relative to fine art, navigate your way through

http://www.photoweb.net

You will find a large set of photo images that are
b/w and all shot using Ilford.

Why not underexpose and over develop? Well, if the
info is not on/in the neg, over developing is not going
to bring it out. This brings out the S curve about
which Ansel Adams made history. For SEM, this is
pre-collection LUT/gamma. No info at collection cannot
be made up later on. And blown out highlights cannot
be reduced to fact later on.

I guess that film is not dead yet. But the principles
slowly migrate to digital.

gary g.



At 09:07 AM 1/24/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 03:03:17 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2005 17:14:41 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist : scanning electron

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Erin
It would be much easier to answer your questions if will be more specific:
what is the protein, which fibril - how your protein "embedded" into
fibril? Does fibril formed from the protein?

Basically, I think the best technique in your case would be TEM with
negative staining. Antibodies (AB) will not interact with specific antigen
in guanidine-HCl - this chemical is strong denaturing agent, it'll equally
denature (read deactivate) most of the ABs. If your protein somehow
present on fibril or part of the fibril- then ABs will react and you may
visualize the complex by negative staining. You may also enhance the
signal using gold-conjugated secondary ABs (10 nm would be OK). Basically,
SEM may be useless based on information you provided.

Have a good day, Sergey

At 07:49 AM 1/24/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 07:18:46 2005



From: germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 07:24:15 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: Thanks for help on

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 at 06:38:57
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: germaine_g_boucher-at-groton.pfizer.com
Name: Germaine Boucher

Organization: Pfizer

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Thank you to everyone who responded to my question regarding reprocessing paraffin blocks for TEM. Your comments and suggestions have been helpful and enlightening.

Germaine Boucher
TEM lab
Pfizer Global Research and Development
(860)715-2708

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 09:05:33 2005



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 09:12:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist : scanning electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am not sure I fully understand your experimental design but I differ with
some of the comments that Sergey made. If you solublilize the protein in
guanine-HCl, then allow it to dry down on a substrate, you could gently was
with buffer, apply your primary antibody and follow that with a 5-10 nm
colloidal gold conjugated secondary antibody. Smaller gold colloids react
with higher efficiency than larger one (} 10 nm) so it is better to use a
smaller label and then enhance the gold size so that it was easier to see
in the SEM. I prefer gold enhanced gold (e.g., Nanoprobes kit) but silver
enhanced gold is also ok. We do this for tissues in the SEM all the time
with great results. Look at the gold with backscattered electron (BSE)
detectors and the surface topography with secondary electron detectors. I
am not sure why you need a fixation for an isolated fiber unless it was to
bind it to the substrate; this would increase retention but lower
immunoreactivity. Guanine-HCl treatment may destroy the reactivity of the
epitope with the antibody but, on the other hand, it may increase
reactivity similar to many antigen retrieval protocols.

At 09:49 AM 01/24/05, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 14:45:32 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 12:50:24 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM hard-soft specimen preparation question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Valerie (Happy New Year)

For your colleague

First, how was the sample stabilized i.e. in what solution, when it was
removed and how is it being stored?
Also, is there still a lot of soft tissue remaining?

Next do you have access to an environmental SEM or critical point dryer?

If the tissue is already dried, then rehydrating it in a fixative and
standard biological SEM prep (given below), might help however there are
certain interfaces that were likely damaged if air drying already
occurred especially in the skin, as the pressure would be significant
from the drying.

SO, if the sample were already dried, I likely would try the following:

1. Examine the sample carefully in the stereo microscope and get
digital images and look for any possible drying artifacts (i.e. collapse
between the epidermal cells and the Ti. Check carefully also the Ti and
collagen. The collagen is fairly robust likely but the interface might
have pulled away.

2. If you have an environmental, or low pressure SEM, then examine it
directly in the SEM. This would be the easiest thing to do if the
instrument is available.

If no ESEM or low pressure SEM is available

A. Fix the sample in 3% glutaraldehyde (buffered with cacodylate at pH
7.2), 1 hr. Agitate in a rotator during fixation. If the skin is
thick, put in a vacuum chamber at room temp (i.e. a vacuum desiccator or
vacuum oven). Usually 20 mm Hg pressure is enough. Pull the vacuum
until all bubbles are gone from the vial, then turn off vac and let the
sample fix.
NOTE: Cacodylate (sodium salt) is usually a better buffer choice than
phosphate for SEM as phosphates often precipitate.

B. Wash sample in buffer, 2 or 3 times

C. Fix in 2% aq Osmium tetroxide (in hood) for 1 hr, RT

D. Dehydrate in 50, 75, 95% EtOH, 2-10 min changes and 2-30 min
changes in 100% EtOH

NOTE: If you have an industrial microwave, these times can be
considerably shortened.

E. Critical point dry (CPD) sample using carbon dioxide.

F. Coat with conductive material e.g. AuPd while rotating the sample
if possible.

If no CPD, then you could try putting it in xylene after the alcohol and
air dry or dry it directly after the alcohol. The surface tension will
be reduced somewhat when dried from an organic solvent, but of course
there will be some shrinkage. In reality even CPD gives shrinkage, but
usually less than drying from a solvent.

There is a method that uses HMDS (a silane), but don't think it is any
more commercially available. People used the drying from a solvent and
HMDS when they didn't have a CPD.

If the sample is already dried and you don't have a ESEM, then you may
want to simply coat it and look at it. It somewhat depends on the
number of samples you have. Once you coat it with a conductive coat, it
will become more difficult to fix, however it still could be fixed from
the bottom side if it isn't damaged from how it was mounted on the stub
for viewing.

If you have a current field emission gun SEM, then you may also be able
to use a low KV and get away with looking at it without coating. Many
of the new SEMs have a low pressure mode, which could be used to view
the sample also without coating.

The choice will be dependent on exactly what state the sample is in now,
i.e. wet, or already dried.

Let me know if you need more details.

Good Luck,
Judy


Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy & Imaging Consultant
Stockton, CA
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net




vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu wrote:

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 25 18:07:35 2005



From: psneeley-at-xmission.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 18:13:18 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Manual for AO Series 2 & 4 Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (psneeley-at-xmission.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 at 08:19:18
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: psneeley-at-xmission.com
Name: P.S. Neeley

Organization: None

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Looking for an AO Series 2 & 4 Microscope Reference Manual

Question: use an American Optical Series 2 scope (160mm tube length) and have been unable to find a copy of the reference (user) manual. These scopes (Series 2 and 4) were manufactured in the 1950s after the heyday of the ëblackí AO models, and before the advent of the infinity corrected AO models (Series 10, 20, 110, etc.). It is possible that you may still have some of these scopes, and their manuals, kicking around the lab or classroom someplace.


I would like to obtain the reference manual if possible.


Ultimately, I would scan the reference manual and place it with the other AO manuals and catalogs available at: http://www.xmission.com/~psneeley/Personal/Microscope.htm for anyone to access and use.


Thank you for any information,


P.S. Neeley


---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 03:23:47 2005



From: lu kang :      luchunwang-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:07:56 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Brightness of TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To everyone who replied about this question -

Thank you very much for the response. After careful consideration, my colleague, Dr. Hossein Hosseinkhani at ICYS, NIMS, Japan, tried the method suggested by Judy Murphy. He reports that it appears to have worked well and wanted me to convey his thanks for the suggestions.

Cheers,
Valerie

--------------------------------------------------------
Valerie J. Leppert, Assistant Professor
University of California, Merced
School of Engineering

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2039
Merced, CA 95344

Physical Address (for couriers/parcels):
4225 N. Hospital Road, Bldg 1200
Atwater, CA 95301

tel: (209) 724-4365
fax: (209) 724-2912
em: vleppert-at-ucmerced.edu

----- Original Message -----
} From: Judy Murphy {murphyjudy-at-comcast.net}

Microscopists,

Could anyone tell me how to measure and calculate the brightness and dose on
the fluorescent screen of a transmission electron microscope? We have the
Tecnai TEM.

Many thanks,

Lu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 12:02:42 2005



From: David Joswiak :      joswiak-at-astro.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 10:07:52 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] staining of micromed sections to see organic carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is a question from a colleague (who is not on the list) regarding
staining of organic carbon.

Dave Joswiak
University of Washington


Hi,

I would be interested in any information regarding staining of organic
carbon prior to observing the sample in a TEM. I work with meteorites
and I am trying to distinguish the organic carbonaceous phases from the
not-organic carbon present in the samples.
I wonder if there exists any staining method to distinguish the organic
carbon from the rest(it does not need to be specific to a type of organic
carbon such as proteins, etc.). And I also wonder if there is a
way/procedure of staining directly the TEM grids containing microtomed
sections on them.

Thanks in advance.

--
Graciela Matrajt
Dept. of Astronomy







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 14:03:15 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 12:07:45 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: staining of micromed sections to see organic carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
I do not know of a stain that would differentiate organic carbon from
not-organic carbon. But am responding to the comment

"And I also wonder if there is a
way/procedure of staining directly the TEM grids containing microtomed
sections on them."

Most of the standard TEM section stains attach to proteins, nucleic acids, or unsaturated lipids or to the Os which reduced those unsaturated bonds. There are several specialty stains as well which can attach to for instance, certain sugars.

However the standard staining method for TEM sections is usually the Reynolds uranyl acetate, lead citrate stain or some derivative of that. Lead citrate can be made from components (lead nitrate, sodium citrate) or using the compound lead citrate directly (e.g. Venables instant lead citrate stain). Generally I have found that making lead citrate from its components is more stable for a longer amount of time than using the "instant" lead citrate stains, however I have used both successfully. When I use the "instant" lead citrate, I usually do so by making it up fresh each time.

Reynolds, E.S., 1963. The use of lead citrate at high pH as an electron-opaque stain in electron microscopy, J. Cell Biol. 17, 208.
Venable, J. H. and Coggeshall, R., 1965. A simplified lead citrate stain for use in electron microscopy, J. Cell Biol 25, 407.
General reference
Lewis, P.R., and Knight, D.P., 1977. Staining methods for sectioned material, in "Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy", Volume 5, Part I,Audrey Glauert (Ed), Elsevier/North-Holland Press.

Below is one way to do the Reynolds uranyl acetate, lead citrate stain. It is likely that the formatting will not be retained in the text mode so in addition I am sending you off line a word document as an attachment which will retain the format. The below method indicates keeping the stains in syringes in a charged desiccator however you can also keep the stains in the refrigerator, just so they are sealed in something that keeps especially the lead citrate away from air and UA away from light.

Especially if you are interested in trying to find something that will differentiate a very minute difference, it is suggested to use deionized, glass distilled water. I have found when working with a variety os polymer staining methods that water that is purified by a resin column method (e.g. millipore) tends to bring along some of the resin on occasion which also nicely stains.

If you find such a stain that can differentiate what you are looking for, would appreciate knowing about it.

Thanks
Judy

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
Stockton, CA 95219
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net

Uranyl Acetate and Reynolds Lead Citrate Staining
of Thin Sections for TEM:
Preparation and Use
Judy Murphy 050124

Staining of TEM thin sections involves a two step process, first staining with uranyl acetate and then with lead citrate. During the lead citrate staining, it is imperative to minimize the exposure of lead citrate with air to prevent precipitation on the sections of lead carbonate. To this end, NaOH pellets are used which removes the CO2 from the air. The more care that is taken to do the staining, the cleaner the sections will look.

NOTES:
• Preparation of Reynolds Lead Citrate stain takes approximately 30-40 minutes.
• Uranyl Acetate stain should be stored in a brown bottle to prevent reaction with light.
• Both stock stains are stored in the refrigerator at 4OC.
• Stains MUST be Millipore filtered just before use.
• Small amounts of the stains may be stored in 3cc syringes with the filters attached and placed in a charged desiccator.

1. Boil deionized, distilled water as follow:
NOTE: Freshly boiled water must be used to make the 0.02 N NaOH (if none available), water wash in wash bottle after staining, and to fill 10 ml water beakers at least 2 times. If new Lead Citrate stain needs to be made then it also needs to be made with freshly boiled water.
A. Prepare Beaker as follows:
a. Procure a clean 400-500 ml glass beaker.
CAUTION: Use a beaker 2-3 times larger than the volume of water to be boiled
b. Rinse the clean beaker with a small amount of deionized, distilled water.
B. Fill the rinsed beaker half full with deionized, distilled water.
C. Place beaker in middle of microwave and close the door.
E. Microwave water for 10 mins. Exact time depends on the microwave.
NOTE: Water should be allowed to boil about 5 minutes after it comes to a boil, which is about 10 min. in the microwave oven.
CAUTION: Do not leave boiling water unattended as water may boil over.
F. Using hot pad to protect skin, remove the beaker from the microwave.
G. Cover the beaker with half of a petri dish.
H. Allow the water to cool to room temperature.
NOTE: It is important that as little CO2 which is found in the air be allowed to enter back into the water. For that reason, water should be boiled shortly before use, leaving enough time only to cool the water.

2. Assemble stains and staining materials while waiting for water:
A. Freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water (See Step 1 for preparation).
B. 2% Uranyl Acetate (aqueous) stain in labeled, clean syringe with FRESH Millipore filter attached (See Step 5A for preparation). This is stored in a charged desiccator specifically for the stains.
C. Reynold's Lead Citrate stain in labeled, clean syringe with FRESH Millipore filter attached (See Step 5B for preparation). This is stored in a charged desiccator specifically for the stains.
D. NaOH pellets in sealed container.
E. Wash bottle containing 0.02M NaOH (for rinse after Lead Citrate staining)
a. Measure out 180ml of the freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water.
b. Pour water into a clean and rinsed wash bottle.
c. Add 2 NaOH pellets.
NOTE: Each pellet weighs approximately 0.07g
d. Mix solution well but do not cause CO2 to enter.
F. Wash bottle containing freshly cooled boiled distilled water.
G. Assemble the following necessary materials on a lined tray:
a. Three large glass Petri dishes (tops and bottoms). Line one Petri dish with a piece of filter paper indicated below.
b. One small Petri dish.
c. Three 10ml beakers.
d. Two waste beakers, one for the 0.02 N NaOH rinse waste and one for the water rinse waste.
e. Two squares of Parafilm cut to fit into one of the large Petri dish.
f. 2 pieces of filter paper, one for lining the Petri dish.
g. Filter paper arrows (fairly small arrows).
h. Clean EM tweezers, preferably locking tweezers, if available (may use small o-ring to lock regular tweezers).
i. Grid box containing sections to be stained with proper identification sheets.

3. Uranyl Acetate Staining:
A. Put grids that are to be stained within 20 min. in a covered Petri dish lined with a piece of filter paper.
B. Heat grids by putting them in the 52°C over for 15 minutes.
A. Fill the 10ml beakers 3/4 full with boiled deionized, distilled water.
B. Prepare Staining Petri dish as follows:
a. Place a square of parafilm in the bottom half of a glass petri dish.
CAUTION: Be sure that parafilm is flat.
b. Place drops of 2% UA on the paraflim layer in the petri dish, one per grid to be stained.
NOTE: Drops should be just larger than the grids.
C. Float each of the grids, singly, section-side down on a separate drop of stain and cover the Petri Dish.
D. Allow grids to stain for approximately 25-30 minutes.
E. Remove the grids one at a time and immediately rinse by quickly dipping 20 times into each of the three10ml beakers of fresh deionized, distilled water.
NOTE: Use a straight up and down motion.
F. Holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water retained on the grid by touching filter paper arrows to the edge of the grid.
G. Place the grid on filter paper in a Petri dish.
H. Clean up of UA:
a. Dispose of stain in appropriate waste bottle under the fume hood.
b. Dispose of solid waste (filter paper arrows, parafilm etc.) in appropriate bio-hazardous waste container.

4. Lead Citrate Staining:
A. Fill the 10ml beakers approximately to 3 mm below the top, with freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water.
B. Prepare Petri dishes as follows:
NOTE: Use a double Petri dish system i.e. small Petri dish top inside top and bottom of larger Petri dish.
a. Place a square of Parafilm in the bottom half of a glass Petri dish.
CAUTION: Be sure that parafilm is flat.
b. Place 4 NaOH pellets close to but NOT touching where the Lead Citrate droplets will be placed.
c. Place drops of Lead Citrate stain on the Parafilm layer in an area that can be covered by the small Petri dish, one per grid to be stained, near where the NaOH pellets are but NOT touching the pellets.
NOTE: Drops should be just larger than the grids.
d. Immediately put the small Petri dish top over the Parafilm area which has the Lead Citrate droplets and the NaOH pellets. Cover also the large Petri dish.
e. Allow it to sit about 5 min. to remove CO2 from the atmosphere surrounding the stain.
C. When ready to stain, quickly open the Petri dishes and float each of the grids, singly, section-side down on a separate drop of stain and quickly cover the Petri Dish.
NOTE: Open the Petri dishes only as far as necessary to minimize the amount of air (which contains CO2) that gets into the Petri dishes.
D. Allow grids to stain for appropriate time. This can vary between 5 to 20 min.
NOTE: Stain time will vary. Perform test for type of tissue and stain.
Staining Time Test: Start with 3 grids that all contain sections of the same thickness. These should be silver when viewed in the ultramicrotome. Stain one grid for 5 min, one for 10 min, and one for 15 min. with Lead Citrate. Uranyl acetate stain can all be 30 min. each.
E. Rinse the grids one at a time as follows:
a. Pick up the first grid and holding the grid with clean tweezers, gently run a stream of 0.02M NaOH (in wash bottle) over the grid and into a waste beaker.
NOTE: Start the stream of NaOH first and then bring the grid into the stream so it doesn't put extensive washing force on the grid.
b. Quickly, rinse the grid in the same manner with freshly boiled deionized, distilled water in a wash bottle.
c. Immediately rinse the grid by quickly dipping at least 20 times into each of the three 10ml beakers of fresh deionized, distilled distilled water.
NOTE: Use a straight up and down motion.
F. Remove liquid on tweezers and grid as follows:]
a. Holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water retained in the tweezers by gently putting a paper arrow in between the tweezers coming from the non-pointed end downward.
NOTE: Anti-capillary tweezers do not require this step.
b. Still holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water retained on the grid by carefully touching filter paper arrows to the edge of the grid.
G. Place the grid on filter paper in a covered Petri dish to dry. After a few minutes, the grid can be placed in a grid box indicating proper labeling information on the Grid Box Information Sheet.
H. Be sure to clean tweezers with clean water before picking up the next grid to be stained or before putting the tweezers away.
I. Clean up Lead Citrate waste as follows:
a. Dispose of used stain in appropriate waste bottle under the fume hood.
b. Dispose of solid waste (filter paper arrows, Parafilm etc.) in appropriate biohazardous waste container.

5. Preparation of Stains:
CAUTION: Wear Gloves when preparing stains.
A. 2% aqueous Uranyl Acetate Stain:
a. Measure 48ml deionized, distilled water into a clean100ml beaker.
b. Weigh out 1 gram Uranyl Acetate.
c. Add measured Uranyl Acetate to the deionized, distilled water in the beaker.
d. Bring volume up to 50ml with deionized, distilled water.
e. Stir solution on the magnetic stirrer to dissolve crystals.
f. Store stock stain in properly labeled brown bottle.
g. Prepare 3cc syringe of UA as follows:
i. Using a 3cc syringe, draw about 2ml of UA.
ii. Remove air from the syringe by holding the syringe straight up (needle on top) and slowly push on the plunger until the air is removed.
iii. Place a clean Sweeney filter holder loaded with a NEW Millipore filter on the end of the syringe.
iv. Label the syringe: "2% UA, Date and initials ".
v. Wrap the syringe with tin foil to protect the stain from light.
B. Reynold's Lead Citrate
CAUTION: Lead stains precipitate as white opaque carbonate grains on grids if any contact with C02 is made. Be careful not to breathe on stain drops or on grids while rinsing.
NOTE: Concentrated NaOH solutions should NOT be stored in glass-stoppered bottles or the stoppers will "freeze" and not be able to be removed.
a. Pour 30ml of the boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water into a 50ml volumetric flask.
b. Weigh out the following:
i. Lead Nitrate crystals: 1.33 g
ii. Sodium Citrate crystals: 1.76 g
c. Add the Lead Nitrate and Sodium Citrate crystals to the 30ml of water in the volumetric flask.
d. Mix the solution as follows:
i. Tightly seal the top of the volumetric flask with parafilm.
ii. Shake vigorously for 1 minute.
NOTE: Solution should be milky white.
iii. Allow to stand with occasional mixing for 30 minutes.
e. Add 1 N NaOH until cloudiness disappears as follows:
i. Add one drop of 1 N NaOH.
ii. Swirl solution until mixed.
iii. Repeat until cloudiness disappears.
g. pH solution to pH 12 using 10 N NaOH and bring the volume up to 50 ml with freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water.
CAUTION: pH must be maintained above PH 12 or carbonate precipitate will form.
h. Store stain is stored in a tightly stoppered bottle.
i. Prepare 3cc syringe of Lead Citrate as follows:
i. Using a 3cc syringe, draw about 2ml of Lead Citrate.
ii. Remove air from the syringe by holding the syringe straight up (needle on top) and slowly push on the plunger until the air is removed.
iii. Place a clean Sweeney filter holder loaded with a NEW Millipore filter on the end of the syringe.
iv. Label the syringe: "Reynolds Lead Citrate, Date and initials ".
v. Place the loaded syringe in the charged desiccator.









David Joswiak wrote:

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 16:55:28 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 14:59:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: staining of micromed sections to see organic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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After receiving several off line comments from my friends about the fact
that Graciela Matrajt was working with meteorites not biological samples
and the staining methods I suggested wouldn't work, just want to add
that I responded to what I thought was a general question i.e. "And I
also wonder if there is a
way/procedure of staining directly the TEM grids containing microtomed
sections"
In retrospect, he perhaps meant microtomed meteorite samples and not
just any sample, in which case my response should be ignored. Sorry for
the wasted words on the listserver. It is hard to get good help anymore :)

General thoughts on meteorite sections and staining:
I have cut all sorts of materials i.e. metals, ceramics, ICs, polymers,
catalysts as well as biological samples, but never meteorites. Not
withstanding, if thin sections could be cut of meteorites, they may have
enough different inclusions etc. to form their own contrast by atomic
number and/or density difference. If it were more of a homogeneous
material, then perhaps the same stains we use for polymers might work
e.g. ruthenium or osmium tetroxide.
Linda Sawyer published a book on Microscopy of Polymers which was
updated in recent years.
I would think that getting nice thin sections of meteorites might be
more of a challenge than staining them.

Cheers
Judy Murphy

Judy Murphy wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Hi,
} I do not know of a stain that would differentiate organic carbon from
} not-organic carbon. But am responding to the comment
}
} "And I also wonder if there is a
} way/procedure of staining directly the TEM grids containing microtomed
} sections on them."
}
} Most of the standard TEM section stains attach to proteins, nucleic
} acids, or unsaturated lipids or to the Os which reduced those
} unsaturated bonds. There are several specialty stains as well which
} can attach to for instance, certain sugars.
} However the standard staining method for TEM sections is usually the
} Reynolds uranyl acetate, lead citrate stain or some derivative of
} that. Lead citrate can be made from components (lead nitrate, sodium
} citrate) or using the compound lead citrate directly (e.g. Venables
} instant lead citrate stain). Generally I have found that making lead
} citrate from its components is more stable for a longer amount of time
} than using the "instant" lead citrate stains, however I have used both
} successfully. When I use the "instant" lead citrate, I usually do so
} by making it up fresh each time.
}
} Reynolds, E.S., 1963. The use of lead citrate at high pH as an
} electron-opaque stain in electron microscopy, J. Cell Biol. 17, 208.
} Venable, J. H. and Coggeshall, R., 1965. A simplified lead citrate
} stain for use in electron microscopy, J. Cell Biol 25, 407.
} General reference
} Lewis, P.R., and Knight, D.P., 1977. Staining methods for sectioned
} material, in "Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy", Volume 5,
} Part I,Audrey Glauert (Ed), Elsevier/North-Holland Press.
}
} Below is one way to do the Reynolds uranyl acetate, lead citrate
} stain. It is likely that the formatting will not be retained in the
} text mode so in addition I am sending you off line a word document as
} an attachment which will retain the format. The below method
} indicates keeping the stains in syringes in a charged desiccator
} however you can also keep the stains in the refrigerator, just so they
} are sealed in something that keeps especially the lead citrate away
} from air and UA away from light.
}
} Especially if you are interested in trying to find something that will
} differentiate a very minute difference, it is suggested to use
} deionized, glass distilled water. I have found when working with a
} variety os polymer staining methods that water that is purified by a
} resin column method (e.g. millipore) tends to bring along some of the
} resin on occasion which also nicely stains.
}
} If you find such a stain that can differentiate what you are looking
} for, would appreciate knowing about it.
}
} Thanks
} Judy
}
} Judy Murphy, PhD
} Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
} Stockton, CA 95219
} murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
}
} Uranyl Acetate and Reynolds Lead Citrate Staining of Thin Sections for
} TEM:
} Preparation and Use
} Judy Murphy 050124
}
} Staining of TEM thin sections involves a two step process, first
} staining with uranyl acetate and then with lead citrate. During the
} lead citrate staining, it is imperative to minimize the exposure of
} lead citrate with air to prevent precipitation on the sections of lead
} carbonate. To this end, NaOH pellets are used which removes the CO2
} from the air. The more care that is taken to do the staining, the
} cleaner the sections will look.
} NOTES: • Preparation of Reynolds Lead Citrate stain takes
} approximately 30-40 minutes. • Uranyl Acetate stain should be
} stored in a brown bottle to prevent reaction with light. • Both
} stock stains are stored in the refrigerator at 4OC. • Stains MUST
} be Millipore filtered just before use.
} • Small amounts of the stains may be stored in 3cc syringes with
} the filters attached and placed in a charged desiccator.
} 1. Boil deionized, distilled water as follow:
} NOTE: Freshly boiled water must be used to make the 0.02 N NaOH
} (if none available), water wash in wash bottle after staining, and to
} fill 10 ml water beakers at least 2 times. If new Lead Citrate stain
} needs to be made then it also needs to be made with freshly boiled water.
} A. Prepare Beaker as follows:
} a. Procure a clean 400-500 ml glass beaker.
} CAUTION: Use a beaker 2-3 times larger than the volume of
} water to be boiled
} b. Rinse the clean beaker with a small amount of deionized,
} distilled water.
} B. Fill the rinsed beaker half full with deionized, distilled
} water.
} C. Place beaker in middle of microwave and close the door.
} E. Microwave water for 10 mins. Exact time depends on the
} microwave. NOTE: Water should be allowed to boil about 5
} minutes after it comes to a boil, which is about 10 min. in the
} microwave oven.
} CAUTION: Do not leave boiling water unattended as water may
} boil over.
} F. Using hot pad to protect skin, remove the beaker from the
} microwave.
} G. Cover the beaker with half of a petri dish.
} H. Allow the water to cool to room temperature.
} NOTE: It is important that as little CO2 which is found in
} the air be allowed to enter back into the water. For that reason,
} water should be boiled shortly before use, leaving enough time only to
} cool the water.
}
} 2. Assemble stains and staining materials while waiting for water:
} A. Freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water (See
} Step 1 for preparation).
} B. 2% Uranyl Acetate (aqueous) stain in labeled, clean syringe
} with FRESH Millipore filter attached (See Step 5A for preparation).
} This is stored in a charged desiccator specifically for the stains.
} C. Reynold's Lead Citrate stain in labeled, clean syringe with
} FRESH Millipore filter attached (See Step 5B for preparation). This is
} stored in a charged desiccator specifically for the stains.
} D. NaOH pellets in sealed container.
} E. Wash bottle containing 0.02M NaOH (for rinse after Lead
} Citrate staining)
} a. Measure out 180ml of the freshly boiled and cooled
} deionized, distilled water.
} b. Pour water into a clean and rinsed wash bottle.
} c. Add 2 NaOH pellets.
} NOTE: Each pellet weighs approximately 0.07g
} d. Mix solution well but do not cause CO2 to enter.
} F. Wash bottle containing freshly cooled boiled distilled water.
} G. Assemble the following necessary materials on a lined tray:
} a. Three large glass Petri dishes (tops and bottoms). Line
} one Petri dish with a piece of filter paper indicated below.
} b. One small Petri dish.
} c. Three 10ml beakers.
} d. Two waste beakers, one for the 0.02 N NaOH rinse waste
} and one for the water rinse waste.
} e. Two squares of Parafilm cut to fit into one of the large
} Petri dish.
} f. 2 pieces of filter paper, one for lining the Petri dish.
} g. Filter paper arrows (fairly small arrows).
} h. Clean EM tweezers, preferably locking tweezers, if
} available (may use small o-ring to lock regular tweezers).
} i. Grid box containing sections to be stained with proper
} identification sheets.
}
} 3. Uranyl Acetate Staining:
} A. Put grids that are to be stained within 20 min. in a covered
} Petri dish lined with a piece of filter paper.
} B. Heat grids by putting them in the 52°C over for 15 minutes.
} A. Fill the 10ml beakers 3/4 full with boiled deionized,
} distilled water.
} B. Prepare Staining Petri dish as follows:
} a. Place a square of parafilm in the bottom half of a glass
} petri dish.
} CAUTION: Be sure that parafilm is flat.
} b. Place drops of 2% UA on the paraflim layer in the petri
} dish, one per grid to be stained.
} NOTE: Drops should be just larger than the grids.
} C. Float each of the grids, singly, section-side down on a
} separate drop of stain and cover the Petri Dish.
} D. Allow grids to stain for approximately 25-30 minutes.
} E. Remove the grids one at a time and immediately rinse by quickly
} dipping 20 times into each of the three10ml beakers of fresh
} deionized, distilled water. NOTE: Use a straight up and down
} motion.
} F. Holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water retained on
} the grid by touching filter paper arrows to the edge of the grid.
} G. Place the grid on filter paper in a Petri dish.
} H. Clean up of UA:
} a. Dispose of stain in appropriate waste bottle under the
} fume hood.
} b. Dispose of solid waste (filter paper arrows, parafilm
} etc.) in appropriate bio-hazardous waste container.
}
} 4. Lead Citrate Staining:
} A. Fill the 10ml beakers approximately to 3 mm below the top,
} with freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled water.
} B. Prepare Petri dishes as follows:
} NOTE: Use a double Petri dish system i.e. small Petri dish
} top inside top and bottom of larger Petri dish.
} a. Place a square of Parafilm in the bottom half of a glass
} Petri dish.
} CAUTION: Be sure that parafilm is flat.
} b. Place 4 NaOH pellets close to but NOT touching where the
} Lead Citrate droplets will be placed.
} c. Place drops of Lead Citrate stain on the Parafilm layer
} in an area that can be covered by the small Petri dish, one per grid
} to be stained, near where the NaOH pellets are but NOT touching the
} pellets.
} NOTE: Drops should be just larger than the grids.
} d. Immediately put the small Petri dish top over the
} Parafilm area which has the Lead Citrate droplets and the NaOH
} pellets. Cover also the large Petri dish. e. Allow it to
} sit about 5 min. to remove CO2 from the atmosphere surrounding the stain.
} C. When ready to stain, quickly open the Petri dishes and float
} each of the grids, singly, section-side down on a separate drop of
} stain and quickly cover the Petri Dish.
} NOTE: Open the Petri dishes only as far as necessary to
} minimize the amount of air (which contains CO2) that gets into the
} Petri dishes.
} D. Allow grids to stain for appropriate time. This can vary
} between 5 to 20 min.
} NOTE: Stain time will vary. Perform test for type of tissue
} and stain.
} Staining Time Test: Start with 3 grids that all contain
} sections of the same thickness. These should be silver when viewed in
} the ultramicrotome. Stain one grid for 5 min, one for 10 min, and one
} for 15 min. with Lead Citrate. Uranyl acetate stain can all be 30
} min. each. E. Rinse the grids one at a time as follows:
} a. Pick up the first grid and holding the grid with clean
} tweezers, gently run a stream of 0.02M NaOH (in wash bottle) over the
} grid and into a waste beaker.
} NOTE: Start the stream of NaOH first and then bring the
} grid into the stream so it doesn't put extensive washing force on the
} grid.
} b. Quickly, rinse the grid in the same manner with freshly
} boiled deionized, distilled water in a wash bottle.
} c. Immediately rinse the grid by quickly dipping at least
} 20 times into each of the three 10ml beakers of fresh deionized,
} distilled distilled water.
} NOTE: Use a straight up and down motion.
} F. Remove liquid on tweezers and grid as follows:]
} a. Holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water
} retained in the tweezers by gently putting a paper arrow in between
} the tweezers coming from the non-pointed end downward.
} NOTE: Anti-capillary tweezers do not require this step.
} b. Still holding the grid in the tweezers, remove the water
} retained on the grid by carefully touching filter paper arrows to the
} edge of the grid.
} G. Place the grid on filter paper in a covered Petri dish to
} dry. After a few minutes, the grid can be placed in a grid box
} indicating proper labeling information on the Grid Box Information Sheet.
} H. Be sure to clean tweezers with clean water before picking up
} the next grid to be stained or before putting the tweezers away.
} I. Clean up Lead Citrate waste as follows:
} a. Dispose of used stain in appropriate waste bottle under
} the fume hood.
} b. Dispose of solid waste (filter paper arrows, Parafilm
} etc.) in appropriate biohazardous waste container.
}
} 5. Preparation of Stains:
} CAUTION: Wear Gloves when preparing stains.
} A. 2% aqueous Uranyl Acetate Stain:
} a. Measure 48ml deionized, distilled water into a
} clean100ml beaker.
} b. Weigh out 1 gram Uranyl Acetate.
} c. Add measured Uranyl Acetate to the deionized, distilled
} water in the beaker.
} d. Bring volume up to 50ml with deionized, distilled water.
} e. Stir solution on the magnetic stirrer to dissolve crystals.
} f. Store stock stain in properly labeled brown bottle.
} g. Prepare 3cc syringe of UA as follows:
} i. Using a 3cc syringe, draw about 2ml of UA.
} ii. Remove air from the syringe by holding the syringe
} straight up (needle on top) and slowly push on the plunger until the
} air is removed.
} iii. Place a clean Sweeney filter holder loaded with a NEW
} Millipore filter on the end of the syringe.
} iv. Label the syringe: "2% UA, Date and initials ".
} v. Wrap the syringe with tin foil to protect the stain from
} light.
} B. Reynold's Lead Citrate
} CAUTION: Lead stains precipitate as white opaque carbonate
} grains on grids if any contact with C02 is made. Be careful not to
} breathe on stain drops or on grids while rinsing.
} NOTE: Concentrated NaOH solutions should NOT be stored in
} glass-stoppered bottles or the stoppers will "freeze" and not be able
} to be removed.
} a. Pour 30ml of the boiled and cooled deionized, distilled
} water into a 50ml volumetric flask.
} b. Weigh out the following:
} i. Lead Nitrate crystals: 1.33 g
} ii. Sodium Citrate crystals: 1.76 g
} c. Add the Lead Nitrate and Sodium Citrate crystals to the
} 30ml of water in the volumetric flask.
} d. Mix the solution as follows:
} i. Tightly seal the top of the volumetric flask with
} parafilm.
} ii. Shake vigorously for 1 minute.
} NOTE: Solution should be milky white.
} iii. Allow to stand with occasional mixing for 30 minutes.
} e. Add 1 N NaOH until cloudiness disappears as follows:
} i. Add one drop of 1 N NaOH.
} ii. Swirl solution until mixed.
} iii. Repeat until cloudiness disappears.
} g. pH solution to pH 12 using 10 N NaOH and bring the
} volume up to 50 ml with freshly boiled and cooled deionized, distilled
} water.
} CAUTION: pH must be maintained above PH 12 or carbonate
} precipitate will form.
} h. Store stain is stored in a tightly stoppered bottle.
} i. Prepare 3cc syringe of Lead Citrate as follows:
} i. Using a 3cc syringe, draw about 2ml of Lead Citrate.
} ii. Remove air from the syringe by holding the syringe
} straight up (needle on top) and slowly push on the plunger until the
} air is removed.
} iii. Place a clean Sweeney filter holder loaded with a NEW
} Millipore filter on the end of the syringe.
} iv. Label the syringe: "Reynolds Lead Citrate, Date and
} initials ".
} v. Place the loaded syringe in the charged desiccator.
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} David Joswiak wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Below is a question from a colleague (who is not on the list) regarding
} } staining of organic carbon.
} }
} } Dave Joswiak
} } University of Washington
} }
} }
} } Hi,
} }
} } I would be interested in any information regarding staining of organic
} } carbon prior to observing the sample in a TEM. I work with meteorites
} } and I am trying to distinguish the organic carbonaceous phases from the
} } not-organic carbon present in the samples.
} } I wonder if there exists any staining method to distinguish the organic
} } carbon from the rest(it does not need to be specific to a type of
} } organic
} } carbon such as proteins, etc.). And I also wonder if there is a
} } way/procedure of staining directly the TEM grids containing microtomed
} } sections on them.
} }
} } Thanks in advance.
} }
} }
} }
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 17:34:35 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 15:53:03 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Brightness of TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 26, 2005, at 8:07 AM, lu kang wrote:

} Could anyone tell me how to measure and calculate the brightness and
} dose on the fluorescent screen of a transmission electron microscope?
} We have the Tecnai TEM.
}
Dear Lu,
There are several ways to do this, but for the most accurate results,
the screen should be calibrated with a suitable Faraday cup. When we
first measured screen current with the utility in the low dose set-up,
it did not agree with the measurement from the screen current
utility--you may or may not have access to that utility, but your FEI
service person does. Subsequently, we calibrated both measurements,
and we now can be confident that either will give us a true reading.
We have continued to check the CCD sensitivity, and, since that has not
changed measurably, we can now use the CCD to determine the desired
dose by setting the beam parameters to give us the number of counts per
channel that corresponds to the number of electrons per nm^2.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 18:36:54 2005



From: armstrong30-at-llnl.gov (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:42:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: EM cooling stage questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (armstrong30-at-llnl.gov) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 at 13:27:33
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: armstrong30-at-llnl.gov
Name: Mike Armstrong

Organization: Lawrence Livermore Nat'l Labs

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] EM cooling stage questions and shopping (buyer)

Question: Hi!

I am interested in doing TEM on frozen (but not necessarily cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures) samples in a JEOL 2000FX TEM. I have two sets of questions:

1) Does anybody out there have a cooling stage for this microscope that I could beg/borrow/rent/buy? Even if you have a lead that I could check out, it would be great if you could let me know.

2) Does anyone know of a Peltier cooled stage for TEM (for this microscope) that's a reasonable price? How hard do you think it would be to build such a thing? I only need to go to sub-freezing, not super cold, and it seems like this might be a cheaper alternative.

I'm new to EM, so if you have any other suggestions, they would be helpful. I'm kind of scraping to get this for as little as possible. If anybody can help me, I'd really appreciate it. This is for a high risk/payoff experiment and you will certainly get a mention (at least) in some acknowledgements if you can help me out.

Cheerios,

Mike

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 18:44:06 2005



From: sschul-at-vet.ksu.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:49:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: help on SEM/TEM of TICKS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (sschul-at-vet.ksu.edu) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 at 15:01:11
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: sschul-at-vet.ksu.edu
Name: Sarah

Organization: Kansas State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am going to do a project that involves ticks. The ticks will feed on the dogs and then drop off, once they drop off and mature to adults I would like to do SEM and TEM on them to determine the location of the bacteria with in the tick itself. I believe that I will do critical point dry. I was wondering if you could help me out with a protocol for how to specifically fix the ticks to ensure that they are being processed correctly. Thanks

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 18:50:41 2005



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:56:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] First AND ONLY announcement: Tenth International Live-cell Course.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,

Hard to believe we are at Year 10 already. Thank you all for your
support over the years.

As the list is now enforcing the One-Announcement-per-Course rule,
don't expect further announcements.

Up-to-date information can always be found at the Course WWW site:
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca

Cheers,

Jim P.


_______________________________

Tenth Annual INTERNATIONAL 12-Day Short Course on 3D Microscopy of
Living Cells, June 11 - 23, 2005 (Pre-course: June 11)

Ninth, Post-course Workshop on 3D Image Processing,
June 25 -27, 2005

Organized by Prof. James Pawley, (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

in association with the Departments of Pharmacology and Physiology
and the Brain Research Centre,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

DATES

Applications must be received by Tuesday, March 15, 2005
Deposit due Friday,
April 15, 2005
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday, June 11, 2005
First Lecture 7:30 PM Saturday, June 11, 2005
Live-cell Course ends, noon Thursday, June 23, 2005
3D Image Processing Course, Saturday, June 25 -
Monday, 27, 2005


APPLICATIONS DUE BY MARCH 15, 2005

APPLICATIONS
Applicants must complete a questionnaire on the web to assess
knowledge level, field of interest and proposed personal, live-cell,
project. Enrollment will be limited to about 32 participants (exact
number depends on number of 3D Systems available). Selection will be
made on the basis of background and perceived need. Those without
previous LM experience will be provided with access to basic texts to
read before the course begins. Application forms requesting
information on field of interest and level of experience may be
down-loaded from the WWW site at

www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/application.htm , or obtained from:

Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph.
608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
250 N. Mills Street, Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU

Additional information is available from:
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/brochure.htm and links.

We expect to have at least 11, 3D microscope workstations for student
use and there will be an international faculty of 20.

Application deadlines:

Application forms must be received for screening by March 15, 2005.
Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, and a deposit of
50% must be received by April 15, 2005. In general, refunds of the
deposit will only be possible if someone on the waiting list can take
the place but this has not been a problem in previous years. The
remaining balance is due before Registration.


Pre-Course Tuition (1/2 day Basic Optical principles)
$100 (US)
3D Live-cell Course Tuition (includes lunches, snacks, 3 dinners):
$2,650 (US)
Workshop Tuition (includes lunches and snacks):
$1,000 (US)

Room/board about $40/day (US) depending on room type.

I hope that this includes all of the information that you need, but
if not, please get back to me.

--
****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
"A scientist is not one who can answer questions but one who can
question answers." Theodore Schick Jr., Skeptical Enquirer, 21-2:39


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 19:24:11 2005



From: sdublin-at-emory.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 19:29:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Trying to make my own carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (sdublin-at-emory.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 at 15:57:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: sdublin-at-emory.edu
Name: Steven Dublin

Organization: Emory University

Education: Graduate College

Location: Atlanta, GA

Question: I am a grad student trying to make my own carbon coated grids. I have no problem depositing a carbon film on a glass slide and floating the film on water. Next,I drop the grids on the film. My problem occurs when I swipe the grids off the surface of the water with a glass slide. The residual water on the slide wrinkles and tears the film, so I am left with an uneven, broken film across the surface of the grid.

Does anyone have advice on how to get the grids out of the water without tearing the film? What about grid glue? Is this required?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 20:19:23 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:37:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: EM cooling stage questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 26, 2005, at 4:42 PM, by way of MicroscopyListserver wrote:

} I am interested in doing TEM on frozen (but not necessarily cooled to
} liquid nitrogen temperatures) samples in a JEOL 2000FX TEM. I have two
} sets of questions:
}
} 1) Does anybody out there have a cooling stage for this microscope
} that I could beg/borrow/rent/buy? Even if you have a lead that I could
} check out, it would be great if you could let me know.
}
} 2) Does anyone know of a Peltier cooled stage for TEM (for this
} microscope) that's a reasonable price? How hard do you think it would
} be to build such a thing? I only need to go to sub-freezing, not super
} cold, and it seems like this might be a cheaper alternative.
}
} I'm new to EM, so if you have any other suggestions, they would be
} helpful. I'm kind of scraping to get this for as little as possible.
} If anybody can help me, I'd really appreciate it. This is for a high
} risk/payoff experiment and you will certainly get a mention (at least)
} in some acknowledgements if you can help me out.
}
Dear Mike,
I can't help you regarding the JEOL 2000FX, but an additional
possibility for a cooled stage is to beg/borrow/rent/buy a LN2 stage
and fill it with a dry ice-ethanol slurry (which a JEOL rep can tell
you if this mixture could cause damage). Ice-salt-water can also be
used for barely sub-freezing temps, but I would rinse thoroughly
afterward. If you want to build a Peltier-cooled stage, you just need
the appropriate thermal contact to which one can attach the Peltiers;
however, that might be easier said than machined. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 20:48:30 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:53:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Trying to make my own carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Steven,

Instead of picking up the carbon from the water surface with a glass
slide all at once, it may be possible to break up the carbon on the
water surface slightly and pick up a small 3 mm piece individually with
each grid from underneath.

