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From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 1995 08:58:29 -0500
Subject: Microscopy Events

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In our newsletter, Microscopy Today, we attempt to publish monthly an
on-going summary of ALL microscopy events (conferences/meetings, schools,
training sessions, etc.) in the U.S. - plus major international events.
A no-charge listing includes:
Dates
Title
Sponsor/Organizer
Location
Contact/Tel/Fax
We will consider longer write-ups and ask for an article contribution to the
newsletter, rather than money, for the effort.
The newsletter is mailed only to those who have requested copies - at no
charge currently to some 8,000 microscopists in the U.S., Canada and the U.K.
Unfortunately we must charge a modest subscription for other international
readers.
We invite your no charge event listing - or request for a subscription.
Regards,
Don Grimes, Editor





From: Juranyi Zsolt :      juranyi-at-kokiux.koki.hu
Date: Sat, 1 Apr 1995 15:53:26 +0200 (MET DST)
Subject: Subscription request

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We would be obliged if you informed us about the specifications
(including ISBN codes) of those books/atlases/workbooks which were
published for students in the field of ULTRASTRUCTURAL HUMAN PATHOLOGY in
the last ten years.
Could you recommend for us some?
Thank you in advance,sincerely yours

Szabolcs Viragh and Evelin Orso





From: MED_SCU-at-FRCU.EUN.EG
Date: Sun, 02 Apr 1995 10:28:59 +0000 (O)
Subject:

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First Intarnational Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in Research in Differcent Fields of Sciance
September 1995
Ismailia - Etap

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt

Special Topics of the conference:
1- Role of EM in diagnostic virology.
2- Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cylulogy and urinary atones.
3- Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic
conditions).
4- X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metalllurgical,
mineralogical, and biological.
5- Scanning EM of plants, animal, ineccts, and mineral material.
6- Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic
electron diffraction patterns.
7- Skin pathology by EM.
8- Morphological ldentification of antigens by EM.
9- Different low temperature methods for biological EM.
10- Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM.

There will be an equipment exblbition in conjunction with this
meeting. Registration for foreigners will be US $ 150 inclusive of
full board during the time of the meeting.
For further information, contact the organizar:
Prof, Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscvpe Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt
Fax: (20) 64- 329478 ( phone and Fax number)
Fax: (20) 64- 333318 ( Phone and Fax number)

Massage from: sayed Mersal





From: tsi-at-werple.mira.net.au (Thomson Scientific:Paul Thomson)
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 12:25:04 +1000
Subject: Newsgroup subsciption

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Please subscribe us to this newgroup.





From: MED_SCU-at-FRCU.EUN.EG
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:38:39 +0000 (O)
Subject:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


First Intarnational Conference on Electron Microscopy
and
Advances in Research in Differcent Fields of Sciance
September 1995
Ismailia - Etap

Sponsored by
Electron Microscopy Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt

Special Topics of the conference:
1- Role of EM in diagnostic virology.
2- Role of EM in diagnosis of tumors cylulogy and urinary atones.
3- Role of EM in ultrastructure pathology of the lung (non neoplastic
conditions).
4- X-ray microanalysis: Applications particularly metalllurgical,
mineralogical, and biological.
5- Scanning EM of plants, animal, ineccts, and mineral material.
6- Study of biological macromolecules from their characteristic
electron diffraction patterns.
7- Skin pathology by EM.
8- Morphological ldentification of antigens by EM.
9- Different low temperature methods for biological EM.
10- Safety measures and maintenance needed for EM.

There will be an equipment exblbition in conjunction with this
meeting. Registration for foreigners will be US $ 150 inclusive of
full board during the time of the meeting.
For further information, contact the organizar:
Prof, Dr. Khalifa Ibrahim Khalifa
Electron Microscvpe Center
Suez Canal University
Ismailia - Egypt
Fax: (20) 64- 329478 ( phone and Fax number)
Fax: (20) 64- 333318 ( Phone and Fax number)

Massage from: sayed Mersal





From: szabop-at-bmeik.eik.bme.hu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 17:21:52 +0100
Subject: Subscription request

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From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 08:22:29 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Subscription request

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Dear Szabolcs and Evelin,
I have several recommendations for you (though I'm sorry I don't have the
ISBN codes handy). I would recommend the Journal: Ultrastructural
Pathology. I would also recommend becoming a member of the
Ultrastrucural Pathology Society. This society has among its members
some of the "giants" in this field. To join, or inquire for more
information please contact:

Claire M. Payne, Ph.D.
Secretary, Ultrastructural Pathology Society
University of Arizona
Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology
1501 N. Campbell
Tucson, AZ 85724
USA

Books:

Diagnostic Ultrastructure of Non-Neoplastic Diseases (1992),
Papadimitriiou, Henderson and Spagnolo,
Churchill Livingstone, Pub.

Diagnostic Electron Microscopy: A Text/Atlas (1988), Dickerson,
Igaku-Shion, Pub.

Ultrastructural Appearances of Tumors (1986), Henderson, Papadimitriou,
Coleman, Churchill Livingstone, Pub.

Diagnostic Ultrastructural Pathology (????) Dvorak, Monahan-Earley, CRC
Press

Ultrastructural Pathology of the Cell and Matrix (1988) Ghadially,
Butterworths, Pub.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but I hope its a start.

Doug Cromey
************************************************
On Sat, 1 Apr
1995, Juranyi Zsolt wrote:

} We would be obliged if you informed us about the specifications
} (including ISBN codes) of those books/atlases/workbooks which were
} published for students in the field of ULTRASTRUCTURAL HUMAN PATHOLOGY in
} the last ten years.
} Could you recommend for us some?
} Thank you in advance,sincerely yours
}
} Szabolcs Viragh and Evelin Orso
}
}


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: JONES-at-KRDC.INT.ALCAN.CA
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:01:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: subscribe

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From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 12:42:40 -0400
Subject: Re: subscribe

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I see several folks trying to subscribe to the Fatfree list using the wrong
address. This is the subscription address: FATFREE-REQUEST-at-HUSTLE.RAHUL.NET

To join, send e-mail to the subscription address using one of the following
subjects:
ADD to join as a regular member
ADD DIGEST to join as a digest member

Hope this helps.

At 12:01 PM 4/3/95, JONES-at-KRDC.INT.ALCAN.CA wrote:
}
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 13:12:17 EDT
Subject: Re: SEM: Carbon Evaporators

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Dear Laurie,
We have an old Ladd and a couple of home-made evaporators. The Ladd
has been here longer than I (15 years), gets heavy use, and still works just
fine (we just use it for coating grids, etc., so your mileage may vary). We
use the 1/8" rods narrowed to ~1 mm (reduced section). I have coated objects
from barely visible to very dark in one shot. BTW, a piece of paper folded
so that one part shadows the other allows the color of the carbon to be fol-
lowed relatively easily once one gets the hang of it. Any bell jar can, of
course, be combined with the evaporating system (power supply, rod holder,
etc.), so if you have the pumps available, you might save some $ by buying
parts. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Rebecca K Siegel-Wasserman :      SIEGELWA-at-AC.GRIN.EDU
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 13:31:02 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: unsubscribe

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please unsubscribe me
siegelwa-at-ac.grin.edu




From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Apr 1995 12:48:06 EDT
Subject: Re: advises about filament needed

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Dear Xiaogang,
We have used both new and rebuilt W filaments, and have found the re-
built ones to be at least as good as the new ones--in some ways better. The
rebuilt ones we bought were from EBTEC (I am only a customer & have no finan-
cial interest). The advantages of EBTEC's designs are 1) the connection of
the hairpin to the posts is better than on some other designs, and 2) they have
"regular" and "sharp" tips. The regular tips give a nice bright beam, and the
sharp ones give a smaller source size. The intensity per unit area for the
sharp tips is about the same as that for the regular tips, so the total inten-
sity is less; however, the coherence is better, so for diffraction with radia-
tion-sensitive specimens, the sharp tips are very good.
We routinely preheat our filaments before mounting them in the Wehnelt
cylinders. I don't know what the thin film you find sticking to your filaments
is, but maybe preheating will help. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Steve Miller
Date: 03 Apr 95 14:19:25 EDT
Subject: Carbon evaporation

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With 20 years of experience in servicing DV502's the most common problems I
have encountered with carbon evaporation are:

1. Early units did not have a braided conduction wire between the moveable
collet and the frame for sure current conduction. The fix for this is get
the braid and drill/tap holes for fastening. If this is a problem, contact
Denton to send it in for upgrade.

2. All versions work well with reduced section rods (approx .7mm diameter),
pointed rods vary in conduction from start to finish and when the size
nears the full 2mm the current can well go over 50 amps. I find reduced
section rods will evaporate between 20-30 amps.

3. If the fuse is blown, often the fuse is replaced with a standard fuse.
The correct fuse would be a ceramic type ABC fuse which is more tolerant
and safer when it blows.

4. With reduced section rods if evaporation is continued past the reduced
section you get the same overcurrent as with pointed rods.

5. Unfortunately there is a lot of variance in the way carbon is made into
rods. You will see a variance of color, brittleness, ash formation (from
some filler!). Only buy small quantities of any type until you find one
that is good.

Obviously constant pressure on the rods during evaporation is essential.
The leaf spring used for pressure can be easily abused by pulling it
straight back to put in carbon rods. A better way of displacing it is to
push it down for loading the carbon rod. If there is poor tension you
really have to remove the spring and reform it to put more pressure on the
rod.

7. If all of this doesn/t help, call the company and GET HELP, there is no
reason to put up with poor performance, all parts and advice are available.
The phone at Denton is 609-439-9100.

For any more detailed discussions you may contact me at Integrated
Microsystems, Inc. 708-698-4210, fax 708-696-2541 or email.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:37:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Enough of Egyptian Announcement

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Colleagues...

I don't want to sound like I'm beating down
the Egyptian meeting. But we've had multiple
postings of that announcement for the last few weeks.
I think we've had enough. Unfortunately, they
are from different sources every time. So I cannot
touch base with one person/organization and
ask them to stop. So as a general announcement

Please cease posting this announcement until
there is a significant change!

Thanks...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.








From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:18:39 +0800PST
Subject: diamond knives

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I remember seeing a request in the last few weeks about diamond
knives. We are about to purchase one and are looking for suppliers
and any thoughts on who makes the best diamond knives. I seem to
remember the last time I bought one that the best were from Dupont or
Diatome(?) but can't remember exactly which. Is that still true.?
Any help greatly appreciated.

Yours
Mark Elliott PhD




From: Heinz Hemken :      hhemken-at-cell.cinvestav.mx
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 16:17:19 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Enough of Egyptian Announcement

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I've had a similar problem with this list that I haven't had with others.
My postings get to the list, but somewhere out there multiple copies
bounce off servers and come back over a period of days. Not being a UNIX
guru, I have no idea why this is.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Heinz Hemken
Departamento de Biologia Celular, CINVESTAV-IPN
http://cell.cinvestav.mx/bchh.html

On Mon, 3 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} Colleagues...
}
} I don't want to sound like I'm beating down
} the Egyptian meeting. But we've had multiple
} postings of that announcement for the last few weeks.
} I think we've had enough. Unfortunately, they
} are from different sources every time. So I cannot
} touch base with one person/organization and
} ask them to stop. So as a general announcement
}
} Please cease posting this announcement until
} there is a significant change!
}
} Thanks...
}
} Nestor
} Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.
}
}
}
}




From: Andreh Khachatouri :      usd14716-at-interramp.com
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 22:01:06 -0800
Subject: Fixatives In electron microscopy

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X-Mailer: InterCon TCP/Connect II 2.1.2
Mime-Version: 1.0
Message-Id: {9504032201.AA06079-at-usd14716.interramp.com}

I am working with sea urchin eggs and would like to have pictures of untreated
eggs plus treated eggs ( with DTT and alpha-amylase) with SEM and TEM. Iam not
sure what fixatives are appropriate for SEM and TEM . Please help me.





From: Andreh Khachatouri :      usd14716-at-interramp.com
Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 22:09:38 -0800
Subject: Fixatives in Electron microscopy

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X-Mailer: InterCon TCP/Connect II 2.1.2
Mime-Version: 1.0
Message-Id: {9504032209.AA38846-at-usd14716.interramp.com}

I would like to know what fixatives to use to have pictures of sea urchin eggs
for SEM and TEM. Thanks





From: Stephan Helfer :      STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 13:20:55 BST
Subject: Subscription to AMC microscopy mailing list

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Dear Dr Zaluzek

I have tried in vain to contact you both using
Zaluzek-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov and listserver-at-....; I hope I'm getting
through this time.

Could you please add my name and Email address to the AMC
microscopy mailing list.

Thanks very much

Yours sincerely


Dr Stephan Helfer, SSO
Mycologist

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Inverleith Row, EDINBURGH EH3 5LR,
Scotland UK

email STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
phone: +44 (0)131 552 7171 ext 280
or +44 (0)131 459 0446-280 (direct digital VoiceMail line)
fax: +44 (0)131 552 0382




From: Fangl-at-fpms.fpms.ac.be
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 17:36:42 +0200
Subject: Re: Microscopy Research and Technique, Guest Editors

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Dr. Johnson: WOuld you mail me already existed topical set about material sc
science structure. Thanks!
FANG L.




From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:35:35 EST
Subject: Sea Urchin Eggs

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To Andreh Khachatouri:

I did a considerable amount of TEM and SEM on urchin eggs a number of
years ago. As I recall, the fixative giving the best results was
something like 2% Glut. in seawater followed by osmium post-fixation. For
references, see Byrd and Eppel, and Belisle and Byrd from the period of
1974 to 1979. Sorry I can't be more specific.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:55:02 -0400
Subject: apology for error

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Good Morning Microscopists,
Yesterday morning after observing several folks trying to subscribe to
this list using the wrong address and some folks attempting to do the same
with another list, I thought I would be helpful. Well....I somehow got my
wires crossed and it seems that a great many of you now know how to join
that other list.
Please accept my apologies and I promise that I shall never again
attempt to be helpful on a Monday morning. (Hopefully, I provided a chuckle
for some of you.) Sandra
Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: DCROMEY-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 07:50:58 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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Mark,
I have had good luck, good quality and quick turn around from Micro
Engineering (409)291-6891. My purchases were only resharpennings of old
DuPont knives, but the price was good and so was the quality. Some of
the folks I work with now will only buy Diatome diamond knives.
Hopefully that means that almost any major manufaturer will have some
high quality knives available.
Doug


Douglas W. Cromey, M.S.
Cell Biology and Anatomy
Arizona Health Sciences Center
1501 N. Campbell Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520)626-2824 dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu













From: Suichu Luo :      SUICHU-at-utkvx.utk.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 14:52:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: subscribe

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Dear Sir:

Would you please send me the information.

Thanks a lot.

Suichu Luo




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 16:59:52 -0700
Subject: Freeze-Fracture Short Course Announcement

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Message-Id: {v01510103aba78b8dbca6-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The Electron Microscopy/Imaging Center at Colorado State University will be
offering a 5 day Short Course in Freeze-Fracture Techniques this summer.
In addition to comprehensive lectures, state-of-the-art instruments will be
available for hands-on training in the laboratory.

For more detailed information, please visit our World Wide Web site at URL:
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/emic/homepage.html, or contact me
directly (not to this list) for an email copy of the announcement.


John
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/faculty/chandler.html






From: Ann-Fook Yang :      YANGA-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 16:48:21 -0400
Subject: Re:Diamond knives

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Mark Elliott asked about diamond knives.
Du Pont sold their diamond knife business to Delaware Diamond
Knives, Inc. years ago. I don't know the further development.
We have several users here; all use Diatome knives and all are
satisfied with their knives. One of the users sent a Diatome
diamond knife, which had been resharpened by a competitor, back to
the Diatome factory for resharpening several years ago. Diatome
would not touch it because it was not one of theirs, although the
boat was. The diamond was of lower quality. This indicates their
high standard of quality.
There may be other good diamond knives in the marketplace, but you
can't go wrong with a Diatome knife. BTW I have nothing to do
with the Diatome except using their knives.

Ann Fook Yang





From: erich-at-ento.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 00:09:54 +1000
Subject: McIlvaine's Buffer

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Message-Id: {9504050210.AA08736-at-spider.ento.csiro.au}

Dear All,
Does anyone have a recipe for McIlvaine's Buffer which I'm told is for pH3
to pH6 and is used for amylase assays? Many thanks,
Eric Hines





From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:29:07 EST
Subject: diamond knives

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To Mark Elliot:

For the past 12 years, I have been dealing exclusively with
MicroEngineering Inc. who make the Microstar diamond knife. I have no
interest in this company other than the fact that they make a high
quality, affordable product. In the rare cases when I have received a bad
one, I have had a replacement by the next day or 2. Pricewise, I would
have difficulty justifying any other brand to my procurement department.
Again, this is no sales pitch, but just the way its been with my lab which
buys or resharpens 1 or 2 knives a year.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: SUSAN R. SESACK :      SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:10:15 EDT
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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} From: {MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca}
} Organization: UBC Pulmonary Research Lab
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 15:18:39 +0800PST
} Subject: diamond knives
} Priority: normal

} I remember seeing a request in the last few weeks about diamond
} knives. We are about to purchase one and are looking for suppliers
} and any thoughts on who makes the best diamond knives. I seem to
} remember the last time I bought one that the best were from Dupont or
} Diatome(?) but can't remember exactly which. Is that still true.?
} Any help greatly appreciated.
}
} Yours
} Mark Elliott PhD
}

Mark,

I have always used Diatome diamond knives, as did the lab where I was
trained. They are of superior quality and can be sharpened as often
as needed, for life. Other companies sometimes limit the number of
sharpenings that they will guarantee. I also have always had
exceptional help and service from Stacey Kirsch who heads the US
division of Diatome. She can be reached at 800-523-5874 for current
pricing and additional information.

S.
sesack-at-bns.pitt.edu
Susan R. Sesack
Dept. Neuroscience
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260




From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 13:52:02 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Seminar of California Association of Criminalistics

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CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF CRIMINALISTS
MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

The California Association of Criminalists (CAC) is holding
its 85th Semi-Annual meeting on May 10-13, 1995, at the Walnut
Creek Marriott in Walnut Creek, California. The Contra Costa
County Sheriff's Department Criminalistics Laboratory will be
hosting this meeting.

The program is shaping up fast. Some of the subjects planned
include: the Integrated Ballistics Identification System
(IBIS), computer animation in casework, retrieving secured data
in cases of computer crime, and bite mark analysis in the case
of a mountain lion attack. This is also our last call for
papers so this is your chance to share your latest project or
most interesting case. Both your technical notes and innovative
research are welcome. For an abstract form contact Rich Schorr,
voice (510)646-2455 or fax (510)646-2913.

Workshops planned include: A Computer Workshop for Cyber-
phobes (Everything You Ever Wanted To Do But Were Afraid To
Admit You Didn't Know How), Practical Applications of GCMS
In a Crime Laboratory Environment, a Glock Armorers Course,
DNA Users Group Meeting and a Polaroid Film Product Workshop.

For more information or to receive a registration package
contact Karen Sheldon, Contra Costa County, Sheriff-Coroner's
Department, 1122 Escobar St., Martinez, CA 94553, voice (510)
646-2455 or fax (510)646-2913.






From: richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood)
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 16:38:16 +1100
Subject: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz
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Mime-Version: 1.0
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Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
(we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
in plant nodule formation.
We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
processing. I think plunge freezing with a KF80, cryosubstituting the cells
using perhaps 2% OsO4 in methanol would be good, followed by conventional
dehydration and embedding in epoxy. Conventional room temperature fix
methods use glutaraldehyde/ruthenium red/OsO4 in various concentrations to
fix and stain the extracellular material but from the pictures I've seen I
suspect much of the material has still been lost.

Is cryoprotection of the sample necessary? If I lightly fix then infiltrate
in sucrose or some other protectant I'm a bit worried we'll start washing
the polysaccharide away, if I don't then the cells (which will be a small
scraping of colonies off the plate surface) could be ice damaged.
If I don't use ruth. red as a stain will the material still be visible -
even if present?
I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who has had experiance of similar samples.

Regards,
Richard E

Richard Easingwood
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
Otago Medical School
PO Box 913
Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254

"The southernmost electron microscope unit in the world"






From: tivol-at-tethys.ph.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Apr 1995 12:59:30 EDT
Subject: Re: pointed filaments

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Dear John,
You asked about specific improvements in capabilities vs reduced life-
times for pointed filaments in use with radiation-sensitive specimens. First,
let me say that we experienced no reduction in lifetime. Since, with proper
design, a pointed filament can be saturated at a lower current, this is not
too surprising. In my work--as opposed to nearly everyone else I know--I often
try to get rid of electrons. For EDX and crystallography I operate at the low-
est setting for wehnelt bias, a maximally excited first condenser lens, and a
small-bore condenser aperture. If I use a more intense beam for EDX, the dead-
time of my system and my beam spot both get larger. For crystallography, I
scan the specimen using low beam currents to avoid damage during the time I am
not recording (damage during recording is inevitable). Furthermore, when I
scan in diffraction mode, I want the beam size to be the same as the selected
area, so that, again, every electron incident on the specimen is of some use.
Bearing these facts in mind, the smaller beam size from a pointed fil-
ament reduces the brehmsstrahlung radiation from the condenser aperture and
other sources within the column and increases the signal-to-noise ratio and
spatial resolution for microanalysis (not that my spatial resolution is too
good; with a high-voltage EM and thick sections, the analysis volume will
never be small). Exposure of unexamined areas of a specimen is crystallography
is harder to characterize; however, given that scanning the specimen, tweaking
the position and adjusting the beam, etc. take only a few percent of the expo-
sure recorded on film, and that often several ED patterns can be taken from
the same selected area, there would seem to be little effect on the data. It
must be remembered that the ultimate, irreducible limit to the data obtainable
is set by damage to the specimen and that the higher-resolution reflections are
the most sensitive to this damage. Once again, it is the smaller size of the
beam which is beneficial. Additionally, the ED pattern is better when the ob-
jective lens is focussed (although, in the HVEM, this is not too critical),
and focussing can be accomplished very rapidly using minimum contrast, which
works better with a more coherent beam.
I have not done quantitative comparisons between regular and pointed
filaments for either case, so I can't give you specific figures of merit, but
I can tell you that the beam is visibly smaller and the interference fringes
are noticably more prominant with the pointed filament. I also have no idea
whether any of these considerations are specific to 1.2 MV electrons, although
I wouldn't think so.
Another occasional consideration is that heating and charging effects
are minimized at low beam currents, so the pointed filaments are more specimen-
friendly in this way also.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: Ann-Fook Yang :      YANGA-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Wed, 05 Apr 1995 12:23:37 -0400
Subject: Re:Diamond knife quality

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Message-ID: {1452822F0179AEAA-at-ggpl.arsusda.gov}

I mentioned in my last message about DIATOME would not touch the
knife which had been resharpened by a competitor. I should have
made it clear that "the diamond was of lower quality" was a direct
quote from a sales rep.

Ann Fook Yang





From: South Bay Technology, 73531,1344
Date: 05 Apr 95 12:18:19 EDT
Subject: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

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---------- Forwarded Message ----------


I POSTED THIS MESSAGE SEVERAL WEEKS AGO AND RECEIVED NO RESPONSE. I THOUGHT I'D
GIVE IT ANOTHER TRY JUST IN CASE THERE WAS A DELIVERY PROBLEM.

RE: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

Dear Microscopists-

I was wondering if anyone out there knows what happened to the Polaron line of
products. I am particularly curious about some of their embedding resins such
as the Polabed 812.

Thanks for your help!

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu (R. Howard Berg)
Date: Wed, 05 Apr 1995 08:22:09 +0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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Richard Easingwood writes:

} Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
} I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
} polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
} (we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
} in plant nodule formation.
} We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
} processing.

Cryofixation would be a good way to go. Why not freeze sub in
osmium/acetone, embed in epoxy, as normal, and then do a PAS stain on
sections? The osmium and normal poststains are unlikely to stain all the
polysaccharides. It would be interesting to find out if freeze
substitution in ruthenium red/acetone would work (i.e., would the RR
penetrate?).


R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Biology Department
University of Memphis
Memphis, TN, 38152
E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457







From: A. Kent Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 10:42:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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Message-Id: {9504051952.AA10641-at-esds01.es.dupont.com}

Continuing the diamond knife theme, I have been using Diatome knives
for many years, and have been impressed with their quality and reliabity.
But in the commercial exibits at the Cell Biology meetings in San
Francisco last December, I became aware of diamond knives being made in
the Netherlands by Drukker International, B.V., an old dutch diamond firm
(dating from 1906). The descriptions sounded quite impressive, including
"superb wetting behavior". A 3 mm blade knife costs $2500. Or you can
use their "exchange program" = if you send them an old diamond knife (any
manufacturer, any condition), you will receive a new 3 mm Drukker knife
for $1750 (if the new knife isn't shipped within two weeks, then you get
it free). The U.S. distributor is Harris Diamond Corporation, 100 Stierli
Court, suite 106, Mount Arlington, N.J. 07856, tel (201) 770-1520, fax
(201)770-1549. I don't know anything about the company other than
spending a few minutes at their booth at the meetings and receiving a nice
brochure. If I had plenty of money and were buying a diamond knife today,
I would probably buy Diatome, but I thought EM people would want to be
aware of the Drukker knife, which could be very good.




From: richard.lander-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Lander)
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 10:10:16 +1200
Subject: SEM of microcapsules

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To listserver people,
Many thanks for the replies to my problem.
We found that putting the Microcapsules between 2 squares of double sided
tape and tearing them apart, left a good idea of the internal structure.
Pretty simple really! This was adequate for what the user was wanting and
they were pleased with the results. So pleased, they have decided to bring
back about 80 samples!

rich.

*****************************************************************
* Richard Lander *
* South Campus Electron Microscope Unit *
* c/- Pathology Department *
* Otago Medical School *
* P.O. Box 913 *
* Dunedin *
* N.Z. *
* *
* Tel. National 03 479 7301 International 64 3 479 7301 *
* Fax. National 03 479 7254 International 64 3 479 7254 *
*****************************************************************






From: David Garrett :      DGARRETT-at-gab.unt.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 08:32:17 CST6CDT
Subject: Re: diamond knives

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} From: "W.L. Steffens" {STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu}
} Organization: College of Vet. Med
} To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Date sent: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 09:29:07 EST
} Subject: diamond knives
} Priority: normal

} To Mark Elliot:
}
} For the past 12 years, I have been dealing exclusively with
} MicroEngineering Inc. who make the Microstar diamond knife. I have no
} interest in this company other than the fact that they make a high
} quality, affordable product. In the rare cases when I have received a bad
} one, I have had a replacement by the next day or 2. Pricewise, I would
} have difficulty justifying any other brand to my procurement department.
} Again, this is no sales pitch, but just the way its been with my lab which
} buys or resharpens 1 or 2 knives a year.
}
} -=W.L. Steffens=-
} College of Veterinary Medicine
} University of Georgia
}
MicroEngineering is now known as Micro Star Technologies.
Contact: Cathy Zimmerman (800)533-2509, E-mail US3SNQ7N-at-IBMMAIL.COM
***************************************
David Garrett "DGARRETT-at-GAB.UNT.EDU"
University of North Texas
Dept. Biological Sciences
(817)565-3964 Fax (817)565-4136
***************************************




From: Jim Stanley :      jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 08:54:14 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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Although, its been a while since I've polished aluminum. My initial
impression is you have way too many steps. I'd go from 600 grit to 5
micron, to 1 micron, perhaps the .25 micron and then the colloidal. I
also remember that cerium oxide paste gave better results. (probably not
the greatest idea from a saftey and envirnomental standpoint) THe key to
fine polishing of aluminium is to keep the steps to a minimum and the
length of time at each step to a minimum. There may be a sure bet way of
polishing aluminium....but I found it a real pain.

