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From: Stephan Coetzee :      stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 14:54:09 GMT+2
Subject: Re: Finger Protection During Grinding

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Dear All
This is all fun. Lost a bit of skin myself. Latex gloves does help a
bit. Home made clamping devices I pressume will help, but I prefer
to have a "hands on" onto the sample. For large amounts of samples
automation is a option.


} Everett Ramer wrote:
}
} } } We have a manual metalographic grinding/polishing wheel. The sample
} } } being prepared is held in the hand as it is pressed against the rotating
} wheel.
} } } Our safety people have asked us to provide finger protection for this
} device.
} } } Does anyone have any solution/suggestion?
} } } Everett Ramer
}
} Everett,
} Mary Mager's response, while funny, is actually quite accurate. There are
} not too
} many ways to protect fingers while properly holding a small (1-1/4",
} typically)
} sample for grinding/polishing.
}
} I preface my next remarks by pointing out that I work for a manufacturer of
}
} metallographic equipment and consumables, and therefore have a financial
} interest in solving your problem:
}
} We at BUEHLER, do offer a simple grinding fixture which might help. This
} fixture
} is a squat, stainless steel, hollow cylinder with a carbide ring around
} it's base.
} The sample is clamped within another hollow cylinder seated within the
} first.
} The two cylinders are threaded, so that the inner can be raised or lowered
} with respect to the carbide 'stop' of the outer. Engraved markings allow
} material removal in increments as fine as 20microns. While this is not
} actually
} finger protection, per se, it will allow you to grasp something larger so
} that your
} fingers are not in such close proximity to the grinding wheel. We also
} offer
} a motor system which allows the fixture to rotate, in place, on the wheel}
Mr. S H Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
Private bag X3
Wits
Johannesburg
2050
Tell: +27 11 716 2419
Fax : +27 11 339 3407
E-mail stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za





From: Corazon Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 07:48:59 -0600
Subject: Ultrastainer

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I am curious if anyone is using an automatic section stainer for TEM. If
so, what brand are you using. We are using an LKB section stainer (15 years
old now). I just wonder if there is anything else in the market. Thanks,

Cora Bucana
*******************************************************
Corazon D. Bucana, Ph.D.
Department of Cancer Biology
U.T. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Blvd. Box 173
Houston, Texas 77030
Phone: (713) 792-8106
Email:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
FAX: (713) 792-8747






From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 09:12:11 EST
Subject: 3RD ANNOUNCEMENT: Image analysis workshops

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Workshops on Quantitative Image Analysis

May 20-22 and May 24-26, 1999
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

and

June 14-16, 1998
Danish Technological Institute
Taastrup, Denmark

This highly regarded hands-on course taught by expert faculty has
been presented annually for more than 15 years. It deals with all phases
of quantitative and computer-assisted imaging from acquisition and
processing through measurement and stereological interpretation.
Attendees receive The Image Processing Handbook plus a CD-ROM
containing images, algorithms (Photoshop-compatible for Mac and
Windows) and an extensive on-line tutorial and course notes on
stereology and statistical analysis. The course is appropriate for scientists,
technicians and administrators using or intending to use these techniques.
Attendees typically come from materials science, geology, biological and
medical sciences, pharmaceuticals, food science, industrial quality control,
remote sensing, and other disciplines. You are encouraged to bring your
own images for the hands-on lab sessions.

For detailed information and registration contact Cindy Allen,
Dept. of Continuing and Professional Education, N. C. State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695-7401, 919-515-8171, fax 919-515-7614,
email: Cindy_Allen-at-NCSU.edu

Information is available on-line at the following sites:

http://members.aol.com/IPCourse/
http://evu.dti.dk/hojslet/ipcourse.htm






From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 10:16:42 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM

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Seadoohog-at-aol.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
}
} My next question concerns Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The
} baseline on the EDS spectra is influenced by inelasic scattering of the
} incident electron beam by the atomic nuclei of the sample, which results in a
} peaked background. This is called the bremsstrahlung effect. What causes
} this???
}
} Thanks!

Dear Seadoohog,
Brehmsstrahlung, or "braking radiation" is caused by the ac-
celeration of the electron by a large mass (nucleus). Both Maxwell's
equations and quantum mechanics predict that accelerated charges will
give off electromagnetic radiation. The large mass is necessary so
that conservation of both energy and momentum can be satisfied.
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 10:36:53 -0500
Subject: Re: LM - old Reichert; need manual

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Following up on Yvan's comments:

There are some second hand equipment outlets here in the US who
occasionally get bits and pieces for Zetopans. One is John Oren, in VT.

Re: illuminators - OptiQuip has suggested some interesting alternatives
for an upgrade path. We will be working on this in Apr/May. Anyone
interested is welcome to email privately for further info.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.



At 01:41 PM 2/28/99 +0100, Yvan Lindekens wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: radsci-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 08:40:29 PST
Subject: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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Hello all,

In the process of trying to produce some Ag coated samples, I instead
obtained some silver beads, which would be dandy if that's what I was after
;^ { ...

The specifics were: Denton DV502A evaporator, 4cm of 0.2mm dia Ag wire
wrapped around ~1mm dia section of a standard carbon rod, 5x10^-7 Torr.
Melting of the wire occured abruptly at well under 20A.

Can anyone suggest conditions or parameters to that will yield evaporation
rather than melting???

Later I expect to coat with Al, which like Ag melts and boils at much lower
temperatures than Pd and Pt (which are no problem with the above...) so if
anyone can provide similar information regarding Al, that would also be
helpful.

(This is probably pushing my luck, but if anyone knows any rule of thumb for
how thick the films of the above are as a function of conditions & time,
that would be super to hear....)

Thanks.




_______________________________________________________
Get your free, private email at http://mail.excite.com/





From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 11:42:21 -0500
Subject: Size of TMV?

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O.k., I've lost my cheat sheet which had the sizes of Tobbaco Mosaic Virus components,
and I can't locate the information presently. Can anyone help me out here? I know the
particles are 18.0 nm in diameter "300 nm" in length (o.k. some of them break). What
is the diameter of the central core?

What is the spacing between the sprialing sub units?

Thanks!


Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."





From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 13:07:56 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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Silver has a melting point of 961C. Its vapor pressure is
847C = 1e-8 torr
958C = 1e-6 torr
1105C = 1e-4 torr

An equilibrium vapor pressure of 1e-6 will give ~1 monolayer per second
deposition rate (using a kinetic theory of gas model with a sticking
coefiicient of 1). Since this will undoubtedly not be an equilibrium
situation, you can this value to be an upper limit. So, at the melting
point of silver, you will get much less than 0.2nm/sec deposition rate near
the sample. Farther away, it will drop as 1/r^2.

Aluminum too, will melt long before you get much evaporation
660C = melting point
677C = 1e-8 torr
821C = 1e-6 torr
1010C = 1e-4 torr

Also, thermal evaporation of Ag, Au, Al will tend to produce metal islands
on the sample which can interfere with high mag imaging. Sputtering often
will give a smaller grain size.

Cheers,
Henk


At 08:40 AM 3/1/99 -0800, you wrote:
}
{snip}
}
} Can anyone suggest conditions or parameters to that will yield evaporation
} rather than melting???
}
} Later I expect to coat with Al, which like Ag melts and boils at much lower
} temperatures than Pd and Pt (which are no problem with the above...) so if
} anyone can provide similar information regarding Al, that would also be
} helpful.
}
} (This is probably pushing my luck, but if anyone knows any rule of thumb for
} how thick the films of the above are as a function of conditions & time,
} that would be super to hear....)
}
} Thanks.

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
A pessimist fears that this is true.






From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 01 Mar 99 10:17:02 -0800
Subject: Re>Techniques book

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


There was a request recently for information on a new EM techniques book. =
The book is scheduled to be published in mid March so there is no =
information yet other than the chapter titles. I post them here.

Electron microscopy methods and protocols / edited by M.A. Nasser
Hajibagheri. (Methods in molecular biology ; v. 117)
ISBN 0-89603-640-5 Expected publication date is mid March.

Contents:
1 General Preparation of Material and Staining of Sections ................=
... 1
Heather A. Davies
2 Negative Staining of Thinly Spread Biological Particulates ..............=
. 13
J. Robin Harris
3 Preparation of Thin-Film Frozen-Hydrated/Vitrified Biological
Specimens for Cryoelectron Microscopy .....................................=
.. 31
J. Robin Harris and Marc Adrian
4 The Production of Cryosections Through Fixed and Cryoprotected
Biological Material and Their Use in Immunocytochemistry .......... 49
Paul Webster
5 High-Pressure Freezing for Preservation of High Resolution Fine
Structure and Antigenicity for Immunolabelling ............................=
. 77
Kent McDonald
6 The Application of LR Gold Resin for Immunogold Labeling .............. =
99
J. R. Thorpe
7 Low-Temperature Embedding in Acrylic Resins .............................=
. 111
Pierre Gounon
8 Quantitative Aspects of Immunogold Labeling in Embedded
and Nonembedded Sections...................................................=
..... 125
Catherine Rabouille
9 Microwave Processing Techniques for Electron Microscopy:
A Four-Hour Protocol ......................................................=
............. 145
Rick T. Giberson and Richard S. Demaree, Jr.
10 Electron Microscopic Enzyme Cytochemistry...............................=
.... 159
Nobukazu Araki and Tanenori Hatae
11 In Situ Molecular Hybridization Techniques
for Ultrathin Sections ....................................................=
................ 167
Jean-Guy Fournier and Fran=E7oise Escaig-Haye
12 Preparation of the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe
for Ultrastructural and Immunocytochemical Study ..................... 183
M. A. Nasser Hajibagheri, Kenneth Sawin, Steve Gschmeissner,
Ken Blight, and Carol Upton
13 Preparation of Double/Single-Stranded DNA and RNA Molecules
for Electron Microscopy ...................................................=
............ 209
M. A. Nasser Hajibagheri
14 Applications of Electron Microscopy for Studying Protein-DNA
Complexes..................................................................=
.................. 229
Maria Schnos and Ross B. Inman
15 X-Ray Microanalysis Techniques .........................................=
............. 245
A. John Morgan, Carole Winters, and Stephen St=FCrzenbaum

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm






From: Deanne L. Hoenscheid :      dlh3-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 1999 14:17:12 -0600
Subject: Job Announcement

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by nss4.cc.Lehigh.EDU (8.9.1a/8.9.1) with ESMTP id OAA158376;
Mon, 1 Mar 1999 14:17:15 -0500
Message-ID: {36DAF5C8.6259645-at-lehigh.edu}


Please note the following job announcement:

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE TECHNICIAN

Lehigh University seeks an Electron Microscope Technician to perform
technical duties in support of the Electron Microscopy Laboratory of the
Materials Science and Engineering Department. Technician will instruct
students in the operation of microscopes and other equipment; maintain
and repair instruments; oversee upkeep of the lab; support research
professors and students; analyze samples; give tours and demonstrations;
supervise students; maintain a safe environment; and other assigned
duties. Bachelors degree in physical science and/or 4+ years related
work experience required. Candidates should be familiar with electron
microscopes, mechanical and electronic equipment, vacuum systems, PC
and/or MAC and EDS/WDS systems. Good communication and interpersonal
skills are essential.

Lehigh University offers excellent benefits and vacation package.
Interested candidates should forward resume to: Deanne Hoenscheid,
Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 E. Packer Ave.,
Bethlehem, PA 18015. EOE. M/F/D/V.





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 18:08:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Size of TMV?

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On Mon, 1 Mar 1999 edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 11:42:21 -0500
} From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Size of TMV?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} O.k., I've lost my cheat sheet which had the sizes of Tobbaco Mosaic Virus components,
} and I can't locate the information presently. Can anyone help me out here? I know the
} particles are 18.0 nm in diameter "300 nm" in length (o.k. some of them break). What
} is the diameter of the central core?
}
} What is the spacing between the sprialing sub units?
}
} Thanks!
}
}
} Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} 352 Pearson Hall
} Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
} Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
} E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
}
} "RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."
}

TMV:

Pitch = 2.3 nm

Don't know about inner diameter of core; try:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nik.gov/ICTVdb/welcome.htm

Let me know the diameter if you find it.
S

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: John Heckman :      heckman-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 18:27:46 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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I've used W baskets to produce thin films of Au,Cr,Al and Cu in similar
evaporators. I would think it would work with Ag too. The liquid metal
seems to "hang" in the basket by what, I would guess, are surface tension
effects. Any of the major EM houses should have these baskets.

I've also attempted to calculate, a priori, what the film thickness should
be and never been too thrilled at the agreement with the result. A quartz
crystal thickness monitor can be calibrated for most metals but if you
don't have one, you might try using the change in resistance across a glass
coverslip (Steere approach) or cross sectioning a series of thin films
generated under known evaporation conditions and looking at them in a TEM.

cheers,
John
John Heckman
Michigan State University




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America








From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 15:54:23 -0800
Subject: RE: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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radsci-at-excite.com writes ...
}
}
} In the process of trying to produce some Ag coated samples, I instead
} obtained some silver beads, which would be dandy if that's
} what I was after
} ...
} The specifics were: Denton DV502A evaporator, 4cm of 0.2mm
} dia Ag wire wrapped around section of a standard carbon rod,
} ...

I might suggest, rather than carbon rod, you wrap the Ag
wire around tungsten wire which will be wetted. I imagine the
Ag on carbon was like water on a duck's back.

BTW, why did a simple reply to this post want to send a
message to {"radsci-at-excite.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ???

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: McLean, Dorrance :      dmclea-at-sandia.gov
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 17:37:14 -0700
Subject: RE: Finger Protection during sample prep

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Everett,
When I have to do a quick grind on something small that I don't want to put
into a mount, I use the "rubber fingers" that secretaries wear. I have
found these to be much better than finger cots, which don't last one spin of
the wheel. I don't know if this solution will satisfy the "safety" people
but I still have finger prints.
Dorrance

} ----------
} From: EVERETT RAMER
} Sent: Thursday, February 1999 8:23 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Finger Protection during Sample Prep
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We have a manual metalographic grinding/polishing wheel. The sample
} being prepared is held in the hand as it is pressed against the rotating
} wheel.
} Our safety people have asked us to provide finger protection for this
} device.
} Does anyone have any solution/suggestion?
} Everett Ramer
}
}





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 01 Mar 99 21:32:27 -0500
Subject: Wehnelt cap holder

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

We have been asked this question by a customer:
===========================================
We are looking for a holder for the Wehnelt cap for filament adjustment.
AMRAY had one when we went up there but they do not sell one nor could they
tell us where to buy one. It looks like a custom job. Do you know what we
are talking about?
===========================================
I am sure that someone has this hidden away somewhere in their catalog but I
have not been able to find it. Any help would be appreciated.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 19:22:53 GMT+1200
Subject: JEOL Probe Wanted

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Dear All

I run a very old probe in a small Geology department.
I want to buy a JEOL 733 or later (eg 840A).
I would be very pleased to hear from anyone who has one currently for
sale or who is planning to sell one this year.

thanks

Ritchie


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Stephan Coetzee :      stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 09:07:59 GMT+2
Subject: Re: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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Dear all
We do evaporation of various metals on a old Edwards evaporator.
First the Tungstan (W) wire gets heated up under vacuum to clean it
from all dirt. Then the requiered metal wire gets wraped around a V
bent in the W wire. when heated up the wire will melt and form a
melted globule. this will evaporate only after futher heating.
}

}
} The specifics were: Denton DV502A evaporator, 4cm of 0.2mm dia Ag wire
} wrapped around ~1mm dia section of a standard carbon rod, 5x10^-7 Torr.
} Melting of the wire occured abruptly at well under 20A.
}
} Can anyone suggest conditions or parameters to that will yield evaporation
} rather than melting???
}

}
} (This is probably pushing my luck, but if anyone knows any rule of thumb for
} how thick the films of the above are as a function of conditions & time,
} that would be super to hear....)
}
No it does exist.

p = density of the of the coating material in g. ( cm^-3)
M = weight of coating material a source (g)
R = source samle seperation, (cm)
dx = film thickness.

(4 pie R^2) dx p = M

But 1) efficiency factor of evaporative method method is rarely
better than 75%.
thuss: (4 pie R^2) dx p = M.3/4
this will only work if the sample is directly under the evaporated
source

If it is at a angle theta,

3/4.M = (4 pie R^2 dx p)/ sin theta
Where theta is the angle between the gounr and the tip of the V.

since Em people do like a really thin coating (nm)
for M in g/cm^3 R in cm and dx in nm

M = 4/3. ( 4pie R^2 dx p)/sin theta . 10^-7

For coating material in wire form for a diameter d cm and l lenth
(cm0

M = (pie d^2 lp)/4

length of wire required for a coatint thickness of dx cm
1 = 64/3 .[( R^2 dx)/d^2 sin theta)]

hope this does help


Mr. S H Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
Private bag X3
Wits
Johannesburg
2050
Tell: +27 11 716 2419
Fax : +27 11 339 3407
E-mail stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za





From: Reinhard Rachel t4534 :      reinhard.rachel-at-biologie.uni-regensburg.de
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 08:52:13 +0100
Subject: Re: Size of TMV?

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check the following pages:

http://www.scisoc.org/feature/TMV/Images/TMVdraw.htm
http://www.tulane.edu/~dmsander/Big_Virology/BVFamilyIndex.html
http://www.tulane.edu/~dmsander/Big_Virology/BVunassignplant.html#tobamo

} What is the diameter of the central core?
according to the sketch, the diameter of the central core is about 4 nm.

RR

Dr. Reinhard Rachel
Universitaet Regensburg
Lehrstuhl fuer Mikrobiologie (Prof. Dr. K.O. Stetter)
D - 93040 Regensburg
Tel.: +49-941-943-4534
Fax.: +49-941-943-1824
http://www.biologie.uni-regensburg.de/Mikrobio/Stetter/Gruppen/rachel.html
e-mail: Reinhard.Rachel-at-biologie.uni-regensburg.de





From: Alan Hall, Lab for Microscopy&Micro-Analysis :      AHall-at-nsnper1.up.ac.za
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 11:51:02 CAT-02:00
Subject: TEM Insect eggs

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Good day Listmembers
A while ago there was a discussion on this list on the preparation of
insect eggs for ultra-thin sectioning. Without re-opening the
discussion, can somebody that collected all the replies and other
experts in this regard please supply me with a general protocol if
there is one?

TIA
Alan N Hall
Laboratory for Microscopy and Micro-Analysis
NWII Building
University of Pretoria
Pretoria
0002
Republic of South Africa
Tel: +27-12-420 3896(Office)
+27-12-420 2075(Laboratory)
Fax: +27-12-362 5150





From: Dr Eric E. Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 09:59:21 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: evaporation

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Dear all,
In the evaporation of metal from tungsten wire it is
important not to raise the temperature of the wire too
fast. If you do this, the metal will melt and drop off in
a blob. The thing to do is to raise the temperature until
the metal just starts to melt. Then wait until the wire is
wetted - you'll see the liquid creeping up the sides of the
V. The bulk of the metal will remain as a blob at the
apex of the V but will not drop off. Then you can turn the
heat up more until the evaporation takes place.

Eric

----------------------
Dr Eric E. Lachowski
University of Aberdeen
Department of Chemistry
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 1224 272934
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk








From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 08:01:07 -0600
Subject: RE: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

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At 03:54 PM 3/1/99, shAf wrote:
}
} BTW, why did a simple reply to this post want to send a
} message to {"radsci-at-excite.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ???
}
I am not sure about the why, but I see that too for various posts. I think
it has something to do with the formating of the address, perhaps the use
of the quotes.

You know, it could almost be beneficial. You can reply to the sender or the
whole list by removing the unwanted part. However, about half the time, I
forget to do the editing and my posts get kecked back for me to fix them.

WS





From: Hall, Ernest L (CRD) :      hallel-at-crd.ge.com
Date: Mon, 1 Mar 1999 17:43:08 -0500
Subject: Microscopy Job Opening - GE Plastics

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Open Position: Microscopy Characterization Scientist

Essential Functions:

Provide polymer morphology, particle and aesthetics characterization support at GE Plastics in Mt.
Vernon, IN. In particular, TEM, SEM, optical microscopy, AFM, particle sizing, surface and other
more specialized techniques are used. Leadership in effective problem solving approaches is a must.