Usually for carboned only grids for virus examination, we would
evaporate carbon onto freshly cleaved mica pieces (available from EM
suppliers). We then floated the carbon films onto the surface of the
water. Using freshly acetone cleaned grids, we put one grid at a time
underneath the pieces of carbon and picked it up. Freshly cleaning
them, would lower the surface tension when the grid went into the
water. We generally used 400 mesh Cu grids to support the films.

"Does anyone have advice on how to get the grids out of the water without tearing the film? What about grid glue? Is this required? "


I have used grid glue routinely for picking up sections on naked grids
but have never found it necessary for carbon only grids.

Good luck,
Judy


Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
Stockton, CA 95219
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net










by way of Ask-A-Microscopist wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 21:20:57 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 19:26:13 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Trying to make my own

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Steven
Try to use piece of Parafilm (instead glass) to pick up the
grids. Parafilm should be larger than carbon film. You need completely
immerse Parafilm into the water and than remove it quickly. Grids should be
clean to stick to the carbon. Depends from carbon thickness, you need to
use grids of corresponding mesh: As thinner carbon, higher mesh should
be. Carbon, which is slightly brownish (so you could see carbon by naked
eye) may be mounted on 400-mesh grids. The alternative (there are so many
ways) way is to put plastic film on the grids (which is easy) first, then
evaporate carbon and then dissolve plastic (it would "glue" carbon to the
grid). You may also leave plastic on the grid. Generally, carbon do not
stick well to the naked grids, so people used plastic support film or
"holey film". You may also "pre-treat" grids with plastic (a drop of very
diluted plastic solution per grid, dry before use) before mounting the
carbon. I hope it helps. Have a great day, Sergey

At 05:29 PM 1/26/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 26 23:00:33 2005



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 15:50:22 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Calibration of objectives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

It has been a long time since I've made carbon coated grids, but one
of the approaches we used was to wrap a piece of coarse copper mesh
around some wire (coat hanger would do) to create a support that we
could place under water. We then dunked the grids through the water
onto this support, and then floated off the carbon film onto the
surface of the water. We were then able to manipulate the grid
holder under the carbon film, and pick up the whole thing through the
water.

The simple method, of course, was to make thin formvar coated grids,
and evaporate some carbon on to them. Does your work preclude this
approach?

Joel


Date sent: Wed, 26 Jan 2005 18:53:21 -0800
} From: Judy Murphy {murphyjudy-at-comcast.net}
To: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist {sdublin-at-emory.edu}
Copies to: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Hi all,

I've been trying to calibrate the objectives of a brightfield microscope
from 2,5x to 100x to its best, but still I have an average deviation of
3,9% if I compare the same object measured on all magnifications. So if
I measure something with the 2,5x, it appears longer then with the 40x
objective.
Is 3,9% acceptable as deviation and if not, what is? Is there a general
rule or a paper about this?
Thanks in advance,

Sven Terclavers



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 10:01:57 2005



From: Dale Batchelor :      dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 11:10:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] AFM Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Announcing a 5 day intensive AFM short course entitled "AFM and Other
Scanned Probe Microscopies". It is being taught at N.C. State
University in
Raleigh, NC by Prof. Phil Russell, Dr. Joe Griffith and others from June
13 -17, 2005.

This one-week short course on atomic force microscopy has evolved from
the
numerous Scanned Probe Microscopy courses developed and taught by Prof.
Russell over the past 2 decades. It is designed for technicians,
scientists,
engineers and researchers. The course includes lectures and laboratories
with hands-on time using a variety of scanning probe microscope (SPM)
systems.

For more information go to www.ncsu.edu/aif/afmcourse

Dale Batchelor, Ph.D.
Course Coordinator
N.C. State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
EGRC room 318C
Campus Box 7531
Raleigh, NC 27695
Office 919-515-3841
FAX 919-515-6965
E-Mail dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu
Website www.ncsu.edu/aif



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 15:41:07 2005



From: James Mohr :      james.mohr-at-onsemi.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 14:47:42 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM FIB - Technician Job Opportunity

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

ON Semiconductor has an immediate technician job opening in the Phoenix,
AZ, Failure Analysis Lab for an SEM / FIB / metallographic prep
Technician.

Please see Job Posting 688AZ at www.onsemi.com for a full description.

You can apply at the website
http://www.careerexchange.com/cejobs/DetailOnsemi.asp?onsemi688AZ

or contact me for more information.
Thank you,
James Mohr
James.mohr-at-onsemi.com
602-244-3483




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 16:12:24 2005



From: George_Munzing-at-engelhard.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 17:20:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello All,

I am looking to obtain some references pertaining to the analysis of human
hair, both morphologic and spectroscopic. I'm trying to get my feet wet and
need a place to start. Does anyone have particular recommendations?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

George R. Munzing Jr.
Engelhard Corporation
Strategic Technologies Group
Iselin, NJ 08830
TEL: 732-205-7030
FAX: 732-494-3283
e-mail: george.munzing-at-engelhard.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 17:32:53 2005



From: Fortner, Jeffrey A. :      fortner-at-cmt.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 17:37:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A spectroscopic reference to a study of Beethoven's hair (finding
evidence of lead poisoning):

http://www.aps.anl.gov/News/APS_News/2000/20001017.htm

Jeffrey A. Fortner, Ph.D.
Chemical Engineering Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, IL 60439
fortner(at)cmt.anl.gov



-----Original Message-----
} From: George_Munzing-at-Engelhard.com [mailto:George_Munzing-at-Engelhard.com]

Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2005 4:20 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Hello All,

I am looking to obtain some references pertaining to the analysis of
human hair, both morphologic and spectroscopic. I'm trying to get my
feet wet and need a place to start. Does anyone have particular
recommendations?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

George R. Munzing Jr.
Engelhard Corporation
Strategic Technologies Group
Iselin, NJ 08830
TEL: 732-205-7030
FAX: 732-494-3283
e-mail: george.munzing-at-engelhard.com





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 18:01:07 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 16:05:48 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi George,

Been dabbling in forensic microscopy for the last 5 yrs with a high
school forensics program and have been using the following for
microscopy of human hair

Atlas of Human Hair: Microscopic Characteristics
ISBN: 0-8493-8134-7

take care,
Judy

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
Stockton, CA 95219
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net




George_Munzing-at-engelhard.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 19:21:21 2005



From: gunkelrl-at-slu.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 19:26:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: manual for Cryo-cut cryostat

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (gunkelrl-at-slu.edu) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 27, 2005 at 12:06:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: gunkelrl-at-slu.edu
Name: Rebecca

Organization: St. Louis University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Does anyone have a operators manual to an old (very old) Cryo-cut cryostat?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 19:21:50 2005



From: kaprelyants-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 19:27:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: looking for info on Leo Scopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (kaprelyants-at-yahoo.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Thursday, January 27, 2005 at 15:24:07
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kaprelyants-at-yahoo.com
Name: Alex Kaprelyants, Ph.D.

Organization: Childrens Hospital, Columbus

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for info about:

LEO 920A TEM
LEO SM940 SEM.

Thank you.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 20:09:31 2005



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 18:14:52 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hey Judy
I have this book. I think George should be warned though that while
the book is useful, it is only about a quarter of an inch thick and
small, and cost about $107 Canadian for 83 pages. It was a shock when
I got it.. I expected at least a tome of some sort.
Elaine

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 20:33:32 2005



From: :      Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:05:08 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi George,

A couple to start you off with.... There may be more in a day or so
when I get a chance to go through some more....

Jones LN. Clinics in Dermatology, 2001;19:95-103.

Rogers GE. Electron microscope studies of hair and wool, Ann NY Acad Sci
1959;83:469-485.

Hallegot P, Corcuff P. High-spatial-resolution maps of sulphur from
human hair sections: An EELS study. J. Micrsc 1993;172:131-136.

Jones LN, Cholewa M, Kaplin IJ, et al. Elemental distributions in
keratin/follicle sections. Proc Eighth Int Wool Textile Conf.
Christchurch NZ 1990;1:246-255.

Rogers GE, Reis PL, et al., editors. The biology of wool and hair.
London: Chapam and Hall, 1989.

Cheers

Colin Veitch

Electron Microscopist

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology

PO Box 21, BELMONT, Vic. 3216. Australia.

E-mail: colin.veitch-at-csiro.au

Web: http://www.tft.csiro.au

Tel: +61 (0) 3 5246 4000
Mob: 0438 538 475
Fax: +61 (0) 3 5246 4811



The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may
not copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
received this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Textile and Fibre
Technology on +61 3 5246 4000.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 27 22:18:57 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 20:23:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

is this evian or naive of me, but have you tried med
line? maybe pubmed.
john
--- George_Munzing-at-engelhard.com wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hello All,
}
} I am looking to obtain some references pertaining to
} the analysis of human
} hair, both morphologic and spectroscopic. I'm trying
} to get my feet wet and
} need a place to start. Does anyone have particular
} recommendations?
}
} Any help is greatly appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance!
}
} George R. Munzing Jr.
} Engelhard Corporation
} Strategic Technologies Group
} Iselin, NJ 08830
} TEL: 732-205-7030
} FAX: 732-494-3283
} e-mail: george.munzing-at-engelhard.com
}
}
}




__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
All your favorites on one personal page – Try My Yahoo!
http://my.yahoo.com


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 01:38:02 2005



From: Gordon Couger :      gcc-at-couger.com
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 01:42:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Hair Analysis References

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George,

Variations on a goggle search www.google.com
"human hair" preparation microscope
look promising try replacing perpareion with other terms like
microtome, embedding, spurs, resin, etc and you should find a
lot of things.

On McCrone's Modern Microscopy publication
http://www.modernmicroscopy.com/main.asp
A Microscopical Study of Exotic Animal Hair: Part 1
by Kristen D. Skraba, McCrone Associates, Westmont, IL.
Might be of interstest even thought it is about animal hair it
shows a few tecniques and methods. The biligoriphy should help
you some.

Check your local library if it is not a major reserch universty
it is unlikely they will have anything but you can search the
Libary of Congress at:
http://catalog.loc.gov/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&PAGE=First
and use inter library loan to get anything that intrests you.
It's not the instant access that the web give but it a geat
service partiulary for obscure papers from all over the world.

Good luck
Gordon
Gordon Couger

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward anything you think might be useful to others.
Microscope Documentation is at www.science-info.org






} } Hello All,
} }
} } I am looking to obtain some references pertaining to
} } the analysis of human
} } hair, both morphologic and spectroscopic. I'm trying
} } to get my feet wet and
} } need a place to start. Does anyone have particular
} } recommendations?
} }
} } Any help is greatly appreciated.
} }
} } Thanks in advance!
} }
} } George R. Munzing Jr.
} } Engelhard Corporation
} } Strategic Technologies Group
} } Iselin, NJ 08830
} } TEL: 732-205-7030
} } FAX: 732-494-3283
} } e-mail: george.munzing-at-engelhard.com
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}
} __________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} All your favorites on one personal page – Try My Yahoo!
} http://my.yahoo.com
}
}





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 07:21:32 2005



From: spagosullamiavaligia-at-libero.it (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 07:27:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microscope incubation systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (spagosullamiavaligia-at-libero.it) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday, January 28, 2005 at 05:35:21
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: spagosullamiavaligia-at-libero.it
Name: Marco Cattaneo

Organization: University of Cosenza

Education: Graduate College

Location: Cosenza, Italy

Question: Dear Sir/Madam,
i need to keep cells alive under the microscope for several hours. I realize that exist two microscope incubation systems: the box surrounding the microscope and the chamber fitting on the microscope stage. Could you please tell me which are the meaningful differences between these two microscope incubation methods? Is it true that the chamber fitting on the stage causes a focus drift? Which are the most reliable brand for these systems (obviously with the best quality/price ratio)?

Thanks in advance

Best regards,
Marco

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 09:09:04 2005



From: jerry.w.ball-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 09:13:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Cryotomy- Automated Sample Facing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Is there an automated cryotome that can face multiple samples with little
human intervention?

Jerry W. Ball
Advanced Characterization
Product Technology
BTEC West Complex
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
5200 Bayway Dr. 77520-2101
Phone: 281-834-1718
Fax: 281-834-1793
E-Mail: jerry.w.ball-at-exxonmobil.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 11:29:44 2005



From: Richard Harris :      rjharris-at-uwo.ca
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:33:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers
I have a researcher who would like to create cross sections of 2 - 3 year
old pine sapling stems.
The sections do not need to be terribly thin (50 - 100 micrometers) but he
would like to have the surface as smooth as possible without embedding the
tissue (he is a physiologist interested in chloroplasts). My background is
with animal tissue so I'm at a bit of a loss in how to advise him. Any
suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
Thanks in advance...

Richard Harris
Laboratory Supervisor
Microscopy, Imaging and Analysis
Department of Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario CANADA
N6A 5B7
Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
Fax 519-661-3935



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 14:07:23 2005



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:12:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Richard,
If you have access to a vibratome than use that to cut the sections. Also,
with some practice you may be able to cut free-hand sections that are thin
enough for your purposes.

Alternatively you can buy little hand microtomes from major science or
school supply companies. These cost about $100 I think and have a sample
chuck that is raised by a little micrometer screw assembly through a flat
platform. You insert your stem and then gradually raise it in height. Then
you slide a long razor blade across the piece using the platform as a
support. It is really a simple but very useful device.

If we have a tissue that is too soft or small to hold well in the chuck
then we just hollow out a piece of carrot and place the twig, etc inside.
This will clamp well and hold the tissue well to get minimal crushing and
distortion during cutting.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy


On 1/28/05 12:33 PM, "Richard Harris" {rjharris-at-uwo.ca} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Dear Listers
} I have a researcher who would like to create cross sections of 2 - 3 year
} old pine sapling stems.
} The sections do not need to be terribly thin (50 - 100 micrometers) but he
} would like to have the surface as smooth as possible without embedding the
} tissue (he is a physiologist interested in chloroplasts). My background is
} with animal tissue so I'm at a bit of a loss in how to advise him. Any
} suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
} Thanks in advance...
}
} Richard Harris
} Laboratory Supervisor
} Microscopy, Imaging and Analysis
} Department of Biology
} University of Western Ontario
} London Ontario CANADA
} N6A 5B7
} Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
} Fax 519-661-3935
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 17:10:31 2005



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:17:24 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would recommend a sliding microtome (aka sledge microtome) if you can
find one. The other possibilities are a cryostat or hand sections made
with a double-edged razor blade. The hand sections are OK if he doesn't
need consistency.
Kim

{} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Kim Rensing PhD
Bio-Imaging Facility, UBC
6270 University Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
{} {} {} {} {} {} {}

On Friday, January 28, 2005, at 09:33 AM, Richard Harris wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Dear Listers
} I have a researcher who would like to create cross sections of 2 - 3
} year
} old pine sapling stems.
} The sections do not need to be terribly thin (50 - 100 micrometers)
} but he
} would like to have the surface as smooth as possible without embedding
} the
} tissue (he is a physiologist interested in chloroplasts). My
} background is
} with animal tissue so I'm at a bit of a loss in how to advise him. Any
} suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
} Thanks in advance...
}
} Richard Harris
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 28 21:59:09 2005



From: svanhorn-at-notes.cc.sunysb.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 22:04:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: to cut adipose tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (svanhorn-at-notes.cc.sunysb.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 28, 2005 at 14:23:09
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: svanhorn-at-notes.cc.sunysb.edu
Name: Sue Van Horn

Organization: SUNY-at-StonyBrook

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Adipose tissue

Question: I am trying to cut adipose tissue for lightlevel.am having a horrible time trying cryostat sections..any suggestions???
thanks
sue

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 29 14:44:16 2005



From: Gordon Couger :      gcc-at-couger.com
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 14:48:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A good sharp wood plane iron or wide wood chisel sharpened as
you would a microtome knife are much better than the straight
razor that usually comes with them. Cementing a glass microscope
slide on each side of the hole in the face of the microtome will
help too. Trim the glass slides so they don't cause a danger you
the operator and use cutting edges made from good steel not the
imported stuff. You may have to find and old chisel or plane to
get a good piece of steel but the good modern brands should be
good enough if you don't have and old on laying around.

Razor blades and straight razors are not stiff enough to good
sections from soft tissue let alone hard stuff.

Try cutting with a slicing motion instead of with the blade at
90 degrees to the direction of travel.

Good luck
Gordon
Gordon Couger

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward anything you think might be useful to others.
Microscope Documentation is at www.science-info.org

Debby Sherman wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Richard,
} If you have access to a vibratome than use that to cut the sections. Also,
} with some practice you may be able to cut free-hand sections that are thin
} enough for your purposes.
}
} Alternatively you can buy little hand microtomes from major science or
} school supply companies. These cost about $100 I think and have a sample
} chuck that is raised by a little micrometer screw assembly through a flat
} platform. You insert your stem and then gradually raise it in height. Then
} you slide a long razor blade across the piece using the platform as a
} support. It is really a simple but very useful device.
}
} If we have a tissue that is too soft or small to hold well in the chuck
} then we just hollow out a piece of carrot and place the twig, etc inside.
} This will clamp well and hold the tissue well to get minimal crushing and
} distortion during cutting.
}
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-052 Whistler Building
} 170 S. University Street
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
} http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy
}
}
} On 1/28/05 12:33 PM, "Richard Harris" {rjharris-at-uwo.ca} wrote:
}
}
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 29 16:08:46 2005



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-comcast.net
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 16:14:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Richard,

Having cut a lot of wood and especially pine, maybe I can add a comment or
two here. The requirement "smooth as possible" is a little vague; it would
help to know how these sections are going to be examined i.e. optical, SEM,
AFM?

1. From my experience, I've found the best way to section this material is
using a regular microtome knife; disposable microtome blades just don't hold
up well enough. A good well sharpened microtome knife will do a great job
and stand up to the hard xylem elements.

2. Depending on the diameter of the sapling stems, they may have to be
surrounded (not embedded) with something to make them more rigid. Options
range from Paraplast to Epoxy depending on how hard the stem material is.

3. When sectioning, it helps to soak the block in ice water (or warm water
depending on the material used in #2) to soften the woody portions of the
stem.

4. Fixing Pinus tissue is a whole other problem!

Good luck on what can be a challenging project

Damian Neuberger



} Dear Listers
} I have a researcher who would like to create cross sections of 2 - 3 year
} old pine sapling stems.
} The sections do not need to be terribly thin (50 - 100 micrometers) but he
} would like to have the surface as smooth as possible without embedding the
} tissue (he is a physiologist interested in chloroplasts). My background is
} with animal tissue so I'm at a bit of a loss in how to advise him. Any
} suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
} Thanks in advance...
}
} Richard Harris
} Laboratory Supervisor
} Microscopy, Imaging and Analysis
} Department of Biology
} University of Western Ontario
} London Ontario CANADA
} N6A 5B7
} Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
} Fax 519-661-3935





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 30 16:00:29 2005



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-csiro.au
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 09:09:20 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Sectioning woody plant stems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Richard,

If your researcher wants to use fresh wood sections, the sliding or sledge
microtome suggested by Kim Rensing will do a great job, as long as your
knives are sharp. We found that the disposable blades are not stiff enough
for doing this on the sledge microtome, you need to use the large metal
blades. A colleague recently sectioned 2-year old poplar stems this way.
We're lucky that a local histologist will sharpen the blades for us.

If you use a hand microtome, a non-flexible blade, something like a
cut-throat razor, is probably necessary to get reasonably consistent
sections. With hard tissue, the flexible blades chatter on the sledge
microtome (on our one, anyway), and tend to flex and scoop out the middle of
the tissue on a hand microtome.

For support material, we use high density foam, the type used for insulating
refrigerators. We have a large slab of this and just cut a small piece
approximately to shape to fit around the tissue, in the same way we get
students to shape carrot pieces around tissue for hand sectioning.
Everything from shoot apical meristems to cores of 50-year old trees have
been sectioned this way on the sledge microtome.

Good luck!
cheers,
Rosemary



Dr. Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre ph. 61-2-6246 5475
CSIRO Plant Industry mob. 61-0402 835 973
GPO Box 1600 fax. 61-2-6246 5334
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

} From: Richard Harris {rjharris-at-uwo.ca}
} Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:33:31 -0500
} To: MSA Listserver {microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Sectioning woody plant stems
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Dear Listers
} I have a researcher who would like to create cross sections of 2 - 3 year
} old pine sapling stems.
} The sections do not need to be terribly thin (50 - 100 micrometers) but he
} would like to have the surface as smooth as possible without embedding the
} tissue (he is a physiologist interested in chloroplasts). My background is
} with animal tissue so I'm at a bit of a loss in how to advise him. Any
} suggestions would be gratefully accepted.
} Thanks in advance...
}
} Richard Harris
} Laboratory Supervisor
} Microscopy, Imaging and Analysis
} Department of Biology
} University of Western Ontario
} London Ontario CANADA
} N6A 5B7
} Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
} Fax 519-661-3935
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 30 16:28:12 2005



From: Jacob.blumenthal-at-weizmann.ac.il (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2005 16:36:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: negative staining of mRNA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Jacob.blumenthal-at-weizmann.ac.il) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Sunday, January 30, 2005 at 04:03:29
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Jacob.blumenthal-at-weizmann.ac.il
Name: Jacob Blumenthal

Organization: weizmann institute of science

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: negative staining of mRNA

Question: Hello, I would like to know if it possible to see mRNA molecule after the ribosomes came off of it using negative staining with uranyl acetate? It appears as a long thin string (not a straight one).
Another question is what is diameter of a single ribosome as it apperas in em using negative staining? And if you can always see the forming peptides coming out from each ribosome?
I am working on eukaryotic cells.
Thanks,

Jacob Blumenthal

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 10:25:53 2005



From: George_Munzing-at-engelhard.com
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 11:36:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Hair analysis references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thank you all for your replies and suggestions. I think I have enough to
keep me busy for quite a while.

Regards

George R. Munzing Jr.
Engelhard Corporation
Strategic Technologies Group
Iselin, NJ 08830
TEL: 732-205-7030
FAX: 732-494-3283
e-mail: george.munzing-at-engelhard.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 14:05:10 2005



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 09:13:29 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Need replacement for dead Coolpix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year

For the last year or so we have been using a Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a petrographic
microscope, yielding considerable user satisfaction.

We have the WPI Adaptor Kit, P/N 501384, which has a 28mm male thread that screws
directly into the filter thread on the end of the lens of the Coolpix. Although the
interfaceability of the Coolpix is a bit primitive, as all images are stored only on the card
memory and have to be transferred to a computer either via the USB cable (slow) or by
removing the card (fiddly), the mechanical coupling is firm and good, the optics work
well.

The camera has now died, and I have to plan its replacement in case it turns out to be
not repairable.

The Coolpix 4500 has been discontinued, and my local Nikon agents advise that there
is no comparable Nikon replacement. As I understand it, the reasons for the
widespread use of the 4500 for this application include the fact that it has a thread on
the end of the lens for easy attachment of the adaptor, and that the end of the lens
doesn't rotate or otherwise move as the camera changes its focus or zoom.

The WPI kit includes adaptors to step up to match camera female threads of 37mm and
43mm, although I can see that the more adaptors that are used, the less rigid the whole
setup may become.

What alternative cameras are currently being successfully used out there?

Preferably with filter threads of 28, 37, or 43mm so that I can continue to use my WPI
kit.


cheers and tia

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 14:28:31 2005



From: pgrover :      pgrover-at-bilbo.bio.purdue.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 15:37:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] how to do a survey; Sorvall TC-2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Does anyone have a manual for a Sorvall TC-2 tissue sectioner they could
copy & send me?

On a completely different note, does anyone know how one could go about
conducting a very brief (two or three multiple choice questions),
non-commercial survey of career scientists? I'd like to make it so the
responses are anonymous, thereby increasing likelihood of candid answers.

Paul :0)

----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Keep your eyes slightly wide and blank. Show no interest or excitement."
- Dr. Miles Bennell
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 15:59:26 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 14:07:53 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: negative staining of mRNA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jackob
It's possible to see the poly-ribosomes, when many individual ribosomes
attached to single mRNA molecule. You may find many of articles already
published on this matter. I don't remember did they use negative staining
or shadowing, I would think: both. As far as I remember, the ribosomes
looks like spherical particles without any details. The single ribosome
visualization is another story. Yes, you could see easily individual
ribosome by negative staining and size for 70S E.coli ribosome is about 2.6
nm (approx. diameter). Eucariotic ribosome may be a little bigger. If you
are talking about mRNA attached to the ribosome - it's completely different
story. You need to keep in mind that in order to function, ribosome needs
at least two molecules of tRNA, mRNA and a bunch of "factors" - all this
stuff attached to the ribosome making the picture very complicated. In
addition, mRNA will never be like "linear structure" under physiological
conditions: it would form compact structure, which is very difficult to
made "straight"... synthesized peptide would act in similar way - you
never will see peptide as a linear structure: it is immediately folded at
the exit (even before). So, finally, you have the ribosomal particle
surrounded with bunch of other molecules. All of them are sort of
globular and interact with each other... There are million articles
published on this matter. You may take a look on works by Joahim (spell?)
Frank - he did 3D reconstruction of bacterial (?) ribosome with different
factors, mRNA etc... Do google search on "ribosome structure Frank"... Good
luck! Sergey

At 04:36 PM 1/30/2005 -0600, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 17:10:55 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 17:17:57 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: how to do a survey; Sorvall TC-2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Paul,

I can't help on the microtome, but MME has been conducting surveys for 15+ years. Contact me off-line and we'll see what we can do.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.



At 02:37 PM 1/31/2005, pgrover wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 18:30:39 2005



From: hgabrisc-at-uno.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 18:38:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: post doctoral position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (hgabrisc-at-uno.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, January 31, 2005 at 17:06:42
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: hgabrisc-at-uno.edu
Name: Heike Gabrisch

Organization: Universit of New Orleans

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: post doctoral position

Question: We have an immediate opening for a post-doctoral scholar. Her/his duties include the characterization of transition metal compounds by electron diffraction techniques. Transition metal compounds are used as intercalation compounds in rechargeable Li-ion batteries. The position requires hands-on experience in transmission microscopy - a background in crystallography is a plus. Contact : Heike Gabrisch (hgabrisc-at-uno.edu)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 31 19:49:25 2005



From: Gordon Couger :      gcc-at-couger.com
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 19:57:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Need replacement for dead Coolpix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Richie,

This has been a hot topic on the Yahoo microscope list.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Microscope/

I have been told by a reliable source a CoolPix 5000 and even
the 5400 can be use with UR-E6 for the 5000 and ER-U11 for the
5400 a part that cost less than 20 dollars in place of the CP
600-4500.

There is no other cameras that will work the optics the CoolPix
600-4500 I now of with out custom parts.

If the 4500 was satisfactory just buy a couple of used ones from
some one with good reputation on ebay. They are pretty sturdy
cameras. If you have problems with artifacts
http://www.couger.com/microscope/shootout/shootout.html
when you use the zoom function on the camera you might want to
consider buying a CoolPix 990 or go the the 5,000 that doesn't
have this problems.


Make sure if you buy a new camera you buy with the right to
return it if doesn't work to suit you.

Gordon
Gordon Couger

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward anything you think might be useful to others.
Microscope Documentation is at www.science-info.org


Ritchie Sims wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Happy New Year
}
} For the last year or so we have been using a Coolpix 4500 interfaced to a petrographic
} microscope, yielding considerable user satisfaction.
}
} We have the WPI Adaptor Kit, P/N 501384, which has a 28mm male thread that screws
} directly into the filter thread on the end of the lens of the Coolpix. Although the
} interfaceability of the Coolpix is a bit primitive, as all images are stored only on the card
} memory and have to be transferred to a computer either via the USB cable (slow) or by
} removing the card (fiddly), the mechanical coupling is firm and good, the optics work
} well.
}
} The camera has now died, and I have to plan its replacement in case it turns out to be
} not repairable.
}
} The Coolpix 4500 has been discontinued, and my local Nikon agents advise that there
} is no comparable Nikon replacement. As I understand it, the reasons for the
} widespread use of the 4500 for this application include the fact that it has a thread on
} the end of the lens for easy attachment of the adaptor, and that the end of the lens
} doesn't rotate or otherwise move as the camera changes its focus or zoom.
}
} The WPI kit includes adaptors to step up to match camera female threads of 37mm and
} 43mm, although I can see that the more adaptors that are used, the less rigid the whole
} setup may become.
}
} What alternative cameras are currently being successfully used out there?
}
} Preferably with filter threads of 28, 37, or 43mm so that I can continue to use my WPI
} kit.
}
}
} cheers and tia
}
} rtch
}
} --
} Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
} Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
} Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} The University of Auckland
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 01:11:15 2005



From: reinhard rachel :      reinhard.rachel-at-biologie.uni-regensburg.de
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 08:19:06 +0100 (MET)
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM - negative staining of mRNA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

BTW: the ribosome is about 25 to 30 nm in diameter,
depending on the projection, but not 2.6 nm.
Just a typing error, I assume.
Kind regards,
Reinhard
-----------------
PD Dr. Reinhard Rachel
Universitaet Regensburg
Microbiology
Universitaetsstr. 31
D-93053 Regensburg - Germany




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 08:04:32 2005



From: Somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 08:13:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: clearing method for leaves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com) from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, February 1, 2005 at 06:45:57
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Somayyeh_kheiri-at-yahoo.com
Name: Somayyeh

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] about clearing method

Question: Hello Dear All

I am researching anatomical aspects of the Verbascum.

I was trying to provide freehand sections of the leaves
unfortunately the sections were thick and did not have
good focus.

So I heard of clearing method .
Can the clearing method be used after sectioning the samples by hand to give good focus?

I appreciate your kind reply


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 09:48:13 2005



From: McFaddin, Wade :      Wade.McFaddin-at-nextekinc.com (by way of
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 09:46:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Position Open: Senior Analytical Engineer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nextek Inc. has an immediate opening for the following failure/materials
analysis engineer position. If interested, please fill out an application
and send your resume to our human resources department (see our web page
link at the end of the job posting).

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
Thanks,
Wade McFaddin
Nextek Inc.
256-772-1995 ext.1064

JOB: Senior Analytical Engineer SHIFT: 1st
Job No: AS001-04

Responsibilities:

Report directly to the Manager of Analytical Service or Vice President of
Product Assurance.

Perform material failure analyses such as FTIR analysis, thermal analysis,
scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)
analysis, C-mode scanning acoustic microscopy analysis, cross section
evaluation of printed circuit boards (PCB) and printed
circuit board assemblies (PCBA). Support in-house PCBA manufacturing
process and external customer requirements.

Evaluate final results of analysis, prepare and present reports outlining
the outcome of analysis, and make recommendations for actions necessary to
achieve desired results.

Job Requirements:
Communication, presentation, and technical writing skills to effectively
communicate to and from a diverse group such as the customer, Nextek
employees and suppliers. Electronic manufacturing experience required.

Experience/Education/Training Requirements:
B.S. degree in Engineering, Materials Science or Science or equivalent
5 - 10 years of electronic material laboratory experience

If you meet the requirements for this job and would like to be considered,
please complete the

Nextek Employment Application on our website at www.nextekinc.com and submit
to Human Resources.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 13:58:53 2005



From: David_Bell-at-Millipore.com
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 14:56:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM Pictures of Mycoplasm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello All,

I have a colleague who is interested in finding SEM micrographs of
mycoplasm (note: not mycoplasma!). We are trying to take pictures of it,
but find ourselves confounded by apparent detritus in the growth media,
such that images of the "fresh" media alone look very similar to the
organisms that have been cultivated. If anyone has done work with this
organism, and could provide us with one or two pictures to use as a
reality check, it would be greatly appreciated!

Sincerely,

David




David Bell
Scientist
Electron Microscopy Lab
Millipore Corporation
80 Ashby Road
Bedford, MA 01730
(781) 533-2108


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 14:29:47 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 12:28:24 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM - negative staining of mRNA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Yes, I am sorry, it was a typo: 70S E.coli ribosome is about 26 nm in
} coronal projection. Thanks Reinhard for correction!

} Sergey
}
} BTW: the ribosome is about 25 to 30 nm in diameter,
} depending on the projection, but not 2.6 nm.
} Just a typing error, I assume.
} Kind regards,
} Reinhard
} -----------------
} PD Dr. Reinhard Rachel
} Universitaet Regensburg
} Microbiology
} Universitaetsstr. 31
} D-93053 Regensburg - Germany



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 18:22:44 2005



From: Diana van Driel :      dianavd-at-eye.usyd.edu.au
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2005 11:20:39 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I've been given some vanishingly small specimens to embed for TEM.
They're peels from the surface of a retina - at most several cells
thick and usually less than 1x2 mm in area. They are also made mostly
of basement membrane, with a few whole cells and some cell fragments,
so not only are they almost invisible to start with, but they remain
invisible even after osmium. Pinning them down won't work - they're too
small. I've embedded some once using a dissecting microscope, but it
was a lot of work and even so I lost 2 of the 6. I thought of embedding
first in agar, but then I'll end up with an invisible specimen
somewhere in the resin, which will take longer find by serial
sectioning than I'm prepared to spend.

Any ideas would be most welcome!

Diana



Diana van Driel
Dept Ophthalmology
Sydney University
GPO Box 4337
Sydney, NSW
AUSTRALIA 2001

Phone 61 2 93827278
Mobile 0423 151614
FAX 61 2 93827318



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 20:17:55 2005



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-hei.org
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 18:14:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I once had specimens so small the final pellet had an area of only one or
two grid holes (cryosectioned too!) so I think I may be able to help here.

After lots of trials I eventually put the specimens in a thin polypropylene
centrifuge tube (about 0.5ml total volume), re-suspended them in 10% gelatin
(warm) and pelleted them down to the bottom of the tube. At the time the
tubes had sharp pointy ends so the pellet of cell fragments went to the very
tip if I used a horizontal rotor. I am not sure that these tubes are
available any more.

Anyway, after the gelatin had gelled, I cut off the tip of the tube, which
is fairly easy if the tube is made of polypropylene, and embedded it using a
routine protocol. The gelatin turned dark and the tip was easily visible so
I was able to orientate the block to cut the tip without problem.

Since then, I have been working with slightly larger amounts of cell
fragments and have found that if you centrifuge the specimens down in warm
gelatin in a regular Eppendorf tube, the pellet always deposits at the same
place. I orientate myself in a fixed angle rotor (45 degrees) by putting the
lid hinge outwards. I look for the pellet at the bottom of the tube under
the hinge. Always wait for the gelatin to gel and cut out the pellet.
Sometimes you cut where you think the pellet is. The smaller the gelatin
block the easier you will be able to section.

If you were to be doing this for immunolocalization then agarose (2%) may be
better. You can visualize the block after embedding by adding some color
(alcian blue, dextran blue etc) to make it visible in the polymerized resin.

I know that some people say you shouldn't use gelatin because of its high
affinity for water, but embedding protocols using gelatin have worked for me
for many years.

Regards,

Paul Webster.



Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Director
Ahmanson Advanced EM and Imaging Center
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles
CA 90057-1922
Phone: 213 273 8026
Fax: 213 13 739
E-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org




On 2/1/05 4:20 PM, "Diana van Driel" {dianavd-at-eye.usyd.edu.au} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Hi all,
}
} I've been given some vanishingly small specimens to embed for TEM.
} They're peels from the surface of a retina - at most several cells
} thick and usually less than 1x2 mm in area. They are also made mostly
} of basement membrane, with a few whole cells and some cell fragments,
} so not only are they almost invisible to start with, but they remain
} invisible even after osmium. Pinning them down won't work - they're too
} small. I've embedded some once using a dissecting microscope, but it
} was a lot of work and even so I lost 2 of the 6. I thought of embedding
} first in agar, but then I'll end up with an invisible specimen
} somewhere in the resin, which will take longer find by serial
} sectioning than I'm prepared to spend.
}
} Any ideas would be most welcome!
}
} Diana
}
}
}
} Diana van Driel
} Dept Ophthalmology
} Sydney University
} GPO Box 4337
} Sydney, NSW
} AUSTRALIA 2001
}
} Phone 61 2 93827278
} Mobile 0423 151614
} FAX 61 2 93827318
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 20:41:08 2005



From: subramss-at-email.uc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 20:39:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Phosphorus contamination in the ESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (subramss-at-email.uc.edu) from http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, February 1, 2005 at 10:54:28
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: subramss-at-email.uc.edu
Name: Jimble

Organization: University of Cincinnati

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Phosphorus contamination in the ESEM

Question: Dear friends and elders,

I was wondering if someone would be able to help me track down a phosphorus contamination issue which I am observing in my ESEM when I use a hotstage. I am giving details of the instrument and conditions below. The materials I am observing are high purity oxides and should have but trace if any contamination of phosphorus.

Instrument: FEI XL-30 ESEM FEG with Diffusion pump backed a Mechanical pump.
The system does not have any in-line filters or residual gas analyzers.
Oils: Edwards Ultra 19 (Mechanical)
Santovac 5 (Diffusion pump)

Mode of operation : Gaseous mode 2 Torr H20 chamber pressure.

Phosphorus (POX)only appears on the MSDS of the Edwards oil as a combustion product but, vacuum gurus from Varian think that in order for mechanical pump backstreaming to occur pressures well below (100 millitorr) need to be present for pressure equilibriation and subsequent backstreaming. Even then with a 2 torr H2O pressure I expect the P traces should still be minimal preventing the contaminant from completely overtaking the process.

I would be greatful for an input as I am currently at a loss. I have attempted numerous methods (EDS, EBSD, XRD, XPS, TEM) in trying to get a clue to this problem and am yet to come up with any real conclusions.




---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 20:42:16 2005



From: Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 20:40:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: online AFM / MFM / STM course?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be) from http://microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday, February 1, 2005 at 12:27:56
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be
Name: Dr. Palash Gangopadhyay

Organization: Molecular and Nano Materials, K U Leuven

Education: Graduate College

Location: Leuven, Belgium

Question: Dear Microscopists

I will appreciate very much if somebody can direct me to an online AFM / MFM / STM course immediately available.

Thanks in Advance
Palash Gangopadhyay

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 1 20:55:11 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 18:52:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Diana,
Many years ago we often embedded spermatozoa which were also invisible.
We got around it by staining them in methylene blue which gave them some
color so we could find them in the capsule. As you did, we embedded
them in a minimum of 2% agar which held them together while they were
processed. Don't know if the MB would stain what you are looking at,
but it might be worth a try or even perhaps some stain that might stick
to what is in your sample if MB doesn't work.

Good Luck,

Judy

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
Stockton, CA 95219
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net


Diana van Driel wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Hi all,
}
} I've been given some vanishingly small specimens to embed for TEM.
} They're peels from the surface of a retina - at most several cells
} thick and usually less than 1x2 mm in area. They are also made mostly
} of basement membrane, with a few whole cells and some cell fragments,
} so not only are they almost invisible to start with, but they remain
} invisible even after osmium. Pinning them down won't work - they're
} too small. I've embedded some once using a dissecting microscope, but
} it was a lot of work and even so I lost 2 of the 6. I thought of
} embedding first in agar, but then I'll end up with an invisible
} specimen somewhere in the resin, which will take longer find by serial
} sectioning than I'm prepared to spend.
}
} Any ideas would be most welcome!
}
} Diana
}
}
}
} Diana van Driel
} Dept Ophthalmology
} Sydney University
} GPO Box 4337
} Sydney, NSW
} AUSTRALIA 2001
}
} Phone 61 2 93827278
} Mobile 0423 151614
} FAX 61 2 93827318
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 08:27:30 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2005 09:24:50 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Diana,
Try putting the ideas from Paul Webster and Judy Murphy together...if
you've got mostly basement membrane, then a cationic dye, like alcian
blue or ruthenium red will take quite nicely. You may need to play a
bit with concentrations...both can get a little murky if you use too
much. Years ago, I did some studies that looked at the proteoglycans
in the heart using a variety of cationic dyes, as I recall we used
concentrations that were on the order of 0.05-0.1% dye (wt-vol).
Good luck,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 09:07:23 2005



From: Patricia Scallion :      PSCALLIO-at-DAL.CA
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2005 11:05:16 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: using a hot glue gun to fix samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
I wanted to know if anyone has much success with the hot glue gun sold by
Cedarlane Labs. They cite a paper in the Proceedings of the 50th Annual Meeting
of the EMSA/MAS/MSC.SMC in 1992, pages 410-411, to describe its merits for fast
fixing of samples for SEM.

Thanks,
Pat
Research Technician
SEM-FIB Facility
Institute for Research in Materials
Dalhousie University
(902) 494-1258


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 11:32:09 2005



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-hei.org
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2005 09:28:14 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello again,

In my original message I gave a brief overview of how I handle small
specimens. It is obvious that I missed out many details (as pointed out
off-line) so here is a slightly more detailed description of how I do it.

First, the cell fragments/specimen/cells/junk etc is fixed in aldehyde. It
is then pelleted down and washed with buffer containing glycine. The glycine
reacts with the aldehyde and stops it cross-linking the gelatin.

I then mix the pellet with a small amount of 10% gelatin (for those in the
US, Knox gelatin works really well, for the rest of the world, try food
quality gelatin it doesn't precipitate phosphates). The gelatin is warm (37
degrees) and should remain warm while the specimen is mixed with it and
centrifuged down. The pellet can be centrifuged into a small tube with a
pointed base, or placed using a fixed angle rotor. Cooling the gelatin will
make it gel (I know it is obvious but apparently it needed to be stated).

Once the gelatin has set, the pellet is cut out and fixed again in aldehyde.
It can then be treated as a piece of tissue and processed in any way you
like. If it is to be embedded in epoxy resin, then osmium treatment it
recommended. This will turn the gelatin brown and make it easy to see in the
polymerized plastic.

If Lowicryl or LR White embedding is required, then I would suggest using
agarose embedding as an alternative. However, gelatin is liquid at 37
degrees but agarose has to be heated to 60 degrees, which may affect
antigenicity. To make the block visible in the resin I add color to the
agarose or gelatin. I do try to avoid staining the specimen.

An alternative approach to handling really small specimens is to mix them
with something that bulks up the pellet but is easily identified in the
pellet. RBC membranes make a good padding for nucleated cells and there is
no way you can mix one up for another.

You could also mix your small sample with fibrin and polymerize it using
fibrinogen (see Acta Histochem. 1998 Jul;100(3):309-13. Processing of free
cells for electron microscopy using a fibrin clot. Raska I, Pliss A, Mandys
V, Risueno MC, Lojda Z. for details of this). The clot is easy to handle and
bulks up the pellet sufficiently to see it when it is embedded.

Finally, if you pellet the specimen, embed it in gelatin as I described
above, you can take out the pellet and place it onto a glass slide covered
with Parafilm. Pour warm gelatin over the pellet and press a second
Parafilm-coated slide over the first. Use spaces to create a space between
the two slides so that when you take the slides apart after the gelatin has
gelled, you will have your specimens embedded in a thin film of gelatin. You
may be surprised by how easily the specimen can be seen in this thin film.
Cutting out the specimen is very easy, but remember to keep the gelatin cool
or it will become liquid.

Good luck,

Paul Webster.