On Tue, 4 Apr 1995 IE09-at-VM.ACS.UNT.EDU wrote:

} We are currently trying to polish aluminum samples (7075). Before we etch
} them, we are trying to get a 0.05 micron finish. The grinding/polishing
} sequence is: 600 grit, 800 grit, 1200 grit, 3 micron diamond paste, 1 micron
} diamond paste, 0.25 micron paste, 0.05 colloidal silica. Everytime we go from
} the 1 micron step to the 0.25 micron step scratches appear....
}
} We have been using Allied High Tech Spec-Cloth polishing pads. Doeas anyone
} have suggestions to get to the final two steps without introducing scratches?
}
} I do not really understand why they get scratched so easily when the finer
} pastes are used.
}
} Should these samples be stored in a dessicator to prevent oxidation? I have
} never worked with Al, and therefore would appreciate any suggestions.
}
} Patrick Diehl
} Center for Materials Characterization
} University of North Texas







From: IAN HALLETT :      ihallett-at-marccri.marc.cri.nz
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 14:44:38 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812

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} Date: 05 Apr 95 12:18:19 EDT
} From: South Bay Technology {73531.1344-at-compuserve.com}
} To: Microscopy ListServer {MICROSCOPY-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
} Subject: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812


} I POSTED THIS MESSAGE SEVERAL WEEKS AGO AND RECEIVED NO RESPONSE. I THOUGHT I'D
} GIVE IT ANOTHER TRY JUST IN CASE THERE WAS A DELIVERY PROBLEM.
}
} RE: Copy of: Polaron Polabed 812
}
} Dear Microscopists-
}
} I was wondering if anyone out there knows what happened to the Polaron line of
} products. I am particularly curious about some of their embedding resins such
} as the Polabed 812.
}
} Thanks for your help!
}
} David Henriks
} South Bay Technology, Inc.
} 1120 Via Callejon
} San Clemente, CA 92673
}
} TEL: 714-492-2600
} FAX: 714-492-1499

David

I am not sure about specific products but the fate of Polaron goes
Polaron was sold to BioRad who sold it to Fisons. By contacting a US
rep of Fisons you may get more info, although the unit may have been
sold to Thermo Instruments as part of the Fisons scientific
instrument division sale.

As far as Polabed goes a number of suppliers have similar alternative
to EPON 812.

Ian Hallett



Ian Hallett
HortResearch
Mt Albert Research Centre
Private Bag 92 169
Auckland, New Zealand
Fax 64-9-815 4201
Telephone 64-9-849 3660




From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 22:08:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: RE: Daughters at Work Day

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On Wed, 5 Apr 1995, B.A. wrote:

}
} We (DuPont CR&D Analytical) have hosted girls in our lab for the past 2 years
} on Take Your Daughters to Work Day and have set up several demonstrations using
} materials we thought would be familiar to the girls. Lots of parents bend the
} rules and bring quite small girls as young as 6, so be prepared.
}
My High School teacher wife read this over my shoulder and asked me to
remind everyone who has these types of event to have them in the summer
so that the students won't miss school. Teachers who try to do a good
job for classrooms of 25 to 35 students, cannot tailor their lessons to
meet the demands of students who take days off for going to work with mom
or dad, and similar things can can just as easily be done during school
vacation periods.





From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 05 Apr 95 12:53:02 EDT
Subject: OM Polishing of Al

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Patrick-

It is difficult to pinpoint the exact cause for the scratches, but there are a
few things you may want to check.

1) What size are the scratches that you see? Are they significantly larger than
the 1u scratches you are trying to remove? Perhaps you are getting an
agglomeration of .25u particles if they are not properly wetted and dispersed in
the paste. Have you used this same .25u paste before without trouble? Perhaps
you should try a diamond suspension that has more uniformly dispersed particles.

2) Is your sample mounted in epoxy? If so, perhaps particles are emedding in
the epoxy from a previous polishing step.

3) If your sample is not embedded in epoxy, perhaps the particles are embedded
in the mounting wax or trapped inside the polishing fixture.

I don't think your cloth would be a problem. What you are using is the same as
our Fine Rayon cloth and that is what I would recommend for what you are doing.
I assume that you are using a fresh cloth when you reach this stage. Of course,
oxidation could be the problem, but I have never had that problem so it doesn't
seem likely to me.

Something else you may want to consider is trying Colloidal Alumina for the
final polishing stage instead of Colloidal Silica. I understand that it can
produce a better finish on softer metals. Of course, I understand you are
having the problem before the colloidal silica, but it may be something to
consider when you get to that point.

Of course, I would be pleased to supply you with a sample of the diamond
suspension or the colloidal alumina if you would like to give that a try. I
would also be interested to hear any suggestions you get from other people and
ultimately your determination of the problem. I wish you good luck in figuring
it out and I encourage you to contact me if I can be of any help.

Best regards-

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

TEL: 800-728-2233
FAX: 714-492-1499







From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 00:01:31 EDT
Subject: Diamond knives

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-- [ From: Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. * EMC.Ver #2.10P ] --


Further continuation of the diamond knife theme::

1] I have heard essentially good things about the Drukker company.
The only negatives I have ever heard came from Drukker competitors.

2] The Drukker people at the ICEM 94 in Paris and at MSA in 94 had in
their exhibit both a video demonstration showing some purported
advantages of their knife, because of the hydrophilic nature of the
knife, over other knives. The advantage supposedly was that the
sections come off more smoothly and with less vibration, e.g. slipping
and sliding down the edge of the blade. At the ICEM 94 in Paris, the
Drukker booth attracted some of the largest crowds.

Can anyone comment as to whether they have actually seen the
hydrophilic edge to be a unique advantage, above and beyond diamond
knives generally and therefore worth spending extra money?

Further with regard to Drukker, it is my understanding that they more
or less "own" the world wide business for diamond scalpel blades used
for radial keratotomy procedures being done by ophthamologists. They
are now trying to apply their expertise gained from the surgical
instruments end of the business to ultramicrotomy.

3] The "talk" seems to center around foreign made diamond knives.
There are some excellent US made knives (e.g. MicroStar and DDK) and
again, standing in our exhibit booths at the various meetings, I don't
detect any unhappiness among their customers either. As a group, they
do seem to be "happy campers". But as the US dollar stays weak
relative to European currencies, those campers are going to have
another reason to be "happy": They are going to be saving money.


Charles A. Garber
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES/STRUCTURE PROBE, INC.
PO BOX 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: (610) 436-5400
(800) 242-4774 [USA only]

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com






From: ychen-at-macc.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 11:59:43 -0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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Message-Id: {25040512580307-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}


} Dear Cryo Electronmicroscopists,
} I have a student who wants to compare the quantity of extracellular
} polysaccharide material produced by bacterial cells grown on agar plates
} (we don't want to use cells from broth) by TEM. The bacteria are involved
} in plant nodule formation.
} We would like to loose as little of the material as possible during
} processing. I think plunge freezing with a KF80, cryosubstituting the cells
} using perhaps 2% OsO4 in methanol would be good, followed by conventional
} dehydration and embedding in epoxy. Conventional room temperature fix
} methods use glutaraldehyde/ruthenium red/OsO4 in various concentrations to
} fix and stain the extracellular material but from the pictures I've seen I
} suspect much of the material has still been lost.
}
} Is cryoprotection of the sample necessary? If I lightly fix then infiltrate
} in sucrose or some other protectant I'm a bit worried we'll start washing
} the polysaccharide away, if I don't then the cells (which will be a small
} scraping of colonies off the plate surface) could be ice damaged.
} If I don't use ruth. red as a stain will the material still be visible -
} even if present?
} I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who has had experiance of similar samples.
}
} Regards,
} Richard E
}
} Richard Easingwood
} South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
} Otago Medical School
} PO Box 913
} Dunedin
} NEW ZEALAND
}
} Telephone: 64-03-479 7301
} Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254
}
} "The southernmost electron microscope unit in the world"


You can try the method devoloped in Mueller's Lab, ETH, Switerland by using
a capillary tube.
"High-pressure freezing of cell suspensions in cellulose capillary tubes",
J. Microscopy 175, 34-43 (1994).






Ya Chen

=========================================================================
\ / Assistant Researcher-Cryo/SEM Coordinator TEL : 608-263-8481
\ / __ Integrated Microscopy Resource (IMR) FAX : 608-265-4076
\/ / / University of Wisconsin-Madison
/ / / 1675 Observatory Drive #167 Email:YChen-at-macc.wisc.edu
/ /__/_ Madison, WI 53706 Email:chen-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu
=========================================================================






From: Veronique Buschmann :      bushman-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 11:37:30 +0200 (METDST)
Subject: subscribe

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Please, subscribe : sci.techniques.microscopy
Thank you in advance.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Veronique Buschmann email: bushman-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
EMAT phone: +32 3 218 02 46
University of Antwerp
-----------------------------------------------------------------





From: Tayloe :      tayloe-at-ptbma.usbm.gov
Date: Wed, 5 Apr 1995 14:13:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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Patrick,

I am not familiar with the Allied Spec-Cloth polishing cloths you are
using, nor have I polished 7075 Al (to my knowledge), but here is some
suggestions for ya to do with as ya see fit:

Using Buehler products, grind on grits 320, 400, 600, and 800;
polish on:
1. 6 micron diamond paste [water-based] on Texmet,
2. 1 micron diamond paste [water-based] on either Texmet or Metcloth,
3. either (a) 1 micron Cerium Oxide solution on Mastercloth -or-
(b) .5 micron Chrome Oxide solution on Mastercloth, then
4. .05 micron Mastermet [colloidal Silica] on Mastercloth.

Few hints:
- make sure new cloths are used, and that before their use, you "beat"
down the fibers on the Mastercloth by using a dummy/blank sample or such;
- if using a ultrasonic to help in cleaning, this may dislodge particles
that will then add scratches in later steps;
- use very warm water and -much- soap to clean the samples between each
step. I use my thumb to very gently rub and clean the sample surface;
- use of a dessicator is highly recommened to help slow oxidation and to
keep samples cleaner for further examination;
- takes much time and is -very- frustrating, but experiment with the
above and other recipes to get what works best for you;
- have not done much myself, but don't overlook electropolishing if such
can be used in your case;
- for me, water-based diamond pastes seem to "cut" better for rough
polishing, whereas oil-based seem to produce a smoother, cleaner finish;
- if get frustrated, quit if can for awhile, and attack the sample(s)
later on - have found myself that a recipe that works wonders one day
seems to suck later, but then seems to work great again! The joys of
hand-polishing!! oh boy...

Hope this is somewhat helpful. Good luck,
-Rob
disclaimer: [once again] am not affiliated nor have any financial
interest in any products mentioned or used
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
| tayloe-at-ptbma.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''





From: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu (R. Howard Berg)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 08:04:31 +0600
Subject: Re: Bacteria cryosubstitution

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} You can try the method devoloped in Mueller's Lab, ETH, Switerland by using
} a capillary tube.
} "High-pressure freezing of cell suspensions in cellulose capillary tubes",
} J. Microscopy 175, 34-43 (1994).
}
} Ya Chen
}
Does anyone know of a US Supplier of dialysis tubing in the dimensions
specified in Mueller's paper (about the diameter of a capillary tube)?


R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Biology Department
University of Memphis
Memphis, TN, 38152
E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457







From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:11:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Newsgroups

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 12:02:31 -0400
Subject: Re: ECHO Usenet

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Message-Id: {199504061559.LAA14193-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}

In article {3lsfh6$51e-at-newsbf02.news.aol.com} , campbell36-at-aol.com
(Campbell36) wrote:

} Is the Miscroscopy listserv still being echoed to this newgroup? I would
} appreciate any info regarding this or the usenet address and instructions
} on how to subscribe.
}
}
} Thanks...Jim Campbell

OK, here is the scoop.
The output of the Microscopy Mailserver at Argonne National Laboratory is
no longer being automatically forwarded to the Newsgroup
Sci.Techniques.Microscopy. The reason for this is that DEC closed down
the gateway I was using to forward the mail to the newsgroup. I do not
know where there is an alternative gateway and would like to know.
So, PLEASE, PLEASE, IF YOU KNOW HOW TO FORWARD A MAILING LIST TO A
NEWSGROUP THEN LET ME KNOW.

Also, if you know how to forward the newsgroup content to a mailing list
then please also let me know.
I know that we would have to parse the messages to prevent things being
sent in infinite loops, but it should be doable.

Please do not send messages to Nestor Zaluzec asking him how to do this,
he does know either!

Many thanks to whoever can help us.

--
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html




From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:11:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: ESEM

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Thu, 06 Apr 1995 12:13:20 -0400
Subject: Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy User Tips

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Message-Id: {199504061610.MAA15723-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}


Hi there,

At the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Users Group Meeting in Monterey CA this last weekend, it was suggested that we keep a list of Tips, Hacks and Frequently Asked Questions about ESEM.
We have started to compile the list and I am soliciting input from the rest of the user community.
Please send anything you think might be applicable to me at the address below (email only please).

By The Way:
When we say ESEM people think mostly of the ElectroScan instrument. We are not talking exclusively about ElectroScan. We know that Topcon, Hitachi and JEOL (at the very least) make elevated pressure SEMs and all users of those instruments are encouraged
to reply too.

In fact since Hitachi calll their instruments "Variable Pressure SEMs", Topcon call theirs "Wet SEMs" and JEOL call theirs "Low Pressure SEMs", I propose that we call the generic instruments "Lousy Vacuum SEMs". Trouble is, LVSEM is JEOL's accronym! If
anyone has a better idea let me know.


--
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html




From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:12:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: bacteria cryosubstitutio

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 6 Apr 1995 09:53:27 -0700
Subject: Re: bacteria cryosubstitutio

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Message-ID: {n1414960321.97812-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 8:01 AM
OFFICE MEMO RE} bacteria cryosubstitution Date: 4/6/95

to: Richard Easingwood
subj: cryosubstitution of bacteria

Richard- We have had some success with preserving the polysaccharide layer in
bacteria without the use of ruthenium red. A post-doc here custom-constructed
a growth chamber which allowed the growth of the bacteria on a filter
substrate. The idea was to examine the compaction of the bacteria under
different osmotic stresses without actually being immersed in the culture
media.
A small paper disc of cigarette paper was placed on the supporting filter
substrate and the bacteria were allowed to grow on top of it. The paper was
then removed and propane-jet frozen in an RMC MF 7200 device.
After a freeze-substitution regime using 1% osmium/0.1% UA in acetone, the
sample was allowed to slowly warm to RT, then embedded in Epon/Araldite 502
epoxy and sectioned on a diamond knife. Overall preservation was excellent.
I am aware of the preservative nature of RR on the polysaccharide layer but
we were surprised to see a great deal of extracellular matrix between the
cells without it. I am not sure what the mechanism of staining was in this
case, but I think it is significant to consider the possible mechanical loss
of the matrix due to processing/handling.
We have not repeated the experiment with the addition of RR to the
freeze-sub media so I do not yet have a comparison.

Regards,

Doug Davis
EML, 26 Giannini Hall
UC Berkeley 94720
(510) 642-2085
doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu





From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:16:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: T lymphocytes immunohistochemistry

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From: FRANCISCO J HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ :      fjhblazq-at-fox.cce.usp.br
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 07:27:04 -0300 (BST)
Subject: T lymphocytes immunohistochemistry

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I'm studying lymphocytes in the bovine skin and I need some
information.

Please, does anyone have information about the identification of
T-lymphocytes subsets (T-helper and T-cytotoxic) in paraffin sections?
I mean, it is possible or it only can be done in cryostat sections.

I will be very grateful for any help.
=============================================================================
Francisco Javier Hernandez Blazquez |
Universidade de Sao Paulo - Faculdade de | e-mail fjhblazq-at-fox.cce.usp.br
Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos | Voice: 55 195 616122 r. 265
Departamento de Ciencias Basicas/Histologia| r. 268
Av. Duque de Caxias Norte, 225 CP 23 | Fax: 55 195 611689
CEP 13630-000 Pirassununga (Sao Paulo) |
BRAZIL |
==============================================================================





From: ldm2-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L.D.Marks)
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 12:12:58 -0500
Subject: PC control of SEM

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I am interested in suggestions for a PC board to control an FEI
electron gun that is being used as a SEM.

Laurie Marks.




From: tivol-at-orkney.ph.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Apr 1995 10:02:03 EDT
Subject: RE: Newsgroups

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Dear John,
I don't know how to forward mailservers to newsgroups or vice versa,
but I'll bet Dave Kristoferson (sp?), who moderates the bionet newsgroups,
does. Good luck; sorting this out will save a lot of people a lot of mailbox
room.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 14:50:52 -0400
Subject: VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING

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GREETINGS,

I HAVE BEEN ASKED TO DO SOME VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING. THE
INTERESTED PARTIES ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE VIRAL CONCENTRATION FOR
CALIBTRATION OF OTHER ASSAYS SUCH AS 260/280 RATIOS AND HPLC.

I HAVE DONE SOME READING ON THE SUBJECT BUT WOULD APPRECIATE ANY
ADVICE ON WHICH TECHNIQUES ARE BETTER.

THANK YOU.


BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ
201-579-4343
201-579-4211 (FAX)
E-MAIL: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING.PLOUGH.SPRINT.COM






From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:15:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Diamond knife discussion

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From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 16:18:07 -0400
Subject: Diamond Knife Discussion

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X400-Received: by mta merit in /PRMD=internet/ADMD=telemail/C=us/; Relayed; Thu, 6 Apr 1995 17:52:52 -0400
X400-Received: by /ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Thu, 6 Apr 1995 17:19:34 -0400
X400-Received: by /PRMD=SCHERING-PLOUGH/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Thu, 6 Apr 1995 16:18:07 -0400


IN REPLY TO ANTHONY GARRATT-REED, I DON'T DISAGREE WITH ALL OF YOUR
COMMENTS, BUT MARK ELLIOTT WAS ASKING FOR ADVICE FROM ANYBODY WHO HAD MORE
KNOWLEDGE THAN HIMSELF ON THE SUBJECT OF DIAMOND KNIFE PURCHASES. TRUE,
THE RESPONSES WERE OVERWHELMINGLY IN FAVOR OF ONE PARTICULAR COMPANY, BUT
ISN'T THAT THE INFORMATION THAT HE ASKED FOR? I WOULD PREFER TO PURCHASE A
KNIFE FROM A COMPANY THAT MANY PEOPLE THOUGHT CONSISTANTLY SELLS GOOD
QUALITY KNIVES AND HAS GREAT SERVICE THEN TO RISK BUYING A KNIFE FROM A
COMPANY THAT DIDN'T GET THE RAVE REVIEWS. I CONSIDER DIAMOND KNIVES AN
EXPENSIVE PURCHASE AND VALUE ANY WISDOM THAT MY CO-ELECTRON MICROSCOPISTS
HAVE TO OFFER.


BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ 07848
(201) 579-4343
(201) 579-4211 (FAX)
E-MAIL:BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.SPRINT.COM








From: Andreh Khachatouri :      usd16093-at-interramp.com
Date: Sat, 8 Apr 1995 01:22:38 -0800
Subject: SEM and TEM studies of Sea urchin

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X-Mailer: InterCon TCP/Connect II 2.1.2
Mime-Version: 1.0
Message-Id: {9504080122.AA38252-at-usd16093.interramp.com}

Hello.......
If anybody out there knows anything about SEM or TEM studies of surface
interactions between sea urchin eggs and beads( germ wheat, sugar beads) ,
please let me know. I will be very glad to know what fixative are you using
and what is the proportional amount of eggs compare to beads? thanks





From: kitajima-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br (Elliot W. Kitajima)
Date: Sat, 8 Apr 1995 07:36:41 -0200 (GRNLNDDT)
Subject: congress

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Dear colleagues of the AAEM: To whom should I contact so that I can place
informations regarding 3rd Interamerican Congress on Electron Microscopy to be
held from September 2 to 6, 1995, in Caxambu,MG, Brazil? Dr.Barbara Reine, from
Univ.Washington,Seattle,who belongs to AMS is the representantive from US in
the organizing committe. Would you plese contact me? Thanks. Kitajima.
--
Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe (kitajima-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br)
Departamento de Biologia Celular - Universidade de Brasilia
70919-970 - Brasilia - DF - Brasil
tel. +55-61-348-2424/+55-61-340-9094 fax +55-61-274-1065




From: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 7 Apr 1995 6:16:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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From: modum-at-gatan.com (Michael Odum)
Date: Thu, 6 Apr 1995 16:51:20 -0700
Subject: Re: OM Polishing of Al

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Message-Id: {199504062349.QAA22492-at-core.gatan.com}

Hello,

I have encountered your problem with fine scratches on aluminum and there
are a couple of things you might want to try. The first option is polish as
you have been, but skip the 1um and 0.25um diamond steps. I find that these
smaller particles tend to embed in the polishing cloth which act as your
scratch makers. And I recommend that you use 0.05 alumina suspension
instead of silica. I think silica is too agressive for fine polishing the
softer metals. If you feel this doesn't give you a fine enough finish you
can go to 0.03 alumina.

Option two is instead of diamond paste try cubic boron nitride. The
particles have rounded edges so they don't embed as easily. For soft metals
like Al I use 2-4um CBN then 0.05 alumina and I get a very good finish. I
get my CBN from Kay Industrial Diamond [1-800-327-8982]. Other than these
are the only people I know of who manufactures CBN pastes, for a resonable
price, I have no commercial interests.

In both options I try to keep actual polishing time to as little as I can
get away with, because the longer you polish you get a statistically better
chance of introducing some sort of scratch making contaminant. I hope this
was helpful.

Respectfully,

Michael W. Odum
Spec. Prep. Tech.
Gatan, Inc.
6678 Owens Dr.
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel: 510-463-0200
Fax: 510-463-0204






} We are currently trying to polish aluminum samples (7075). Before we etch
} them, we are trying to get a 0.05 micron finish. The grinding/polishing
} sequence is: 600 grit, 800 grit, 1200 grit, 3 micron diamond paste, 1 micron
} diamond paste, 0.25 micron paste, 0.05 colloidal silica. Everytime we go from
} the 1 micron step to the 0.25 micron step scratches appear....
}
} We have been using Allied High Tech Spec-Cloth polishing pads. Doeas anyone
} have suggestions to get to the final two steps without introducing scratches?
}
} I do not really understand why they get scratched so easily when the finer
} pastes are used.
}
} Should these samples be stored in a dessicator to prevent oxidation? I have
} never worked with Al, and therefore would appreciate any suggestions.
}
} Patrick Diehl
} Center for Materials Characterization
} University of North Texas





From: Jane A. Fagerland (708) 935-0104 :      FAGERLAND.JANE-at-igate.abbott.com
Date: Fri, 07 Apr 1995 09:33:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: RE: T lymphocytes immunohistochemistry

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Mr-Received: by mta RANDB; Relayed; Fri, 07 Apr 1995 09:54:41 -0600
Mr-Received: by mta MCM$RAND; Relayed; Fri, 07 Apr 1995 09:54:46 -0600
Mr-Received: by mta RANDD; Relayed; Fri, 07 Apr 1995 09:55:02 -0600
Alternate-Recipient: prohibited
Disclose-Recipients: prohibited
Content-Return: prohibited

I tried to stain lymphocyte subsets in paraffin embedded sections of
bird lung fixed with a wide variety of fixatives - alcoholic, aldehydes,
PLP, imidates, etc. etc. - with no luck. I ended up using frozens.
However, I recently read a paper in which glycol methacrylate sections
were successfully stained for T cell subsets. The success was partly
due to using protease inhibitors in fixatives. I haven't tried this
method, but here is the reference:

Britten KM, Howarth PH, and Roche WR. 1993. Immunohistochemistry of
resin sections: a comparison of resin embedding techniques for small
mucosal biopsies. Biotechnic and Histochemistry 68(5):271-280.

The only other alternative is to use antibodies that recognize epitopes
after formalin fixation and paraffin embedding. I don't know if these
are available for bovine tissues. From past experience with veterinary
tissues, I'd be surprised if they were!

Good luck!

Jane A. Fagerland, Ph.D.
Dept. Cellular and Microscopic Research
Abbott Laboratories D45M/AP31
Abbot Park IL, 60064 USA






From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Sat, 8 Apr 1995 13:49:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: BA360 Free Fracture instrument spare part

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

Dear Fellow Microscopists,

I have been using an old Balzers BA360 freeze-fracture instrument for
teaching for the past several years. I neeed to replace the stainless-steel
bellows that is part of the LN2 plumbing for cooling the microtome knife.
Spare parts for BA360 is not available any more from Balzers/Bal-Tec. If you
have a BA360 that is scrapped and would like to sell or give away parts
including the bellows, kindly get in touch with me directly through e-mail.
Thanks!

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology & Director, EM Facility
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: Ann-Fook Yang :      YANGA-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Sat, 08 Apr 1995 11:59:43 -0400
Subject: Re:Polabed 812

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Message-Id: {sf867b14.017-at-EM.AGR.CA}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

Someone was asking for information about POLABED 812.
I know of Polybed 812 from Polysciences.
In late 1970's Shell Chemicals decided to get out of Epon
production. They sold the stock to every distributor by ration,
just to be fair. I stocked up Epon myself and have some left. Two
years later, one company came up with its name prefix to "bed
812". Then many companies followed with their own xxxbed 812 to
replace Epon. The companies I dealt with recommended same formula
for mixing the components and claimed that it behaved like Epon.
Are these xxxbed 812 not the old Epon?

Ann Fook Yang







From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Sat, 08 Apr 1995 20:54:06 EDT
Subject: Fwd: Re:Polabed 812

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Replying to posting of YANG, Ann-fook:

Your are correct in that there is some amount of selection of what are
sometimes called the "Epon 812 substitutes".

With regard to these substitutes, they are most definitely NOT all the
same. Our own SPI Pon 812 resin is indistinguishable from the original
Epon 812 when it was being manufactured. I make this point because
some of the Epon 812 that has been in the kind of long term storage
described, has in fact started to change, since the shelf life is not
unlimited, so if you were to compare one of the "substitutes"made today,
with what you have had in your storage, indeed you might find that
there are differences in the characteristics. Generally when the
changes are occurring they are undesirable and are likely to erode the
possibility of obtaining the best possible results.

Charles A. Garber
SPI Supplies
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19380 USA

Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
1-(800)-242-4774

FAX:1-(610)-436-5755
e-mail: sp-supp-at-cerf.com
or
GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com
------- FORWARD, Original message follows -------

} Date: Saturday, 08-Apr-95 07:54 PM
}
} From: YANG, Ann-fook \ Internet: (yanga-at-em.agr.ca)
} To: Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. \ PRODIGY: (GVKM07A)
}
} Subject: Re:Polabed 812
}
} Someone was asking for information about POLABED 812.
} I know of Polybed 812 from Polysciences. In late 1970's Shell
Chemicals
} decided to get out of Epon production. They sold the stock to every
} distributor by ration, just to be fair. I stocked up Epon myself and
have
} some left. Two years later, one company came up with its name prefix
to
} "bed 812". Then many companies followed with their own xxxbed 812 to
} replace Epon. The companies I dealt with recommended same formula for
} mixing the components and claimed that it behaved like Epon. Are
these
} xxxbed 812 not the old Epon?
}
} Ann Fook Yang
}
}
}

------- FORWARD, End of original message -------







From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Sun, 9 Apr 1995 12:59:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Environmental SEM and similar Instruments

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

Reply to J.H. Mansfield's comments on ESEM type SEMs:

In addition to the ESEM, the Variable Pressure SEM of Hitachi and the Low
Vacuum SEM of Jeol, there is now the new ECO-SEM (Environment controlled
Sanning EM) introduced by AMRAY at Pittcon '95. How about coining the acronym
SAPSEM--SubAtmospheric Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope--when referring
to this class of SEMs?