Developing Six Sigma quality methods, leveraging information technology to improve problem
solving/productivity, and establishing world class techniques appropriate for supporting the
businesses are key components to success. This position will have as an area of responsibility the
interface role between Analytical Technology and the High Performance Polymer business. The role
requires development of effective test plans to support customer issue resolution, Technology Design
for Six Sigma programs and manufacturing issues. Broad analytical problem solving skills or the
ability to develop these skills.

Qualifications/Requirements:

Ph.D. in Polymer Science, Analytical Chemistry or related areas with expertise in Microscopy
characterization of materials. Excellent problem solving and innovation skills are required. Six
Sigma Quality Training or the ability to learn these skills. Good interpersonal , teamwork, and
communication skills. High energy.

Interested candidates should send their resume to:

Matt Harthcock
GE Plastics Global Leader
Materials Characterization and Analytical Technology
Building 1
1 Lexan Lane
Mt. Vernon, Indiana 47620
Phone: 812-831-4776
FAX 812-831-4917






From: MAPE-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu (Maureen A. Petersen)
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 09:39:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TMV core

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The C.M.I./A.A.B. Descriptions of Plant Viruses No. 151 (Oct. 1975) on
tobacco mosaic virus (type strain) gives the following information:

..cylindrical canal of radius c. 2 nm.....

As Sarah Miller states, a pitch of c. 2.3 nm is given.

More infromatiom about particle structure is given: If anyone would like a
complete copy of this bulletin, I can mail you a copy. Dont' know if the
fax machine will accept this document the way it is folded.

Maureen Petersen

************************************************************************
Maureen Petersen
Department of Plant Pathology
1453 Fifield Hall
University of Florida

voice: (352) 392-0634
fax: (352) 392-6532
email: MAPE-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
************************************************************************







From: Azriel Gorski :      azrielg-at-cc.huji.ac.il
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 16:18:27 +0200
Subject: Grandson's New Microscope

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My grandson in the states recently and proudly wrote to his Grand-Dad that
he NOW has a microscope and could I send him some samples to look at. He
told me that .....

"the microscope is EDU-SCIENCE and the magnifications
are 100x 300x 600x."

Since my grandson is 10 years old and egar, I don't want to ask him
questions like - Are the objectives aprochromats?. Is anyone on the list
familiar with this microscope? I specifically want to know if it's optics
are good, and if they are color corrected.

Once I know if he has a decent microscope or a toy that makes things biger
and the user blind or crazy, I will better know how to encourage him, and
what type of samples and reading matter to send.

Thanks for you help, from a land far away.

Shalom from Jerusalem,
Azriel

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Azriel Gorski, Head
Fibers and Polymers Laboratory
Division of Identification and Forensic Science
Israel National Police
Jerusalem

azrielg-at-cc.huji.ac.il ICQ User ID No. - 1750739

CHOICE - The enchanted blade, with an edge
that shapes lifetimes.
Richard Bach
RUNNING FROM SAFETY

A friend is someone who knows the song in your
heart, and can sing it back to you when you have
forgotten the words.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+






From: sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu (Peggy Sherwood)
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 10:11:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LM Stains for Nerves

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Hi!
I have a reference to two stains/methods for nerves: Koelle's acetyl
cholinesterase technique and
Winklemann's Silver Impregnation method. I have not been able to find
either one. I found a "general" reference to acetyl cholinesterase from
the University of Nottingham web page in which they
recommend using 'DPK' mounting resin. I have never heard of it--can
anyone help me out? Thanks!

Peggy Sherwood
Wellman Labs of Photomedicine (224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-3192 (fax)







From: Ken Bart :      kbart-at-hamilton.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 10:24:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Wehnelt cap holder

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} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} We have been asked this question by a customer:
} ===========================================
} We are looking for a holder for the Wehnelt cap for filament adjustment.
} AMRAY had one when we went up there but they do not sell one nor could they
} tell us where to buy one. It looks like a custom job. Do you know what we
} are talking about?
} ===========================================
} I am sure that someone has this hidden away somewhere in their catalog but I
} have not been able to find it. Any help would be appreciated.
}
} Chuck


Chuck:

I believe these Wehnelt cap holders are available from Energy Beam
Sciences.

Ken Bart

Kenneth M. Bart
Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Hamilton College
Clinton, New York 13323 USA
kbart-at-hamilton.edu
(315) 859-4715







From: Ming Chen :      mingchen-at-gpu.srv.ualberta.ca
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 08:29:57 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Size of TMV?

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} O.k., I've lost my cheat sheet which had the sizes of Tobbaco Mosaic Virus components,
} and I can't locate the information presently. Can anyone help me out here? I know the
} particles are 18.0 nm in diameter "300 nm" in length (o.k. some of them break). What
} is the diameter of the central core?

The diameter of the central core is 40 A, it is packed with the nucleic acid
(RNA). The protein subunits are arranged in a helix containing 16 1/3
subunits per turn ( or 49 subunits per three turns). Each subunit consists
of 158 amino acids in a constant sequence.

} What is the spacing between the sprialing sub units?
}
It is the nucleic acid.

Best regards,

Ming

***********************************************
* Ming H. Chen, PhD *
* Medicine/Dentistry Electron Microscopy Unit *
* #1074B Dentistry Pharmacy Building *
* University Of Alberta. *
* Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2N8 *
* *
* Visit My Page At: *
* http://www.ualberta.ca/~mingchen *
***********************************************









From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 07:53:34 -0800
Subject: RE: Wehnelt cap holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Charles writes ...
}
} We have been asked this question by a customer:
} ===========================================
} We are looking for a holder for the Wehnelt cap for filament
} adjustment.
} AMRAY had one when we went up there but they do not sell one
} nor could they tell us where to buy one. ...

Just to clarify ... this sounds like a "jig" strictly for
holding the wehnelt on the workbench(??) From personal experience
I've never seen one of these as a necessary component for the
adjustment ... or if it were, it came with the instrument, or was
available from the manufacturer. Usually, its primary use is as
a heat sink so that the wehnelt assy can be removed while it is hot
and to allow it to cool down in a minimum amount of time. Since
wehnelts vary in design and geometry I can't imagine this being
available thru any other source other than the manufacturer ...
which leaves you with what would seem to be a very simple job for
a machine shop.
(... why do I think this isn't much help? ...)

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 12:05:50 -0600
Subject: picoammeter wanted

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

--part0_920394772_boundary
Content-ID: {0_920394772-at-inet_out.mail.aol.com.1}
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII



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} From: Mriglermas-at-aol.com
Return-path: {Mriglermas-at-aol.com}
To: Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Cc: Mriglermas-at-aol.com


I wish to purchase a picoammeter for specimen current measurement (x-ray
analysis work) and am requesting information on models, prices and vendors.
Please contact me directly. Thanks.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################







From: Rik Littlefield :      rj_littlefield-at-pnl.gov
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 09:40:10 -0800
Subject: need 1975 Trans.AMS article quickly

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I need to obtain quickly a copy of

Sonneborn, T.M. (1975), "The Paramecium aurelia complex of fourteen
sibling species", Transactions of the American Microscopical Society
94: 155-178.

This is to support a high school student doing a very interesting
project on individual variation in protozoa. The local library
ordered a copy but estimates 3 weeks delivery.

Can someone out there help me to get it quickly? I will be happy to
reimburse reasonable expenses.

Thanks!
--Rik
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Email: Rik.Littlefield-at-pnl.gov Rik Littlefield
Phone: 509-375-3927 Staff Scientist
Fax: 509-375-3641 Battelle/PNL, MS K7-15
Home: 509-375-3493 P.O.Box 999, Richland, WA 99352
----------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 13:59:24 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM (?) Help with Ag, Al evaporation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Posted by our evaporater, dating from who-knows-when, but certainly long
ago, is a sheet of recommended procedures for evaporation different metals.
For silver it recommends using a molybdenum or tantalum wire as the
filament. It says to wrap a fine wire of silver around the Ta or Mo
filament, and then simply evaporate. I recently did a number of successful
silver evaporations by fashioning (by hand) a Mo spiral basket and putting a
small bead of Ag in it. (I had some Mo wire and Ag beads). I then
evaporated the Ag just as I would have evaporated Au from a W basket. It
worked fine, but, as always with evaporating from a basket in this way, the
thickness uniformity over distances of 2-3 cm. was not very good.

I always just use a W basket for Al evaporations.

Hope this helps.

Tony Garratt-Reed.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Anthony J. Garratt-Reed, M.A., D.Phil.*
* SEF Team Leader *
* MIT, Room 13-1027 *
* 77 Massachusetts Avenue *
* Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 *
* USA *
* Phone: (617) 253-4622 *
* Fax: (617) 258-6478 *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *







From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 13:29:59 -0600
Subject: Re: Finger Protection During Grinding

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My favorite form of fingertip protection has always (20+ years) been long
fingernails. Not talons by any means, but longer than fingertip length. You can
feel when a nail is touching without actually losing any skin. Granted, you
sometimes generate a strange-looking manicure but an emery board or some 600 grit
paper will soon put that to rights. One thing to watch out for: don't let the
water to your wheel get so cold as to cause numbness in your fingers. If the
water's too cold, you won't know you've ground off your fingerprints until you
notice blood on the wheel. And it will really smart when the feeling comes back!

Stephan Coetzee wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear All
} This is all fun. Lost a bit of skin myself. Latex gloves does help a
} bit. Home made clamping devices I pressume will help, but I prefer
} to have a "hands on" onto the sample. For large amounts of samples
} automation is a option.
}
}
} } Everett Ramer wrote:
} }
} } } } We have a manual metalographic grinding/polishing wheel. The sample
} } } } being prepared is held in the hand as it is pressed against the rotating
} } wheel.
} } } } Our safety people have asked us to provide finger protection for this
} } device.
} } } } Does anyone have any solution/suggestion?
} } } } Everett Ramer
} }
} } Everett,
} } Mary Mager's response, while funny, is actually quite accurate. There are
} } not too
} } many ways to protect fingers while properly holding a small (1-1/4",
} } typically)
} } sample for grinding/polishing.
} }
} } I preface my next remarks by pointing out that I work for a manufacturer of
} }
} } metallographic equipment and consumables, and therefore have a financial
} } interest in solving your problem:
} }
} } We at BUEHLER, do offer a simple grinding fixture which might help. This
} } fixture
} } is a squat, stainless steel, hollow cylinder with a carbide ring around
} } it's base.
} } The sample is clamped within another hollow cylinder seated within the
} } first.
} } The two cylinders are threaded, so that the inner can be raised or lowered
} } with respect to the carbide 'stop' of the outer. Engraved markings allow
} } material removal in increments as fine as 20microns. While this is not
} } actually
} } finger protection, per se, it will allow you to grasp something larger so
} } that your
} } fingers are not in such close proximity to the grinding wheel. We also
} } offer
} } a motor system which allows the fixture to rotate, in place, on the wheel}
} Mr. S H Coetzee
} Electron Microscope Unit
} Private bag X3
} Wits
} Johannesburg
} 2050
} Tell: +27 11 716 2419
} Fax : +27 11 339 3407
} E-mail stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-598-1291
KFAB Physical Analysis Lab
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~







From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 17:12:57 -0500
Subject: Help-nuclear autofluorescence

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Help- We are having a problem with getting nuclear autofluorescence of
tissue culture cells fixed (Paraformaldehyde) and prepped for
immunofluorescence. If you fix and mount the cells in glycerol-phenylene
diamine with no antibody treatment, they usually look blank immediately,
then over time they develop nuclear fluorescence. The nuclear stain is
primarily in the fluorescein window and somewhat variable but seems to come
up over time. Is it possible that this is coming from a breakdown product
of the phenylene diamine we are using as an antifade? An apparently
unrelated problem is nuclear background with secondary antibodies alone.
If we treat with secondary and look immediately (before the other problem
seems to arise), we also get nuclear staining. This seems to vary with the
batch of secondary antibody so appears to be non-specific binding of the
secondary. It is not blocked by serum etc. Any ideas appreciated.
THanks- Dave

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
75 N. Eagleville Rd.
U-125
Storrs, CT 06269
Knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860-486-2200
860-486-4331 (fax)







From: A.P. Alves de Matos :      apmatos-at-ip.pt
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 21:28:42 -0000
Subject: TEM Trouble in dissolving Brefeldin A

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charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am trying to dissolve Brefeldin A in Dulbecco's MEM for use in a cell =
culture experiment for TEM study. However the drug does not seem to be =
readily soluble in the MEM.=20
Can someone give me some help?

Dr. A.P. Alves de Matos
Curry Cabral Hospital
TEM Unit
Portugal

------=_NextPart_000_000E_01BE64F3.A5921F40
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{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} I am trying to dissolve Brefeldin A =
in=20
Dulbecco's MEM for use in a cell culture experiment for TEM study. =
However the=20
drug does not seem to be readily soluble in the MEM. {BR} Can someone =
give me=20
some help? {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2} Dr. A.P. Alves de Matos {BR} Curry =
Cabral=20
Hospital {BR} TEM Unit {BR} Portugal {/FONT} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

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From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 17:48:54 -0500
Subject: Sputter Coating

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Hi George,

I have been watching what has been going on in relation to your sputter
coating problems. I did not look too hard at the early postings so what =
I
have set out below may be covering old ground, but I hope it may help? M=
ay
I say that there have been many who have tried so hard to help you, my
comments below in no way are critical of their stirling efforts.

Sputter coaters need a RP vacuum of just to the left of dead centre on yo=
ur
coater's vacuum gauge. It does not matter what the gauge has as its
calibration; this setting should work for gold, gold-palladium or platinu=
m.

There are three styles of sputter coater low voltage {600volts, medium
voltage 1,000 to 1,500volts and a high voltage coater at 1,000 to
3,000volts.

The low voltage coaters do not have a voltage control, simply a depositio=
n
control which you should set at it's mid point. Set the voltage controls=

for the other two coaters in their mid range too.

As a test specimen use a 2" square piece of white paper weighted down wit=
h
a stub. Set the target to specimen distance at 5cms. Set the time at tw=
o
minutes (much too long for normal coating but fine for this test).

Pump the system down YOU DO NOT NEED ARGON! We often run with air, the
difference is that argon gas gives a constant coating rate but air, wet o=
r
dry, gives different coatings. If you are using argon, flush to full lef=
t
scale once or twice to clean out the system during the pump down.

When you have a vacuum greater than 60% of the scale bleed the gas into t=
he
system until the pressure holds on the position mentioned above; just to
the left of dead centre. When the vacuum is at the correct level, switch=

on the plasma and increase the voltage to the correct level. You should
have a plasma and by adjustment of the voltage, deposition, or gas, adjus=
t
the current to ~20mA. Let the system run for the two minutes.

When the system completes its cycle open it up and take a look at the
paper. Using a gold target - very light blue, its working but not very
efficiently, pale blue, better but still not good enough, darker blue,
still not good enough, blue-grey much more like it, grey to gold tint, it=
s
working fine.

If you do not have any of these colours the target material may be your
problem. Is it one of the metals mentioned below? Even if the target is=

gold on brass and all the gold has gone you will still sputter brass! =

Chromium, aluminium and carbon will not sputter with the very simple
systems used for conventional SEM. Much higher specification systems, i=
n
relation to current and vacuum, are required.

Well I do hope that helps? Please remember that sputter coaters are not
100% efficient when it comes to coating non-conducting specimens. Even a=

good coater will have trouble with rough and porous specimens. You shoul=
d
never expect to run above 15kV if you have coated this type of specimen.

Well that's it I do hope we can sort out your problem?

Regards

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 18:34:52 -0800
Subject: Amray 1600 SEM & Robinson Detector & EDAX 9100

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If anyone is disposing of this Amray scope, I would appreciate
knowing about it so that I could purchase some spare parts and
assemblies from it before it is dumped. I am particularly interested
in the main 30KV power supply and the CRT power supply, photomult
assembly, and any of the circuit boards. (Specific model is 1600T
without the digital controls and pushbuttons. All components and
assemblies are of interest.)

I am also looking for a Robinson detector for this scope. Pls let me
know if you have one and want to dispose of it.

I also have an EDAX 9100 with detector and LSI-11 console that I
do not need. suggestions on its disposition are welcome.

Cheers,
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.

PGP Public key:
BDC9 8860 AA83 1FB2 66D3 01BB 9EB8 8E6D 671F BEB3





From: udel-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 99 18:12:48 EST
Subject: Get More Web Page Hits!

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subject field and send to: mailstop-at-eastmail.com






From: TJ LaFave :      lafatim-at-charlie.cns.iit.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 22:49:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8" floppies (!!) --> standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Slightly off subject, but I am sure that someone has encountered this
obstacle. We have ASCII data files on 8" floppies from various sort of
data acquisision hardware/software and are seeking out a way to transfer
the data to a useable media 3.5" would suffice, a 8" drive on a system
w/internet access would be great, etc. etc.

Does anyone know of someone I could obtain assistance from?

__ _-==-=_,-.
/--`' \_-at---at-.-- {
Tim (TJ) LaFave Jr. `--'\ \ {___/.
Department of Physics \ \\ " /
University of North Carolina, Charlotte } =\\_/` {
Charlotte, NC 28223 ____ /= | \_|/
_' `\ _/=== \___/
(704)547-3244 `___/ //\./=/~\====\
(704)509-6622 [Hm] \ // / | ===:
http://www.iit.edu/~lafatim | ._/_,__|_ ==: __
\/ \\ \\`--| / \\
---------- +*+ ---------- | _ \\: /==:-\
`.__' `-____/ |--|==:
Such that the future be theirs \ \ ===\ :==:`-'
to shape and direct. _} \ ===\ /==/
-----------------------------------------------------------------






From: COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Mar 1999 23:43:33 EST
Subject: garden of microbial delights.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi there there seems to be 2 versions of this book, one was pub in 1988 and
one in 1995, what is the diff in them besides the ISBN number?

I have the older one I just got it today and it is a lot of fun was
wondering what the newer one might offer..... The one I have has all black and
white pictures in it.
thanks Ed Sharpe





From: colin.veitch-at-dwt.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 15:57:48 +1000
Subject: EDXS Sulphur Standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

We are interested in quantifying the amount of sulphur in wool via EDXS
analysis in the TEM.

Wool has approximately 5% sulphur within the fibre which varies for
different components of the fibre. We would like to be able to mount the
sample and standard in the same block and microtome them together. It is
not necessary for the material to be fibrous but that would help!

To date we have tried a couple of methods without much success.

In the first instance we attempted to mix sulphur compounds in with the
resin to obtain a homogenous material but found that no matter what we did
there was always significant variability in the amount of sulphur throughout
the resin.

The next attempt used a commercially available fibre which had a known
amount of sulphur in it (0.25%) which we embedded in the resin and
microtomed. This "sort of" worked OK but the level of sulphur was not quite
high enough for our purpose and the uncertainties in our measurements were
too high.

So, if anyone has any ideas or a source of materials we could use, I (and
the rest of the team) would be most grateful.

Thanks very much in anticipation.

Colin Veitch

Instrumentation Scientist
Fibre Structure & Function Group
CSIRO Wool Technology
PO Box 21 BELMONT Vic 3216 Australia

Tel: +61 (0)3 5246 4000 Fax: +61 (0)3 5246 4811

The information contained in this email message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may not
copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have received
this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Wool Technology on +61 3 5246
4000.







From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 02 Mar 1999 21:04:29 -0800
Subject: Amray 1600T & Robinson BS & EDAX 9100

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If anyone is disposing of this Amray scope, I would appreciate
knowing about it so that I could purchase some spare parts and
assemblies from it before it is dumped. I am particularly interested
in the main 30KV power supply and the CRT power supply, photomult
assembly, and any of the circuit boards. (Specific model is 1600T
without the digital controls and pushbuttons. All components and
assemblies are of interest.)

I am also looking for a Robinson detector for this scope. Pls let me
know if you have one and want to dispose of it.

I also have an EDAX 9100 with detector and LSI-11 console that I
do not need. suggestions on its disposition are welcome.

Cheers,
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.







From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-czapla.IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 07:13:39 +0100 (MET)
Subject: SOPHIA process casting Al allloys

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Good morning,


I need information about SOPHIA process for aluminium castings ?