On 2/2/05 6:24 AM, "Leona Cohen-Gould" {lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Diana,
} Try putting the ideas from Paul Webster and Judy Murphy together...if
} you've got mostly basement membrane, then a cationic dye, like alcian
} blue or ruthenium red will take quite nicely. You may need to play a
} bit with concentrations...both can get a little murky if you use too
} much. Years ago, I did some studies that looked at the proteoglycans
} in the heart using a variety of cationic dyes, as I recall we used
} concentrations that were on the order of 0.05-0.1% dye (wt-vol).
} Good luck,
} Lee



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 14:48:20 2005



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2005 15:46:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sigma makes low-temperature gelling agarose. Type VII has a gel point of
about 30oC. We use this routinely for all samples...even those for ICC. We
just dissolve the agarose (usually a 1.5% solution) and then cool it to
about 40oC before adding it to samples. This is well below the temperature
that should affect antigenicity but is still high enough to keep the agarose
fluid while you are pelleting. I try to put the tubes in warm water when
possible(depending on centrifuge) while spinning to also slow down the
gelling.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy

On 2/2/05 12:28 PM, "Paul Webster" {pwebster-at-hei.org} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Hello again,
}
} In my original message I gave a brief overview of how I handle small
} specimens. It is obvious that I missed out many details (as pointed out
} off-line) so here is a slightly more detailed description of how I do it.
}
} First, the cell fragments/specimen/cells/junk etc is fixed in aldehyde. It
} is then pelleted down and washed with buffer containing glycine. The glycine
} reacts with the aldehyde and stops it cross-linking the gelatin.
}
} I then mix the pellet with a small amount of 10% gelatin (for those in the
} US, Knox gelatin works really well, for the rest of the world, try food
} quality gelatin it doesn't precipitate phosphates). The gelatin is warm (37
} degrees) and should remain warm while the specimen is mixed with it and
} centrifuged down. The pellet can be centrifuged into a small tube with a
} pointed base, or placed using a fixed angle rotor. Cooling the gelatin will
} make it gel (I know it is obvious but apparently it needed to be stated).
}
} Once the gelatin has set, the pellet is cut out and fixed again in aldehyde.
} It can then be treated as a piece of tissue and processed in any way you
} like. If it is to be embedded in epoxy resin, then osmium treatment it
} recommended. This will turn the gelatin brown and make it easy to see in the
} polymerized plastic.
}
} If Lowicryl or LR White embedding is required, then I would suggest using
} agarose embedding as an alternative. However, gelatin is liquid at 37
} degrees but agarose has to be heated to 60 degrees, which may affect
} antigenicity. To make the block visible in the resin I add color to the
} agarose or gelatin. I do try to avoid staining the specimen.
}
} An alternative approach to handling really small specimens is to mix them
} with something that bulks up the pellet but is easily identified in the
} pellet. RBC membranes make a good padding for nucleated cells and there is
} no way you can mix one up for another.
}
} You could also mix your small sample with fibrin and polymerize it using
} fibrinogen (see Acta Histochem. 1998 Jul;100(3):309-13. Processing of free
} cells for electron microscopy using a fibrin clot. Raska I, Pliss A, Mandys
} V, Risueno MC, Lojda Z. for details of this). The clot is easy to handle and
} bulks up the pellet sufficiently to see it when it is embedded.
}
} Finally, if you pellet the specimen, embed it in gelatin as I described
} above, you can take out the pellet and place it onto a glass slide covered
} with Parafilm. Pour warm gelatin over the pellet and press a second
} Parafilm-coated slide over the first. Use spaces to create a space between
} the two slides so that when you take the slides apart after the gelatin has
} gelled, you will have your specimens embedded in a thin film of gelatin. You
} may be surprised by how easily the specimen can be seen in this thin film.
} Cutting out the specimen is very easy, but remember to keep the gelatin cool
} or it will become liquid.
}
} Good luck,
}
} Paul Webster.
}
}
}
} On 2/2/05 6:24 AM, "Leona Cohen-Gould" {lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu} wrote:
}
} }
} }
} }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------} }
-
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
}
} -
} }
} } Diana,
} } Try putting the ideas from Paul Webster and Judy Murphy together...if
} } you've got mostly basement membrane, then a cationic dye, like alcian
} } blue or ruthenium red will take quite nicely. You may need to play a
} } bit with concentrations...both can get a little murky if you use too
} } much. Years ago, I did some studies that looked at the proteoglycans
} } in the heart using a variety of cationic dyes, as I recall we used
} } concentrations that were on the order of 0.05-0.1% dye (wt-vol).
} } Good luck,
} } Lee
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 15:57:10 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2005 15:54:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: online AFM / MFM / STM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Palash,

The new Nanotech America site just launched this morning at www.nanotech-america.com. If you look under "How SPMs work", you will find a animations of all the major imaging and measurement modalities. Also, there is a textbook which can be downloaded under The Library.

Hope this is helpful.

Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
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Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.



At 08:40 PM 2/1/2005, Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 2 18:07:45 2005



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2005 22:32:57 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: embedding tiny specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Patricia,
I don't know about the hot glue gun sold by Cedarlane, but I have been using
a household-type hot glue gun to fix samples on an SEM stub for twenty
years. (I've been through several guns and learned to get the more expensive
ones.) I find it is good for heavier or odd-shaped samples and gives a more
secure hold with no creep than the sticky tabs, but it is not conductive, so
you have to make a path to ground over the glue after it is hard. I use a
stripe of carbon paint. What is your problem with it?
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Department of Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Patricia Scallion" {PSCALLIO-at-DAL.CA}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 7:05 AM

(Sorry about all of the } } } , please ignore them. )
} } } Diana,
} } } This sounds like a job for the Formvar sandwich. Here is a
} } } description I wrote as applied to the tiny arabidopsis root tip, but
} } } the problem is the same. If you have further questions, please email.
} } } Note that Formvar stands up just fine to acetone and epoxies but
} } } propylene oxide will dissolve it. Good luck. TB.
} } }
} } }
} } } The small size of arabidopsis roots (ca 0.15 mm diameter) makes them
} } } easy to lose while changing solutions. To retain the roots, I use a
} } } method that is not only convenient but also turns out to be
} } } beneficial for sample preservation. Originally, I encased each root
} } } in a small droplet of low-gelling-temperature agarose, but this is
} } } messy and exposes the sample to heat, albeit briefly. Then, I
} } } modified a method from cryofixation where samples are mounted on a
} } } Formvar film. A chemically fixed root tip is placed on a
} } } Formvar-coated wire loop, a second Formvar film secures the root tip
} } } on the loop. The Formvar films are readily permeated by solvents and
} } } small molecules. Between Formvar films, the thin arabidopsis root tip
} } } is prevented from bending or twisting. I call this "mechanical
} } } fixation" and beyond being convenient, it seems to enhance sample
} } } preservation.
} } } Loops are made in advance and coated by casting Formvar
} } } rectangles (measuring a little more than the loop diameter on one
} } } side and a little more than twice the loop diameter on the other) and
} } } plunging the loop into the water over the rectangle so that the plane
} } } of the loop bisects the long axis of the rectangle. The Formvar
} } } rectangle wraps around the wire loop and the coated loop is removed
} } } at once from the water. Such loops remain stable for months. To
} } } secure a sample, the procedure is repeated: After the sample has been
} } } fixed and rinsed, a loop (already Formvar coated) is placed
} } } horizontally on a drop of water (or buffer) and the sample placed on
} } } the Formvar. Excess sample is trimmed if needed, and the loop (with
} } } sample) is plunged onto a new Formvar rectangle, thus encasing the
} } } sample between Formvar layers, held by the loop. Several loops can be
} } } placed in a vial and solutions exchanged without losing the sample.
} } } The loop is embedded with the sample, and removed during trimming. I
} } } use fine copper wire (36 gauge), which can be trimmed along with the
} } } block.
} } }
} } }
} } } }
} } } } Hi all,
} } } }
} } } } I've been given some vanishingly small specimens to embed for TEM.
} } } } They're peels from the surface of a retina - at most several cells
} } } } thick and usually less than 1x2 mm in area. They are also made
} } } } mostly of basement membrane, with a few whole cells and some cell
} } } } fragments, so not only are they almost invisible to start with, but
} } } } they remain invisible even after osmium. Pinning them down won't
} } } } work - they're too small. I've embedded some once using a dissecting
} } } } microscope, but it was a lot of work and even so I lost 2 of the 6.
} } } } I thought of embedding first in agar, but then I'll end up with an
} } } } invisible specimen somewhere in the resin, which will take longer
} } } } find by serial sectioning than I'm prepared to spend.
} } } }
} } } } Any ideas would be most welcome!
} } } }
} } } } Diana
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Diana van Driel
} } } } Dept Ophthalmology
} } } } Sydney University
} } } } GPO Box 4337
} } } } Sydney, NSW
} } } } AUSTRALIA 2001
} } } }
} } } } Phone 61 2 93827278
} } } } Mobile 0423 151614
} } } } FAX 61 2 93827318
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/
--


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 00:50:33 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 00:49:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Looking For a Copy of 1994 Microscopy Today Issue#2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

Does anyone have in their archives a complete copy of
the 1994 Microscopy Today Magazine Issue#2?

If someone has a copy can you please contact me off
line so that I can arrange to borrow it to digitize/scan it
for the MSA Archives?

It is the only missing issue from the Microscopy Today Archives
which MSA/MT is assembling.

Thanks.

Nestor

Your FriendlyNeighborhood SysOp


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 11:06:22 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 11:05:18 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Jan 2005 Archives now on-line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

The Jan 2005 Archives of the Microscopy Listserver are now on-line.

http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 11:05:38 2005



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2005 11:01:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Automated in situ and ab staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our campus-wide, multi-user microscopy imaging facility is considering the
purchase of an instrument that would process slides for in situ
hybridization or antibody staining (e.g., Intavis InsituPro VS). I am
skeptical on the usefulness of these type of instruments in a multi-user
environment where the reagents and staining conditions change on a daily
basis. Are there any core facilities out there that are successfully using
one? Do you recover the costs of consumables and make enough to cover the
service contract and staff time? Your public or private responses would be
welcome. Thanks, Tom Phillips

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 12:26:09 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 10:37:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Lattice constant of gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,
I am trying to find the best value for the lattice constant of gold at
82 K. I have only found the values for room temp and above. Does
anyone have a reference for this value at low temperature? TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 12:31:25 2005



From: Jan Factor :      jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2005 13:30:47 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Request about Orion 6 digital system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues: I am considering the Orion 6 system for passive digital
image collection from my old analog SEM. Does anyone have personal
experience (positive or negative) with the Orion system they would care
to share? I would be happy to have your candid comments off-list. Thank you.
--Jan Factor

---------------------------------------2/3/05
Jan Robert Factor, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
---------------------------------------
Natural Sciences
Purchase College
State University of New York
735 Anderson Hill Rd.
Purchase, NY 10577
USA
---------------------------------------
Office Tel: 914-251-6659
Office Fax: 914-251-6635
E-mail: jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
or- jan.factor-at-purchase.edu
---------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 13:28:49 2005



From: Richard Harris :      rjharris-at-uwo.ca
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2005 14:25:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Embedding woody specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers
Thank you for you many(!) helpful and useful responses. Our researcher is
overwhelmed by your generous help.

Richard Harris
Laboratory Supervisor
Department of Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario CANADA
N6A 5B7
Ph. 519-661-2111 ext. 86780
Fax 519-661-3935



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 13:53:02 2005



From: Johnson, Teri :      TJJ-at-Stowers-Institute.org
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 13:51:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Automated in situ and ab staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom,

I would be most hesitant to get one of these instruments and put it in a
multi-user environment. We have the InSituPro unit (previous
generation) for whole mount staining. We do all of the staining with
this and charge back what it costs to do the service. We do not charge
for staff time. One of the PIs here also has a unit, and they have one
dedicated operator in their lab. The post-docs will bring their samples
and probes, she will load them and do the runs, and then give them back
to the post-doc for the chromogen step.

I caution against getting the VS for staining on slides as this
application is still undergoing development. Personally I would prefer
to wait until it has finished development and undergone field testing
for a bit before committing $$$s to the instrumentation. I think the
technology has promise and was very much encouraged by what I saw at the
demo.

In my opinion, the best results from equipment such as this require
dedicated operators. Yes, many people can be trained on using the
instrument because it's not rocket science. But too many cooks that
have their hands in the pot (so to speak), is a recipe for disaster. One
day someone will come in and someone previously has toyed with the
settings just enough that their run will be ruined. Or you'll have all
your samples ready to run, only to find out the machine is not working
properly, won't initialize, whatever, and have no indication from the
previous user there was a problem.

But then again, maybe I'm just a control freak. LOL

Best of luck to you,

Teri Johnson
Managing Director Histology Facility
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
1000 E. 50th St.
Kansas City, Missouri 64110
tjj-at-stowers-institute.org




-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:phillipst-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 11:02 AM
To: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Our campus-wide, multi-user microscopy imaging facility is considering
the
purchase of an instrument that would process slides for in situ
hybridization or antibody staining (e.g., Intavis InsituPro VS). I am
skeptical on the usefulness of these type of instruments in a multi-user

environment where the reagents and staining conditions change on a daily

basis. Are there any core facilities out there that are successfully
using
one? Do you recover the costs of consumables and make enough to cover
the
service contract and staff time? Your public or private responses would
be
welcome. Thanks, Tom Phillips

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 16:06:18 2005



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2005 09:04:32 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] FITC as a stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

Apologies in advance for double post to confocal and microscopy list.

The group studying flour and dough structure here wants to use FITC to stain
the dough protein so they can get an idea of the macrostructure of the
dough. The protocol has been published in a couple of papers from another
group, and after staining the blob of dough they looked at it under confocal
to see changes in fluorescence pattern after various amounts of mixing, and
assumed that any fluorescence came from protein aggregates. This worries
me, as I wasn't aware that FITC per se was such a specific stain for
protein, and the published protocol says nothing about washing out excess
free dye. The alternative I thought of was to use fluorescamine, which is
only fluorescent when bound to protein, so you could put your sample into
the dye and observe without rinsing. (Needs UV, though.)

Does anyone have experience with this sort of material, comments about FITC
as a protein stain?

TIA,
Rosemray

Dr. Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre ph. 61-2-6246 5475
CSIRO Plant Industry mob. 61-0402 835 973
GPO Box 1600 fax. 61-2-6246 5334
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 16:13:10 2005



From: Doug Cromey :      dcromey-at-email.arizona.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2005 15:11:02 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Automated in situ and ab staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Is the Intavis InsituPro VS similar to the automated immunohistochemistry
and In Situ units sold by Ventana Medical Systems? The Ventana systems
were developed at the University of Arizona and they seem to work well
if you are doing the same sort of staining runs on histologic samples
(paraffin or frozen sections) over and over again. I gather that there's a
bit of a learning curve to know how to program in a new procedure.

Doug

Caveat: I have no financial interest in VMS, but I do know the founders
and have several friends who work for the company.
....................................................................
Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy
Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona
(office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044
(voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA
(FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: Cromey-at-Arizona.edu)
....................................................................
http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 17:07:56 2005



From: Connie McManus :      conniemoss-at-relia.net
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 16:06:09 -0700 (MST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: automated in situ and ab staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dr. Phillips,
I have 30 years of experience in histology and close to 6 years of
experience doing antibody staining. I don't know what the environment of
your lab is, but in any lab where someone is doing a LOT of IHC (antibody
staining) or ish (in situ hybridization) staining, automation is the way
to go. The technology of these stainers has become really good and many of
the bugs in the older instruments that you may be thinking of have pretty
much been worked out.
I'm not familiar with the stainer you mentioned, but I am familiar with
Ventana Medical Systems and DAKOCytomation. IMO, DAKO makes one of the
best and also happens to be the least costly because you can use whatever
reagents you choose. Ventana makes a fabulous machine, but the one I used
in my former job was tied in to the use of their reagents only. Their
detection kits run over 2000USD per kit and each kit performs only 250
tests. I think Ventana now makes another stainer that is more reagent
flexible. THey're a great company, just really expensive. I cannot advise
you on whether it is economical for your lab to invest in this as I don't
know how much work you're doing and what you charge per slide vs your
overhead in salaries, etc. You can figure that out easily enough.

If there are to be mutliple users of these instruments, that is usually no
problem as the manufacterer usually provides a training session for all
employees. When you get your stainer, I would mandate that all techs who
will use the instrument must be trained first. In most facilities,
training is done not only when a new instrument arrives, but also a
periodic check with each tech to ensure they are doing things right.

I hope this is helpful

Connie McManus
Mt Ogden Scientific Services
950 W Kershaw, Suite E
Ogden UT 84401
tel: 866/933-6677
conniemoss-at-relia.net
www.mtogdensci.com (not yet available)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 20:28:41 2005



From: Diana van Driel :      dianavd-at-eye.usyd.edu.au
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 13:26:33 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Embedding tiny specimen - lost Email and thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks to everyone. I now have a collection of ideas to try! Could the
person who suggested blue material and who had the PowerPoint
presentation please resend me the Email and I would love the
presentation as well; somehow I managed to delete your message.

Diana


Diana van Driel
Dept Ophthalmology
Sydney University
GPO Box 4337
Sydney, NSW
AUSTRALIA 2001

Phone 61 2 93827278
Mobile 0423 151614
FAX 61 2 93827318



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 22:56:54 2005



From: anith nelleri :      anith_n-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 20:55:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] regarding simulated specimens for microscopy experiments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,

I'm a graduate student from India. I'm working on
digital holographic imaging. I am intereted to extend
it for microscopic imaging . Recently I came to know
that, there are simulated specimens (both amplitude
and phase objects- phantoms-synthetic) available for
microscopy experiments. Are there any suppliers where
I can place orders for such objects according to my
requirements or may be for the readily available
samples.

Hoping your replies
Sincerely,
Anith.N




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 3 23:56:27 2005



From: George Theodossiou :      George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 16:55:17 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] ISIS Spectrum Export

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,

Last year I posed a question on whether anyone had a method or software that
could read and batch export ISIS maps and images from a job rather than
doing it individually. I got great support from several individuals and now
have a some great pieces of software that I use regularly.
As a follow on I now need to do the same with the ISIS spectra. Is there
anyone out there who has a method or software for reading the ISIS spectra
and batch saving the files as txt, tif or jpg.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Regards
George


George Theodossiou
Physicist / Microscopist
Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory

AMCOR Research and Technology
Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
Mobile: 0409 568 840
email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au


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notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
please notify AMCOR immediately.
Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 07:23:13 2005



From: Mr Brian Kirkmeyer :      kirk3377-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 05:21:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] LM Staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I come from an EM background and have recently assumed
responsibility for LM evaluations. However, I am in
need of a reference detailing what stains what, and
for which types of microscopy. Our current microscope
is equipped for UV/fluorescence (among other things),
and this is of primary interest to me at this point.

So if anyone can point me toward an LM staining
reference, I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!

Kirk

Brian (Kirk) Kirkmeyer, Ph.D.
Research Scientist, Microscopy
International Flavors and Fragrances
1515 State Highway 36
Union Beach, NJ 07735-3542
732-335-2426 / 732-335-2350 FAX
brian.kirkmeyer-at-iff.com



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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 08:26:06 2005



From: Richard Fiore :      rfiore-at-juno.com
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 09:22:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: online AFM / MFM / STM course?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Though not an on-line course, you should consider the AFM short course
(one week) at NC State University. Check it out at
http://www.ncsu.edu/aif/afmcourse

Lehigh U also has a course but they cancelled it last year so I am not
sure if it will be held this year or not.

On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 20:40:39 -0600 Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be
(by way of Ask-A-Microscopist) writes:
}
}
}
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} America
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} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be) from
} http://microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on
} Tuesday, February 1, 2005 at 12:27:56
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
}
} Email: Palash.Gangopadhyay-at-fys.kuleuven.ac.be
} Name: Dr. Palash Gangopadhyay
}
} Organization: Molecular and Nano Materials, K U Leuven
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Leuven, Belgium
}
} Question: Dear Microscopists
}
} I will appreciate very much if somebody can direct me to an online
} AFM / MFM / STM course immediately available.
}
} Thanks in Advance
} Palash Gangopadhyay
}
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
}
}
}


Richard Fiore, Southeast Sales
Carl Zeiss SMT (formerly LEO Electron Microscopy)
5127 Orange Grove Rd., Hillsborough, NC 27278
Tel: 919-643-2234, Cell: 919-593-1960, Fax: 919-643-2667
Email: rfiore-at-juno.com or fiore-at-smt.zeiss.com, URL:
www.smt.zeiss.com/nts


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 08:43:34 2005



From: Johnson, Teri :      TJJ-at-Stowers-Institute.org
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 08:41:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: automated in situ and ab staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ditto what Connie said about the Dako instrument...it seems to be the
"industry standard" for automated IHC. However, it does not have
capability for doing in situ hybridization. We currently have the
Ventana Discovery to do the automated ISH on slides, in addition to the
InSituPro for doing automated ISH on whole mounts. What makes the new
InSituPro VS unit so compelling is that you can do either whole mounts
or slide-mounted tissues on it on any given run.

To further clarify my position on multiple users, in our lab all
technicians are trained on every instrument. My initial response to Dr.
Phillips about having dedicated users was with regard to not making it
available for post-docs and other researchers to just come in and run
the thing, which is a common practice in core facilities.

Teri Johnson
Managing Director Histology Facility
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
1000 E. 50th St.
Kansas City, Missouri 64110
tjj-at-stowers-institute.org




-----Original Message-----
} From: Connie McManus [mailto:conniemoss-at-relia.net]
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 5:06 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Dr. Phillips,
I have 30 years of experience in histology and close to 6 years of
experience doing antibody staining. I don't know what the environment of
your lab is, but in any lab where someone is doing a LOT of IHC
(antibody
staining) or ish (in situ hybridization) staining, automation is the way
to go. The technology of these stainers has become really good and many
of the bugs in the older instruments that you may be thinking of have
pretty much been worked out. I'm not familiar with the stainer you
mentioned, but I am familiar with
Ventana Medical Systems and DAKOCytomation. IMO, DAKO makes one of the
best and also happens to be the least costly because you can use
whatever reagents you choose. Ventana makes a fabulous machine, but the
one I used in my former job was tied in to the use of their reagents
only. Their detection kits run over 2000USD per kit and each kit
performs only 250 tests. I think Ventana now makes another stainer that
is more reagent flexible. THey're a great company, just really
expensive. I cannot advise you on whether it is economical for your lab
to invest in this as I don't know how much work you're doing and what
you charge per slide vs your overhead in salaries, etc. You can figure
that out easily enough.

If there are to be mutliple users of these instruments, that is usually
no problem as the manufacterer usually provides a training session for
all employees. When you get your stainer, I would mandate that all
techs who will use the instrument must be trained first. In most
facilities, training is done not only when a new instrument arrives, but
also a periodic check with each tech to ensure they are doing things
right.

I hope this is helpful

Connie McManus
Mt Ogden Scientific Services
950 W Kershaw, Suite E
Ogden UT 84401
tel: 866/933-6677
conniemoss-at-relia.net
www.mtogdensci.com (not yet available)





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 10:57:23 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2005 10:54:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM Staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Kirk,

If fluorescence is your primary interest I would strongly recommend that you visit websites for the following companies:
Molecular Probes - they make the broadest range of fluorescence probes and have very rich content as well as gorgeoous images
Quantum Dots - a new approach to fluorescent staining. Instead of being based on organic molecules, the qDots are derived from more inert, semiconductor based materials.

The two primary filter manufacturers in our industry are Omega Filters (www.omegafilters.com) and Chroma. Both have, again, very informative websites.

Re: learning more about fluorescence - I would encourage you to visit the Nikon mini-university, Olympus' site, and (at the risk of being a bit self-serving), getting a copy of Optimizing Light Microscopy (visit www.microscopyeducation for details).

Hope this was helpful
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&
Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.

Caveat: MME has no financial involvement in any of the companies mentioned above.


At 07:21 AM 2/4/2005, Mr Brian Kirkmeyer wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 11:42:56 2005



From: Connie McManus :      conniemoss-at-relia.net
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 10:41:00 -0700 (MST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kirk,

I assume you want to stain something with a fluorescent antibody of some
kind. This is not in my area of expertise, but from what I understand,
before you do that, you need to have some kind of stained section to get a
fix on where you are in the tissue. Also, it is important to know what
kind of tissue prep ... FFPE (formalin fixed paraffin embedded) or are
the tissues processed in plastic? Are these sectioned at 3-5 um? more or
less that that? Do you want special stains ((i.e. stains for connective
tissues, glycogen, fungi, bacteria, mast cells ... ad infinitum) or do you
just want a plain, simple stain that will show the basic cell arrangements
in the tissue ???? What do you want to see? There are some excellent
texts out there. Perhaps the best one for starters is Frieda Carson's
book on Histotechnology. Can be purchased from Sigma, Amazon.com, Barns
Noble, etc. and it's fairly inexpensive. There are tons and tons of
really good histology books out there. Also, it doesn't hurt to have a
sit down chat with your technicians and find out from them what they can
do and what they would recommend.

I'm sorry not to be of more help. Please feel free to contact me
privately if you need help of any kind.

Connie McManus
Mt Ogden Scientific Services
950 W Kershaw, Suite E
tel: 866/933-6677
fax: 435/514-1781
conniemoss-at-relia.net
www.mtogdensci.com


------------------------------------------
} } Kirk wrote: { {
I come from an EM background and have recently assumed
responsibility for LM evaluations. However, I am in
need of a reference detailing what stains what, and
for which types of microscopy. Our current microscope
is equipped for UV/fluorescence (among other things),
and this is of primary interest to me at this point.

So if anyone can point me toward an LM staining
reference, I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!

Kirk




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 16:35:09 2005



From: David Vowles :      djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 22:33:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: ISIS Spectrum Export

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


George Theodossiou {George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au} wrote:
}
} ...Is there anyone out there who has a method or software for reading
} the ISIS spectra and batch saving the files as txt, tif or jpg.
}
I have written some software that will convert ISIS spectra to JPEG, BMP
or text format. You can convert files singly or as a batch. The programme
also reads, displays and converts other Link/Oxford formats, as well as
Noran, Edax and EMSA formats.If you can give me your mailing address I
will send you a copy.

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 334325
Fax: +44 (0)1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 17:54:10 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2005 17:51:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: LM Staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

Several of you have written re: problems geting to www.microscopyeducation.com. Much to my chagrin, the links mentioned in my earlier posting got crossed with those of our sister group. I've spoken to the webmaster and he will have it fixed over the weekend. Please try again. ... Follow the Nav buttons in The Library to link to Optimizing Light Microscopy.

Thanks :-)
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&
Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.


At 10:54 AM 2/4/2005, Barbara Foster wrote:




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 4 19:20:51 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2005 17:19:14 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Zeiss/LEO Supra topics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings Listers:

Is there a separate formal list for Zeiss/LEO
Supra users? If so, I'd appreciate knowing
about it. If not, I would like to communicate
with others about discoveries, disappointments, observations,
history, experiences, lessons learned (easy and
hard way) and other topics relative thereto.

We can keep this off of the MSA list and I would
forward all relevant material to those who are
interested.

This is for Supra and SupraVP.

gary g.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 5 06:29:34 2005



From: Alberto Diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 13:27:33 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] fib

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear friends,
I am looking for infos for setting up a FIB, dual scan, system.
All my best
AD



------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------
[...] Dance with wolves and count the stars, including the
unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet, 2001)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center, LAMBS-IFOM, Department
of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy
facsimile +39-010314218 - voice +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
http://www.lambs.it
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------



------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
[...] Dance with wolves and count the stars, including the
unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet, 2001)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center, LAMBS-IFOM, Department
of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy
facsimile +39-010314218 - voice +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
http://www.lambs.it
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 5 08:52:12 2005



From: Valery Ray :      vray-at-partbeamsystech.com
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 06:49:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: fib

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Alberto,

What information exactly are you looking for? If you
have specific questions I may be able to help you out.

Disclaimer: PBS&T provides support for charged
particle beam instruments commercially.

Cheers,
=================
Valery Ray
www.partbeamsystech.com

--- Alberto Diaspro {diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear friends,
} I am looking for infos for setting up a FIB, dual
} scan, system.
} All my best
} AD
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} --------------
} [...] Dance with wolves and count the stars,
} including the
} unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet,
} 2001)
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
-----------------------------------------------------------
} Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center,
} LAMBS-IFOM, Department
} of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33,
} 16146 Genova, Italy
} facsimile +39-010314218 - voice
} +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
} http://www.lambs.it
}
}
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
-----------------------------------------------------------
} [...] Dance with wolves and count the stars,
} including the
} unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet,
} 2001)
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
-----------------------------------------------------------
} Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center,
} LAMBS-IFOM, Department
} of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33,
} 16146 Genova, Italy
} facsimile +39-010314218 - voice
} +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
} http://www.lambs.it
}
}
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}


=====
Valery Ray

Particle Beam Systems
& Technology
www.partbeamsystech.com


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 5 11:25:30 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 09:23:52 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Zeiss/LEO Supra topics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

As was pointed out to me, the Gemini column
is also on the LEO 1550. So these would apply
as well. I suppose the only main differentiating
factor is plinth and uni-plinth. But the column
seems to be the same.

gary g.


At 05:19 PM 2/4/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 5 19:16:24 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 17:14:41 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] [MICROSCOPY] Osmium coating resistance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings Listers:

Has anyone done any measurements on the resistivity
of Os coatings? Sheet rho vs. thickness, etc.?

If a charging specimen was imaged at 20-25KV, what
Os coating thickness would eliminate the charge?
Then, given that thickness, what would the inherent
sheet resistance be?

gary g.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 6 08:45:14 2005



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2005 15:42:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Calibration of objectives: thanks!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To all of you who informed me about your experiences, tips & tricks etc.
concerning calibration of objectives, thanks a lot for the massive
input! This states again that this listserver is not just 'a bunch of
people', but a nice collection of pro's with some pro's-to-become, just
as myself (hopefully), who can learn a lot from them!

I calibrated every objective individually with a stage micrometer, but
still noticed about + or - 4% deviation between the 2,5x and 40x
objective. Thanks to your input I now know that it is not so bad, and,
I recalibrated the objectives, but more accurate, and now have about
2,1% difference. Not too bad I think, though it took some time!

Thanks again for your answers, you were of great help!

Sven Terclavers

"A microscopist observes things
which nature hides for the majority,
always feel honoured for that!"



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 6 14:52:40 2005



From: Bobby Hooghan :      hooghan-at-grandecom.net
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2005 14:49:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] fib

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alberto,
What is it that you are looking for exactly? Is it for setting up different
scans etc for an existing FIB ? or something else. You can reply on line or
offline,
Best regards,
Bobby Hooghan
Hooghan-at-grandecom.net

-----Original Message-----
} From: Alberto Diaspro [mailto:diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it]
Sent: Saturday, February 05, 2005 6:28 AM
To: MSA listserver

Dear friends,
I am looking for infos for setting up a FIB, dual scan, system.
All my best
AD



------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------
[...] Dance with wolves and count the stars, including the
unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet, 2001)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center, LAMBS-IFOM, Department
of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy
facsimile +39-010314218 - voice +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
http://www.lambs.it
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------



------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
[...] Dance with wolves and count the stars, including the
unseen...(L.Ferlinghetti, Challenges to young poet, 2001)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
Alberto Diaspro, MicroScoBIO Research Center, LAMBS-IFOM, Department
of Physics, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy
facsimile +39-010314218 - voice +39-0103536426/480/309; URL:
http://www.lambs.it
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471409200.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 6 19:36:18 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2005 17:34:35 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] [MICROSCOPY] Zeiss/LEO Gemini user group

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings Listers:

There seems to be some interest in a focused group
for Zeiss/LEO Gemini systems. I have formed a
user group on Yahoo that is open to all Gemini
column system users (if you don't have a Gemini
column system, you likely won't be interested in
this topic/group).

The Gemini systems include all LEO 1500 and Supra
models which are high vacuum and/or variable pressure
(VP). The purpose of the group is to exchange
experiences and info on these systems. Contact
info, service experience, system nuances, macro
editing and creation, etc. are key topics. The group
is not moderated. I started the group but I do not
moderate or edit it. All that is required is vetting--
you need to apply for group membership and then you
are in.

Group Settings:
-listed in directory (does not work at this time--no idea why not)
-membership requires approval
-messages do not require approval
-all members may post messages
-message archive viewable by members only
-e-mail attachments are not permitted

Hopefully this is useful for Gemini users. As a
newbee, I hope to gain from others' experiences.
Perhaps, others can gain from my experiences. A
goal is to not clutter up the MSA list with system-specific
threads. But of course, you can post this topic
if you so desire. General EM topics still should go
to the MSA list. The gemini list should be specific
to this Gemini group of systems (no EVSEM, etc.).

Subscribe: geminisem-subscribe-at-yahoogroups.com
Post: geminisem-at-yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: geminisem-unsubscribe-at-yahoogroups.com

If the group does not pan out, I'll cancel it or
turn it over to someone else if there is a desire
to take it on.

gary g.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 07:42:43 2005



From: Mr Brian Kirkmeyer :      kirk3377-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 05:41:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: LM staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} From the responses I have received so far, it seems
that I should clarify what I'm looking for a little
bit more. I seek a reference that describes
staining/dyeing/tagging methods for non-histological
samples, as I work with flavor and fragrance chemical
compounds. So recipes for tissue stains or tags,
unless related to a specific chemistry, unfortunately
don't do me a lot of good. If anyone knows of such a
non-histological reference, I would love to hear of
it.

While on the subject, I am also interested in knowing
what stains/dyes/tags are safe for contact with human
skin. Thanks!

Kirk

Brian (Kirk) Kirkmeyer, Ph.D.
Research Scientist, Microscopy
International Flavors and Fragrances
1515 State Highway 36
Union Beach, NJ 07735-3542
732-335-2426 / 732-335-2350 FAX
brian.kirkmeyer-at-iff.com

--- Connie McManus {conniemoss-at-relia.net} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Kirk,
}
} I assume you want to stain something with a
} fluorescent antibody of some
} kind. This is not in my area of expertise, but from
} what I understand,
} before you do that, you need to have some kind of
} stained section to get a
} fix on where you are in the tissue. Also, it is
} important to know what
} kind of tissue prep ... FFPE (formalin fixed
} paraffin embedded) or are
} the tissues processed in plastic? Are these
} sectioned at 3-5 um? more or
} less that that? Do you want special stains ((i.e.
} stains for connective
} tissues, glycogen, fungi, bacteria, mast cells ...
} ad infinitum) or do you
} just want a plain, simple stain that will show the
} basic cell arrangements
} in the tissue ???? What do you want to see? There
} are some excellent
} texts out there. Perhaps the best one for starters
} is Frieda Carson's
} book on Histotechnology. Can be purchased from
} Sigma, Amazon.com, Barns
} Noble, etc. and it's fairly inexpensive. There are
} tons and tons of
} really good histology books out there. Also, it
} doesn't hurt to have a
} sit down chat with your technicians and find out
} from them what they can
} do and what they would recommend.
}
} I'm sorry not to be of more help. Please feel free
} to contact me
} privately if you need help of any kind.
}
} Connie McManus
} Mt Ogden Scientific Services
} 950 W Kershaw, Suite E
} tel: 866/933-6677
} fax: 435/514-1781
} conniemoss-at-relia.net
} www.mtogdensci.com
}
}
} ------------------------------------------
} } } Kirk wrote: { {
} I come from an EM background and have recently
} assumed
} responsibility for LM evaluations. However, I am in
} need of a reference detailing what stains what, and
} for which types of microscopy. Our current
} microscope
} is equipped for UV/fluorescence (among other
} things),
} and this is of primary interest to me at this point.
}
} So if anyone can point me toward an LM staining
} reference, I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!
}
} Kirk
}
}
}
}





__________________________________
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Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 09:01:57 2005



From: spradhan-at-siu.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 09:00:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Hitachi S2460 N stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (spradhan-at-siu.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Sunday, February 6, 2005 at 21:39:34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: spradhan-at-siu.edu
Name: Sailesh Pradhan

Organization: Southern Illinois University, Cabondale

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:Hitachi S2460 N stage

Question: Hello list!
I have been looking around, pretty much in vain, for a spare door and stage assembly for a Hitachi S2460N SEM for quite sometime now...We wanted to have it so that we could modify it to suit our purpose for conducting some experiments at our facility here...However, the situation looks very grim to me since i have almost exhausted all possible resources i have know of...could you suggest some more places i could look for it? Or better still, do you think it would be possible to modify such assemblies of other hitachi models to fit our machine?
i shall look forward to your suggestions and advice..thanks a lot in advance...
regards,
sailesh.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 09:02:16 2005



From: cvierret-at-umr.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 09:00:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Ge single crystal for TEM examinatio

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (cvierret-at-umr.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, February 7, 2005 at 08:43:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cvierret-at-umr.edu
Name: Clarissa

Organization: University of Missouri/Rolla

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,

I am looking for information on sample preparation of a Ge single crystal for TEM examination. I need to know how to cut the sample, thin the sample and any other information that would make this job simpler or at least less frustrating.

Thanks for your help in advance.

Clarissa Wisner
UMR-AMCL
Rolla, MO

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 09:12:45 2005



From: medunn-at-mail.uri.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 09:11:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: how to quanitfy the number of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (medunn-at-mail.uri.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday, February 7, 2005 at 08:39:20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: medunn-at-mail.uri.edu
Name: Michael Dunn

Organization: Uinversity of Rhode Island

Education: Graduate College

Location: Kingston, RI

Question: 1)Is there a way to quanitfy the number of cells contained in a tissue sample that is being analyzed on the electron microscope through the use of a software program like NIH?

2)What is the correlation, if any, with the mitochondrial density of a section and the cell count of that same section?

Thanks.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 09:56:09 2005



From: Jan Factor :      jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 10:55:52 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] To Tom Phillips

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom: Please re-send the email you sent to me over the weekend. (Between
home and work, it ended up on the wrong computer. - Sorry to use the
list for this.)
--Thanks, Jan

---------------------------------------2/7/05
Jan Robert Factor, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
---------------------------------------
Natural Sciences
Purchase College, State University of New York
735 Anderson Hill Rd.
Purchase, NY 10577
USA
---------------------------------------
Office Tel: 914-251-6659
Office Fax: 914-251-6635
E-mail: jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
or- jan.factor-at-purchase.edu
---------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 10:57:01 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 10:54:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [MICROSCOPY] Osmium coating resistance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Gary,

I'd suggest that you contact Chuck Garber at SPI (www.2SPI.com). He is a wealth of info in this area.

Good hunting!
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
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Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.

Caveat: MME has no financial interest in this product.


At 07:14 PM 2/5/2005, Gary Gaugler wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 11:03:35 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 11:00:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: LM staining reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, again, Brian

Again, I would really recommend that you investigate fluorescence. The
chemistry is very specific.

As for safety, again, the probe companies have all of that information.

Good hunting,
B

At 07:41 AM 2/7/2005, Mr Brian Kirkmeyer wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 14:45:37 2005



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 15:43:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Ge single crystal for TEM examinatio

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am not speaking from direct experience for doing Ge, but offhand, Ge should not be more difficult than silicon. If it is a single crystal of Ge, you should know the crystallographic directions of the sample. Of the following, the two least expensive and easy methods would be chemical polishing and small angle cleavage technique.

I would look at several standard techniques to start.

1) if you are doing plan view samples, chemical polishing should work nicely. I don't know the chemical polish for Ge, but I am sure that it is in the literature. Peter Goodhew has a simple chemical polisher apparatus in his book, Thin Foil Preparation for Electron Microscopy (Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy, Vol 11). Basically, it is a tilted rotating cup with a platform in the center where the chemical drips from a burret until the material is perforated. South Bay Technology sells a chemical polisher that can be set up specifically for accurate and reproducible termination, especially if Bernie Kestel's instructions are followed.

2) mechanical polishing, dimpling, and ion milling should work nicely. See the equipment brochures from South Bay Technology, E. A. Fischione, Baltec, and Gatan

3) Ge cleaves. For cross sections and bulk crystal the small angle cleavage technique (microcleave technique) would work very well on this. This gives the best samples known to man (and women). I gave a little short course at UMR a few years ago on SACT. Talk to Lou Ross about it and see South Bay Technology's web site on microcleave for information on this.

4) Tripod Polishing -again see South Bay Technology web site.

5) FIB -Pay some money and have no trouble at all.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:cvierret-at-umr.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2005 10:01 AM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (cvierret-at-umr.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Monday, February 7, 2005 at 08:43:52
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cvierret-at-umr.edu
Name: Clarissa

Organization: University of Missouri/Rolla

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,

I am looking for information on sample preparation of a Ge single crystal for TEM examination. I need to know how to cut the sample, thin the sample and any other information that would make this job simpler or at least less frustrating.

Thanks for your help in advance.

Clarissa Wisner
UMR-AMCL
Rolla, MO

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 16:03:06 2005



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 17:00:50 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] [MICROSCOPY] Osmium coating resistance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary,
Just want to clarify something that others might be confused about.

The inherent property to the material that is deposited is its resistivity, not sheet resistance. Sheet resistance is measured usually with a four point probe and has units of ohms per square. It is dependent on the thickness of the material. If you have a square of any size, it will have the same resistance. (It is amazing to see a large 4 foot by 4 foot piece of glass with a conductive coating on it measure the same resistance as a one inch by one inch piece.) If you multiply the sheet resistance by the thickness, you get the resistivity with units ohm-cm.

This all assumes that the layer is uniform across the surface. For very light layers, that may not be the case. For charge drainage, it also assumes that the charge can come to the surface and be drained off. If the conductivity of the sample material is so low that this can't happen, then the relatively high voltage that you are using would put charge deep into the sample. There your charging affects would be voltage dependent. There is an article on that in the latest Microscopy Today issue, isn't there?

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Saturday, February 05, 2005 8:15 PM
To: MSA listserver

Greetings Listers:

Has anyone done any measurements on the resistivity
of Os coatings? Sheet rho vs. thickness, etc.?

If a charging specimen was imaged at 20-25KV, what
Os coating thickness would eliminate the charge?
Then, given that thickness, what would the inherent
sheet resistance be?

gary g.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 16:06:02 2005



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 11:04:15 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolpix 5700, Lumenera Infinity 3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

Anybody got any experience to share, either good or bad, with the
Lumenera Infinity 3?

Also, does anyone know a source of microscope adaptors for the Nikon
Coolpix 5700?
Presumably they involve also the Nikon UR-E8 adaptor.

cheers and tia

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599
ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email :
r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 16:07:30 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2005 17:05:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,
I have just received a request to process balls of what had been
mouse stem cells which have now been differentiated into
cardiomyocytes. They are loose, spongy balls of cells that fall
apart when prodded. The PI would like them embedded in paraffin and
sectioned for light microscopy. If these were for EM, I'd be
perfectly comfortable with the whole thing, but I am a bit boggled
about how to handle infiltration and embedding in wax...they are
essentially transparent and will disappear.
I know that there was a thread about a similar topic a short time
ago, where is was suggested that the samples in question be stained
before embedding. The problem here is that the PI would like to be
able to do a variety of staining protocols on the resultant slides.
Ideas?
thanks,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 7 23:40:14 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2005 23:39:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MM2005 Abstract Deadline Feb 15

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues...

The deadline for receipt of manuscripts for Microscopy & Microanalysis 2005
is 17:00 PST Feb 15, 2005.

Information concerning the program, registration, travel, student
and professional
staff awards, as well as electronic submission is available at
the meeting WWW site.

http://mm2005.microscopy.org

There are a number of new entries for student awards as well as
opportunities
for student discount lodging. These new opportunites have been
established since the original
call for papers the information for which is only available on the
meeting WWW site.

Regards

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 00:53:08 2005



From: George Theodossiou :      George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 17:51:47 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,

A very broad question to draw out as many thoughts and ideas as possible.
We are at it again in the box factory trying to image starch in paper and
board and I am seeking every scrap of information I can lay my hands on. It
seems we visit this issue every year because we can never seem to find a
satisfactory solution. There are several things we would like to achieve:

1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution
2. To detect the starch spectroscopically
3. To find a way of differentiating between various starches (wheat, tapioca
and potato)
4. Quantify the starch

We have tried the following in house and using external service providers:
Iodine staining (but it also stains the cellulose, therefore differentiating
starch and fibre is difficult)

Fluorescence microscopy using the stains Calcofluor White (cellulose) and
Con A-FTIC (Starch). Too much background fluorescence from starch.

TEM but getting sections is difficult. We were able to image the cellulose
fibers using the CBH gold conjugate but not the starch using the Con A-gold
conjugate.

Osmium Tetroxide staining, saw some faint staining across the samples but
nothing that would be indicative of the starch distribution

Ideas that I have brainstormed thus far (not all of them necessarily
useful):
EDXS, XPS, XRF, Tof SIMS, RBS, TEM, EELS, Fluorescent staining, X-ray
absorption/Diffraction/Tomography, Osmium staining with SEM/TEM (again),
Confocal, IR, E-SEM, Chemical etching of the fibres, gold labelling, NMR,
Raman, Conductivity (through two plates??? Different hydration??),
Ultrasound, FRET, Multi Photon Microscopy.

If you have any thoughts, ideas, comments, techniques, papers, texts on the
subject I would very much like to hear from you. I'll even take a wizened,
gnarled old microscopist, as long as they can image starch.

Thank you for all your help.

George


George Theodossiou
Physicist / Microscopist
Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory

AMCOR Research and Technology
Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
Mobile: 0409 568 840
email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au


************************************************************************
CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
please notify AMCOR immediately.
Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 02:55:50 2005



From: Klughammer :      opto-at-klughammer.de
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:52:22 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolpix 5700, Lumenera Infinity 3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Ritchie,

we offer adapters for all kind of cameras. Let me know
whether you would like to receive a quotation for an adapter
for your Nikon 5400 camera.

You can connect a digital consumer camera from

Agfa, Canon, Casio, Epson, Fuji, Hewlett-Packard,
JVC, Kodak, Leica, Minolta, Nikon,
Olympus, Pentax, Sharp, Sony, Toshiba

SLR cameras from
Canon, Fuji, Kodak, Konica, Minolta, Nikon, Olympus,
Pentax

Camcorders from
Canon, JVC, Panasonic,Sony
or threads with 30 mm, 30.5 m, 37 mm, 40.5 mm, 43 mm, 46
mm, 49 mm, 52 mm, 55 mm, 58 mm, 62 mm

to your microscope. The adapter fits to a c-mount or to a 23
mm or 30 mm eyepiece.