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology & Director, EM Facility
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 11:53:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Looping Messages...

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G'day Subscribers...

I returned from the MSA Program Production Meeting
this morning and found the Listserver looping a series
of messages. I believe I have found the source and
have temporairly shutdown the list until I clear up
the mess (and also delete the addresses causing the problems).
In the interim, we may loose a few postings. Hopefully
they will be retrievable. Please wait until you receive
a back on-line message from me before you repost your
messages to the list.

Sorry, but as Murphy has it, the problem ocurred while I was out
of town for a few days.

We should be back on-line later tonight.

Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 20:52:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Analysis of the Bouncing Message--Why

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Ev'ning Subscribers.....

Well I've sorted out what I think is the source
of the bounce. If your curious read on. Otherwise
trash this. I'm going to leave the node down for
the rest of the evening just to try make sure all of
the bouncing/reflections have finished.

----------------------------------------------------
Here's what happened..

1.) A user turned on an automatic reply in his Email
program. This automatic reply sent the message
"Thank you for Remembering...."
back to anyone that sent him a message.
2.) When a message that originated at the Microscopy list
was sent to this user, his program sent a reply
back to the list, which (by design) then sent
this message out to everyone on the list. This
of course included the user with the automatic
reply. The automatic reply then kicked in (again)
and the cycle started the FIRST infinite loop.
3.)After many of these cycles, a different user in
Australia had their mailbox fillup. Their program
next generated an error message which was sent back
to the list, which went to everyone, including
our "Thank-you" user. This started a SECOND infinite
loop, since now everytime the message went out their
mailbox was still full and the error message was
sent again.
4.)At least 2 more users (one in Hungary and another in Slovenia)
had their mailboxes fill....
5.)The cycle just gets worse from there.

What made matters worse is that I was out of town from Friday AM, through
Tuesday AM. Although I did a quick check on Friday PM I did not see
anything that was grossly out of line, but by Tuesday AM there was
a queue of some 100,000+ messages waiting to be delivered!

I had no intention of trying to sort throught that lot to see which
were real or which were the echo so I shut down the whole system
and started trashing things.

We will restart probably tomorrow, when I'm pretty sure that
things have cleared up.

I've managed to save a some of the last few posting. I'll
try to resend them as tests.

G'night All.... Nestor





From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:33:56.78
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:00:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Be Window replacement

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From: KAKER-at-ctklj.ctk.si
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 10:38:14 +0200 (WET-DST)
Subject: Window Mount

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In our laboratory we have a old Edax 9100 detector with Be window.
In future we wish replace this Be window with Moxtek window. I'm
looking information, how is window mount mechanicaly mounted to the
end cup. Has anyone had experience with replacing Be window in the
EDS detector. Thank you.

Henrik Kaker
kaker-at-ctklj.ctk.si




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:37:46.11
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:03:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Capillatory tubes for Bacteria cryosubstitution

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From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:38:14.82
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:04:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: OsO4 'oxidation'

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Message-ID: {BC5D8A2F0179AEAA-at-ggpl.arsusda.gov}





From: Richard E. Edelmann :      EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 12:01:56 -500
Subject: OsO4 'oxidation'

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Just a general chemistry question on OsO4 degradation. When OsO4
breaks down in aqueous solution and turns brown, we generally consider
it no good. And quite often it is refered to as having been
"oxidized'. But if you expose Osmium metal to ambient air it will
oxidize to form OsO4 (Merck Index). I am just currious does anybody
know what happens to the aqueous OsO4 when it turns brown?


Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Biological Science Building
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:35:18.61
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:00:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Nitrogen in EDS

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From: Leszek Kepinski :      kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 11:22:52 +0100 (CET)
Subject: Nitrogen in EDS

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

As a non specialist in EDS I have a question.
Is it possible that our EDS detector (UTW from EDAX) attached to SEM does not
"see" nitrogen peak at 0.91 keV (even in AlN and GaN it is hardly visible),
though at the same time it detects easily very close C and O peaks?
Leszek Kepinski


*****************************************************************
Leszek Kepinski
Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research,
Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 937, 50-950 Wroclaw, Poland
tel:(4871) 350 21 ext.153
fax:(4871) 44 10 29
email: kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
*****************************************************************




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:35:33.52
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:01:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5th Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications

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From: lporter-at-goodyear.com (LE Porter)
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 09:05:29 -0400
Subject: 5th Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications

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Message-Id: {9504111300.AA02749-at-rds163.noname}
X-Sender: t456b19-at-rds163
Mime-Version: 1.0
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Dear Imagers,

Does anyone out there have anything more specific on the following: 5th
Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications, Details: S
Griffiths, IEE, Savoy Place, London WC2R OBL? I am looking for an email
address, tentative proceedings, etc.
Thanks for your help

L E Porter Phone (216) 796-1620
Head of Microscopy Fax (216) 796-3304
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company EMail LPORTER-at-GOODYEAR.COM
Dept 415A
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
USA







From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 12-APR-1995 08:47:16.57
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:02:38 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Correction on N peak

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From: Leszek Kepinski :      kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 08:23:09 +0100 (CET)
Subject: Re: Nitrogen in EDS

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

{Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 11:22:52 +0100 (CET)
{From: "Leszek Kepinski" {kepinski-at-156.17.85.7}
{To: MICROSCOPY-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

{As a non specialist in EDS I have a question.
{Is it possible that our EDS detector (UTW from EDAX) attached to SEM does not
{"see" nitrogen peak at 0.91 keV (even in AlN and GaN it is hardly visible),
{though at the same time it detects easily very close C and O peaks?

{Leszek Kepinski kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl

Sorry for the mistake. The considered nitrogen peak is of course at 0.39
keV. As you see I am really non-specialist.

Leszek Kepinski


*****************************************************************
Leszek Kepinski
Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research,
Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 937, 50-950 Wroclaw, Poland
tel:(4871) 350 21 ext.153
fax:(4871) 44 10 29
email: kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
*****************************************************************




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:38:00.19
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:03:59 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: gluing sapphire

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From: Georges_Veilleux-at-INRS-ENER.UQuebec.CA (Georges Veilleux)
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 11:39:24 -0400
Subject: gluing sapphire

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Does anybody know a method of mounting sapphire to make cross-
sections for TEM ?

We have used the GATAN G1 EPOXY glue whitout success.

We know a lot of methods to prepare cross-section specimens. We are
able to prepare samples in plane without difficulty and cross-sections with
different materials but sapphire.

It seems it would be the adhesion of the glue on sapphire which is the
problem with our cross-section samples. Any idea on the type of glue that
should be used.

Thank you.
Georges Veilleux
Researcher
INRS-Energie et materiaux
C.P. 1020
Varennes, Qc
Canada
J3X 1S2
Tel.: (514) 929-8110
Fax: (514) 929-8102





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 9:37:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Meetings/Conferences

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Subscribers...

The Listserver is up and running, but I will
for the short term be checking/monitoring each contribution
for a reflection/bounce before I turn it back into
a free-for-all system as it was in the past. I'll not moderate, just
intercept all messages and look at them first
before passing them along. My guess is that
in another day all the bounces will have finally
cleared up. I saw a few from last week late last night.
Because of this checking (manual) postings will appear
abit behind what your used to, as I will be doing it
late in the evening..


I've also had multiple requests for information about
meeting schedules. I've now added a section to
the Microscopy&Microanalysis WWW site which has
dates/locations/contacts etc.. for different
meetings that I know about. As I receive updates
or see items of interest I will update the lists.

You may access this information at:

http://www.amc.anl.gov


Your Friendly (& lately blurry eyed) Neighborhood SysOp

Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 9:59:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Window Mount

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From: _ _ _ _ _ MARK W. LUND _ _ _ _ _ :      LUNDM-at-PHYSC1.BYU.EDU
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 09:04 MDT
Subject: Window Mount

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The window mount is attached to the detector snout with epoxy.
I should point out that it is difficult to predict the results of
putting a light-element window on an old detector. You do not know
the dead layer (or what is sometimes called the "detector window") thickness,
or the attenuation from the front electrode. I also would like to hear
of any experiences others have had doing this.
regards
mark

Mark W. Lund, Ph
Director
MOXTEK, Inc.
Orem UT




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 12-APR-1995 08:48:40.09
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 10:15:01 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: MPSEM/ESEM

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 8:42:39 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: MPSEM/ESEM

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From: Alan Pooley :      pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 08:42:28 -0400
Subject: Re: Undeliverable Mail

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how about mid-pressure SEM ie MPSEM pronounced empsem

just a thought from a lpsem user.....
alan pooley




From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 12-APR-1995 08:48:23.42
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 10:14:27 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Newsgroups

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From: Marcelle A Gillott :      magem-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 09:05:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Newsgroups

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I am now sure that it weould be a good idea to forward the newsgroup
stuff to the listserver........
the messages on this mail list outomatically get sent to all subscribers,
many of whom are on commercial links and therefore have to pay by the message

Although this would not affect me cost-wise, it would vastly increase my
volume & I am unsure about whether I would benefit from that -

Please make a concerted effot to check out all the ramifications of
such an action before doing something that may change the character of
this activity and try to get a concensus as to its desirability

thanks

marcelle gillott
uwm

ps - I am not trying to be a spoilsport - more like a devil's advocate!






From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:36:36.51
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:01:54 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: W-filament discussion

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From: xxie-at-lsuvm.sncc.lsu.edu (Xiaogang Xie)
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 09:35:58 -0600
Subject: Summary about "W filament advises"

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Summary about "W Filament Advises" discusses

Ten days ago, I posted a message to ask advises about (a). new W
filament vs. rebuilt one; (b). better sources to order filament; (c). a
problem about a bad batch of filaments. A few people provided their
experiences and more people asked for a summary. THANKS FOR ALL OF YOU!

1. New W filament vs. Rebuilt one
(a). Price: A box of 12-piece JOEL K-type filament is about
$500-$600 for the new ones from manufacturer, and $120-$180 for the rebuilt
ones.
(b).Pros: three people believe that the rebuilt one is as good as
the new one, and two of them have better experience with the rebuilt one.
(c). Cons: however, I also got "boo" about the rebuilt one from two
people. One of them pointed out that W hairpin bend and distortion is a
common problem with the rebuilt one.

2. Better vendor source for W filament
No conclusion. Five different sources are mentioned in these
response messages. Most people do not have preference in any specific
vendor except two of them told me that they enjoy SPI and one prefers EBTEC
for rebuilt filament.

3. Other tips
A suggestion for achieving better filament performance that I got
is to preheat the filament before mounting it.

Xiaogang

****************************************
* Xiaogang Xie *
* Department of Geology and Geophysics *
* Louisiana State University *
* Baton Rouge, LA 70803 *
* Office (504)388-2240 *
* Fax (504)388-2302 *
****************************************






From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:37:30.31
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:02:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EDXA Book

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From: Laurie Frederick :      frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 16:53:29 PDT
Subject: Re: EDXA Book

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950410165329.480-at-vanlab.paprican.ca}
To: "DAVID VOWLES" {VOWLES-at-rsbs-central.anu.ed

Dear David,
I received a very helpful responce from Dave Williams, and yes the
(his?) book has been published. It is available from Plenum Press, NY.
Their phone number is (212) 620-8000. It's ISBN 0306-448-580 and lists
for $79.50 US.
I'm looking forward to it.
Laurie

} Dear Laurie,
}
} Recently you posted an enquiry to the Microscopy Listserver:
} "Has the book from MAS entitled "X-ray Spectrometry in Electron
} Beam Instruments" by Dave Williams and Dale Newbury actually
} been published yet and if so, is there a phone number for orders?"
}
} Did you receive any answer to this question? I am interested in
} obtaining a copy of the above book by Williams and Newbury and
} would be grateful if you could forward any details which you may
} have.
}
} With thanks,
}
} David Vowles
} Electron Microscopy Unit
} Australian National University
} Email: David.Vowles-at-anu.edu.au
}

______________________________________________________________________
Laurie Frederick, A.SC.T. PAPRICAN
Corrosion Control Group 3800 Wesbrook Mall
The Pulp and Paper Research Vancouver, B.C.
Institute of Canada Canada V6S 2L9

Email: frederick_laurie-at-vanlab.paprican.ca
Tel: 604-222-3200 Fax: 604-222-3207




From: DLIETZ-at-TrentU.ca
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 14:55:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: position available

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Dear Colleges
There is a full-time contract position in Electron Microscopy
coming up at Trent University which is located in Peterborough Ontario.
The position is available from May 15 to December 22 1995 and is in the dept.
of biology. Applicants interested please reply and a job description can
be faxed to you.


SEND ALL REQUESTS to: DLIETZ-at-TrentU.ca






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 8:43:49 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Freeze-sub w/Ruthenium Red

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 13 Apr 1995 12:03:05 -0700
Subject: Freeze-sub w/Ruthenium Red

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Message-ID: {n1414347570.62701-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 10:59 AM
OFFICE MEMO Freeze-sub w/Ruthenium Red Date: 4/13/95


Anyone have any experience with Ruthenium Red in freeze-substitution? Seems
to me that RR is not soluble in 100% acetone.
Thanks....
doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu









From: DLIETZ-at-TrentU.ca
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 15:06:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: books for sale

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Recently, I had seen a book entitled "MICROCOSMOS" BY Jeremy Burgess ,
Michael Marten and Rosemary Taylor . The book is now out of print and I'm
interested in purchasing a second hand book. I work at Trent University
and often do high school tours for the area. I thought this type of book
would peek the interests of those students as well as lower year
university students into the field of microscopy. If anyone would like to
part with their copy or know where I can purchase a copy please reply. Or
if there is a title of a more recent edition to the book recently in print
please forward .
THANKS DEBBIE





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 8:50:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5th Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications

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From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:35:33.52
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 14:01:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5th Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications

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From: lporter-at-goodyear.com (LE Porter)
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 09:05:29 -0400
Subject: 5th Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications

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Message-Id: {9504111300.AA02749-at-rds163.noname}
X-Sender: t456b19-at-rds163
Mime-Version: 1.0
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Dear Imagers,

Does anyone out there have anything more specific on the following: 5th
Intl Conference on Image Processing & its Applications, Details: S
Griffiths, IEE, Savoy Place, London WC2R OBL? I am looking for an email
address, tentative proceedings, etc.
Thanks for your help

L E Porter Phone (216) 796-1620
Head of Microscopy Fax (216) 796-3304
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company EMail LPORTER-at-GOODYEAR.COM
Dept 415A
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
USA







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 15:55:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Residual Gas Analyzer: req for info

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 15:56:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: SGI-SEM Interface

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From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab Univers :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 13:16:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: SGI - SEM interface

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Is there nayone out there who is using a UNIX based system, SGI Indy in
particular to grab images from a Hitachi S-4000 or later FESEM. I would like
to know how you configured your system to do this, e.g., do you get the digital
signal or tv output? do you you go directly to the SGI video in or do you have
something between etc.

Thanks much
******************************************************
* Greg Erdos ** *
* Director, ICBR EMCL ** Phone 904-392-1295 *
* 218 Carr Hall ** FAX 904-846-0251 *
* University of Florida ** gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 ** *
******************************************************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 15:57:39 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Cy% recommendations needed

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From: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 1995 16:19:30 -0400
Subject: Cy5 problem

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I'd like some recommendation on what kind of filter blocks and lines to use
to view Cy5. I'm using a MRC 600. I haven't been able to view any
fluorescence with Cy5 using filter block "RHS" line 647 DF10, Neutral
Density set at 1.
I have tried different dilutions: 1:100, 1:200, 1:400, 1:600 for Cy5 1.4
mg/ml. None of these dilutions have given me good results. Any
recommendation would be appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Ciprian

__________________________________________________________
Ciprian Almonte * * :)
*
Medical College of Pennsylvania
Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology * * *

3200 Henry Ave. :)
Philadelphia, PA 19129
E-mail: almonte-at-medcolpa.edu * * *
Voice: (215) 842-4081
Fax: (215) 843-9082 *
* :)
__________________________________________________________







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 16:05:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Looking for a old book

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 15:58:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: OsO4 Oxidation

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From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:38:14.82
Date: Wednesday, April 12, 1995 2:04PM
Subject: OsO4 'oxidation'

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From: Richard E. Edelmann :      EDELMARE-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 12:01:56 -500
Subject: OsO4 'oxidation'

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Just a general chemistry question on OsO4 degradation. When OsO4
breaks down in aqueous solution and turns brown, we generally consider
it no good. And quite often it is refered to as having been
"oxidized'. But if you expose Osmium metal to ambient air it will
oxidize to form OsO4 (Merck Index). I am just currious does anybody
know what happens to the aqueous OsO4 when it turns brown?


Richard E. Edelmann
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Biological Science Building
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513-529-5712
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:44:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: reply/Nitrogen in EDS

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From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:35:18.61
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 13:00 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Nitrogen in EDS

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From: Leszek Kepinski :      kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 1995 11:22:52 +0100 (CET)
Subject: Nitrogen in EDS

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

As a non specialist in EDS I have a question.
Is it possible that our EDS detector (UTW from EDAX) attached to SEM does not
"see" nitrogen peak at 0.91 keV (even in AlN and GaN it is hardly visible),
though at the same time it detects easily very close C and O peaks?
Leszek Kepinski


*****************************************************************
Leszek Kepinski
Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research,
Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O.Box 937, 50-950 Wroclaw, Poland
tel:(4871) 350 21 ext.153
fax:(4871) 44 10 29
email: kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
*****************************************************************


It's not unusual to have relatively poor sensitivity for nitrogen in UTW or ATW
detectors. Nitrogen x-rays are strongly absorbed by carbon that may be present
on the sample surface(s), on the detector window, or--in some detectors--as a
detector window material. Carbon and oxygen x-rays are less strongly absorbed
by carbon films. You could also get high differential absorption of nitrogen x-
rays by specific elements in bulk samples, but not by Al or Ga.

What can you do about it?
1. To enhance the detection of light elements in a SEM, try operating at low KV
(~2-5 KV) to increase the yield of soft x-rays relative to that of higher
energy x-rays. Increase the beam spot size to obtain the beam current needed
to maintain an optimum counting rate.

2. Be sure the sample surface is clean. (A 10-20 nm thick anticharge coating
of carbon on the sample won't affect the soft x-ray absorption significantly).

3. If the UTW window is dirty, it may require replacement (a factory job in
most cases, but can be done by the user if the detector has a turret-type
window assembly.

4. If the detector crystal is dirty, contact the manufacturer about cleaning
or replacing it (usually very expensive).

5. For an SEM with a high rate of hydrocarbon contamination (also not
unusual), consider one of the hydrocarbon cleaning systems now on the market
(or make your own).

6. Probably most important: Try calculating what the x-ray spectra from your
detector should look like, to find out what the nitrogen detectability should
be for different experimental conditions. The DTSA program for Macintosh
computers, from NIH/NIST, performs this function.

Larry Thomas
Battelle, PNL
Richland, WA, USA




From: kvecchio-at-ames.UCSD.EDU
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:47:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Opening for Microscopist Post-Doc

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Dear Collegues:

This message is on behalf of Professor Nemat-Nasser in the Applied
Mechanics and Engineering Sciences Department at the University of CA, San
Diego. Prof. Nemat-Nasser has an opening for a post-doctoral researcher
with expertise in electron microscopy of deformation mechanisms and damage
evolution. The candidate would be working closely with researchers in the
area of mechanics of materials, and is expected to collaborate of several
projects involving deformation and fracture of both ductile metals and
brittle solids. Some of this research will be focused on understanding
deformation behaviors at high strain rates, an area where there is
currently considerable research in our group here at UCSD.

Interested candidates should sent a resume, list of publications, and three
references directly to Professor Nemat-Nasser -at- Dept. of AMES, MC-0411,
Univ. of CA, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093.

E-mail files may be send to: Sia-at-CEAM.UCSD.EDU, but should be followed up
with a hard copy sent by regular mail. The position will be open until an
suitable candidate is found to fill the position.

Please do not send any responses to the author of this message, but direct
all future correspondences to Prof. Nemat-Nasser.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:49:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Nitrogen in EDS

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:49:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Nitrogen in EDS

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} email: kepinski-at-highscreen.int.pan.wroc.pl
} *****************************************************************
}
} Yes, it is quite possible that your window has poor Nitrogen transmission.
For instance, Noran used to market a window material called ZMAX ( a diamond
film?). ZMAX had very poor Nitrogen transmission. You should press EDAX
for more information regarding your Window type and transmission properties.

Paul Thomson





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:52:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Old TEM Available

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From: Marcelle A Gillott :      magem-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 09:22:40 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Old TEM available

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Anyone interested in an Hitachi HU 11B ???

I have one that is still under vacuum (was last used about 2 years ago
for a demonstration) - we have lots of extra parts, including some
specialized stages that were obtained when someone else's 11B was
decommissioned. ... The space it is currently occupying is now needed
for another activity -

Please contact me directly if you are interested -

Marcelle Gillott
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:56:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Viral Particle Counting

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:56:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Viral Particle Counting

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GREETINGS,

I POSTED THIS QUESTION LAST WEEK AND DID'T GET A RESPONSE SO I
THOUGHT I'D GIVE IT ANOTHER TRY.

I HAVE BEEN ASKED TO DO SOME VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING BY TEM. THE
INTERESTED PARTIES ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE VIRAL CONCENTRATION FOR
CALIBRATION OF OTHER ASSAYS SUCH AS 260/280 RATIOS AND HPLC.

I HAVE DONE SOME READING ON THE SUBJECT BUT WOULD APPRECIATE ANY
ADVICE ON TECHNIQUES.


THANK YOU.


BARBARA HARTMAN
SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH
LAFAYETTE, NJ
201-579-4343
201-579-4211 (FAX)
E-MAIL: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING.PLOUGH.SPRINT.COM






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:59:51 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Fatty Acid Stain

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From: DIRK DOMASCHKO :      DOMASCHK-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 13:33:21 +1100
Subject: Fatty Acid Stain

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Does anyone out there know of a good method for stainning fatty acids
for TEM? Both intra and extracellular fatty acids are of intrest in
red skeletal muscle, if it makes any difference in the procedure.

Thanks in Advance for any help.










Dirk W. Domaschko
Electron Microscopy Facility
Marshall University School of Medicine
Huntington, WV 25755-9350
Ph: 304-696-7393
E-Mail: Domaschk-at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 21:01:28 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Freeze-sub w/Ruthenium Red

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From: tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tom Phillips)
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 13:07:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Freeze-sub w/Ruthenium Red

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how about tetrahydrofuran. it is a great freeze sub alternative to acetone.

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(314)-882-4712 (voice)
(314)-882-0123 (fax)






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:49:53 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Gluing Sapphire

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From: tsi-at-werple.mira.net.au (Thomson Scientific:Paul Thomson)
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 12:50:05 +1000
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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} From: ANLAEM::MICROSCOPY 11-APR-1995 11:38:00.19
} To: ZALUZEC
} CC:
} Subj: gluing sapphire
}



From: tsi-at-werple.mira.net.au (Thomson Scientific:Paul Thomson)
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 12:50:05 +1000
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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Paul Thomson





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:51:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: OsO4 Oxidation

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:51:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: OsO4 Oxidation

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I would like to respond as follows:

The valence state of Os in the tetroxide is presumed to be +8.

As the valence state is reduced to lower valence states there is a
whole series of color changes, and by the time it gets to +2, the color
is black.

When one has a vial that has started to turn brown, more likely than
not, it is not a unique valence state but a mixture of valence states,
or some purists might say a distribution of valence states and
continues to become more and more black in color as the extent of
reduction proceeds further.

At that point, in the ampoule, the change is irreversible and there is
nothing anyone can do to reverse that change (without breaking open the
ampoule) and doing actual chemistry to reverse the reactions..

Here are some options to discarding the spoiled (for some applications)
ampoules::

1] Some people could still make use of the aqueous osmium , for
example, those doing vapor phase staining of rubber modified polymers.
For such work, it does not really matter that much whether the solution
is "100% active" or not. It is the vapors that count. This might not
be true for everyone but at least it is one reason why you need not
automatically think of sending it off to some kind of hazardous waste
container. I would imagine there would be student uses for the "brown"
osmium product as well.

2] If you absolutely have no use for it and if you have some quantity
of ampoules, the osmium can be recycled. Or even if you don't have a
whole lot, we can still combine it with other ampoules and recycle the
reduced osmium. Contact me by e-mail if you wanted to explore that
option. Osmium is a non-renewable resource and we should try to
preserve it. The osmium you would send back might not have any real
economic value in the sense that you would get anything back for it,
but it is usually a lower cost alternative relative to the cost of
disposing of it as a hazardous waste.

Charles A. Garber
SPI Supplies
PO Box 656
West Chester, PA 19380

Ph: 1-(610) 436-5400 FAX:1-(610) 436-5755

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com.






From: lmiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 1995 11:56:28 -0700
Subject: Virus particle counting

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Message-Id: {199504151655.AA23238-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi barbara,
I tried to post you personally, the mail bounced back. Probable reason for
some lack of response!!

We mixed a known concentration of latex spheres with a known volume of
virus culture. The sample was ultracentrifuged and resusupended with a
known volume of water. Then we mixed well and negative stained the samples.
Determine the counts using a ratio of # latex particles to known
concentration and using this ratio with the particle count.

Understanding that this is going on the assumption that latex spheres and
virus particles will have the same affinity for the formvar grid. (Some
problems will occur if the latex agglutinates.)

In this method, both a general ideal of concentration is reached, and the
size can be determined by comparison with the latex particle. A back up to
measuring the particle on a negative.

I've done this about 2X for researchers.

Good luck,
Lou Ann

***************************
Lou Ann Miller
Microscopic Imaging Lab
College of Vet. Medicine
University of Illinois
2001 S Lincoln Ave
Urbana,Illinois 61801
217-244-1566
lmiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu






From: Bilge Hakan Sen :      SEN-at-dishekimligi.ege.edu.tr
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 12:56:01 TUR+2
Subject: ' Seeking Postdoctoral Position '

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To whom it may concern,
I am a research assistant professor in Department of Restorative
Dentistry,School of Dentistry,Ege University in Izmir,Turkiye since
1987. I have received my Ph.D. degree in endodontics in
February,1994.
I have been running a JEOL JSM-5200 scanning electron microscope in
our faculty for two years. I had also used a Philips SEM in
Amsterdam,The Netherlands for six months during my doctoral
studies.
I would like to continue my postdoctoral studies in biomedical
sciences by using SEM. Language will not
be a problem for me since I had graduated from Gar-Field High School
in Dale City,VA. Upon your request, I will be glad to send you my CV.
My researches by using SEM are:
- Anatomical approaches to dental pulp and periodontal ligament,
- Observation of microflora in dental root canals and dentinal
tubules,
- Observation of root surfaces in teeth with periapical resorption,
- Adaptation and penetration of root canal sealers into dentinal
tubules,
- Morphological changes in red blood cells of patients with diabetes
mellitus,
- Local effect of tetracycline on teeth with periodontitis,
- SEM investigations on natal and neonatal teeth,
- The effect of polishing on dental filling materials,
- Interactions of yeasts with dentin,
- The effect of titanium tetrafluoride on dental hard tissues,
- Durability of titanium tetrafluoride on enamel after in vivo
applications,
- Resorption patterns of decidous teeth.

Hope to collaborate with you.
Kind regards,
Dr. Bilge Hakan Sen







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:51:57 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: gluing sapphire

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From: AlliedHT-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 1995 03:43:15 -0400
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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Try using LocTite 460 glue. It seems to be the highest quality super glue on
the market. You must buy it through a distributor. You can contact me for
that information.