Best regards




Krzysztof Jan Huebner

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl} :-)

FOUNDRY RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Research Materials Department
Manager of Structural and Mechanical Research Laboratory
str. Zakopianska 73 Call (*48 12) 2618356 (after 8th march)
30-418 KRAKOW - POLAND Fax (+48 12) 2660870







From: matthias.morgelin-at-medkem.lu.se
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 12:48:40 +0100
Subject: SEM protocol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Lesley S. Bechtold,
=20
I have read with interest your contribution from 1998-11-27 where you=20
described your treatment of mouse sperm prior to SEM. I want to=20
prepare thrombocytes in a similar way and wonder whether you always=20
apply 1% solutions of poly-L-lysine to render coverslips adhesive. As=20
I understand 0.01% solutions are suitable (and much less expensive...)=
=20
for other applications. I deal with moderate amounts of "precious"=20
thrombocytes from knockout mice so I can not play around with=20
conditions. You certainly have extensive experience with this.=20
Any comments would be highly appreciated!
=20
All the best,
Matthias





From: Dan Hill :      dh2-at-mole.bio.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 12:14:19 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: LM Stains for Nerves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Peggy

I think DPK is a misprint for DPX which is a mounting medium consisting of
polystyrene and plasticizers dissolved in xylene and should be widely
available from most microscopy suppliers

Dan Hill
Biochemistry Department
Cambridge University
Cambridge
UK

On Tue, 2 Mar 1999, Peggy Sherwood wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi!
} I have a reference to two stains/methods for nerves: Koelle's acetyl
} cholinesterase technique and
} Winklemann's Silver Impregnation method. I have not been able to find
} either one. I found a "general" reference to acetyl cholinesterase from
} the University of Nottingham web page in which they
} recommend using 'DPK' mounting resin. I have never heard of it--can
} anyone help me out? Thanks!
}
} Peggy Sherwood
} Wellman Labs of Photomedicine (224)
} Massachusetts General Hospital
} 50 Blossom Street
} Boston, MA 02114
} 617-724-4839 (voice mail)
} 617-726-3192 (fax)
}
}
}
}






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 08:52:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: need dual light source accessory for Oly BX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Please contact me if you have a dual light source accessory for an Olympus
BX60 microscope. Thank you.

James Martin
Director of Analytical Services and Research
Williamstown Art Conservation Center

Research Scientist, Chemistry
Williams College






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Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 22:53:13 +0900
Subject: 16 Great Offers!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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)
25





From: Charles Butterick :      cbutte-at-ameripol.com
Date: 3/3/99 3:57 PM
Subject: EDXS Sulphur Standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Colin,

There are 3-4 sulfur standards for the carbon black industry, ASTM
D-1619. The concentrations I know about are 0.82%, 1.54%, and 1.93%.
These are carbon black powders so combining them in block with your
fibers would be a real challenge. I do know a source for these
standards if you want to try them.

Chuck Butterick
Engineered Carbons, Inc.
______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi All,

We are interested in quantifying the amount of sulphur in wool via EDXS
analysis in the TEM.

Wool has approximately 5% sulphur within the fibre which varies for
different components of the fibre. We would like to be able to mount the
sample and standard in the same block and microtome them together. It is
not necessary for the material to be fibrous but that would help!

To date we have tried a couple of methods without much success.

In the first instance we attempted to mix sulphur compounds in with the
resin to obtain a homogenous material but found that no matter what we did
there was always significant variability in the amount of sulphur throughout
the resin.

The next attempt used a commercially available fibre which had a known
amount of sulphur in it (0.25%) which we embedded in the resin and
microtomed. This "sort of" worked OK but the level of sulphur was not quite
high enough for our purpose and the uncertainties in our measurements were
too high.

So, if anyone has any ideas or a source of materials we could use, I (and
the rest of the team) would be most grateful.

Thanks very much in anticipation.

Colin Veitch

Instrumentation Scientist
Fibre Structure & Function Group
CSIRO Wool Technology
PO Box 21 BELMONT Vic 3216 Australia

Tel: +61 (0)3 5246 4000 Fax: +61 (0)3 5246 4811

The information contained in this email message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may not
copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have received
this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Wool Technology on +61 3 5246
4000.










From: Joel McClintock :      jmcclin-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 09:54:59 -0500
Subject: RE: SEM wanted

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Woody,

We have a JEOL 35CF for sale that was made in '82. Excellent condition and
has backskatter detector. Dual supply Haskris water chiller also available
that cooled a TEM as well as this SEM.

J. McClintock
(606)257-1242 or 277-6507






From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 09:04:36 -0600
Subject: TEM: Old RCA EMU-3G Parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

We have a stock of spare parts, vacuum tubes, manuals, tools, etc., for an
old RCA EMU-3G microscope. Since the scope itself is long gone, these items
are destined for that mysterious place where old scope parts go to die.
UNLESS someone wants them.

Preserve history! Keep your EMU going! Read the manuals! Now's your
chance. All yours for the mere cost of shipping.

Randy Tindall
Electron Microscope Core
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri - Columbia
Phone: 573-882-8304






From: Robert Ruscica :      ruscica-at-etp-usa.com
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 08:26:44 -0800
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 09:44:17 -0800
Subject: Field Service Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have an immediate opening for a field service technician in the Los
Angeles area.
All interested parties, please e-mail or faxyour resume to me at:

Earl Weltmer

earlw-at-pacbell.net

Fax: 714.573-9159






From: mykkb-at-juno.com
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:12:14 -0500
Subject: Re:SEM- Wehnelt cap holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I made a makeshift but useable holder for filament adjustment for a
Amray 1830.
I took one of the cardboard boxes that hold the coaters for Polaroid film
(about 9"X2"X3/4")
and glued two metal washers(1" outer diameter and ~7/16 inner diameter)
on top of one another
and to the middle of the box. The height of the washers was about 1/8". I
then positioned the posts
of the filament in the center of the washers to mark the spots. Then I
used a needle to poke holes
in the cardboard.
The Wehnhelt can then be upright and it is easier to center the
filament.

Mike Baxter
Lehman College
mykkb-at-juno.com

___________________________________________________________________
You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]





From: Keith Collins :      collins-at-alrc.doe.gov
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 12:00:46 PST
Subject: RE: Wehnelt cap holder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If this is what I think it is it should be available from E Fjeld C., Inc.
978-667-1416. CAA-FB Filament Alignment Base is item discription
in my 1985 catalog.

Keith
USDOE Albany Research Center
Albany, Oregon





From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-wpo.itss.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 19:59:32 +0000
Subject: JEOL TEM & ultramicrotome for sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All

I am posting this on behalf of nearby hospital colleagues:

1. JEOL 1200EX TEM for sale, serviced twice yearly since installation
in 1985. In excellent condition. Very light use of up to 65 cases per
year.

2. Reichert (now Leica) Ultracut S ultramicrotome, new in 1993, with
table, drawers plus LKB Knifemaker 7800. Hardly used and in storage
over the last three years.

For information, telephone Mike Sale on England (0)1872 255006. Cash
offers to Keith Atkinson on England (0)1872 255006. An e-mail address:
tracey.leigh-at-rcht.swest.nhs.uk

Please do not "Reply to sender" - although I would pass replies on to
the correct contact!

Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Plymouth, UK





From: Ginger R Baker :      lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:53:11 -0600
Subject: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest Colloidal Gold Techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I have been asked to research the latest methods for colloidal gold
labelling in biological tissues. The researchers would first like to do
some diaminobenzidine peroxidase staining on kidney tubules embedded in
paraffin to see if the cell membrane antigen and distribution can be
detected at the LM-peroxidase level.

Then the project would progress to preparation, sectioning, and labelling
of kidney tissue at the TEM level. I have been asked to provide a
beginning point of up-to-date protocols that are presently being done.

I am currently scanning Medline and Ovid search engines. Any suggestions
would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ginger Baker
EM Lab Manager
OSU-College of Osteopathic Medicine
918-561-8232
lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu







From: Patricia Hales :      hales-at-med.mcgill.ca
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 15:38:41 -0500
Subject: Thank you and Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I just wanted to say a wholehearted thank you to all of you on this
listserver. With your suggestions I have managed to inject an antibody
which was directly conjugated to ultrasmall gold particles (thanks to Dr.
Jan Leunissen and Electron Microscopy Sciences), perfuse the mouse, and
embed the tissues with the specific orientation that I wanted in airtight
flat embedding molds to polymerize under UV (thanks to so many people for
different aspects of the embedding that I don't have space to name them
all), then cut, silver enhance and examine by TEM!

The antibody in question had failed to label anything when the tissue was
fixed with ANY fixative but these results were unquestionable and the
morphology great!!

My most sincere thanks to you all - I'm off to try new things as our little
research lab is closing down. Thanks and Good-bye!

Pat Hales
McGill University
Dept. of Anatomy & Cell Biology
hales-at-med.mcgill.ca






From: BGH Martin :      bghmartin-at-brookes.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:54:20 -0500
Subject: Brefeldin A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


hi,
Brefeldin A does not dissolve in media , you need first to dissolve it
in either Methanol or DMSO. We dissolve the Brefeldin A in Methanol at a conc
of 5mgs/ml and use this as our stock to then be diluted into our buffer or
media.

good luck

Barry Martin







From: Arnold, Jim :      Jim.Arnold-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:54:04 -0500
Subject: EDS Upgrade

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am currently looking to upgrade my EDS system. I work in a semiconductor
manufacturing facility(CMOS) and I currently have a Cambridge S200 SEM with
Kevex Delta II.

I have an interest in Oxford, EDAX and a company called EVEX (which I am not
familiar with)? Does anyone have experience with these companies - Good or
Bad?

I am looking for a light element detector with possibly a WDS for Boron
quantification.

Thanks in advance.



Jim Arnold
Microelectronics and Technology Center
AlliedSignal Electronics and Avionics Systems
9140 Old Annapolis Road
Columbia, MD 21045

email: Jim.arnold-at-alliedsignal.com
voice: (410) 964-4118
fax: (410) 964-5046







From: Wright, John D. :      jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:32:22 -0700
Subject: Preparation of bacteria for SEM & TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have a requirement to process liquid and agar-bound pathogenic
bacteria for SEM & TEM. I've been collecting them in
cacodylate-buffered 3% glutaraldehyde where the final concentration has
been 1.5% for the liquid suspended bacteria. These have been kept in
the refrigerator. Does anyone have a protocol(s) that would lead me to
SEM and TEM specimens from this point? Have I made a mistake already? My
instruments are a Philips EM-400 and JEOL 6300V.

John Wright
Microbiologist

West Desert Test Center
Dugway, UT





From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 13:56:30 -0800
Subject: Field service position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have an immediate opening for a field service technician in the Los
Angeles area. Responsibilities include the repair and maintenance of
Scanning Electron Microscopes of a number of manufacturers including
JEOL, Hitachi, Leo.

Candidate should have a minimum of three years electronic or
instrumentation experience. Please e-mail or fax me at:

Earl Weltmer

earlw-at-pacbell.net

Fax: 714.573-9159






From: Ginger R Baker :      lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:53:11 -0600
Subject: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest Colloidal Gold Techniques

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello,

I have been asked to research the latest methods for colloidal gold
labelling in biological tissues. The researchers would first like to do
some diaminobenzidine peroxidase staining on kidney tubules embedded in
paraffin to see if the cell membrane antigen and distribution can be
detected at the LM-peroxidase level.

Then the project would progress to preparation, sectioning, and labelling
of kidney tissue at the TEM level. I have been asked to provide a
beginning point of up-to-date protocols that are presently being done.

I am currently scanning Medline and Ovid search engines. Any suggestions
would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ginger Baker
EM Lab Manager
OSU-College of Osteopathic Medicine
918-561-8232
lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu









From: Ekstrom, Harry :      Harry.Ekstrom-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 17:19:00 -0700
Subject: RE: Finger Protection During Grinding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We bought some of those chain meshed type gloves that protect fingers pretty
well when hand grinding. Our metallographers say you can easily hold the
samples and mounts. They look and feel rather clumsy to me tho. But if
they work....alrighty then.

Harry Ekstrom





From: rpowell-at-mail.lihti.org (Rick Powell at Nanoprobes)
Date: Wed, 3 Mar 1999 22:10:31 -0500
Subject: Re: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest Colloidal Gold Techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ginger:

There are two special issues of journals on immunogold labeling which
appeared recently. Cell Vision, Vol. 4, No. 6 (1997), and Microscopy
Research and Technique, Vol. 42, No. 1 (1998). If you have trouble finding
a hard copy of that issue of Cell Vision (I think it was from before it was
indexed by Medline), you can download all the articles from the journal's
web site - if you go to

http://www.cbba.org/cbba/table%20of%20content-b.pdf

this is the table of contents for this issue, and it links to the full text
articles in pdf format.

Disclaimer: we supply immunogold reagents, and both these special issues
contain several articles which feature results obtained with our products
(Nanogold).

A good recent reference on post-embedding immunogold labeling is "Colloidal
Gold Post-Embedding Immunocytochemistry" (Progress in Histochemistry and
Cytochemistry, Vol 29, No 4) by Moise Bendayan (Gustav Fischer, 1995).

Hope this helps,

Rick Powell
Nanoprobes, Incorporated.

}
} Hello,
}
} I have been asked to research the latest methods for colloidal gold
} labelling in biological tissues. The researchers would first like to do
} some diaminobenzidine peroxidase staining on kidney tubules embedded in
} paraffin to see if the cell membrane antigen and distribution can be
} detected at the LM-peroxidase level.
}
} Then the project would progress to preparation, sectioning, and labelling
} of kidney tissue at the TEM level. I have been asked to provide a
} beginning point of up-to-date protocols that are presently being done.
}
} I am currently scanning Medline and Ovid search engines. Any suggestions
} would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Sincerely,
}
} Ginger Baker
} EM Lab Manager
} OSU-College of Osteopathic Medicine
} 918-561-8232
} lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu


******************************************************************
* NANOPROBES, Incorporated | US Toll-free: (877) 808-2101 *
* 25 East Loop Road, Suite 113 | Tel: (516) 444-8815 *
* Stony Brook, NY 11790-3350, | Fax: (516) 444-8816 *
* USA | rpowell-at-mail.lihti.org *
* *
* NOW EASY TO FIND ON THE WEB: http://www.nanoprobes.com *
******************************************************************







From: Bruce E. Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 1999 22:29:38 -0600
Subject: Re: EDS Upgrade

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Jim.,
Since you mentioned the word evex, I suspect you missed the past
discussions on this list server regarding them. It centered around their
registering URLs with the trade names of all competitors so that any web search
by manufacture's name produced the evex web page. Reports were that they were
willing to sell the URLs to the principles for 10s of K$, perhaps more.
Seems they (someone) did try a defense with an unsigned response.
Personally wouldn't have confidence in any claim they made.
You can probably find these discussion in the list server archives, ~a year
ago.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.

Disclaimer: I use EDS & WDS on occasion. I have absolutely no financial interest
& know no one with financial interest in the sales of equipment in this industry
& no qualms about bringing this issue back to light.


Arnold, Jim wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am currently looking to upgrade my EDS system. I work in a semiconductor
} manufacturing facility(CMOS) and I currently have a Cambridge S200 SEM with
} Kevex Delta II.
}
} I have an interest in Oxford, EDAX and a company called EVEX (which I am not
} familiar with)? Does anyone have experience with these companies - Good or
} Bad?
}
} I am looking for a light element detector with possibly a WDS for Boron
} quantification.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Jim Arnold
} Microelectronics and Technology Center
} AlliedSignal Electronics and Avionics Systems
} 9140 Old Annapolis Road
} Columbia, MD 21045
}
} email: Jim.arnold-at-alliedsignal.com
} voice: (410) 964-4118
} fax: (410) 964-5046






From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 11:16:36 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Electrolytical thinning of Al

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Everyone,

I have to prepare pure Al foils for TEM investigation. What I need is (as
usual :) a large thin area. What are the best electrolytes for the thinning
of Al? Is there anything else to consider (e.g. temperature, ...)?
As you see, I have not a lot of experience with this technique. Could
anybody recommend a book concerning electrolytical thinning?

TIA,

Petra
--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpcu.lu/~wahlbrin






From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 09:02:22 -0500
Subject: SEMS Memebers Only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Don't forget our annual meeting in Gainesville Florida April 8-10

Dealines are fast approaching

For details see the latest issue of the Beam or our web site at :

http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/cbr/sems/sems.html

or cal or fax me below.

Greg Erdos
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611







From: Mohamed Belhaj :      mohamed.belhaj-at-univ-reims.fr
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 16:18:55 +0100
Subject: Looking for a Wenhelt for sale (SEM505)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi, All
We are looking for a Wenhelt Block Filament for filament ( SEM Philips 505
or 501),
If you got one we're interested in it ( Free, or for sale , reasonable
price)) , please contact us.

Thanks




*****************************************************************
Mohamed Belhaj
UFR SCIENCES
Laboratoir d'Analyse des Solides Surfaces et Interfaces
DTI/LASSI EP CNRS 120
BP 1039
Reims 51687 Cedex 2
Tel : 03 26 05 33 27 ou 03 26 05 33 14
Fax : 03 26 05 33 12
******************************************************************





From: j.meen :      jpmeen-at-usa.net
Date: 4 Mar 99 09:13:16 CST
Subject: Printers for SEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi,

I have a usual question, which was posted before and, I believe, will be
posted again and again. It is about printers for SEM images. So:

- What is the best printer for monochrome SEM/STEM images?
- What is the best inexpensive printer for the same images?
- What is the best printer for EDS output (color maps, maps+images)?

Thank you,

J.Meen


____________________________________________________________________
Get free e-mail and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=3D=
1





From: Frank-Martin Haar :      Frank-Martin.Haar-at-embl-heidelberg.de
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 16:22:12 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1999 - Last Reminder Abstract Submission/Change

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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"Microscopy Listserver" {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ,
"Confocal Listserver" {confocal-at-listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu} ,
"Bionews Listserver" {bionews-at-net.bio.net}



========================================================
FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

========================================================

We wish to remind you about the upcoming deadline for abstract submission
and
modification.

The abstract submission and modification deadline is:

!!! Monday, 8 March 1999 --- 15.00 hours Heidelberg Time !!!

The "abstract submission part" of the database will definitely be closed at
15.00 hours, so that it is not possible to submit further abstracts or make
any further modifications to the abstracts after this date.

The "registration only part" of the database will remain open until 9 April
1999!!!

========================================================

Our website now also includes informations about some highlights of the
commercial exhibition. This is an extract:

Leica Microsystems GmbH: Two-Photon Confocal System Leica TCS MP
L.O.T. Oriel GmbH & Co KG: Nanopositioning Unit and Fiber Laser
Molecular Probes: New fluorescent reagents for Cell Biology and Imaging
highly - Fluorescent Alexa dyes
Olympus Optical Co. GmbH: Confocal Laser-Scanning-Microscope with two-photon
excitation
Omicron Vakuumphysik GmbH: Scanning Near Field Optical Microscope (SNOM)
Visitron Systems GmbH: 2D/3D Fluorescence Imaging System based on Cooled
Digital Camera System
Wallac Distribution GmbH: Confocal Microscope


Ernst H.K. Stelzer
Frank-Martin Haar

========================================================

Meeting Announcement:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

Confocal microscopy, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution techniques are
increasingly applied in the study of three-dimensional structures such as
are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
Three-dimensional analysis and representation are crucial tasks in
subsequent data assessment. These conferences offer a most efficient meeting
point for developers and users working in these rapidly evolving fields and
play an important role in the dissemination of information about new
developments. Special attention will be given to the dramatic developments
in live cell imaging and manipulation, such as the role of the green
fluorescent protein.
Further information:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy


Local Organizing Committee:
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Heidelberg
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen

Under the auspices of The International 3D Microscopy Society:
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University


Mailing address:
Focus on Microscopy 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Meyerhofstrasse 1
69117 Heidelberg
P.O. Box 102209
69012 Heidelberg
Germany

This e-mail was produced by Ernst H.K. Stelzer
EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany






From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-aretha.jax.org
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 10:53:07 -0500
Subject: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I have never done any material sciences work - I've only ever done
biological specimens for EM. Our engineering department has asked me to
look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I know I don't
need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating unnecessary?
What whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease somewhere
that is not good for my vacuum!

Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks in advance.....