Our adapters are stable. Vignetting is eliminated with most
cameras because of the variation in length which can be
adjusted.

We have a list of the cameras we support - let me know when
you would like to receive it.

mfg / regards

Anneliese Schmaus
Sales Manager

klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
www.klughammer.de



RS} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RS} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
RS} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
RS} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
RS} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RS} Hi

RS} Anybody got any experience to share, either good or bad, with the
RS} Lumenera Infinity 3?

RS} Also, does anyone know a source of microscope adaptors for the Nikon
RS} Coolpix 5700?
RS} Presumably they involve also the Nikon UR-E8 adaptor.

RS} cheers and tia

RS} rtch

RS} --
RS} Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599
RS} ext 87713
RS} Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
RS} Department of Geology email :
RS} r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
RS} The University of Auckland
RS} Private Bag 92019
RS} Auckland
RS} New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 03:15:19 2005



From: gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:12:35 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Leona,
we have just started using very successfully a Thermo Electron
Corporation, Shandon Cytoblock Kit (REF 74010150) for applications such as
you describe.
You do need a Shandon Cytospin. The cells etc are gelled together and end
up concentrated and encased in a small disc which when removed from the
cassette can be embedded on edge in the wax mould.
I too do EM and am thinking of trying for that as it is so easy.

their web site: www.thermo.com/shandon

Cheers

Gill Brown


Histopathology Group
Asthma and Allergy Disease Biology
ri- CEDD.
GlaxoSmithKline Medicines Research Centre,
Gunnelswood Road,
STEVENAGE,
Hertfordshire.
SG1 2NY
tel. +44 (0)1438 764119
fax. +44 (0)1438 764782
email. gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 04:29:07 2005



From: Gerd Leitinger :      gerd.leitinger-at-meduni-graz.at
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 11:24:43 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Golgi-stained specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

Does anybody know a source for prepared slides with Golgi-stained
neurons?

I am putting together a course for students on the histology of the
nervous system, and would like to demonstrate the benefits of the
Golgi method over more classical histological methods, but I do not
have the time or know-now to prepare Golgi specimens myself.
Ideally, the slides should show neurons of the vertebrate cortex, but
could also be of other parts of the nervous system or of other animals.
I know of two companies that sell prepared slides, but one of them
(Fisher Scientific) only sells sets of slides, many of which I will not
need, and the other (Home Training Tools) does not ship outside the
US.

I would be VERY grateful for any suggestions

thank you

Gerd


Dr. Gerd Leitinger

Institut für Zellbiologie, Histologie und Embryologie
Medizinische Universität Graz
Harrachgasse 21
A-8010 Graz
Austria

Tel. ++43 316 380 4237
Fax. ++43 316 380 9625
Mailto: Gerd.Leitinger-at-meduni-graz.at




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 04:30:31 2005



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 14:01:33 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George

I don't know if you have tried this, but could you not experiment with
amylase digestion and either look before and after or even at what's
made soluble? I've never tried this so I'm sorry if I've stated the
obvious/impossible.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK

e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk





----- Original Message -----
} From: George Theodossiou {George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au}

Hi

The first thing that comes to mind is PAS with and without amylase/diastase
treatment. It will be the same as the iodine staining but the amylase
treated section will lack the starch as it is labile to the enzyme. (PAS
with/without amylase is standard for identifying glycogen in animal tissues).

The other thought is polarised light. Starch will give a Maltese Cross
birefringence. So will talc but they are morphologically different and the
clincher would be to combine PAS and polarised light.

Hope this helps

All the best

Gareth


} 1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution
} 2. To detect the starch spectroscopically
} 3. To find a way of differentiating between various starches (wheat, tapioca
} and potato)
} 4. Quantify the starch
}
} We have tried the following in house and using external service providers:
} Iodine staining (but it also stains the cellulose, therefore differentiating
} starch and fibre is difficult)
}
} Fluorescence microscopy using the stains Calcofluor White (cellulose) and
} Con A-FTIC (Starch). Too much background fluorescence from starch.
}
} TEM but getting sections is difficult. We were able to image the cellulose
} fibers using the CBH gold conjugate but not the starch using the Con A-gold
} conjugate.
}
} Osmium Tetroxide staining, saw some faint staining across the samples but
} nothing that would be indicative of the starch distribution
}
} Ideas that I have brainstormed thus far (not all of them necessarily
} useful):
} EDXS, XPS, XRF, Tof SIMS, RBS, TEM, EELS, Fluorescent staining, X-ray
} absorption/Diffraction/Tomography, Osmium staining with SEM/TEM (again),
} Confocal, IR, E-SEM, Chemical etching of the fibres, gold labelling, NMR,
} Raman, Conductivity (through two plates??? Different hydration??),
} Ultrasound, FRET, Multi Photon Microscopy.
}
} If you have any thoughts, ideas, comments, techniques, papers, texts on the
} subject I would very much like to hear from you. I'll even take a wizened,
} gnarled old microscopist, as long as they can image starch.
}
} Thank you for all your help.
}
} George
}
}
} George Theodossiou
} Physicist / Microscopist
} Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory
}
} AMCOR Research and Technology
} Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
} Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
} Mobile: 0409 568 840
} email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
}
}
} ************************************************************************
} CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
} information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
} If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
} notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
} this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
} please notify AMCOR immediately.
} Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
} and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
} ************************************************************************


With best wishes,

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Histo/cytopathology, Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institute,
Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 07:56:58 2005



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 08:54:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Surround them with low-gelling agarose and embed a black thread in the
agarose before it gels.

At 05:05 PM 2/7/2005 -0500, Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 08:02:20 2005



From: Terry E Ellis :      tellis2-at-hallmark.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:00:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] starch Id.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George:
I have identified starch particles (offset powders) on our
lithographed cards and polarized microscopy revealed them the best , they
show nice German crosses (X) under crossed polars, SEM can also be used but
that's over kill . I use 3m sticky tape to remove the starch from the cards
then identify and count them if necessary . If you have a metallurgical
microscope you can also see the starch particle on the card stock but since
I have to turn the cards upside down and move it around you loose some
particles. McCrone has some nice pictures and dimensions of the different
starches in their PAE2 Particle Atlas.
I have also collected some known offset powders ( starches) from the
suppliers and used them to identify the different starches. Some starches
are easy to identify and others are difficult but it can be done from the
shapes and size ranges of the different starches.

Terry Ellis
Hallmark Cards Inc.
816-545-6573



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 08:09:50 2005



From: davebernh-at-golden.net (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:08:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: Nikon Apophot Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (davebernh-at-golden.net) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 01:42:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: davebernh-at-golden.net
Name: Dave Bernhardt

Organization: NA

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello All,
My love of fine optics has garnered me a Nikon Apophot microscope and a lot of questions. Could (would) anyone
be able to assist in the "specs" for this microscope?
The "net" searches have but ever so fleeting referece to this unit and Nikon seems to have no available info at all.
All I have been able to find out is that this microscope was manufactured in the late 60's, approx 1968! Any input on or about this microscope would be appreciated.

PS: photos are available

Thank You
Dave Bernhardt
davebernh at golden dot net

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 08:11:02 2005



From: kinder-at-cableone.net (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:09:28 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: help with focusing a microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (kinder-at-cableone.net) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday, February 8, 2005 at 07:46:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kinder-at-cableone.net
Name: Nanette

Organization: Homeschool

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: grenada, ms

Question: Where can I find help with focusing a microscope? This is a Bristoline microscope that was purchased on Ebay. I can't seem to focus in on anything. Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Nanette

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 08:18:16 2005



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:14:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George,
In your long list of every method under the lens, I was
surprised not to see polarized light. Starch is birefringent and very
lovely in polarized light. Different species grains are
distinguishable too. Of course, the cellulose is birefringent too but
it should not be too hard to distinguish long flat ribbons from beach
balls. I don't have references to hand but I bet you could get
started in Fry-Wyssling's book Submicroscopic Morphology (a gnarled
old microscopist's book for you).

Hope this helps,
Tobias
}
} Hi All,
}
} A very broad question to draw out as many thoughts and ideas as possible.
} We are at it again in the box factory trying to image starch in paper and
} board and I am seeking every scrap of information I can lay my hands on. It
} seems we visit this issue every year because we can never seem to find a
} satisfactory solution. There are several things we would like to achieve:
}
} 1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution
} 2. To detect the starch spectroscopically
} 3. To find a way of differentiating between various starches (wheat, tapioca
} and potato)
} 4. Quantify the starch
}
} We have tried the following in house and using external service providers:
} Iodine staining (but it also stains the cellulose, therefore differentiating
} starch and fibre is difficult)
}
} Fluorescence microscopy using the stains Calcofluor White (cellulose) and
} Con A-FTIC (Starch). Too much background fluorescence from starch.
}
} TEM but getting sections is difficult. We were able to image the cellulose
} fibers using the CBH gold conjugate but not the starch using the Con A-gold
} conjugate.
}
} Osmium Tetroxide staining, saw some faint staining across the samples but
} nothing that would be indicative of the starch distribution
}
} Ideas that I have brainstormed thus far (not all of them necessarily
} useful):
} EDXS, XPS, XRF, Tof SIMS, RBS, TEM, EELS, Fluorescent staining, X-ray
} absorption/Diffraction/Tomography, Osmium staining with SEM/TEM (again),
} Confocal, IR, E-SEM, Chemical etching of the fibres, gold labelling, NMR,
} Raman, Conductivity (through two plates??? Different hydration??),
} Ultrasound, FRET, Multi Photon Microscopy.
}
} If you have any thoughts, ideas, comments, techniques, papers, texts on the
} subject I would very much like to hear from you. I'll even take a wizened,
} gnarled old microscopist, as long as they can image starch.
}
} Thank you for all your help.
}
} George
}
}
} George Theodossiou
} Physicist / Microscopist
} Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory
}
} AMCOR Research and Technology
} Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
} Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
} Mobile: 0409 568 840
} email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
}
}
} ************************************************************************
} CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
} information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
} If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
} notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
} this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
} please notify AMCOR immediately.
} Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
} and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
} ************************************************************************


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \ University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \ Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/
Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533 Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 08:52:09 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 08:49:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George,

I have never tried to image starch in paper or board, and I'm sceptical
that intact starch grains would survive the manufacturing process in any
quantity (but I don't know that for sure).

Starch grains are often optically visualized using a standard optical
microscope and are differentiated by size, shape, melting point,
solubility in various reagents, and properties of the "Maltese Cross".
The latter is visible using crossed polarizers. For more information on
starch identification methods and keys, check out "Reichert, E.T. 1913.
The Differentiation and Specificity of Starches in Relation to Genera,
Species, Etc. Washington. Carnegie Institute", if you can find a copy
anywhere. It's old, but it's almost unique and represents a HUGE amount
of basic work, much of which is still useful and relevant. Obviously it
doesn't cover newer technologies.

Also, for a wealth of references and basic info on starch research and
identification go to http://www.siu.edu/~ebl/amylose.htm.

Hope this gets you started.

Cheers,
Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu








-----Original Message-----
} From: George Theodossiou [mailto:George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au]
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2005 12:52 AM
To: 'Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com'

Hi All,

A very broad question to draw out as many thoughts and ideas as
possible.
We are at it again in the box factory trying to image starch in paper
and board and I am seeking every scrap of information I can lay my hands
on. It seems we visit this issue every year because we can never seem
to find a satisfactory solution. There are several things we would like
to achieve:

1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution 2. To
detect the starch spectroscopically 3. To find a way of differentiating
between various starches (wheat, tapioca and potato) 4. Quantify the
starch

We have tried the following in house and using external service
providers:
Iodine staining (but it also stains the cellulose, therefore
differentiating starch and fibre is difficult)

Fluorescence microscopy using the stains Calcofluor White (cellulose)
and Con A-FTIC (Starch). Too much background fluorescence from starch.


TEM but getting sections is difficult. We were able to image the
cellulose fibers using the CBH gold conjugate but not the starch using
the Con A-gold conjugate.

Osmium Tetroxide staining, saw some faint staining across the samples
but nothing that would be indicative of the starch distribution

Ideas that I have brainstormed thus far (not all of them necessarily
useful):
EDXS, XPS, XRF, Tof SIMS, RBS, TEM, EELS, Fluorescent staining, X-ray
absorption/Diffraction/Tomography, Osmium staining with SEM/TEM (again),
Confocal, IR, E-SEM, Chemical etching of the fibres, gold labelling,
NMR, Raman, Conductivity (through two plates??? Different hydration??),
Ultrasound, FRET, Multi Photon Microscopy.

If you have any thoughts, ideas, comments, techniques, papers, texts on
the subject I would very much like to hear from you. I'll even take a
wizened, gnarled old microscopist, as long as they can image starch.

Thank you for all your help.

George


George Theodossiou
Physicist / Microscopist
Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory

AMCOR Research and Technology
Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
Mobile: 0409 568 840
email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au


************************************************************************
CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
please notify AMCOR immediately.
Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
************************************************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 09:47:35 2005



From: Jan Factor :      jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 10:47:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I was going to make the same kind of suggestion, but using a strip of
thin paper on either side of the ball of cells so you can locate them in
the block. The paper can either be trimmed away or sectioned through.
--Jan Factor

---------------------------------------
Jan Robert Factor, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
---------------------------------------
Natural Sciences
Purchase College, State University of New York
735 Anderson Hill Rd.
Purchase, NY 10577
USA
---------------------------------------
Office Tel: 914-251-6659
Office Fax: 914-251-6635
E-mail: jfactor-at-ns.purchase.edu
or- jan.factor-at-purchase.edu
---------------------------------------



Greg Erdos wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Surround them with low-gelling agarose and embed a black thread in the
} agarose before it gels.
}
} At 05:05 PM 2/7/2005 -0500, Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Hi All,
} } I have just received a request to process balls of what had been
} } mouse stem cells which have now been differentiated into
} } cardiomyocytes. They are loose, spongy balls of cells that fall
} } apart when prodded. The PI would like them embedded in paraffin and
} } sectioned for light microscopy. If these were for EM, I'd be
} } perfectly comfortable with the whole thing, but I am a bit boggled
} } about how to handle infiltration and embedding in wax...they are
} } essentially transparent and will disappear.
} } I know that there was a thread about a similar topic a short time
} } ago, where is was suggested that the samples in question be stained
} } before embedding. The problem here is that the PI would like to be
} } able to do a variety of staining protocols on the resultant slides.
} } Ideas?
} } thanks,
} } Lee
} } --
} } Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
} } Sr. Staff Associate
} } Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
} } Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
} } Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
} } of Cornell University
} } voice (212)746-6146
} } fax (212)746-8175
}
}
} Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
} P.O. Box 118525
} 217 Carr Hall
} University of Florida
} Gainesville, FL 32611
} gwe-at-ufl.edu
} 352-392-1295
} fax- 352-846-0251
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:23:16 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:34:53 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Lattice constant of gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,
Thanks to all who replied. I was able to find the appropriate
reference.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:35:02 2005



From: Barbara :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 11:31:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear George,

Nothing fancy, but have you tried Polarized light? Starch exhibits a unique "Maltese Cross" pattern on a bright white background. While you will also get a Pol response from the cellulose, it will be dramatically different. You should be able to segment (for your quantification) either on the pattern or on the bright white areas of a specific size (depending on which software you have, you can use one of the "Fill Hole" algorithms to eliminate the areas of the cross)

As for distinguishing between different starches, I would think that simple FT-IR would be the key. I suspect there are slightly different IR signatures. The easiest implementation would be to add SensIR's IlluminatIR to an upright microscope that you already have. Also, if you'd like to learn more about this technique, I have a PDF of an article I wrote on IlluminatIR several years ago. Just contact me off-line.

If you call Greg Durdock or Dave Johnson at SensIR (203-207-9708), they should be able to arrange to have some samples run for you to tell you whether or not this approach will work.

Hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

Caveat: MME helped to launch IlluminatIR but has no financial interest in this product.

At 12:51 AM 2/8/2005, George Theodossiou wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:36:28 2005



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 11:34:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MT-5000 Ultramicrotome Value

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone in this group know what the market value of a used MT-5000
ultramicrotome is worth?



Garry Burgess
Charge Technologist
Department of Electron Microscopy
Health Sciences Center
Winnipeg, Canada

This e-mail and/or any documents in this transmission is intended for the address(s) only and may contain legally privileged or confidential information. Any unauthorized use, disclosure, distribution, copying or dissemination is strictly prohibited. If you receive this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately and return the original.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:53:30 2005



From: Barbara :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 11:30:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Imaging Starch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear George,

Nothing fancy, but have you tried Polarized light? Starch exhibits a unique "Maltese Cross" pattern on a bright white background. While you will also get a Pol response from the cellulose, it will be dramatically different. You should be able to segment (for your quantification) either on the pattern or on the bright white areas of a specific size (depending on which software you have, you can use one of the "Fill Hole" algorithms to eliminate the areas of the cross)

As for distinguishing between different starches, I would think that simple FT-IR would be the key. I suspect there are slightly different IR signatures. The easiest implementation would be to add SensIR's IlluminatIR to an upright microscope that you already have. Also, if you'd like to learn more about this technique, I have a PDF of an article I wrote on IlluminatIR several years ago. Just contact me off-line.

If you call Greg Durdock or Dave Johnson at SensIR (203-207-9708), they should be able to arrange to have some samples run for you to tell you whether or not this approach will work.

Hope this is helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.

Caveat: MME helped to launch IlluminatIR but has no financial interest in this product.

At 12:51 AM 2/8/2005, George Theodossiou wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:56:37 2005



From: Barbara :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 11:53:20 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: help with focusing a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Nanette

Several thoughts come to mind:
The first is that there is a prism mis-aligned. I'm not familiar with this line of microscope: does it have an adjustable tube lens that raises the eyepiece up and down a substantial amount? If so, you may need to experiment to find the best setting.

The second thought is that you are mis-aligned (no disrespect intended). Are you sitting really close to the microscope? If so, try sitting close then slowly moving you head back from the eyepieces.

Let us know if either of these adjustments work.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education

We've moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
W: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

P. S.
Need a good general reference or light microscopy text? Visit our website to learn more about "Optimizing LIght Microscopy". Copies still available through MME... even for class-room lots ... and we give quantity discounts.





At 08:09 AM 2/8/2005, kinder-at-cableone.net wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 11:59:11 2005



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 12:58:13 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To find the ball of cells you could:
1. put some eosin in the dehydrating alcohols so you can see the cells.
Osmium might also work.
2. put the balls in gelatin or agar inside a tube you can see, a cross
section of aorta or small intestine might be worth a try.

Geoff

Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

} Hi All,
} I have just received a request to process balls of what had been mouse
} stem cells which have now been differentiated into cardiomyocytes.
} They are loose, spongy balls of cells that fall apart when prodded.
} The PI would like them embedded in paraffin and sectioned for light
} microscopy. If these were for EM, I'd be perfectly comfortable with
} the whole thing, but I am a bit boggled about how to handle
} infiltration and embedding in wax...they are essentially transparent
} and will disappear.
} I know that there was a thread about a similar topic a short time ago,
} where is was suggested that the samples in question be stained before
} embedding. The problem here is that the PI would like to be able to
} do a variety of staining protocols on the resultant slides.
} Ideas?
} thanks,
} Lee


--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 12:51:52 2005



From: Anjeanette Ormonde :      Anjeanette.Ormonde-at-unilever.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 13:49:38 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Cryo-EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,
Our lab has begun exploring cryo-SEM to look at the microstructure of
surfactant systems and other similar types of samples. However, as I have no
prior experience I'm never sure exactly what I'm looking at and what methods of
sample prep are best. It has been suggested that I form an outside
collaboration that can help us improve our cryo-capabilities and provide a much
needed "professional opinion". So, I'm looking for recommendations.
This person would probably have to give a talk to a small group of scientists
at some point but would primarily be working one-on-one with me. It isn't
exactly clear at this point how the relationship would work out but I'm
thinking a visit to our lab for 1 or 2 days then more frequent e-mail
conversations. If all goes well there may be an annual visit of about a day.
With the collaborative relationships I've seen in the past, the outside
parties are typically in a university setting. If you, or anyone you know,
might be interested in such a collaboration please let me know offline. The
only requirements are that they are recognized as an expert in the field and
have surfactant experience. I would need a CV showing any publications and
references would be nice.

Thanks,
Angie




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 12:55:29 2005



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 11:53:13 -0700 (MST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Lee - Could you make a giant Formvar sandwich with them? I'm worried that
they might fall apart when adding to agarose; does the PI need them as
intact balls?

Sounds like fun (picture me rolling my eyes).

Tamara

On Mon, 7 Feb 2005, Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi All,
} I have just received a request to process balls of what had been mouse stem
} cells which have now been differentiated into cardiomyocytes. They are
} loose, spongy balls of cells that fall apart when prodded. The PI would like
} them embedded in paraffin and sectioned for light microscopy. If these were
} for EM, I'd be perfectly comfortable with the whole thing, but I am a bit
} boggled about how to handle infiltration and embedding in wax...they are
} essentially transparent and will disappear.
} I know that there was a thread about a similar topic a short time ago, where
} is was suggested that the samples in question be stained before embedding.
} The problem here is that the PI would like to be able to do a variety of
} staining protocols on the resultant slides.
} Ideas?
} thanks,
} Lee
} --
} Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
} Sr. Staff Associate
} Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
} Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
} Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
} of Cornell University
} voice (212)746-6146
} fax (212)746-8175
}
}

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 13:16:35 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 14:14:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: processing loose balls of cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Tamara,
Yes, he'd like them intact. Luckily, he has dozens of them to play
with, so I will try a variety of things. I'm hoping that they have a
little structural integrity once they are fixed in pfa. It'll be
interesting.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 13:24:38 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 14:22:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] cell balls...thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thank you all for your helpful ideas. The leading candidates to try are:

1. encapsulating the cells in gelatin (staining either the cells or
the gelatin)
2. eosin staining the free-floating balls of cells during the last
dehyration steps so that they can be seen in the wax
3. putting the cell balls into either a "tea bag" within an embedding
cassette, or using the very fine mesh, divided cassettes and
processing as usual.

Luckily for me the PI has many, many of these little things, and is
willing to let me try a number of things.

As always, "the List" has come through again.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 13:26:35 2005



From: Terry E Ellis :      tellis2-at-hallmark.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 13:24:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] reference for starch in paper

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George:
In case you are concerned about the starch in the paper (internal
size, surface size, adhesive in pigment coating ) the book Analysis of
Paper by
B.L. Browning describes several wet chemistry methods to do so. For a more
modern approach see Surface Analysis of Paper by Terrance E. Conners and
Suji Banerjee, I think this book is less useful than the one by B. L.
Browning but it is interesting and has useful info on other components on
and in paper.
Terry E Ellis
Hallmark Cards Inc.
816-545-6573



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 13:26:51 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 14:24:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: MT-5000 Ultramicrotome Value

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

}
}
} Does anyone in this group know what the market value of a used MT-5000
ultramicrotome is worth?

It makes a very effective paperweight. Remember, that model is what
put Dupont out of the microtome business.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 15:10:03 2005



From: Phaedra McGuinness :      scanning-at-fams.org
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 16:25:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SCANNING 2005 Abstract Deadline Extended

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Well...Lee has a more environmentally friendly idea...mine was it also makes
a great boat anchor ;-)



Al Coritz
EMS/Diatome USA

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Garry Burgess" {GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca}
To: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2005 12:34 PM

Dear Listers:

Re: SCANNING 2005, April 5-7 in Monterey, California

**Please note the abstract deadline for submissions has been extended
to February 28. **

Please visit www.scanning.org for complete meeting details and the
updated preliminary program.

See you in beautiful Monterey!


Best regards,


Phaedra McGuinness
Managing Editor
SCANNING, The Journal of Scanning Microscopies
P.O. Box 485
Mahwah, NJ 07430
Tel: (201) 818-1010 * Fax: (201) 818-0086 *email: scanning-at-fams.org *
Web: www.scanning.org



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 16:39:28 2005



From: George Theodossiou :      George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 11:43:26 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Imaging Starch Part 2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would not be so harsh. I´m doing service on DuPont / RMC in Germany and my
experience had been that changing the lubricants and putting a day of work
into the microtome (older types from MT-5000 to MT-7000) would give some
more years of working time...
Sure: there are some microtomes not worth repairing...
Selling it depends on how reliable it cuts, how even the stages are working,
how equal the sections are in thickness... But I think you know this...

Best regards,
Stefan Diller



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Leona Cohen-Gould" {lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu}
To: "Garry Burgess" {GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca} ; "MSA listserver"
{Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2005 8:24 PM

Hi,

Thank you for all the responses. I didn't provide enough background
information in my original email so here is a bit more.

Optical microscopy using polarised light and exploiting the Maltese Cross
birefringence is great for 'uncooked' starch ie granules, but in paper and
cardboard the starch is 'cooked' and the granules which can be thought of as
a ball of string unwinds. The end result is a carbohydrate chain that glues
the cellulose fibres together and contributes to the strength and rigidity.


In electron microscopy we have the same issue. The paper and cardboard can
be sectioned by appropriate means and coated but cooked starch is nigh on
impossible to see amongst the cellulose fibres, fillers (CaCO3 and Clay),
optical brightners (TiO2) etc without tagging it in some way.

Amylase and diastase are enzymes that are used to chop up the carbohydrate
chains. The trick is to chop the starch up to lengths that give good
strength. If it continues to far and chops the chain down to its sugar
units, then we lose viscocity and the strength of the final product is
compromised.

The goal for us is to image the carbohydrate chains (cooked starch) in the
finished product (paper, cardboard, corrugated cardboard) to meet our four
points below. (for rolls 3-7 m wide and several kilometers long, but that's
a sampling problem)
1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution
2. To detect the starch spectroscopically
3. To find a way of differentiating between various starches (wheat, tapioca
and potato)
4. Quantify the starch

Thanks again for all your responses, I eagerly await the next round.

Regards
George

PS Philip, in melbourne on tha banks of the Yarra river. Great native
parklands nearby, excellent for running after work. Great city, with best
little Italian café...Pellegrinis. ;-)


George Theodossiou
Physicist / Microscopist
Microscopy and Microanalysis Laboratory

AMCOR Research and Technology
Ph: +61 3 9490 6135
Fax: +61 3 9499 4295
Mobile: 0409 568 840
email: George.Theodossiou-at-amcor.com.au


************************************************************************
CAUTION - This message may contain privileged and confidential
information intended only for the use of the addressee named above.
If you are not the intended recipient of this message you are hereby
notified that any use, dissemination, distribution or reproduction of
this message is prohibited. If you have received this message in error
please notify AMCOR immediately.
Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender
and may not necessarily reflect the views of AMCOR.
************************************************************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 8 20:34:25 2005



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 20:32:02 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Imaging Starch & Part 2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

George,

When you mention using iodine, I assume you are using a weak solution of
iodine-potassium iodide. (0.3g iodine, 1.5g potassium iodide, 100cc water.
The starch grains (depending on how modified they are from the
paper/cardboard mfg) will stain dark blue to black and the color will
disappear upon heating and reappear upon cooling. I wonder if you stain
with Safranin O first to get the cellulose in the "fibers" and then use the
Isub2KI for the solubilized starch.

Now reading your Imaging Starch Part 2, I see that you really want to see if
the starch has been digested too far, losing viscosity and strength. Are
you suggesting that you want to literally look at the dispersed cellulose
chain fragments amongst the plant fibers? That sounds like TEM method and
if you are looking at 30m wide rolls that are several km long your
statistics becomes an issue. Getting wisdom from a real old wizened and
yellowed Plant Microtechnique textbook by Donald Alexander Johansen (McGraw
Hill) and long out of print (1940). There is a Chapter on Microchemical
Methods - Carbohydrates - Sugars. It has tests for Sucrose, fructose,
maltose, amylodextrin and glucose. I wonder if you could run samples
testing for these components to see if the quantity of these other sugars
would give you an idea of how much the starch has been digested. I
understand that hydrolyzing the cellulose in the fibers, tracheids, and
vessel elements (the latter if only you are using angiosperm woods in the
mfg process) would presumably require 70-75% sulfuric acid or HCl (specific
gravity ???). Are you able to "macerate" the samples and separate the
fibers from the other particles?

I assume you have already obtained some of the three starch grains used in
the mfg process and have done a partial digestion and characterized those
first as well as determine whether or not you can also see the digestion
products.

If you want to check out the microchemical stains, safranin stains, I can
scan the pages for you and email them. Also a good reference for paper
fibers and starch grains is the McCrone Atlas and I have the entire series
on CD.

Damian Neuberger, Ph.D. (botany :-)
Microscopy and Digital Photography Consultant
2416 Covert Rd
Glenview IL 60025
Tel: (847) 998-8574
email: neuberger1234-at-comcast.net {mailto:neuberger1234-at-comcast.net}


Hi All,

A very broad question to draw out as many thoughts and ideas as possible.
We are at it again in the box factory trying to image starch in paper and
board and I am seeking every scrap of information I can lay my hands on. It
seems we visit this issue every year because we can never seem to find a
satisfactory solution. There are several things we would like to achieve:

1. To image the starch optically and look at its distribution
2. To detect the starch spectroscopically
3. To find a way of differentiating between various starches (wheat, tapioca
and potato)
4. Quantify the starch

We have tried the following in house and using external service providers:
Iodine staining (but it also stains the cellulose, therefore differentiating
starch and fibre is difficult)

Fluorescence microscopy using the stains Calcofluor White (cellulose) and
Con A-FTIC (Starch). Too much background fluorescence from starch.

TEM but getting sections is difficult. We were able to image the cellulose
fibers using the CBH gold conjugate but not the starch using the Con A-gold
conjugate.

Osmium Tetroxide staining, saw some faint staining across the samples but
nothing that would be indicative of the starch distribution

Ideas that I have brainstormed thus far (not all of them necessarily
useful):
EDXS, XPS, XRF, Tof SIMS, RBS, TEM, EELS, Fluorescent staining, X-ray
absorption/Diffraction/Tomography, Osmium staining with SEM/TEM (again),
Confocal, IR, E-SEM, Chemical etching of the fibres, gold labelling, NMR,
Raman, Conductivity (through two plates??? Different hydration??),
Ultrasound, FRET, Multi Photon Microscopy.

If you have any thoughts, ideas, comments, techniques, papers, texts on the
subject I would very much like to hear from you. I'll even take a wizened,
gnarled old microscopist, as long as they can image starch.

Thank you for all your help.

George





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 07:11:25 2005



From: Miller, Shea :      MILLERS-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 08:12:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all:

I have a user who is trying to look at GFP expression in plant leaves. We are having a hard time with the fluorescence from the chlorophyll masking everything else. Is there some way to quench the chlorophyll, without killing the GFP?



thanks in advance

shea


Dr. S. Shea Miller
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 613-759-1760
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 613-759-1701
Rm 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
960 Carling Ave.
Central Experimental Farm
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0C6
millers-at-agr.gc.ca

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 08:40:18 2005



From: R. Howard Berg :      rhberg-at-danforthcenter.org
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 08:40:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Shea,


Try keeping the excitation power as low as possible. When we image GFP
in leaves the chlorophyll starts getting in the way when it is emitting
enough light that this emission spills into the GFP channel.

Howard


On Feb 9, 2005, at 7:12 AM, Miller, Shea wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Hi all:
}
} I have a user who is trying to look at GFP expression in plant
} leaves. We are having a hard time with the fluorescence from the
} chlorophyll masking everything else. Is there some way to quench the
} chlorophyll, without killing the GFP?
}
}
}
} thanks in advance
}
} shea
}
}
} Dr. S. Shea Miller
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
} Telephone/Téléphone: 613-759-1760
} Facsimile/Télécopieur: 613-759-1701
} Rm 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
} 960 Carling Ave.
} Central Experimental Farm
} Ottawa, ON
} K1A 0C6
} millers-at-agr.gc.ca
}
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire
} Canada
}
}
}
}
R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Director, Integrated Microscopy Facility
Danforth Plant Science Center
975 N. Warson Rd.
St. Louis, MO 63132

ph 314-587-1261 fx 314-587-1361 cell 314-378-2409
rhberg-at-danforthcenter.org www.danforthcenter.org
visit this educational resource: http://www.danforthcenter.org/Cells/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 08:41:44 2005



From: dave.piston-at-Vanderbilt.Edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 08:43:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: 6th International Weber Symposium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (dave.piston-at-Vanderbilt.Edu)
from http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Wednesday, February 9, 2005 at 08:38:07
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dave.piston-at-Vanderbilt.Edu
Name: Dave Piston

Organization: Vanderbilt

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: 6th International Weber Symposium

Question:
Announcement and Call for Papers: 6th International Weber Symposium on
Innovative Fluorescence Methodologies in Biochemistry and Medicine; July
22-28, 2005, Kauai, Hawaii. Check out the www site:
http://lfd.uiuc.edu/weber/

This symposium series honors the fundamental and far-reaching
contributions of Professor Gregorio Weber (1916-1997). It provides a
current overview of modern fluorescence methodologies and applications
in the biological and medical sciences. As in the past six symposia,
speakers will describe state-of-the-art and emerging technologies used
in their research programs. Topics addressed will include multiphoton
fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, time-resolved fluorescence
instrumentation, single molecule studies, fluctuation correlation
spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging spectroscopy, fluorescence resonance
energy transfer, macromolecular (nucleic acids and proteins)
interactions, membrane dynamics, and quantitative cellular dynamics.
The symposium will close the evening of Wednesday, July 27th, with a
spectacular Hawaiian Luau, specifically designed for attendees of the
Weber Symposium.

REGISTRATION FEES: Professional = $400, Student/Guest = $200

Meeting will be held at the Kauai Marriott Resort and Beach Club,
located on Kalapaki Beach, Lihue, Hawaii, on the Island of Kauai
(1-800-220-2925). We have negotiated a room rate of $195 (plus 11.416%
tax) per night, applicable for the dates of the symposium, plus 3 days
before and after. Please identify yourself as a participant of the "6th
Innovative Fluorescence Methodologies in Biochemistry & Medicine
Symposium" in order to receive the special symposium rate.

Further information can be obtained from any of the organizers: David M.
Jameson, (djameson-at-hawaii.edu) or Enrico Gratton (lfd-at-uiuc.edu) or the
Conference Secretary, Julia Wright (wrightj-at-uiuc.edu).

Aloha!
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 09:01:39 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 10:02:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Shea,
The "plant people" may have an answer for you about quenching he
chlorophyll. My suggestion, from the hardware end, would be to find
out if anyone around you has a confocal microscope that can do
spectral separation ( eg: either the Zeiss Meta or the Leica). These
instruments can discriminate bands as narrow as 10nm and so can
separate out fluorescent signals that have similar spectra.
Lee

no commercial interest in either Zeiss or Leica...I'm just a happy
microscopist.
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 09:50:31 2005



From: Nunnemacher, Gretl :      Gretl.Nunnemacher-at-bhs.org
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 10:51:10 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] digital imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are a clinical electron microscopy laboratory that needs to start using digital imaging. We currently use a JEOL 1210 microscope. It has an older, side mounted CCD camera. The images were unsatisfactory and the process cumbersome, so we are still using 4489 EM film and an Ilford print processor. I would like to inquire about a good negative scanner and/or a better digital imaging system. Can anyone give me some advise? I woud appreciate any help I can get. Thanks, Gretl Nunnemacher


-----------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 09:52:51 2005



From: James Chalcroft :      jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 16:53:57 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Shea,

Are you sure that the problem is coming from the chlorophyll?
Chlorophyll is supposed to fluoresce around 665nm whereas your GFP should emit with a peak just over 500nm. Any reasonable suppression filter should be able to deal with that!
Perhaps you have an autofluorescence problem here?
If chlorophyll is really the problem, how about looking at etiolated leaf tissue?
Best wishes,

Jim

-----Original Message-----
} From: Miller, Shea [mailto:MILLERS-at-agr.gc.ca]
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2005 2:12 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Hi all:

I have a user who is trying to look at GFP expression in plant leaves. We are having a hard time with the fluorescence from the chlorophyll masking everything else. Is there some way to quench the chlorophyll, without killing the GFP?



thanks in advance

shea


Dr. S. Shea Miller
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 613-759-1760
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 613-759-1701
Rm 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
960 Carling Ave.
Central Experimental Farm
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0C6
millers-at-agr.gc.ca

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 10:22:15 2005



From: JLaGoy :      Jane.LaGoy-at-bodycote.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 11:36:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] refurbishing Nikon microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello listers,

We have a Nikon Optiphot light microscope, still in good shape except for
spots that are either somewhere on some unreachable lens or are defects
(pits?) in a lens or mirror. The last time it was routinely cleaned by a
professional nothing they did could eliminate the fuzzy spots in pictures.
We also have a Nikon Epiphot with similar problems but not as bad. My
question is, can anyone recommend a Nikon microscope repair shop, or someone
that refurbishes these microscopes that would have parts for them? We have
some stereology work coming up that I won't be able to do accurately if I
can't get rid of the spots!

Thank you,

Jane

Jane L. LaGoy
R&D Engineer
Bodycote HIP
155 River Street
Andover, MA 01810
978-470-1620 x429
FAX 978-475-2951
jane.lagoy-at-bodycote.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 10:50:04 2005



From: Mark Grimson :      mark.grimson-at-ttu.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 10:45:01 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Kleinschmidt DNA spreading protocol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello, I was looking for a detailed protocol of the Kleinschmidt DNA
spreading technique. I have never done this technique before, so any tips
or tricks would be appreciated as well. Thanks in advance, Mark




Mark J. Grimson Ph.D
Department of Biological Sciences
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, TX 79409-3131

806-742-2704 (phone)
806-742-2963 (fax)
mark.grimson-at-ttu.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 11:14:53 2005



From: Daniel Shaw Porter :      danielshawporter-at-uky.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 12:14:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Embedding bone procedure for SEM and TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
Does anyone know how to embed and stain rat bone for SEM and TEM use? What is the procedure? Also I would like if possible to keep the bone calcified.
Thanks
Daniel S. Porter
Grad Student at the
University of Kentucky





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 12:17:37 2005



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 10:18:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: digital imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A good scanner is an Epson Perfection 4870 photo. Great for negatives,
but you may need to build a holder out of posterboard for TEM negatives.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Wed, 9 Feb 2005, Nunnemacher, Gretl wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} We are a clinical electron microscopy laboratory that needs to start
} using digital imaging. We currently use a JEOL 1210 microscope. It has
} an older, side mounted CCD camera. The images were unsatisfactory and
} the process cumbersome, so we are still using 4489 EM film and an Ilford
} print processor. I would like to inquire about a good negative scanner
} and/or a better digital imaging system. Can anyone give me some advise?
} I woud appreciate any help I can get. Thanks, Gretl Nunnemacher
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email communication and any attachments may contain confidential and privileged information for the use of the designated recipients named above. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this communication in error and that any review, disclosure, dissemination, distribution or copying of it or its contents is prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please reply to the sender immediately or by telephone at (413) 794-0000 and destroy all copies of this communication and any attachments. For further information regarding Baystate Health System's privacy policy, please visit our Internet web site at http://www.baystatehealth.com.
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 12:43:38 2005



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 13:53:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] MSA Videos

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You could try contacting Phil Hutcheson at Arc Micro Optics,
arcmicro-at-mikrotec.com, 859-498-1345.

Jeff Stewart
Metallographic Laboratory Manager
Stern-Leach Company
49 Pearl Street
Attleboro, MA 02703
508-222-7400 x1329
----- Original Message -----
} From: "JLaGoy" {Jane.LaGoy-at-bodycote.com}
To: "Microscopy Listserver (E-mail)" {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2005 11:36 AM

We have reduced the prices on many of the MSA videos
(DVDs). These are the older ones that may be out of date to one degree or
another. Most, however, still contain valuable information, especially for
beginners. We hope that these lower prices will allow more students to
take advantage of our archives. The full listing of DVD's and the new
price schedule can be found at the following URL:
http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/newtape00.htm

Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
Scientific Director, Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 118525
217 Carr Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295
fax- 352-846-0251



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 13:21:09 2005



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 11:18:27 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotome drive belt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi:

I just sat down to do some sectioning with our antique ulstramicrotome and
it was a no go.

I took the cover off and found the 'drive belt' broken. It looks like a
simple O-ring to me and I was just going to find one around here, but I
thought I would check the group for advice.

This is an AO Ultracut, circa 1981. Getting the old, broken belt off was
easy, putting a new one on might be a little more challenging. Any
experience out there?

Also, when I went to the catalog to size and price a replacement, I was
knocked out by the number of choices, both size and material. I can get the
size figured out, but any advice on material? Buna-N, Viton, Silicone and
EPDM seem to be the main choices.

Thanks

Jon

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 14:01:10 2005



From: David Knecht :      david.knecht-at-uconn.edu
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 14:45:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I haven't done this myself, but it may qualify for a relatively low
tech solution. If you also acquire images in a non-GFP emission
wavelength channel, you should simply be able to subtract out the
chlorophyll background since it is likely much broader in emission
profile than GFP. Once you know the % crosstalk of the probe under
your conditions, this should be fairly straightforward to do for all
images. Dave


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
91 N. Eagleville Rd. U-3125
Storrs, CT 06269-3125
knecht-at-uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 14:17:03 2005



From: Judy Murphy :      murphyjudy-at-comcast.net
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 12:16:58 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: digital imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The Epson 4870 scanner comes with a 4 x 5 holder which holds two of
them. Turn the 3 1/4" x 4" TEM negs sideways and they fit perfectly.
If you are super critical, one can cut a piece of exposed TEM film to
fit the little extra that the TEM film doesn't cover. Works great.
Have used it for years with the duo Agfa 2500 and now the Epson 4870.

Judy

Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy, Imaging & Lab Design Consultant
Stockton, CA 95219
murphyjudy-at-comcast.net

Gordon Vrololjak wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} A good scanner is an Epson Perfection 4870 photo. Great for
} negatives, but you may need to build a holder out of posterboard for
} TEM negatives.
} Gordon
}
} \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
}
} Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron
} Microscope Lab
} AOL/IM rakhasha http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini
} Hall
} gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
} phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA
} 94720-3330
} fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793
}
} On Wed, 9 Feb 2005, Nunnemacher, Gretl wrote:
}
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } We are a clinical electron microscopy laboratory that needs to start
} } using digital imaging. We currently use a JEOL 1210 microscope. It
} } has an older, side mounted CCD camera. The images were
} } unsatisfactory and the process cumbersome, so we are still using 4489
} } EM film and an Ilford print processor. I would like to inquire about
} } a good negative scanner and/or a better digital imaging system. Can
} } anyone give me some advise? I woud appreciate any help I can get.
} } Thanks, Gretl Nunnemacher
} }
} }
} } -----------------------------------------
} } CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email communication and any attachments
} } may contain confidential and privileged information for the use of
} } the designated recipients named above. If you are not the intended
} } recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this
} } communication in error and that any review, disclosure,
} } dissemination, distribution or copying of it or its contents is
} } prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please
} } reply to the sender immediately or by telephone at (413) 794-0000 and
} } destroy all copies of this communication and any attachments. For
} } further information regarding Baystate Health System's privacy
} } policy, please visit our Internet web site at
} } http://www.baystatehealth.com.
} }
} }
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 16:13:20 2005



From: slc6-at-lehigh.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 16:14:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SPM Course at Lehigh U

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (slc6-at-lehigh.edu) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, February 9, 2005 at 14:55:19
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: slc6-at-lehigh.edu
Name: Sharon Coe

Organization: Lehigh University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: SPM Course at Lehigh U

Question: SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY: FROM FUNDAMENTALS TO ADVANCED
APPLICATIONS
June 6-9, 2005 Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA
www.lehigh.edu/microscopy

This course introduces the concepts, instrumentation, and
applications of the rapidly expanding field of scanning probe
microscopy (SPM) for beginners and advanced users. The course will
include the practical and theoretical basis of AFM and STM operation.
Instruction and hands-on labs will span the range of basic operation
to advanced techniques, even presenting some of the newest 'custom
designed' approaches that will be the future of the field.
Participants will take away the necessary background to utilize the
full potential of SPM for semiconductor, MEMS, data storage, and
biological applications.

This course is presented by instructors with distinguished
records in inventing advanced SPM probes, producing SPM based
textbooks and instructional materials, and leading the implementation
of SPM in electronics, nanotechnology, and bio-related fields.