Gary Liechty
310-635-2466




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:53:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Microtome for Bones

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From: jswafford-at-CCTR.UMKC.EDU
Date: Sun, 16 Apr 1995 14:25:41 CST
Subject: bone microtomes

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Does anyone know of the availability of a used microtome capable of cutting
undecalcified bone- something similar to the Reichert Autocut, Polycut etc?
Also, is there a server on the network for histochemical people?
Jim Swafford
School of Dentistry
University of Missouri
Kansas City, MO
muchas gracias and many thanks!




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:53:43 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: gluing sapphire

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From: Brian G. Demczyk :      demczyk-at-ERXINDY.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 08:50:26 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Gluing Sapphire

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What's wrong with M-Bond 610. I've used it for years in preparing
cross sections, including sapphire.X






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 12:01:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Please use the Stnd Address

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G'day Subscribers....


You may notice that Microscopy Email appears
to be coming from a new address called

MicroscopyListZaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov...


PLEASE PLEASE, DO NOT use this address when
posting to the list. Continue to use

Microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

It is a temporary forwarding address that I
am using to help clear up the looping that
happened last week. Over the weekend one
person tried to post to that address and
started another loop. I caught it, but
it still took me the morning to clear up
things. Just post as you always did in the
past.

Thanks.... Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:54:01 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: looking for an old book

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:52:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Virus particle counting

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From: lmiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 1995 11:56:28 -0700
Subject: Virus particle counting

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Message-Id: {199504151655.AA23238-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi barbara,
I tried to post you personally, the mail bounced back. Probable reason for
some lack of response!!

We mixed a known concentration of latex spheres with a known volume of
virus culture. The sample was ultracentrifuged and resusupended with a
known volume of water. Then we mixed well and negative stained the samples.
Determine the counts using a ratio of # latex particles to known
concentration and using this ratio with the particle count.

Understanding that this is going on the assumption that latex spheres and
virus particles will have the same affinity for the formvar grid. (Some
problems will occur if the latex agglutinates.)

In this method, both a general ideal of concentration is reached, and the
size can be determined by comparison with the latex particle. A back up to
measuring the particle on a negative.

I've done this about 2X for researchers.

Good luck,
Lou Ann

***************************
Lou Ann Miller
Microscopic Imaging Lab
College of Vet. Medicine
University of Illinois
2001 S Lincoln Ave
Urbana,Illinois 61801
217-244-1566
lmiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:54:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: looking for an old book

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From: Arthur_Strange-at-mail.magic.ca
Date: Sun, 16 Apr 1995 10:41:24 EST
Subject: Re: Looking for a old book

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Hi Debbie; Re: "MICROCOSMOS" BY Jeremy Burgess , Michael Marten and
Rosemary Taylor.
This was First published in 1987 by Cambridge University Press and in 1990
republished under the tile of "UNDER THE MICROSCOPE'.

I see that you live in Peterborough you should be able to find it at The
Worlds Biggest Bookstore in Toronto, I saw it there some time last year.

Another source for the book where they have copies of both editions listed
is:

SAVONA BOOKS
9 Wilton Road,
Hornsea,
North Humberside,
HU18 - 1QU
England UK

The current catalogue lists the 1987 edition at 27 pounds sterling, and the
1990 edition at 15 pounds sterling.

For general interest to all on the list, SAVONA BOOKS has an extensive
catalogue, some fifty pages long with as many topic areas of rare, old,
and new books on microscopy and related subjects. I have had a number of
books from them and they all arrive safely on this side of the pond.

Happy reading,

Arthur





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:55:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Viral Particle Counting

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From: Joseph P. Neilly 708-938-5024 :      NEILLY.JOSEPH-at-igate.abbott.com
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 08:50:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re:Viral Particle Counting

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Mr-Received: by mta RANDB; Relayed; Mon, 17 Apr 1995 09:16:22 -0600
Mr-Received: by mta MCM$RAND; Relayed; Mon, 17 Apr 1995 09:16:25 -0600
Mr-Received: by mta RANDC; Relayed; Mon, 17 Apr 1995 09:16:40 -0600
Alternate-Recipient: prohibited
Disclose-Recipients: prohibited
Content-Return: prohibited

Barbara Hartman asked for a technique for viral particle counting in the
TEM. We routinely use a direct sedimentation/negative staining method
for doing particle counts (see Miller M.F. and Rdzoc E.J., Proc. 39th
Ann. Mtg. EMSA, p. 404 (1981) and Miller M.F., Proc. 37th Ann. Mtg.
EMSA, p. 404 (1979)). This technique uses a Beckman Airfuge and a
specially designed rotor (Model EM90) which produces uniform
sedimentation across the grid, a potential source of error with some
rotor designs. It is relatively easy to do if you have an airfuge and
rotor. Hope this helps.

Joe Neilly
Abbott Laboratories
North Chicago, IL 60064
709-938-5024
E-mail: Joseph.neilly-at-abbott.com






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 15:47:25 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: RE-TechBooks Addr

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From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 17 Apr 1995 14:31:17 -0400
Subject: RE-TechBooks Addr

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Message-ID: {n1413993084.2966-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

Subject: Time: 2:27 PM
OFFICE MEMO RE:TechBooks Addr Date: 4/17/95

On two occasions TechBooks have produced copies of out-of-print books for me,
and have done a truly high quality job of it. The phone number I have for
them is 800-767-1518.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 15:48:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM Disc Grinder

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 15:54:11 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Another old TEM available

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 17 Apr 1995 08:59:28 -0700
Subject: Another old TEM available

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Message-ID: {n1414013206.5297-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 7:57 AM
OFFICE MEMO Another old TEM available Date: 4/17/95

Philips 200 at UC Berkeley, has not run in two years.

Contact: Prof. Ed Sylvester at (510) 642-7353 or Ethel Nakamura in Wellman
Hall at (510) 642-1603 for details.
Some funds available for moving, Ask Ed.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 15:46:53 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Residual Gas Analyzer

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From: minter-at-Kodak.COM (John Minter)
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 14:08:06 -0500
Subject: Re: Residual Gas Analyzer

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X-Sender: minter-at-halide.kodak.com
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John Fournelle wrote:

} I would be interested in hearing experiences/suggestions folks have
} with Residual Gas Analyzers on their electron microscopes (specifics
} please). (I have a Cameca SX50/51 electron microprobe that I am thinking
} about installing one on.)

We have a Spectra VacScan Model 100 RGA permanently attached to
our Philips CM-20 that is used primarily for cryoTEM. The ability
to measure the partial pressure of contaminants (especially water
vapor) makes it easy to track down problems. We bought this through
Philips when we bought the microscope. We chose this one because it
is the model they send to their service engineers when they need one.
Our service engineer really like having this as a diagnostic tool.
Given the high price most of us pay for our microscopes, I can't understand
why more labs don't have this accessory that costs less than $10k.

Best Regards,
John

John R. Minter, Ph. D. Phone: (716) 722-3407
Eastman Kodak Company FAX: (716) 477-3029
Analytical Technology Division email: minter-at- kodak.com
Rochester, NY 14562-3712






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:56:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: viral particle counting

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From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:35:53 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: VIRAL PARTICLE COUNTING

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Dear Barbara,

I have preformed many many viral particle counts, mainly with enteric virus.
The few references I have concerning particle counting are as follows:


Kinetic Attachment Method:

1) Sharp, D.G., 1974 Procedings of 32nd Annual Meeting of EMSA. Clayton's
Publishing Division, p. 264-265

This methods describes using Al coated grids to allow virus to settle
out onto the grids.


Pseudoreplication Method:

2) Smith,K.O. and Benyesh-Melnick,M., 1961 Proc. Soc. Exptl. Biol. 107:409-413.

3) Smith,K.O. and Melnick,J.L., 1962 J. Immunol. 89:279-284.

4) Smith,K.O. and Melnick,J.L., 1962 Virology 17:480-490

5) McCombs,R.M., Benyesh-Melnick,M. and Brunschwig,J.P., 1966 J. Bacteriol
91:803-812.

6) Benyesh-Melnick,M., et al 1966 J. Bacteriol. 92:1555-1561

The first method works vewry well with highly purified preps while the second
method is great for cell culture supernatants, lysates or stool specimens.
The first method is much more accurate and precise while the second is for
good ball park estimations.

The one comment that I saw on the microscopy listserver about adding latex
spheres to the viral prep and counting virus/spheres in my opinion is not a
good suggestion only because of the different diffusion/settling constants
between virus and spheres.

One comment on the counts obtained. You will probably be counting all viral
particles and not just infectious ones, sokeep this in mind.

Good Luck,
Ed Calomeni
Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, OH
emlab-at-opus.mco.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 15:53:36 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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From: modum-at-Gatan.com (Michael Odum)
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 10:09:12 -0700
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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Message-Id: {199504171607.JAA06923-at-core.gatan.com}

Hello,

I think that you are having trouble with the G1 epoxy for one or two
reasons. First the epoxy is not bonding because the sapphire is not clean.
When I make cross-sections I always use a cotton swab and a little acetone
to clean my wafers right before putting them into a stack. Even if I have
cleaned them previously.

The second reason may be that the G1 is being mixed wrong. It needs to
be measured by weight in a 10:1, epoxy-to-hardener ratio. The 10 drops/1
drop instructions on the lid of the cross-sectioning kit have misled a lot
of people. It is something that should have been fixed in the packaging
long ago, and I am sorry if it has confused you.

If you are still having problems after this I would suggest getting a
new batch of epoxy. It is possible that the epoxy is too old, or has been
stored in an enviroment not suitable for long-term sitting.

Please feel free to contact me or, Dr. Alani, if you have an other questions.
Thanx.

Michael W. Odum
Gatan, Inc.
6678 Owens Dr.
Pleasanton, CA 94588
Tel: 510-463-0200
Fax: 510-463-0204
E-Mail: modum-at-gatan.com

Reza Alani
E-Mail: ralani-at-gatan.com



} Does anybody know a method of mounting sapphire to make cross-
} sections for TEM ?
}
} We have used the GATAN G1 EPOXY glue whitout success.
}
} We know a lot of methods to prepare cross-section specimens. We are
} able to prepare samples in plane without difficulty and cross-sections with
} different materials but sapphire.
}
} It seems it would be the adhesion of the glue on sapphire which is the
} problem with our cross-section samples. Any idea on the type of glue that
} should be used.
}
} Thank you.
} Georges Veilleux
} Researcher
} INRS-Energie et materiaux
} C.P. 1020
} Varennes, Qc
} Canada
} J3X 1S2
} Tel.: (514) 929-8110
} Fax: (514) 929-8102





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 1995 11:55:57 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: OsO4

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From: SUSAN R. SESACK :      SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu
Date: Sun, 16 Apr 1995 12:17:10 EDT
Subject: Re: OsO4 Oxidation

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} Date: Fri, 14 Apr 1995 20:51:14 -0500 (CDT)
} From: "Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab." {ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}
} To: MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} Subject: OsO4 Oxidation

} From: SMTP%"GVKM07A-at-mail.prodigy.com" 14-APR-1995 03:25:23.55
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: Fwd: OsO4 'oxidation'
}
} I would like to respond as follows:
}
} The valence state of Os in the tetroxide is presumed to be +8.
}
} As the valence state is reduced to lower valence states there is a
} whole series of color changes, and by the time it gets to +2, the color
} is black.
}
} When one has a vial that has started to turn brown, more likely than
} not, it is not a unique valence state but a mixture of valence states,
} or some purists might say a distribution of valence states and
} continues to become more and more black in color as the extent of
} reduction proceeds further.
}
} At that point, in the ampoule, the change is irreversible and there is
} nothing anyone can do to reverse that change (without breaking open the
} ampoule) and doing actual chemistry to reverse the reactions..
}
} Here are some options to discarding the spoiled (for some applications)
} ampoules::
}
} 1] Some people could still make use of the aqueous osmium , for
} example, those doing vapor phase staining of rubber modified polymers.
} For such work, it does not really matter that much whether the solution
} is "100% active" or not. It is the vapors that count. This might not
} be true for everyone but at least it is one reason why you need not
} automatically think of sending it off to some kind of hazardous waste
} container. I would imagine there would be student uses for the "brown"
} osmium product as well.
}
} 2] If you absolutely have no use for it and if you have some quantity
} of ampoules, the osmium can be recycled. Or even if you don't have a
} whole lot, we can still combine it with other ampoules and recycle the
} reduced osmium. Contact me by e-mail if you wanted to explore that
} option. Osmium is a non-renewable resource and we should try to
} preserve it. The osmium you would send back might not have any real
} economic value in the sense that you would get anything back for it,
} but it is usually a lower cost alternative relative to the cost of
} disposing of it as a hazardous waste.
}
} Charles A. Garber
} SPI Supplies
} PO Box 656
} West Chester, PA 19380
}
} Ph: 1-(610) 436-5400 FAX:1-(610) 436-5755
}
} e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com.

Dr. Garber,

I had no idea that you could recycle osmium or that is was a
non-renewable resource. I suppose I could have figured this out but
never thought about it. We collect the osmium that we use to fix
tissue sections in waste containers and have them picked up when
they're full. We also occasionally discard osmium that we've diluted
with phosphate buffer once it gets beyond a certain age. Are you
only interested in recycling un-opened ampoules, or are these other
forms also of value? The jug of waste osmium eventuall turns
completely to a black solid in a clear liquid. I don't care about
getting any money back. My only monitary concern is the cost of
hazardous chemical shipment. Please let me know whether it would be
worth my initiating a recycling policy in my lab. Thanks.

S.
sesack-at-bns.pitt.edu
Susan R. Sesack
Dept. Neuroscience
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:07:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Residual Gas Analyser

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:08:36 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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From: {ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 4-17-95 2:02pm
Subject: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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Message-Id: {9504171927.AA04601-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: gluing sapphire
Orig-Author: {"Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab."
{ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV} }:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------



From: AlliedHT-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 1995 03:43:15 -0400
Subject: Re: gluing sapphire

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Try using LocTite 460 glue. It seems to be the highest quality super glue on
the market. You must buy it through a distributor. You can contact me for
that information.

Gary Liechty
310-635-2466






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:16:03 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Univ of Nebrasaka EM Lab

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From: tvoiles-at-unlinfo.unl.edu (Todd Voiles)
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 10:00:04 -0400
Subject: Univ of Nebrasaka EM Lab

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Message-Id: {9504181500.AA02970-at-unlinfo.unl.edu}
X-Sender: tvoiles-at-129.93.1.11
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Hi,


I'd just like to inform all those persons from the U of Nebraska that
happen to be on this list that the EM Lab is starting a "newsletter" of
sorts and an electronic scheduling system. Please send me a
note - tvoiles-at-unlinfo.unl.edu- if you wish further information.

Center for Materials Research and Analysis
Central Facility for Electron Microscopy
University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Todd Voiles
tvoiles-at-unlinfo.unl.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 10:26:51 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Sources for RGA's

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From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 18 Apr 1995 12:14:02 -0400
Subject: RE-Sources for RGAs

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Message-ID: {n1413915191.89693-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

Subject: Time: 12:08 PM
OFFICE MEMO RE:Sources for RGAs Date: 4/18/95

When I was finishing up my book on Vacuum Methods I made a survey of the
sources of RGAs and found more than a dozen companies sell them (probably not
all are manufacturers, however). These are listed in Appendix 2, p. 468, and
their addresses are given in Appendix 3. There is also a discussion of the
functioning of RGAs and some interesting examples of their application to
problems in EM in Section 3.4.1, p. 114.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:14:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Residual Gas Analysis

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From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 10:11:00 +0000
Subject: Residual Gas Analysis

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Message-Id: {sf938fea.041-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

Residual Gas Analysis - I missed the original John Fournelle message but
caught the John Minter reply.

I spent some time in the mid-80's using an Anavac-2 mass spectrometer
from VG Gas Analysis, Cheshire, UK. This was mounted on both a JEOL
35C SEM and a JEOL 200CX STEM (obviously not simultaneously!).

The system was amazingly sensitive and showed rise and fall of
hydrocarbons as the pumping system liquid nitrogen traps were filled and
later emptied, or when specimen-area anti-contaminators were cooled or
warmed. We actually wanted to monitor water vapour in cryo-setups, and
in this regard it was again very useful.

A small paper was published in the now defunct Austrian joournal
Mikroskopie (Wien) 42: 196-205 by KP Ryan, DH Purse & JW Wood titled:
Cryo-stage performance and observation of freeze-drying in a scanning
electron microscope. It shows a few graphs of water vaour partial pressure
in various ways. Those were the days!

The instrument was very useful also for tracing vacuum leaks, tune it for
helium (by letting some in via the airlock) and then probe around the
column with a fine jet from a hypodermic needle or something similar. Mail
again if I can be of further help - although it is now receding in the past!
Good luck. Keith Ryan





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 12:08:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Microtome for Bone

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 18 Apr 95 13:46:43 EDT
Subject: Microtome for Bones

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While I do not know of any microtomes such as what you mentioned, we do produce
a line of cutting and polishing equipment that is ideally suited for
undecalcified bone. We produce diamond wheel saws and diamond band saws that
are used extensively for this purpose.

If you would like more detailed information, please contact me either by e-mail
or at:

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233 (toll free in USA)
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 12:09:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Technician Position

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 12:35:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Disk Grinder

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:12:32 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Looking for old books

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From: morten.laane-at-bio.uio.no (Morten M. Laane)
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 08:59:32 +0100
Subject: Re: Looking for a old book

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Message-Id: {199504180745.JAA19168-at-darwin.uio.no}
Mime-Version: 1.0
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

} Date: Thu, 13 Apr 1995 15:06:11 -0400 (EDT)
} From: DLIETZ-at-TrentU.ca
} Subject: books for sale
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Message-id: {01HPALSGL9E400DE1O-at-TRENTU.CA}
} X-VMS-To: IN%"microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov"
} MIME-version: 1.0
} Content-type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=3DUS-ASCII
} Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT
}
} Recently, I had seen a book entitled "MICROCOSMOS" BY Jeremy Burgess ,
} Michael Marten and Rosemary Taylor . The book is now out of print and I'm
} interested in purchasing a second hand book. I work at Trent University
} and often do high school tours for the area. I thought this type of book
} would peek the interests of those students as well as lower year
} university students into the field of microscopy. If anyone would like to
} part with their copy or know where I can purchase a copy please reply. Or
} if there is a title of a more recent edition to the book recently in print
} please forward .
} THANKS DEBBIE

Sir! I have this book in my library. My specimen was bought at the
university book store here called "Akademica" , fax no. 22 85 30 53 , p.o.
Box 84- 0314 Oslo,Norway. As they keep lots of books, there still may be a
copy left. The book is ISBN 0-521-30433-4. and was published in 1987.
That s not so old. We have both the original Hooke s "Micrographia" and
Leeuvwenhookes "Achana Naturae" in two volumes here (1695) and most of what
have been published ever. Sincerely yours Morten M.Laane , Professor of
Biology, University of Oslo.






From: Ian Parkinson :      IPARKINS-at-immuno.imvs.sa.gov.au
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 13:37:22 GMT+1030
Subject:

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Message-Id: {9504190406.AA25707-at-huon.itd.adelaide.edu.au}

UNSUBSCRIBE


Ian Parkinson
Division of Tissue Pathology
Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science
Frome Road
Adelaide
South Australia 5000
Australia.




From: CAROL ANNE COOKE :      cooke-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 10:52:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: subscription

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Please subscribe.





From: CAROL ANNE COOKE :      cooke-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 13:12:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Another test

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Hi,
Would someone please send me a quick message, I'm
trying to test this new subscription. Is there a special
procedure for Macintosh cpu's through welchlink?

Thanks
C. Cooke





From: Peru Laurence :      perul-at-ERE.UMontreal.CA
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 13:18:20 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: asking for informations

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Hello

I heard about your news group from a friend.
I am working with TEM, SEM and microanalysis on biological materials. I
think I should have interesting informations with your list.
How can I subscribe ?

Sincerely

Laurence Peru - Perul-at-ERE.UMontreal.Ca

Laboratory for Electron Microscopy
Faculty of Dental Medicine
Universite de Montreal
2900 Edouard Montpetit
Montreal, QC, Canada - H3C 3J7






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:56:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Lets Try a Restart Again!

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G'day Colleagues

Yes I have seen all your questions as to the
fact your not receiving mail. I once again shut
things down. This time it was due to a major change
in the Email router here at ANL. The new configuration
completely swamped my host here, because, unlike the
old router, when a message was delayed for more than
4 hours the router started sending messages back to
the originator.

I started getting ~ 100 warning messages each day
saying that the mail message to XXXX.YYYY.ZZZZ
was not sent for 4 hours and a new attempt will
be made in another 4 hours..

I'm going to try to restart today and see if the
message problem is cured.

Keep posting your messages to Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
I will intercept each and repost it after a short delay.

Sigh... Nestor






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:58:04 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Ruthenium Red in freeze-sub

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 18:28:21 -0400
Subject: Ruthenium Red in freeze-sub

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Doug,
Ok got your message and I see the problem with DMSO although it would have
been nicer to work with. Please let me know if lunch helped generate any
other ideas. Have you tried the THF yet? Please let me know. I am still
searching for other alternatives and will let you know if something comes up.
Stacie




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:59:53 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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From: Brian G. Demczyk :      demczyk-at-ERXINDY.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 09:55:38 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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Superglue is unstable under the electron beam!!!






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:00:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Unicryl

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:56:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: JEOL Scope For Sale

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From: Larry Hawkey :      hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 15:11:29 -0400
Subject: FOR SALE JEOL 1200 exII TEM

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JEOL 1200exII Conventional TEM (straight TEM with no add-ons). This
instrument is less than five years old, has been under service contract the
entire time, and is in mint condition. It has had limited users and all were
closely supervised. As a result, this machine has had no down time.
For more information, call Larry Hawkey (919-6841-6425) or E-Mail
(hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu)

A real jem of a JEOL.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:57:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Microtome for Bones

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From: South Bay Technology, 73531,1344
Date: 18 Apr 95 14:05:15 EDT
Subject: Microtome for Bones

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---------- Forwarded Message ----------


RE: Copy of: Microtome for Bones

While I do not know of any microtomes such as what you mentioned, we do produce
a line of cutting and polishing equipment that is ideally suited for
undecalcified bone. We produce diamond wheel saws and diamond band saws that
are used extensively for this purpose.

If you would like more detailed information, please contact me either by e-mail
or at:

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233 (toll free in USA)
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:57:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Salaries

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From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 14:28:44 +0500
Subject: EM Salaries

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} To: Microscopy
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: EM Salaries
}
} Hello,
} I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges for
} electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} source I can check? Thank you.
}
} M. Delannoy
}





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:58:29 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 18:43:03 -0400
Subject: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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As we discussed today, there is a pretty interesting paper which is out that
deals with your recent correspondance on the above subject. I have sent you a
reprint of the article entitled "Pro's for a multiple/repeated use and
disposal with recovery of osmium tet. solutions in routine e.m.. This paper
was presented at the 1992 Boston EMSA meeting. It makes for very interesting
reading and gives you a whole lot of alternatives of what to do with the
Osmium. If you have any questions just let me know for I am in contact
constantly with the gentlemen that did the work.
If anyone else is interested in a copy of this protocol please contact me and
I will be more then happy to send you one.
Stacie Kirsch
Electron Microscopy Sciences
215-646-1566




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:59:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: CPD of millipore filters

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From: t.bostrom-at-qut.edu.au (Thor Bostrom)
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 18:54:45 +1000
Subject: CPD of millipore filters

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A staff member here would like to critical point dry millipore filters
containing bacteria and zooplankton for SEM. She is concerned about
losing the fine material, and was wondering if the filters could be
mounted in some special holder in the CPD. Has anyone tried doing this,
and if so, what sort of setup would you need to hold the filters?

Thanks for any suggestions,
Thor

Dr Thor Bostrom
Analytical EM Facility
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia
Ph: 61-7-8642351 FAX: 61-7-8645100





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:00:47 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: BDMA questions

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:01:21 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Tripod Polishing Sapphire for TEM

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 19 Apr 95 15:21:31 EDT
Subject: Tripod Polishing Sapphire for TEM

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Dear Fellow Tripodders-

I am looking for any information I can find concerning Tripod Polishing of
Sapphire. I have spoken to a few people who have had some success, but even
they would like to hear other suggestions. If anyone out there has any
information, please respond to me directly. I'll summarize the responses for
the listserver.

Thank you!

David Henriks
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233 (toll free in USA)
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:01:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: cryo-ultramicrotomy of macrophages

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From: Jaime Dant :      jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 16:01:09 -0500
Subject: cryo-ultramicrotomy of macrophages

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Hello. I am currently having difficulty getting cryo sections of mouse bone
marrow macrophages to stick on grids.

I am using conventional techniques with a dry diamond knife, picking the sections up with sucrose and floating the grids on buffer before further prossing
with immunogold. I have been using this method for some time with different
types of cells and intracellular parisites with no difficulty. My problem
seems to be with just this one cell type...

Any advise from someone in the know?

Thank you.

Jaime A. Dant
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis
jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:02:39 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: microwaving coplin jars

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From: russb-at-xactdata.com (Russell Berkheimer)
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 15:38:25 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: wayward email

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Hi -

My machine serves as an internet Gateway for 'space.com'.
My machine has been receiving email with an incorrectly
specified Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN).

email was addressed to:

jegiles-at-honeywell.space.com

other possible addresses:

...-at-space.honeywell.com {== probable address
...-at-space.lockheed.com

Thanks -



Russ Berkheimer, Chief Engineer | email: russb-at-xactdata.com
XactData Services, Inc. | voice: (206) 382-6618
701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4850 | fax: (206) 382-6615
Seattle, WA 98104




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:57:24 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM Disc Grinder

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 18 Apr 95 14:01:33 EDT
Subject: TEM Disc Grinder

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Patrick-

We produce a wide range of "disc grinders" for TEM and other applications. Our
lapping and polishing fixtures are ideally suited for TEM sample preparation.
In fact, we have a few polishing fixtures that will allow you to transfer the
sample mount from the polishing fixture, to any of our saws and also to our
dimpling instrument.

Our polishing fixtures which are designed specifically for TEM are:

Model 140 $ 785.00
Model 141 395.00

Either of these will allow you to transfer the sample holder as described above.
We also have larger fixtures for holding samples up to 2" in diameter. The
price range on these fixtures is from $345 - $995.

If you would like additional information, please contact me at:

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: 800-728-2233 (toll free in USA)
714-492-2600
FAX: 714-492-1499

Best regards-

David Henriks





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:59:04 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: NItrogen in EDS

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From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 1995 09:29:25 +0100 (BST)
Subject: Re: Nitrogen in EDS

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Message-Id: {9504190829.AA01870-at-zeus.bris.ac.uk}

}
} As a non specialist in EDS I have a question.
} Is it possible that our EDS detector (UTW from EDAX) attached to SEM does not
} "see" nitrogen peak at 0.91 keV (even in AlN and GaN it is hardly visible),
} though at the same time it detects easily very close C and O peaks?
} Leszek Kepinski
}
Leszek,

I don't know where I copied it from, but I wrote in my PhD thesis: "When
operating with the thin window in place, it is not possible to analyse for
nitrogen, as the carbon in the window heavily absorbs the nitrogen x-rays",
meaning the nitrogen x-rays are the right sort of energy to interact with
the carbon in your thin window, and only a few get through to be detected.
I haven't bothered figuring out more precisely what is happening.
Keith






From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 19-APR-1995 10:20:56.45
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:00:24 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:02:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Can Image calc. Shape Factor?

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From: Leo D Frawley 03 5667464 :      FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 12:04:57 +1000
Subject: Can Image calc. Shape Factor?