Lesley Bechtold


Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191






From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 04 Mar 99 09:02:02 -0800
Subject: RE: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest Colloidal Gold Tech

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
Ginger R Baker {lizard-at-osu-com.okstate.edu}
CC: Bruce A Benjamin {benjamb-at-osu-com.okstate.edu} ,
Connie A Hebert {hconnie-at-osu-com.okstate.edu} ,
William D Meek {meekwd-at-osu-com.okstate.edu}
X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.3 (Mac)
X-Priority: 3
MIME-Version: 1.0
Reply-To: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org}
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="====50515355485450534849===1"



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 04 Mar 99 09:02:02 -0800
Subject: RE: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest Colloidal Gold Tech

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--====50515355485450534849===1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"

Reply to: RE: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest =
Colloidal Gold T
Dear Ginger,

The methods you are looking for can be slit into two sections; (i) =
specimen preparation and (ii) colloidal gold labeling. For both, you have =
many choices that will be determined by your lab equipment, lab skills =
and budget. A good book to have next to you is "Fine structure =
Immunocytochemistry" by G. Griffiths (published 1993 by Springer Verlag) =
because it will give you advice on all your choices.
First, specimen preparation: Your aim is to prepare samples that have =
good morphology but also have good accessibility to antigen by the =
antibodies and colloidal gold. The best way to achieve this is to obtain =
sections. To section, you can either embed in resin (Lowicryl, LR White/=
Gold, Unicryl, Monostep), or use cryosections. If you decide to use resin,=
will you embed using the PLT method or by freeze substitution? Whatever =
your choice, if you are to test the system first by light microscopy then =
I would highly recommend using the same system for LM and EM. Do not try =
to compare paraffin-embedded, HRP-DAB labeled material with aldehyde-fixed,=
sectioned material. =

The gold labeling is also filled with many choices. It is clear that =
sequential labeling (ie adding the primary antibody followed by a gold-=
labeled secondary) is the best choice. However, what you choose as the =
gold-labeled secondary may affect your labeleing pattern. If a =
quantitative result is your aim (do you want a signal that reflects the =
amount of antigen present?) then you must try not to use signal =
amplification. For this either protein A-gold or immunoglobulin-gold as a =
single secondary step is best. If you want to get a "strong" signal and =
are not too worried about quantitative result you may want to try silver =
enhancement of the gold marker.

If I were doing this study, I would fix the kidney, by perfusion, in 4% =
formaldehyde (buffered in phosphate buffer). I would then cryoprotect =
with sucrose, freeze in liquid nitrogen and embed part of it in Lowicryl =
resin through freeze substitution. Other pieces of the cryoprotected, =
frozen tissue, I would then section in a cryoultramicrotome. Both the =
Lowicryl and cryo sections can be mounted onto glass substrate and labeled =
with antibody and fluorescent secondary antibody. You can also label the =
sections with the gold conjugated secondary you choose to use for EM and =
visualize this for LM by silver enhancement. The advantage of using the =
same reagents and tissues for LM is that you can easily test your system =
before moving onto EM preparation. Once you have the conditions worked =
out, the same blocks you used for LM can be sectioned again for EM (just =
mount the sections on grids) and labeled with the same (or similar) =
protocols you used for LM.

The protocols you need are all covered in the Griffiths book. Some of the =
newer advances have been covered in the a book that had the contents =
posted recently.

Contact me if you want more details, resources or references.

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
--====50515355485450534849===1
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-Ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: LM and TEM Need help locating the latest =
Colloidal Gold T

{/PRE}
{FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 =
COLOR=3D"#000000"} Dear Ginger, {BR}
{BR}
The methods you =
are looking for can be slit into two sections; =
(i) specimen preparation and (ii) colloidal =
gold labeling. For both, you have many =
choices that will be determined by your =
lab equipment, lab skills and budget. A =
good book to have next to you is "Fine =
structure Immunocytochemistry" by G. =
Griffiths (published 1993 by Springer Verlag) =
because it will give you advice on all your =
choices. {BR}
First, specimen preparation: =
Your aim is to prepare samples that have =
good morphology but also have good accessibility =
to antigen by the antibodies and colloidal =
gold. The best way to achieve this is to =
obtain sections. To section, you can either =
embed in resin (Lowicryl, LR White/Gold, =
Unicryl, Monostep), or use cryosections. =
If you decide to use resin, will you embed =
using the PLT method or by freeze substitution? =
Whatever your choice, if you are to test =
the system first by light microscopy then =
I would highly recommend using the same =
system for LM and EM. Do not try to compare =
paraffin-embedded, HRP-DAB labeled material =
with aldehyde-fixed, sectioned material. =
{BR}
{BR}
The gold labeling is also filled =
with many choices. It is clear that sequential =
labeling (ie adding the primary antibody =
followed by a gold-labeled secondary) is =
the best choice. However, what you choose =
as the gold-labeled secondary may affect =
your labeleing pattern. If a quantitative =
result is your aim (do you want a signal =
that reflects the amount of antigen present?) =
then you must try not to use signal amplification. =
For this either protein A-gold or immunoglobulin-gold =
as a single secondary step is best. If =
you want to get a "strong" signal =
and are not too worried about quantitative =
result you may want to try silver enhancement =
of the gold marker. {BR}
{BR}
If I were doing =
this study, I would fix the kidney, by perfusion, =
in 4% formaldehyde (buffered in phosphate =
buffer). I would then cryoprotect with =
sucrose, freeze in liquid nitrogen and embed =
part of it in Lowicryl resin through freeze =
substitution. Other pieces of the cryoprotected, =
frozen tissue, I would then section in a =
cryoultramicrotome. Both the Lowicryl and =
cryo sections can be mounted onto glass =
substrate and labeled with antibody and fluorescent =
secondary antibody. You can also label =
the sections with the gold conjugated secondary =
you choose to use for EM and visualize this =
for LM by silver enhancement. The advantage =
of using the same reagents and tissues for =
LM is that you can easily test your system =
before moving onto EM preparation. Once =
you have the conditions worked out, the =
same blocks you used for LM can be sectioned =
again for EM (just mount the sections on =
grids) and labeled with the same (or similar) =
protocols you used for LM. {BR}
{BR}
The protocols =
you need are all covered in the Griffiths =
book. Some of the newer advances have been =
covered in the a book that had the contents =
posted recently. {BR}
{BR}
Contact me if you =
want more details, resources or references. {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
{BR}
Paul Webster, Ph.D {BR}
House =
Ear Institute {BR}
2100 West Third Street {BR}
Los =
Angeles, CA 90057 {BR}
phone:213 273 8026 {BR}
fax: =
213 413 6739 {BR}
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org {BR}
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm {/FONT} {/BODY} {/HTML}
--====50515355485450534849===1--







From: tom moninger :      moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 11:12:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Drukker and Edge Knives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Has anyone had any experience with these knives and would you like to
comment on their performance relative to "standard" diamond knives?

Tom

Thomas Moninger moninger-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
University of Iowa Central Microscopy Research Facility
http://www.uiowa.edu/~cemrf
Views expressed are mine.






From: Tina Schwach :      tschwach-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 13:14:19
Subject: Re:Preparation of bacteria for SEM and TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:32:22 -0700,
jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil wrote...
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

For the TEM samples, fixation in small 1.5 mL eppendorf microfuge tubes
works well since you can pellet the samples between solution changes if
necessary. From the point you are at right now, you should rinse in your
cacodylate-buffer (I used 0.1M cacodylate with 7.5% sucrose), then move on
to post-fixation with 1% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate (no sucrose) until pellets
turn dark brown or black (usually 30-min at room temp). If the pellets are
really big, separate them before osmium treatment to make sure the entire
pellet is fixed. Rinse in cacodylate buffer (no sucrose), dehydrate in an
acetone or ethanol series. I use ethanol because I like to embed in LR
White. After 2 changes in 100%, separate the SEM run (for critical point
drying and coating) from the TEM samples- move on to resin infiltration
right in the eppendorf tubes. I usually do 3:1 (solvent:resin) on a
rotator for 1 hr., 1:1, 1:3, 100% times two and cure overnight.
Good luck.










From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 11:27:32 -0800
Subject: MSA EDX spectra format

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Dear Listers,

As promised, here is a summary of the replies I received to my enquiry about
who uses the MSA (formerly EMSA) spectra file format.

Of eight replies, two didn't care for the format or never used it. "My
personal preference is not to use MSA format for these purposes. It's way
overcomplicated".

The rest of the replies were either reluctant or enthusiastic users who use
the format to transfer spectra from one EDX analyser to another, or to the
DTSA program, or into a desktop computer. Three would be just as happy to
have any method to convert the spectra into Excel format, but three were
quite enthusiastic about the ability to exchange spectra between different
labs, different EDX programs on commercial systems, even different analysers
from the same company of differnet versions.

Thanks to all who replied. I can send the text of all replies to anyone who
wishes to see them.

Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca






From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 14:03:52 -0600
Subject: Re: Printers for SEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The best quality will probably always be from a dye sublimation printer.
There are Kodak and Codonics machines at the high end for full page output
at a cost of about $10K. Kodak also makes a small format (4x5) printer that
does 3-color for about $600 and under $1/print. I don't know that they yet
offer a black ribbon for true monochrome prints.

For general purpose work, most any of the inkjets will do decent work for
both color and monochrome. You may just want to try some at your local
computer stores to see what resolution you can get and how fast. We use an
Epson 600 ( {$200) for pretty good work at maybe 2 minutes per full page print.

1200 dpi laser printers do a pretty good job for monochrome. We have a
Lexmark Optra R. I have seen similar good results from an HP LaserJet 5. It
takes a while to transmit the data to the printer, but then they whip out
prints fast.

In all cases, the paper can do a lot to improve appearance. You will want
some good stuff on had for the best prints.

None of what I have said is peculiar to EM work. You may want to enlist a
few others in your area to get a good printer. Happy hunting.

Warren S.

At 09:13 AM 3/4/99 -0600, you wrote:
} Hi,
}
} I have a usual question, which was posted before and, I believe, will be
} posted again and again. It is about printers for SEM images. So:
}
} - What is the best printer for monochrome SEM/STEM images?
} - What is the best inexpensive printer for the same images?
} - What is the best printer for EDS output (color maps, maps+images)?
}
} Thank you,
}
} J.Meen






From: Jonathan Barnard :      J.Barnard-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 20:11:27 +0000
Subject: Re:Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am more of a TEM eprson, but I have a suggestion from watching my
colleagues.
Take an aluminium stub, which would normally go into an SEM, and using a
5 mm drill bit just drill a small , 1-2 mm deep, hole in top so that the
ball bearing will sit in it. Before you mount the bearing, wash the
bearing in organic solvents first, say two acetone washes and then two
ethanol washes, and ultrasonically clean the bearing in an ultrasound
bath with both solvents.

Dry it off by putting it into an oven at say 150 C for ten minutes and
then mount it onto the stub using silver-dag mounting paint (used by
almost everyone here) to fix the bearing onto the stub. If you have
access to vacuum coating system with a Radio Frequency inductive plasma
ring attachment or anything that can produce an Argon plasma, then put
the stub in for ten minutes so that there are no organic residues left.
Once it is finished you can put it straight into the SEM knowing that
there should be a clean surface to look at. The silver dag paint should
earth the bearing to the stub.

I hope this helps.

Jon

--
*****************************************
Jonathan Barnard

Microstructural Physics,
H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory,
University of Bristol,
Tyndall Avenue,
Bristol BS8 1TL.

0117 928 9000 ext 8750

*****************************************







From: Stephen R Poe :      Stephen.R.Poe-at-usda.gov
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:28:08 -0500
Subject: FS LKB-Huxley Ultramicrotome - WILL DELIVER

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes, that's right - if you are somewhere between Baltimore, Maryland and
Sarasota, Florida (with a detour to visit my son in Chapel Hill, NC) I can
deliver this lovely item to you in early April. I still don't want to crate it
for shipment, but I am driving down to visit my mother and can drop it off on
the way if it is not too far off my path. The item in question is an
LKB-Huxley Ultra Microtome (model 9801-1) in nice clean condition with the
knife holder and a set of chucks and collets. I have about $500 tied up in it
which I would like to recover - if you can use it, get in touch and perhaps we
can work something out. It just does not fit the work I am doing now, and I
need both the $$ and space.

Stephen Poe





From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 12:59:52 -0800
Subject: Re: Electrolytical thinning of Al

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Petra,
We have had good success with Al alloys with the Struers Tenupol Twin-jet
polisher, using their A-7 electrolyte at about -5 degrees C and 12V. The A-7 is:
100 ml. perchloric acid
700 ml. methanol
200 ml. gycerine
The usual precautions with perchloric acid solutions apply. Another I have
had recommended to me is:
100 ml. perchloric acid
900 ml. ethanol
The solution must be kept at less than 10 degrees C. while polishing, and a
voltage range of 7.5V to 20 V, depending on the alloy. I have no experience
with pure Al, only commercial Al alloys.
A book I recommend for these things is: "Metallography Principles and
Practices" by Vander Voort, but I don't know if it is still in print.

You wrote:
}
} Hello Everyone,
}
} I have to prepare pure Al foils for TEM investigation. What I need is (as
} usual :) a large thin area. What are the best electrolytes for the thinning
} of Al? Is there anything else to consider (e.g. temperature, ...)?
} As you see, I have not a lot of experience with this technique. Could
} anybody recommend a book concerning electrolytical thinning?
}
} TIA,
}
} Petra
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Best of luck,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 16:05:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Printers for SEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We've been very pleased with the Epson Color Stylus 740 (approx. $280) and
Epson Stylus Photo 700 (approx. $250) using Epson's Photo Quality Glossy
Film. Image and text quality is very good to excellent.

James Martin
Director of Analytical Services and Research
Williamstown Art Conservation Center

Research Scientist, Chemistry
Williams College

On Thu, 4 Mar 1999, Warren E Straszheim wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} The best quality will probably always be from a dye sublimation printer.
} There are Kodak and Codonics machines at the high end for full page output
} at a cost of about $10K. Kodak also makes a small format (4x5) printer that
} does 3-color for about $600 and under $1/print. I don't know that they yet
} offer a black ribbon for true monochrome prints.
}
} For general purpose work, most any of the inkjets will do decent work for
} both color and monochrome. You may just want to try some at your local
} computer stores to see what resolution you can get and how fast. We use an
} Epson 600 ( {$200) for pretty good work at maybe 2 minutes per full page print.
}
} 1200 dpi laser printers do a pretty good job for monochrome. We have a
} Lexmark Optra R. I have seen similar good results from an HP LaserJet 5. It
} takes a while to transmit the data to the printer, but then they whip out
} prints fast.
}
} In all cases, the paper can do a lot to improve appearance. You will want
} some good stuff on had for the best prints.
}
} None of what I have said is peculiar to EM work. You may want to enlist a
} few others in your area to get a good printer. Happy hunting.
}
} Warren S.
}
} At 09:13 AM 3/4/99 -0600, you wrote:
} } Hi,
} }
} } I have a usual question, which was posted before and, I believe, will be
} } posted again and again. It is about printers for SEM images. So:
} }
} } - What is the best printer for monochrome SEM/STEM images?
} } - What is the best inexpensive printer for the same images?
} } - What is the best printer for EDS output (color maps, maps+images)?
} }
} } Thank you,
} }
} } J.Meen
}
}
}






From: Staman, John :      John.Staman-at-lsil.com
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:19:11 -0700
Subject: RE: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Lesley,

Depending on the suspected failure mechanism, just give them a good soaking
in acetone or some kind of degreasing detergent (local auto store) followed
by a good rinse and dry. That should remove any grease. I would however
talk to the Eng. folks to make sure that your cleaning would not disturb the
failure mecahnism or worse.... enhance it. Yes, I would give them a light
coat of Au or AuPd. Mounting on any kind of tape (carbon or otherwise)
might present some drifting problems in the SEM.......perhaps Ag or C paint
would do the trick....that's our solution around here anyway. Hope this
helps.

John Staman
LSI Logic, Process Analysis Lab, Colorado Springs, CO.
719-573-3282

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Lesley S. Bechtold [SMTP:lsb-at-aretha.jax.org]
} Sent: Thursday, March 04, 1999 8:53 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} I have never done any material sciences work - I've only ever done
} biological specimens for EM. Our engineering department has asked me to
} look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I know I don't
} need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
} double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating unnecessary?
} What whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease somewhere
} that is not good for my vacuum!
}
} Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks in advance.....
}
} Lesley Bechtold
}
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191
}





From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:33:38 -0700
Subject: RE: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Assuming that you want to look at the bearings in an SEM and that the
balls are made of steel, the solution is very simple:

Clean the balls to get rid of any grease. A few years back we used
Trichlorethylene to degrease materials, but that is environmentally
unsafe. There are other possibilities for safer degreasing.

Then you could just use a simple specimen holder and glue the balls to
the holder with silver paint or carbon paint, mainly to fix them in
place. I am not sure what you mean by double-sided sticky tape, but I
would not use that. Who knows what the tape might do when the chamber is
pumped down. Since they are steel, you don't have to worry about
conductivity, just put them in the chamber, pump down and enjoy.

Michael Bode

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: info-at-soft-imaging.com


} ----------
} From: Lesley S. Bechtold[SMTP:lsb-at-aretha.jax.org]
} Sent: Thursday, March 04, 1999 8:53 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} I have never done any material sciences work - I've only ever
} done
} biological specimens for EM. Our engineering department has asked me
} to
} look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I know I
} don't
} need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
} double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating
} unnecessary?
} What whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease
} somewhere
} that is not good for my vacuum!
}
} Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks in advance.....
}
} Lesley Bechtold
}
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191
}
}





From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:24:56 -0800
Subject: LM, need knife holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi:

I need a razor blade holder to use in an old A/O CryoCut vintage 1978. It's
a weird one, the blade is mounted to the far right of the holder to
accommodate the knife mounting mechanism of the cryostat.

I could also use a razor blade holder for use in an old A/O rotary
microtome. This is pretty standard, with the blade in the center of the
holder.

I think they are available new, but are pretty expensive given the scope of
my project. Anything old but serviceable would work for me. If you have
something, maybe we can workout a deal.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu







From: South Bay Technology :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 18:31:12 -0500
Subject: Electrolytical thinning of Al

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Petra!

I have a few technical papers that deal with electropolishing aluminum
using our Model 550 Single Vertical Jet Electropolisher which may be of
interest:

1)" Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, Morphology and
Toughness in Particulate and Short Fibre Reinforced Aluminum Matrix
Composites", M.R. Krishnadev et al

2) "Preparation of Iron and Aluminum Samples for Ion Implantation and TEM=

Examination" J.M. McDonald

and the "Bible" of Jet Polishing:

3) "Polishing Methods for Metallic and Ceramic Transmission Electron
Microscopy Specimens", B.J. Kestel

Kestel report is 60+ pages and give preparation guidelines for dozens of
materials. He has recipes for pure aluminum as well as several aluminum
alloys. I would recommend this report for anyone doing electropolishing.=


I have copies of all 3 of these reports as well as a bibliography of over=

200 technical reports mostly dealing with specimen preparation. I would =
be
pleased to mail you a copy of any or all of these if you think they will =
be
of use. Please let me know.

DISCLAIMER: South Bay Technology does manufacture the Model 550 Single
Vertical Jet ELectropolisher and has a vested interest in promoting its
use.

Best regards-

David =

Writing at 2:39:48 PM on 3/4/99
=

*************************************************************************=
**
************************

David Henriks TEL: =

800-728-2233 (toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499=

San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com=


*************************************************************************=
**
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.
Message text written by Petra Wahlbring
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =



Hello Everyone,

I have to prepare pure Al foils for TEM investigation. What I need is (as=

usual :) a large thin area. What are the best electrolytes for the thinni=
ng
of Al? Is there anything else to consider (e.g. temperature, ...)?
As you see, I have not a lot of experience with this technique. Could
anybody recommend a book concerning electrolytical thinning?

TIA,

Petra {






From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:36:52 -0800
Subject: RE: Printers for SEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


J. Meen asks ...
}
}
} ...
}
} - What is the best printer for monochrome SEM/STEM images?

A dye-sublimation printer with its optional gray scale media.

} - What is the best inexpensive printer for the same images?

A good 600dpi laser printer configured for random dithering,
although the next printer would work well too. I would opt for
$$ being spent up front on the printer ... it will still cost
pennies per page.

} - What is the best printer for EDS output (color maps, maps+images)?

A photographic quality ink jet would work well here ...
inexpensive and could as well serve your second purpose, 'cept for
speed.