Prof. Dawn Bonnell (University of Pennsylvania),
Dr. Joe Griffith (Lucent Technologies, Bell Labs - Retired),
Prof. Richard Vinci (Lehigh University),
Prof. Brian Huey (University of Connecticut) and
Dr. Sergei Kalinin (Oak Ridge National Lab)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 9 23:21:02 2005



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2005 16:22:24 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Shea,

On a confocal, you can collect chlorophyll autofluorescence above about 650
nm and if you collect GFP in a narrow band in the green, you should be able
to detect the "pure" green from GFP separately from any chlorophyll
autofluorescence. You could also subtract the red from green, or use
whatever dye separation package is available on the microscope. While
chlorophyll is not supposed to autofluoresce in the green, we routinely see
some fluorescence there. If your chloroplasts are "suffering" you'll get
more autofluroescence in the green and yellow. Treating the tissue with
DCMU should reduce chlorophyll fluorescence, it's a herbicide that attacks
one of the quinones (can't remember which) in the photosynthesis electron
transport pathway. Not sure if it has other effects in the cell. In
contrast (if I remember correctly), PCMBS will enhance chlorophyll
fluorescence.

If you have narrow-band emission filters on a regular fluorescence
microscope, you could collect chlorophyll autofluorescence using a Texas Red
filter, and GFP with a narrow-band green emission filter, and overlay them.
If GFP is there, you should see it.

good luck,
cheers,
Rsoemary

Dr. Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre ph. 61-2-6246 5475
CSIRO Plant Industry mob. 61-0402 835 973
GPO Box 1600 fax. 61-2-6246 5334
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

} From: "Miller, Shea" {MILLERS-at-agr.gc.ca}
} Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2005 08:12:06 -0500
} To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] LM - GFP in plants
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Hi all:
}
} I have a user who is trying to look at GFP expression in plant leaves. We
} are having a hard time with the fluorescence from the chlorophyll masking
} everything else. Is there some way to quench the chlorophyll, without killing
} the GFP?
}
}
}
} thanks in advance
}
} shea
}
}
} Dr. S. Shea Miller
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
} Telephone/Téléphone: 613-759-1760
} Facsimile/Télécopieur: 613-759-1701
} Rm 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
} 960 Carling Ave.
} Central Experimental Farm
} Ottawa, ON
} K1A 0C6
} millers-at-agr.gc.ca
}
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 10 01:45:20 2005



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2005 08:46:02 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: LM - GFP in plants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Shea,

If available of course, spectral unmixing, as possible with the Zeiss
META detector on a confocal microscope, you should be perfectly able to
split the GFP from autofluorescence! Otherwise, as stated before,
subtraction of autofluorescence in another channel (650nm) from the by a
narrow GFP-filter obtained image might already help you much further!

Sven


On Feb 9, 2005, at 7:12 AM, Miller, Shea wrote:

}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Hi all:
}
} I have a user who is trying to look at GFP expression in plant
} leaves. We are having a hard time with the fluorescence from the
} chlorophyll masking everything else. Is there some way to quench the

} chlorophyll, without killing the GFP?
}
}
}
} thanks in advance
}
} shea
}
}
} Dr. S. Shea Miller
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
} Telephone/Téléphone: 613-759-1760
} Facsimile/Télécopieur: 613-759-1701
} Rm 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
} 960 Carling Ave.
} Central Experimental Farm
} Ottawa, ON
} K1A 0C6
} millers-at-agr.gc.ca
}
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire
} Canada
}
}
}
}
R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Director, Integrated Microscopy Facility
Danforth Plant Science Center
975 N. Warson Rd.
St. Louis, MO 63132

ph 314-587-1261 fx 314-587-1361 cell 314-378-2409
rhberg-at-danforthcenter.org www.danforthcenter.org
visit this educational resource: http://www.danforthcenter.org/Cells/






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 10 13:50:28 2005



From: Lett, Jaclynn :      LettJ-at-ent.wustl.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2005 13:51:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: JEOL 100S

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are planning to sell a 27-year old JEOL 100S TEM (with water chiller
and vacuum pumps; uses 3x4-inch plate film). If any of you have
purchased or sold an old scope recently, I would like to know the price
paid.

Thank you so much for your help,

Jaclynn Lett
Senior Research Technician
ENT Research Center
Washington University School of Medicine
Department of Otolaryngology
660 S. Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8115
St. Louis, MO 63110

lettj-at-ent.wustl.edu

Voice: 314-747-7257
Fax: 314-747-7230




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 11 03:15:41 2005



From: Ursula Potter :      U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 09:16:56 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM of phage in section

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

Has anyone ever looked at bacteriophage in sectioned material. I have been
asked if this is possible and to embed and section a bacterium with phage
either on the outside or inside. Apart from immunocytochemical labelling
and negative staining of extracted phage I am pretty sure that its not
possible to distinguish phage in sections. However, I would be grateful for
any comments on the problem.

Thanks & Regards
Ursula
-----------------

Ursula J. Potter
Centre for Electron Optical Studies
The University of Bath
Claverton Down
Bath BA2 7AY
UK
Tel: 01225 385651
E-mail: U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 11 05:10:29 2005



From: Reinhard Rachel :      reinhard.rachel-at-biologie.uni-regensburg.de
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 12:11:24 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM of phage in sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I just found a very recent article, covering this topic. I'm sure there

are earlier papers as well.

Kind regards,

Reinhard Rachel

Sandra Chibani-Chennoufi et al (2004) J. Bacteriol. 2004 November;
186(21): 7069 7083.


-------------------------------
PD Dr.Reinhard Rachel
Universität Regensburg
Lehrstuhl für Mikrobiologie
Universitaetsstr. 31
D-93053 Regensburg
tel.: +49 941 943 4534
fax.: +49 941 943 1824




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 11 06:28:44 2005



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 14:46:14 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: problems with NMR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ursula,

I have and you can see some detail (not as much as in negative stain).
You can make out tail and head quite clearly. The only thing is you
need to look at quite a few cells to get the perfect picture with the
phage in section attached to the surface of the bacterium. I think I
could even see the difference between phage containing DNA and empty
ones still attached. You can of course see the forming phage inside the
bug, as well.

If you want, I can see if I can rustle up a couple of pictures - off
the newsgroup of course.


Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk



----- Original Message -----
} From: Ursula Potter {U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk}

Hi,

Does anybody know of any problems with an NMR unit
about 6 meters away from a 200 kV FEGTEM used for
imaging up to about 0.3 nm resolution?

Yours,

Philip




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 11 10:44:23 2005



From: Christopher Gilpin :      christopher.gilpin-at-utsouthwestern.edu
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 11:05:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: problems with NMR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Philip

I don't know which TEM and NMR you mean, but I do know of some problems
with a Hitachi S2300 SEM. The NMR was a 15 year old JEOL with a
superconducting magnet (LN2 and He cooled) and it was between 5-10
metres from the SEM.

The operator of the SEM reckoned that he had to adjust his stigmators
quite a bit more but could still achieve reasonable results because the
field didn't change much. Of course the 2300 is thermionic tungsten SEM
and not very high resolution so you might expect more problems with a
field emission gun TEM maybe at lower voltages.

The NMR manufacturer should have information about the intensity and
shape of the magnet's field and you should be able to compare that with
the sensitivity of magnetic field that affects the TEM. A site survey
should be carried out if one or other of the instruments is about to be
installed anyway.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk



----- Original Message -----
} From: Philip Koeck {Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se}

Philip,
We have an NMR close to our 200Kv FEG. Not as close as yours though! - about
50 feet diagonally up 2 floors.
I asked many questions prior to our installation (the NMR was there first).
The result of the questions is that the field near the microscope is static
DC around 5m Gauss with fluctuations well below the requirements of the
microscope. The only time when there could be a problem is when the magnets
are run up and down. Our NMR is a twin 14.4T system.

We had an additional problem however. The external doors in our building
are made from metal for fire precautions. Each time a door is opened the
"static" DC field changes! This was identified at site survey time and was
amusingly confirmed by me running up and down stairs opening doors whilst
recording field changes at the proposed microscope location. We decided to
install a field cancelling system and this takes care of the problem.

Hope this helps

Chris


Christopher J. Gilpin Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Director, Molecular and Cellular Imaging Facility
K1.A04
Department of Cell Biology
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
5323 Harry Hines Boulevard
Dallas, Texas 75390-9039
+1 214 648 2827 Phone
+1 214 648 6408 Fax
christopher.gilpin-at-utsouthwestern.edu


-----Original Message-----
} From: Philip Koeck [mailto:Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se]
Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 7:46 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Hi,

Does anybody know of any problems with an NMR unit about 6 meters away from
a 200 kV FEGTEM used for imaging up to about 0.3 nm resolution?

Yours,

Philip





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 11 14:21:21 2005



From: Eric Anderson :      andersone1-at-southernct.edu
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:21:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Philips EM400 Leak Tip?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings all,

We very suddenly developed a significant vacuum leak somewhere in the
viewing chamber or plate camera of our EM400, as PV3 won't come down any
lower than to about 30 microamps. Before I start checking every last
joint, are there any very typical seals or valves that fail in this
portion of the scope?

Thanks so much for any tips!
Best regards,
~Eric

Eric Anderson
Southern Connecticut State University
Physics Department - JE108B
501 Crescent Street
New Haven, CT 06515
203-392-6468
fax 203-392-6466




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 12 03:35:07 2005



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 09:35:31 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Philips EM400 Leak Tip?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

The large O-ring that seals the lid. You need to lift it out and
clean the lid face, O-ring itself and the seating.

Next try the drive mechanism which moves the plates in and out. If
you swing out the rear unit, the drive mechanism is fairly easy to
get at. If I remember correctly, 3 bolts hold it in place. Remove
these and the whole mechnism comes out (you'll have to power down the
microscope and depressurise the pneumatics so you can disconnect the
pneumatic hoses from the piston).

The drive rod often dries out or gets dirt on it or, occassionally,
scratched. You'll need to check the sliding seal between the
pneumatic piston and the camera chamber.

The pointer seal is also worth checking.

These three are my first choice because they're either frequently
broken or they're sliding seals. If you have a CCD camera in the 35
mm port, I think I'd go for that first. Remove it completely and
replace the original blaning plates.
--
Larry Stoter
JEOL (UK) Ltd
tel: +44-(0)1707-377117, fax: +44-(0)1707-373254, e-mail: larrys-at-jeoleuro.com

PLEASE NOTE
1. Any mail other than plain text will be automatically deleted.
2. Any mail, legitimate or not, apparently or actually from hotmail,
netscape, yahoo or excite will automatically be deleted.
3. Mail with no subject or without a clear subject will be ignored :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 12 14:41:57 2005



From: staylor-at-fit.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2005 07:43:25 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: LKB 7800 glass knifemaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (staylor-at-fit.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Micro-Form.html
on Friday, February 11, 2005 at 09:33:25
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: staylor-at-fit.edu
Name: Scott Taylor

School: Fl. Inst. of Technology

State: FL

Zip: 32901

Question: Does anyone know where I can purchase replacement scoring
wheels for the LKB 7800 glass knifemaker?

Thank you!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 12 21:26:15 2005



From: jdatkins-at-ualr.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2005 14:27:42 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: cyanobacteria-anabaena cell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (jdatkins-at-ualr.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Saturday, February 12, 2005 at 15:46:24
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jdatkins-at-ualr.edu
Name: Jennifer Wells

Organization: UALR(University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Little Rock, Arkansas

Question: How do I measure the photosynthetic and heterocysts of the
cyanobacteria-anabaena cell with the base pointer of the microscope?
I know that the width of the base is 15mm. I also know that most
photosynthetic cells are 5 micrometers and most heterocysts cells are
larger, about 9 to 10 micrometers. How would I get a filament value
for how many of each would fit inside the 15mm base?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 13 10:53:13 2005



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2005 11:53:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM of phage in section

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ursula,
Check out the references below for cyanobacteria infected with phage.
They are from back in the late 60's but to my knowledge the quality has not
been surpassed since. One of the authors later became my husband so I knew
the work quite well. We have used this fixation (PAF-Acrolein) periodically
through the years with excellent results each time.

Safferman, R.S., Morris, M.E., Sherman, L.A. and Haselkorn, R. 1969.
Serological and electron microscopic characterization of a new group of
blue-green alga viruses (LPP-2). Virology 39:755-780.

Sherman, L.A. and Haselkorn, R. 1970. LPP-1 infection of the blue-green
alga Plectonema boryanum. I. Electron Microscopy J. Virol. 6:820-833.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy


On 2/11/05 4:16 AM, "Ursula Potter" {U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Dear all,
}
} Has anyone ever looked at bacteriophage in sectioned material. I have been
} asked if this is possible and to embed and section a bacterium with phage
} either on the outside or inside. Apart from immunocytochemical labelling
} and negative staining of extracted phage I am pretty sure that its not
} possible to distinguish phage in sections. However, I would be grateful for
} any comments on the problem.
}
} Thanks & Regards
} Ursula
} -----------------
}
} Ursula J. Potter
} Centre for Electron Optical Studies
} The University of Bath
} Claverton Down
} Bath BA2 7AY
} UK
} Tel: 01225 385651
} E-mail: U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 14 04:10:12 2005



From: Massimo :      andromeda_tm-at-libero.it
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 11:11:25 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Microphotos and reticule eyepiece...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Torino 14 February 2005
(ITALY)

Hi everyone,

I was wondering if anyone is familiar with a Lomo MFN-11 head and its Zenit 122 camera, placed on his microscope.
I want to do some photos and I’d like to talk about the adjustment of the focus on the film plane through the eyepiece reticule.
I do not understand how I can focus the reticule. Have I to keep the alone eyepiece and, seeing through it, to turn the frontal lens up to I see the reticule on focus, then place it in the eyepiece place.
But in such way I do not understand what’s the matter with focusing the image on the film plane.
Thank you in advance for your assistance.
Best Regards,

Massimo




____________________________________________________________
Navighi a 2 MEGA e i primi 3 mesi sono GRATIS.
Scegli Libero Adsl Flat senza limiti su http://www.libero.it





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 14 11:02:32 2005



From: carl :      cboswell-at-email.arizona.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 10:04:18 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] axioplan parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,
I'm looking for the Fluorescent attachment, whole or in part, for an older
Zeiss Axioplan. Pictures of the the scope and the rear attachemnt site can
be found at: http://www.mcb.arizona.edu/ipc/cb/axioplan.htm. Fluorescent
cubes/slider would also be good.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks very much,
Carl

Carl A. Boswell, Ph.D.
Molecular and Cellular Biology
University of Arizona
520-626-8469
FAX 520-621-3709



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 14 14:10:09 2005



From: engstler-at-lmu.de (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 07:11:22 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: best way to remove azide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (engstler-at-lmu.de) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Monday, February 14, 2005 at 10:40:09
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: engstler-at-lmu.de
Name: Markus Engstler

Organization: University of Munich

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: azide

Question: Hi - I 'd like to do some work on fluid phase endocytosis
of (BSA)gold-conjugates (5nm). Most preparations contain azide, which
will kill my cells. What is the best way to remove azide from the
gold-conjugate without diluting/harming the preparation. Any advice
is appreciated, Markus

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 14 17:18:38 2005



From: Jerry Kudenov :      afjdk-at-uaa.alaska.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:19:51 -0900
Subject: [Microscopy] Need LM Recipe for Muller's Fluid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,

A graduate student here is looking for a recipe for Mullers fluid. I have it
someplace but am unable to lay my hands on it. It is a hardening solution
based on potassium dichromate, sodium sulfate and water. What are the
suggested/recommended proportions. Thank you in advance!

Sincerely,

Jerry

-------------------------------------
Jerry D. Kudenov
Dept Biological Sciences
Univ. Alaska Anchorage
3211 Providence Dr
Anchorage, AK 99508

Office: 907-786-1769
Fax???? 907-786-4607
Email: afjdk-at-uaa.alaska.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 08:20:29 2005



From: Ruth Kramer :      ruthie-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 09:20:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: RE: weekend

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Hi David,

Hope the rest of your weekend went well. Betsy
never made it up because she had the flu, but
here is the message she sent me. It won't hurt to
connect with her.

Hope to see you on March 19th at Flo's for Byrd's 60th birthday. Take care.

Ruthie

} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: weekend
} Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:38:26 -0600
} Thread-Topic: weekend
} Thread-Index: AcUSviUD5CIoEvaRTiCR2nIXMgdjFgAFug8w
} From: "Schultz, Elizabeth \(STP\)" {elizabeth.schultz-at-guidant.com}
} To: "Ruth Kramer" {ruthie-at-mtu.edu}
} X-OriginalArrivalTime: 14 Feb 2005 20:38:27.0052
} (UTC) FILETIME=[22C3D2C0:01C512D5]
} X-PMX-Version: 4.7.0.111621, Antispam-Engine:
} 2.0.2.0, Antispam-Data: 2005.2.14.12
} X-PerlMx-Spam: Gauge=IIIIIII, Probability=7%,
} Report='__C230066_P5 0, __CT 0, __CTE 0,
} __CTYPE_CHARSET_QUOTED 0, __CT_TEXT_PLAIN 0,
} __HAS_MSGID 0, __HIGHBITS 0, __IMS_MSGID 0,
} __MIME_VERSION 0, __SANE_MSGID 0'
}
} Ruthie,
}
} Glad to hear your trip well well. I feel bad
} missing David-feel free to give him my email
} address in case he has any concerns. He can
} also email me his resume. Whatever works!
}
} B
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Ruth Kramer [mailto:ruthie-at-mtu.edu]
} Sent: Monday, February 14, 2005 11:52 AM
} To: Schultz, Elizabeth (STP)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: weekend
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Yes, we are still planning on coming. I haven't
} made a motel reservation yet, but will probably
} do that today or tomorrow. We hope to stay at the
} one motel in Cambridge, and it is just off 35 -
} easy to find. I'm sure your cousins will be
} delighted to see you, also!
}
} Sorry to hear you weren't feeling well. I was
} afraid you didn't come because I was gone. If
} there is any consolation, the warm weather made
} this one of the worst seasons for statues we have
} ever had.
}
} I'm so glad I went to Aunt Mary's funeral. About
} 22 out of the remaining 43 cousins were there. I
} put on 1300 miles between Thursday and Sunday and
} was exhausted by the time I got home yesterday.
} Wish your Dad could have made it.
}
} I'll get the details of the weekend to you later
} this week. Angela's family will be staying at the
} same motel so I think it makes sense to do
} everything there. We will probably just go out
} for a meal rather than anyone trying to fix &
} bring. there is a pool and stuff, so we can just
} relax there.
}
} Love,
} R.
}
}
} --
} §§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§
}
} Ruth I. Schultz Kramer
} Scientist, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Houghton, MI 49931
} 906-487-3375


--
§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§

Ruth I. Schultz Kramer
Scientist, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Houghton, MI 49931
906-487-3375



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 11:10:09 2005



From: psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 12:10:27 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM Recipe for Muller's Fluid

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Quoting Jerry Kudenov {afjdk-at-uaa.alaska.edu} :
} A graduate student here is looking for a recipe for Mullers fluid. I have it
} someplace but am unable to lay my hands on it. It is a hardening solution
} based on potassium dichromate, sodium sulfate and water. What are the
} suggested/recommended proportions. Thank you in advance!
}
} Sincerely,

} Jerry D. Kudenov
} Dept Biological Sciences
} Univ. Alaska Anchorage
} 3211 Providence Dr
} Anchorage, AK 99508
======================
Jerry,

Muller's Fluid is as follows:
Potassium bichromate 2.5 Gm.
Sodium sulfate crystals 1.0 Gm.
Distilled water 100 cc.

The reference is in Histopathologic Technic and Practical Histochemistry
by R. D. Lillie 1954 on page 332. The coppyright is The Blakiston Company, Inc.
but printed by the Country Life Press Corp., Garden City, NY

Muller's Fluid was used as a Fixative and a Mordant by Pal and by Wolters for
Myelin for 2 - 3 weeks each step.

I knew this old book would have a use!

Pat Connelly
Dept. of Biology
Univ. of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 13:50:50 2005



From: amal1966_2-at-yahoo.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 07:07:06 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Bone samles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hey

Flo didn't invite me.

Am I on the outer, or what?


rtch


Date sent: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 09:20:40 -0500
To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} From: Ruth Kramer {ruthie-at-mtu.edu}

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (amal1966_2-at-yahoo.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at 02:36:45
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: amal1966_2-at-yahoo.com
Name: Amal El Shikh

Education: Graduate College

Location: Saudi Arabia

Question: How I can prepare Bone samles For Electron microscopy

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 15:05:30 2005



From: Ken Converse :      kenconverse-at-qualityimages.biz
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 16:04:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Stigmator, aperture, and lens adjustment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ritchie,
Somehow I didn't make the shift to the new system, but now I'm back on
(thanks, Nestor). I had held this message from you and checked the January
archives and didn't see the reply you were looking for, so here's the simple
explanation of what they're trying to do:

When you flip the objective lens polarity back and forth, the images flips
about 180 degrees (or perhaps something less), but that point of rotation
isn't necessarily in the center of the CRT. The idea is to try and get some
identifiable point on your sample moved to the center of rotation (i.e.
about half way between the 2 places that it shows up when you flip the
switch).

Once your identifiable point no longer moves (or moves very far), you then
use the adjustment handles for the condenser lens to move that point to the
center of the CRT. Now, if you flip the lens polarity, the image should
rotate around the center of the CRT. It is important to use the CLEAR OL
button (I always do both lenses at the same time, and hold them down for not
less than 1 second, 2 may be better, but consistency is also important) to
find the true center of rotation.

I think one of the reasons their directions are so confusing is because most
of the time you are going to need to make corrections on 2 axes to get your
point to the point of rotation and they don’t explain that that is what they
are doing.

Hope this helps.

Ken Converse

owner 
QUALITY IMAGES
Servicing Scanning Electron Microscopes
Since 1981
16 Creek Rd.
Delta, PA 17314
717-456-5491
Fax 717-456-7996
kenconverse-at-qualityimages.biz
qualityimages.biz


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2004 6:55 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com


Thanks, Randy and shAf, for your contributions re stigmator and aperture
adjustment.

I've never been able to make much sense of the JEOL (840) instructions for
condenser
lens alignment. It seems they take me into a loop from which there is no
escape other
than giving up (yet again) in frustration.

Do you guys, or does anyone, have either a lucid step-by-step procedure for
this, or an
explanation of what is aiming to be achieved that I can translate into
specifics for the
840?

I use the thing only as a microprobe, so the spot tightness isn't a real
issue, but it would
be nice to be able to do the sort of imaging that I know the 840 is capable
of, and I
suspect that beam current stability is improved by good alignment.

Happy New Year

rtch



--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext
87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email :
r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand






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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 15:21:22 2005



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 10:21:57 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] apology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I apologise to you, Ruth, and to the list, for being so mean-spirited and grumpy and
reforwarding the personal email which Ruth accidentally sent to the list.

I haven't yet made that simple mistake, but maybe I will in the future.

sorry

cheers

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 16:34:33 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 14:34:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Fwd: RE: weekend

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i didn't get an invite either.
now i am depressed.
--- Ritchie Sims {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Hey
}
} Flo didn't invite me.
}
} Am I on the outer, or what?
}
}
} rtch
}
}
} Date sent: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 09:20:40 -0500
} To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} } From: Ruth Kramer {ruthie-at-mtu.edu}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: RE: weekend
}
} }
} }
} }
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor:
} The Microscopy Society
} } of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} }
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} } } Hi David,
} }
} } Hope the rest of your weekend went well. Betsy
} } never made it up because she had the flu, but
} } here is the message she sent me. It won't hurt to
} } connect with her.
} }
} } Hope to see you on March 19th at Flo's for Byrd's
} 60th birthday. Take
} } care.
} }
} } Ruthie
} }
} } } Subject: [Microscopy] RE: weekend
} } } Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:38:26 -0600
} } } Thread-Topic: weekend
} } } Thread-Index:
} AcUSviUD5CIoEvaRTiCR2nIXMgdjFgAFug8w
} } } From: "Schultz, Elizabeth \(STP\)"
} {elizabeth.schultz-at-guidant.com}
} } } To: "Ruth Kramer" {ruthie-at-mtu.edu}
} X-OriginalArrivalTime: 14 Feb 2005
} } } 20:38:27.0052 (UTC) FILETIME=[22C3D2C0:01C512D5]
} X-PMX-Version:
} } } 4.7.0.111621, Antispam-Engine: 2.0.2.0,
} Antispam-Data: 2005.2.14.12
} } } X-PerlMx-Spam: Gauge=IIIIIII, Probability=7%,
} Report='__C230066_P5 0,
} } } __CT 0, __CTE 0, __CTYPE_CHARSET_QUOTED 0,
} __CT_TEXT_PLAIN 0,
} } } __HAS_MSGID 0, __HIGHBITS 0, __IMS_MSGID 0,
} __MIME_VERSION 0,
} } } __SANE_MSGID 0'
} } }
} } } Ruthie,
} } }
} } } Glad to hear your trip well well. I feel bad
} } } missing David-feel free to give him my email
} } } address in case he has any concerns. He can
} } } also email me his resume. Whatever works!
} } }
} } } B
} } }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Ruth Kramer [mailto:ruthie-at-mtu.edu]
} } } Sent: Monday, February 14, 2005 11:52 AM
} } } To: Schultz, Elizabeth (STP)
} } } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: weekend
} } }
} } }
} } } Hi,
} } }
} } } Yes, we are still planning on coming. I haven't
} } } made a motel reservation yet, but will probably
} } } do that today or tomorrow. We hope to stay at the
} } } one motel in Cambridge, and it is just off 35 -
} } } easy to find. I'm sure your cousins will be
} } } delighted to see you, also!
} } }
} } } Sorry to hear you weren't feeling well. I was
} } } afraid you didn't come because I was gone. If
} } } there is any consolation, the warm weather made
} } } this one of the worst seasons for statues we have
} } } ever had.
} } }
} } } I'm so glad I went to Aunt Mary's funeral. About
} } } 22 out of the remaining 43 cousins were there. I
} } } put on 1300 miles between Thursday and Sunday and
} } } was exhausted by the time I got home yesterday.
} } } Wish your Dad could have made it.
} } }
} } } I'll get the details of the weekend to you later
} } } this week. Angela's family will be staying at the
} } } same motel so I think it makes sense to do
} } } everything there. We will probably just go out
} } } for a meal rather than anyone trying to fix &
} } } bring. there is a pool and stuff, so we can just
} } } relax there.
} } }
} } } Love,
} } } R.
} } }
} } }
} } } --
} }
}
} §§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§
} } }
} } } Ruth I. Schultz Kramer
} } } Scientist, Dept. of Materials Science and
} Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } 906-487-3375
} }
} }
} } --
} }
}
§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§
} }
} } Ruth I. Schultz Kramer
} } Scientist, Dept. of Materials Science and
} Engineering
} } Michigan Technological University
} } Houghton, MI 49931
} } 906-487-3375
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 16:43:11 2005



From: BETTY FABER :      bfaber-at-lsc.org
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 17:44:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscope suggestions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are expanding and improving our exhibit floors at Liberty Science
Center. We do have some experience using microscopes on the exhibit
floors (for use by school children and other members of the general
public) of a science center, but are quite open to suggestions and
recommendations.


We have used Wentzscopes, but would like to consider other methods.
What other recommendations does the list have for viewing objects the
size of red blood cells?

We have used student grade dissection scopes to view opaque objects.
These tend to have gears stripped and worse within 6 months. Is there
an industrial grade of dissection scope that is bullet proof?

We are leery of digital scopes. Should we be?

What we really want is microscopes that are very durable and easy to
use. Microscopes that allow the viewer to see the kinds of images that
inspire them to think seriously about the sciences.

I really appreciate your thoughts and time.


Betty Faber, Ph.D.
Leader Program Development
Liberty Science Center
201-451-0006X260
Bfaber-at-lsc.org




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 17:16:23 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 15:17:50 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: best way to remove azide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

dialysis

At 12:11 PM 2/14/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 15 17:51:24 2005



From: John Brealey :      john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 10:20:46 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] Transport of a TEM - advice needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I have a few questions regarding the transport of a Hitachi H-600.
I am currently seeking to have the TEM dismantled and moved from Melbourne
to Adelaide (800km) by a removalist company specialising in sensitive
freight.
Should the HV cable be removed from the gun and HV tank or can it be left
attached at one or both ends?
If it can be left attached at one end, which end is best to leave attached?
If the HV cable is removed from the HV tank, should the tank be drained of
oil or left full and covered by the blanking plate?
How can the HV cable best be wrapped to minimise damage?
How long would it take to dismantle the TEM and what is the minimum number
of component parts that the TEM can be broken down to? For example, is left
console, right console, camera console, column, HV cable, HV tank and
electronics box a reasonable breakdown of components (this is excluding
rotary pumps, compressor and desiccator)?

Any advice or personal experiences on this issue welcome.

Thanks,

____________________________
John Brealey
Medical Scientist
Electron Microscopy Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
IMVS - TQEH Pathology
Woodville, 5011
Adelaide
South Australia
(08) 82226612



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 02:42:49 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 00:44:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microscope suggestions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Betty
You may check Russian microscopes made by LOMO. I did not see their latest
models, but those we used in the school were bullet/student proof,
really... not only bullets, they perhaps will survive in direct tank
attack... I think, there is some company in US who distribute LOMO
products overseas. You may check google. Microscopes, by the way, made
using classical Zeiss technology, quite good for the price. No any
interest in LOMO rather than nostalgia for LM-2 - 100% quartz-optic
microscope... Sergey

At 05:44 PM 2/15/2005 -0500, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 02:54:27 2005



From: James Chalcroft :      jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 09:54:36 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Transport of a TEM - advice needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear John,

Sorry that I cannot help you with your Hitachi H-600 removal problem,
nevertheless I would also be most grateful to have help from the list
regarding the dismantling, packing and transport of a Zeiss 902 TEM (for
road transport within Germany). There seem to be a lot of major
components which will have to be separated before it hits the road!
Perhaps someone out there has done just this and could perhaps help us
avoid unnecessary woes during this major exercise.
TIA and best wishes,

Jim



-----Original Message-----
} From: John Brealey [mailto:john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 12:51 AM
To: Listserver

Hi all,

I have a few questions regarding the transport of a Hitachi H-600.
I am currently seeking to have the TEM dismantled and moved from
Melbourne
to Adelaide (800km) by a removalist company specialising in sensitive
freight.
Should the HV cable be removed from the gun and HV tank or can it be
left
attached at one or both ends?
If it can be left attached at one end, which end is best to leave
attached?
If the HV cable is removed from the HV tank, should the tank be drained
of
oil or left full and covered by the blanking plate?
How can the HV cable best be wrapped to minimise damage?
How long would it take to dismantle the TEM and what is the minimum
number
of component parts that the TEM can be broken down to? For example, is
left
console, right console, camera console, column, HV cable, HV tank and
electronics box a reasonable breakdown of components (this is excluding
rotary pumps, compressor and desiccator)?

Any advice or personal experiences on this issue welcome.

Thanks,

____________________________
John Brealey
Medical Scientist
Electron Microscopy Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
IMVS - TQEH Pathology
Woodville, 5011
Adelaide
South Australia
(08) 82226612





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 06:14:49 2005



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=F6ran_Axelsson?= :      axelsson-at-acc.umu.se
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 13:14:51 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Transport of a JEOL JEM 100CX TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I changed the subject for the sake of the archives. Old subject was
" Transport of a Zeiss CEM 902 TEM - advice requested"

It isn't the same maker or model but at least it is a description about
how we moved a Jeol 100CX TEM two years ago.
http://www.home.neab.net/gandalf/EM-lab/TEM100CX/index.htm

There are a lot of pictures of the dismantling in the raw picture archive.
A small warning first, the raw pictures are direct from the camera and is on
average 600k so they are slow to load.

We have now dismantled and moved two 100CX TEM:s. The first took
five days to pack and move on five pallets. The second one went a lot
faster and it only took eight hours for two people to put it on three
pallets.
Then it took us six hours to move it to the loading bay and to pack all the
small bits in two cars.
On both moves we left the oil in and only put the cap on the HT tank
and the HT cable was transported in the car.

If you only take it slowly, use a digital camera and takes a huge amount
of pictures (I took 600 pictures on the first microscope) and mark every
cable you should have no problem.
When i put it back together I only needed to look at two pictures to get
it right.

Two good things to have when packing a TEM is plastic film, the type
you use to cover leftovers, to wrap cables and hold things in place.
You use it instead of tape, it doesn't leave glue when taken off and is
easy to put on. In the end we even wrapped the main console from top
to bottom, it keeps dust out of it.
The second thing is aluminium foil to cover any open vacuum connection.

Well, except for that I could only wish you luck.

Göran

James Chalcroft wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 08:01:17 2005



From: monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 01:02:37 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: particles in liquid solution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at 15:30:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca
Name: Monica ILIESCU

Organization: Ecole Polytechnique

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,

I would like to ask is someone of you imaged in ESEM or
SEM-HiVAc,(micro- or nano) particles in liquid solution. If yes, what
the best preparation method is?
The using of a negatively charged mica substrates that catch
(attract) positive charged particles could be a valuable way for High
Vacuum imaging?

Thank you,
Monica

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 09:58:57 2005



From: John Shields :      jpshield-at-uga.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 11:00:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] volunteers for M&M2005

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi everyone,
If you are planning to attend M&M 2005 in Hawaii this summer
and wish to volunteer to assist in various ways
(e.g. "projectionist", booths, helping in any way) then
please contact me at jshields-at-cb.uga.edu with the subject
line "volunteer 2005".
I will contact you with more information, requirements, and
answer any questions I have answers for.
There will *not* be money for travel or room and board.
There will be inexpensive housing and other members have
already provided alternative housing ideas (e.g. hostels).
Students will be able to take advantage of reduced rates at
specific hotels - information is available when you contact
me.
Thanks in advance for your help.
John
} --
} John Shields
} E.M. Lab, 151 Barrow Hall
} University of Georgia
} Athens, GA 30602
} 706-542-4080


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 10:35:14 2005



From: Andrea Brothers :      Andrea.Brothers-at-biovail-btl.com
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 11:35:34 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microscope suggestions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear listers,

http://www.lomoplc.com/SF100.htm

Website for LOMO FYI.
AB

Andrea Blake Brothers
Sr. Research Microscopist
andrea.brothers-at-biovail-btl.com

(703) 480-5879 office
(703) 480-5943 fax

Biovail Technologies Ltd.
3701 Concorde Parkway
Chantilly, VA 20151

The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged
information and is intended only for the use of the individual and/or entity
identified in the address of this message. If the reader of this message is
not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible to deliver
it to the intended recipient, you are hereby requested not to distribute or
copy this communication. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately by calling us collect at (703) 480-6000, or by
so advising us by return e-mail. In this circumstance, we request that you
delete the original message from your system.


-----Original Message-----
} From: Sergey Ryazantsev [mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 3:45 AM
To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Betty
You may check Russian microscopes made by LOMO. I did not see their latest
models, but those we used in the school were bullet/student proof,
really... not only bullets, they perhaps will survive in direct tank
attack... I think, there is some company in US who distribute LOMO
products overseas. You may check google. Microscopes, by the way, made
using classical Zeiss technology, quite good for the price. No any
interest in LOMO rather than nostalgia for LM-2 - 100% quartz-optic
microscope... Sergey

At 05:44 PM 2/15/2005 -0500, you wrote:


} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 11:19:33 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 11:19:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: particles in liquid solution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Monica,

One of the easiest ways is to take ordinary cover slips and cover them
with large drops of 1 mg/ml poly-l-lysine. Leave the coverslips in a
humidity chamber (such as a petri dish with a rolled-up soaked Kimwipe
or something similar) for about an hour, then rinse them gently in
distilled water. These coated coverslips will remain useful for a month
or so after drying.

Take some of your particles in liquid and put them on the coated
coverslips and let the particles settle onto the surface, where they
should adhere to the coating. After a half hour or so, gently rinse the
coverslips to remove the excess solution, then proceed with your normal
fixation and/or coating routine. You should be able to view your
particles in high vacuum conditions with little difficulty.

One problem is occasionally that the coverslips are difficult to ground
and can create charging artifacts in the SEM. Usually all you need to
do is be extra careful about mounting the coverslips to your SEM stub.
We usually use carbon adhesive tabs, then metal tape to bridge the top
of the coverslips to the stub by folding the tape over the edges in a
couple of places. Following this, we sputter coat normally, starting
with a light coat, then adding more as necessary until the charging is
under control.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,
Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu









-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca]
Sent: Wednesday, February 16, 2005 8:03 AM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Tuesday,
February 15, 2005 at 15:30:22
------------------------------------------------------------------------
---

Email: monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca
Name: Monica ILIESCU

Organization: Ecole Polytechnique

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hello,

I would like to ask is someone of you imaged in ESEM or
SEM-HiVAc,(micro- or nano) particles in liquid solution. If yes, what
the best preparation method is?
The using of a negatively charged mica substrates that catch
(attract) positive charged particles could be a valuable way for High
Vacuum imaging?

Thank you,
Monica

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 11:52:02 2005



From: Michael Dunlap :      mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 09:52:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Transport of a TEM - advice needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi John,

I have moved our H-600 several times. The instrument can be broken
down into the individual sections as you described. I did find that
the HV cable did not separate from the gun on our instrument. We had
a 'can' we found on the side of the column and the right console that
held the insulator on the HV cable that was in the HT tank and the
lid of the 'can' sealed the HT to help prevent leaks.

We had to remove the gun and gun jack to get the microscope out the door.

One thing to note, there is a small part (sorry the name escapes me)
that comes loose in the column just above the sample holder. Lift
the gun and condenser lens and it should be right in that space.

Mike

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
===================================================================================
Michael Dunlap
office (530) 752-0284
University of California lab (530) 752-5489
Chemical Engineering & Material Science Fax (530) 752-9554
110A Kemper Hall mrdunlap-at-ucdavis.edu
One Shields Ave.
http://www.chms.ucdavis.edu/
Davis CA, 95616
===================================================================================


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 12:19:04 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 13:19:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Housing for M&M2005

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I did a quick check of Expedia and Travelocity. Both have
airfare/hotel packages that offer substantial savings over staying at
the 3 hotels listed in the meeting brochure. I don't know how these
various hotels rate wrt convenience to the convention center, etc.,
but if you've got a tight budget they may make the difference between
going and staying home.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 13:37:11 2005



From: William Stratton :      wgstratton-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 13:36:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Selective Alumina Etch

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,

Can anyone recommend selective alumina etch, specifically one that won't
etch aluminum. I'm looking for a way to clean the alumina from my
aluminum specimens.

Thanks in advance for your help.

William Stratton


-------------------
William G. Stratton
Research Assistant
University of Wisconsin - Madison

1509 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706
Office: 608-265-6391
Fax: 608-262-8353
wgstratton-at-wisc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 13:37:31 2005



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 13:38:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: particles in liquid solution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Monica,

For high-vacuum SEM, we just put a drop of the particle solution on a
glass coverslip or formvar coated TEM grid, blot a little (not to
dryness), cover with something like an inverted petri dish to keep
the sample clean, and allow to air dry.
Your thought of charges and mica should also work fine.

Phil

} Email: monica.iliescu-at-polymtl.ca
} Name: Monica ILIESCU
}
} Organization: Ecole Polytechnique
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Hello,
}
} I would like to ask is someone of you imaged in ESEM or
} SEM-HiVAc,(micro- or nano) particles in liquid solution. If yes,
} what the best preparation method is?
} The using of a negatively charged mica substrates that catch
} (attract) positive charged particles could be a valuable way for
} High Vacuum imaging?
}
} Thank you,
} Monica
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 16 18:16:35 2005



From: John Brealey :      john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 10:45:58 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] Moving a TEM - thankyou

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi again,

Thanks for the quick replies.
You have provided me with a lot of good advice which I am still digesting.

Regards,

____________________________
John Brealey
Medical Scientist
Electron Microscopy Unit
The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
IMVS - TQEH Pathology
Woodville, 5011
South Australia
(08) 82226612


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 06:22:54 2005



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 08:54:03 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] x-y-r stage transformations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

hello all :o)

I need to transform x-y coordinates determined from one stage to that of
another. The cartesian origin (0,0) will not be coincident, and rotation
needs to be taken into account. Rather than wrap my brain around the
required analytical geometry gained 30 years ago, I was hoping someone had
already created the spreadsheet. That is, given 2 reference coordinates
(x', y' and x", y") for the original stage, and the new coordinates for the
same on the new stage, transform a list of original coordinates to new
coordinates.

tia & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
{www.micro-investigations.com}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 10:15:09 2005



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 11:17:13 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Housing for M&M2005

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List:

In my recent experience most hotels, airlines and car rental
companies will give you a better deal than Expedia or Travelocity will.
Use Expedia or Travelocity to find a hotel (car, airline), then go to
the hotel's (car agency's, airline's) own website and compare prices..
The added benefit is that if there are billing problems you won't have
to go through a third party. I would be out several hundred dollars if I
had to rely on Expedia to straighten out a billing dispute. Also, if you
use a third party (Expedia, Travelocity) to do the booking your credit
card company may force you to deal with that booking agency to resolve
the dispute. :-(

Geoff

Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} I did a quick check of Expedia and Travelocity. Both have
} airfare/hotel packages that offer substantial savings over staying at
} the 3 hotels listed in the meeting brochure. I don't know how these
} various hotels rate wrt convenience to the convention center, etc.,
} but if you've got a tight budget they may make the difference between
} going and staying home.
} Lee


--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 13:11:33 2005



From: Karl Garsha :      garsha-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 13:12:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Position Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Position Announcement: Visiting Light Microscopist
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Imaging Technology Group (ITG) at the Beckman Institute for Advanced
Science and Technology, UIUC provides facilities for both microscopy and
visualization to campus researchers from a broad spectrum of
disciplines. The ITG Microscopy Suite provides a wide range of
instrumentation, training and user support for electron, scanning probe
and optical microscopy. Optical microscopy capabilities include laser
scanning confocal and multiphoton microscopy, widefield transmitted and
fluorescence microscopy, stereomicroscopy, computer-assisted stereology,
near-field scanning microscopy, reflected/transmitted light
micro-spectroscopy and near IR imaging. More extensive information
about our facilities is available on our web site at
http://www.itg.uiuc.edu.

The ITG is presently conducting a search for a microscopist to serve as
a primary contact for user training, trouble-shooting, and quality
assurance for a Leica SP-2 confocal microscope. In addition to managing
one of the confocal microscopes, the successful applicant will also help
to answer research questions using all of the microscopy techniques
available in the ITG as well as participate in the development of
advanced imaging technologies. A more detailed version of the
announcement is available at:

http://www.itg.uiuc.edu/announcements/lightmicro.htm

This is a 12-month, full-time visiting academic professional position
with university benefits and the possibility of becoming a permanent
position. Salary is commensurate with experience. For full
consideration, applications should be received by March 1st. To apply
please send a letter of interest, CV, and the contact information of
three references to:

Lori Heil
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology Group
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Phone: (217) 244-0170
Fax: (217) 244-6219
E-mail: lheil-at-uiuc.edu

Informal questions can be directed to Glenn Fried, ITG Co-director
(gfried-at-itg.uiuc.edu; phone: 333-5493), or myself (contact information
below). Thanks.

Best Regards,
Karl

--
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Office: B650J
Phone: 217.244.6292
Fax: 217.244.6219
Mobile: 217.390.1874
www.itg.uiuc.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 15:01:59 2005



From: frank.karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 16:02:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Chilling Water the TEM Blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Hello everyone,

I got a problem that I hope the collective you can help me solve. My
Phillips 420 TEM is suffering from poor circulation. The recirculating
cooling water comes in to the scope and is split, one part to the diffusion
pump and one to the electronics. Both sides have adjustable flow meters
and should have 1.5 L per min rates. Recently the electronic side dropped
to about 400ml per minute and the scope shut off.

Previous experience indicated I needed to flush the cooling water with a
dilute phosphoric acid based detergent. Have done this I can get the DP
side up to 2.5 liters/min if I wanted, but the electronic side stays at 800
ml/min no matter how I adjust the flow meters. The cleaning solution
pulled all the discoloration from sight glass on the flow meter, so I
believe I have the gunk flushed, but I know if I leave it at 800 ml/min
it's only a matter of time before I have to re-flush the cooling lines.

Where else could I have an obstruction and how can I get rid of it?

Any advice and thoughts would be welcome.