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MR-Received: by mta VULCAN.MUAS; Relayed; Thu, 20 Apr 1995 12:04:57 +1000
MR-Received: by mta VULCAN; Relayed; Thu, 20 Apr 1995 12:05:10 +1000
Alternate-recipient: prohibited
Disclose-recipients: prohibited
Content-return: prohibited

Has anyone ever used NIH Image to calculate the shape factor of a sessile drop, and if so, how.
Calculation of the shape factor allows the surface tension of the droplet to be determined and requires the
accurate measurement of the radius of curvature on many points of the drop surface.

Thanks in advance.

Leo Frawley B.Sc
Electron Microscopist
BHP Research - Melbourne Labs
AARNet " frawley-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au "





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 9:58:46 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Residual Gas Analysis

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 9:14:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Residual Gas Analysis

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From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 10:11:00 +0000
Subject: Residual Gas Analysis

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Message-Id: {sf938fea.041-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

Residual Gas Analysis - I missed the original John Fournelle message but
caught the John Minter reply.

I spent some time in the mid-80's using an Anavac-2 mass spectrometer
from VG Gas Analysis, Cheshire, UK. This was mounted on both a JEOL
35C SEM and a JEOL 200CX STEM (obviously not simultaneously!).

The system was amazingly sensitive and showed rise and fall of
hydrocarbons as the pumping system liquid nitrogen traps were filled and
later emptied, or when specimen-area anti-contaminators were cooled or
warmed. We actually wanted to monitor water vapour in cryo-setups, and
in this regard it was again very useful.

A small paper was published in the now defunct Austrian joournal
Mikroskopie (Wien) 42: 196-205 by KP Ryan, DH Purse & JW Wood titled:
Cryo-stage performance and observation of freeze-drying in a scanning
electron microscope. It shows a few graphs of water vaour partial pressure
in various ways. Those were the days!

The instrument was very useful also for tracing vacuum leaks, tune it for
helium (by letting some in via the airlock) and then probe around the
column with a fine jet from a hypodermic needle or something similar. Mail
again if I can be of further help - although it is now receding in the past!
Good luck. Keith Ryan





From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 09:34:15 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: EM Salaries

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IOn Thu, 20 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} From: SMTP%"delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu" 18-APR-1995 15:19:23.95
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: EM Salaries
}
} Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 14:28:44 +0500
} Message-Id: {9504181828.AA21435-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} X-Sender: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
} To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: EM Salaries
} X-Mailer: {Windows Eudora Version 1.4.2b16}
} content-length: 291
}
} } To: Microscopy
} } From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} } Subject: EM Salaries
} }
} } Hello,
} } I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges for
} } electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} } source I can check? Thank you.
} }
} } M. Delannoy
} }
} Hi,
Statistics were taken by EMSA several years ago.
I can tell you that salaries are pathetic for techs, at least in my
experience. I just sent a man with 12 years of experience in histo and
EM pathology & research, a recent BS, and MSA Certification , to
Northwestern University for a position in downtown Chicago, and he was
offered $21,000 per year.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 10:19:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Important Notice Read This!!!

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G'day Subscribers;

I've just finished reworking the mailing list.
I have now seperated out each group of users by
country code. This is the LAST message you
will receive using the original mailing list.
As soon as I'm sure that all copies of this message
have been sent out I will be disabling that old
list of subscribers and restarting a new list.

If by Monday AM you DO NOT receive another message
from me called TEST OF NEW LIST, then I have
accidently left your subscription off the reconfigured
list.

Please contact me at that time, at:

Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

so that we can get you back on the system.


The mailing address of the listserver has not changed
it remains:

Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

You may continue to post all your messages to that
address. I will continue to intercept and redirect the
messages to the temporairy lists until I'm sure things
are back to some sense of normal (i.e. minimum errors) operation.

Cheers.. Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.










From: John Warrack-1 :      John_Warrack-1%notes-at-sb.com
Date: 21 Apr 95 17:52:37 EDT
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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Message-Id: {9504211955.AA2171-at-pho018.sb.com}
To: MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC {MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}

Millipore filters can be successfully CPD'd in envelopes made from folded
filter paper, closed with a staple at the open edge. I use Whatman 541 4.25cm
papers routinely with 12mm filters. The sample code can be written on the paper
with pencil, and this mark can then be used to determine the "up" side of the
millipore filter - sometimes the sample is invisible to the eye.

John_Warrack-1%notes-at-sb.com

SmithKline Beecham UK






From: david.bright-at-NIST.GOV (David S. Bright)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 14:17:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: WWW sites

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Anyone have good web sites for microscopy or image processing? The address
and a few words about it - topic, scope, usefulness - would be great.

Thanks
Dave

-------------------------------------------------------------
David S. Bright dbright-at-nist.gov
Microanalysis Research Group
Bldg. 222 (Chem.) A113
National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST, formerly NBS)
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-0001 / USA
301-975-3911 (voice), 301-216-1134 (fax)
"You must have accurate and honest weights and measures, so that you may
live long in the land the Lord your God is giving you.", Deuteronomy 25:15






From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 21-APR-1995 10:19:20.51
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 13:00:11 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Important#2 - from Nestor

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Hi Gang,

Just as I send out this posting the main DNS system
here at ANL crashed. About 1/2 of the sites did not
receive this message. So I apologize if you got
it twice, but for some of you (~ 800-1000) this will be your
first receipt.

Nestor



G'day Subscribers;

I've just finished reworking the mailing list.
I have now seperated out each group of users by
country code. This is the LAST message you
will receive using the original mailing list.
As soon as I'm sure that all copies of this message
have been sent out I will be disabling that old
list of subscribers and restarting a new list.

If by Monday AM you DO NOT receive another message
from me called TEST OF NEW LIST, then I have
accidently left your subscription off the reconfigured
list.

Please contact me at that time, at:

Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

so that we can get you back on the system.


The mailing address of the listserver has not changed
it remains:

Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

You may continue to post all your messages to that
address. I will continue to intercept and redirect the
messages to the temporairy lists until I'm sure things
are back to some sense of normal (i.e. minimum errors) operation.

Cheers.. Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.










From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:02:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Test of New List

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Morning Microscopy Listserver Subscribers:

Here is the test of the new list.
Unless you receive another message from
me there is no need to reply to this message
just trash it.

Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:47:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 11:39:53 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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Message-Id: {v01510101abbc59d98c06-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

}
} Superglue is unstable under the electron beam!!!

Would you explain a little bit what you mean by unstable? Do you mean
drifting specimen, or damage in the beam with release of sludge into the
column? I can learn to deal with some specimen drift for certain
specimens, but I don't want contamination.

Thanks for any input from anyone on the list.


John
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/faculty/chandler.html






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:49:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Microwaving Coplin Jars

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 07:00:46 -0400
Subject: Microwaving Coplin Jars

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Dear Dr. Robertson,
I saw your message on the e-mail regarding the above mentioned subject. From
what we understand you are currently using glass and yes I would agree that
over a short period of time they would begin to crack. With our microwave
and in conjunction with polyethylene coplin jars we have had much success.
The high density polyethylene does not crack nor rupture over many uses.
Our part # is 70319 if you have an interest.
If you have any further questions please do not hesitate to contact us.
Sincerely,
Stacie Kirsch
Electron Microscopy Sciences
P.O.Box 251
Fort Washington, Pa, 19034
Tel:215-646-1566
Fax:215-646-8931




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:49:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: Stephan Helfer :      S.Helfer-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 09:28:59 BST
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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I shouldn't think there are any problems. However, it might be
advisable to freeze dry part of the samples to compare the bacterial
/ plankton population. Filters can be cut up and prepared like thin
plant leaves, marking the top might be advisable [unless you want to
mount them vertically anyhow].
Yours sincerely


Dr Stephan Helfer, SSO
Mycologist

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Inverleith Row, EDINBURGH EH3 5LR,
Scotland UK

email STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
phone: +44 (0)131 552 7171 ext 280
or +44 (0)131 459 0446-280 (direct digital VoiceMail line)
fax: +44 (0)131 552 0382




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:50:45 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 08:51:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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Stacie,

How about posting the title, author(s) and journal of the reference you
mention in your posting of 2ndary use of OsO4.
Thanks,

Ed Calomeni
Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, OH
EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:51:08 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Osmium Tetro. Protocol req.

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 06:22:51 -0400
Subject: Osmium Tetro. Protocol req.

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To all that has requested a copy of the protocol that I mentioned in my
E-Mail message regarding the recycling of osmium please note that I have
mailed to each of you a copy of the complete protocol.
If anyone has questions please do not hesitate to contact me.
Sincerely
Stacie Kirsch
Electron Microscopy Sciences
P.O.Box 251
Fort washington, Pa 19034
Tel: 215-646-1566
Fax:215-646-8931




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:51:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Salary Surveys

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:51:54 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: microwaving coplin jars

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From: :      MELLIOTT-at-prl.pulmonary.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 06:53:48 +0800PST
Subject: microwaving coplin jars

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T. Robertson was asking about microwaving coplin jars. The answer is
not to use glass coplin jars as they do indeed tend to break. Use
plastic coplin jars available from a variety of scources. Any
reference I have seen says to use the plastic ones. We obtained ours
from either Fischer Scientific, or from Baxter-Canlab (now VWR-Canlab
) and have had no problems with them.

Yours,
Mark Elliott, PhD
UBC-Pulmonary Research Lab
Vancouver, Canada




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:48:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: grey levels - film vs digital

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From: tphillips-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tom Phillips)
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 1995 12:12:08 -0500
Subject: grey levels - film vs digital

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Krivanek and Mooney (Ultramicroscopy 49:95-108, 1993) state "However,
whereas each pixel of the SSC (slow scan CCD) is capable of faithfully
capturing an intensity between 0 and 2(to the 14th power), each pixel of
film can capture only a few gray levels (roughly equivalent to the number
of silver grains that can fit into the area of one pixel without
overlapping)". Buonaquisti (Microscopy Today 95(1):12-13, 1995) states
film "is an anlog process and, as such, one can argue that sheet film has
an infinite gray scale resolution". Can anyone comment on this? I have
always thought more along Krivanek and Mooney's reasoning. Does anyone
know the number of grey levels film can capture? Thanks for any comments.


Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(314)-882-4712 (voice)
(314)-882-0123 (fax)






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:49:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: CPD of Millipore membrane filters

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From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 02:35:23 EDT
Subject: CPD of Millipore membrane filters

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This is in response to posting from Dr. Thor Bostrom on April 20:

There is an easy solution:

We have been making for some years a product called "Microporous
Specimen Capsules". The original product had a pore size range of 120-
200 um, and is our part SPI #13215 and has overall dimensions of 10 mm
x 10 mm. However, you will have to cut out a small piece of the
membrane filter prior to insertion of the piece into the capsule.

We have a second product, exactly like the first, but with a pore size
of 78um which should be used if the features on the membrane at that
small.

We expect to have available yet a third product, just like the other
two, but with pore size on the order of 30 um.

Charles A. Garber
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES
PO BOX 656
WEST CHESTER, PA 19380

Ph: (610) 436-5400
(800) 2424-SPI

FAX:(610) 436-5755

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:52:09 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: BDMA

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 06:34:54 -0400
Subject: BDMA

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Dear Karen,
I saw your message and I do have quite a bit of experience of uses with BDMA
and I have spoken for quite a few years with Audrey and alot of my customers
now do use BDMA in place of DMP-30 with great success. Please note the
following:
BDMA is less viscous than DMP-30,has a longer shelf life, and offers better
penetration of the tissue. In order to achieve the optimum results my
customers have all told me that when they use DMp the percentage is at 1.5-2%
final volume and with the BDMA it needs to be 2.5-3%. No greater than 3
however. One should warm the resin and the anhydride prior to mixing and as
well it would be beneficial to warm the stirring rod and the containers which
will be used for mixing.You should make up the lot fresh however many of my
customers has informed me that they have been storing the mixture at 4
degrees C in a bottle with a well fitting tight cap for several weeks and
have never experienced any difficulties and have achieved fine results. It
should be noted that if this is the avenue you will take prior to use the
mixture must be allowed to reach room temperature.
If you would like to delve deeper into this subject please just let me know.
I hope this gives you some info you were looking for.
Stacie Kirsch
Electron Microscopy Sciences
P.O.Box 251
Fort Washington, Pa. 19034
Tel:215-646-1566
Fax:215-646-8931




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:52:40 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: RE: microwaving coplin jars

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From: M.V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 09:31:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: RE: microwaving coplin jars

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

In message Thu, 20 Apr 1995 10:02:39 -0500 (CDT),
"Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab." {ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV} writes:

} From: SMTP%"TROBERTS-at-eosin.path.uwa.edu.au" 19-APR-1995 22:49:39.09
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: microwaving coplin jars
}
***************

I don't know about coplin jars, but PARR INSTRUMENT COMPANY, 211 53rd St.,
Moline, IL 61265-1770 (Tel: 309 762-7716; Fax: 309-762-9453) sells microwave
acid digestion vessels that can be used for LM & EM mivrowave fixation. The
vessels are designed to provide complete containment of volatiles and stand
pressures up to 1200 psi and temperatures up to 250 C. Hope this helps.

*************************************************************************
M.V. Parthasarathy
Professor of Plant Biology & Director, EM Facility
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850
Telephone: (607) 255-1734
Fax: (607) 255-5407
E-mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
***********************************************************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:50:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Salaries

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From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 09:34:15 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: EM Salaries

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IOn Thu, 20 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} From: SMTP%"delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu" 18-APR-1995 15:19:23.95
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: EM Salaries
}
} Date: Tue, 18 Apr 1995 14:28:44 +0500
} Message-Id: {9504181828.AA21435-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
} X-Sender: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
} To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} Subject: EM Salaries
} X-Mailer: {Windows Eudora Version 1.4.2b16}
} content-length: 291
}
} } To: Microscopy
} } From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy)
} } Subject: EM Salaries
} }
} } Hello,
} } I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges for
} } electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} } source I can check? Thank you.
} }
} } M. Delannoy
} }
} Hi,
Statistics were taken by EMSA several years ago.
I can tell you that salaries are pathetic for techs, at least in my
experience. I just sent a man with 12 years of experience in histo and
EM pathology & research, a recent BS, and MSA Certification , to
Northwestern University for a position in downtown Chicago, and he was
offered $21,000 per year.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:53:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Unicryl

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From: Luc Analbers :      L.J.S.Analbers-at-med.ruu.nl
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 11:35:54 +0200
Subject: Re: Unicryl

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Hello Karen,

Always be carefull with using stuff like Unicryl or Lowicryl. If possible use
a fumehood. Otherwise (like we do) wear a full-face gas-mask with an apropriate
filter. Use the filter only once (every experiment).

I tried Unicryl, but after lots of disapointments we skipped to Lowicryl HM20.
(we used the plastic for immunno Electron Microscopy).
Do you get good results with Unicryl? If so, please let me know.

Bye.


Luc Analbers


***************************************************************************
* Luc Analbers * E-mail: Analbers-at-med.ruu.nl *
***************************************************************************
* Utrecht University * LLL *
* Medical Faculty * LLL *
* Dept. Medical Physiology & * LLL A *
* Sportsmedicine * LLL AA AA *
* PO-box 80043 * LLL AA AA *
* Zip: 3508 TA * LLLLLAAALLLAAALLL *
* Utrecht The Netherlands * LLLLLAAALLLAAALLLL *
* Tel: 030 - 538911 * AAA AAA *
* Fax: 030 - 539036 * AAA AAA *
***************************************************************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:37:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Millipore filters

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From: W.L. Steffens :      STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 11:01:14 EST
Subject: Millipore filters

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To Thor Bostrom,

Be very certain that your Millipore filters are of the polycarbonate type
and NOT nitrocellulose, as these will not survive the CPD. The problem
with the polycarbonate filters though, is that they tend to roll up into
tight tubes when dried. To hold them in place during CPD, I cut them into
grid-sized pieces and clamp them between a 50 mesh folding (oyster) grid.
Several of these can then be mounted on a single stub.

Hope this helps.

-=W.L. Steffens=-
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Georgia




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:41:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: John Warrack-1 :      John_Warrack-1%notes-at-sb.com
Date: 21 Apr 95 17:52:37 EDT
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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Message-Id: {9504211955.AA2171-at-pho018.sb.com}
To: MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC {MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}

Millipore filters can be successfully CPD'd in envelopes made from folded
filter paper, closed with a staple at the open edge. I use Whatman 541 4.25cm
papers routinely with 12mm filters. The sample code can be written on the paper
with pencil, and this mark can then be used to determine the "up" side of the
millipore filter - sometimes the sample is invisible to the eye.

John_Warrack-1%notes-at-sb.com

SmithKline Beecham UK






From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 21-APR-1995 13:45:56.22
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:43:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Need virus Pictures

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From: Joyce Craig :      bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 09:49:39 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: virus

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We have 50 fifth graders from Hammond Indiana coming to visit in May.
They have been in a special science program and all want to see viruses
in the TEM. Unfortunately, I have never worked with viruses. Does
anyone have any ideas I could use? I have a JEOL 1200 TEMSCAN
which is capable of visualizing them, but have to do a prep of some
sort. Fortunately I have a CRT & also a computer with a program so they
can see on either CRT & don't have to rely on the green screen.
Thanks from Joyce at Chicago State University.
.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:44:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Polishing Sapphire

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 21 Apr 95 17:51:45 EDT
Subject: Polishing Sapphire

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I posted a message earlier for information on polishing sapphire for TEM. I'd
now like to expand that to get any information at all on polishing sapphire.
Ideal information would be suggested sample load, wheel speed, abrasive type
etc. I've received several bits of information - naturally, it all conflicts to
some degree. Perhaps if I get enough information, I can make a reasonable
conclusion.

Thanks for your help!

David Henriks TEL: 800-728-2233
South Bay Technology, Inc. 714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: 714-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 e-mail: 75431.1344-at-compuserve.com






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:40:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: info on EM Salaries

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From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 11:04:41 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: info on EM Salaries

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I run the day to day operations of the confocal microscopy/ video
microscopy/ computer image analysis lab. I am the lowest rank faculty.
My salary began at $26.5k in 1992 and is up to $32.5 now. To keep the
Facility going, I work, on average, 9 hour days. We are in New York City.
My salary feels low for the area. In another part of the country, this
might be more comfortable.

You could try writing to macaluso-at-aecom.yu.edu to find out about the EM
facility here.

Please do not post on the bboard.

-----------------------------------------------
} } I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges
for } } electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} } source I can check? Thank you.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:42:32 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 12:08:02 -0700
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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Message-Id: {v01510102abbdaacb97c6-at-[129.82.126.28]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

} Millipore filters can be successfully CPD'd in envelopes made from folded
} filter paper, closed with a staple at the open edge. I use Whatman 541 4.25cm
} papers routinely with 12mm filters. The sample code can be written on the
} paper
} with pencil, and this mark can then be used to determine the "up" side of the
} millipore filter - sometimes the sample is invisible to the eye.
}
} John_Warrack-1%notes-at-sb.com
}
} SmithKline Beecham UK

One way we handle specimens like this for CPD is to sandwich them between
two ring magnets. The thickness of the magnets protects the specimen.

The magnets are 1/2 inch diameter, 1/8 inch thick, with a 1/4 inch center
hole. They are in the Edmond Scientific catalog as stock number D41,990.
A pack of 25 was $5 in 1993.

Hope this helps.


John
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
http://www.vetmed.colostate.edu/anatomy/faculty/chandler.html






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:43:38 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Alternates to D-19

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From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 15:01:27 -0500
Subject: Alternates to D-19

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X-Sender: t456b15-at-rds163
Message-Id: {v01510102abbdbeec0db8-at-[163.243.13.93]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi everyone!

We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
less time preparing to develop.

Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
better or equivalent film than 4489?


Thanks for your input.


Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
142 Goodyear Blvd
Akron, OH 44305
U.S.A.









From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:44:44 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:45:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 22 Apr 1995 9:49:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: CPD of Millipore membrane filters

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From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 02:35:23 EDT
Subject: CPD of Millipore membrane filters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This is in response to posting from Dr. Thor Bostrom on April 20:

There is an easy solution:

We have been making for some years a product called "Microporous
Specimen Capsules". The original product had a pore size range of 120-
200 um, and is our part SPI #13215 and has overall dimensions of 10 mm
x 10 mm. However, you will have to cut out a small piece of the
membrane filter prior to insertion of the piece into the capsule.

We have a second product, exactly like the first, but with a pore size
of 78um which should be used if the features on the membrane at that
small.

We expect to have available yet a third product, just like the other
two, but with pore size on the order of 30 um.

Charles A. Garber
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES
PO BOX 656
WEST CHESTER, PA 19380

Ph: (610) 436-5400
(800) 2424-SPI

FAX:(610) 436-5755

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com





From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 23-APR-1995 07:35:56.63
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:38:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 08:43:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 08:43:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: osmium tetroxide oxidation

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I would like to have this information please.
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 23-APR-1995 07:36:16.25
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:39:03 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 08:47:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Greg Erdos)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 08:47:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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What we have done is to put two filter face to face and hold them
together using the cap of a BEEM capsule that has had a large hole punched
in it with a cork borer and a ring cut from the top of the capsule that will
fit inside the cap.

SO it goes cap, then two filters, then the ring on top and push
them together. Something like an embroidery hoop/
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
Greg Erdos Phone: 904-392-1295
Scientific Director, ICBR EMCL
218 Carr Hall Fax 904-846-0251
University of Florida E-mail: gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Gainesville, FL 32611





From: ANLAEM::ZALUZEC Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. 23-APR-1995 07:36:35.03
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:39:27 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 10:52:47 -0400
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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Good Morning Dr. Bostrom,
In reply to your question about handling millipore filters containing
bacteria and zooplankton for SEM, we do this sort of thing by covering the
filter containing the sample with a spacer (which comes packaged between the
filters) and sandwich that between two washers which are held together with
small alligator clamps. Be sure when you purchase the washers that they are
made of a material which will not rust. I'm not sure what the ones I use
are made of....perhaps stainless or aluminum. I took them to a trophy shop
and had numbers engraved on them to help with sample identification.
I hope this is helpful.
Sandra Zane






From: sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu (Sandra F. Zane)
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 10:52:47 -0400
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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Sandra F. Zane, EM Tech.
Biol. Dept. UNCC
Charlotte, NC 28223
sfzane-at-unccvm.uncc.edu
Fax (704) 547-3128





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 15:05:08 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Loctite 460 super glue

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 15:09:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Curling of membrane filters

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From: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com (DR CHARLES A GARBER)
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 15:26:43 EDT
Subject: Curling of membrane filters

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W.L. Steffens and Thor Bostrom:

If the curling of membrane filters is a problem, then try using our
silver membrane filter product, exactly like the polymer membrane (e.g.
MCE) product in structure but made out of pure silver. Any curling is
very slight and the bonus is that what ever conductive layer is
eventually applied can be much less (maybe no conductive coating at all
in fact) because of the inherent conductivity of the substrate. The
aluminum oxide membrane filters are even stiffer, but are not
conductive, but the pores are the smallest available in any membrane
filter product (e.g. 20 nm). These are on pages 53 and 54 of our SPI
Supplies 1991 SourceBook (catalog) of products for the EM laboratory.
E-mail me if you need a copy.

Charles A. Garber
PRESIDENT
SPI SUPPLIES
PO BOX 656
WEST CHESTER, PA 19380

Ph: (800) 2424-SPI
FAX:(610) 436-5755

e-mail: GVKM07A-at-prodigy.com
or
sp-supp-at-cerf.com [April 25 to May 3 when I am abroad]





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 15:10:44 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: grey levels - film vs digital

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From: em-at-mediacity.com (E. Monberg)
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 13:20:25 -0800
Subject: grey levels - film vs digital

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Message-Id: {m0s385J-000rc2C-at-easynet.com}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


= 8 x 10E3 THAT is a HOT CCD !

I seem to recollect this as a kind of wondrous
upper limit, How many charges
fit in a charge bucket vs the noise floor?
Is the underlying question.

Candlelight to direct sun ratio is about 10E6

} each pixel of
} film can capture only a few gray levels
} (roughly equivalent to the number of silver grains

THE GRAINS ARE NOT ALL THE SAME SIZE - - -

} that can fit into the area of one pixel without
} overlapping)". Buonaquisti (Microscopy Today 95(1):12-13, 1995) states
} film "is an anlog process and, as such, one can argue that sheet film has
} an infinite gray scale resolution". Can anyone comment on this? I have
} always thought more along Krivanek and Mooney's reasoning. Does anyone
} know the number of grey levels film can capture? Thanks for any comments.
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} (314)-882-4712 (voice)
} (314)-882-0123 (fax)




Regards,

Ed M.

Ed Monberg, General Manager
Laser Motion and Development Co.
3101 Whipple Road
Union City, CA 94587-1216
510-429-1060, FAX 429-1065
em-at-mediacity.com






From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 22:12:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: info on EM Salaries

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On Sun, 23 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} From: SMTP%"cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu" 21-APR-1995 09:19:28.20
} To: ZALUZEC
} CC:
} Subj: info on EM Salaries
}
} Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 11:04:41 -0400 (EDT)
} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} Subject: info on EM Salaries
} To: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} In-Reply-To: {950420095748.1cc-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}
} Message-Id: {Pine.3.07.9504211140.A20241-a100000-at-alsys1}
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
}
} To keep the
} Facility going, I work, on average, 9 hour days.

As I sit here on a Sunday night noticing that my reply was posted here, I
would like to clarify or revise. Nine hour days was a glib comment. This
means coming in at 9:30 and leaving at 7:00 with a break merely for lunch
if nobody walks in demanding help. And this does not include
administrative paperwork which must be prepared on weekend evenings when
interruptions are less likely. I'm not complaining and, in fact, I love
being constantly challenged with interesting projects; I'm merely
clarifying the pay scale.


} -----------------------------------------------
} } } I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges
} for } } electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} } } source I can check? Thank you.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 8:45:57 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Salaries....

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From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 22:12:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: info on EM Salaries

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On Sun, 23 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} From: SMTP%"cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu" 21-APR-1995 09:19:28.20
} To: ZALUZEC
} CC:
} Subj: info on EM Salaries
}
} Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 11:04:41 -0400 (EDT)
} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} Subject: info on EM Salaries
} To: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} In-Reply-To: {950420095748.1cc-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}
} Message-Id: {Pine.3.07.9504211140.A20241-a100000-at-alsys1}
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
}
} To keep the
} Facility going, I work, on average, 9 hour days.

As I sit here on a Sunday night noticing that my reply was posted here, I
would like to clarify or revise. Nine hour days was a glib comment. This
means coming in at 9:30 and leaving at 7:00 with a break merely for lunch
if nobody walks in demanding help. And this does not include
administrative paperwork which must be prepared on weekend evenings when
interruptions are less likely. I'm not complaining and, in fact, I love
being constantly challenged with interesting projects; I'm merely
clarifying the pay scale.


} -----------------------------------------------
} } } I'm trying to get some information on salary ranges
} for } } electron microscopists and EM core facility managers. Is there a
} } } source I can check? Thank you.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 8:58:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: RE: Alternates to D-19

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From: bob-at-befvax.uchicago.edu
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 16:32:51 EDT
Subject: RE: Alternates to D-19

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How about making up a LARGE volume of D19 (say 10 gallons or more) and storing
them in brown bottles. It will be cheaper than buying liquid developer
and the D19 will last a long time if the bottles are filled and capped.


Bob Josephs
Univ of Chicago

312 702 1077





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:06:28 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: osmium update

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From: SGKCCK-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 05:00:33 -0400
Subject: osmium update

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Dear Ed,
Here is The infor you requested. If you can not find it let me know for I
will send you a copy: To all others that have requested a copy they have all
been send and posted today.
50th anniversary Meeting of EMSA proceedings, Boston.
Author: W.H. Muss
Let me know if you need anything else.
Sincerely
Stacie Kirsch
Electron Microscopy Sciences




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:07:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: CPD of millipore filters

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From: Microbill-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 06:59:06 -0400
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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I used to CPD millipore filters with diatoms and found that there was little
loss if the filters were simply a sandwich of two filters. The filters
become very brittle after CPDing. If you decide to freeze dry the samples be
sure to so from water free of buffers or salt or you will find all sorts of
strange crystals.
Good Luck.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:01:51 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Looking for a SEM atlas in biomedicine

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From: Bilge Hakan Sen :      SEN-at-dishekimligi.ege.edu.tr
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 10:08:32 TUR+2
Subject: Looking for a SEM atlas in biomedicine

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Anybody knows a SEM book related to techniques and pictures related
to dentistry and medicine?