If you're concerned with archiving, fading can be a problem
with color ink jets ... moreso than with dye-subs ... so the
dye-sub can serve dual purposes, gray scale and color. But,
it is a hassle to constantly be changing its purposes from
monochrome to color. The dye-sub's color media can be used to
print gray scale, but it almost always has a tint because CMY is
used, therefore I would not classify a color mode dye-sub as the
best printer for your first need.

my $0.02 and cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 15:41:28 -0800
Subject: RE: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Lesley writes ...
}
}
} ... Our engineering department has asked me to
} look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I
} know I don't
} need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
} double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating
} unnecessary?
} What whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease
} somewhere
} that is not good for my vacuum!
}
} ...

I would clean them first with acetone and then with clean
ETOH and then dry to remove the small amount of absorbed water.
They shouldn't need coating, but I'd mount them with conductive
double-stick tape. Should be as easy as that :o)

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-botanica.ufrgs.br
Date: Thu, 04 Mar 1999 21:06:42 -0300
Subject: RE: Drukker and Edge Knives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tom,

I am using a Drukker Diamond Knive at 3 years. It is a excellent knive.
I did perfect sections without compression. I cut plant tissues and
pollen grains with a hard cell wall.

Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
Dept of Botany - Plant Anatomy Laboratory - UFRGS
Porto Alegre - RS - Brazil






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 17:04:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: EMs in D.C.?

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Hi Boarders,

A student of ours is going to the Washington, D.C. area this
summer. I've already told her to stay away from the White House. What she
really wants to know is: are any EM/Imaging facilities in the area? She
would like to use one to help her with her work while she's there.
So drop me a line and I'll pass the info on to her.

Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 4 Mar 1999 21:40:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Printers for SEM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Warren E Straszheim says:
} The best quality will probably always be from a dye sublimation printer.
} There are Kodak and Codonics machines at the high end for full page output
} at a cost of about $10K. Kodak also makes a small format (4x5) printer that
} does 3-color for about $600 and under $1/print. I don't know that they yet
} offer a black ribbon for true monochrome prints.

1. Several other manufacturers (JVC, Sony, Panasonic) offer dye
sublimation printers, marketed for catching/printing video frames.
[I'm planning to buy one of those, probably Sony.]

2. I doubt that a term "ribbon" can be applied to such a printer...

} For general purpose work, most any of the inkjets will do decent work for
} both color and monochrome. You may just want to try some at your local
} computer stores to see what resolution you can get and how fast. We use an
} Epson 600 ( {$200) for pretty good work at maybe 2 minutes per full page
} print.

Interesting. For monochrome of course inkjets hardly cut it. But for
color - it suddenly becomes cost-effective and attractive.

} 1200 dpi laser printers do a pretty good job for monochrome. We have a
} Lexmark Optra R. I have seen similar good results from an HP LaserJet 5. It
} takes a while to transmit the data to the printer, but then they whip out
} prints fast.

1. I have yet to see a laser printer (within $2K price range) that comes
close to Optra in reproducing photographs. LaserJet-5 is good, but not
that good.

2. I wonder what kind of printer connection you use, and how large your
files are. My printers are on Ethernet, and 16MB files "fly in" in
less than half-a-minute.

} In all cases, the paper can do a lot to improve appearance. You will want
} some good stuff on head for the best prints.

(:-)
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}





From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 14:49:18 +1100
Subject: RE: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Additional to the useful replies relating to the
preparation of ball bearings, I would like to add a little
regarding the microscopy:
Small, clean and undamaged ball bearings are a good
instructive aid to explain SEM functioning. This may be of
some use to Jonathan when viewing those bearings and to
anybody trying to explain some SEM effects.
1 At high kV (say above 20) you may have trouble seeing
anything, because fine surface structure and dirt will be
invisible.
2 At low kV (say 10 and below) such surface structures will
be visible.
3 At low powers, regardless of kV, the ball bearing will
appear like a disk, but the outer part of the disk is
brighter. This nicely shows that in secondary mode,
brightness almost entirely is increased with the angle of
incidence. Being a sphere, tilt has no effect on the
brightness distribution over that image.
4 A BS detector mounted at an angle (whereas the Robinson
and some others are vertical) will make the distinction
that the specimen is not a disk but a sphere, because the
BS electrons directed away from the detector leave a
shadow.
5 A similar effect is produced when the bias current of the
secondary detector is turned off and the condenser current
is turned down. This floods the secondary detector's
scintillator with backscattered electrons and produces a BS
image quite suitable for low powers.

Nice teaching exercise, but its useful to know about these
effects when actually looking at those bearings.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Friday, March 05, 1999 6:11 AM, Jonathan Barnard
[SMTP:J.Barnard-at-bristol.ac.uk] wrote:
}
} I am more of a TEM eprson, but I have a suggestion from
} watching my
} colleagues.
} Take an aluminium stub, which would normally go into an
} SEM, and using a
} 5 mm drill bit just drill a small , 1-2 mm deep, hole in
} top so that the
} ball bearing will sit in it. Before you mount the
bearing,
} wash the
} bearing in organic solvents first, say two acetone washes
} and then two
} ethanol washes, and ultrasonically clean the bearing in
an
} ultrasound
} bath with both solvents.
}
} Dry it off by putting it into an oven at say 150 C for
ten
} minutes and
} then mount it onto the stub using silver-dag mounting
} paint (used by
} almost everyone here) to fix the bearing onto the stub.
If
} you have
} access to vacuum coating system with a Radio Frequency
} inductive plasma
} ring attachment or anything that can produce an Argon
} plasma, then put
} the stub in for ten minutes so that there are no organic
} residues left.
} Once it is finished you can put it straight into the SEM
} knowing that
} there should be a clean surface to look at. The silver
dag
} paint should
} earth the bearing to the stub.
}
} I hope this helps.
}
} Jon
}
} --
} *****************************************
} Jonathan Barnard
}
} Microstructural Physics,
} H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory,
} University of Bristol,
} Tyndall Avenue,
} Bristol BS8 1TL.
}
} 0117 928 9000 ext 8750
}
} *****************************************
}
}






From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 15:19:21 +1100
Subject: Effect of delayed second fixation/ Preparation for SEM and TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



The string concerning preparation of bacteria touched on
delayed second fixation. This is worth a separate
discussion on delayed second (usually Os) fixation:
Sabatini, first to publish GA as a fixative, also published
that Os fixation could be delayed by several months. That
seems true for some tissues, which show no ill-effects when
compared with the usual, immediate double fixation.
However, we found in the lab that other tissues are
sensitive to that delay. I used to run a couple of busy
service labs and cannot remember specifically which tissues
and what structures were affected.
It would be interesting to know when delayed double
fixation is acceptable and others may have experience to
share. I believe that specimen preparation for SEM is never
affected by delayed second fixation.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Thursday, March 04, 1999 11:14 PM, Tina Schwach
[SMTP:tschwach-at-tc.umn.edu] wrote:
}
} On Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:32:22 -0700,
} jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil wrote...
} } I have a requirement to process liquid and agar-bound
} } pathogenic
} } bacteria for SEM & TEM. I've been collecting them in
} } cacodylate-buffered 3% glutaraldehyde where the final
} } concentration has
} } been 1.5% for the liquid suspended bacteria. These have
} } been kept in
} } the refrigerator. Does anyone have a protocol(s) that
} } would lead me to
} } SEM and TEM specimens from this point? Have I made a
} } mistake already? My
} } instruments are a Philips EM-400 and JEOL 6300V.
} }
} } John Wright
} } Microbiologist
} }
} } West Desert Test Center
} } Dugway, UT
} }
} }
} } John,
} I have stored samples in primary fixative (glut-para-
} ruthenium red in
} cacodylate) for several weeks, even months and they
appear
} to be fine.
} For SEM, you may want to place (dry) your samples on some
} kind of surface,
} ie stainless steel chips, so you'll be able to view them.
} You'll have to
} do this at the end anyway. You can even place them on
} nucleopore filter
} membranes. Depending on what you want to see, the agar
} strands can get in
} the way.
}
} For the TEM samples, fixation in small 1.5 mL eppendorf
} microfuge tubes
} works well since you can pellet the samples between
} solution changes if
} necessary. From the point you are at right now, you
} should rinse in your
} cacodylate-buffer (I used 0.1M cacodylate with 7.5%
} sucrose), then move on
} to post-fixation with 1% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate (no
} sucrose) until pellets
} turn dark brown or black (usually 30-min at room temp).
} If the pellets are
} really big, separate them before osmium treatment to make
} sure the entire
} pellet is fixed. Rinse in cacodylate buffer (no
sucrose),
} dehydrate in an
} acetone or ethanol series. I use ethanol because I like
} to embed in LR
} White. After 2 changes in 100%, separate the SEM run
(for
} critical point
} drying and coating) from the TEM samples- move on to
resin
} infiltration
} right in the eppendorf tubes. I usually do 3:1
} (solvent:resin) on a
} rotator for 1 hr., 1:1, 1:3, 100% times two and cure
} overnight.
} Good luck.
}
}
}
}
}






From: melim-at-qes.po.my
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 14:20:24 +0800
Subject: Infrared Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear List ,
I am looking for a Infrared Camera , I am quite new to this . Can anyon=
e recommend me a few model and please do let me where to get .

Preferable in Singapore


Regards
Lim ( S'pore)





From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 21:28:26 GMT+1200
Subject: EDS trouble-shooting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Experts

The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
resolution stays good.
The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
(analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
down as being either
a the detector
b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
rigorously enough?

cheers (well, I try)

Ritchie


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Frank-Martin Haar :      Frank-Martin.Haar-at-embl-heidelberg.de
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 09:39:36 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1999 - Last Reminder Abstract Submission/Change

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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========================================================
FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

========================================================

We wish to remind you about the upcoming deadline for abstract submission
and
modification.

The abstract submission and modification deadline is:

!!! Monday, 8 March 1999 --- 15.00 hours Heidelberg Time !!!

The "abstract submission part" of the database will definitely be closed at
15.00 hours, so that it is not possible to submit further abstracts or make
any further modifications to the abstracts after this date.

The "registration only part" of the database will remain open until 9 April
1999!!!

========================================================

Our website now also includes informations about some highlights of the
commercial exhibition. This is an extract:

Leica Microsystems GmbH: Two-Photon Confocal System Leica TCS MP
L.O.T. Oriel GmbH & Co KG: Nanopositioning Unit and Fiber Laser
Molecular Probes: New fluorescent reagents for Cell Biology and Imaging
highly - Fluorescent Alexa dyes
Olympus Optical Co. GmbH: Confocal Laser-Scanning-Microscope with two-photon
excitation
Omicron Vakuumphysik GmbH: Scanning Near Field Optical Microscope (SNOM)
Visitron Systems GmbH: 2D/3D Fluorescence Imaging System based on Cooled
Digital Camera System
Wallac Distribution GmbH: Confocal Microscope


Ernst H.K. Stelzer
Frank-Martin Haar

========================================================

Meeting Announcement:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

Confocal microscopy, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution techniques are
increasingly applied in the study of three-dimensional structures such as
are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
Three-dimensional analysis and representation are crucial tasks in
subsequent data assessment. These conferences offer a most efficient meeting
point for developers and users working in these rapidly evolving fields and
play an important role in the dissemination of information about new
developments. Special attention will be given to the dramatic developments
in live cell imaging and manipulation, such as the role of the green
fluorescent protein.
Further information:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy


Local Organizing Committee:
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Heidelberg
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen

Under the auspices of The International 3D Microscopy Society:
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University


Mailing address:
Focus on Microscopy 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Meyerhofstrasse 1
69117 Heidelberg
P.O. Box 102209
69012 Heidelberg
Germany

This e-mail was produced by Ernst H.K. Stelzer
EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany






From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 04:13:39 -0500
Subject: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

Others have offered their suggestions but may I add a friendly warning, o=
r
offer a bit of fun?

Ball bearings are a great eye opener for the novice SEM operator. Fix a
small ball bearing to a stub with a NON conducting adhesive. Run the
microscope at 20 to 25kV for a few minutes and the ball will charge like=

mad. let it charge { one of the very few reasons for using such high kV :=
-)
}. NOW drop to 2kV and wonder of wonders you will see the inside of the=

specimen chamber. Move the ball around and change the magnification and
you will be able to view the chamber in detail. Take a look at the
aperture of the final lens, the EDX detector face, or the backscattered
detector surface. Great fun if you know what is happening, totally
confusing if you did not do it deliberately.

This "problem" may occur in other circumstances where, after using high k=
V
and charging a specimen, moving to a low kV the charge does not go away b=
ut
simply acts as a reflector of the beam. Double sided tape which is non
conducting is the biggest culprit. It should never be used in SEM where =
we
now have available carbon double sided media which is great for a quick f=
ix
with lighter weight specimens.

Have fun?

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 04:13:43 -0500
Subject: Complications

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

As an assistance to people who have day to day problems with their
equipment the listserver provides a very valuable service and I am often
pointing people in this direction to solve their problems.

My area of knowledge is in the operation and maintenance of scanning and
transmission electron microscopes so I take an interest in and discussion=
s
in this area.

Of late I have noticed a tendency for replies to become very complicated,=

so much so that the person asking the question would in my mind only beco=
me
bemused by the reply. Should we not build the knowledge base step by ste=
p
rather than leap in with solutions far distant from the actual
question/problem?

As a made-up example -

Q - What do I do if I do not have a good quality image on the screen in m=
y
TEM?

A - Change the phosphor.

Have you seen answers like this?

I like many of you reading this I would not like to inhibit anyone sendin=
g
in a reply to a question, but should they not place their reply on a leve=
l?

Example

A - Assuming that you have prepared the specimen correctly, have the
correct alignment, kV and apertures, have the condenser lenses set
correctly and are in a well darkened room and have become dark adapted - =
if
you notice your screen is not as bright as a colleagues TEM perhaps you
should consider changing the screen as they fade due to beam damage and
contamination?

I look forward to being put in my place! =


Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide







From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 15:19:21 +1100
Subject: Effect of delayed second fixation/ Preparation for SEM and TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



The string concerning preparation of bacteria touched on
delayed second fixation. This is worth a separate
discussion on delayed second (usually Os) fixation:
Sabatini, first to publish GA as a fixative, also published
that Os fixation could be delayed by several months. That
seems true for some tissues, which show no ill-effects when
compared with the usual, immediate double fixation.
However, we found in the lab that other tissues are
sensitive to that delay. I used to run a couple of busy
service labs and cannot remember specifically which tissues
and what structures were affected.
It would be interesting to know when delayed double
fixation is acceptable and others may have experience to
share. I believe that specimen preparation for SEM is never
affected by delayed second fixation.
Cheers
Jim Darley

ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Thursday, March 04, 1999 11:14 PM, Tina Schwach
[SMTP:tschwach-at-tc.umn.edu] wrote:
}
} On Wed, 3 Mar 1999 14:32:22 -0700,
} jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil wrote...
} } I have a requirement to process liquid and agar-bound
} } pathogenic
} } bacteria for SEM & TEM. I've been collecting them in
} } cacodylate-buffered 3% glutaraldehyde where the final
} } concentration has
} } been 1.5% for the liquid suspended bacteria. These have
} } been kept in
} } the refrigerator. Does anyone have a protocol(s) that
} } would lead me to
} } SEM and TEM specimens from this point? Have I made a
} } mistake already? My
} } instruments are a Philips EM-400 and JEOL 6300V.
} }
} } John Wright
} } Microbiologist
} }
} } West Desert Test Center
} } Dugway, UT
} }
} }
} } John,
} I have stored samples in primary fixative (glut-para-
} ruthenium red in
} cacodylate) for several weeks, even months and they
appear
} to be fine.
} For SEM, you may want to place (dry) your samples on some
} kind of surface,
} ie stainless steel chips, so you'll be able to view them.
} You'll have to
} do this at the end anyway. You can even place them on
} nucleopore filter
} membranes. Depending on what you want to see, the agar
} strands can get in
} the way.
}
} For the TEM samples, fixation in small 1.5 mL eppendorf
} microfuge tubes
} works well since you can pellet the samples between
} solution changes if
} necessary. From the point you are at right now, you
} should rinse in your
} cacodylate-buffer (I used 0.1M cacodylate with 7.5%
} sucrose), then move on
} to post-fixation with 1% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate (no
} sucrose) until pellets
} turn dark brown or black (usually 30-min at room temp).
} If the pellets are
} really big, separate them before osmium treatment to make
} sure the entire
} pellet is fixed. Rinse in cacodylate buffer (no
sucrose),
} dehydrate in an
} acetone or ethanol series. I use ethanol because I like
} to embed in LR
} White. After 2 changes in 100%, separate the SEM run
(for
} critical point
} drying and coating) from the TEM samples- move on to
resin
} infiltration
} right in the eppendorf tubes. I usually do 3:1
} (solvent:resin) on a
} rotator for 1 hr., 1:1, 1:3, 100% times two and cure
} overnight.
} Good luck.
}
}
}
}
}








From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 14:49:18 +1100
Subject: RE: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Additional to the useful replies relating to the
preparation of ball bearings, I would like to add a little
regarding the microscopy:
Small, clean and undamaged ball bearings are a good
instructive aid to explain SEM functioning. This may be of
some use to Jonathan when viewing those bearings and to
anybody trying to explain some SEM effects.
1 At high kV (say above 20) you may have trouble seeing
anything, because fine surface structure and dirt will be
invisible.
2 At low kV (say 10 and below) such surface structures will
be visible.
3 At low powers, regardless of kV, the ball bearing will
appear like a disk, but the outer part of the disk is
brighter. This nicely shows that in secondary mode,
brightness almost entirely is increased with the angle of
incidence. Being a sphere, tilt has no effect on the
brightness distribution over that image.
4 A BS detector mounted at an angle (whereas the Robinson
and some others are vertical) will make the distinction
that the specimen is not a disk but a sphere, because the
BS electrons directed away from the detector leave a
shadow.
5 A similar effect is produced when the bias current of the
secondary detector is turned off and the condenser current
is turned down. This floods the secondary detector's
scintillator with backscattered electrons and produces a BS
image quite suitable for low powers.

Nice teaching exercise, but its useful to know about these
effects when actually looking at those bearings.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Friday, March 05, 1999 6:11 AM, Jonathan Barnard
[SMTP:J.Barnard-at-bristol.ac.uk] wrote:
}
} I am more of a TEM eprson, but I have a suggestion from
} watching my
} colleagues.
} Take an aluminium stub, which would normally go into an
} SEM, and using a
} 5 mm drill bit just drill a small , 1-2 mm deep, hole in
} top so that the
} ball bearing will sit in it. Before you mount the
bearing,
} wash the
} bearing in organic solvents first, say two acetone washes
} and then two
} ethanol washes, and ultrasonically clean the bearing in
an
} ultrasound
} bath with both solvents.
}
} Dry it off by putting it into an oven at say 150 C for
ten
} minutes and
} then mount it onto the stub using silver-dag mounting
} paint (used by
} almost everyone here) to fix the bearing onto the stub.
If
} you have
} access to vacuum coating system with a Radio Frequency
} inductive plasma
} ring attachment or anything that can produce an Argon
} plasma, then put
} the stub in for ten minutes so that there are no organic
} residues left.
} Once it is finished you can put it straight into the SEM
} knowing that
} there should be a clean surface to look at. The silver
dag
} paint should
} earth the bearing to the stub.
}
} I hope this helps.
}
} Jon
}
} --
} *****************************************
} Jonathan Barnard
}
} Microstructural Physics,
} H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory,
} University of Bristol,
} Tyndall Avenue,
} Bristol BS8 1TL.
}
} 0117 928 9000 ext 8750
}
} *****************************************
}
}








From: Stephan Coetzee :      stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 16:01:43 GMT+2
Subject: Re: Purchasing a new confocal -Reply

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We lost our Ar/Kr laser very early in its life. (it was still under
warranty) A bit of advice was given to us from Zeiss regarding our
Ar/Kr laser. That is to run it at 50% power rather than full blast
all the time. It seems to be much better now.

} Just to give an opposite example about the laser,
}
} I'm running an LSM 410 equipped with an Omnichrome Ar/Kr 488/568/647 laser
} since 5 years (1750 hours) and i had no problem yet ! Maybe it's just luck
} though...
}
}
} At 05:01 PM 25/2/99 -0800, you wrote:
} } As for my own experience, I found the 568nm Kr laser sadly unreliable, we
} had to } change it twice in the past year.
}
}
Mr. S H Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
Private bag X3
Wits
Johannesburg
2050
Tell: +27 11 716 2419
Fax : +27 11 339 3407
E-mail stephan-at-gecko.biol.wits.ac.za





From: Dr Eric E. Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 14:42:47 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: bilogist needs help from material scientist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello.