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 17:40:18 2005



From: John V Nailon :      J.Nailon-at-uq.edu.au
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 09:41:14 +1000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Chilling Water the TEM Blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

G'day Frank,

I've had similar problems on microscopes, usually it is because the
cooling water flows through alloy heat sinks, the alloy corrodes and
occludes the channel through it. On an Electroscan Esem we had, we
reamed out the cooling line through the alloy heat sink and slid copper
tube through, well lubricated with vacuum grease as a heat sink agent.
Hope this helps.

Regards
JVN


frank.karl-at-degussa.com wrote:

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--
John V Nailon
Executive Officer and Operations Manager
Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis
The University of Queensland
St.Lucia QLD 4072 Australia
Phone: 617 3365 4214
Fax: 617 3365 4422
Mobile: 0423 020 680




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 17 18:41:04 2005



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 19:40:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Chilling Water the TEM Blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Frank,

I'm not sure if the EM420 used them, but it could be a problem with the
"Watts" regulator for the lenses. It might need to be replaced. We've had
some fail.

For flushing the cooling lines, our service people have been really
enthusiastic about something called "CLR" cleaner (Calcium, Lime,
Rust). If I remember correctly, sulfamic, glycolic, and citric acids are
the active ingredients. I picked it up at our local hardware store
("cleaners" department rather than "plumbing"). It did a good job of
cleaning up the flow in our CM200 and caused no noticeable damage.

You also might try running the cleaner through the system overnight and
throttling back the flow through the DP to increase the pressure through
the lens section.

Cheers,
Henk

At 04:02 PM 2/17/2005, frank.karl-at-degussa.com wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
040 Fontana Labs, 116 W. 19th Ave



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 10:12:38 2005



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 10:19:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re:Chilling Water the TEM Blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,

Here's a write-up describing what I did some years ago to clear SEM cooling
lines. Just hit upon this idea as I had some lab water pumps lying around.
Maybe this will give you something to try.

But... a cautionary note: our CM-12 TEM has similar split in lines with
adjustable flow valves & floating flowrate indicators as you describe and
I'm not sure if this method would damage those, depending on how they are
built, so take a look at that before trying this. Our SEM cooling lines
didn't have such a fancy control system, water just came in through a fine
wire mesh final filter and into the lines.

Good luck shakin' off them blues! Gib
------
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra
-----
Here are my notes, with a few updates, to show you how we cleaned our SEM's
cooling lines some years ago. You can take what might be helpful from this
to apply to your situation there.

Symptom: Intermittent SEM shutdown, due to insufficient cooling water
supply.

BEFORE cleaning, measure the output from your cooler unit, which would be
the input to your machine. Then measure the output from your machine, by
collecting output in a can per minute, measure with graduated beaker. This
will allow you to determine if the cleaning of the cooling lines through
your machine actually achieved any increase in coolant flow-through rate.

Example, on my SEM: Before cleaning, output was 1,050 ml per minute. After
cleaning, rate was 1,800 ml per minute, a 71% increase, and overheating of
SEM problem went away.

1. I used a small lab water circulating pump, a "Little Giant", to pull a
weak 409 detergent cleaner solution through the scope lines, after
disconnecting the scope input lines from the cooling supply. Mix up a gallon
or two of dilute 409 solution, put in large dishpan and stick input hose
from machine into solution. Hook up pump to output end of cooling line,
collect output of pump in another dishpan, so you can inspect it for junk
that might some out of the lines.

2. Another thing we did, was to pump the lines for a few seconds to fill
the lines full of detergent solution, as above, then shut off pump and
removed it from output end of machine. Then at input to machine, we hooked
up a lab vacuum pump which could be run in "reverse" to act as an air
pressurizing device. So then I'd hold my finger over the output end for a
few seconds when this pressurizing pump was turned on, to build up a little
bit of pressure inside the lines, then released my finger to "blast" out any
algae/junk which had built up in the lines. Repeated this a few times, until
that charge of cleaning solution had been expelled. Filled lines and
repeated this a few times. It seemed to help flush the junk out of the
lines. Just don't want to put too much pressure in there or internal seals
could blow out, so just a little bit of finger pressure was all we did.
Could run this set-up in either direction to get a bach & forth effect, may
help to loosen up or free blockages.

3. When lines have been cleaned out, pump some clean water through to flush
out all the 409 detergent.

4. Connect up input lines from your chiller unit, turn on and measure the
hopefully greater output flow from the output of the machine. If satisfied,
hookup the output end of the machine to the return line for your cooling
unit.

Hope this helps! Let me know what results you have with whatever you come up
with.

Gib Ahlstrand

} Hello everyone,
}
} I got a problem that I hope the collective you can help me solve. My
} Phillips 420 TEM is suffering from poor circulation. The recirculating
} cooling water comes in to the scope and is split, one part to the diffusion
} pump and one to the electronics. Both sides have adjustable flow meters
} and should have 1.5 L per min rates. Recently the electronic side dropped
} to about 400ml per minute and the scope shut off.
}
} Previous experience indicated I needed to flush the cooling water with a
} dilute phosphoric acid based detergent. Have done this I can get the DP
} side up to 2.5 liters/min if I wanted, but the electronic side stays at 800
} ml/min no matter how I adjust the flow meters. The cleaning solution
} pulled all the discoloration from sight glass on the flow meter, so I
} believe I have the gunk flushed, but I know if I leave it at 800 ml/min
} it's only a matter of time before I have to re-flush the cooling lines.
}
} Where else could I have an obstruction and how can I get rid of it?
}
} Any advice and thoughts would be welcome.
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
} 330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 13:43:20 2005



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 13:44:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LaB6 filament use

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to switch our JEOL 1010 microscope to LaB6 filaments for
biological applications and I was wondering what other people felt about
LaB6 filaments, and how much they liked them. Any comments on the matter
would be welcome because I have no experience with these filaments.

This e-mail and/or any documents in this transmission is intended for the address(s) only and may contain legally privileged or confidential information. Any unauthorized use, disclosure, distribution, copying or dissemination is strictly prohibited. If you receive this transmission in error, please notify the sender immediately and return the original.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 15:43:45 2005



From: :      Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 08:44:34 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Screens on a Hitachi S4100 FESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

We have a Hitachi S4100 FESEM which has been our workhorse for 12 years or so. Gradually over time the CRT screens have been getting duller and fuzzier to the point now that focussing is becoming a little difficult. Given that the machine has been used for virtually every workday since it was installed this isn't too bad.

What I'd like to know is what is the best solution to the problem? The screens are embedded in tbe console, so do we have to replace them with similar screens or can we somehow take the signal out and use an external monitor or possibly even an LCD screen? There are BNC outputs on the back so I'm guessing that it could be done.

Thank you very much for any help with this.

Colin Veitch

CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology
Belmont Vic Australia



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 16:16:23 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 14:30:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LaB6 filament use

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Feb 18, 2005, at 11:44 AM, Garry Burgess wrote:

} I would like to switch our JEOL 1010 microscope to LaB6 filaments for
} biological applications and I was wondering what other people felt
} about
} LaB6 filaments, and how much they liked them. Any comments on the
} matter
} would be welcome because I have no experience with these filaments.
}
Dear Garry,
We have a LaB6 on our T12, and, in general, the increased brightness,
coherence, and lifetime with respect to a W filament makes it worth the
increase in cost. We have had some uneven lifetime issues with some of
the filaments we've installed, so I recommend researching which brand
of filament works best in the 1010.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:01:05 2005



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 15:01:40 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Specimen Preparation Technician Job Opening at Intel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Specimen Preparation Technician Job Opening at Intel

Responsibilities:

California Materials Technology Labs (CA MATTEC), part of CTM Quality and Reliability, is providing a challenging opportunity for a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) technician. As a TEM Technician, you will be responsible for carrying out TEM sample preparation of materials related to CTM/D2 development and manufacturing. Sample prep requires a high degree of manual skill, judgment and dexterity. Sample prep tools which must be operated include precision mechanical sectioning and polishing equipment, Dual Beam FIBs, Argon ion mills, and various wet etches. Additional technical duties for this position include, but are not limited to, development, evaluation and improvement of instruments and preparation techniques; minor maintenance of instruments and labs; and writing brief summary reports.

Qualifications:

This position requires an individual who can work with minimal supervision and is able to make sound independent judgments with regard to routine instrument problems, lab or analysis related issues. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills are required for interfacing with requesters, vendors, lab staff and peers. Requires an AA/AS degree with at least 2 years of lab experience. Familiarity with device fabrication and structure is regarded as a real asset for this position; previous mechanical polishing and FIB experience is also highly desirable.

Please submit any resume as a text message pasted into an e-mail, rather than as an attachment to an email.

Hiring Manager:  David W. Susnitzky
david.susnitzky-at-intel.com
Phone: 408-765-2026




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:06:55 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:07:42 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Chilling Water the TEM Blues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank

Have you removed and cleaned the in-line filter on the system. ?
I've had this problem many times with 420 electronics and cleaning this
usually cures the issue.

On my 420, the inline filter is hidden in a small brass "y shaped"
connection on the inside of the right hand
side of the electronics rack. Take off the side panel, swing open the
electronics
and look in the rear lower corner. Some 400 series instruments have this
filter mounted on the lower back panel (much easier to get at).

One leg of the Y fittinghas a cap that unscrews and a metal screen
filter can be withdrawn
cleaned and then re-inserted. You'll need a pan to catch the drainage, while
your cleaning the filter. What I do is put a low profile pan underneath
unscrew the cover, remove the filter and quickly screw the cover back
on to stop a large loss of water. Clean the filter and then replace.

BTW, getting the cover off isn't always easy as it is in an awkward
location and getting a wrench on it to get leverage is inconvenient
to say the least.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



At 4:02 PM -0500 2/17/05, frank.karl-at-degussa.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:17:00 2005



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:18:05 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Screens on a Hitachi S4100 FESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colin

On ANL's on the S4700 the BNC output is NTSC Video and only provides
the SEM image from the framestore. It does not provide the other
screen information.

This may be different on the 4100 series, but I tend to doubt that, as I've
seen earlier models (4500's) that use the same architecture and would
guess that the 4100 is similiar.

The important thing is that it is likely NTSC and not the PAL standard
used by most video monitors used downunder. You should however be
able use an external
monitor to focus since the output is from the framestore which has a seperate
line out.

Remember the location of the monitor is important from the ergonomics point
of view. I'm very sensitivite to neck problems when too many monitors are
positioned at the wrong viewing location/angle.

Given that this is your workhorse I'd go for replacement monitors from Hitachi.


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
(who is still in Oz)



At 8:44 AM +1100 2/19/05, {Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au} wrote:
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:56:33 2005



From: laloggia.brigette-at-mbco.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:58:00 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Wanted Fluorescence Microscopy short course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(laloggia.brigette-at-mbco.com) from
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html
on Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 12:11:08
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: laloggia.brigette-at-mbco.com
Name: Brigette La Loggia

Organization: Miller Brewing

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am a new microbiologist at Miller and
my department heads want me to take a basic
Fluorescence Microscopy short course but also by
the end of March. I was registered with McCrone
Reaseach Institute in Chicago for their Course
1210 class but due to low enrollment was
cancelled. I was hoping that you could give me
some leads on other courses. McCroneís course
consisted of introduction to theory and practice;
introductory fluorescence investigations;
fluorescence microscopes; filter sets and
cleaning; intrinsic, general, and specific
fluorescence probes; viability probes; sample
preparation; dye loading; indirect
immunolocalization; problem solving; resources,
materials and probes; and where to purchase
filters probes, and antibodies. The senior
microbiologist said that I donít want anything
that gets into image analysis. Thank you so much
for your help.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:57:56 2005



From: fleyte-at-imp.mx (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:59:15 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: seeking microscope vibration isolation company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(fleyte-at-imp.mx) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html
on Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 12:55:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: fleyte-at-imp.mx
Name: Florentino

Organization: IMP

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] seeking microscope vibration isolation company

Question: Hello everyone,

I am looking for a reliable company to help us on
a high resolution microscope vibration isolation
situaciÛn we have.

The microscope we are dealing with is a high
resolution TEMF30ST from FEI, the operation
voltaje is 300 KV, it has several signal
detectors like EDS EELS HAADF and it is capable
to produce tomography images from the sample, it
has also a STEM unit and a FIELD EMISSION GUN. It
requires an ultra high vacuum system and a
cooling system.

The mic¥s own isolation system has a 2.7 Hertz
natural frequency and the concrete pad under it
has 3.1 Hertz, so we have amplification problems.
If you need more info or If you know or belong to
a company that may have low natural frequency
vibration isolation systems suitable for these
mics please conctact me at fleyte-at-imp.mx

Thank you

Florentino Leyte

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 17:58:34 2005



From: neily-at-nprl.ph.bham.ac.uk (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:59:52 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: STEM probe size measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(neily-at-nprl.ph.bham.ac.uk) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html
on Friday, February 18, 2005 at 06:31:40
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: neily-at-nprl.ph.bham.ac.uk
Name: Neil Young

Organization: Birmingham University UK

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] STEM probe measurement

Question: Dear all,

I'm looking for methods to measure the diameter
of my STEM probe at different spot sizes.Ý The
machine is an FEI tecnai F20 TEM/STEM.Ý I am
considering scanning across MgO cubes and taking
the HAADF intensity profile acoss edges of MgO
cubes.Ý Could anyone comment on this or give a
better method?Ý

regards

Neil

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 21:54:33 2005



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 22:52:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: seeking microscope vibration isolation company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Florentino,

Here are 2 companies that have active vibration isolation systems. Others
on the list may know of more vendors. I have not used either system, so I
can not make any recommendations as to which is better. For your
frequencies, passive vibration isolation will probably not give you
sufficient attenuation, I think you will need an active vibration
compensation system.

Halcyonics
http://www.halcyonics.com/
TMC
http://www.techmfg.com/

Good luck,
Henk Colijn

At 06:59 PM 2/18/2005, fleyte-at-imp.mx wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
040 Fontana Labs, 116 W. 19th Ave




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 18 23:41:56 2005



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 19:43:01 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] MM2005 - Interisland airfare deals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, All-

There is a sudden and limited-time-only airfare war and drop in prices
between islands on Hawaiian Airlines and Aloha Airlines. This would be
your best opportunity to book flights to the neighbor islands before or
after Microscopy & Microanalysis 2005 in Honolulu this summer. Fares are
as low as $69 each way, and we haven't seen anything like that in quite
awhile

Both airlines also have decent fares from selected cities, mostly on the
West Coast. I suspect Hawaii will have a banner tourist season this year,
so I recommend looking at fights and hotel packages sooner rather than
later.

More tips as I hear about them!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 19 01:52:11 2005



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 01:51:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Transport of a TEM - advice needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm getting in on this a little late, due to hardware failures here that
prevented my getting this message till now. But, I hope that I may be able
to offer some general guidelines that will help you and others.

Any electron microscope is composed of two or more basic cabinets or
assemblies. For an SEM it might be the electron optics console and the
electronics console and may include a separate power console. A TEM may
split into the electron optics, right, left and camera assemblies and will
probably have a separate power cabinet. In either case, the manufacturer
has to design them that way in order to ship them to customers and get them
through standard doors.

The trick is to take a practical, kind of engineered, view of the required
move. If the instrument is merely being moved to a new location down the
hall, it may be practical to leave the various consoles connected, if they
can fit through the doors, and you have a number of people to push and
control the various components. This isn't as simple as it may seem - a
first step would be to provide a flexible control between components so
that they can't be separated enough to stress the electrical and other
connections between them. A rope or other means to prevent that and some
means to prevent the cables and tubing from dragging on the floor.

You would also have to take a close look at the path you will take. The
casters on instruments, or hand trucks used to transport them, are
generally small. Any bump or gap in the floor can provide a major
impediment to these. Two things have to be remembered here - these
instruments have considerable mass and the electron optics column can have
a considerable moment arm. If you try to forcibly push it over a small
bump or depression it will result in a considerable vertical and rotational
momentum. The electron optics console usually has a very high center of
gravity and such movement can easily cause a tipping motion.

That brings us to one very basic consideration. When originally shipped,
every instrument has some column clamp down mechanism. For vibration
isolation, electron optic columns are usually isolated by some form of
elastomeric mounting. That usually takes the form of the entire, and very
heavy, electron optics column, sample chamber and vacuum system being
suspended from a single plane around table height. The manufacturer
probably shipped the instrument with a number of heavy bolts that were used
to clamp the column to the table at that plane so that the column moves
with the supporting table. Without those clamps, the column can, with it's
momentum, exaggerate any rotation force and, with its high center of
gravity, cause a tip over or sufficient movement to cause damage.

If a more complicated move is required, the various cabinets, consoles or
assemblies will have to be separated. First rule here is to document every
disconnect as well as possible. Second rule, make every disconnect at the
easiest possible site. Your question regarding the high voltage cable is
quite simple in this regard. The high voltage tank connection is normally
a custom plug and connector that can be easily removed. If it results in
an opening to the tank, cover it up - heavy aluminum foil can work well
here. Given the mass and size of the tank, and the cabinet it is in, it is
unlikely that they will be subjected to any great tilting that may cause a
spill - just ensure that no contaminants will fall in. Make sure to
protect the HV cable connector, this will be a high expense part - bubble
wrap usually works good.

One thing that I pay particular attention to when I wrap up an instrument
to be transported by others is the human factor. Whether the instrument
will be secured on pallets or moved by hand, you have to pay attention to
what may be construed as a handle. Table tops should be removed - they are
usually particle board or thin metal and easily damaged. When removed,
structural members will be exposed that are suitable and obvious as
handles. Anything sticking out from the column such as aperture
micrometers, detectors and sample exchange mechanisms should be removed or
covered (a thick bubble wrap works well here) and marked to prevent anyone
from thinking that it may offer a solid handle. Basically, if someone
grabs a soft and giving surface, like an aperture micrometer wrapped with a
few layers of bubble wrap, they won't think it a suitable handle. But if
they see and can grab a structural steel tube that's solidly attached,
they'll use it.

That brings us to a real move - one where every contingency must be
covered. This is one you don't want to do yourself. If the instrument is
being transported by unknown means, without direct control and oversight,
you should dismantle the electron optics column completely and assure the
individual components are packaged to prevent damage. The problem here is
that, not only do you have to know what you are doing in disassembly, but
you have to be able to re-assemble and align the components on
installation.

Just a quick response, but hopefully one that will equip anyone planning a
move with a start on the things that should be considered.


Allen R. Sampson, Owner
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
Saint Charles, Illinois 60174
phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092
email mailto:ars-at-sem.com web www.sem.com


On Tuesday, February 15, 2005 5:51 PM, John Brealey
[SMTP:john.brealey-at-imvs.sa.gov.au] wrote:
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
}
} Hi all,
}
} I have a few questions regarding the transport of a Hitachi H-600.
} I am currently seeking to have the TEM dismantled and moved from
Melbourne
} to Adelaide (800km) by a removalist company specialising in sensitive
} freight.
} Should the HV cable be removed from the gun and HV tank or can it be left
} attached at one or both ends?
} If it can be left attached at one end, which end is best to leave
attached?
} If the HV cable is removed from the HV tank, should the tank be drained
of
} oil or left full and covered by the blanking plate?
} How can the HV cable best be wrapped to minimise damage?
} How long would it take to dismantle the TEM and what is the minimum
number
} of component parts that the TEM can be broken down to? For example, is
left
} console, right console, camera console, column, HV cable, HV tank and
} electronics box a reasonable breakdown of components (this is excluding
} rotary pumps, compressor and desiccator)?
}
} Any advice or personal experiences on this issue welcome.
}
} Thanks,
}
} ____________________________
} John Brealey
} Medical Scientist
} Electron Microscopy Unit
} The Queen Elizabeth Hospital
} IMVS - TQEH Pathology
} Woodville, 5011
} Adelaide
} South Australia
} (08) 82226612
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 19 06:33:44 2005



From: Reinhard Rachel :      reinhard.rachel-at-biologie.uni-regensburg.de
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 13:34:23 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM - LaB6 filament use

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Garry,
As long as you have got the money for the LaB6 filament,
as long as the vacuum is good in the column and in
particular in the gun area (keep the oil diff or turbo pump and ion
getter pump running all the time, overnight and over weekend; always
use LN2 trap),
as long as you have well trained users,
there are a number of advantages, as Bill said:
increased brightness,
increased coherence,
increased lifetime (in our CM12, usually around 3 years; exclusively in
TEM low dose imaging modus; no EDX or EELS).

'Disadvantages':
- a good vacuum is a prerequisite
- needs careful, slow heating
- some of the users will never see how such a filament looks like (so,
keep an old one, for demo), and how to change it.

yours,
Reinhard

-------------------------------
PD Dr.Reinhard Rachel
Universität Regensburg
Lehrstuhl für Mikrobiologie
Universitaetsstr. 31
D-93053 Regensburg
tel.: +49 941 943 4534
fax.: +49 941 943 1824




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 19 16:40:56 2005



From: S. Kelly Sears :      sksears-at-eps.mcgill.ca
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 17:42:03 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Help with a JEOL-JEM 2011 w/FasTEM]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a JEOL JEM-2011 w/ FasTEM. I was wondering if anyone has created
a help file, or even better, a reference manual for using the FasTEM? I
always have the feeling that I'm not using this program to its full
capability. Many thanks.

-- Kelly

--
S. Kelly Sears, Ph.D., B.F.A.
Facility for Electron Microscopy Research
McGill University




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 19 20:15:40 2005



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-UDel.Edu
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 21:16:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Help with a JEOL-JEM 2011 w/FasTEM]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kelly,

I'm very interested in this too. We have a FasTEM 2010f with a remote
5-axis stage control. The remote tilts have only been used once or twice
with marginal success since 2001. I probably have to disable the remote
tilts to enable motorized apertures.

A bit frustrated,
-Chao


On Sat, 19 Feb 2005, S. Kelly Sears wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} We have a JEOL JEM-2011 w/ FasTEM. I was wondering if anyone has created a
} help file, or even better, a reference manual for using the FasTEM? I always
} have the feeling that I'm not using this program to its full capability. Many
} thanks.
}
} -- Kelly
}
} --
} S. Kelly Sears, Ph.D., B.F.A.
} Facility for Electron Microscopy Research
} McGill University
}
}
}


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 20 17:09:55 2005



From: Hong Yi :      hyi-at-emory.edu
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2005 18:14:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Everyone;

           We have been using Formvar/carbon coated grids for spreading
magnetic nano-particles in water and for negative staining. But as you
know aqueous solution does not spread well on grids because of the
charge characteristics on film surface. The only way I know of for
making the film surface more hydrophilic is to do glow discharge on a
sputter coater, but we do not have such a device. I heard treating
coated grids with EtOH vapor works too but did not have a very good
luck with it when I tried. Does anyone out there have any other tricks
or suggestions? Does anyone out there want to get rid of an old sputter
coater?

           Thank you in advance.

 
Hong

Emory EM




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 20 18:34:17 2005



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2005 16:43:02 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hong -

Do you have a vacuum evaporator? It's simple to rig it for glow
discharge with an inexpensive Tesla coil. A plastic vacuum
dessicator, the same Tesla coil, and a rough vacuum source will do
the job also.

Caroline
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 20 19:00:05 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2005 20:04:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Hong Yi wrote:
================================================================
We have been using Formvar/carbon coated grids for spreading magnetic nano-
particles in water and for negative staining. But as you know aqueous
solution does not spread well on grids because of the charge
characteristics on film surface. The only way I know of for making the film
surface more hydrophilic is to do glow discharge on a sputter coater, but
we do not have such a device. I heard treating coated grids with EtOH vapor
works too but did not have a very good luck with it when I tried. Does
anyone out there have any other tricks or suggestions? Does anyone out
there want to get rid of an old sputter coater?
================================================================
I don't think that a sputter coater, old or new, is going to solve your
problem. I have not heard of EtOH vapors making a carbon grid more
hydrophilic.

Carbon coated grids lose their hydrophilic nature as they age and they
become more hydrophobic. The process can be "reversed" by a) exposure to an
RF "air" plasma in a small plasma etcher such as the SPI Plasma Prep™ II
unit (effect will last 60-90 days) or b) a thin evaporation of Victawet®
onto the grids, see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/evapor_3c.shtml Our own studies
would suggest that Victawet can keep the grids highly hydrophilic
essentially forever (e.g. more than one year). Just remember that it is a
phosphate based surfactant so if you are doing elemental analysis work, you
might not want to have P showing up in your data. But if you have an
ordinary vacuum evaporator and tungsten baskets, and don't have a plasma
etcher, you can solve your problem with Victawet.

The best bet for having carbon coated grids with the greatest hydrophilic
characteristics is to make or purchase your carbon coated grids always
"fresh". If the grids are purchased, and their age is uncertain, contact
the manufacturer of the carbon coated grids, give them the lot number and
then you will know.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies manufactures the SPI Plasma Prep II Plasma Etcher,
has been a distributor of Victawet for electron microscopy applications, and
we are a manufacturer of carbon coated grids.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 20 23:56:10 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2005 22:00:25 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Has anyone done EBSD of Os coated specimens
for EBSD? Considering the EBSD interactive
volume is about 30-50nm, the coating must be
very thin. Has anyone had success with this
Os and care to share with us about this?

Right now, I tend to stick to VP. If the
resistance of the Os was high, that would
help. SPI is of no help in this regard.
They have not done this sort of work before.

New ground for new inputs.

gary g.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 04:18:15 2005



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 06:51:43 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary Gaugler writes ...

} Has anyone done EBSD of Os coated specimens
} for EBSD? Considering the EBSD interactive
} volume is about 30-50nm, the coating must be
} very thin. Has anyone had success with this
} Os and care to share with us about this?

Maybe we should begin with the "benefits" for EBSD?
I would think a high-Z coating would decrease the
contrast of the EBSP(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 07:45:40 2005



From: James Chalcroft :      jchalcro-at-neuro.mpg.de
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:49:08 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Hong,

Another method occasionally used to make C-coated grids hydrophilic is to expose them for some minutes to the direct illumination of a UV lamp.
This is done at normal atmospheric pressure, so needs no vacuum technology.
Perhaps this method is applicable in your case?
Best wishes and good luck,

Jim


-----Original Message-----
} From: Hong Yi [mailto:hyi-at-emory.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 21, 2005 12:14 AM
To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Dear Everyone;

           We have been using Formvar/carbon coated grids for spreading
magnetic nano-particles in water and for negative staining. But as you
know aqueous solution does not spread well on grids because of the
charge characteristics on film surface. The only way I know of for
making the film surface more hydrophilic is to do glow discharge on a
sputter coater, but we do not have such a device. I heard treating
coated grids with EtOH vapor works too but did not have a very good
luck with it when I tried. Does anyone out there have any other tricks
or suggestions? Does anyone out there want to get rid of an old sputter
coater?

           Thank you in advance.

 
Hong

Emory EM






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 09:55:33 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 07:59:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The specimens are Cu IC runners. Current is passing
through them, so any sort of good coating scheme is
not workable. I don't have C coating and even so, it
would mess up the specimens. Au/Pd is too conductive
and also does indeed kill patterns.

The runners are between 0.15u and 0.25u wide and between
4-10u long. Usually, I don't look at the whole length of
the runner--just the ends and a bit beyond. Forward scatter
detector is good for imaging at lower mag, but at 100KX,
it is tricky to optimize WD, KV, probe current, etc. for good
patterns while obtaining good image resolution. Generally,
if I don't have good image resolution, I don't get good
pattern quality.

If I use Robinson BSE, it too tends to work better at short
WD and high mag rather than longer WD at high mag. My other
option is VP. But I have not sorted this feature out well
enough to use it all the time.

I was wondering what the film characteristics are like of
Os coating. Being high Z, it would degrade patterns. But,
if the coating were thin, would it reduce charge, keep patterns,
and not dramatically interfere with isolation between adjacent
runners?

gary g.


At 03:40 AM 2/21/2005, you wrote:
} Dear Gary,
}
} I'd avoid all metal coatings as they generally kill the EBSPs.
} Can you do Carbon coating with Carbon string (rather than rods) so that
} you get a very thin layer?
}
} What is the specimen?
} If it has lots of cracks/porosity (that trap charge), then think about
} gold coating and then polishing away most of the gold to leave a smooth
} surface (with a network of conductive tracks for the charge). Some
} Geologists use this trick.
} Sometimes the charging isn't really as bad as it looks in the SE image -
} try the backscatter detector (SE electrons are easily deflected); you can
} also try lower kV, e.g. 10-15, and smaller probe currents. It all depends
} on how small the features are in your specimen and what you want to
} measure, but I've looked at uncoated polycrystalline alumina and
} quartz+pyrite specimens in high vacuum.
}
} Good luck and I'll be interested to hear how things go,
}
} Austin
}
} P.S. You've probably already guessed, but HKL is a commercial EBSD company.
}
} Dr. Austin Day
} Research Manager
} HKL Technology Aps
} Majsmarken 1
} 9500 Hobro
} Denmark
} tel: +45 96 57 26 00
} fax: +45 96 57 26 09
} www.hkltechnology.com
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: 21 February 2005 07:00
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] EBSD Os coated
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 10:27:21 2005



From: Stefan Gunnarsson :      Stefan.Gunnarsson-at-ebc.uu.se
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 17:30:17 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM - Price for XL30

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

I am wondering about a suitable price for a used Philips XL30 SEM. I
have looked around on the web for used SEMs but found nothing that
would suit this.
The SEM is from 1993, has been serviced regularly every year and is in
good condition. It was upgraded to the NT-version of the software a few
years ago. The price should be 'as is', i.e. disregarding costs for
moving and re-installation.

Thanks,

Stefan

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Stefan Gunnarsson
Uppsala universitet Uppsala University
Evolutionsbiologiskt centrum Evolutionary Biology Centre
Enheten för biologisk strukturanalys Microscopy and Imaging Unit
Norbyvägen 18A
SE75236 Uppsala, Sweden Tel & Fax: +46 - 18 471 2638
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 10:51:33 2005



From: paul r hazelton :      paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 10:54:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

hong

sorry i did not get to this yesterday. there are several additional
solutions to those mentioned so far. first, unless my memory is wrong,
dogma is that grids need to be 'freshly glow discharged' to reduce
hydrophobicity. i do not remember what the definition of fresh was.
i'm hope someone on the list will be able to enlighten us on that.
also, the hydrophobicity of carbon-plastic films decreases over time.
again, my memory is that the time frame is about 2 weeks - meaning that
if the grids are more than 2 weeks old most hydrophobicity is gone.

because of the way we do preparations here, the issue of hydrophobicity
is not major, our samples usually have soluble protein present and we
centrifuge directly to the grid. these factors overcome pretty well all
hydrophobicity. if you want a poor man's solution, in place of UV
treatment you can pretreat the grids by floating them on a drop of 0.1%
polylysine or 5% alcian blue for 30 seconds to 5 minutes. polylysine is
supposed to create a positive charge on the surface of the grid. i do
not know what the mechanism of alcian blue is supposed to be. we never
have seen a difference, but then our preparation methods usually will
overcome most hydrophobicity issues anyway.

oh yeah, UV - you should give 30 minutes exposure to the light. i think
that may not have been mentioned.

paul

Paul R. Hazelton, PhD
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Manitoba
Department of Medical Microbiology
531 Basic Medical Sciences Building
730 William Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3E 0W3
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Work Phone: 204-789-3313
Pager: 204-931-954
Home Phone: 204-489-6924
Cell: 204-781-1502
Fax: 204-789-3926/204-489-6924




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 12:26:52 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 11:13:04 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Colin, there are number of possible solutions:

1) Best solution- buy replacement CRTs from your Hitachi service rep.

2) Second best- buy replacement CRTs from Richardson Electronics
http://www.rell.com/ . Click "Catalog"; enter CRT as keyword, click "CRTs
monochrome". Most likely you will have to call Richardson directly, in order
to identify your pic. tubes. So, have the following information handy: all
information from your CRTs labels, diagonal size of the screen, neck
diameter, and number of pins. Richardson can do 2 things for you. One- to
give you brand new CRTs. The inconvenience might be that this type of CRT is
mass-produced with only short decay time phosphor. Still works, but picture
in TV mode looks a bit noisier. The other thing Richardson can do, is to
repair your existing CRTs (either replace the neck assembly, or re-coat the
phosphor, or both).

3) The cheapest solution is- to increase cathode heater voltage of your CRTs
by up to 20%. This is a gamble. Might work forever, might work for only a
few months.

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane
Duluth, GA 30096
Tel. (770)232-7785
Fax (770)232-1791
Mobile (678)467-0012
www.sia-cam.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: {Colin.Veitch-at-csiro.au}
To: {Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, February 18, 2005 4:44 PM

you should try poly-L-lysine i forget the
concentration since i have retired from EM. there must
be someone out there that knows the concentration.
john

--- Hong Yi {hyi-at-emory.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Everyone;
}
}            We have been using Formvar/carbon coated
} grids for spreading
} magnetic nano-particles in water and for negative
} staining. But as you
} know aqueous solution does not spread well on grids
} because of the
} charge characteristics on film surface. The only way
} I know of for
} making the film surface more hydrophilic is to do
} glow discharge on a
} sputter coater, but we do not have such a device. I
} heard treating
} coated grids with EtOH vapor works too but did not
} have a very good
} luck with it when I tried. Does anyone out there
} have any other tricks
} or suggestions? Does anyone out there want to get
} rid of an old sputter
} coater?
}
}            Thank you in advance.
}
}  
} Hong
}
} Emory EM
}
}
}
}




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Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more.
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 14:18:55 2005



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:22:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Your work is a bit foreign to me, and maybe for that reason I am confused.
Do I understand you are trying to put down a conductive layer, but not too
conductive a layer? Is that possible? You want enough conductivity to
prevent charging in the SEM but you want to preserve the working nature of
the IC. I would not think you can have it both ways. Would not the
conductivity needed for EM render the insulating parts of the IC
ineffective? Maybe someone more familiar with this application can speak to
this.

I think I missed the reason for doing EBSD on this sample in the first
place. Could you share it with us? It sounds like you application is rather
demanding - trying to get enough current for EBSD while maintaining
resolution. I would think that you would get enough scattering in VP mode
that you would get significant contribution from areas outside your runner.
It seems that some conductive layer would be necessary.

Now curious,
Warren

At 09:59 AM 02/21/05, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 14:31:21 2005



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:35:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Kodak 4489 Suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are looking for good prices on Kodak 4489 film (2K to 4K sheets
needed) and are inquiring as to where microscopists are buying this
film these days.

Thank you.
--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 16:23:59 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:27:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ah...you hit on the dilemma. Good conductivity
to prevent charging but not such that EBSD patterns
are diminished or eliminated and not to deter IC
operation. The insulating layers are not at issue
in this analysis. They are actually the cause of the
charging!

The reason for doing EBSD on these runners of
off-the-shelf ICs is to attempt to determine the
wearout lifetime based on electromigration of the
Cu runners.

Here is my generic abstract for the work at issue:

This IC evaluation work aims to provide a quantitative method of predicting
the lifetime of COTS ICs when used in other than commercial
applications--especially when used in military applications. Of the
numerous IC failure mechanisms, this work focuses on electromigration and
metal interconnect degradation through the use of electron backscatter
diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Through the
use of EBSD analysis, the effects of accelerated stressing of interconnects
can be measured and quantified as a basis for lifetime prediction.

Since the runners are very narrow (but could be long), high
mag and high rez is needed. This follows through for 25C,
100C and 150C temperature analysis using EBSD. So far, I ignore
any charging. My TSL/EDAX EBSD does not seem to care about
charging. However, I am concerned that this is an unbounded
variable and may influence the final data. Not sure about this.

So, I'm trying to make sure that I have eliminated all possible
significant variables in this research.

gary g.




At 12:22 PM 2/21/2005, you wrote:


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 16:49:22 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:52:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Kodak 4489 Suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

electron microscopy supplies (EMS) has always been the
best if not the cheapest source for film.
john
--- "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
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}
} We are looking for good prices on Kodak 4489 film
} (2K to 4K sheets
} needed) and are inquiring as to where microscopists
} are buying this
} film these days.
}
} Thank you.
} --
}
##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics
} Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 19:21:10 2005



From: rcmoretz-at-att.net
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 01:24:16 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Kodak 4489 Suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In addition to EMS, I have obtained my film from Ladd Research, National Graphic Supply (Albany, NY) and directly from VWR (my preferred corporate supplier).

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept. of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticlas, Inc
Ridgefield, CT

--
Where the world is only slightly
less weird than it actually is.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
} From: "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} We are looking for good prices on Kodak 4489 film (2K to 4K sheets
} needed) and are inquiring as to where microscopists are buying this
} film these days.
}
} Thank you.
} --
} ##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
} ##############################################################
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 20:05:13 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 18:09:47 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: (Microscopy) Carbon coated grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I personally don't like glow discharge at all: it's very difficult to
reproduce (from Lab to the Lab and from hand to another hand), it depends
from the equipment and there is no control to "amount" of discharge. I
agree with John that poly-lysine treatment may help. I am using 0.5-1%
poly-lysine from any EM suppliers (don't try to make solution by himself -
I don't remember, but there is some trick how to do so). So, place EM grid
on 10 ul poly-lysine drop for 5-10 min, wash on a few drops of deionized
water, air dry - good for a month (at least, did not try for
longer). Alcyan Blue works in the similar way with similar result. As far
as I remember, results with alcyan blue depend from the batch and
manufacturer (some particular is better than another - I don't remember
which one). Of coarse, it would work for positively charged molecules
only. I hope it helps, Sergey

At 11:13 AM 2/21/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 21 23:13:58 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 00:17:58 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM film vendors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

John J. Bozzola wrote:
===========================================================
} We are looking for good prices on Kodak 4489 film (2K to 4K sheets
} needed) and are inquiring as to where microscopists are buying this
} film these days.
===========================================================
All of the main sellers of microscopy supplies and consumables, including
SPI Supplies, Pella, Ladd and EMS in the USA and Agar in the UK and PLANO in
Germany are Kodak distributors. It has been our belief, because of the
rapid and high turnovers, that film that comes from one of the "EM
distributors" is generally more fresh than film that sat for a while on the
shelf of a (lower volume in EM film) general photographic products
distributor.

But if saving money is an objective for asking the question, SPI (and some
of the above mentioned distributors) have been offering the MACO line of
films for electron microscopy, the essentially plug-in compatible film for
4489 is MACO ES film and for SO-163, is MACO EM film. Forgive me if this
sounds too commercial, but the selling prices of the MACO film are roughly
35-40% less than the selling prices of the alternative film in the yellow
box. See URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/photo/maco-TEM-film1.shtml

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 02:11:46 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 03:15:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] osmium metal characteristics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gary Gaugler wrote:
=============================================================
Has anyone done EBSD of Os coated specimens for EBSD? Considering the EBSD
interactive volume is about 30-50nm, the coating must be very thin. Has
anyone had success with this Os and care to share with us about this?

Right now, I tend to stick to VP. If the resistance of the Os was high,
that would help. SPI is of no help in this regard. They have not done this
sort of work before.


and in another message:
--------------------------------
........... Good conductivity to prevent charging but not such that EBSD
patterns are diminished or eliminated and not to deter IC operation. .......
...
=============================================================
I am not aware of anyone who would have osmium metal resistance information
of the type you are requesting.

Osmium coating is still quite new and there is not as much known about the
osmium metal coatings as for coatings of other metals. But the point is,
the layer becomes conductive at a far thinner point than for metals that are
sputtered including chromium. Typically, the coatings for high resolution
SEM work are on the order of 1 nm thick. No one to my knowledge has ever
imaged a grain size in an osmium coated sample in the OPC osmium coaters.

I can direct you to some data on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/osmium-plasma-coater-demonstration.html
which was on gold surface-tagged cells viewed by BSE imaging. Now everyone
tells me that this truly goes against conventional wisdom, considering how
high Z is osmium. But as you can see, despite the high Z, the thickness is
so thin that it does not interfere with the taking of the data at all.

I don't know as much about EBSD as I should, so I feel a bit insecure
suggesting this, but if it is that thin and has such an imperceptible effect
on the BSE image, could the same be expected for the EBSD image? Isn't
there similar physics going on here?

Certainly we could do a test run for you Gary, and to set that up, you
should contact Gene Rodek, E-mail: erodek-at-2spi.com. He is our laboratory
manager and he coordinates all lab demos.

Chuck
===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 03:07:06 2005



From: Niko Hellsten :      niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 10:11:09 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello to everyone!

I have a basic question concerning sample preparation for TEM.

I've recently started working on a physics and materials lab doing TEM
(microscopy and sample preparation) and it's all new to me. Obviously
we do a lot cross-section samples of multi-thin layers.

My colleague showed me a preparation technique which includes cleaving
and polishing of the sample and finally ion milling it to transparency
(making a hole in the centre with the area surrounding the whole being
transparent because of the angle of milling).

Does anyone have any tips or otherwise helpful "basic" information
about preparing samples this way or other techniques I should
consider. The sample becomes very fragile while thinning it and
cleaning it is very difficult.

Thanks to everyone who comments.

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
Laboratoire des Matériaux et Génie du Physique
Grenoble



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 04:53:53 2005



From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science :      COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 13:02:35 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I do not know what you are working on but the following might help.

1) Ion thin from both sides for a short while at a low angle to get a clean sample
2) carefully remove the sample and glue one side to a slotted grid.

3) Ion mill only from the top till you get a hole.

This worked lovely for some samples I have done. Difficult to get it glued down right without contaminating it, but worth it in the end.


Since some mail do get Lost, Bounces, etc Please send a duplicate/copy of all urgent mail to:

coetzeesh-at-yahoo.co.uk {mailto:coetzeesh-at-yahoo.co.uk}

Mr S. H. Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Botswana
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
Botswana
Phone : +267 355 2462/5222
Mobile : +267 718 36547
Fax : +267 318 5097
e-mail : coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw


-----Original Message-----
} From: Niko Hellsten [mailto:niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 11:11 AM
To: Microscopy

Hello to everyone!

I have a basic question concerning sample preparation for TEM.

I've recently started working on a physics and materials lab doing TEM
(microscopy and sample preparation) and it's all new to me. Obviously
we do a lot cross-section samples of multi-thin layers.

My colleague showed me a preparation technique which includes cleaving
and polishing of the sample and finally ion milling it to transparency
(making a hole in the centre with the area surrounding the whole being
transparent because of the angle of milling).

Does anyone have any tips or otherwise helpful "basic" information
about preparing samples this way or other techniques I should
consider. The sample becomes very fragile while thinning it and
cleaning it is very difficult.

Thanks to everyone who comments.

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
Laboratoire des Matériaux et Génie du Physique
Grenoble





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 05:11:16 2005



From: Bobby Hooghan :      hooghan-at-grandecom.net
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 05:14:51 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Niko,
Have you tried using a Focused Ion Beam system in order to prepare your
TEM/SEM cross-sectional samples? Looks like that would be the way to go in
your case.
You can contact me at Hooghan-at-grandecom.net for specific issues,
Good luck,
Bobby Hooghan

-----Original Message-----
} From: Niko Hellsten [mailto:niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 3:11 AM
To: Microscopy

Hello to everyone!

I have a basic question concerning sample preparation for TEM.

I've recently started working on a physics and materials lab doing TEM
(microscopy and sample preparation) and it's all new to me. Obviously
we do a lot cross-section samples of multi-thin layers.

My colleague showed me a preparation technique which includes cleaving
and polishing of the sample and finally ion milling it to transparency
(making a hole in the centre with the area surrounding the whole being
transparent because of the angle of milling).

Does anyone have any tips or otherwise helpful "basic" information
about preparing samples this way or other techniques I should
consider. The sample becomes very fragile while thinning it and
cleaning it is very difficult.

Thanks to everyone who comments.

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
Laboratoire des Matériaux et Génie du Physique
Grenoble






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 07:00:26 2005



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 08:08:44 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Best to check with the King of cross-sampling:
Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-Chao



-----Original Message-----
} From: Niko Hellsten [mailto:niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 4:11 AM
To: Microscopy

Hello to everyone!

I have a basic question concerning sample preparation for TEM.

I've recently started working on a physics and materials lab doing TEM
(microscopy and sample preparation) and it's all new to me. Obviously
we do a lot cross-section samples of multi-thin layers.

My colleague showed me a preparation technique which includes cleaving
and polishing of the sample and finally ion milling it to transparency
(making a hole in the centre with the area surrounding the whole being
transparent because of the angle of milling).

Does anyone have any tips or otherwise helpful "basic" information
about preparing samples this way or other techniques I should
consider. The sample becomes very fragile while thinning it and
cleaning it is very difficult.

Thanks to everyone who comments.

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
Laboratoire des Matériaux et Génie du Physique
Grenoble





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 07:18:52 2005



From: Aghajanian,John :      aghajanian-at-nso1.uchc.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 08:22:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Kodak 4489 Suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi John,

We purchase our 4489 from Fisher Scientific who gives us a fairly good
discount. It is not listed in their catalog or web site. If you call them, they
will get it for you.