______________________________
Bilge Hakan SEN, DDS, PhD
Ege Universitesi
Dishekimligi Fak.
Bornova/Izmir/Turkiye 35100

Tel. 90 232 3880328 (Work)
90 232 2390467 (Home)
Fax. 90 232 3880325




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:07:44 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: dissolving solvent?

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From: George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU (George C. Ruben)
Date: 24 Apr 95 07:26:41 EDT
Subject: dissolving solvent?

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Message-id: {16166369-at-donner.Dartmouth.EDU}


Ron,

"We haven't tried that particular brand but
cyanoacrylates (superglues)
shouldn't be used where they can be illuminated by the electron beam
in our experience. They tend to bubble and release sludge into the
column when not cured rock hard. M-Bond 610, Gatan G-1, Epotec 353ND,
and Devcon-2-ton epoxys are better choices.

Superglues are far better than wax for mounting parts on preparation
fixtures. They dissolve in solvents nearly as fast as wax but without
a waxy residue."

What solvent do you use to dissolve and remove super glue?

Thanks,
George C. Ruben
Dept Biological Sciences
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755
tel 603 646-2144
fax 603 646-1347




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:08:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: D of millipore filters -REPONSE to Dr thor bostrom

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From: Diane Montpetit :      montpetitd-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 07:25:46 -0400
Subject: CPD of millipore filters -REPONSE to Dr thor bostrom

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Message-Id: {sf9b52d5.053-at-EM.AGR.CA}
X-Mailer: Novell GroupWise 4.1

I routinely CPD bacteria on a millipore filter that I roll like a "hand made"
cigarette, the specimens lying inside the roll, and I simply put that roll in
the metal mesh basket of the CPD, it works very well and i do not loose
material.

Diane Montpetit
Food research center
St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada
tel: 514 773 1105
fax: 514 773 8461






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 12:12:42 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Alternates to D-19

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 12:16:06 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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Message-Id: {Chameleon.950424115119.tonygr-at-emlab.mit.edu}




From: Brian G. Demczyk :      demczyk-at-ERXINDY.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 13:05:03 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: TEM: LocTite 460 super glue

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I meant that it decomposes under the beam, releasing unwanted
hydrocarbons into the column. I generally use M-Bond 610 for
making cross sections, as it doesn't have this problem-also,
it won't dissolve in acetone like Epoxy resins will.






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 12:16:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: alternatives to d-19

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From: Brian G. Demczyk :      demczyk-at-ERXINDY.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 13:12:11 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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We use 4489 for routine work and S0163 for high resolution (or low
dosage work). The SO163 has a larger grain, but is higher sensitivity that
4489.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:05:01 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Alternatives to D-19

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From: Dr R.J. Keyse :      keyse-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 09:25:35 +0100 (BST)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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} We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
} Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
} developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
} people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
} powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
} I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
} speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
} less time preparing to develop.
}
} Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
} better or equivalent film than 4489?

I think you'll find that you can use D-19 for up to about 800 plates developed
without any side effects, assuming you have a nitrogen gas burst system.
SO-163 is the film of choice. Its faster than 4489.
Rob Keyse




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:14:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: SuperGlue

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From: _ _ _ _ _ MARK W. LUND _ _ _ _ _ :      LUNDM-at-PHYSC2.BYU.EDU
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 08:47 MDT
Subject: Super glue in vacuum?

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Hi,
I was a lens-designer and all-around optical engineer in one of my
previous lives. A few times we had problems with contamination
on lenses in various military instruments that we made. The problem
was a cheesy goo (when examined over the microscope) and was always
solved by me walking around the production/assembly floor and looking
for the super-glue. Often a tech or assembler would bring in a tube
in order to stake wires or subassemblies to make the work easier.
When the instrument was later evacuated for back-filling with inert
gas the glue would out-gas and spray all this goo around.
I did a couple of experiments in a vacuum oven to verify that this
is what we saw.

Now, I have to admit that nothing was done to 'cure' this super-glue,
it may be that the heating was necessary (during the pump-down
there was a bake-out to try to eliminate water vapor) to cause the
out-gassing, but I am sure that NASA won't let super-glued components
into space.

My $0.02
best regards
mark

Mark W. Lund, PhD
Director
MOXTEK, Inc.
Orem UT




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 8:59:54 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: e: cryo-ultramicrotomy of macrophages

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From: Gerry LITTLE :      ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 08:18:22 GMT +11
Subject: Re: cryo-ultramicrotomy of macrophages

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}
} Subj: cryo-ultramicrotomy of macrophages
}

} Hello. I am currently having difficulty getting cryo sections of mouse bone
} marrow macrophages to stick on grids.
}
} I am using conventional techniques with a dry diamond knife, picking the sections
up with sucrose and floating the grids on buffer before further prossing
} with immunogold. I have been using this method for some time with different
} types of cells and intracellular parisites with no difficulty. My problem
} seems to be with just this one cell type...
}
} Any advise from someone in the know?
}
} Thank you.
}
} Jaime A. Dant
} Washington University School of Medicine
} St. Louis
} jaime-at-borcim.wustl.edu

G'day Jaime,
I haven't tried this type of tissue, we work with peripheral nerve.
One technique that we have found useful for some nerve types is the
electrostatic transfer method. The procedure was published by Tsuji
et al. 1992, in the Arch. Histol. Cytol. vol 55, p. 423-428.
Hope this helps,
Regards,
Gerald Little.

Dr Gerald J. Little | Ph (61 49) 215618
The Neuroscience Group |
Discipline of Anatomy | Fax (61 49) 216903
Faculty of Medicine and |
Health Sciences |
The University of Newcastle | Email ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Australia, 2308 |




From: Fred Pearson :      eoptics-at-mcmail.CIS.McMaster.CA
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 14:34:43 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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}
} We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
} Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
} developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
} people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
} powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
} I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
} speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
} less time preparing to develop.
}
} Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
} better or equivalent film than 4489?

} Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
} Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
} Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} U.S.A.

Frank:

Try making up batches of 5 gal. or more in large cube-tainers, and then
mix D19 1:2 parts H20. We develop our negs. (Kodak SO-163) for 4 min. The
S0-163 film can be pushed for longer development times if necessary, up
to 1\2 hr. for some special experiments.

Fred




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 19:51:28 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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From: Brian G. Demczyk :      demczyk-at-ERXINDY.rl.plh.af.mil
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 13:10:25 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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We typically dilute the D-19 mixed stock with water 1:1 and develope
700 plates between changings. I've never seen any degradation of the
developed negatives up to that time and one may even be able to go longer
between developer changes-in fact, we've gone over 1000 on several
occasions when people were too lazy to make up new developer.






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 19:51:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Looking for a SEM atlas in biomedicine

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From: Marcelle A Gillott :      magem-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 15:39:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Looking for a SEM atlas in biomedicine

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Dont know if it is still in print (pub in 79) but there is a nice SEM
atalas from The Freman Publ Co (the ones who do Scientific American) and
As I seem to recall, it was relatively inexpensive:

Tisssues & Organs: a text atlas of scanning electron microscopy

RG Kessel & RH Kardon

Happy hunting

Marcelle Gillott
UWM





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 19:52:43 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: greys levels, film vs digital

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From: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu (R. Howard Berg)
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 12:27:49 +0600
Subject: Re: greys levels, film vs digital

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Thomas E. Phillips wants comments on grey levels possible in film vs.
digital. Film response is a sigmoidal curve and one adjusts exposure to
fit the light coming off the subject to the linear portion of the curve in
the film's response. Black & white film provides a greater number of lens
aperture stops (6-8) to capture greys compared to color film (about 4,
depends on the film). So the answer to the question of grey values
possible in film is that one can capture a great variety of greys in film,
but not all in one image-only a relatively narrow range can be captured,
with the appropriate adjustment of exposure. CCDs have a linear response
over several orders of magnitude. Slow scan CCDs can capture a remarkable
range of greys in each image, in which case one can choose which range of
greys to display on the moniter.




R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
Biology Department
University of Memphis
Memphis, TN, 38152
E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 19:53:09 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Making Holey Carbon Films

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From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John. J. Bozzola)
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 18:51:07 -0600
Subject: Making Holey Carbon Films

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Anyone have a good, reproduceable protocol for making holey carbon films
for high resolution work? We have tried numerous methods including
Formvar/glycerol mixtures, steaming, followed by opening of pseudoholes
with solvents and carbonization of the film. Major problem has been
obtaining sufficient numbers of holes (either too many or not enough are
obtained using glycerol). Another problem seems to be getting the Formvar
to separate from the slide. Evaporated Victawet helps, but this seems a bit
constraining. Thanks mucho.

John J. Bozzola
Center for Electron Microscopy
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4402
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: -2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu OR bozzola-at-qm.c-cem.siu.edu






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 19:53:46 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Alternatives to D-19

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From: Fred Pearson :      eoptics-at-mcmail.CIS.McMaster.CA
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 14:34:43 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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}
} We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
} Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
} developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
} people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
} powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
} I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
} speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
} less time preparing to develop.
}
} Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
} better or equivalent film than 4489?

} Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
} Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
} Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} U.S.A.

Frank:

Try making up batches of 5 gal. or more in large cube-tainers, and then
mix D19 1:2 parts H20. We develop our negs. (Kodak SO-163) for 4 min. The
S0-163 film can be pushed for longer development times if necessary, up
to 1\2 hr. for some special experiments.

Fred




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:00:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Alternatives to d-19

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From: SALLY STOWE :      STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 08:53:11 EST10
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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} From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
} Subject: Alternates to D-19
}
} Hi everyone!
}
} We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
} Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
} developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
} people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
} powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
} I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
} speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
} less time preparing to develop.
}
} Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
} better or equivalent film than 4489?
}
}
} Thanks for your input.
}
}
} Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
} Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
} Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} U.S.A.
}
} We use Ilford PQ Universal developer with Kodak 4489 film, for the
convenience of using a liquid developer. Over the years we have
tried different strengths, and are currently using a 1:9 dilution,
as per the standard instructions for film. We normally use a fresh
solution every day. The mismatch came about
because we originally used Ilford film, and when switching to Kodak
it was natural to test with the same processing chemicals. - the
results were fine. However if there is a real incompatibility
lurking in the background, we would be interested to know!

} best wishes,
Sally Stowe

}
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sally Stowe Australian National Univ.
Facility Coordinator Canberra, AUSTRALIA
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit Ph 61 6 249 2743
RSBS, Box 475
Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au FAX 61 6 249 4891
------------------------------------- --------------------------------
-





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 9:13:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Need virus Pictures

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:21:52 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: grey levels - film vs digital

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:22:45 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Separating Formvar from Slides

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From: gburges-at-cc.UManitoba.CA (Garry Burgess)
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 22:43:59 -0500
Subject: Separating Formvar from Slides

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Another problem seems to be getting the Formvar
} to separate from the slide.

} John J. Bozzola
} Center for Electron Microscopy
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901-4402
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: -2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu OR bozzola-at-qm.c-cem.siu.edu

To separate the formvar from the slide, I take a razor blade, and holding
it at a 45 degree angle relative to the edge of the slide, I scrape all 3
sides of the slide, then I cut a line several time near the top of the
slide, so that all sides have been cut with the razor blade. This should
really help separate the formvar from the slide.

Garry Burgess






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:28:45 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: GLUES

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From: Stephan Coetzee :      STEPHAN-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 08:22:50 GMT+2
Subject: GLUE

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Dear Microscopists

I see that we are back on the subject of glues again. There are two
publications by M J Witcomb (The suitability of various adhesives and
mounting media for scanning electron microscopy :Journal of
Microscopy Vol 121 March 1981 pp. 289-308;
The suitability of various mounting media for scanning electron
microscopy. II. General glues Journal of Microscopy, Vol 139 Pt 1,
July 1985 pp 75-114)

I think this may clear things up a bit and set a standard of criteria
for glues.



Stephan H Coetee
Electron Microscope Unit
Private Bag 3
Wits
2050 Stephan-at-Gecko.biol.WITS.ac.za

Tell: (011) 716 2419
Fax : (011) 339 3407




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:30:49 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Making Holey Carbon Films

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:37:55 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: D-19 Alternative

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 25 Apr 1995 09:10:30 -0700
Subject: Re: D-19.alt

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Message-ID: {n1413321423.31186-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 8:00 AM
OFFICE MEMO RE} D-19.alt Date: 4/25/95

We use Kodak HRP (high resolution plate) developer, Kodak catalog # 140-1306
with 4489 film. Kodak EIFilm SO-163 is a reasonable alternative and is more
sensitive than 4489, reducing the time required for exposure, and is also a
fine grain emulsion.
Kodak has a tech sheet on this; call 1-800-242-2424, ext. 50 for technical
info. I think it is publication # JJ-7

doug_davis -at-maillink.berkeley.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:41:21 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Another old TEM available

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From: Doug Davis :      doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu
Date: 25 Apr 1995 10:23:29 -0700
Subject: Another old TEM available

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Message-ID: {n1413317002.94149-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}

Subject: Time: 7:57 AM
OFFICE MEMO Another old TEM available Date: 4/17/95

Philips 200 at UC Berkeley, has not run in two years.

Contact: Prof. Ed Sylvester at (510) 642-7353 or Ethel Nakamura in Wellman
Hall at (510) 642-1603 for details.
Some funds available for moving, Ask Ed.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:31:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: virus pictures

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From: EMLAB-at-opus.mco.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 09:07:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: virus pictures

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Dear Joyce,

In response to your query, a very good source of viruses are your local
neighbor's baby's. Ask your friends if one of their children have a good
case of diarrea, collect some stool from them, make a 10% suspension of the
stuff and preform a negative stain. It will be possible to have a number of
enteric viruses (adeno, rota, HAV, picorna, etc., also bacterial phages) in
the preps. Of course not usually more than one species at a time. Also
there will be various pieces or whole bacteria in it. If the child is a little
older, there will be various undigested bits of food (ex: collegen fibers)
which are neat to look at.
Another side note is that if you find an enteric virus in the stool,
you can tell the parents to quit giving the child antibiotics, unless of
course the pediatrician has had a stool culture preformed and knows that
there is a pathologic bacteria present.
PS Work in a fume hood. Not fun to smell.

Good Luck,
Ed Calomeni
Medical College of Ohio
Toledo, OH
emlab-at-opus.mco.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:34:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: EM Film

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 10:19:59 -0400
Subject: EM Film

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If my memory serves me correctly
4489 and Ilford film are roughly equivalent in speed and grain size,
although the Ilford stuff has the edge (I think).
S0163 is much faster that 4489 because of the large grain but you obviously
pay the price in resolution.
For very fast work I have colleagues that have used DuPont mammography film
(I think 10 to 15 times faster than Ilford).
Does any one have a listing of what the grain size and realtive speed of
the the em films is? Seems to me that this would be a useful list to
maintain.
As far as I know there are the 2 Kodak films, The Ilford (Ciba-Geigy) film,
Agfa EM Film and Fuji EM film. Are there any others?

This info could be part of the Microscopy Web Pages. I will compile the
info if we can collect it.

Jfm.


John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu, John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
or jfmjfm-at-umich.edu they all reach me!
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:24:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Gluing Sapphire/Loctite 460

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From: South Bay Technology :      73531.1344-at-compuserve.com
Date: 25 Apr 95 00:26:18 EDT
Subject: Gluing Sapphire/Loctite 460

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After reading all of the comings and goings on the listserver concerning the
gluing of sapphire for TEM, I have noticed that we seem to be running parallel
conversations. The initial question that started all of this was from Georges
Veilleux who wanted to bond pieces together in order to make a cross section
sample for TEM. The bond used to make a cross-section sample is intended to be
a permanent bond - therefore, any questions about solvents would become
irrelevent.

The entire conversation got twisted around when Gary Liechty suggested using
Loctite 460 super glue. Super glue is an ideal material to use when mounting a
sample for polishing (such as with a Tripod Polisher), but is not suitable for
bonding together the cross section. Super glues or cyanoacrylates are soluble
in acetone - an ideal characteristic for temporary bonding, but a very
undesirable characteristic for a permanent bond. Materials such as: M-Bond 610
Gatan G1, South Bay Technology Golly G1, and EpoTek 353ND are all permanent
bonding materials and I am not aware of anything that will disolve them after
they have cured.

In short:

M-Bond, SBT Golly G1, Gatan G1, EpoTek 353ND are used for permanent bonding of a
TEM cross section and are stable under the electron beam.

Superglues and other cyanoacrylates such as Loctite 460 are OK for temporary
bonding, are soluble in acetone and are not stable under the electron beam.

If anyone has other questions concerning the bonding of materials, I would be
pleased to offer whatever assistance I can. Please contact me directly and I
will respond as quickly as possible. I hope this information has helped and has
clarified the bonding question!

Best regards-

David Henriks TEL: 800-728-2233
South Bay Technology, Inc. 714-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: 714-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 e-mail: 75431.1344-at-compuserve.com






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:35:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: holey films

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From: Jane A. Fagerland (708) 935-0104 :      FAGERLAND.JANE-at-igate.abbott.com
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 08:30:00 -0600 (CST)
Subject: holey films

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Mr-Received: by mta RANDB; Relayed; Tue, 25 Apr 1995 09:38:25 -0600
Mr-Received: by mta MCM$RAND; Relayed; Tue, 25 Apr 1995 09:38:29 -0600
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I have used a method described by Paul Elsner in the proceedings of the
29th EMSA meeting, page 460. The method produced holey grids that even
my microscope service engineer coveted!

In a chamber or room with 50-70% relative humidity, clean glass slides
are dipped in a Coplin jar of 0.2-0.4% Formvar in ethylene dichloride.
The films are mounted onto grids and then treated with either acetone,
methanol, or chloroform-methanol (1:9) to open up pseudoholes and widen
holes. Varying the concentration of Formvar and relative humidity
results in different hole diameters and numbers of holes. After solvent
treatment, the grids are rinsed in 95% ethanol, 50% ethanol, and
distilled water - about 30 dips in each - and carbon coated.

A few tips to help strip the films from the slides: Rub a clean finger
over the slide a couple of times before you dip it into the Formvar.
After the film is dried, run a razor blade along the edges of the slide
and cut across the top edge of the film. Then breathe on the film until
it's fogged, and dip it into your stripping bath quickly. Sounds hokey,
but it's a method that has never failed me.

Hope this is useful,

Jane A. Fagerland
Dept. Cellular and Microscopic Research
Abbott Laboratories






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:28:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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From: Daniel Possin :      oemlab-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Apr 1995 15:24:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Alternates to D-19

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X-Sender: oemlab-at-saul3.u.washington.edu

Hi Frank -

We use a liquid developer from Dupont called DL24 I believe. It is a
graphic arts developer and we dilute it 1:7 for use. You have to buy it
at least 5 gals. at a type. It comes in a polyethelene 'cubitanier'
which collapses as it is emptied. It works well for us.

Dan

On Sun, 23 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} Date: Sun, 23 Apr 1995 7:43:38 -0500 (CDT)
} From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. {ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}
} To: MICROSCOPYLISTZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
} Subject: Alternates to D-19
}
} From: SMTP%"fskarl-at-goodyear.com" 21-APR-1995 14:21:32.08
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: Alternates to D-19
}
} X-Sender: t456b15-at-rds163
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} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
} Date: Fri, 21 Apr 1995 15:01:27 -0500
} To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} From: fskarl-at-goodyear.com (Frank Karl)
} Subject: Alternates to D-19
}
} Hi everyone!
}
} We are currently using Kodak D-19 developer and Kodak Electron Microscopy
} Film 4489. We typically develop 123 pieces of film before changing
} developer and due to the relatively large number of potential users (6
} people) we burn through the stock solution of D-19. Mixing D-19 from
} powder is time consuming activity, and in this era of doing more with less
} I would like to find a developer sold as a liquid concentrate. This would
} speed up darkroom maintenance and let us spend more time developing and
} less time preparing to develop.
}
} Can anyone recommend a liquid developer? And while I'm asking, is there a
} better or equivalent film than 4489?
}
}
} Thanks for your input.
}
}
} Frank Karl fskarl-at-goodyear.com
} Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. Voice 216.796.7818
} Analytical Services - Dept 415B Fax 216.796.3304
} 142 Goodyear Blvd
} Akron, OH 44305
} U.S.A.
}
}
}
}
}
}

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
% %
% Daniel Possin Work: 206/ 543-7489 %
% Dept. of Ophthalmology RJ-10 FAX: 206/ 543-4414 %
% University of Washington Home: 206/ 778-1714 %
% Seattle WA 98195 USA Email: oemlab-at-u.washington.edu %
% %
% "The chinese expression 'cheung meng ba sui, gong hey fat choy' is %
% equilvalent to Vulcan expression 'live long and prosper'. It's a %
% small universe and getting smaller everyday". %
% %
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Tue, 25 Apr 1995 12:33:06 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: grey levels - film vs digital

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: sassaroli-at-msvax.mssm.edu
Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1993 09:08:05 -0500
Subject: Re: grey levels - film vs digital

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} } Subject: grey levels - film vs digital
} } }
} } } Krivanek and Mooney (Ultramicroscopy 49:95-108, 1993) state "However,
} } } whereas each pixel of the SSC (slow scan CCD) is capable of faithfully
} } } capturing an intensity between 0 and 2(to the 14th power),
} }
} } = 8 x 10E3 THAT is a HOT CCD !
} }
} } I seem to recollect this as a kind of wondrous
} } upper limit, How many charges
} } fit in a charge bucket vs the noise floor?
}
} The full-well capacity of a CCD can be as high as half a million e/pixel
} (as in TEK1024 CCDs, with a pixel size of 24 microns), and the noise level
} is only ~10 e/sec when cooled to -40C, so a dynamic range of 14 bits can be
} readily achieved. But, the true dynamic range is shot-noise limited. Say
} your image is formed with 1,000,000 primary electrons/pixel (which is very,
} very high), the dynamic range is 1000.
}
} ...
} } } each pixel of film can capture only a few gray levels
} } } (roughly equivalent to the number of silver grains
}
} I agree.
}
} } } that can fit into the area of one pixel without
} } } overlapping)". Buonaquisti (Microscopy Today 95(1):12-13, 1995) states
} } } film "is an anlog process and, as such, one can argue that sheet film has
} } } an infinite gray scale resolution". Can anyone comment on this?
}
} Infinite? I read that too. Keep in mind that artcile was not refereed.
}
} Gary Fan
} UC San Diego


I agree with the first half of Gary Fang's answer. Indeed, the dynamic
range of cooled slow-scan CCD's can attain values in excess of } = 40,000
(we have an EG&G camera with a Thompson chip which does that when cooled to
-65C).
The second half of the answer, I believe, confuses dynamic range with
signal/noise and whether the image is dark noise limited or shot noise
limited: this will depend on the level of the signal (in
photoelectrons/pixel/sec) as compared to the dark noise (in
electrons/pixel/sec) due to the thermally excited electrons generated in
the silicon and to the added electronic noise in the digitization
electronics and in the bias voltage applied to the A/D converter.
The shot noise is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical origin and cannot be
eliminated, only minimized by accumulating as much signal as possible! In
the example given, the image would be of very high quality indeed
(S/N=1000/1)!!!
Signal levels in low-light level fluorescence microscopy, which is the
application I am most familiar with, almost never exceed 10,000
photoelectrons/pixel/sec with a pixel size of 20x20 micron.

No film can come even close to the dynamic range of a modern CCD: as
explained by Nestor, film can be used to capture signals of various
intensities by adjusting the f-stops on the camera, but the intrascene
dynamic range (the number of different intensity levels that can be
captured in the same image) is very limited (certainly less than 100).

Best regards,
Massimo Sassaroli

_________________________________
Massimo Sassaroli, D.Sc.
Dept. of Physiology & Biophysics
Box 1218
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
1 Gustave L. Levy Pl.
New York, NY 10029-6574

sassaroli-at-msvax.mssm.edu







From: Michael O'Keefe :      Michael_O'Keefe-at-macmail7.lbl.gov
Date: 25 Apr 1995 13:56:45 U
Subject: EM Technician Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {n1413304036.39952-at-macmail7.lbl.gov}




From: Michael O'Keefe :      Michael_O'Keefe-at-macmail7.lbl.gov
Date: 25 Apr 1995 13:56:45 U
Subject: EM Technician Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The National Center for Electron Microscopy has a vacancy for an electron
microscope technician. For details see --

http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/Current-Jobs-Offerings/Apr-21-95.Technical.html


HOW TO APPLY for this position (Job MSD/3280) --

To apply for job MSD/3280, submit a resume to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.
Following our receipt of your resume, you will receive a letter of
acknowledgment. If you do not have a resume, please complete an LBL
application form: this will not affect your being considered for employment.

Resumes will be retained in our active employment file for six months. During
this period, you may refer to a specific job number by including it in your
one-page cover letter or by writing it on the back of your resume. Individuals
interviewed will be notified of selection or nonselection for the position.

Submit your resume by mail to --
The Staffing Office, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 938A, Berkeley, CA 94720,
or, if you prefer, via e-mail to the LBL Recruitment Coordinator,
RLBoucher-at-LBL.gov.
Please do not send your resume directly to, or otherwise contact, the NCEM.


DESCRIPTION
(Job MSD/3280) --

Research Technician, Senior

1.Job MSD/3280
2.Materials Sciences Division
3.NCEM
4.$12.10-$20.53/Hr.

DUTIES:
Essential --
Responsible for daily operation and maintenance of several transmission
electron microscopes. Duties include daily start-up, alignment, trouble
shooting, user training in basic operation, alignment, microanalysis, and
high-resolution imaging. Effective interaction with users and close
coordination with Center staff and with manufacturers' service representatives
are essential. Flexibility to work hours assigned based on Center needs.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Essential --
Demonstrated ability in electron microscopy with emphasis on physical sciences.
Detailed knowledge of operating principles of transmission electron
microscopes, with demonstrated ability to maintain, operate and troubleshoot
advanced and support transmission electron microscopes. Demonstrated
experience in microscope alignment procedures for phase contrast imaging.
Working knowledge of diffractogram analysis for diagnosis of defocus,
astigmatism, beam tilt, sample tilt, drift, damping, information transfer etc.
Sufficient understanding of principles of electron beam imaging, diffraction
and crystallography to permit operating of the JEOL ARM-1000 under the
scientific guidance of a user. Working knowledge of vacuum systems, specimen
holders, high voltage systems and control electronics found in modern electron
microscopes. Ability to isolate malfunctions in an electron microscope and to
rectify failures. Practical experience with thin foil preparation methods.
Elementary knowledge of principles of materials science. Elementary knowledge
of computers for digital acquisition of images and microanalytical spectra.
Ability to learn new techniques of imaging, diffraction, microanalysis and
computer image processing. Ability to work with a minimum of supervision. Good
communication skills for clear and efficient interaction with users and NCEM
scientific staff scientists.
Marginal --
B.S. or B.A. in general sciences, physics, or electronics, and coursework in
electron microscopy.

CLOSING DATE: Open until filled.