A number of suggestions have been made about the
preparation and observation of failed ballbearings. These
will certainly give good images and may well be enough to
solve the problem, but if the fault lies in the alloy
rather than in the physical state of the balls, it will not
show up. You might have to consider embedding the bearing
in resin and polishing a flat on it. A thin coat of carbon
is needed unless you use a conductive resin. Then the BSE
image (and EDX if possible) will reveal the internal
structure of the alloy.

Eric




----------------------
Dr Eric E. Lachowski
University of Aberdeen
Department of Chemistry
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 1224 272934
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk








From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 10:21:53 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?

One thing to note is if your movement is due to gain or offset
drifts. If offset drift then both a low peak and high peak will move the
same amount. If gain the low will move a little, high will move much more.

Sometimes the gain and offset pots on the pulse processor get
"dirty". Run them up and down a few times or clean with electronic cleaner
spray.


Disconnect and reconnect every connector. The contacts can get
"dirty" over time. The physical active of disconnecting/reconnecting will
clean the contacts.

You can test your MCA by using a sliding pulser. We use a Berkley
Nucleonics Corp (BNC) GL-3 pulse generator to test every MCA that we ship.
It's the only way to really know how well the MCA is working. It's about
$5k, not cheap. You really need a very good pulser to test linearity. 10 to
20eV is a really small voltage difference.


Scott
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com






From: kennedy-at-nsi.edu (Grace Kennedy)
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 08:45:57 -0800
Subject: cell culture inserts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Is it OK to (thin) section the Falcon cell culture inserts in cross
section, and would anyone who's done this please contact me directly? I
have a question or two about the best way to embed to maximize cell
numbers. (I think this has been discussed before.) Thank you. Grace







From: Thomas, Larry :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 1999 09:08:48 -0800
Subject: RE: EDS trouble-shooting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the spirit recently suggested by Steve Chapman, try disturbing the cables and
processor box. If this affects the peak positions or resolution, there's a good
chance you have a loose or dirty connector. Try reseating the PC boards in the
processor box.

Larry Thomas
Washington State University

----------
From: Ritchie Sims
Sent: Friday, March 5, 1999 1:28 PM
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Subject: EDS trouble-shooting

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Dear Experts

The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
resolution stays good.
The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
(analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
down as being either
a the detector
b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
rigorously enough?

cheers (well, I try)

Ritchie


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand






From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 05 Mar 99 09:48:02 -0800
Subject: RE: Complications

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From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 05 Mar 99 09:48:02 -0800
Subject: RE: Complications

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Reply to: RE: Complications
With regard to this comment By Steve Chapman, I agree that the discussion =
aspect of the listserver is slowly being erroded and would sometimes like =
to see the more detailed, carfully considered answers being posted again. =
I use the server as a source of assistance but also find that by reading =
discussions on subjects I know little about, I can actually learn =
something. This sort of passive learning is useful in a busy lab environme=
nt.

I am not sure we can hold the solution providers totally responsible for =
this errosion either. It is sometimes difficult to know exactly the =
problem, the skill of the poster or the environmentally limiting factors =
from such brief postings as in the example given by Steve ("What do I do =
if I do not have a good quality image on the screen in my TEM?"). Why is =
it that some questions are posted in almost annotated form from posters =
who do not even provide us with an identification? =

The tendency for discussions to be carried out "off-line" in more detail =
is not very beneficial either. It is true that some of the really =
detailed discussions, and perhaps some of the comments about particular =
products, are best covered in a more private setting, but it would be =
great to see edited summaries and final results.

I know writing is tough and it takes some time to write but by putting =
more effort into this skill we could improve our list. I am not getting =
at non-English writers here but at anyone who writes messages which are so =
brief that relevant information is omitted. The more we practice our =
writing, the better we get (hopefully). =

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm


Steve Chapman wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =

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Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-Ascii"
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{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: Complications

{/PRE}
{FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 =
COLOR=3D"#000000"} With regard to this comment By Steve =
Chapman, I agree that the discussion aspect =
of the listserver is slowly being erroded =
and would sometimes like to see the more =
detailed, carfully considered answers being =
posted again. I use the server as a source =
of assistance but also find that by reading =
discussions on subjects I know little about, =
I can actually learn something. This sort =
of passive learning is useful in a busy =
lab environment. {BR}
{BR}
I am not sure we can =
hold the solution providers totally responsible =
for this errosion either. It is sometimes =
difficult to know exactly the problem, the =
skill of the poster or the environmentally =
limiting factors from such brief postings =
as in the example given by Steve ("What =
do I do if I do not have a good quality =
image on the screen in my TEM?"). Why =
is it that some questions are posted in =
almost annotated form from posters who do =
not even provide us with an identification? =
{BR}
{BR}
The tendency for discussions to be =
carried out "off-line" in more =
detail is not very beneficial either. It =
is true that some of the really detailed =
discussions, and perhaps some of the comments =
about particular products, are best covered =
in a more private setting, but it would =
be great to see edited summaries and final =
results. {BR}
{BR}
I know writing is tough and =
it takes some time to write but by putting =
more effort into this skill we could improve =
our list. I am not getting at non-English =
writers here but at anyone who writes messages =
which are so brief that relevant information =
is omitted. The more we practice our writing, =
the better we get (hopefully). {BR}
{BR}
Regards, {BR}
{/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Paul =
Webster, Ph.D {BR}
House Ear Institute {BR}
2100 =
West Third Street {BR}
Los Angeles, CA 90057 {BR}
phone:213 =
273 8026 {BR}
fax: 213 413 6739 {BR}
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org {BR}
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm {BR}
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
{BR}
{BR}
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" =
SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Steve Chapman wrote: {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva"=
=
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>-----------------------------------------------------------------------=
- {BR}
>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America {BR}







From: Barr, Dennis B :      dennbarr-at-eastman.com
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 13:38:06 -0500
Subject: RE: EDS trouble-shooting

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Regarding moving peaks in EDS, we once experienced a problem caused by the
video monitor on the EDS unit being too close to the wires coming from the
detector. Our problem became quite obvious when the resolution began to
degrade. Moving the wires fixed the problem. Perhaps your problem is being
caused by electromagnetic fields.

Dennis B. Barr (dennbarr-at-eastman.com)
Physical Chemistry Research Laboratory
Physical & Analytical Chemistry Research Division
Eastman Chemical Company
Kingsport, TN 37662-5150







From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 10:21:53 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

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} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?

One thing to note is if your movement is due to gain or offset
drifts. If offset drift then both a low peak and high peak will move the
same amount. If gain the low will move a little, high will move much more.

Sometimes the gain and offset pots on the pulse processor get
"dirty". Run them up and down a few times or clean with electronic cleaner
spray.


Disconnect and reconnect every connector. The contacts can get
"dirty" over time. The physical active of disconnecting/reconnecting will
clean the contacts.

You can test your MCA by using a sliding pulser. We use a Berkley
Nucleonics Corp (BNC) GL-3 pulse generator to test every MCA that we ship.
It's the only way to really know how well the MCA is working. It's about
$5k, not cheap. You really need a very good pulser to test linearity. 10 to
20eV is a really small voltage difference.


Scott
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com








From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 15:54:00 -0500
Subject: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? Pub domain EELS software?

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I have a couple of questions w/r to EELS output in other formats. I am
acquiring EELS data on a GIF at another institution, but would like to take
the files back to my lab. I saved the files as ASCII X,Y, tagged ASCII, and
EMSA/MAS format. I can plot the X,Y data with no problem. However, in the
tagged ASCII and the EMSA/MAS format, the data are written in 5 wide rows
that wrap the data. I typically use Excel to plot stuff like this, but I
don't know how to unwrap the data. What I am doing is going into a
Wordprocessor and getting rid of the hard returns and commas and then
resaving as a text file. I can automate it a little with macros, but it
still takes time.

1. Are there ways to unwrap the data directly into Excel?

2. Is there a public domain EELS program that will plot the data and
perhaps do some work with the EMSA/MAS format that will run on a PC or a
Mac? (I would prefer PC because our Macs are old and there is not much
chance of getting new ones here.)

Thanks in advance.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)











From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 99 18:03:31 -0500
Subject: Ball bearing failure analysis

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:
============================================
I have never done any material sciences work - I've only ever done
biological specimens for EM. Our engineering department has asked me to
look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I know I don't
need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating unnecessary? What
whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease somewhere that is
not good for my vacuum!
==================================================
It is interesting how so many different persons, skilled in the art, would
approach the same kind of problem so many different ways. Of course, not
much information was given either so we could all be those proverbial blind
men feeling a different part of the elephant.

We ourselves approach bearing failures somewhat differently. For one thing,
at the onset, it is rarely clear whether it is a straight SEM job. If
corrosion is involved, for example, the ability to analyze corrosion product
is lost if vigorous washing/cleaning procedures are used.

No mention was made of the examination of the raceway, but that is also
something of importance in any kind of a failure analysis of this type.

Our approach is to liquid wash in cold solvent, such as acetone and/or
heptane, perhaps even xylene, but you don't want a solvent that is "too good
." You want to leave some organic layer on the metal surfaces. We then
remove the last vestiges of the lubricant system with exposure to an oxygen
plasma such as in our Plasma Prep™ II plasma etcher. This is a dry process
approach, corrosion product is left in situ in place, right where it is, and
with EDS, sometimes complimented with Auger, one can learn information about
the failure mechanism that would not be learned by straight topographical
examination.

For the mounting of the bearing "balls", depending on size, we would always
use one of the conductive double sided adhesive products, either carbon
sheets or if larger, then Tempfix™.

We ourselves believe one should use caution before washing away the
information that could be contained in corrosion product.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies manufactures the Plasma Prep II plasma etcher and
supplies the carbon based adhesives. Our Structure Probe services
laboratory performs failure analysis as a service on these kinds of samples.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 02:31:21 +0300
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

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Hello

Ritchie Sims wrote:
} Dear Experts
}
} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?
}
} cheers (well, I try)
}
} Ritchie
}
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}

Dear Ritchie!
In similar cases the first I do is the following:
I take off the signal cable from preamplifier and processor and
measure its resistance, which should be near zero, and then check
stability of this resistance during curving this cable.
Two times in my practice I have met the case when after several
working years the copper core of the cable was corroded as result of
chemical interaction with material of cable insulation, and the
resistance between many wires of core became rather big and unstable.
After change to cable with Teflon insulation the peaks became very (!)
stable.
Regards.

Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Co. Ltd., scientific service, Moscow, Russia.
e-mail: antron-at-space.ru.






From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Mar 1999 17:24:07 -0600
Subject: Re: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? Pub domain EELS

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I have run across the same problems with EMSA format and with other files
that store multiple points of data per row.

I have developed macros that insert the necessary number of blank lines (5
for EMSA) following a given row, I select the data in the row, Copy-Special
using the transpose function into the blank rows, delete the original row,
and move down to the next row, and repeat. It isn't pretty, but it gets the
job done.

If I was doing it regularly, I think I would write a program (standalone or
Word Basic) that would incorporate the smarts enough to do it all
automatically given the file name. As of yet, I have not been so driven.
But maybe someone else has already done one.

Good luck.

At 03:54 PM 3/5/99 -0500, you wrote:
} I have a couple of questions w/r to EELS output in other formats. I am
} acquiring EELS data on a GIF at another institution, but would like to take
} the files back to my lab. I saved the files as ASCII X,Y, tagged ASCII, and
} EMSA/MAS format. I can plot the X,Y data with no problem. However, in the
} tagged ASCII and the EMSA/MAS format, the data are written in 5 wide rows
} that wrap the data. I typically use Excel to plot stuff like this, but I
} don't know how to unwrap the data. What I am doing is going into a
} Wordprocessor and getting rid of the hard returns and commas and then
} resaving as a text file. I can automate it a little with macros, but it
} still takes time.
}
} 1. Are there ways to unwrap the data directly into Excel?
}
} 2. Is there a public domain EELS program that will plot the data and
} perhaps do some work with the EMSA/MAS format that will run on a PC or a
} Mac? (I would prefer PC because our Macs are old and there is not much
} chance of getting new ones here.)
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.

----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications






From: Steven D. Majewski :      sdm7g-at-Virginia.EDU
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 19:39:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? Pub domain EELS software?

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On Fri, 5 Mar 1999, Walck. Scott D. wrote:
|
|2. Is there a public domain EELS program that will plot the data and
|perhaps do some work with the EMSA/MAS format that will run on a PC or a
|Mac? (I would prefer PC because our Macs are old and there is not much
|chance of getting new ones here.)
|

I've been using XlispStat {http://www.xlispstat.org/} for both
plotting and analysis ( Mostly EDS but some EELS ).

It's a free, cross-platform (Mac,Windows,Unix) version of Lisp
enhanced with vector and matrix arithmetic, math and statistical
function, linear and non-linear regression, smoothing, FFTs, and
simple object oriented graphics.

It's extensible with function written either in Lisp or C:
I've written functions to read & write EMSA/MAS format (roughly -- the
specs are somewhat ambiguous), read spectra from a 4pi SpectraEngine
on a Mac, convolution and digital filtering and other utilities.
( Haven't quite gotten it all wrapped up into a complete EDS/EELS
package yet. )


---| Steven D. Majewski (804-982-0831) {sdm7g-at-Virginia.EDU} |---
---| Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics |---
---| University of Virginia Health Sciences Center |---
---| P.O. Box 10011 Charlottesville, VA 22906-0011 |---

Caldera Open Linux: "Powerful and easy to use!" -- Microsoft(*)
(*) {http://www.pathfinder.com/fortune/1999/03/01/mic.html}







From: hhlim-at-qes.po.my
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 09:38:28 +0800
Subject: Infrared Camera

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Dear Lim (S'pore),
There are many infrared camera in the market. You might need to specify =
what is the usage are for. By the way, how is Singapore nowadays? Still M=
oney no enough?


Thank you. =



-----Original Message-----
} From: -at-sparc5.microscopy.com =

Sent: Friday, March 05, 1999 2:20 PM
To: Lim Meng Ean; Au Chun Mun; Lim Siong Wai; Lim Hian Ho; Microscopy-at-spa=
rc5.microscopy.com



Dear List ,
I am looking for a Infrared Camera , I am quite new to this . Can anyon=
e recommend me a few model and please do let me where to get .

Preferable in Singapore


Regards
Lim ( S'pore)






From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 18:45:02 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

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Thank you for the replies so far.
I should have included the info that it's a gain problem ie the zero
peak stays in the right place.
I guess it boils down to:

given that the resolution stays good, does anyone think that it could
be a detector problem, or does everyone think that it's the
pulse-processor?

rtch



} From: Self {GLGNOV2/RSIMS}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: EDS trouble-shooting
} Date: Fri, 5 Mar 1999 21:28:27 GMT+1200

} Dear Experts
}
} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?
}
} cheers (well, I try)
}
} Ritchie
}


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 05:53:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? MSA/MAS Format?

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Scott

As one of the committee members of the MSA/MAS Format I'm perplexed
about your comment on the 5 wide rows. That sounds very odd indeed and
I recall nothing in the format that calls out that type of coding.
Perhaps there
is an error somewhere or a misinterpretation of the spectral file format. .

Send me a "private" copy of the 3 files at my ANL address
(Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov) and I'll have a look at them when
I get back to the US.

Nestor


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America







From: John F. Mansfield :      jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 10:09:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? Pub domain EELS

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I think that the main problem here is that we have a defined M&M=20
=46ormat (MSA/MAS in old parlance, let's face it we are a Microscopy=20
and Microanalysis community and the sooner we realize it the=20
better!), but the XEDS and EELS manufacturers don't fully support it.=20
They either write it but don't read it or read it but don't write it.=20
I think the format should be refined so that the manufacturers will=20
use it and let them have tags in the format similar to the TIFF.

Just my two cents worth (probably start a war, but just my opinion)

Jfm.


John Mansfield PhD CPhys MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (734) 936-3352 FAX (734) 936-3352
Cellular Phone: (734) 358-7555
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 358-7555)
Email: jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html
Location: Lat. 42=B0 16' 48" Long. 83=B0 43' 48"





From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Sun, 7 Mar 1999 00:59:34 +0300
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

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Hello

Ritchie Sims wrote:
} Dear Experts
}
} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?
}
} cheers (well, I try)
}
} Ritchie
}
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}

Dear Ritchie!
In similar cases the first I do is the following:
I take off the signal cable from preamplifier and processor and
measure its resistance, which should be near zero, and then check
stability of this resistance during curving this cable.
Two times in my practice I have met the case when after several
working years the copper core of the cable was corroded as result of
chemical interaction with material of cable insulation, and the
resistance between many wires of core became rather big and unstable.
After change to cable with Teflon insulation the peaks became very (!)
stable.
Regards.

Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Co. Ltd., scientific service, Moscow, Russia.
e-mail: antron-at-space.ru.







From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Sun, 7 Mar 1999 00:59:34 +0300
Subject: Re: EDS trouble-shooting

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Hello

Ritchie Sims wrote:
} Dear Experts
}
} The peaks have suddenly started to move around a bit, although the
} resolution stays good.
} The problem comes and goes, in its good times the standard deviation
} of the position of the Co Ka peak is about 0.4 eV (10
} determinations), but sometimes it's about 10 or even 20 eV.
} My thinking is that if it were the detector, the resolution would be
} degrading, but it's not, so maybe the culprit is the
} (analog) pulse-processor. Anyone got any thoughts on how to pin it
} down as being either
} a the detector
} b the subsequent signal-processing stuff, eg pulse-proc?
} Could I successfully test the pulse-proc with a ramp from a standard
} signal generator, or would that signal, being relatively clean
} compared with that from a detector, not really check it out
} rigorously enough?
}
} cheers (well, I try)
}
} Ritchie
}
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}
}

Dear Ritchie!
In similar cases the first I do is the following:
I take off the signal cable from preamplifier and processor and
measure its resistance, which should be near zero, and then check
stability of this resistance during curving this cable.
Two times in my practice I have met the case when after several
working years the copper core of the cable was corroded as result of
chemical interaction with material of cable insulation, and the
resistance between many wires of core became rather big and unstable.
After change to cable with Teflon insulation the peaks became very (!)
stable.
Regards.

Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Co. Ltd., scientific service, Moscow, Russia.
e-mail: antron-at-space.ru.









From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Sun, 07 Mar 1999 18:53:55 -0500
Subject: NIKON Microscope For Sale......