John Aghajanian
CEMF
UConn Health Center

-----Original Message-----
From: John J. Bozzola [mailto:bozzola-at-siu.edu]
Sent: Mon 2/21/2005 3:35 PM
To: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
Cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Kodak 4489 Suppliers





------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We are looking for good prices on Kodak 4489 film (2K to 4K sheets
needed) and are inquiring as to where microscopists are buying this
film these days.

Thank you.
--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 07:32:07 2005



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-maia-scientific.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 14:35:31 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Resolution and GPCR pits and vesicles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I am looking at images from GPCR activity in cells detected by studying
GFP-barrestin in cells (http://www.xsira.com/Transfluor/science_tf.htm).

From looking at the images it seems to me that the larger "vesicles"
can easily be detected by dry objectives. The smaller "pits" however
require a high-NA immersion oil objective to be detected?

What type of objectives are people using for detecting those "pits" and
"vesicles" ?

Regards,

Peter Van Osta

----------------------------------------------
Peter Van Osta, MD

Director Imaging
MAIA SCIENTIFIC
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel, Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 620
Mobile: +32 (0)497 228 725
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621
Email: pvosta-at-maia-scientific.com
Website: www.maia-scientific.com
A Harvard Bioscience Company
----------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 08:48:30 2005



From: hkonishi-at-indiana.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 09:52:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Reference for TEM sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I am looking for a paper, book chapter, website, or personal pdf/powerpoint
file that show sample preparation method of solid. I need it for a graduate
student who has never seen TEM instrument. Unfortunately, I am not around him,
so I cannot demonstrate sample preparation for him. I have found a protocol on
Internet, but there are no pictures. He will crash sample with
acetone/alcohol/water, ultrasonicate, put a lacy carbon in the bottle, and
then air-dry. If you know a good reference with pictures, please advise. Also,
I would appreciate it if you can provide your personal file for your lecture.

Thank you,
Hiromi Konishi
IU&JHU


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 09:41:59 2005



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 10:45:22 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There are some good references out there for you for sample prep. I would try to get a copy of the four books from MRS Proceedings on "Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials". I remember three of the four volume numbers: 115, 254, 480. Although, I am biased to the fourth one in the series being the best, you should definitely try to get a hold of the first and third.

Another very good source for a collection of literature on sample prep is the South Bay Technology website.

There is also a paperback book by Peter Goodhew on sample prep that has some good pointers.


Enjoy your new profession.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Niko Hellsten [mailto:niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 4:11 AM
To: Microscopy

Hello to everyone!

I have a basic question concerning sample preparation for TEM.

I've recently started working on a physics and materials lab doing TEM
(microscopy and sample preparation) and it's all new to me. Obviously
we do a lot cross-section samples of multi-thin layers.

My colleague showed me a preparation technique which includes cleaving
and polishing of the sample and finally ion milling it to transparency
(making a hole in the centre with the area surrounding the whole being
transparent because of the angle of milling).

Does anyone have any tips or otherwise helpful "basic" information
about preparing samples this way or other techniques I should
consider. The sample becomes very fragile while thinning it and
cleaning it is very difficult.

Thanks to everyone who comments.

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
Laboratoire des Matériaux et Génie du Physique
Grenoble





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 13:25:03 2005



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 13:28:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Opinion on MACO TEM film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I recently heard of the MACO film as a possible substitute for the
Kodak 4489 TEM film.

I would like to hear from researchers who are using the MACO film
(good and bad points).

Thank you, again, MSA Listers.

John
--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 16:30:48 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 14:34:06 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Opinion on MACO TEM film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i have never heard of the film but this web site maybe
useful:
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/photo/maco-TEM-film1.shtml.
exhaushtive testing i would think would be in order or
just do what should be the next step in EM go digital.
john
--- "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I recently heard of the MACO film as a possible
} substitute for the
} Kodak 4489 TEM film.
}
} I would like to hear from researchers who are using
} the MACO film
} (good and bad points).
}
} Thank you, again, MSA Listers.
}
} John
} --
}
##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics
} Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
}
##############################################################
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 18:32:25 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 16:22:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks for the response and the feedback on my website.
It has evolved over quite a few years.

In response to your response and to those of several others,
I will fill in some data areas.

While drift is typically an issue, my system (Zeiss Supra55VP)
has drift correction for EBSD and EDS. So when collecting
patterns or spectra (maps), drift is not a problem. I've
run up to 100KX and not had any drift problems seen. A major
problem is trying to find the same runner area that was
analyzed previously! Big problem. Current solution is to
burn the runner at 30KV, 120u aperture, high current to form
an index marker.

The Cu runners are sitting on either SiO2 or organic ILD.
The issue is how to ensure that charging of the ILD (either type)
does not affect the EBSD data. If phase data is being collected,
that affects the EDS detector as well. To add insult to
injury, the specimens will be at between -25C up to 150C.
Temperature shift causes image shift. But again, this can
be removed.

As I understand EBSD, the patterns are generated from within
30-40nm of the surface. This is quite different from much
greater volumetric interaction using EDS. Consequently, if
an Os coating was about 10-20nm thick, it probably would negate
EBSD patterns. Bummer.

At 15KV, 60u high current, VP works OK at 20Pa. There is
still some charging but not too much. The issue of runner-to-runner
shorting is an issue. Thus, the coating can't be to aggressively
conductive (thick) to remove charging or it affects isolation
of adjacent runners but also affects EBSD patterns. If there was
a way to coat with MWCNTs, that might work...maybe. other metal
coatings have to be thick to withstand a 15KV, 10nA probe spot.
That thickness kills the EBSD patterns.

What I am doing now may be optimum, given the circumstances.
But I'd rather not waste a lot of time doing something one way
that would be better done some other way.

gary g.





At 04:55 AM 2/22/2005, you wrote:
} Gary,
}
} I looked at your web page. Nice job and neat photographs.
}
} I have two thoughts for you. Could you lay down something like SiO2/SiO as
} an insulator and then Au-Pd? I don't think this will work for you. Comments?
}
} I think this might partially work 'both ways' for you. If you have a
} sputter coater, do you know what the size the Au-Pd nanoparticles are that
} it puts down on your samples? Mine were 4 nms spheres using a Hummer 7.
} The size and distribution of the particles were determined by viewing a
} tilted thin section of the nanoparticles in a TEM on a polymer surface.
} Suppose yours sizes are the same. Set the coating for 2 nms. That will
} create an anti-stat coating with about 50% coverage of the surface. It
} should cut down the charging on the insulating area and be chemically
} inert. Will it cut down the charging enough? I don't know. Will Au-Pd
} nanoparticles interfer with your analysis? I don't know.
}
} I do not know what you are doing either. You said, "so any sort of good
} coating scheme is not workable." I just hope this means you are worried
} about shorting the traces with a coating and not a diffraction interference
} from a coating. Both?
}
} Let me know if this anti-stat coating technique works.
}
} Hint: If you don't know the coating size of your Au-Pd particles, start at
} 1 nm, see what happens, then put down another 1 nm, and see what happens.
} I think this anti-stat should work for you without causing a short.
}
} Paul
}
} Dr. Joy, "Don't turn your sample into a piece of jewlery." (or a busbar)
}
} At 07:59 AM 2/21/05 -0800, you wrote:
} }
} }
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} }
} } The specimens are Cu IC runners. Current is passing
} } through them, so any sort of good coating scheme is
} } not workable. I don't have C coating and even so, it
} } would mess up the specimens. Au/Pd is too conductive
} } and also does indeed kill patterns.
} }
} } The runners are between 0.15u and 0.25u wide and between
} } 4-10u long. Usually, I don't look at the whole length of
} } the runner--just the ends and a bit beyond. Forward scatter
} } detector is good for imaging at lower mag, but at 100KX,
} } it is tricky to optimize WD, KV, probe current, etc. for good
} } patterns while obtaining good image resolution. Generally,
} } if I don't have good image resolution, I don't get good
} } pattern quality.
} }
} } If I use Robinson BSE, it too tends to work better at short
} } WD and high mag rather than longer WD at high mag. My other
} } option is VP. But I have not sorted this feature out well
} } enough to use it all the time.
} }
} } I was wondering what the film characteristics are like of
} } Os coating. Being high Z, it would degrade patterns. But,
} } if the coating were thin, would it reduce charge, keep patterns,
} } and not dramatically interfere with isolation between adjacent
} } runners?
} }
} } gary g.
} }
} }
} } At 03:40 AM 2/21/2005, you wrote:
} } } Dear Gary,
} } }
} } } I'd avoid all metal coatings as they generally kill the EBSPs.
} } } Can you do Carbon coating with Carbon string (rather than rods) so that
} } } you get a very thin layer?
} } }
} } } What is the specimen?
} } } If it has lots of cracks/porosity (that trap charge), then think about
} } } gold coating and then polishing away most of the gold to leave a smooth
} } } surface (with a network of conductive tracks for the charge). Some
} } } Geologists use this trick.
} } } Sometimes the charging isn't really as bad as it looks in the SE image -
} } } try the backscatter detector (SE electrons are easily deflected); you can
} } } also try lower kV, e.g. 10-15, and smaller probe currents. It all depends
} } } on how small the features are in your specimen and what you want to
} } } measure, but I've looked at uncoated polycrystalline alumina and
} } } quartz+pyrite specimens in high vacuum.
} } }
} } } Good luck and I'll be interested to hear how things go,
} } }
} } } Austin
} } }
} } } P.S. You've probably already guessed, but HKL is a commercial EBSD company.
} } }
} } } Dr. Austin Day
} } } Research Manager
} } } HKL Technology Aps
} } } Majsmarken 1
} } } 9500 Hobro
} } } Denmark
} } } tel: +45 96 57 26 00
} } } fax: +45 96 57 26 09
} } } www.hkltechnology.com
} } }
} } }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} } } Sent: 21 February 2005 07:00
} } } To: MSA listserver
} } } Subject: [Microscopy] EBSD Os coated
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} } } --------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -----
} } }
} } } Has anyone done EBSD of Os coated specimens
} } } for EBSD? Considering the EBSD interactive
} } } volume is about 30-50nm, the coating must be
} } } very thin. Has anyone had success with this
} } } Os and care to share with us about this?
} } }
} } } Right now, I tend to stick to VP. If the
} } } resistance of the Os was high, that would
} } } help. SPI is of no help in this regard.
} } } They have not done this sort of work before.
} } }
} } } New ground for new inputs.
} } }
} } } gary g.
} } }
} } }
} } } This mail has been scanned for virus by Sybari Antigen (HKL-DK).
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 18:32:25 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 16:36:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm getting about 10fps and doing data collection
for about 1 hour using .01-.05u step size. For smaller
runners, I use 10nm step size. These go quicker since
the runner length being analyzed is shorter. This is
at 15KV, 60u, high current, SE detector, 15mm WD,
pretty much for all data collection. If I use 120u, high
current, I suspect that resolution suffers and that
negatively affects the patterns.

As posted in another msg, drift is not a problem.
Forward scatter detector use is also possibly a benefit.
I would ordinarily use Robinson BSE but I'm worried about
how the close 150C specimen might affect the plastic
scintillator piece.

Hum, you should not get hats at all. I assume you mean
that the patterns are trapezoidal. This means that your
geometry is off. If the data scan at high tilt is a square,
the polymerized area at zero degrees should also be a square.
If not, collection tilt or SEM tilt correction is off. This is
a tricky area. If you take a flat piece of paper and draw
a square on it, then tilt it to say 65 degrees, the shape is
a rectangle. The net result is that analysis results are wrong.
Grain size and diameter/area will be incorrect.

gary g.


At 01:52 AM 2/22/2005, you wrote:
} Dear Gary,
}
} We've looked at similar specimens, see
} http://www.hkltechnology.com/data/0-Cu-lines.pdf. We'd normally try to go
} for very short working distance ~5mm, relatively low probe current ~1nA
} and fast mapping ~50/s to minimise charging/drift/contamination. Specimen
} contamination (build up under the beam) can also cause drift and will
} lead to a degradation of the EBSPs, which is why you need to go fast.
} Charging can affect the EBSPs, but if you map fast enough, it shouldn't
} be a big problem.
} VP will drop your spatial resolution and you'll need a higher probe
} current to get good quality EBSPs (which also has an effect on spatial
} resolution), so I don't think it will help. For mineral phases, we find
} that 10-20 Pa will eliminate most charging effects but that we need to go
} to a larger aperture, sometimes even the 120 µm, to get reasonable EBSPs.
}
} I don't think that a metallic coating over the whole specimen
} will help. However, you could try painting an (earthed) block of silver
} dag close to the area you want to look at - but it's not easy controlling
} this and the dag could make the contamination worse; maybe gold coating
} with part of the specimen masked would be simpler.
}
} Good luck,
}
} Austin
}
} P.S. One other thing on contamination and small step size. Ian Brough
} (UMIST) showed me some beautiful witches' hats (contamination cones) on an
} Al specimen. We found that if you map upwards (i.e. against gravity), then
} the hats tend to fall downwards and away from the area you're about to look at.
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: 21 February 2005 23:28
} To: Warren E Straszheim
} Cc: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EBSD Os coated
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 22 22:07:42 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 20:11:26 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes...I have tried that. It does seem that Os
is not going to work. So I am left with regular
imaging and with VP. Thus, the challenge is to
sort out which is best. At 50KX-100KX, this is not
all that simple.

gary g.


At 07:12 PM 2/22/2005, you wrote:
} Gary,
}
} You might try some calculations with a Monte Carlo program (Casino or
} WinXRay). They allow a layer on substrate geometry. This should give you
} some idea of the BSE depth for your situation. Depth is ~100 nm for Al,
} so I would be surprised if you get anything with any sort of Os
} layer. VPSEM sounds like the best option if available.
}
} Good luck!
} Henk Colijn
}
} At 07:22 PM 2/22/2005, you wrote:
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 09:02:10 2005



From: Karl Garsha :      garsha-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:06:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Position Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Due to new regulations concieved by the newly formed Office of Equal
Opportunity at the Beckman Institute, the official search announcement
for the position below will be delayed for a period of time (probably
about two weeks). Therefore, the previously posted announcement must be
considered unofficial until further notice, and the start and end dates
of the official search will have to be adjusted accordingly.
Regards,
Karl

Karl Garsha wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Position Announcement: Visiting Light Microscopist
} Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
} University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
}
} The Imaging Technology Group (ITG) at the Beckman Institute for
} Advanced Science and Technology, UIUC provides facilities for both
} microscopy and visualization to campus researchers from a broad
} spectrum of disciplines. The ITG Microscopy Suite provides a wide
} range of instrumentation, training and user support for electron,
} scanning probe and optical microscopy. Optical microscopy
} capabilities include laser scanning confocal and multiphoton
} microscopy, widefield transmitted and fluorescence microscopy,
} stereomicroscopy, computer-assisted stereology, near-field scanning
} microscopy, reflected/transmitted light micro-spectroscopy and near IR
} imaging. More extensive information about our facilities is available
} on our web site at http://www.itg.uiuc.edu.
}
} The ITG is presently conducting a search for a microscopist to serve
} as a primary contact for user training, trouble-shooting, and quality
} assurance for a Leica SP-2 confocal microscope. In addition to
} managing one of the confocal microscopes, the successful applicant
} will also help to answer research questions using all of the
} microscopy techniques available in the ITG as well as participate in
} the development of advanced imaging technologies. A more detailed
} version of the announcement is available at:
}
} http://www.itg.uiuc.edu/announcements/lightmicro.htm
}
} This is a 12-month, full-time visiting academic professional position
} with university benefits and the possibility of becoming a permanent
} position. Salary is commensurate with experience. For full
} consideration, applications should be received by March 1st. To apply
} please send a letter of interest, CV, and the contact information of
} three references to:
}
} Lori Heil
} Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology Group
} 405 North Mathews Avenue
} Urbana, IL 61801
} Phone: (217) 244-0170
} Fax: (217) 244-6219
} E-mail: lheil-at-uiuc.edu
}
} Informal questions can be directed to Glenn Fried, ITG Co-director
} (gfried-at-itg.uiuc.edu; phone: 333-5493), or myself (contact information
} below). Thanks.
}
} Best Regards,
} Karl
}

--
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Office: B650J
Phone: 217.244.6292
Fax: 217.244.6219
Mobile: 217.390.1874
www.itg.uiuc.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 10:20:10 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 08:23:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Interesting. I don't seem to have these, or at least,
don't see them. Since the specimen is in the chamber
for a long time (several weeks), perhaps this aids?
For the first scans, the specimen is rather newly
placed in the SEM. Scans are done and then the specimen
is raised to 150C for several days. Then same scans
run again at 150C. Then cool down, stabilize for two
days and run scans again at 25C.

The ID problem (Edward Principe) is trying to find each small cluster of
runners on the die. Scans are typically 3x10x.05u
and .6x3x.01u, depending on the set of runners being
scanned. Since the die piece is about 3mmx1mm, finding
my set of five to seven runners in a sea of 90,000 runners
is not easy. Usually, I have a circle inscribed around
the sets with a wide FIB beam. Also, the FIB can be used
to quickly sweep the die to clean off any crud and ensure
any dielectric is removed from the top of the runners.

The setup you showed is great for short WD. I've "discovered"
this trick too when using the multi-stub specimen holder.

Indexing maybe seems to get worse with time per run. Not sure.
Will have to check this out. But specimen drift should not
be an issue with drift correction turned on. In the EDAX/TSL
system, drift correction is done by the OIM data collection
app. It corrects the x&y scan values to compensate for a
drifting image. I have it set to update every second.
This seems to work OK. When imaging directly in the SEM,
then it has its own drift correction feature.

Have you compared fps between the XL-30 and Supra? In the
XL-30 at 15KV, spot 5, aperture 5 15mm WD, I got about 60fps.
In the Supra at 15KV, 60u aperture, high current, 15mm WD
I get about 7fps. I figure that this difference is mostly
operator error on my part. But I don't know what that error
might be. If rates are really different, then that would be
good to know and just move on. In the XL-30, the specimen
(un-heated) was mounted on a pin stub and the stage was
tilted 70 degrees. In the Supra, I use a 45 degree pre-tilt
adapter and put the specimen on a Deben temperature stage stub
for use in the XP temperature stage. Doing this, one is limited
to longer WD since the whole stage affair blocks closer access
to the pole piece. However, having the pre-tilt makes it
more convenient in x movement--less chance of bashing the
pole piece.

I used to get postings from XL-30 list but that seems to have gone
away. I would have asked there. What is your experience with
fps between systems?

I got quite a bit of feedback from the geminisem group regarding my
failed Haskris chiller. That has been about all the action, so far.
Hopefully there will be more than just this. However, it was
very educational and helpful.

gary g.



At 01:23 AM 2/23/2005, you wrote:
} Dear Gary,
}
} Re. Hats. I really do mean contamination build up and not scan
} distortion.
} If you imagine keeping the beam on one place for a long time, say 1
} second, than in most SEMs, a cone of contamination will build up (size
} depends on time, how clean your specimen & SEM are, probe current...).
} When you scan slowly, each point builds up a small cone, if your step size
} is too small or the cones fall over, then they can affect the next row of
} EBSP measurements. In some cases faster is better, but we also lower kV
} (as you do) to get better spatial resolution and test different probe currents.
}
} I've attached an image to show the hats, etc.
}
} Best wishes,
}
} Austin
}
} P.S. The GeminiSEM user group is a great idea.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 10:28:41 2005



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 08:31:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: EBSD Os coated

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks for the feedback. Alumina does not seem to
be a problem specimen. The grains are much larger
than Cu runners and mag is way lower. I scan alumina
and sapphire at 15KV-20KV using 20Pa VP. No big
problem.

For specimens that have grains that would fit between
Au webs, that would probably be OK. for normal coating
when not doing EBSD, I use Au/Pd or Pt. These definitely
kill EBSD.

gary g.


At 02:41 AM 2/23/2005, you wrote:

} Dear Gary,
}
} Perhaps it is worth trying to apply a very thin gold coating, ~10
} Angstrom. Gold tends to form islands and not a continuous layer. These
} islands provide enough paths to remove the charge, while the uncoated
} areas in between allow transmission of the diffracted electrons. I have
} had good experience with gold (better than using carbon) on alumina samples.
}
} Rene de kloe
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 16:31:15 2005



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 16:34:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: viaWWW: seeking microscope vibration isolation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Florentino: I have a Stacis 2000 Active Vibration Canceling System from
TMC and it works great. My building vibrates at 15 Hz and this was
getting coupled into my SEM stage and amplified. I couldn't get a
decent image over 30KX. Now I can get images around 150KX. The system
is kinda pricey but well worth it if it makes your scope usable.

Hendrik O. Colijn wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Florentino,
}
} Here are 2 companies that have active vibration isolation systems.
} Others on the list may know of more vendors. I have not used either
} system, so I can not make any recommendations as to which is better.
} For your frequencies, passive vibration isolation will probably not
} give you sufficient attenuation, I think you will need an active
} vibration compensation system.
}
} Halcyonics
} http://www.halcyonics.com/
} TMC
} http://www.techmfg.com/
}
} Good luck,
} Henk Colijn
}
} At 06:59 PM 2/18/2005, fleyte-at-imp.mx wrote:
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} } submitted by (fleyte-at-imp.mx) from
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
} } Thursday, February 17, 2005 at 12:55:16
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } Email: fleyte-at-imp.mx
} } Name: Florentino
} }
} } Organization: IMP
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] seeking microscope vibration
} } isolation company
} }
} } Question: Hello everyone,
} }
} } I am looking for a reliable company to help us on a high resolution
} } microscope vibration isolation situaciÛn we have.
} }
} } The microscope we are dealing with is a high resolution TEMF30ST from
} } FEI, the operation voltaje is 300 KV, it has several signal
} } detectors like EDS EELS HAADF and it is capable to produce
} } tomography images from the sample, it has also a STEM unit and a
} } FIELD EMISSION GUN. It requires an ultra high vacuum system and a
} } cooling system.
} }
} } The mic¥s own isolation system has a 2.7 Hertz natural frequency and
} } the concrete pad under it has 3.1 Hertz, so we have amplification
} } problems. If you need more info or If you know or belong to a company
} } that may have low natural frequency vibration isolation systems
} } suitable for these mics please conctact me at fleyte-at-imp.mx
} }
} } Thank you
} }
} } Florentino Leyte
} }
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
}
} Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
} OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
} 040 Fontana Labs, 116 W. 19th Ave
}
}
}

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 16:52:01 2005



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 17:55:58 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

For the second time in 2 years, we are having serious
problems with our new batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions
appear very clear and give very little contrast. Increasing
the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve that
problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
extremely frustrating, especially since the company that
sells us the product is not very responsive and claims
that they are the only source of uranyl acetate around
the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
people who have experienced the same problem, and
information on other sources for the chemical.
Thank you

Marc

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 18:31:29 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 16:49:30 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Feb 23, 2005, at 2:55 PM, Marc Pypaert wrote:

} This is
} extremely frustrating, especially since the company that
} sells us the product is not very responsive and claims
} that they are the only source of uranyl acetate around
} the US.

Dear Marc,
I don't know whom you are dealing with, but each of the first three
companies in my list of EM supply bookmarks sells UAc. I'd suggest
checking out all the web sites and ordering from another company.
There are so many responsive EM supply companies that it is not worth
dealing with one that is not.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 20:34:09 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 21:38:15 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Marc Payert wrote:
============================================================
For the second time in 2 years, we are having serious problems with our new
batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very clear and give very little
contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve that
problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is extremely frustrating,
especially since the company that sells us the product is not very
responsive and claims that they are the only source of uranyl acetate around
the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM people who have
experienced the same problem, and information on other sources for the
chemical. Thank you
============================================================
I always get an uneasy feeling when I read something like this because it
casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide high quality chemicals
and products for microscopy and at the same time, to deal honestly with our
customers. But knowing my competitors pretty well, it would be my guess
that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an incompletely trained employee
and it should not negatively reflect on the overall thinking of that
particular supplier.

Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in the USA:

SPI Supplies
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml

Ladd Research
http://www.laddresearch.
com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html

Ted Pella, Inc.
http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662

EMS
http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/tannic.aspx#22400


Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 21:19:32 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 19:24:04 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Marc
Give us the name of company, so we'll not repeat your "mistake". I think,
it's important for EM community to share information which may help others.
By the way, I was just thinking to order UA, so from which company I SHOULD
NOT order? I very sure your answer on this message will help to resolve
the problem with company. Good luck! Sergey

At 02:55 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 22:45:44 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 20:50:19 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Charles
I think, it's quite difficult to damage a really good reputation. Everyone
has some problems with vendors. It's normal. What abnormal is when the
problem repeatedly appears with the same vendor in a limited period of
time. Then, ListServer is a good place to share this "experience", so
others will have chance to avoid troubles. If vendor is smart enough, they
will fix the problem and "thank you" this forum for pointing out their
mistake. I think, it's normal to share different experience in EM
community. Have a great night, Sergey.

At 06:38 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 23 22:46:51 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 20:41:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bill
Do you aware that each bottle of UA is about $100+? So, your suggestion is
that someone should give up with company and spoil $400 ($200 is
replacement from another company) on it... Ok, I think, you are quite rich
person. I could not afford such "deal"... I strongly believe that every
manufacturer should be responsible for its mistakes. They should
return money with great "thank you" that Marc is not me and did not post
the company's name. If it would be me - I'll post immediately and many
manufacturers know that, so I don't have any problems with UA...
Sergey

At 04:49 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 02:50:55 2005



From: Niko Hellsten :      niko.hellsten-at-gmail.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 09:54:50 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM cross-section preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi everybody!

Many thanks to everybody who answered to my question. You gave me lots
of information and ideas. And thanks for the procedures also.

To be more precise about what I'm doing and how:

Sample of 750 µm thick Si wafer on top of which are thin layers. Area
of interest is about 250 µm x 950 µm. First I've cleaved and then used
a diamond saw (blade thickness 300 µm) to cut a piece that fits into
the supporting grid (1 mm x 1,6 mm) where I make a sandwitch.

After resin fixation I polish mecanically up to 50 µm thickness. And
finally when the sample is about 50 µm thick, I move to ion thinning
to make a hole in the centre.

Anyway, thanks again to everybody

- Niko Hellstén, engineer
LMGP
Grenoble



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 07:00:18 2005



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 08:03:59 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Chuck et al.
The force of your comment is well taken. And the real
question here is the source of the UAc. Lots of folks can package and
label small amounts of a powder but where do they get it? It would
not surprise me to hear that there was only one place in the country
(world?) where hunks of uranium ore and vinegar were reacted together
to give UAc crystals which were then milled to a reasonable powder.
This stuff would be sold to SPI, Ladd, Pella, EMS, etc for resale. In
that case, if the source company switched from say cider to wine
vinegar, and the product suffered, it wouldn't matter which reseller
you tried. Now, as this message makes clear, I don't know a thing how
UAc is made. Perhaps it is easy to make and the suppliers really do
have distinct products. Do you know?

As ever,
Tobias


}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Marc Payert wrote:
} ============================================================
} For the second time in 2 years, we are having serious problems with our new
} batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very clear and give very little
} contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve that
} problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is extremely frustrating,
} especially since the company that sells us the product is not very
} responsive and claims that they are the only source of uranyl acetate around
} the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM people who have
} experienced the same problem, and information on other sources for the
} chemical. Thank you
} ============================================================
} I always get an uneasy feeling when I read something like this because it
} casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide high quality chemicals
} and products for microscopy and at the same time, to deal honestly with our
} customers. But knowing my competitors pretty well, it would be my guess
} that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an incompletely trained employee
} and it should not negatively reflect on the overall thinking of that
} particular supplier.
}
} Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in the USA:
}
} SPI Supplies
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml
}
} Ladd Research
} http://www.laddresearch.
} com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html
}
} Ted Pella, Inc.
} http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662
}
} EMS
} http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/tannic.aspx#22400
}
}
} Chuck
}
} ===================================================
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
} President
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
}
} Look for us!
} ############################
} WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} ############################
} ==================================================


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 09:47:16 2005



From: Stefan Gunnarsson :      Stefan.Gunnarsson-at-ebc.uu.se
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 16:50:14 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] STEM - How to......

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear listers,

I am sitting with an FEGSEM with, along all the normal SE and BSE
detectors, a STEM detector, which in our world here is primarily meant
to be used for biological TEM samples. This actually works quite
nicely, but I am aware that the STEM detector (it is of type with one
level for darkfield in four quadrants and one level for brigthfield)
could also be useful for metallurgical and other material samples. As I
am more or less totally ignorant of STEM work in that context, I would
be very glad if someone could point to good sources of information
(preferably web-sites) on the what's, how's, and why's....

thanks in advance
Stefan


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Stefan Gunnarsson
Uppsala universitet Uppsala University
Evolutionsbiologiskt centrum Evolutionary Biology Centre
Enheten för biologisk strukturanalys Microscopy and Imaging Unit
Norbyvägen 18A
SE75236 Uppsala, Sweden Tel & Fax: +46 - 18 471 2638
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 10:16:58 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 08:20:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i have never had the problem you report. i have always
gotten my UA from EMS. have always made mine up in a
4% in 50%EToH. it always worked well but did counter
stain with Pb citrate.
john
--- Marc Pypaert {marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} For the second time in 2 years, we are having
} serious
} problems with our new batches of uranyl acetate.
} Solutions
} appear very clear and give very little contrast.
} Increasing
} the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve
} that
} problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
} extremely frustrating, especially since the company
} that
} sells us the product is not very responsive and
} claims
} that they are the only source of uranyl acetate
} around
} the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
} people who have experienced the same problem, and
} information on other sources for the chemical.
} Thank you
}
} Marc
}
} --
} Marc Pypaert
} Department of Cell Biology
} Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
} Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
} Yale University School of Medicine
} 333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
} New Haven, CT 06520-8002
} TEL 203-785 3681
} FAX 203-785 7446
}
}
}


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 10:24:08 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 08:27:08 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i think we are jumping the gun based on one person
experience. we are not even sure if the problem is a
vendor or with the person using the UA. i have know
experienced techs make mistakes like not aging the UA
before use and could not figure out the problem. i
think before we accuse a vendor we need more info.
just a suggestion.
john
--- Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Charles
} I think, it's quite difficult to damage a really
} good reputation. Everyone
} has some problems with vendors. It's normal. What
} abnormal is when the
} problem repeatedly appears with the same vendor in a
} limited period of
} time. Then, ListServer is a good place to share this
} "experience", so
} others will have chance to avoid troubles. If
} vendor is smart enough, they
} will fix the problem and "thank you" this forum for
} pointing out their
} mistake. I think, it's normal to share different
} experience in EM
} community. Have a great night, Sergey.
}
} At 06:38 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
} }
} } Marc Payert wrote:
}
} ============================================================
} } For the second time in 2 years, we are having
} serious problems with our new
} } batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very
} clear and give very little
} } contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5
} times!) seem to solve that
} } problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
} extremely frustrating,
} } especially since the company that sells us the
} product is not very
} } responsive and claims that they are the only source
} of uranyl acetate around
} } the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
} people who have
} } experienced the same problem, and information on
} other sources for the
} } chemical. Thank you
}
} ============================================================
} } I always get an uneasy feeling when I read
} something like this because it
} } casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide
} high quality chemicals
} } and products for microscopy and at the same time,
} to deal honestly with our
} } customers. But knowing my competitors pretty
} well, it would be my guess
} } that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an
} incompletely trained employee
} } and it should not negatively reflect on the overall
} thinking of that
} } particular supplier.
} }
} } Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in
} the USA:
} }
} } SPI Supplies
}
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml
} }
} } Ladd Research
} } http://www.laddresearch.
}
} com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html
} }
} } Ted Pella, Inc.
}
} http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662
} }
} } EMS
}
} http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/tannic.aspx#22400
} }
} }
} } Chuck
} }
} } ===================================================
} } Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph:
} 1-(610)-436-5400
} } President
} } SPI SUPPLIES FAX:
} 1-(610)-436-5755
} } PO BOX 656
} e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
} } West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service:
} spi2spi-at-2spi.com
} }
} }
} } Look for us!
} } ############################
} } WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} } ############################
} } ==================================================
}
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
} Los Angeles, CA 90095
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
}
}
}
}
}





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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 10:24:35 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 08:27:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i think we are jumping the gun based on one person
experience. we are not even sure if the problem is a
vendor or with the person using the UA. i have know
experienced techs make mistakes like not aging the UA
before use and could not figure out the problem. i
think before we accuse a vendor we need more info.
just a suggestion.
john
ps forgive any typos.
--- Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Charles
} I think, it's quite difficult to damage a really
} good reputation. Everyone
} has some problems with vendors. It's normal. What
} abnormal is when the
} problem repeatedly appears with the same vendor in a
} limited period of
} time. Then, ListServer is a good place to share this
} "experience", so
} others will have chance to avoid troubles. If
} vendor is smart enough, they
} will fix the problem and "thank you" this forum for
} pointing out their
} mistake. I think, it's normal to share different
} experience in EM
} community. Have a great night, Sergey.
}
} At 06:38 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
} }
} } Marc Payert wrote:
}
} ============================================================
} } For the second time in 2 years, we are having
} serious problems with our new
} } batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very
} clear and give very little
} } contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5
} times!) seem to solve that
} } problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
} extremely frustrating,
} } especially since the company that sells us the
} product is not very
} } responsive and claims that they are the only source
} of uranyl acetate around
} } the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
} people who have
} } experienced the same problem, and information on
} other sources for the
} } chemical. Thank you
}
} ============================================================
} } I always get an uneasy feeling when I read
} something like this because it
} } casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide
} high quality chemicals
} } and products for microscopy and at the same time,
} to deal honestly with our
} } customers. But knowing my competitors pretty
} well, it would be my guess
} } that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an
} incompletely trained employee
} } and it should not negatively reflect on the overall
} thinking of that
} } particular supplier.
} }
} } Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in
} the USA:
} }
} } SPI Supplies
}
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml
} }
} } Ladd Research
} } http://www.laddresearch.
}
} com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html
} }
} } Ted Pella, Inc.
}
} http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662
} }
} } EMS
}
} http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/tannic.aspx#22400
} }
} }
} } Chuck
} }
} } ===================================================
} } Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph:
} 1-(610)-436-5400
} } President
} } SPI SUPPLIES FAX:
} 1-(610)-436-5755
} } PO BOX 656
} e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
} } West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service:
} spi2spi-at-2spi.com
} }
} }
} } Look for us!
} } ############################
} } WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} } ############################
} } ==================================================
}
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
} Los Angeles, CA 90095
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
}
}
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 11:16:41 2005



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:19:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Chuck,

I agree with you that companies try their very best
to sell good quality products to their customers. My
intention was not to cause our supplier any harm
(hence I did not name them!). But from the replies
I am getting I can see we are not the only ones
struggling with our UA supplies. Having done EM
for 20 years, in 2 continents and 5 different countries,
this is the first time I am experiencing this kind of
problems. Our supplier will replace batches for free
when we complain, but at the same time do not
warn us in advance when they are aware of
problems with their supplies, and as a result we
lose many hours (days) of work and hundreds of $!
Can't you understand my frustration?

As Sergey puts it very well, the use of this listserver
allows us to share our good and bad experiences,
and allows us to save a lot of time for not having
to repeat other people's mistakes. Sorry if this makes
you feel uneasy. My intention was not to hurt anyone,
but simply to find a solution to our serious (and
urgent) problem. I believe this is one of the main
goals of this listserver.

Best wishes

Marc

On Wednesday, February 23, 2005, at 09:38 PM, Garber, Charles A. wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Marc Payert wrote:
} ============================================================
} For the second time in 2 years, we are having serious problems with
} our new
} batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very clear and give very
} little
} contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve
} that
} problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is extremely
} frustrating,
} especially since the company that sells us the product is not very
} responsive and claims that they are the only source of uranyl acetate
} around
} the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM people who have
} experienced the same problem, and information on other sources for the
} chemical. Thank you
} ============================================================
} I always get an uneasy feeling when I read something like this because
} it
} casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide high quality
} chemicals
} and products for microscopy and at the same time, to deal honestly
} with our
} customers. But knowing my competitors pretty well, it would be my
} guess
} that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an incompletely trained
} employee
} and it should not negatively reflect on the overall thinking of that
} particular supplier.
}
} Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in the USA:
}
} SPI Supplies
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml
}
} Ladd Research
} http://www.laddresearch.
} com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html
}
} Ted Pella, Inc.
} http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662
}
} EMS
} http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/
} tannic.aspx#22400
}
}
} Chuck
}
} ===================================================
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
} President
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
}
} Look for us!
} ############################
} WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} ############################
} ==================================================
}
}
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 11:44:02 2005



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 10:01:53 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Feb 23, 2005, at 8:41 PM, Sergey Ryazantsev wrote:

} Do you aware that each bottle of UA is about $100+? So, your
} suggestion is that someone should give up with company and spoil
} $400 ($200 is replacement from another company) on it... Ok, I think,
} you are quite rich person. I could not afford such "deal"... I
} strongly believe that every manufacturer should be responsible for its
} mistakes. They should return money with great "thank you" that Marc
} is not me and did not post the company's name. If it would be me -
} I'll post immediately and many manufacturers know that, so I don't
} have any problems with UA...

Dear Sergey,
Actually, some companies offer smaller amounts of UAc for about $25,
so one doesn't have to be too rich to try them out. As far as spoiling
$400 is concerned, if one has a bad batch of UA, one can attempt to
recover the cost from the vendor quite apart from ordering a new
supply, and one will have to order a new bottle from somebody in order
to get well-stained specimens. I agree that the original company
should, at the very least, offer to send a new bottle of UAc to replace
the bad one, and pay for shipping the old one back (if they are to find
out why that batch was bad). If, as Marc wrote, the company was
unresponsive, then one can either swallow the loss of the money for the
UAc or go to court. I expect that the prospect of negative publicity
from being named on this list would be enough to get the company to
rectify the problem, so I would contact the president first and see if
that solves the problem before posting the company name.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 11:50:48 2005



From: S. Kuehner :      kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 09:54:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] particle analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello-

I'm looking for information on how to make matrix corrections to WDS
analysis of {20um grains of iron oxide embedded in silcate glass. The
problem is that the totals are always 1-3% low (after correcting for Fe3+
and beam overlap into the silicate matrix following the procedure
described by Warren in an LPSC abstract). It is clearly a grain size
effect and we suspect the low totals are due to unaccounted continuum
flourescence in the particles compared to the standards. I've found a
number of articles describing methods for analyzing particles ON a
substrate but have not been able to locate info on particles embedded IN a
substrate. I suspect that I'm not the first to worry about this so any
help would be great. Thanks, sk

************************************************
....amphiboles do violence to history...
T. Feininger, 2001. (taken out of context)
****************************

Dr. Scott Kuehner kuehner-at-u.washington.edu
Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences ph.206-543-8393
Mail Stop 351310 Fax 206-616-6873
The University of Washington
Seattle, Washington 98195-1310
************************************************


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 12:58:40 2005



From: Joe Kulik :      juk12-at-psu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:03:22 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: Stability of amorphous Ge test sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I plan to use an amorphous Ge sample to characterize the contrast
transfer function in our TEM.

Does anyone have a comment about the stability of a thin amorphous Ge
sample after prolonged exposure to atmosphere? Must the sample be kept
under vacuum (or in an inert atmosphere)?

-- Joe Kulik

_________________________________

Joseph Kulik
Research Associate
Materials Research Institute
The Pennsylvania State University
194 MRI Bldg
University Park, PA 16802

Telephone: 814-865-0344
Fax: 814-863-8561
e-mail: juk12-at-psu.edu
_________________________________




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 13:09:53 2005



From: Barbara Maloney :      maloneyb-at-fiu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:11:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] tetramethlysilane

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Group - can you reuse this after you you only use it once on same
type of samples?
Thanks
Barbara


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 13:41:50 2005



From: John Knowles :      john-at-microvisionlabs.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:41:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer (CPD) from a second
party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The model of CPD I have
is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems to no longer exist
(all of my internet searches have failed to turn them up so far), I am
looking for anyone that may know something about this model or even have
a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If you know anything
about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could you please let me
know? From my initial inspection of the unit everything appears to be
in good shape, but I wound rather not risk a test run without a more
detailed inspection and knowledge of the exact start up and run
procedures. Thanks for any information any of you can give me on the
SPC-1500 or even what happened to The Bomar Company.

John Knowles
MicroVision Labs, Inc.
Burlington, MA



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:15:25 2005



From: Paul Voyles :      voyles-at-engr.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:17:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM: Stability of amorphous Ge test sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

At 01:03 PM 2/24/2005, you wrote:
} I plan to use an amorphous Ge sample to characterize the contrast
} transfer function in our TEM.
}
} Does anyone have a comment about the stability of a thin amorphous Ge
} sample after prolonged exposure to atmosphere? Must the sample be kept
} under vacuum (or in an inert atmosphere)?

Ge does oxidize, and I believe the oxide is water-soluble. In my
experience, Ge thin films on Cu grids also slowly, over a period of months,
crystallize when stored at room temperature in air. I don't know if
crystallization can be slowed or avoided by storing samples at low
temperature or in an inert atmosphere.


Best wishes,
Paul Voyles

Paul Voyles
Assistant Professor
Materials Science and Engineering Department
University of Wisconsin - Madison
1509 University Ave.
Madison, WI 53706-1595
Voice: (608) 265-6740
Fax: (608) 262-8353
voyles-at-engr.wisc.edu
www.engr.wisc.edu/mse/faculty/voyles_paul.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:16:33 2005



From: azel-at-azeronline.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 07:20:34 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM advice

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (azel-at-azeronline.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.org/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Thursday, February 24, 2005 at 09:11:13
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: azel-at-azeronline.com
Name: Muradov

Organization: Baku State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: We want to get scanning electronic microscope for research
semi-conductor thin films and nanoparticles. What could you advise?
What guiding price of such devices?

Bests,
Dr.M.Muradov

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:16:08 2005



From: g.chau-at-ucl.ac.uk (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 07:20:03 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM of Hollow Biological Sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (g.chau-at-ucl.ac.uk) from
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Thursday, February 24, 2005 at 06:30:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: g.chau-at-ucl.ac.uk
Name: Garr Chau

Organization: University College London

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM of Hollow Biological Sample

Question: Hi all,

Being a novice at SEM, I'm wondering what would be the best method of
sampling a hollow-centred tube of polymer with cells mixed within? I
want to look at the homogeneity of spread of cells throughout the
polymer tube i.e. surface morphology of cross-sections.

The tube is formed within a glass capillary, but it is unfortunately
rather flimsy and I originally thought of backing it with a molten
material, letting it set (i.e. for mechanical support) and removing
the tube from the glass before slicing cross-sections, coating in
gold and scanning using SEM.

However I was unaware of the water content removal needed. I am
aware of alternatives including SEM with a cryostage and ofcourse
environmental EM.

The problems include: removing of the tube from the glass capillary,
and slicing the tube without smearing.

What is everyone's recommended approach?

Garr

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:17:28 2005



From: liu_zhongyi-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 07:21:28 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Script for importing a binary image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (liu_zhongyi-at-yahoo.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Thursday, February 24, 2005 at 11:43:14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: liu_zhongyi-at-yahoo.com
Name: Zhongyi Liu

Organization: Argonne National Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Script for importing a binary image

Question: Question: I have images acquired using TIA on Tecnai 20F
microscope and exported as binary images (.bin). For data process,
I want to import these binary images to DigitalMicrograph (DM) and
save them in the format of .dm3. Does anyone have such script at
hand? (More accurately, my real question is: does anyone know how to
use DM script to open a binary image?)
Thanks in advance.

Zhongyi Liu

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:17:23 2005



From: lethomps-at-us.ibm.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 07:20:56 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Conductive adhesive for ion milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (lethomps-at-us.ibm.com) from on Thursday, February 24,
2005 at 10:37:15
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: lethomps-at-us.ibm.com
Name: Leslie Thompson

Organization: IBM Almaden Research

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Conductive adhesive for ion milling

Question: Hello Listers-

I am in need of a conductive adhesive to attach glass substrate
samples to a stub for ion milling in the Gatan PIPS. In a perfect
world, I could buy conductive crystalbond, but I am not aware of a
product like that. I have been using conductive graphite in IPA by
applying 2 drops as small as possible (ideally just the edge of a 3
mm sample), and quickly placing the sample before it dries, which
doesn't always work. The milling is greatly improved, but the
application method and cleaning after milling leaves much to be
desired. Any suggestions?