From: Michael O'Keefe :      Michael_O'Keefe-at-macmail7.lbl.gov
Date: 25 Apr 1995 13:49:10 U
Subject: Position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {n1413304642.4716-at-macmail7.lbl.gov}
"Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
Cc: "Nestor ZALUZEC" {ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP/QM 3.0.0

Subject: Time:11:40 AM
OFFICE MEMO Position available Date:4/24/95

The National Center for Electron Microscopy has a vacancy for an electron
microscope technician. For details see --

http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/Current-Jobs-Offerings/Apr-21-95.Technical.html


HOW TO APPLY for this position (Job MSD/3280) --

To apply for job MSD/3280, submit a resume to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.
Following our receipt of your resume, you will receive a letter of
acknowledgment. If you do not have a resume, please complete an LBL
application form: this will not affect your being considered for employment.

Resumes will be retained in our active employment file for six months. During
this period, you may refer to a specific job number by including it in your
one-page cover letter or by writing it on the back of your resume. Individuals
interviewed will be notified of selection or nonselection for the position.

Submit your resume by mail to --
The Staffing Office, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 938A, Berkeley, CA 94720,
or, if you prefer, via e-mail to the LBL Recruitment Coordinator,
RLBoucher-at-LBL.gov.
Please do not send your resume directly to, or otherwise contact, the NCEM.


DESCRIPTION
(Job MSD/3280) --

Research Technician, Senior

1.Job MSD/3280
2.Materials Sciences Division
3.NCEM
4.$12.10-$20.53/Hr.

DUTIES:
Essential --
Responsible for daily operation and maintenance of several transmission
electron microscopes. Duties include daily start-up, alignment, trouble
shooting, user training in basic operation, alignment, microanalysis, and
high-resolution imaging. Effective interaction with users and close
coordination with Center staff and with manufacturers' service representatives
are essential. Flexibility to work hours assigned based on Center needs.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Essential --
Demonstrated ability in electron microscopy with emphasis on physical sciences.
Detailed knowledge of operating principles of transmission electron
microscopes, with demonstrated ability to maintain, operate and troubleshoot
advanced and support transmission electron microscopes. Demonstrated
experience in microscope alignment procedures for phase contrast imaging.
Working knowledge of diffractogram analysis for diagnosis of defocus,
astigmatism, beam tilt, sample tilt, drift, damping, information transfer etc.
Sufficient understanding of principles of electron beam imaging, diffraction
and crystallography to permit operating of the JEOL ARM-1000 under the
scientific guidance of a user. Working knowledge of vacuum systems, specimen
holders, high voltage systems and control electronics found in modern electron
microscopes. Ability to isolate malfunctions in an electron microscope and to
rectify failures. Practical experience with thin foil preparation methods.
Elementary knowledge of principles of materials science. Elementary knowledge
of computers for digital acquisition of images and microanalytical spectra.
Ability to learn new techniques of imaging, diffraction, microanalysis and
computer image processing. Ability to work with a minimum of supervision. Good
communication skills for clear and efficient interaction with users and NCEM
scientific staff scientists.
Marginal --
B.S. or B.A. in general sciences, physics, or electronics, and coursework in
electron microscopy.

CLOSING DATE: Open until filled.






From: Michael O'Keefe :      Michael_O'Keefe-at-macmail7.lbl.gov
Date: 25 Apr 1995 09:19:40 U
Subject: Position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {n1413320776.33851-at-macmail7.lbl.gov}
"Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
Cc: "Nestor ZALUZEC" {ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP/QM 3.0.0

Subject: Time:11:40 AM
OFFICE MEMO Position available Date:4/24/95

The National Center for Electron Microscopy has a vacancy for an electron
microscope technician. For details see --

http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/Current-Jobs-Offerings/Apr-21-95.Technical.html


HOW TO APPLY for this position (Job MSD/3280) --

To apply for job MSD/3280, submit a resume to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.
Following our receipt of your resume, you will receive a letter of
acknowledgment. If you do not have a resume, please complete an LBL
application form: this will not affect your being considered for employment.

Resumes will be retained in our active employment file for six months. During
this period, you may refer to a specific job number by including it in your
one-page cover letter or by writing it on the back of your resume. Individuals
interviewed will be notified of selection or nonselection for the position.

Submit your resume by mail to --
The Staffing Office, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 938A, Berkeley, CA 94720,
or, if you prefer, via e-mail to the LBL Recruitment Coordinator,
RLBoucher-at-LBL.gov.
Please do not send your resume directly to, or otherwise contact, the NCEM.


DESCRIPTION
(Job MSD/3280) --

Research Technician, Senior

1.Job MSD/3280
2.Materials Sciences Division
3.NCEM
4.$12.10-$20.53/Hr.

DUTIES:
Essential --
Responsible for daily operation and maintenance of several transmission
electron microscopes. Duties include daily start-up, alignment, trouble
shooting, user training in basic operation, alignment, microanalysis, and
high-resolution imaging. Effective interaction with users and close
coordination with Center staff and with manufacturers' service representatives
are essential. Flexibility to work hours assigned based on Center needs.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Essential --
Demonstrated ability in electron microscopy with emphasis on physical sciences.
Detailed knowledge of operating principles of transmission electron
microscopes, with demonstrated ability to maintain, operate and troubleshoot
advanced and support transmission electron microscopes. Demonstrated
experience in microscope alignment procedures for phase contrast imaging.
Working knowledge of diffractogram analysis for diagnosis of defocus,
astigmatism, beam tilt, sample tilt, drift, damping, information transfer etc.
Sufficient understanding of principles of electron beam imaging, diffraction
and crystallography to permit operating of the JEOL ARM-1000 under the
scientific guidance of a user. Working knowledge of vacuum systems, specimen
holders, high voltage systems and control electronics found in modern electron
microscopes. Ability to isolate malfunctions in an electron microscope and to
rectify failures. Practical experience with thin foil preparation methods.
Elementary knowledge of principles of materials science. Elementary knowledge
of computers for digital acquisition of images and microanalytical spectra.
Ability to learn new techniques of imaging, diffraction, microanalysis and
computer image processing. Ability to work with a minimum of supervision. Good
communication skills for clear and efficient interaction with users and NCEM
scientific staff scientists.
Marginal --
B.S. or B.A. in general sciences, physics, or electronics, and coursework in
electron microscopy.

CLOSING DATE: Open until filled.






From: Michael O'Keefe :      Michael_O'Keefe-at-macmail7.lbl.gov
Date: 24 Apr 1995 13:51:55 U
Subject: EM Tech position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {n1413390807.23289-at-macmail7.lbl.gov}
"Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
Cc: "Nestor ZALUZEC" {ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP/QM 3.0.0

Reply to: EM Tech position available

The National Center for Electron Microscopy has a vacancy for an electron
microscope technician. For details see --

http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Documents/Current-Jobs-Offerings/Apr-21-95.Technical.html


HOW TO APPLY for this position (Job MSD/3280) --

To apply for job MSD/3280, submit a resume to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.
Following our receipt of your resume, you will receive a letter of
acknowledgment. If you do not have a resume, please complete an LBL
application form: this will not affect your being considered for employment.

Resumes will be retained in our active employment file for six months. During
this period, you may refer to a specific job number by including it in your
one-page cover letter or by writing it on the back of your resume. Individuals
interviewed will be notified of selection or nonselection for the position.

Submit your resume by mail to --
The Staffing Office, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 938A, Berkeley, CA 94720,
or, if you prefer, via e-mail to the LBL Recruitment Coordinator,
RLBoucher-at-LBL.gov.
Please do not send your resume directly to, or otherwise contact, the NCEM.


DESCRIPTION
(Job MSD/3280) --

Research Technician, Senior

1.Job MSD/3280
2.Materials Sciences Division
3.National Center for Electron Microscopy
4.$12.10-$20.53/Hr.

DUTIES: Essential --
Responsible for daily operation and maintenance of several transmission
electron microscopes. Duties include daily start-up, alignment, trouble
shooting, user training in basic operation, alignment, microanalysis, and
high-resolution imaging. Effective interaction with users and close
coordination with Center staff and with manufacturers' service representatives
are essential. Flexibility to work hours assigned based on Center needs.
QUALIFICATIONS: Essential --
Demonstrated ability in electron microscopy with emphasis on physical sciences.
Detailed knowledge of operating principles of transmission electron
microscopes, with demonstrated ability to maintain, operate and troubleshoot
advanced and support transmission electron microscopes. Demonstrated
experience in microscope alignment procedures for phase contrast imaging.
Working knowledge of diffractogram analysis for diagnosis of defocus,
astigmatism, beam tilt, sample tilt, drift, damping, information transfer etc.
Sufficient understanding of principles of electron beam imaging, diffraction
and crystallography to permit operating of the JEOL ARM-1000 under the
scientific guidance of a user. Working knowledge of vacuum systems, specimen
holders, high voltage systems and control electronics found in modern electron
microscopes. Ability to isolate malfunctions in an electron microscope and to
rectify failures. Practical experience with thin foil preparation methods.
Elementary knowledge of principles of materials science. Elementary knowledge
of computers for digital acquisition of images and microanalytical spectra.
Ability to learn new techniques of imaging, diffraction, microanalysis and
computer image processing. Ability to work with a minimum of supervision. Good
communication skills for clear and efficient interaction with users and NCEM
scientific staff scientists.
Marginal --
B.S. or B.A. in general sciences, physics, or electronics, and coursework in
electron microscopy.
CLOSING DATE: Open until filled.






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:15:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Never, Never Do This!!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Subj: NEVER, DO THIS!!!

All Subscribers....

Please, Pleeease, Pleeeeeeeeeease

Never, never submit a posting to the temporary address:

MicroscopyListZaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov

always submit your messages to the correct address:

Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov.

The temporary address "MicroscopyListZaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov"
was set up so that I can monitor and remove any problems
which were created by the series of bouncing messages, DNS/Router
crashes and several other things that went wrong last week.
I have been manually checking each message which comes through
and trashing the various error messages etc... and only
forwarding the "real" mail. This minimizes your Email traffic
and slows things down, and complicates my life, since I now
check each message before it goes out. (BTW that is one reason
for the longer delays now between the time you send a message and
you see it back as a posting to the list).

If you post to the temporary address you WILL likely start
another loop (Yes a person who will remain nameless did this today).
I think I caught it before it got too far, but I'm sure several iterations
went out. I have shut down the server and trashed any messages in the queue.
This means that some things will likely be lost.

Please don't try to second guess the system.
Just use the old address and thing will be fine, albeit abit
slow for the next few more days....



Your Frustrated and Temporarily Unfriendly Neighborhood SysOp.

Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:51:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: d-19 storage

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From: Mrs Priscilla Maartens :      MAARTENP-at-biology.und.ac.za
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 08:09:58 +0200 (SAST)
Subject: d-19 srorage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950426080958.523-at-biology.und.ac.za}

Bob Josephs suggests making up your D-19 stco and then storing it in
brown bottles.
What about making up your stock and freezing aliquots? You then
freeze the quantity most suited to the final dilution you will use.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:58:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Wanted - Stereomicroscope

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From: Ann Webb :      Ann_Webb-at-uow.edu.au
Date: 27 Apr 1995 11:56:53 +1000
Subject: Wanted - Stereomicroscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stereomicroscope wanted - zoom preferred. Please send details and asking
price to A.Webb-at-uow.edu.au.

Ann Webb




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:54:35 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: recycle silver paste?

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From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 10:26:53 -1000 (HST)
Subject: recycle silver paste?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Aloha, all-

I have some 150 grams of dried-up colloidal silver paste that is not worth
trying to get back into solution, partly because it costs more to ship
the solvent to Hawaii than to purchase new paste. Is it worth trying to
recycle somehow? What all is in it besides silver? Is it pretty pure?
I'm not even sure there's anyone in Hawaii who recycles silver from darkroom
chemicals.

Besides the osmium, what else should us environmentally-concerned
microscopists be trying to conserve/recycle?

A belated Happy Earth Day to you all!

Mahalo,
Tina Weatherby Carvalho
Biological EM Facility
University of Hawaii





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 9:07:25 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Gatan Imaging Filter

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From: loewe-at-uni-bonn.de (Andreas Loewe)
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 08:46:49 +0100
Subject: GIF - Gatan Imaging Filter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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X-Sender: UNC900-at-131.220.221.1
Message-Id: {v01510100abc4fa41bef0-at-[131.220.128.16]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi all -

I would like to get and exchange information about the Gatan Imaging
Filter. We will receive ours at the end of the month, so we are absolute
beginners. What I like to see are hints about the little things you just
don't know because you have not enough experience.

Every help, sugestions and ideas is highly welcomed.


Andreas
UofB






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:49:06 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

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From: Alan S. Pooley :      pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 09:16:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: CPD of millipore filters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Re filters for cpd, I have made and used for years an aluminium holder
about 15 mm on a side, ~cubic, consisting of folded thin alum sheet
which switches back and forth in a multiple 'S' fashion so that individual
slots about 1.5 mm wide by 15 * 15 mm are made. I have about 8 or 10
slots per holder. The multiple s is held together with a wide 'U' shape
that holds the side and bottom of the holder. Individual filters are
slipped down into the slots (I do this in a 20 or 30 mm beaker filled with
enough alcohol that the filter stays emersed as it is fed into the slot,
the filter is quickly transfered from the previous container to avoid
drying by evaporation) By the way, I much prefer nucleopore filters
to millipore, better background for SEM. I do not believe that material
falls off the filter unless too much matrerial is applied. A good rule
is to put about 500,000 cells on a 12 mm dia filter. Call me if you
can't figure out the design of the holder. It took me 10 minutes to make
with simple tools.

Alan S. Pooley ,PhD Bivalve shell SEM & shape analysis
SEM/Morphometrics lab
Marine & Coastal Sciences
Rutgers University
908 932 8959 ext 225
Pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:49:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Histo-resins

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From: JOHN PUTTERILL :      JOHN-at-moon.ovi.ac.za
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 08:45:47 CAT
Subject: Histo-resins

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Hello Microscopists

Would anyone out there have any experience with a resin called
"Immuno-Bed" Embedding Resin (Polysciences?). It is in the EM Sciences
catalogue and is claimed to be "A low viscosity media for light
microscopy and immuno histochemistry techniques". I would like to
know whether it would be suitable for staining of animal tissue using
routine histo staining techniques, specifically H&E, PAS, Masson's
Trichrome, Verhoeff's Elastic Stain and Periodic Acid Silver
Haematoxylin Methamine. Comment regarding its staining
reproducibility, ease of cutting etc are also welcome. Any
suggestions of alternatives to the "Immuno-Bed" would also be
appreciated.

Please correspond with me directly. Thanks in advance.

John////////
////////////





-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-
-at- John F. Putterill -at-
-at- Electron Microscopy Unit Tel: (Int) 27-12-529-9174 -at-
-at- Pathology Section Fax: (Int) 27-12-529-9165 -at-
-at- Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute E-mail: john-at-moon.ovi.ac.za -at-
-at- Private Bag X05 -at-
-at- Onderstepoort 0110 -at-
-at- South Africa -at-
-at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at--at-




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 14:33:42 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Validation of EDS Equipment

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From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:44:20 -0400
Subject: VALIDATION

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X400-Received: by mta merit in /PRMD=internet/ADMD=telemail/C=us/; Relayed; Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:56:16 -0400
X400-Received: by /ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:46:14 -0400
X400-Received: by /PRMD=SCHERING-PLOUGH/ADMD=TELEMAIL/C=US/; Relayed; Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:44:20 -0400

Greetings,

I have to validate an EDAX DX-4. I am in the pharmaceutical
industry and validation for the FDA on our equipment is top priority.
Most of the advice that I have been receiving is more calibration than
validation. What do others do to validate such a piece of equipment?


Thank you!!


Barbara Hartman
Schering-Plough Research
Lafayette, NJ 07848
(201) 579-4343
(201) 579-4211 FAX
E-Mail: Barbara.Hartman-at-1773.220.Schering-Plough.sprint.com






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:51:55 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM films and development

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From: cook-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 12:26:34 -0600
Subject: TEM films and development

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In answer to John Mansfield's questions, there was another EM film in 1990,
but I haven't looked lately to see whether it is still available:
Mitsubishi MEM.

Let me refer you to a paper by Y. Kamiya and T. Arii, J. Electron Microscoy
39: 351-355 (1990). It shows that Kodak 4489 and Fuji FG are very similar.
Mean sizes of developed grains in the Fuji film were measured at 0.24 and
0.33 micron for development times of 4 and 10 minutes, respectively. The
Mitsubishi film was shown to be 5 times as sensitive as the Kodak or Fuji
films at a development time of 4 minutes. Each film used a different
developer.

Several years ago, we learned of a developing technique which uses a 2-part
developer (Daniel Morse at Los Alamos National Laboratory). He (and we)
used a particular product called Diafine, but there are other 2-part
developers available. This procedure holds back development in areas of
high exposure and increases development in areas of low exposure. The
result is a negative which can be printed easily compared to a negative
developed in a single-solution developer. Diafine also increases the
effective film speed.

I have some data sheets from Kodak which compare 4489 and SO-163. I do not
have rms granularity numbers for the films, but Kodak did provide relative
electron speeds (sensitivities) for electron energies between 50 and 100
keV. These sensitivities were measured at a density of 1.0 above gross fog
and are the reciprocal of the exposure measured in electrons per square
micron.

Film Electron Speed Developer Devel. Time

SO-163 2.2 D19, full strength 12 min.

SO-163 0.8 1 part D19 to 2 parts 4 min.
of water

SO-163 0.15 (1985) D19, full strength, 2 min.
or 0.4 (1990) plus 1 gm/l of Kodak
Anti-Fog #1

4489 0.4 1 part D19 to 2 parts 4 min.
of water

By the way, the Kodak technical sheet for SO-163 recommends maintaining the
relative humidity above 25% to mitigate against static build-up (and
discharges) on the film.


Russell E. Cook
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory






From: vickie-at-macc.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 8:54:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 2 Photon Meeting Announcement

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Message-Id: {25042514005049-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

Meeting Announcement

Symposium on

"INTEGRATED MICROSCOPY"

September 29 to October 1, 1995

at

The Wisconsin Center
702 Langdon Street
Madison, WI 53706

organized by the

Integrated Microscopy Resource
University of Wisconsin-Madison

********************************************************************************
Presentations in this symposium will focus on biological problems for which
a combination of microscopies (i.e. integrated microscopy) has been used.
In this way the speakers will demonstrate by example the power, potential
and limitations of various microscopical techniques. The techniques which
will be discussed include: DIC, confocal, 2-photon excitation imaging,
SEM, TEM, cryo-specimen preparation, and AFM.
********************************************************************************

FRIDAY (Evening), September 29, 1995
6:00 - 7:55 RECEPTION
8:00 - 8:45 Ken Jacobson, Univ. of N. Carolina-Chapel Hill
8:50 - 9:35 John Sedat, Univ. of California-San Francisco
9:40 - 10:25 Edward Salmon, Univ. of N.Carolina-Chapel Hill
SATURDAY, September 30, 1995
8:30 - 9:15 D. Lansing Taylor, Carnegie-Mellon University
9:20 - 10:05 Jeff Lichtman, Washington University
10:10 - 10:40 COFFEE BREAK
10:45 - 11:30 John White, University of Wisconsin-Madison
11:35 - 12:20 Steven Smith, Stanford University
12:25 - 1:25 LUNCH (on your own)
1:30 - 2:15 Gary Borisy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
2:20 - 3:05 Ralph Albrecht, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison
3:10 - 3:55 Paul Bridgman, Washington University-Madison
5:00 - 6:00 EXHIBITOR'S SOCIAL
6:00 - 8:00 BUFFET DINNER
SUNDAY (Morning), October 1, 1995
9:00 - 9:45 Kent McDonald, Univ. of California-Berkley
9:50 - 10:35 Stanley Erlandsen, University of Minnesota
10:40 - 11:10 COFFEE BREAK
11:15 - 12:00 Hans Ris, University of Wisconsin-Madison
12:05 - 12:50 Eric Henderson, Iowa State University


Fees:
General Registration $100.00 (Late fee: $130.00)
(Includes: Fri. Reception, Sat. Social & Dinner, Coffee
Breaks and Materials)
Local Registration $ 80.00 (Late fee: $110.00)
(Includes: Fri. Reception, Sat. Social, Coffee Breaks and
Materials)
Guest Ticket - Saturday Dinner $ 20.00 (On-site Unavailable)


Interested in attending?

Consult our Web site for additional information:

http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/imr.html


To receive a brochure and registration form write to:
IMR
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706

or email: imradmin-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu



Following the symposium, there will be a two-day workshop at the IMR. We
will be presenting lectures and provide "hands-on" experience for the
following techniques:
* 2-photon excitation imaging
* 4D DIC imaging
* cryo-SEM
* high pressure freezing
* reversible embedment for SEM and TEM

Workshop attendence will be limited to 25 students. A letter of
application is required. Fee: $150.00.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:21:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Image archive system

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:23:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Polaroid Micrograph Contest???

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Message-Id: {9504271535.AA03439-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}




From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:37:40 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Polaroid Micrograph Contest???

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Does anyone know if there will be a Polaroid International Micrograph
Contest this year? I've not been able to get hold of anyone at Polaroid
who knows...

Aloha,
Tina Carvalho
Biological EM Facility
University of Hawaii





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:31:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Term lbs.

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From: Campbell36-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:02:46 -0400
Subject: Term lbs.

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Can anyone tell me the origin of the term (lbs.) as it relates to the unit of
measure pounds?

Thanks

Jim Campbell




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:25:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: grey levels - film vs digital

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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:25:03 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: RE-SourceVacBk

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From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 27 Apr 1995 16:12:19 -0400
Subject: RE-SourceVacBk

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Message-ID: {n1413123023.39654-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}

Subject: Time: 4:08 PM
OFFICE MEMO RE:SourceVacBk Date: 4/27/95

Peggy:
Thanks for inquiring about my vacuum book. The following is the
information you requested:
Title: Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy
Author: Wilbur C. Bigelow
Series: Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy, Vol. 15,
Audrey M. Glauert, Editor
Soft cover: ISBN 1-85578-053-4, 492 pp/116 illus/1994/$80
Hard cover: ISBN 1-85578-052-6, 492 pp/116 illus/1994/$175
In US and Canada, order from: Portland Press, Ashgate Publishing Co.,
Old Post Road, Brookfield, VT, 05036-9704. U.S.A.
Ph: 802-276-3162; Fx: 802-276-3837
In Europe, order from: Portland Press Ltd., Commerce Way, Colchester
CO2 8HP, UK Ph: 0206-796351; Fx: 0206-799331
I apologize for the fact that the prices are a bit higher than one might
wish them to be; however, the book is nearly 500 pages long, and was a high
quality production by Cambridge Univ. Press. It is printed on high quality
paper, and the figures are of very high quality. In addition, I think you
will find it to be filled with practically useful operational information.
The two reviews I have seen so far have been pleasingly favourable. A quote
from one for the Italian EM Society: "It is a (sic) almost perfect book,
practical and convincing. The Series title is masterly (sic) fulfilled by
practical hints, numerical data, references to everyday life, operation
procedures, and suggestions, which, if followed, will save trouble and time
for microscopists and will optimise their results". If you buy it, I hope
you like it and find it useful.
Wil Bigelow (bigelow-at-umich.edu)





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:26:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: d-19 storage

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From: Daniel Possin :      oemlab-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 11:20:42 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: d-19 storage

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X-Sender: oemlab-at-saul1.u.washington.edu


} Subject: d-19 storage
}
} From: SMTP%"MAARTENP-at-biology.und.ac.za" 26-APR-1995 09:27:38.06
} To: ZALUZEC
} CC:
} Subj: d-19 srorage
}
} Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950426080958.523-at-biology.und.ac.za}
} From: Mrs Priscilla Maartens {MAARTENP-at-biology.und.ac.za}
} To: zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 08:09:58 +0200 (SAST)
} Subject: d-19 srorage
} X-pmrqc: 1
} Priority: normal
} X-mailer: PMail v3.0 (R1a)
}
} Bob Josephs suggests making up your D-19 stco and then storing it in
} brown bottles.
} What about making up your stock and freezing aliquots? You then
} freeze the quantity most suited to the final dilution you will use.
}
I don't think it will work. The salts in the developer (sodium sulfite,
etc.) will come out of solution and need to be redissolved before use,
which maybe difficult (or impossible) depending on the other developer
constituents.

Sorry-

Dan

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
% %
% Daniel Possin Work: 206/ 543-7489 %
% Dept. of Ophthalmology RJ-10 FAX: 206/ 543-4414 %
% University of Washington Home: 206/ 778-1714 %
% Seattle WA 98195 USA Email: oemlab-at-u.washington.edu %
% %
% "The chinese expression 'cheung meng ba sui, gong hey fat choy' is %
% equilvalent to Vulcan expression 'live long and prosper'. It's a %
% small universe and getting smaller everyday". %
% %
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 8:54:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Term lbs.

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From: DOUG ARRELL :      ARRELL-at-fs-iam-1
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 08:16:39 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Term lbs.

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950428081639.544-at-FS-IAM-1.JRC.NL}

} Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 22:31:10 -0500 (CDT)
} From: "Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab." {ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
} To: MICROSCOPYLISTNESTOR-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
} Subject: Term lbs.

} } From: SMTP%"Campbell36-at-aol.com" 27-APR-1995 20:06:46.60

} Can anyone tell me the origin of the term (lbs.) as it relates to the unit of
} measure pounds?
}
} Thanks
}
} Jim Campbell

It comes from the latin word libra which was the original term and is
still used in French, Spanish and other latin languages. The word
'pound' is the germanic equivalent also used in Dutch.

Doug


******************************************
Dr Douglas Arrell
Mechanical Properties and Joining Division
Institute for Advanced Materials
Joint Research Centre
European Commission
Westerduinweg 2
1755 ZG Petten
The Netherlands

Tel. (+31) 2246 5287
Fax. (+31) 2246 1917
E-Mail Arrell-at-JRC.NL
*********************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:00:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Wanted - Stereomicroscope

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From: ALAN . STONE :      73004.1733-at-compuserve.com
Date: 28 Apr 95 06:57:52 EDT
Subject: Wanted - Stereomicroscope

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we have a B&L stereozoom 7 in great shape. magnification varies from 10X
to 70X and comes with a supplemental .5X lens to extend the magnification
range from 5X to 35X. The asking price is US $1500.

Please reply with your level of interest.

Alan Stone
ASTON
312/528-9830




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:01:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: JWS 7500E SEM

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From: S_MCGARVEY-at-SAL9K.dnet-at-gmd.fujitsu.com
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 04:38:49 +0800
Subject: JWS 7500E SEM

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Greetings,

I am interested in hearing from anyone who has worked with a JWS
7500E SEM for defect analysis on silicon wafers. Any information
anyone can offer would be a great help!


Many thanks!



Steve McGarvey
Photolithograhy Process Tech
Fujitsu Microelectronics, Inc.
Gresham, Oregon 97030

e-mail: s_mcgarvey-at-sal9k.dnet-at-gmd.fujitsu.com
Fax: (503) 669-6131
Phone: (503) 669-6118

"There are lies, damned lies, and statistics."





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:02:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Coverslip removal

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From: Fermin, Cesar :      fermin-at-tmc.tulane.edu
Date: 28 Apr 1995 06:48:25 -0600
Subject: FW: Coverslip removal

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Message-ID: {n1413070635.56712-at-postoffice.tmc.tulane.edu}



I will appreciate any trick (besides immersion in xylene) for removing
coverslips from previously mounted 10 microns thick paraffin sections. In
addition, any comments on antigenicity left over on those sections, which were
previously stained with H&E?