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=20
The following NIKON Microscope is For Sale, No Reserve on eBay at=
;

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3D75289816

Thank You
Joseph Passero
jp-at-spacelab.net


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{td align=3Dcenter width=3D"100%"} {font size=3D3 color=3D"#000000"} {b=
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{td width=3D"45%"} $100.00 {/td}
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{td width=3D"31%"} {b} 1 {/b} {/td}
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{td width=3D"13%"} {font size=3D"2"} Started {/font} {/td}
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{td width=3D"13%"} {font size=3D2} Seller {/font} {/td}
{td width=3D"31%" colspan=3D4} {b} {a href=3D"mailto:jp-at-spacelab.net"} j=
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PI.dll?ViewFeedback&userid=3Djp-at-spacelab.net"} (36) {/A} {A HREF=3D"htt=
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celab.net"} (view seller's other auctions) {/a}   {a=
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n) {/a} {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{tr} {td width=3D"13%"} {/td} {td width=3D"31%"} {/td} {td width=3D"1%"} {/=
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{td width=3D"13%" valign=3D"top"} {font size=3D2} High bid {/font} {/td}
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{/td} {/tr} {tr} {td width=3D"13%" valign=3D"top"} {font size=3D2} Payment=
{/font} {/td} {td width=3D"31%" valign=3D"top" colspan=3D4} {font size=
=3D"2"} Money Order/Cashiers Checks, Personal Checks, See item desc=
ription for payment methods accepted {/font} {/td} {/tr} {tr} {td width=
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h=3D"31%" valign=3D"top" colspan=3D4} {font size=3D"2"} Buyer pays actu=
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order=3D"0"} {/td} {td width=3D"45%"} {/td} {/tr} {tr}
{td width=3D"13%"} {font size=3D2} Update item {/font} {/td}
{td width=3D"31%" colspan=3D4} {font size=3D2} {b} Seller: {/b} If this =
item has received no bids, you may {a href=3D"http://cgi5.ebay.com/aw=
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t. {/font} {br} {font size=3D"2"} {a href=3D"http://pages.ebay.com/aw/sel=
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irst bid. {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{/table} {/center} {br} {table border=3D"0" cellpadding=3D"8" cellspacin=
g=3D"0" width=3D"100%"} {tr} {td} Seller assumes all responsibility for =
listing this item. You should contact the seller to resolve any quest=
ions before bidding. Currency is U.S. dollars (US$) unless otherwise =
noted. {/td}
{/tr}
{/table}
{center} {table border=3D1 cellspacing=3D0 width=3D"100%" bgcolor=3D"#=
99CCCC"}
{tr}
{td align=3Dcenter width=3D"100%"} {font size=3D4 color=3D"#000000"} {b=
} {a name=3D"DESC"} Description {/a} {/b} {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{/table} {/center}

{blockquote}
{!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"}
{html}
{head}
{meta http-equiv=3D"Content-Type" content=3D"text/html; charset=
=3Diso-8859-1"}
{meta name=3D"GENERATOR" content=3D"Mozilla/4.5 [en] (Win95; U) [N=
etscape]"}
{title} Joseph Passero {/title}
{/head}
{body text=3D"#000000" bgcolor=3D"#FFFFFF" link=3D"#0000FF" vlink=
=3D"#FF0000" alink=3D"#FF0000"}

{center} {b} {font size=3D+2} NIKON {/font} {/b}
{br} {b} {font size=3D+2} LABORATORY MICROSCOPE {/font} {/b}
{p} All Original NIKON Eyepieces and Objectives
{p} Binocular Head with Interpupillary Adjustment and Indivudual Eyepi=
ece
Adjustment
{p} Pair of NIKON Bi=A0 H.KW. 10 X=A0 {sup} =A0 {/sup} Eyepieces
{p} Four NIKON Objectives
{p} =A0 4 /=A0 0.10
{br} 10 /=A0 0.25
{br} =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 s 40 /=A0 0.65=A0=A0
0.17 {/center}
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=
=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0Hi 100 /=A0 1.25
{center}
{p} Coaxial Mechanical Stage with Holder
{p} NIKON Substage Condenser N.A.1.30 with Aperture Diaphragm
{p} NIKON 115 V Lamp
{p} {img SRC=3Dhttp://home.cwix.com/~joseph.passero-at-cwix.com/Nikonside=
2.jpg height=3D621 width=3D384}
{br} =A0
{p} If you have comments or suggestions, email me at {i} {a href=3D"mai=
lto:jp-at-spacelab.net"} jp-at-spacelab.net {/a} {/i} {/center}

{/body}
{/html}

{/blockquote}
{/blockquote} {/blockquote} {/center} {/center} {/strong} {/pre} {/em} {/fon=
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{a name=3DBID} {center} {table border=3D1 cellspacing=3D0 width=3D"100%=
" bgcolor=3D"#99CCCC"}
{tr}
{td align=3Dcenter width=3D"100%"} {font size=3D5 color=3D"#000000"} {b=
} Bidding {/b} {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{/table} {/center} {/a}
{p align=3Dcenter} {font size=3D4}
***(PIC)*** NIKON LABORATORY MICROSCOPE ***** {/font} {font size=3D3} (=
Item #75289816) {/font} {/p}
{center} {table border=3D0 cellpadding=3D0 cellspacing=3D0 width=3D"35=
%"}
{tr}
{td width=3D"50%"} {font size=3D2} Starts at {/font} {/td}
{td width=3D"50%" align=3Dright} {font size=3D4} $100.00 {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{tr}
{td width=3D"50%"} {font size=3D2} Bid increment {/font} {/td}
{td width=3D"50%" align=3Dright} {font size=3D4} $2.50 {/font} {/td}
{/tr}
{tr}
{td width=3D"50%"} {font size=3D2} {b} Minimum bid {/b} {/font} {/td}
{td width=3D"50%" align=3Dright} {font size=3D4} {b} $100.00 {/b} {/font} {=
/td}
{/tr}
{/table} {/center} {br}
{font size=3D"3"} {b} Registration required. {/b} eBay requires registra=
tion in order to bid. Find out how to {a href=3D"http://pages.ebay.co=
m/aw/register-by-country.html"} become a registered user {/a} . It's fas=
t and it's {b} free {/b} ! {/font}

{form method=3Dpost action=3D"http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dl=
l"} {INPUT TYPE=3DHIDDEN NAME=3D"MfcISAPICommand" VALUE=3D"MakeBid"}
{input type=3Dhidden name=3Ditem value=3D75289816}

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00%" cellspacing=3D"0"} {tr} {td} {a href=3D"http://pages.ebay.com/aw/us=
erid.html"} {strong} User ID {/strong} {/a} or E-mail address {/td} {td} {st=
rong} Password {/strong} ( {a href=3D"http://pages.ebay.com/aw/reqpass.h=
tml"} forgotten {/a} it?) {/td} {/tr} {tr} {td} {input type=3D"text" name=
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{/table}
{/td}
{/tr}
{tr}
{td width=3D"40" valign=3D"top" bgcolor=3D"#99CCCC"}   {/td} {td wi=
dth=3D"500"} {input type=3D"text" name=3D"maxbid" size=3D"12" maxlengt=
h=3D"12"} {font size=3D"2"} {i} Current minimum bid is 100.00 {/i} {/font=
}      {input type=3D"submit" value=3D"review bid"} =
{br} {font size=3D"3"} Your {strong} maximum {/strong} {strong} bid {/stron=
g} . {/font} {br} {br} {font size=3D"2"} Please type only numerals and the =
decimal point (if required). Do {b} not {/b} include currency symbols s=
uch as a dollar sign ('$') or commas (','). {/font} {br} {br}
{b} {font size=3D"3"} Binding contract. {/font} {/b} {br}
{font size=3D"2"}      Placing a bid is a bin=
ding contract in
many states. Do not bid unless you intend to buy this item at the amo=
unt of your bid.
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From: Kenneth Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sun, 07 Mar 1999 20:05:52 -0800
Subject: Re: EDS Upgrade

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Arnold, Jim wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am currently looking to upgrade my EDS system. I work in a semiconductor
} manufacturing facility(CMOS) and I currently have a Cambridge S200 SEM with
} Kevex Delta II.
}
} I have an interest in Oxford, EDAX and a company called EVEX (which I am not
} familiar with)? Does anyone have experience with these companies - Good or
} Bad?
}
} I am looking for a light element detector with possibly a WDS for Boron
} quantification.
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Jim Arnold
} Microelectronics and Technology Center
} AlliedSignal Electronics and Avionics Systems
} 9140 Old Annapolis Road
} Columbia, MD 21045
}
} email: Jim.arnold-at-alliedsignal.com
} voice: (410) 964-4118
} fax: (410) 964-5046


Jim,
One of my customers sent their Kevex detector to Evex for repair. They
didn't complete the repair, they bent the dewar, and they never
returned. A very bad bet to do business with them.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA





From: Kenneth Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sun, 07 Mar 1999 20:22:57 -0800
Subject: Re: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi,
}
} I have never done any material sciences work - I've only ever done
} biological specimens for EM. Our engineering department has asked me to
} look at some ball bearings that are failing, as a favour. I know I don't
} need to fix or dehydrate but do I simply clean them, mount them (using
} double-sided tape?) and coat them as usual? Or is coating unnecessary?
} What whould I clean these with? I'm assuming there is grease somewhere
} that is not good for my vacuum!
}
} Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks in advance.....
}
} Lesley Bechtold
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191


Lesley,
All of the suggestions have been pretty much on the mark. Just two
things 1) Get a degausser so you can demagnetize the sample, because
if you don't, your resolution will have you swearing at your microscope
for its poor performance, 2) a ball bearing that has a good surface
may require up to 20kx magnification to see any surface detail. Some
dirt on the surface can make finding that surface much easier.
Materials failure analysis is a lot of fun!

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA





From: mohammed y abdulrawoof / f40z006 75760 :      mdyousuf-at-KSU.EDU.SA
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 11:50:36 -0300 (GMT)
Subject: MSA Certification - regarding.

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Dear listserved all,
I wish to know the examination dates for the next cycle of MSA
certification in Electron Microscopy. I know that this question should
have been sent to the business office at MSA, but I hope to have a quicky
answer from any of the list members.
Cheers and have a good day.
Mohammed Yousuf A.Rawoof.






From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Mon, 08 Mar 1999 10:40:25 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Gatan EELS ELP output to other formats? Pub domain EELS software?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
} 1. Are there ways to unwrap EMSA/MAS data directly into Excel?
}

Scott,
it's a fairly straightforward process to unwrap the data in MSExcel. I recorded a macro to do it a while ago - although we were on Macs then, not PCs, I think I kept it somewhere...
If you e-mail a file to me I could write it again, if you like. It is fairly easy to do yourself - I think it's just a matter of cutting and pasting columns. If you can work out a routine to do it once, you can 'record' what you're doing as a macro. All you have to do for subsequent files is to run the macro again.

Cheers,

Richard Beanland
Marconi Materials Technology Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ

e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com

Tel. +44 1327 356363
Fax. +44 1327 356389

} 2. Is there a public domain EELS program that will plot the data and
} perhaps do some work with the EMSA/MAS format that will run on a PC or a
} Mac? (I would prefer PC because our Macs are old and there is not much
} chance of getting new ones here.)
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} PO Box 11472 (letters)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8161 (fax)
}
}
}
}
}
}







From: Peter Tarquinio :      Peter-at-evex.com
Date: Sunday, March 07, 1999 8:00 PM
Subject: Re: EDS Upgrade

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ken,

I am alarmed by your statement. It is Evex Analytical's policy to "always"
perform an on-site installation of "any" new detector install or detector
repair.

Please be more specific on your customer's name, location, detector serial
number, date of service. .

Are you absolutely sure the customer you mentioned sent a "Kevex" detector
to "Evex Analytical"? Your prompt reply is appreciated.

Thank you
Evex Analytical
Peter Tarquinio




-----Original Message-----
} From: Kenneth Converse {qualityimages-at-netrax.net}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ;
Arnold, Jim {Jim.Arnold-at-alliedsignal.com}






From: Yevgeniya Zastavker :      zhenya-at-critical.mit.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 10:42:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: adhesive for lipids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everybody,

I am working with self-assembled microstructures that are composed of a
sterol and a phosphatidylcholine. I need to be able to attach these
structures to glass or plastic walls of a chamber they grow in. What
would you recommend? I have tried various commercially coated glass
slides, super glue, jewel glue, leather glue, and almost any other glue I
could think of. The problem is that my structures grow in an aqueous
solution, and I was not able to find an adhesive which would not only glue
the structures (super glue did the job actually), but also not dissolve in
water.

I would greatly appreciate your suggestions and comments.

Thank you in advance -- Yevgeniya Zastavker.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Yevgeniya V. Zastavker
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Biophysics
77 Massachusetts Ave, Room 13-2038
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-4826







From: Yevgeniya Zastavker :      zhenya-at-critical.mit.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 10:52:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: sterol crystals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everybody,

Sorry to bombard you with questions. This could be the wrong list, but I
thought to try anyway. I am looking for crystallographic data of various
sterols, and in particular (MAJORLY) I need information on the crystal
angles of various sterols. Does anybody know of a good source for this
information? I would greatly appreciate your advice.

Thank you very much in advance -- Yevgeniya Zastavker

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Yevgeniya V. Zastavker
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Biophysics
77 Massachusetts Ave, Room 13-2038
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-4826






From: Soumitra Ghoshroy :      ghoshroy-at-ag.arizona.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 10:26:39 -0700 (MST)
Subject: job opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


ELECTRON MICROSCOPY SPECIALIST

The Electron Microscopy Laboratory at New Mexico State University has an
open position for an Electron Microscopy Specialist. The laboratory
provides transmission and scanning electron microscopy and some light
microscopy services for the university research community and a few
external organizations, in biological, physical and materials sciences
fields.
Qualifications: bachelor's degree minimum, master's degree desirable, with
at least four years of electron microscopy experience. The preferred
candidate will have experience with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis.
Experience with digital image capture and analysis, fluorescence
microscopy, immunocytochemistry (including immunogold labeling), and laser
scanning confocal microscopy is desirable. The candidate must be
competent with sample preparation techniques, including vacuum
evaporation, sputter coating, critical point drying, support film
production, low temperature embedding, and photographic film processing
and printing. The successful candidate must be able to work well with
researchers, staff, and students, and be able to train graduate and
undergraduate students for independent work with relevant techniques and
equipment.
Duties: operations and routine maintenance of transmission and scanning
electron microscopes and associated equipment; fixation, embedding,
semi-thin and ultrathin sectioning, staining, and coating of samples;
supervision of facility users; record keeping, including billings,
budgets, maintenance of instrument and research logs, and researching and
designing specimen preparation protocols as required.
Salary: DOQ Website: www.nmsu.edu/~personal/postings/professional/
Screening of applicants will begin May 1, 1999 and continue until a
candidate is chosen.
Applications should include a resume, letter of application and three
letters of recommendation.

Apply to: Dr. Reed Dasenbrock
Associate Dean/Director
Arts and Sciences Research Center
New Mexico State University
MSC RC, Box 30001
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001
rdasenbr-at-nmsu.edu













From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 8 Mar 1999 11:38:36 -0800
Subject: ETEC SEM Available

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


We have an ETEC SEM available if anyone wants it. (Stockton, CA) It is =
in working condition. We bought it new in 1973 and it has been under =
contract since that time until Feb. 1, 1999. We also have extra ETEC =
parts (power supplies, modules, etc.)
We must take it out by March 24, 1999. If anyone wants it, please let me =
know or we start chopping it on that day.
Thanks
Judy M.

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us







From: Laura Robles :      lrobles-at-CAS.CSUDH.EDU
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 12:10:09 -0800
Subject: microtome purchase

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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id {1DCJVQ86} ; Mon, 8 Mar 1999 12:10:10 -0800
Message-ID: {3D55EE50922DD21192CC00A0C9A9D8270120F8-at-cas.csudh.edu}


Dear subscribers,

I want to purchase a microtome that sections both paraffin and plastic
embedded tissue. I have not purchased a rotary microtome before and I would
like your suggestions as to what companies handle rotary microtomes at the
present time. I have an ultramicrotome and I know that both types of media
can be cut on it but I need a second microtome and have about $12,000 to
spend.

Laura J. Robles

Laura J. Robles, PhD.
Associate Dean, Student Academic Advancement
Professor of Biology
MBRS Program Director
College of Arts and Sciences
California State University, Dominguez Hills
1000 East Victoria Street, Carson CA 90747
310 243-3389, FAX 310 516-4268
lrobles-at-cas.csudh.edu






From: Ekstrom, Harry :      Harry.Ekstrom-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Mon, 8 Mar 1999 15:11:00 -0700
Subject: FW: Printers for SEM Images

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I think an inexpensive inkjet is the way to go. However, you must try to
set the DPI of the printer to match the resolution setting of your digital
images. If you capture a digital image at 1024 X800 for instance, you have
about 820K of information. Now lets say you plan to print a 4X5 image
similar to a Polaroid, then your printer should be no less than 300dpi
{4"x5" x (300)2=1.8Mpixel} to accommodate the amount of pixel information
from the capturing rate of the image. Hence, a 2048X1600 resolution setting
captures 3.2 Mpixels of info, so a 400DPI setting should be used. The idea
being to match the capturing info with the amount of pixels the printer can
resolve to minimize interpolation...be it upwards or downwards. Not sure
what the human eye can resolve tho.

Good Luck,
Harry Ekstrom





From: melim-at-qes.po.my
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 14:31:24 +0800
Subject: Reflective in Laser Terminology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




We have an ETEC SEM available if anyone wants it. (Stockton, CA) It is =
in
working condition. We bought it new in 1973 and it has been under =
contract
since that time until Feb. 1, 1999. We also have extra ETEC parts (power
supplies, modules, etc.)
We must take it out by March 23, 1999. If anyone wants it, please let me =
know
or we start chopping it on that day.
Thanks
Judy M.

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us





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Dear List,
Can anyone explain what does "Reflective" means in Laser Terminology .

I read through a article in a Magazine regarding Laser Marker and in the =
article the mentioned that Wood and Paper is 100% reflective . I am lost =
and confuse

M.E.Lim
Sr Regional Support Engineer
QES(Asia Pacific) Sdn Bhd
Tel : 603-7241188 ext 214
Fax : 603-7244488
Emails : melim-at-qes.po.my






From: Raija Sormunen :      Raija.Sormunen-at-oulu.fi
Date: Tue, 09 Mar 1999 13:02:43 +0200
Subject: Processing of micro-injected cells for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All,

Can anyone give me tips how to prepare micro-injected cells for TEM. Which
cell culture support is best for detaching the cells? Is there any compound
which we could micro-inject as a marker?


Thanks

Raija
Raija Sormunen, PhD

Biocenter Oulu, Department of Pathology,

University of Oulu,

P.O.Box 5000 (Kajaanintie 52D),

FIN-90401 Oulu

Finland


tel +358 8 5375916

fax +358 8 5375953

E-mail Raija.Sormunen-at-oulu.fi





From: oshel-at-terracom.net (Philip Oshel)
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 06:25:00 -0600
Subject: Re: adhesive for lipids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yevgeniya,

Try gap-filling super glue (crazy glue), available at any hobby store or it
should be at a hardware store. No particular brand, they all work--it's the
gap-filling that seems to be important. I used this to glue gelatin
specimen blocks to the stage of a Vibratome which was then flooded with
phosphate buffer. It holds under water if you let it set. This doesn't take
long.

The problem may be the gap-filling property--it may cover your microstructures.

Phil

} I am working with self-assembled microstructures that are composed of a
} sterol and a phosphatidylcholine. I need to be able to attach these
} structures to glass or plastic walls of a chamber they grow in. What
} would you recommend? I have tried various commercially coated glass
} slides, super glue, jewel glue, leather glue, and almost any other glue I
} could think of. The problem is that my structures grow in an aqueous
} solution, and I was not able to find an adhesive which would not only glue
} the structures (super glue did the job actually), but also not dissolve in
} water.
}
} I would greatly appreciate your suggestions and comments.
}
} Thank you in advance -- Yevgeniya Zastavker.
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Yevgeniya V. Zastavker
} Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Biophysics
} 77 Massachusetts Ave, Room 13-2038
} Cambridge, MA 02139
} (617) 253-4826

****be famous! send in a tech tip or question***
Philip Oshel
Technical Editor, Microscopy Today
PO Box 620068
Middleton, WI 53562
Voice: (608) 833-2885
Fax: (608) 836-1969 (please make sure my name is on any fax)
oshel-at-terracom.net








From: James.Passmore-at-sealedair.com
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 09:17:46 -0500
Subject: RE: Printers for SEM Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


May I offer a word of caution about the approach below?

While you're correct in saying you need to optimize printing
conditions for your image and printer, there will probably be a
little more to it than setting up comparable number of pixels.
Your image is probably either a 256-level gray scale or a
16 million color (256 levels of red, green and blue). An inkjet
can't print that kind of color depth in each pixel. The concepts
of "halftoning" or "dithering" need to be considered. As I'm far
from the expert, and we don't need a complete textbook on the
listserver anyway, so I'll refer you to chapter 2 of "The Image
Processing Handbook" by John Russ. As we would expect from
Dr. Russ, the material is excellent.

That does bring up a question for me, though. The new HP
inkjets have a "PhotoREt" technology which, I believe is
supposed to be able to vary the size of the dots it produces,
therefore producing better photo-printing results. Has anyone
determined whether this is true, or just hype?