Leslie Thompson
IBM Almaden Research
650 Harry Road, K19/D2
San Jose, CA 95120-6099
(408) 927-3856

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:24:58 2005



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 15:23:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Uranyl acetate availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear John,

The problem is definitely not with the
users in this case! I supervise the
work of my technicians very closely,
and would have noticed changes in the
procedures. Plus the company
has acknowledged problems with the
supplies. My question is really - are
others experiencing the same problems,
and what are they doing to solve them?
I'm not trying to accuse anybody, just
want to find a solution to a serious and
costly problem.
Best

Marc

On Thursday, February 24, 2005, at 11:27 AM, john hoffpauir wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} i think we are jumping the gun based on one person
} experience. we are not even sure if the problem is a
} vendor or with the person using the UA. i have know
} experienced techs make mistakes like not aging the UA
} before use and could not figure out the problem. i
} think before we accuse a vendor we need more info.
} just a suggestion.
} john
} --- Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} wrote:
}
} }
} }
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} } Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} }
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
} }
} } Charles
} } I think, it's quite difficult to damage a really
} } good reputation. Everyone
} } has some problems with vendors. It's normal. What
} } abnormal is when the
} } problem repeatedly appears with the same vendor in a
} } limited period of
} } time. Then, ListServer is a good place to share this
} } "experience", so
} } others will have chance to avoid troubles. If
} } vendor is smart enough, they
} } will fix the problem and "thank you" this forum for
} } pointing out their
} } mistake. I think, it's normal to share different
} } experience in EM
} } community. Have a great night, Sergey.
} }
} } At 06:38 PM 2/23/2005, you wrote:
} }
} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} } Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} }
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} } }
} } } -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
} } }
} } } Marc Payert wrote:
} }
} } ============================================================
} } } For the second time in 2 years, we are having
} } serious problems with our new
} } } batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions appear very
} } clear and give very little
} } } contrast. Increasing the concentration (up to 5
} } times!) seem to solve that
} } } problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
} } extremely frustrating,
} } } especially since the company that sells us the
} } product is not very
} } } responsive and claims that they are the only source
} } of uranyl acetate around
} } } the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
} } people who have
} } } experienced the same problem, and information on
} } other sources for the
} } } chemical. Thank you
} }
} } ============================================================
} } } I always get an uneasy feeling when I read
} } something like this because it
} } } casts a pall over all of us working hard to provide
} } high quality chemicals
} } } and products for microscopy and at the same time,
} } to deal honestly with our
} } } customers. But knowing my competitors pretty
} } well, it would be my guess
} } } that this was an innocent mistake, perhaps an
} } incompletely trained employee
} } } and it should not negatively reflect on the overall
} } thinking of that
} } } particular supplier.
} } }
} } } Here are just **some** of the sources for UA in
} } the USA:
} } }
} } } SPI Supplies
} }
} } http://www.2spi.com/catalog/chem/Uranyl_Acetate.shtml
} } }
} } } Ladd Research
} } } http://www.laddresearch.
} }
} } com/General_Catalog/Chapter_2/ElectronStains/electronstains.html
} } }
} } } Ted Pella, Inc.
} }
} } http://www.tedpella.com/chemical_html/chem3.htm#anchor440662
} } }
} } } EMS
} }
} } http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/chemicals/
} } tannic.aspx#22400
} } }
} } }
} } } Chuck
} } }
} } } ===================================================
} } } Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph:
} } 1-(610)-436-5400
} } } President
} } } SPI SUPPLIES FAX:
} } 1-(610)-436-5755
} } } PO BOX 656
} } e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
} } } West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service:
} } spi2spi-at-2spi.com
} } }
} } }
} } } Look for us!
} } } ############################
} } } WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} } } ############################
} } } ==================================================
} }
} } _____________________________________
} }
} } Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} } Electron Microscopy
} } UCLA School of Medicine
} } Department of Biological Chemistry
} } 10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-080
} } Los Angeles, CA 90095
} }
} } Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
} } (310) 206-1029 (Lab)
} } FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} } mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}
} __________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.
} http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:40:25 2005



From: Leslie E Thompson :      lethomps-at-us.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:43:56 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Conductive adhesive for ion milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers-

I am in need of a conductive adhesive to attach glass substrate samples to
a stub for ion milling in the Gatan PIPS. In a perfect world, I could buy
conductive crystalbond, but I am not aware of a product like that. I have
been using conductive graphite in IPA by applying 2 drops as small as
possible, and quickly placing the sample before it dries, which doesn't
always work. The milling is greatly improved, but the application method
and cleaning after milling leaves much to be desired. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Leslie


Leslie Thompson
IBM Almaden Research
650 Harry Road, K19/D2
San Jose, CA 95120-6099
(408) 927-3856


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 14:58:48 2005



From: Edward Calomeni :      calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 16:02:10 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] LM embedding resins for Bone marrow

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello All,

Have a colleague that wants everything possible done on a sample.
Wants to rapid process clinical bone marrow biopsies in a plastic resin
(GMA?) and do routine LM (no problem), FISH (probably no problem) and
also remove the resin and extract the DNA/RNA for genetic analysis.
They are currently doing the first two on rapid EDTA decal procedures
out of paraffin embedded stuff. However the EDTA chews up the DNA into
unrecognizable pieces, rendering it useless for genetic analysis. My
question is: Is there a resin that can be completely removed (for the
DNA stuff), is rapidly processed and does not interfere with any FISH
procedures.

Thanks for your help.

Ed

Edward Calomeni
Director EM Lab
Ohio State University - Pathology
M018 Starling Loving Hall
320 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210-1240
614-293-5580 (office)
614-293-8806 (lab)
calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 15:23:18 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 16:26:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John,
Is your Bomar purple? I had a purple Bomar in my lab for a while...I
don't recall the model number. It was a "hand-me-down" from another
lab here that had closed up shop. It was pretty reliable and easy to
use. One feature that I liked was that the chamber was horizontal.
It worked well for the type of specimens I was running at the time.
I never had a manual either, the original user gave me a walk
through when he brought it to me. The unit I had did have a
pressure-release safety valve. I just did everything in the logical
order for a CPD run and it worked well until the temperature gauge
gave out and since the chamber didn't have a window, I could not
longer tell when I'd crossed the critical point.
Its been a few years now since I trashed it, so the details are
fuzzy. If you have any specific questions, ask them off list. Maybe
your questions will jog my memeory.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 16:22:12 2005



From: John C. Wheatley :      John.Wheatley-at-asu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 15:26:03 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscope Contracts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would like to know if there are any university EM laboratories that have
TEMs and or SEMs that are eight or less years old and do not have
maintenance contracts. I especially would like to hear from those people
who have Tecnai, XL-30 and 2010 instruments or equivalents and do not
carry maintenance contracts for them. If so, how are repairs and
maintenance costs paid? Are all maintenance functions performed in-house
or are all maintenance functions performed by the OEM maintenance
engineers? Is there a combination of in-house and OEM maintenance? Is
there a significant subsidy from the university for maintenance costs? As
we work toward a business model in our lab, we find that $25.00/hr internal
rate charge and a 12% subsity from the Dean for maintenance contracts is
probably too little to cover all necessary costs. I realize that
periodically the question is asked about microscope charges. However, I
would like to know what the internal charge rate is for those labs where
there is no EM maintenance contract and no subsidy.

John C. Wheatley
Lab Manager
Arizona State University
Center for Solid State Science
PSA-213
BOX 871704
Tempe, AZ 85287-1704


Phone: (480) 965-3831
FAX: (480) 965-9004
John.Wheatley-at-ASU.Edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 16:48:05 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:51:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

you might check with this person. he had a post in the
MSA achives a few years ago and mentions having one,
if he his still in the buisnes: Gib Ahlstrand :
giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu

--- John Knowles {john-at-microvisionlabs.com} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer
} (CPD) from a second
} party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The
} model of CPD I have
} is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems
} to no longer exist
} (all of my internet searches have failed to turn
} them up so far), I am
} looking for anyone that may know something about
} this model or even have
} a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If
} you know anything
} about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could
} you please let me
} know? From my initial inspection of the unit
} everything appears to be
} in good shape, but I wound rather not risk a test
} run without a more
} detailed inspection and knowledge of the exact start
} up and run
} procedures. Thanks for any information any of you
} can give me on the
} SPC-1500 or even what happened to The Bomar Company.
}
} John Knowles
} MicroVision Labs, Inc.
} Burlington, MA
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 16:51:30 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:55:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i have found through google a refence that used the
bomar cpd. ladd sold it years back.
john
--- John Knowles {john-at-microvisionlabs.com} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer
} (CPD) from a second
} party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The
} model of CPD I have
} is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems
} to no longer exist
} (all of my internet searches have failed to turn
} them up so far), I am
} looking for anyone that may know something about
} this model or even have
} a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If
} you know anything
} about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could
} you please let me
} know? From my initial inspection of the unit
} everything appears to be
} in good shape, but I wound rather not risk a test
} run without a more
} detailed inspection and knowledge of the exact start
} up and run
} procedures. Thanks for any information any of you
} can give me on the
} SPC-1500 or even what happened to The Bomar Company.
}
} John Knowles
} MicroVision Labs, Inc.
} Burlington, MA
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 16:59:33 2005



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 17:03:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Garr,

Fix in glutaraldehyde and dehydrate as usual for critical point
drying, but! after the final 100% EtOH, throw the tubes in liquid
nitrogen and snap them. The EtOH freezes vitreously, and you'll get
nice breaks with no smearing.
I do this for biofilm studies in catheters. Your biggest problem will
be finding the bits after breaking -- capillary tubing is pretty
small. Try putting black paper over the aluminum (oop -- "aluminium")
foil that you use the line the styrofoam container holding the LN2,
and do the breaking in small petri dishes in the LN2 bath.
Bring back into 100% EtOH and critical point dry as usual.

Phil

} Email: g.chau-at-ucl.ac.uk
} Name: Garr Chau
}
} Organization: University College London
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM of Hollow Biological Sample
}
} Question: Hi all,
}
} Being a novice at SEM, I'm wondering what would be the best method
} of sampling a hollow-centred tube of polymer with cells mixed
} within? I want to look at the homogeneity of spread of cells
} throughout the polymer tube i.e. surface morphology of
} cross-sections.
}
} The tube is formed within a glass capillary, but it is unfortunately
} rather flimsy and I originally thought of backing it with a molten
} material, letting it set (i.e. for mechanical support) and removing
} the tube from the glass before slicing cross-sections, coating in
} gold and scanning using SEM.
}
} However I was unaware of the water content removal needed. I am
} aware of alternatives including SEM with a cryostage and ofcourse
} environmental EM.
}
} The problems include: removing of the tube from the glass capillary,
} and slicing the tube without smearing.
}
} What is everyone's recommended approach?
}
} Garr
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 17:27:02 2005



From: John Knowles :      john-at-microvisionlabs.com
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 18:26:26 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes, someone just emailed me and said that The Bomar Company went under
about 20 years ago. I talked to Ernest Fullem Co. and they said they
had also carried the Bomar CPDs back in the day but never had any at
their location. They would just have them sent to the customer when one
was ordered. So they have no manuals or such. That is likely the same
with Ladd as well.
Looks like there are a few manuals out there from the emails I have been
getting and I should be ok on that front. Thanks for everyone's
responses. You have been very helpful to me.

John Knowles
MicroVision Labs, Inc.


-----Original Message-----
} From: john hoffpauir [mailto:hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2005 5:55 PM
To: John Knowles; Microscopy-at-microscopy.com

i have found through google a refence that used the
bomar cpd. ladd sold it years back.
john
--- John Knowles {john-at-microvisionlabs.com} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
}
}
} I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer
} (CPD) from a second
} party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The
} model of CPD I have
} is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems
} to no longer exist
} (all of my internet searches have failed to turn
} them up so far), I am
} looking for anyone that may know something about
} this model or even have
} a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If
} you know anything
} about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could
} you please let me
} know? From my initial inspection of the unit
} everything appears to be
} in good shape, but I wound rather not risk a test
} run without a more
} detailed inspection and knowledge of the exact start
} up and run
} procedures. Thanks for any information any of you
} can give me on the
} SPC-1500 or even what happened to The Bomar Company.
}
} John Knowles
} MicroVision Labs, Inc.
} Burlington, MA
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 18:20:09 2005



From: Jeffrey Farrer :      jeff_farrer-at-byu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 17:24:13 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Visible-light Microscopes for Honduras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Looking for surplus compound or stereo visible-light microscopes for
the University of Honduras.

I received a request from a humanitarian group that has been doing a
lot of work in the Honduras, for light microscopes to be used in
setting up a microbiology department at the University of Honduras.
Other microbiology-type equipment was also requested, but I'll stick to
the microscopes for this forum.

The group that contacted me started out building homes in Honduras,
then they collaborated with another group (Academy of LDS Dentists) and
set up a Dental clinic with Dentists from the U.S. Now they are
working with the University of Honduras to expand their educational
offerings. A group of professors from North American Universities will
be going down at the end of March along with a container of donated lab
equipment. If you have any surplus visible-light microscopes (or other
microbiology equip) that you would like to donate, or if you have any
questions about this, please send an email to:

helpforhonduras-at-beprepared.com

All donated equipment is going to a 501c3 (non-profit) organization.
The group said they could pay for shipping and would provide the info
for U.S. charitable tax deductions.

Thanks

Jeff Farrer



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 24 22:41:10 2005



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 22:45:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We had a Bomar years ago and it was famous for using freon rather than CO2.

They may have made a later model for CO2 after freon got expensive
(and now illegal) but you should check that yours is actually
designed for CO2.

Not only are the seals different but freon went through its critical
point at a much lower pressure and so it was cheaper to make the
chamber.

Cheers,

Jim Pawley

}
} i have found through google a refence that used the
} bomar cpd. ladd sold it years back.
} john
} --- John Knowles {john-at-microvisionlabs.com} wrote:
}
} }
} } I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer
} } (CPD) from a second
} } party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The
} } model of CPD I have
} } is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems
} } to no longer exist
} } (all of my internet searches have failed to turn
} } them up so far), I am
} } looking for anyone that may know something about
} } this model or even have
} } a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If
} } you know anything
} } about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could

--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building,
FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706
JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 11-23, 2005, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2005


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 02:35:17 2005



From: Neil P. Young :      neil-at-young8696.freeserve.co.uk
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:38:42 +0100 (CET)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: STEM - How to......

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Stefan,
Have a look for the book: Characterization of Nanophase Materials, published by
Wiley, edited by Z.L. Wang. (2000). Has a nice section on STEM. Also have a look
for the papers from S. Pennycook / P.Nellist for theory on HAADF and applications.

Neil


} Message date : Feb 24 2005, 08:52 PM
} From : "Stefan Gunnarsson" {Stefan.Gunnarsson-at-ebc.uu.se}
} To : Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Copy to :
} Subject : STEM - How to......
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear listers,
}
} I am sitting with an FEGSEM with, along all the normal SE and BSE
} detectors, a STEM detector, which in our world here is primarily meant
} to be used for biological TEM samples. This actually works quite
} nicely, but I am aware that the STEM detector (it is of type with one
} level for darkfield in four quadrants and one level for brigthfield)
} could also be useful for metallurgical and other material samples. As I
} am more or less totally ignorant of STEM work in that context, I would
} be very glad if someone could point to good sources of information
} (preferably web-sites) on the what's, how's, and why's....
}
} thanks in advance
} Stefan
}
}
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Stefan Gunnarsson
} Uppsala universitet Uppsala University
} Evolutionsbiologiskt centrum Evolutionary Biology Centre
} Enheten för biologisk strukturanalys Microscopy and Imaging Unit
} Norbyvägen 18A
} SE75236 Uppsala, Sweden Tel & Fax: +46 - 18 471 2638
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
}
}
}


Neil Young


--

Whatever you Wanadoo:
http://www.wanadoo.co.uk/time/

This email has been checked for most known viruses - find out more at: http://www.wanadoo.co.uk/help/id/7098.htm




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 02:55:41 2005



From: gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:58:16 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re:Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
I had an interesting conversation with another experienced Manager of an
EM facility here in the UK regarding recent problems she had with UA
precipitating and actually darkening in colour in the stock bottle.
After a lot of 'research' it turned out not to be a supplier or operator
problem.
They had recently had the fluorescent tubes changed in the over head
lighting system which caused some weird photochemical effect.
They now have ensure all UA is kept in the dark and actually do the UA
staining in the dark too.

Gill Brown
GSK
Stevenage
UK





"Marc Pypaert" {marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu}
23-Feb-2005 22:55

To
Microscopy {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
cc

Subject
Uranyl Acetate








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

For the second time in 2 years, we are having serious
problems with our new batches of uranyl acetate. Solutions
appear very clear and give very little contrast. Increasing
the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve that
problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
extremely frustrating, especially since the company that
sells us the product is not very responsive and claims
that they are the only source of uranyl acetate around
the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
people who have experienced the same problem, and
information on other sources for the chemical.
Thank you

Marc

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 07:14:51 2005



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:18:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Embedding of cells in a tube

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --


Garr Chau wrote:
===========================================================
Being a novice at SEM, I'm wondering what would be the best method of
sampling a hollow-centred tube of polymer with cells mixed within? I want
to look at the homogeneity of spread of cells throughout the polymer tube i
e. surface morphology of cross-sections.

The tube is formed within a glass capillary, but it is unfortunately rather
flimsy and I originally thought of backing it with a molten material,
letting it set (i.e. for mechanical support) and removing the tube from the
glass before slicing cross-sections, coating in gold and scanning using SEM

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 09:58:45 2005



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 10:08:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM: Critical-Point Dryer Info. needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John Knowles,

With respect to:

} you might check with this person. he had a post in the
} MSA achives a few years ago and mentions having one,
} if he his still in the buisnes: Gib Ahlstrand :
} giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu

Yep, I am still in the biz, but my e-mail address has changed to:

ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu

I did have a Bomar CPD a long time ago, the SPC-50. It was a manual unit,
and you had to plumb in the cooling and heating water lines. I still have a
sales brochure but the 1500 is not mentioned in it, only the SPC-50 series
and the SPC-900 series, that's how old the brochure is. But it is not an
operating manual. The company went out of business a long time ago.

If you've operated a CPD before, you should have no trouble operating the
1500. I don't know if the 1500 has an automatic or programed mode, but I'd
suggest you run it manually at first to check it out. Carefully inspect the
chamber cover: if has a window, make sure you put it on right side facing
out, as its likely designed to support the pressure only going one way. Most
units have a fool-proof mount so that it can only be put on correctly, but
my old Bomar did not, as I recall.

PLease contact me off line if you want more specific info.

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

} } I have recently bought a used critical-point dryer
} } (CPD) from a second
} } party vendor that had no manual for the unit. The
} } model of CPD I have
} } is a Bomar SPC-1500. Since The Bomar Company seems
} } to no longer exist
} } (all of my internet searches have failed to turn
} } them up so far), I am
} } looking for anyone that may know something about
} } this model or even have
} } a manual I could copy (or pay to have copied). If
} } you know anything
} } about the SPC-1500 or know anyone that has one could
} } you please let me
} } know? From my initial inspection of the unit
} } everything appears to be
} } in good shape, but I wound rather not risk a test
} } run without a more
} } detailed inspection and knowledge of the exact start
} } up and run
} } procedures. Thanks for any information any of you
} } can give me on the
} } SPC-1500 or even what happened to The Bomar Company.
} }
} } John Knowles
} } MicroVision Labs, Inc.
} } Burlington, MA



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 10:12:09 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:14:58 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re:Re: Uranyl Acetate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

UA precipitation is almost always linked to light. UA
should always be stored in a dark bottle, filtered
before staining and stained in the dark if staining
longer than a few minutes. when working in a collagen
lab had to stain for over 20 minutes, then the
staining had to be carried out in the dark.
john
--- gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi,
} I had an interesting conversation with another
} experienced Manager of an
} EM facility here in the UK regarding recent problems
} she had with UA
} precipitating and actually darkening in colour in
} the stock bottle.
} After a lot of 'research' it turned out not to be a
} supplier or operator
} problem.
} They had recently had the fluorescent tubes changed
} in the over head
} lighting system which caused some weird
} photochemical effect.
} They now have ensure all UA is kept in the dark and
} actually do the UA
} staining in the dark too.
}
} Gill Brown
} GSK
} Stevenage
} UK
}
}
}
}
}
} "Marc Pypaert" {marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu}
} 23-Feb-2005 22:55
}
} To
} Microscopy {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} cc
}
} Subject
} Uranyl Acetate
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} For the second time in 2 years, we are having
} serious
} problems with our new batches of uranyl acetate.
} Solutions
} appear very clear and give very little contrast.
} Increasing
} the concentration (up to 5 times!) seem to solve
} that
} problem, but gives increased precipitation. This is
} extremely frustrating, especially since the company
} that
} sells us the product is not very responsive and
} claims
} that they are the only source of uranyl acetate
} around
} the US. I would appreciate any advise from other EM
} people who have experienced the same problem, and
} information on other sources for the chemical.
} Thank you
}
} Marc
}
} --
} Marc Pypaert
} Department of Cell Biology
} Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
} Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
} Yale University School of Medicine
} 333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
} New Haven, CT 06520-8002
} TEL 203-785 3681
} FAX 203-785 7446
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 10:13:28 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 10:17:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

We have someone wanting to study bacterial attachment to sand grains.
Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of sand? This will be a
first for us.

We're going to start with negative staining, hoping to avoid cutting
thins altogether, but if that doesn't work we thought we'd try adhering
to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover slips or embedding in agar before
resin embedding.

Thanks!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 11:29:06 2005



From: Roger Baker :      rcbaker-at-eden.infohwy.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:29:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am a hands-on amateur, interested in microscopy for decades, and new
to this list.

I have been studying ultramicrotome and embedding technique in some
detail recently. It would be my guess that as you approach the hard
grain it the bacterial layer might section normally, but its an obvious
way to screw up a good diamond knife.

So I would imagine that you would fix and embed whole sand grains as if
they were a piece of tissue. And then mechanically pry away the sand
grain to separate it from the embedding plastic, leaving the bacterial
layer stuck in the exposed plastic surface, sort of like
freeze-fracture. And then you would cure a drop of fresh embedding
plastic onto this exposed surface and then slice it. -- Roger, Austin
Tx


On Feb 25, 2005, at 10:17 AM, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Hi all,
}
} We have someone wanting to study bacterial attachment to sand grains.
} Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of sand? This will be a
} first for us.
}
} We're going to start with negative staining, hoping to avoid cutting
} thins altogether, but if that doesn't work we thought we'd try adhering
} to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover slips or embedding in agar before
} resin embedding.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 12:10:44 2005



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 12:58:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Dr. Muradov

We are consultants in electron microscopy and one of the services that we
provide is advice on the purchase of electron microscopes and energy
dispersive analysis systems.

Our services are available in three styles which you may use as parts or as
a complete purchasing service.

1) We will discuss your requirements and finances and then survey the
current instruments that would be suitable for your establishment . We will
prepare a report with our suggestions as to the most suitable instruments.
2) Further to the above to prepare suitable samples of your material and
visit the microscope manufacturers to determine the most suitable
instruments for the tasks you wish to perform. We may carry out this
section for you and prepare a report or you may join us for this evaluation.
3) We will study the results obtained from the instruments with you and
determine which has performed in the most satisfactory manner therefore
which instrument should be purchased.

Further information on our techniques of instrument evaluation are available
on request.

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For electron microscopy consultancy and training world wide
www.emcourses.com tel +44 1280 816512 fax +44 1280 814007
Mobil +44 07711 606967

----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {azel-at-azeronline.com}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2005 8:20 PM

Randy,

If you have the equipment, the best way to do this is freeze-fixing
-- plunge into slush or HPF -- then cryoSEM of the frozen sample.
Next best is freeze-fixing followed by proper freeze-drying (if you
don't have a real freeze-dryer, the kind that starts at -90 then goes
to -60, etc., you can put the samples in a vacuum desiccator with
molecular sieve, pull a good vacuum, and stick them in a -80 freezer.
The desiccant acts as a cryopump.
Next best after that is routine fix/deH2O/CPD. That won't have any
more artifacts than sectioning.
The negative staining would be useful if you get it to work.
Have fun!

Phil

} Hi all,
}
} We have someone wanting to study bacterial attachment to sand grains.
} Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of sand? This will be a
} first for us.
}
} We're going to start with negative staining, hoping to avoid cutting
} thins altogether, but if that doesn't work we thought we'd try adhering
} to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover slips or embedding in agar before
} resin embedding.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
}
}
}
}

--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 13:39:24 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:42:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

agar may not be needed if you have a large enough
number of bacteria, just spin them down in the
fixative, should get a pellet.as for the sand, well
never have cut sand not even certain it is cutable.
--- "Tindall, Randy D." {TindallR-at-missouri.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi all,
}
} We have someone wanting to study bacterial
} attachment to sand grains.
} Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of
} sand? This will be a
} first for us.
}
} We're going to start with negative staining, hoping
} to avoid cutting
} thins altogether, but if that doesn't work we
} thought we'd try adhering
} to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover slips or
} embedding in agar before
} resin embedding.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small
} Well!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 13:50:21 2005



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 14:53:43 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Conductive adhesive for ion milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Are you making cross sections or plan view samples?

Regardless, I don't think that you need conductive glue for glass samples. We have been making cross sections and plan sections on glass for a number of years.

Check you alignment of the guns in the PIPS. If you use float glass (normal window glass) you can see the sample fluoresce when the beam hits it. In the limited number of glass samples that I have prepared in a PIPS (about 12 total), I have found that the focus drifted more than I liked on the machine that I was using. In addition, the PIPS guns are too hot for glass and you have to de-tune them to conditions where the rates may be a little slow, i.e. Low kV and low current. It also helps to use the lowest practical milling angle to minimize heating. (However, heating helps the conductivity of glass.) It may be that the sample holder

The best results that I get for cross sections is using a blank piece of silicon on top. (I think that you might be able to scrounge up a loose piece or two. :) ) The Si helps several ways: it helps in the mechanical thinning process to gauge the thickness of the dimple with glass -just use the color changes that John McCaffrey described and calibrated a number of years ago, it helps dissipate the heat in the ion mill, it helps with charging in the microscope, and it helps align the cross section with the surface parallel to the beam by using the [011] zone axis of Si by tilting in the TEM.

I hope this helps.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Leslie E Thompson [mailto:lethomps-at-us.ibm.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2005 3:44 PM
To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com

Hello Listers-

I am in need of a conductive adhesive to attach glass substrate samples to
a stub for ion milling in the Gatan PIPS. In a perfect world, I could buy
conductive crystalbond, but I am not aware of a product like that. I have
been using conductive graphite in IPA by applying 2 drops as small as
possible, and quickly placing the sample before it dries, which doesn't
always work. The milling is greatly improved, but the application method
and cleaning after milling leaves much to be desired. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Leslie


Leslie Thompson
IBM Almaden Research
650 Harry Road, K19/D2
San Jose, CA 95120-6099
(408) 927-3856





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 15:21:28 2005



From: bplowman-at-pacific.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 08:25:30 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Intel Play QXP3 digital microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (bplowman-at-pacific.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.org/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Friday, February 25, 2005 at 14:20:17
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: bplowman-at-pacific.edu
Name: Barbara Plowman

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:Intel Play QXP3 digital microscope

Question: Does anyone have a QXP3Plus.exe file on disk they could
send to me? I have a CD for the Windows 98 version. The Plus CD is
for XP. There is a QXP3Plus.exe file one can download from the
website, but the download keeps interrupting and I can't get the
complete file finished even with download managers. I will be happy
to reimburse anyone who can send me the complete QXP3Plus.exe file
for Windows XP. Thank you...this is for fun!

Barbara Plowman
Univ of the Pacific
Electron Microscope Lab
2155 Webster
San Francisco, CA 94115
email:bplowman-at-pacific.edu
ph: 415-929-6692

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 15:43:29 2005



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 15:47:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Randy,

This is a real nitty gritty ultramicrotomy problem. The diamond knive
people are cringing, I'm sure.

How about treating the sand/bacteria with HF to soften the sand prior
to sectioning? It may even be possible to totally dissolve the sand
prior to embedding. Of course, then you won't be able to see how the
bacteria are attached to the sand. I asssume they are wanting to see
the "strands" or cement that the bacteria use to adhere.

Better yet, try to convince the people to culture the bacteria on
something like silica gel or even a glass side which would be easier
to deal with.

Good luck, Rando.

JB


--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 19:06:20 2005



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 19:10:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Don't fight Mother Nature:

Better plan is to freeze dry and look at in the SEM. Alan Boyde made
spectacular stereo images of the bacterial jungle on the surface of
teeth in about 1973. Should be repeated more.

Also don't forget Confocal. There will be a whole chapter on Biofilms
in the new edition of The Handbook (Coming soon, to a theatre near
you!). You can even watch them grow, something you won't get in an EM.

Cheers,

Jim P.

}
} This is a real nitty gritty ultramicrotomy problem. The diamond
} knive people are cringing, I'm sure.
}
} How about treating the sand/bacteria with HF to soften the sand
} prior to sectioning? It may even be possible to totally dissolve the
} sand prior to embedding. Of course, then you won't be able to see
} how the bacteria are attached to the sand. I asssume they are
} wanting to see the "strands" or cement that the bacteria use to
} adhere.
}
} Better yet, try to convince the people to culture the bacteria on
} something like silica gel or even a glass side which would be easier
} to deal with.
}
Good luck, Rando.
--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building,
FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706
JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 11-23, 2005, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: htt/www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2005


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 25 19:15:32 2005



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 19:19:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Randy,

If you don't have a good SEM, you might try to look at the bacterial
film as a whole mount. Even at 100 kV you can see through a lot of
tissue once the water is gone. Just put some sand on the grid and
grow the bacteria on it, then remove, fix, CPD (perhaps a thin
coating of carbon or metal, very thin) and view in the TEM. If you
are careful, you should have clumps sticking off the side of the sand
grains and some of these may show what you need. ANd if yo have a
TEM/SEM, you can have the best of both worlds.

Cheers,

Jim P.
}
} }
} } We have someone wanting to study bacterial attachment to sand grains.
} } Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of sand? This will
} be a first for us.
} }
} } We're going to start with negative staining, hoping to avoid
} cutting thins altogether, but if that doesn't work we thought we'd
} try adhering to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover slips or
} embedding in agar before resin embedding.
} }
} } Thanks!
} }
} } Randy

--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building,
FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706
JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 11-23, 2005, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: http://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2005


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 26 10:39:49 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 08:43:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: TEM--Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

ok i think we need to know more about what you are
trying to do? are you attempting to see how the the
sand is attached to the bacteria? if that is the case
only thin sections will work. it is not impossible, we
cut collodial gold all the time with very few
problems, the issue is the size of the sand grains.
most sand grains are many times larger than bacteria.
the question is what are you trying to do. you could
for that matter if you are just attemping to provide a
substrat for the bacteria try polystyrene spheres.
they can be embedded and cut for TEM.
john
--- James Pawley {jbpawley-at-wisc.edu} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi Randy,
}
} If you don't have a good SEM, you might try to look
} at the bacterial
} film as a whole mount. Even at 100 kV you can see
} through a lot of
} tissue once the water is gone. Just put some sand on
} the grid and
} grow the bacteria on it, then remove, fix, CPD
} (perhaps a thin
} coating of carbon or metal, very thin) and view in
} the TEM. If you
} are careful, you should have clumps sticking off the
} side of the sand
} grains and some of these may show what you need. ANd
} if yo have a
} TEM/SEM, you can have the best of both worlds.
}
} Cheers,
}
} Jim P.
} }
} } }
} } } We have someone wanting to study bacterial
} attachment to sand grains.
} } } Does anyone have any hints on ultramicrotomy of
} sand? This will
} } be a first for us.
} } }
} } } We're going to start with negative staining,
} hoping to avoid
} } cutting thins altogether, but if that doesn't work
} we thought we'd
} } try adhering to poly-lysine coated Thermonox cover
} slips or
} } embedding in agar before resin embedding.
} } }
} } } Thanks!
} } }
} } } Randy
}
} --
}
} **********************************************
} Prof. James B. Pawley,
} Ph. 608-263-3147
} Room 223, Zoology Research Building,
} FAX 608-265-5315
} 1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706
} JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
} 3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 11-23,
} 2005, UBC, Vancouver Canada
} Info: http://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications
} due by March 15, 2005
}
}




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 08:46:16 2005



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 08:53:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Ultramicrotomy of sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Many thanks to everyone who has replied to my query on ultramicrotomy to
study bacterial attachment to sand grains. Lots of good ideas here. I
will go through all the replies in detail shortly and post a summary to
the list-server, if no one objects. We'll discuss these various
approaches with our customer and work this thing out.

Thanks again. You folks are great.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 10:47:10 2005



From: Roger Baker :      rcbaker-at-eden.infohwy.com
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 10:51:28 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LED illumination for photomicroscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I recently purchased a Chinese trinocular biological microscope for
general use. It was an overall good deal with practical design, good
optics, and flat fields and sharp focus out to the edge, although they
cut some corners on sturdyness of construction.

I also bought an inexpensive ($ 300) Chinese microscopy camera called
the Moticam 1000 with which I am not so happy because of a low
sensitivity CD chip and the fact that there is solarizing at high
illumination levels and the image pixelates when you use the full one
mega-pixel resolution. But I try to live with that. Considerably better
pictures are made by simply holding my 4 megapixel Canon Powershot A80
up to the eyepiece and shooting.

The high numerical aperture objectives means that the depth of focus is
small; this scope is solely designed to study flat transparent sections
mounted on slides. The built-in halogen illumination presents few
design problems because few photons are lost along the light path. One
bright white LED inserted in the same light path can nicely substitute
for their halogen bulb illuminator.

But I want to do reflectance illumination photography of flat-ground
sections of carbonate micro-fossils stained with gentian violet. Then I
put on a drop of glycerine and top with a coverslip. This makes the
denser structure of micro fossil details show up nicely against a deep
purple matrix, but it takes strong reflective illumination, especially
with my rather insensitive CCD camera.

I think the standard solution is an illuminator with a halogen light in
a box and two fiber optic bundles on stalks that can be arranged to
apply light to two sides of the field. This however costs as about as
much as my $750 microscope, so I have been investigating LEDS as an
inexpensive alternative.

What I have found is that you can use a ring of four white LEDs
(superbrightleds.com in Saint Louis) ) mounted on a fixture that clamps
on the objective. This works pretty nicely for visual work, since the
eye is quite sensitive at low light levels. And you can easily power
this gadget with 5 volts DC; each LED should its own 100 ohm current
limiting resistor.

But this is still not bright enough for my CCD cameras.

The best fix I have found for the sensitivity problem is to use a ring
of bright green LEDs.
I have four mounted now, but a ring of seven would still fit and would
be better. Each has to be independently adjusted by bending its leads
to cast its light onto the same small area under the objective. Since
the purple stain gives a monochromatic image anyhow, the resulting
image still shows up nicely under both visual examination and for
photography by my hand held digital camera, and even marginally for my
Moticam 1000.

Green LEDs are a definite improvement over white LEDs where my CCDs are
concerned.
Has LED illumination been discussed on this list before?

Are there any microscope cameras that can compete in both cost and
image quality with a consumer camera held up to the eyepiece? -- Roger,
Austin Tx



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 11:01:52 2005



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 12:09:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] : New England Society for Microscopy (NESM) March Me

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The March meeting of the New England Society for Microscopy (NESM) will be held
on Tuesday, March 8th at the ATMC Conference Center, UMASS Dartmouth in Fall
River, MA. The meeting begins at 5pm with registration and a tour of the
MicroMagnetic Labs.

A buffet dinner follows at 6pm. At 6:45pm, the technicial presentations begin.
The first talk is "Electron Microscopy of Transparent Conducting Oxides" by
Prof. David Paine of Brown University and the second talk is "Using Inverse
Light Microscopy to Monitor Quantal Neurotransmitter Release in Real Time: The
End of a Neuroscience Dogma" by Dr. Emmanuel N. Pothos of Tufts University
School of Medicine.

Please contact Paul Bain, NESM Treasurer, by phone 617-432-3236 or by email:
paul_bain-at-hms.harvard.edu by Friday, March 4th to indicate if you are coming to
the meeting and dinner. (A head count is needed for the dinner). Payment will
be made at the door. Registration for members is $10.00 and $25.00 for
non-members. (Note: $15.00 for non-members goes towards a one-year membership
in NESM).

(Directions to UMASS Dartmouth can be found on NESM's (new) website:
http://nesm.cims.harvard.edu under Future Meetings.

We hope to see you there!

Peggy Sherwood
Corresponding Secretary, NESM









Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Center for Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 11:20:22 2005



From: Ursula Potter :      U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 17:27:27 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM section stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

Has anyone ever used Potassium Permanganate as a section stain? Apparently
it has been shown to improve the contrast in certain types of cell in the
artery wall and I wondered what might be going on in these cells that their
contrast should be so improved with this stain. Has anyone a method for the
staining?

Many thanks
Ursula
----------------

Ursula J. Potter
Centre for Electron Optical Studies (CEOS)
Building 3 West 2.15
The University of Bath
Claverton Down
Bath BA2 7AY
UK
Tel: 01225 385651
Email: U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 13:01:40 2005



From: John Raffensperger :      chiphead-at-sbcglobal.net
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 11:08:08 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LED illumination for photomicroscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Roger;

You might find some past discussions, or care to raise
this issue again in the Yahoo Microscope group. Both
issues (LED Illumination and inexpensive camera
options) have been discussed there in the past. That
group is more focused (no pun intended) on LM. It is
also more of an amateur orientated group, although
many of the prime contributors are professionals (or
retirees). As a result of the audiance, a number of
low cost but "workable" alternatives are discussed.

The latest option for cameras seems to be using "Web
Cams", either out of the box (with standard occulars),
or by removing the lens assemblies and using a Photo
or Projection eyepiece.

I've played with LEDs myself, and have experienced
results similar to what you describe (OK, but not
spectacular). For me, it is more a matter of a light
source that can be used "in the field".

John Raffensperger, Jr.
Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

--- Roger Baker {rcbaker-at-eden.infohwy.com} wrote:
} Green LEDs are a definite improvement over white
} LEDs where my CCDs are
} concerned.
} Has LED illumination been discussed on this list
} before?
}
} Are there any microscope cameras that can compete in
} both cost and
} image quality with a consumer camera held up to the
} eyepiece? -- Roger,
} Austin Tx



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 15:02:54 2005



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 13:12:19 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM section stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ursula
Potassium permanganate works in the similar way as OsO4 - it stains
membranes as far as know. For some unknown to me reason, it delivers very
good results with yeasts cells (used instead OsO4). I don't think it may
work on the sections because you basically don't have intact membranes (if
not fixed before embedding) after standard plastic embedding
procedure. From another hand, KMnO4 is quite strong oxidizer, so it may
"improve" section's staining by discoloring (oxidizing) something on the
surface of the section, so some particular structures may become visible
better. Have a great day, Sergey

At 05:27 PM 2/28/2005 +0000, you wrote:


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 16:08:38 2005



From: sghoshro-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 15:15:37 -0700 (MST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Asbestos analysis info

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Everyone,

I am interested to know how and where to obtain training to perform TEM,
SEM, and light microscopic analysis of asbestos. Are there short courses
or certifications available to perform asbestos analysis ? Do we need any
acreditation to perform this sort of analysis ? If any one knows of good
references on asbestos analysis, books, protocols etc. then please let us
know. We will really appreciate your help.

Thanks in advance.

Soumitra

*************************************************************
Soumitra Ghoshroy
College Associate Professor, Biology
Director, Electron Microscopy Lab
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003
Tel: 505-646-3268 (office), 646-3283 (lab)
Fax: 505-646-3282
e-mail:sghoshro-at-nmsu.edu
http://biology-web.nmsu.edu/ghoshroy/ghoshroy.htm
http://emldata.nmsu.edu/eml/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 18:07:26 2005



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 18:14:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Asbestos analysis info

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Soumitra,

I'd recommend that you contact John Reffner, currently at SensIR Technologies (JReffner-at-sensir.com). He is one of the founding fathers of the New Eng Association of Forensic Sciences (NEAFS) and, at one time, ran an asbestos analysis business with his wife, Sally. His other "partner in crime" is Tom Kubik, who ran a company I think was called "TAKA" (no further info). Both of them are experts in this field.

Also, there are special courses offered through the McCrone Institute in Chicago (www.mcri.org)

Hope this was helpful.

Best regards,
Barbara

Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
www.MicroscopyEducation.com

We've Moved!
313 S Jupiter Rd, Suite 100
Allen, TX 75002
P: 972-954-8011
F: 972-954-8018
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Need a good general text on light microscopy? MME still has copies of Optimizing Light Microscopy available, with discounts for class-sized orders (10 or more). Visit www.MicroscopyEducation.com for details.

At 04:15 PM 2/28/2005, sghoshro-at-NMSU.Edu wrote:


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 19:16:14 2005



From: john hoffpauir :      hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 17:22:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM section stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

i have used Potassium Permanganate as a TEM section
stain in conjuction with UA on corneas where we could
not use Pb citrate. it added some contrast to the
collagen. used a 1% solution and stained for 20
minutes at room temp. i can't give you any chemistry
of the stain. sorry about that.
john
--- Ursula Potter {U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk} wrote:

}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
}
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear all,
}
} Has anyone ever used Potassium Permanganate as a
} section stain? Apparently
} it has been shown to improve the contrast in certain
} types of cell in the
} artery wall and I wondered what might be going on in
} these cells that their
} contrast should be so improved with this stain. Has
} anyone a method for the
} staining?
}
} Many thanks
} Ursula
} ----------------
}
} Ursula J. Potter
} Centre for Electron Optical Studies (CEOS)
} Building 3 West 2.15
} The University of Bath
} Claverton Down
} Bath BA2 7AY
} UK
} Tel: 01225 385651
} Email: U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk
}
}


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 21:14:07 2005



From: WWAHL2-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 22:21:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] superfine Sediment consolidate

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello
Maybe somewhere out there can help with this.
What is the standard consolidate for finegrained sandstones in preparation before SEM so the sample won't leave any residue. I imagined a super fine cyanoacyrlate to consoildate but not coat.

--
Thanks, Bill Wahl

Winter
(785)628-4593 home... such as it is
(785)628-5715 office (machine)
Dept. of Geosciences
Fort Hays State University
Hays. Kans, 67601.

Summer
307-864-2997-or 2979
Wyoming Dinosaur Center
110 Carter Ranch Road
Thermopolis, Wyoming
82443

"a bowl of oatmeal tried to stare me down... and won."
John Prine

































































































































From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 28 23:51:53 2005



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-csiro.au
Date: Tue, 01 Mar 2005 16:59:58 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: TEM section stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

FYI, making up stains in 9% isobutanol seems to improve contrast -
presumably it allows greater stain penetration. Seems to work for both
light and electron microscopy. Seemed also to improve immunogold label
without increasing background.

Roberts, IM (2002) Iso-butanol saturated water: a simple procedure for
increasing staining intensity of resin sections for light and electron
microscopy. J. Microscopy 207:97-107.

We're about to try this....
cheers,
Rosemary

} From: john hoffpauir {hoffpajo-at-yahoo.com}
} Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 17:22:56 -0800 (PST)
} To: Ursula Potter {U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk} , Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM section stain
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} i have used Potassium Permanganate as a TEM section
} stain in conjuction with UA on corneas where we could
} not use Pb citrate. it added some contrast to the
} collagen. used a 1% solution and stained for 20
} minutes at room temp. i can't give you any chemistry
} of the stain. sorry about that.
} john
} --- Ursula Potter {U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk} wrote:
}
} }
} }
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The
} } Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} }
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
} }
} } Dear all,
} }
} } Has anyone ever used Potassium Permanganate as a
} } section stain? Apparently
} } it has been shown to improve the contrast in certain
} } types of cell in the
} } artery wall and I wondered what might be going on in
} } these cells that their
} } contrast should be so improved with this stain. Has
} } anyone a method for the
} } staining?
} }
} } Many thanks
} } Ursula
} } ----------------
} }
} } Ursula J. Potter
} } Centre for Electron Optical Studies (CEOS)
} } Building 3 West 2.15
} } The University of Bath
} } Claverton Down
} } Bath BA2 7AY
} } UK
} } Tel: 01225 385651
} } Email: U.J.Potter-at-bath.ac.uk
} }
} }
}
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do You Yahoo!?
} Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
} http://mail.yahoo.com
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Apr 11 08:04:16 2005



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:22:27 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Tips for M&M05 in Hawaii

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tina,
Thank you for the advice. See you in August.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy & Histology Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175






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