************************************************************
*Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D \|*|/ Fax (504) 587-7389 *
*Tulane Medical School /|*|\ Answ. Mach.(504) 584-2618 *
*Pathology/SL79 \|*|/ Secretary (504) 584-2436 *
*New Orleans, La 70 112 /|*|\ Lab (504) 5841 *
*Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu -} Director of Morphological Services*
************************************************************





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:10:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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From: cook-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 09:48:23 -0600
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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Message-Id: {v01510101abc6bcf603c9-at-[146.139.72.78]}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

In response to Frank Scheltens query about the limits of the Mac OS to keep
track of files, our local computer systems administrator/guru, Paul
Domagala, said that the OS is limited to 65,000 per partition. That is,
each partition of a drive can have up to 65K files. He is unaware of any
other limitations. In other words, Frank, it appears that you won't have a
file-limitation problem, especially if most of the files are multi-megabyte
images. If you think you'll have too many files, just partition the
drives.




Russell E. Cook
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 8:58:59 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: S-SIMPLY : May update...

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From: epicier-at-univ-lyon1.fr (Thierry Epicier)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 10:55:18 +0200
Subject: S-SIMPLY : May update...

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A short message for users of (or people interested in) the freeware
version of 'S-SIMPLY' (SHRLI-SIMulation and diSPLaY of TEM
& HRTEM images, for PCs), available on FTP.UNIV-LYON1.FR
(/pub/dos/HRTEM) has been significantly re-updated, and new
features are available (graphical displays, a "Make Interface" tool,
"Beams" / Pendellosung plot....).

P.S. : S-SIMPLY will be available for use at the NCEM SummerSchool
1995 "Computer Simulation and Processing of HRTEM Images"
to be held June 26-30, 1995, at NCEM, Berkeley, CA.
(for information : Michael A. O'Keefe, MAOK-at-LBL.GOV)


With best regards,



______________________________________________

Thierry EPICIER
GEMPPM-502, INSA de Lyon,
69621 VILLEURBANNE, France
tel : (33) 72 43 84 94 (83 85)
FAX : (33) 72 43 85 28
Email : EPICIER-at-CISMSUN.UNIV-LYON1.FR





From: Elinor Solit :      cambrex-at-world.std.com
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 14:08:00 +0059 (EDT)
Subject: Re: Polaroid Micrograph Contest???

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Tina,

In response to your question about the Polaroid Photomicrography Contest,
it is no longer held. Polaroid called the event off in 1994, I believe
for economic reasons. So we'll all have to live with the wonderful images
it produced during its life span.

Regards,

Ellie Solit
Director of Publication
The Microscope Book

On Thu, 27 Apr 1995, Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. wrote:

} From: SMTP%"tina-at-wana.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu" 27-APR-1995 14:43:51.17
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: Polaroid Micrograph Contest???
}
} Date: Thu, 27 Apr 1995 10:37:40 -1000 (HST)
} From: Tina Carvalho {tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu}
} Subject: Polaroid Micrograph Contest???
} To: Microscopy Newsgroup {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
} Message-Id: {Pine.3.89.9504271047.A3193-0100000-at-ahi}
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
}
} Does anyone know if there will be a Polaroid International Micrograph
} Contest this year? I've not been able to get hold of anyone at Polaroid
} who knows...
}
} Aloha,
} Tina Carvalho
} Biological EM Facility
} University of Hawaii
}




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:11:09 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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From: DOUG ARRELL :      ARRELL-at-fs-iam-1
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 08:22:45 GMT+0200
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950428082245.352-at-FS-IAM-1.JRC.NL}

} Fellow Microscopists,
}
} In the process of designing an image archive system (Mac based/huge external
} HD/CD-ROM writer/CD-ROM Jukebox), I have heard rumblings concerning the
} limitations of the Mac OS with regard to the number of individual files and
} total external SCSI HD capacity that can be handled by the system. This
} could be a big problem; we are planning on handling thousand of MB size
} images on muli GB external drives before writing to the CD-ROM.
}
} Has anybody out there experienced problems of this type?
}
} Advise from anyone operating a similar system would be greatly appreciated!
}
}
} Cheers,
} Frank


MacOS up to version 7.1 was only capable of holding 2Gb per disk
partition. I don't think that you could easily produce multiple
partitions either, but I may be wrong here. System 7.5 allows disks
of up to 4Gb. To use larger disks you _may_ need to purchase some
disk partition software. We use 'Formatter Five' from Software
Architects which allows us to put multiple partitions (mixed Mac and
PC) on the same disk so that we can use the same removable disks on
Macs and PCs as transferring a few hundred Mb at a time is very slow
on our network.

Doug

******************************************
Dr Douglas Arrell
Mechanical Properties and Joining Division
Institute for Advanced Materials
Joint Research Centre
European Commission
Westerduinweg 2
1755 ZG Petten
The Netherlands

Tel. (+31) 2246 5287
Fax. (+31) 2246 1917
E-Mail Arrell-at-JRC.NL
*********************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 9:03:46 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: REcycle....

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From: hunt-at-msc.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 09:19:57 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: recycle silver paste?

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Reply-To: hunt-at-msc.cornell.edu

}
} From: SMTP%"tina-at-wana.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu" 26-APR-1995 14:44:05.69
} To: MICROSCOPY
} CC:
} Subj: recycle silver paste?
}
} Date: Wed, 26 Apr 1995 10:26:53 -1000 (HST)
} From: Tina Carvalho {tina-at-ahi.pbrc.Hawaii.Edu}
} Subject: recycle silver paste?
} To: Microscopy Newsgroup {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
} Message-Id: {Pine.3.89.9504261052.A29751-0100000-at-ahi}
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
}
} Aloha, all-
}
} I have some 150 grams of dried-up colloidal silver paste that is not worth
} trying to get back into solution, partly because it costs more to ship
} the solvent to Hawaii than to purchase new paste. Is it worth trying to
} recycle somehow? What all is in it besides silver? Is it pretty pure?
} I'm not even sure there's anyone in Hawaii who recycles silver from darkroom
} chemicals.
}
} Besides the osmium, what else should us environmentally-concerned
} microscopists be trying to conserve/recycle?
}
} A belated Happy Earth Day to you all!
}
} Mahalo,
} Tina Weatherby Carvalho
} Biological EM Facility
} University of Hawaii

Tina,
Mechanical vacuum pump oil to gas stations if nowhere else.
Any large film developer should have a system for recycling fixer (which contains the Ag removed from the film). We bought containers to store several gallons in until we bring to a store down the street. There is a small charge for that service. Unfor
tunately, the campus life safety group doesn't pick this up like they do other chemicals for proper disposal. We have them pick up used acetone and alcohol etc.} I know Hawaii is different in unexpected ways; i.e. the price of milk. Good Luck.
I still remember the first Earth Day when I went to Herald Square, and collected bumper stickers etc.
John Hunt





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:14:33 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Validation of EDS Equipment

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From: SMTP%"kris-at-miat0.vein.hu" 28-APR-1995 01:47:53.25
To: MICROSCOPY
CC:
Subj: Validation of EDS Equipment

Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 09:43:21 -0500
Message-Id: {9504281443.AA09249-at-miat0.vein.hu}
X-Sender: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu
X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
From: kris-at-miat0.vein.hu (Kovacs Kristof)
Subject: Validation of EDS Equipment

Dear Barbara:

I don't know too much about the FDA validation process but if I were you I
would do the following:

Have some good, approved standards e.g. from SPI Supplies in West Chester,
PA (e-mail:sp-supp-at-cerf.com) and do several quantitative analysis runs on
composite standards. Compare the results with the specified and approved
standard values and report the results of comparison.

My other suggestions are connected to the operation of the instrument. In
order to do this you have to have a good textbook dealing with EDS analysis,
or some laboratory workbook such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-Ray
Microanalysis, and Analytical Electron Microscopy by Charles E. Lyman et al.

1. Check the incoming vs. processed count rate. For a good instrument there
should not be much difference up to about several thousand incoming counts.

2. Check the resolution of the detector with with a pure metal standard (not
necessarily Mn), calculate it to Mn K alpha and see if it is in accordance
with the specification.

3. Check the window constant of the detector. It is important to know the
detector efficiency especially for light elements.

That's all, if you have any further question just send me a message.

Wish you good luck!

Kris

(kris-at-miat0.vein.hu)


End of returned message





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:15:51 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Term lbs.....

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From: SMTP%"S.Helfer-at-rbge.org.uk" 28-APR-1995 02:28:33.15
To: ZALUZEC
CC:
Subj: Re: Term lbs.

To: "Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab." {ZALUZEC-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov}
From: "STEPHAN HELFER" {S.Helfer-at-rbge.org.uk}
Organization: Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 09:24:46 BST
Subject: Re: Term lbs.
Priority: normal
X-mailer: WinPMail v1.0 (R2)
Message-ID: {F09E282F0C-at-rbg-3.rbge.org.uk}

From: SMTP%"Campbell36-at-aol.com" 27-APR-1995 20:06:46.60
To: MICROSCOPY
CC:
Subj: Term lbs.


Can anyone tell me the origin of the term (lbs.) as it relates to the unit
of
measure pounds?

Thanks

Jim Campbell

Chambers Everyday Dictionary: Pound: unit of mass of varying value
[hence not metric] long used in Western and Central Europe, more or
less answering to the Roman LIBRA, whose symbol lb is used for
pound.. ... British pound = 0.54359237kg...

Incidentally the Pound Sterling used to have the value of 0.543...kg of
silver; comme ca change

Yours sincerely


Dr Stephan Helfer, SSO
Mycologist

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Inverleith Row, EDINBURGH EH3 5LR,
Scotland UK

email STEPHAN-at-rbge.org.uk
phone: +44 (0)131 552 7171 ext 280
or +44 (0)131 459 0446-280 (direct digital VoiceMail line)
fax: +44 (0)131 552 0382

End of returned message





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:23:33 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: CCDs, point spread function

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From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 11:11:18 -0400
Subject: CCDs, point spread function

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X-Sender: jfmjfm-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu
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Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Instead of all this discussion on the dynamic range of CCDs, how about
considering the point spread function of scintillator/CCD systems?. If you
want to measure intensities, it seems to me that you should be taking this
into account.

Jfm


John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
413 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu, John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu
or jfmjfm-at-umich.edu they all reach me!
URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:24:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Questions on Courses?

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From: hukee.margaret-at-mayo.EDU (Marge Hukee)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 11:14:40 +0200
Subject: Questions on Courses?

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Message-Id: {9504281612.AA17153-at-fermat.Mayo.EDU}
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Two very quick questions:
Is a short course (1 week)in biological TEM available in the US?
Is Dr. Bendayan offering his course on colloidal gold labeling this year?
Thanks
Marge

Marge Hukee
EM Core Facility hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Mayo Foundation (507) 284-3148
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:26:46 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: FREE ZEISS TEM

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From: fsack-at-magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 10:36:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: excess tem

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X-NUPop-Charset: English

If you are interested in this TEM please contact Dr. Fred Sack directly.

M.V. Parthasarathy
------------------------------

Partha - we have a Zeiss 10 TEM in good shape that the College wants to
dispose of since they won't pay a service contract and moving charges (I
have my own but can't swing another one..)

Zeiss will take it back for free and we could strip it, but would be happy
to GIVE it away for anyone willing to pay for shipping. Do you know of
anyone interested??

Fred Sack phone: 614-292-0896
Plant Biology fax: 614-292-6345
Ohio State University e-mail: sack.1-at-osu.edu
1735 Neil Avenue alternate e-mail address:fsack-at-magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu
Columbus Ohio 43210




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:28:24 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Cover Slip removal

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From: Peter D. Barnett :      pbarnett-at-crl.com
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 13:26:23 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Coverslip removal

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} From: "Fermin, Cesar" {fermin-at-tmc.tulane.edu}
} Subject: FW: Coverslip removal
} To: "Zaluzec, Nestor" {ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV}
} X-Mailer: Mail*Link SMTP-MS 3.0.2
}
}
}
} I will appreciate any trick (besides immersion in xylene) for removing
} coverslips from previously mounted 10 microns thick paraffin sections. In
} addition, any comments on antigenicity left over on those sections, which were
} previously stained with H&E?
}

Try freezing. I have had success by freeezing from an inverted can of
dust-off or similar compressed air product that uses a compressed gas as
a propellant. Direct the spray right onto the cover slip, the pop off
with a razor blade or scalpel blade.


Peter D. Barnett - Forensic Science Associates - Richmond CA
pbarnett-at-crl.com VOICE: 510-222-8883 FAX: 510-222-8887






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:29:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: High quality video capture boards

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From: Alan Pooley :      pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 14:56:25 -0400
Subject: High quality video capture boards

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Can anyone with experience point me in the right direction toward
chosing a high resolution video capture board. We are about to buy a fuji
pictography 3000 color printer at $26,000. (Thanks to all who helped
me earier with advice about this and other printers). We are trying to
capture the highest possible spatial and color resolution from Betacam SP
tape via a Sony BVW 75 tape reader, which gives COMPONENT signal
(intensity Y, red-Y, Blue-Y). We hear various 'line' resolutions from
this, ranging from 450 to 750 analog lines of video resolution. Does anyone
know what the actual is? How does this translate into pixels? Do we need mo
Do we need more than 640 * 480 * 8 bits/color channel? Some of the
boards support 1024 * 1024 and various color resolution depths. Where
do you see a differnce? We are willing to go either powermac or pentium
and want to find the capture card with the best. We also want to be able
to capture 5-10 images 'on the fly' as the tape plays, rather
than slowwing it down or freezing the particular frame we want to capture.
The subject matter is color video of tube worm etc fields growing
rapidly at the hydrothermal vents as captured on betacam sp for national
geographic tv last november by Rich Lutz. Our purpose in digitizing
is both for measurement and for high quality image hard copy to the fuji
printer via photoshop on the powermac. (Does photoshop come on the PC?)

I would appreciate any help you can give me.

Alan Pooley Marine Science SEM & Morphometrics lab, Rutgers univ
908 932 8959 ext 225 pooley-at-ahab.rutgers.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:30:15 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: More info on lbs...

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From: Chris Jefferies :      chris-at-stowey.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 20:01:13 GMT
Subject: Re: Term lbs.

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Jim,

In your message dated Thursday 27, April 1995 you wrote :

} Can anyone tell me the origin of the term (lbs.) as it relates to the unit of
} measure pounds?

This is quite an interesting one, actually.

In Roman times the Latin work for a pair of scales or a balance was 'libra',
this word is still used for the astronomical constellation Libra, the scales.
Over time the word for scales became associated with a specific mass, what we
call a pound today.

The lb stands for 'libra', lbs is really a sort of false plural, adding an
Anglo-Saxon ending to a Latin word! 'Libras' is nonsense, it should have been
'librae' I suppose. That explains the lbs, but leaves the new question, 'Why did
we start to call the mass a 'pound', and when? Anyone know?

Oh, by the way. The English *monetary* value, the pound, was originally the
value of one pound in weight of metallic silver. Inflation has long since made
nonsense of that! But that explains the pound sign, it's an old-fashioned
copperplate capital 'L', for 'libra' again.

Kind regards,

Chris
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Chris Jefferies E-Mail at home - chris-at-stowey.demon.co.uk |
| at work - chris.jefferies-at-bbsrc.ac.uk |
| Microscopy page {URL: http://metro.turnpike.net/jefferie/index.html} |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:31:37 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Image

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From: gpma44-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk (Peter McHardy)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 18:05:26 +0200
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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From: gpma44-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk (Peter McHardy)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 18:05:26 +0200
Subject: Re: Image archive system

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external=20
} HD/CD-ROM writer/CD-ROM Jukebox), I have heard rumblings concerning the=20
} limitations of the Mac OS with regard to the number of individual files and=
=20
} total external SCSI HD capacity that can be handled by the system. This=20
} could be a big problem; we are planning on handling thousand of MB size=20
} images on muli GB external drives before writing to the CD-ROM.
}
} Has anybody out there experienced problems of this type?
}
} Advise from anyone operating a similar system would be greatly appreciated!=
=20
}
}
} Cheers,
} Frank
Dear Frank,
This is a problem that we are also facing. At the moment it appears=
=20
that we are collecting about 1.5 Gb of confocal images a month. On top of=20
this our network has also to deal with a large volume of images from other=
=20
sources such as laser scaning densitometers. Our network consists of a SUN=
=20
based PCNFS network with ~80 PCs and 10 MACs all acessing files held=20
centrally on our unix machine. All our file should ideally be available to=
=20
all machines and we also need to be sure that they are all properly backed=
=20
up in case of accidents.
I am currently talking to a number of computer suppliers regarding=
=20
data storage. The current favourite option appears to be to have a large=20
disk farm, about 27 Gb for online storage, then as this becomes fully to=20
move of data onto a read/write optical juke box then finally as this becomes=
=20
full to write CD roms. The price for this system complete with backup=20
software appears to be about =A320-30 sterling.=20
What I was reallly wondering is what do you other confocal=20
microscopist do? I am a microscopist and I don't want to spend all day being=
=20
a network manager so I am looking for a simple answer.


Peter



Peter McHardy,
Technology Services Manager,
Dept. Medical Oncology,
Glasgow University,
Alexander Stone Building,
Garscube Estate,
Switchback Road,
Bearsden,
Glasgow
G61 1BD
Tel No. 041-330 4811 Fax No. 041-330 4127
e-mail:gpma44-at-udcf.gla.ac.uk





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:33:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re-send of INTEGRATED MICROSCOPY SYMPOSIUM

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Subscriber's,

This message got accidently confused by me and
was incorrectly titled. My apologizes


Nestor.

---------------------


Meeting Announcement

Symposium on

"INTEGRATED MICROSCOPY"

September 29 to October 1, 1995

at

The Wisconsin Center
702 Langdon Street
Madison, WI 53706

organized by the

Integrated Microscopy Resource
University of Wisconsin-Madison

********************************************************************************
Presentations in this symposium will focus on biological problems for which
a combination of microscopies (i.e. integrated microscopy) has been used.
In this way the speakers will demonstrate by example the power, potential
and limitations of various microscopical techniques. The techniques which
will be discussed include: DIC, confocal, 2-photon excitation imaging,
SEM, TEM, cryo-specimen preparation, and AFM.
********************************************************************************

FRIDAY (Evening), September 29, 1995
6:00 - 7:55 RECEPTION
8:00 - 8:45 Ken Jacobson, Univ. of N. Carolina-Chapel Hill
8:50 - 9:35 John Sedat, Univ. of California-San Francisco
9:40 - 10:25 Edward Salmon, Univ. of N.Carolina-Chapel Hill
SATURDAY, September 30, 1995
8:30 - 9:15 D. Lansing Taylor, Carnegie-Mellon University
9:20 - 10:05 Jeff Lichtman, Washington University
10:10 - 10:40 COFFEE BREAK
10:45 - 11:30 John White, University of Wisconsin-Madison
11:35 - 12:20 Steven Smith, Stanford University
12:25 - 1:25 LUNCH (on your own)
1:30 - 2:15 Gary Borisy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
2:20 - 3:05 Ralph Albrecht, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison
3:10 - 3:55 Paul Bridgman, Washington University-Madison
5:00 - 6:00 EXHIBITOR'S SOCIAL
6:00 - 8:00 BUFFET DINNER
SUNDAY (Morning), October 1, 1995
9:00 - 9:45 Kent McDonald, Univ. of California-Berkley
9:50 - 10:35 Stanley Erlandsen, University of Minnesota
10:40 - 11:10 COFFEE BREAK
11:15 - 12:00 Hans Ris, University of Wisconsin-Madison
12:05 - 12:50 Eric Henderson, Iowa State University


Fees:
General Registration $100.00 (Late fee: $130.00)
(Includes: Fri. Reception, Sat. Social & Dinner, Coffee
Breaks and Materials)
Local Registration $ 80.00 (Late fee: $110.00)
(Includes: Fri. Reception, Sat. Social, Coffee Breaks and
Materials)
Guest Ticket - Saturday Dinner $ 20.00 (On-site Unavailable)


Interested in attending?

Consult our Web site for additional information:

http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/imr.html


To receive a brochure and registration form write to:
IMR
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706

or email: imradmin-at-calshp.cals.wisc.edu



Following the symposium, there will be a two-day workshop at the IMR. We
will be presenting lectures and provide "hands-on" experience for the
following techniques:
* 2-photon excitation imaging
* 4D DIC imaging
* cryo-SEM
* high pressure freezing
* reversible embedment for SEM and TEM

Workshop attendence will be limited to 25 students. A letter of
application is required. Fee: $150.00.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:34:51 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: greys levels, film vs digital

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From: jpawley-at-macc.wisc.edu (James Pawley)
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 19:22:22 -0600
Subject: Re: greys levels, film vs digital

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Sorry to be late in seeing this discussion but, looking over the points
made so far, I think that there seems to be a misunderstanding.

Yes, the CCD part of the Gatan (or Teitz etc.) digital TEM image recording
system may have a dynamic range of 14 to 16 bits, however, there is not a
1-to-1 relation between electrons-in-the-beam and electrons-in-the-CCD.
The beam electrons are first converted to photons in some sort of phosphor
or scintillator. Although the exact number of photons
produced/incident-beam -electron varies with the energy of the beam (less
at higher kV) and with the thickness and type of phosphor, 500 might be a
good number.

Of these, only a small fraction make it to the CCD while others are lost
because they are going in the wrong direction to start off with and never
get out of the phosphor layer (because of total internal reflection,
scattering or absorbtion in the phosphor, either YAG-Ce or P-20) or because
they never get into the fiber-optical coupling (or lens system), as they do
not strike the lens or fiber-optic plate at the correct angle. As a result,
50-100 photons may reach the CCD, producing 25-50
electrons/incident-beam-electron. For this reason the dynamic range of the
entire detector is 25-50 times less for electron-optical use than for use
with light. One can use a thinner phosphor or a FO-plate with a lower NA
to reduce this factor but then you lose the single-electron sensitivity
that is also a good feature of this detector.

As mentioned by others, one of the other good features is the linearity of
response of this detector. However, one should remember that the response
of film to direct kV electron exposure is far less non-linear than is its
response to light. This is because it is generally believed that
two-photons are needed to expose a silver grain (and therefore the
blackening is proportional to intensity squared) whereas only a single
kV-electron is needed to expose a grain (because this single electron is
likely to deposit far more energy with each interaction.).

The dynamic range of film exposed to electrons is likewise less than the
linear exposure range (or the range of your digitizer) because each 100 kV
beam electron (though perhaps not each 1000 keV etectron) is likely to
expose (many) more than one grain (depending on grain size, emulsion
thickness and silver density). As a result, although one may be able to
digitize a brightness ratio or 10,000:1 from the developed film, this may
actually only represent an electron intensity range of 1,000:1 or less.

Because of its very low "fog" level, the Fugi imaging plate is (extremely)
linear over a larger range but the resolution is also low so one must
generally operate at a higher magnification (and hence a higher dose rate
to the specimen).

An excellent reference on the response (resolution and "speed") of a wide
variety of photographic emulsions to 100 keV electrons is given in K.H.
Downing and D.A. Grano, Ultramicroscopy 7:381 (1982)
}
} Thomas E. Phillips wants comments on grey levels possible in film vs.
} digital. Film response is a sigmoidal curve and one adjusts exposure to
} fit the light coming off the subject to the linear portion of the curve in
} the film's response. Black & white film provides a greater number of lens
} aperture stops (6-8) to capture greys compared to color film (about 4,
} depends on the film). So the answer to the question of grey values
} possible in film is that one can capture a great variety of greys in film,
} but not all in one image-only a relatively narrow range can be captured,
} with the appropriate adjustment of exposure. CCDs have a linear response
} over several orders of magnitude. Slow scan CCDs can capture a remarkable
} range of greys in each image, in which case one can choose which range of
} greys to display on the moniter.
}
}
}
}
} R. Howard Berg, Ph.D.
} Biology Department
} University of Memphis
} Memphis, TN, 38152
} E mail: bergrh-at-cc.memphis.edu
} phone: 901-678-4449 fax: 901-678-4457
}

***************NEW ADDRESS**************
Prof. James B Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 1235, Engineering Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1500 Johnson Dr. Madison, Wisconsin, 53706.
JPAWLEY-at-MACC.WISC.EDU






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 20:48:08 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Restarting the Automatic Delivery Mode

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Morning Subscribers,

I am going to attempt a restart of the automatic
delivery mode tonight. Over the weekend we
had only slightly more than normal "error"
which generally were due to network connection
failures, computers shutdown, disk full problems.
Basically, nothing that looked like a loop,
or bouncing messages. Remember if a delivery
error occurs, the originator of the message will
get the report and I will only see it if the
originator's node is down. We continue to
have problems with some nodes shutting down & or crashing.
so bewarned that some delivery error messages
will virtually always appear. Generally much less
than 1% of the mail that comes thorough this system
is not delivered. Just remember that for every
single message that comes into the host over 2000 copies
leave.

Keep your collective fingers crossed.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp...





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-Argonne Nat. Lab. :      ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 20:48:08 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Restarting the Automatic Delivery Mode

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Morning Subscribers,

I am going to attempt a restart of the automatic
delivery mode tonight. Over the weekend we
had only slightly more than normal "error"
which generally were due to network connection
failures, computers shutdown, disk full problems.
Basically, nothing that looked like a loop,
or bouncing messages. Remember if a delivery
error occurs, the originator of the message will
get the report and I will only see it if the
originator's node is down. We continue to
have problems with some nodes shutting down & or crashing.
so bewarned that some delivery error messages
will virtually always appear. Generally much less
than 1% of the mail that comes thorough this system
is not delivered. Just remember that for every
single message that comes into the host over 2000 copies
leave.

Keep your collective fingers crossed.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp...





From: bob-at-befvax.uchicago.edu
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 15:48:06 EDT
Subject: RE: CCDs, point spread function

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Indeed Mansfields remark is correct. The point spread function is the
definitive description of the performance of any detector. The
psf of CCD cameras is described by Kujawa and Krahl in Ultramicroscopy
46, 395-403 (1992) and by Daberkow et al Ibid 38 215-223 (1991).

Both papers are well written and lucid.


Robert Josephs
Univ of Chicago
312 702 -1077





From: Peter Steele :      70152.3105-at-compuserve.com
Date: 30 Apr 95 11:19:32 EDT
Subject: Coverslip removal - nitrogen

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Instead of compressed gases, we routinely use liquid nitrogen. Just hold the
slide in the 'fumes' until the coverslip goes opaque (you can try submersing for
10 s). The coverslip will pop off with gently prying from a single edge safety
razor blade.

As for antigenicity on H&E it is very much an individual trial an error. Start
by de-coloring followed by a 1 hour soak in buffer. Then proceed as normal.

Peter O. Steele, Ph.D.
All Children's Hospital
St. Petersburg, FL





From: m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson)
Date: Mon, 1 May 1995 11:23:32
Subject: Re: Osmium oxidation

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To: microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV

Osmium solutions that have reduced (and changed color) can be partially or
wholly restored by reoxidation using hydrogen peroxide. Just add dilute
peroxide dropwise until the colour lightens. If the change is not too
advanced, the original oxidation state can be completely restored.

We saved up discarded osmium from around australia for years then sent it to
Johnson Matthey. But the concentration was so low the value of the product
only just covered the cost of reclamation and refining. We didn't make money
but I guess we got a warm fuzzy from saving a non renewable product

Mel Dickson




From: em-at-mediacity.com (E. Monberg)
Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 21:56:57 -0800
Subject: FS: NEW EYEPIECES 30mm BARRELS "10x/20" (fit Zeiss, Leitz, Wild)

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FS: NEW EYEPIECES 30mm BARRELS "10x/20" (fit Zeiss, Leitz, Wild)

I have a few sets of some new, modern design microscope eyepieces with a
quite wide field of view, and fit ZEISS and LEITZ and WILD WF binocular
eyetubes. Also work quite well with astronomical optics.

"WF10x/20"
TUBE DIAMETER 30mm/1.18"
MFG B&L
MODEL 31-15-77
ORIGINAL COST $264/set
CONDITION New in original packaging

My Price $89/pair

Ed Monberg em-at-mediacity.com








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