Jim Passmore
Sr. Analytical Chemist
Cryovac Division
Sealed Air Corporation

----------
} From: Harry.Ekstrom
} To: Microscopy
} Subject: FW: Printers for SEM Images
} Date: Monday, March 08, 1999 5:11PM
}
-------------
}
} I think an inexpensive inkjet is the way to go. However, you must try to
} set the DPI of the printer to match the resolution setting of your digital
} images. If you capture a digital image at 1024 X800 for instance, you have
} about 820K of information. Now lets say you plan to print a 4X5 image
} similar to a Polaroid, then your printer should be no less than 300dpi
} {4"x5" x (300)2=1.8Mpixel} to accommodate the amount of pixel information
} from the capturing rate of the image. Hence, a 2048X1600 resolution setting
} captures 3.2 Mpixels of info, so a 400DPI setting should be used. The idea
} being to match the capturing info with the amount of pixels the printer can
} resolve to minimize interpolation...be it upwards or downwards. Not sure
} what the human eye can resolve tho.
}
} Good Luck,
} Harry Ekstrom
}
}






From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 09:49:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: EM safety book?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have or know of a good reference on EM lab safety? I thought
there was a book called "Safety in the EM Laboratory"...but I haven't been
able to find it. Probably imagined it.

Thanks for any help anyone can give!

Tamara Howard
CSHL







From: Heiligers, Bert :      bjh-at-eo.ie.philips.nl
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 09:01:34 -0600
Subject: Philips Anniversary Image Contest

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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FEI Company Celebrates 50 Years Philips Electron Microscopy with an
Anniversary Image Contest
(Calling all microscopists!)


Fifty years ago, we delivered the first Philips electron microscope.
Since then, our TEMs and SEMs are used for all kinds of applications.

To celebrate the occasion, we're inviting all Philips electron
microscope users all over the world to join our special Anniversary
Image Contest.

To enter, simply submit prints of one or two of your best images made
with a Philips electron microscope, showing the original data bar.
Prints only, please! Closing date: 31 July 1999

WIN 1,000 EURO*!

Our jury panel of experts will select the best ten images, five in Life
Science and five in Material Science. All ten winners will each be
awarded a prize of 1000 Euro*. The winners will be announced in August
1999 on the FEI website at www.feic.com.

The following details must accompany each entry:
* Name and contact address of owner
* Category: Life Science or Material Science
* Description of subject
* Type of instrument used
* Electron optic magnification
* Magnification of print

Please submit your entry to:
FEI Company
50 Years Philips EM Celebration
P.O. Box 218
5600 MD EINDHOVEN
The Netherlands

Digital images cannot be accepted for practical reasons. All submissions
must be free of any legal obligations. All entries remain property of
their original owners, but contestants consent to the use of their
entries for promotional purposes by FEI Company without further
compensation. Prizes are not transferable. Taxes are the sole
responsibility of the winners. Contest rules are available on the
company's website (www.feic.com) or can be requested by fax to +31 40
276 6587. FEI Company will not enter into any other correspondence
regarding this contest.

*Actual prize will be the equivalent value in the winner's local
currency







From: Goodhouse, Joseph :      jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 11:00:27 -0500
Subject: RE: adhesive for lipids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yev,
You might try Cell-Tak from Collaborative Biomedical Products, Two Oak Park,
Bedford, Mass. 617-275-0004. This is the isolated mussel adhesion protein
(map) the marine mussels and barnacles use to attach themselves to rocks and
boats etc. It is commonly used by people perform atomic force microscopy to
attach their molecules to a surface.


Images & Info at http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/confocal
{http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/confocal}

Joseph Goodhouse
Confocal / EM Core Laboratory
Department of Molecular Biology
Princeton University
jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu {mailto:Jgoodhouse-at-molbio.princeton.edu}

609-258-5432


-----Original Message-----
From: Yevgeniya Zastavker [mailto:zhenya-at-critical.mit.edu]
Sent: Monday, March 08, 1999 10:43 AM
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Cc: Yevgeniya Zastavker
Subject: adhesive for lipids


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Hello everybody,

I am working with self-assembled microstructures that are
composed of a
sterol and a phosphatidylcholine. I need to be able to
attach these
structures to glass or plastic walls of a chamber they grow
in. What
would you recommend? I have tried various commercially
coated glass
slides, super glue, jewel glue, leather glue, and almost any
other glue I
could think of. The problem is that my structures grow in
an aqueous
solution, and I was not able to find an adhesive which would
not only glue
the structures (super glue did the job actually), but also
not dissolve in
water.

I would greatly appreciate your suggestions and comments.

Thank you in advance -- Yevgeniya Zastavker.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Yevgeniya V. Zastavker
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Biophysics
77 Massachusetts Ave, Room 13-2038
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 253-4826







From: Ekstrom, Harry :      Harry.Ekstrom-at-alliedsignal.com
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 09:48:21 -0600
Subject: Printers for SEM Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I think an inexpensive inkjet is the way to go. However, you must try to
set the DPI of the printer to match the resolution setting of your digital
images. If you capture a digital image at 1024 X800 for instance, you have
about 820K of information. Now lets say you plan to print a 4X5 image
similar to a Polaroid, then your printer should be no less than 300dpi
{4"x5" x (300)2=1.8Mpixel} to accommodate the amount of pixel information
from the capturing rate of the image. Hence, a 2048X1600 resolution setting
captures 3.2 Mpixels of info, so a 400DPI setting should be used. The idea
being to match the capturing info with the amount of pixels the printer can
resolve to minimize interpolation...be it upwards or downwards. Not sure
what the human eye can resolve tho.

Good Luck,
Harry Ekstrom







From: Sandy Perkins :      skperkin-at-vt.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 11:01:08 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM-cells on Permanox slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi-

I just scanned through postings about processing tissue cultures and
coverslips for TEM, but I didn't see anything on processing cells grown on
8 well Permanox slides. I will be embedding in PolyBed 812, with a
transition through propylene oxide. Unfortunately, the wells don't survive
the p.o. step. I would appreciate hearing about any experiences with
Permanox slides. Thank you very much.

Sandy Perkins

Laboratory for Neurotoxicity Studies
Virginia-Maryland Regional College
of Veterinary Medicine
Virginia Tech







From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Mar 1999 11:58:57 -0600
Subject: Re: FW: Printers for SEM Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree that you must match the print resolution to the image resolution,
but take some exception with your math.

At the crux of the issue is how many printer pixels are required to
represent a single image pixel with a satisfactory level of gray or color
scale resolution. While a dye sub printer conceptually requires only a
single pixel to render the whole range of colors or gray scales, an inkjet
printer may require multiple pixels based on the technology used. If an ink
jet can only be tunred on and off (like a laser printer), then dithering
will be required over a number of pixels to give the appearance of shades
of color. More pixels will be needed for smoother or finer gradations. Now
I think I heard that new inkjet printers can control the amount of ink at
each pixel so that they approach the dye-subs in using only one printer
pixel per one image pixel. However, I think better results would be had by
allowing something like an 6x6 printer pixel pattern for each image pixel.

Using those assumptions, a 1024x800 image would require 6144x4800 pixels in
a 5x4 inch space which requires 1200 dpi printer resolution. Doubling the
image resolution to 2048 requires doubling the printer resolution to 2400
dpi. However, the limited resolution (both spatial and color) of the human
eye may permit decent images with much less printer resolution, but there
would be some loss of image detail.

At 03:11 PM 3/8/99 -0700, Ekstrom, Harry wrote:
}
} I think an inexpensive inkjet is the way to go. However, you must try to
} set the DPI of the printer to match the resolution setting of your digital
} images. If you capture a digital image at 1024 X800 for instance, you have
} about 820K of information. Now lets say you plan to print a 4X5 image
} similar to a Polaroid, then your printer should be no less than 300dpi
} {4"x5" x (300)2=1.8Mpixel} to accommodate the amount of pixel information
} from the capturing rate of the image. Hence, a 2048X1600 resolution setting
} captures 3.2 Mpixels of info, so a 400DPI setting should be used. The idea
} being to match the capturing info with the amount of pixels the printer can
} resolve to minimize interpolation...be it upwards or downwards. Not sure
} what the human eye can resolve tho.
}
} Good Luck,
} Harry Ekstrom

----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer applications






From: Sally Burns :      burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Mar 1999 13:45:54 -0500
Subject: Re: EM safety book?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have an address for
Electron Microscopy Safety Handbook. 2nd Edition. 1994. $15.00
Barber, V.C. and J.A. Mascorro (Eds)

San Francisco Press,
Box 428600
San Francisco, CA 94142-6800

Hopefully it is still in print,
Sally
--
Sally Burns
Center for Electron Optics
B5 Center for Integrated Plant Systems
E. Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 355-5004
burnssal-at-pilot.msu.edu





From: David E. Luzzi :      luzzi-at-sol1.lrsm.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 14:22:45 -0500
Subject: Electropolishing of Hf alloy

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We are electropolishing a two-phase alloy containing a Laves phase and a bcc
solid solution. The bcc phase is mainly Vanadium and the Laves phase is
mainly HfV2. We are experiencing preferential polishing of the bcc phase
leading to marginal TEM specimen quality.

Our solution is H2SO4 / Methanol / HF / butyl cellusolve

Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

David E. Luzzi
Department of Materials Science
University of Pennsylvania
3231 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272

215-898-8366
215-573-2128 - fax
luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu {mailto:luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu}


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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 09 Mar 99 14:48:17 -0500
Subject: RE: Electropolishing of Hf alloy

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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 09 Mar 99 14:48:17 -0500
Subject: RE: Electropolishing of Hf alloy

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Reply to: RE: Electropolishing of Hf alloy
Try adding about 5% acetic acid, polish at -40 C, 100 volts.

Alternate polish: (worked on V-20Ti)
=
5.3 g lithium chloride Temp=3D -50 C
11.1 g magnesium perchlorate voltage=3D 190-200
500 ml methanol current=3D 40-50 mA
100 ml butyl cellosolve

Above done with a South Bay 550-B single jet polisher in 1985.
A notation mentions even grain boundaries. =

Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439 E-mail {kestel-at-anl.gov}
100 ml butyl cellosolve
David E. Luzzi wrote:
} We are electropolishing a two-phase alloy containing a Laves phase and a =
bcc
} solid solution. The bcc phase is mainly Vanadium and the Laves phase is
} mainly HfV2. We are experiencing preferential polishing of the bcc phase
} leading to marginal TEM specimen quality.
}
} Our solution is H2SO4 / Methanol / HF / butyl cellusolve
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
}
} David E. Luzzi
} Department of Materials Science
} University of Pennsylvania
} 3231 Walnut Street
} Philadelphia, PA 19104-6272
}
} 215-898-8366
} 215-573-2128 - fax
} luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu {mailto:luzzi-at-lrsm.upenn.edu}
}
}
}
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} Mar 1999 13:42:50 -0600
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} From: "David E. Luzzi" {luzzi-at-sol1.lrsm.upenn.edu}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Subject: Electropolictropoliing of Hf alloy
} Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 14:22:45 -0500
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{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE =
WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: Electropolishing of Hf alloy

{/PRE}
{FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Try =
adding about 5% acetic acid, polish at -40 =
C, 100 volts. {BR}
{BR}
Alternate polish: =
(worked on V-20Ti) {BR}
{BR}
5.3 =
g lithium chloride =
Temp=3D -50 C {BR}
11.1 g magnesium perchlorate =
voltage=3D 190-200 {BR}
500 ml methanol =
current=3D 40-50 =
mA {BR}
100 ml butyl cellosolve {BR}
{BR}
=
Above done with a South Bay 550-B single =
jet polisher in 1985. {BR}
A notation mentions =
even grain boundaries. {BR}
{BR}
Bernie =
Kestel {BR}
Materials Science Division {BR}
=
Argonne National Laboratory {BR}
Argonne, =
Il., 60439 E-mail =
<kestel-at-anl.gov> {BR}
100 ml =
butyl cellosolve {BR}
David E. Luzzi wrote: {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>We are electropolishing =
a two-phase alloy containing a Laves phase =
and a bcc {BR}
>solid solution. The bcc =
phase is mainly Vanadium and the Laves phase =
is {BR}
>mainly HfV2. We are experiencing =
preferential polishing of the bcc phase {BR}
>leading =
to marginal TEM specimen quality. {BR}
> {BR}
>Our =
solution is H2SO4 / Methanol / HF / butyl =
cellusolve {BR}
> {BR}
>Does anyone have =
any suggestions? Thanks in advance. {BR}
> {BR}
>David =
E. Luzzi {BR}
>Department of Materials Science {BR}
>University =
of Pennsylvania {BR}
>3231 Walnut Street {BR}
>Philadelphia, =
PA 19104-6272 {BR}
> {BR}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 09 Mar 99 14:48:17 -0500
Subject: RE: Electropolishing of Hf alloy

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From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 16:47:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: safety book - thanks!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks to everyone for the safety book info.I guess I did imagine the
other title. Too much osmium...................

Tamara







From: Doug Cromey :      doug-cromey-at-ns.arizona.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Mar 1999 14:53:01 -0700
Subject: AZ Imaging & Microanalysis Society Spring Mtg 3/11/1999

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Arizona Imaging and Microanalysis Society
Annual Spring Meeting
Thursday, March 11, 1999
University of Arizona Student Union Sr. Ballroom

There is no registration fee.

8:30 - 9:00 Registration

9:00 - 9:15 Welcome Dr. Clark Lantz, President AIMS

9:15 - 10:15 Microanalysis Society Tour Speaker -
Applications of SEM/EDX to forensic cases and research related to
food product and pharmaceutical tampering and counterfeiting.
Dr. Frank Platek, US Food and Drug Administration

10:15 - 10:30 Break

10:30 - 10:55 Metals as documents: some uses of imaging and microanalysis
in African history.
Dr. David Killick, Anthropology, University of Arizona

10:55 - 11:20 Visualizing surfactant aggregation with atomic force microscopy
Jon Wolgemuth, Physics, University of Arizona

11:20 - 11:45 Multi-parametric analysis of cell function in 2- and
3- dimensions by spectral imaging microscopy
Dr. Ron Lynch, Physiology, University of Arizona

11:35 - 1:30 Lunch
AIMS Business Meeting

1:30 - 1:55 In situ molecular imaging of stress proteins and oxidative damage
Dr. Claire Payne, Microbiology & Immunology
University of Arizona

1:55 - 2:20 Determining the functional signficance of cytoskeletal proteins
using microinjection and transfection techniques
Dr. Carol Gregorio, Cell Biology and Anatomy
University of Arizona

2:20 - 2:45 Fiberoptic Confocal Microscope for In Vivo Imaging
Dr. Art Gmitro, Radiology, University of Arizona

2:45 - 3:00 Break

3:00 - 5:00 Student Presentations

5:30 - 7:30 Banquet
($12 for dinner, contact Suzanne Kelly
{suekelly-at-ag.arizona.edu} to reserve dinner)

Microscopy Society of America Tour Speaker -
Digital manipulation of acquired images: What is possible vs
what is ethical
Dr. Jack Kinnamon, University of Denver

....................................................................
: Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy :
: Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona :
: (office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044 :
: (voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA :
: (FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: doug-cromey-at-ns.arizona.edu):
:...................................................................:
http://www.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exp_path.html
Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"






From: EMAD S A-HASSAN :      ehassan-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 17:44:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: T4 phage size?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all,

I would like to know the average size of T4 phages, and the method it is
determined by.

Thanks,

Emad
----






From: EMAD S A-HASSAN :      ehassan-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 18:12:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: T4 phage size?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all,

I would like to know the average size of T4 phages, and the method it is
determined by.

Thanks,

Emad
----






From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 09 Mar 99 18:04:30 -0800
Subject: RE: Processing of micro-injected cells for TEM

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: RE: Processing of micro-injected cells for TEM
Dear Raija,

If you are to microinject cells, then the best support is one that gives =
access for your needles. I am sure you would prefer to use coverslips. =
The material you use will depend on your cells but glass usually works =
well. Get the coverslips that have locator grids etched onto them. It is =
important to know if you plan to examine the cells for morphology or if =
you want to immunolabel them. I will assume you only want to look at =
their morphology.

Once you have micro-injected cells and know where they are on the grid (so =
don't plate then at too high a density), fix with aldehyde, post fix with =
osmium tetroxide, dehydrate and infiltrate with resin (as you would any =
piece of tissue for TEM). During the final stages of infiltration (=
acetone or propylene oxide) it is wise to transfer the cells, still on the =
glass coverslip, to a glass or metal dish. Plastic will dissolve. =

Embed the glass in resin, cells up, at the bottom of an aluminum weigh =
boat. Push the glass to the bottom of the dish and pour unpolymerized =
resin over. Polymerize by heat and remove from the aluminum dish. Cut =
the thin layer of resin away from the back of the coverslip to expose the =
glass. Now you can remove the glass by plunging into liquid nitrogen and =
rapidly warming few times. It will cause the block to crack but it does =
work. Alteratively you can heat the resin, glass-down, on a hot plate and =
slide the glass of.. Either way the cells will remain in the resin, as =
will the grid locator lines. You should then be able to locate your cells =
and cut sections. This is not as easy as I make it seem but it all has =
been done before.

If you don't like the idea of embedding at the bottom of a dish, it is =
also possible to embed the glass coverslip, cells to the resin, over BEEM =
or gelatin capsules, or over flat embedding molds. You will still have to =
remove the glass. You could use plastic coverslips and section them too, =
but finding your cells will not be easy.

The second part of your question - is there anything you can inject to =
identify the cells by EM. Yes, colloidal gold particles can be prepared =
that can be microinjected into cells. However, if the gold suspension is =
too concentrated it will block the needle. If it is too dilute, it will be=
more difficult to detect by EM. =

Immunocytochemistry by request.

Regards,

Paul Webster


Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
http://www.hei.org/htm/apw.htm

Raija Sormunen wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =







From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 03:04:09 -0500
Subject: safety book - thanks!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by arl-img-10.compuserve.com (8.8.6/8.8.6/2.18) id DAA22626;
Wed, 10 Mar 1999 03:04:50 -0500 (EST)


Hi,

The Royal Microscopical Society (Oxford England) produced a series of
safety notes for its members that included - the microscopes, embedding a=
nd
fixation.

I have had use of some of these recently so I do know that they are still=

available.

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: B.Laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 10:53:26 GMT+0100
Subject: Thanks for Liposome-watching tips

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all, thanks for the tips preparing liposomes for TEM observations. In summary, most answers dealed with negativ staining of the liposomes.
We' ve tried so and got good results for an overview. I added all replies to this meeages for all who're interested in this topic. Bernward
1.Don Gantz wrotes: To all who desired more info on fixing and staining of liposomes-- I
apologize for the delay in my response. We had a major snowstorm and I
lost a day.
The initial query by Bernward Laube was about evaluating homogeneity
of liposome suspensions ( {100nm diam) and estimating particle volumes.
We have been using a osmium fix/negative stain technique for a number
of years to look at size distribution of VLDL, chylomicrons, and synthetic
lipid emulsions. The osmium fix firms up these particles nicely so that
flattening is greatly reduced. In fact, based upon metal shadowing exps.
the slight enlargement of diameter due to flattening after fixation is
negated by slight shrinkage of particles during processing. The result is
an excellent estimate of diameter and volume.

In regard to lipid vesicles/liposomes, our experience with
smaller ones of 50nm or so prepared by sonication and processed with
only negative stain is that they are preserved pretty well. We would
expect some flattening although we have not shadowed these. However, with
larger liposomes of 100nm+ diam, we believe OsO4 will aid in preservation
and stability and presumably reduce flattening.

If one requires differentiation of lamellar structure (uni vs multi)
among particles within a population, negative staining is unreliable
because of variability of stain penetration. For this purpose, we use
vitreous ice cryomicroscopy as we are fortunate to have it available.

In general our fixation/negative staining procedure is as follows:

1) Add 1 volume of 2% OsO4 in Cacodylate buffer to 2 volumes of
emulsion or liposome prep. Fix for 30 mins.+

2) Place small aliquot on freshly flow-discharged carbon formvar-coated
grid for a few seconds.

3) Remove and blot off excess fluid and immediately stain with 1% NaPT.

4) After a few seconds, remove and blot excess fluid. Air dry.

Optimum concentration is trial and error. Fixed suspension can be
diluted as needed. Hope this helps.
2.Sheila Garcia wrotes:I've just finished my Doctorate Thesis, and I worked preparing
liposome. I used phosphotungstic acid in 2% aq solution, neutralized with
KOH 1M (PTK). But, before it, I used bacitracin 0,1mg/ml aq sol., as a
wetting agent ( D.W.Gregory and B.J.S. Pirie-Journal of Microscopy,
v.99,pt.3, dec. 1973,.261-265). Take a coated grid (carbon, formvar), put
a drop of bacitracin sol. for 2 min. Draw off drop with with a piece of
torn filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the
liposome (a dilueted solution), draw off again and add a drop of PTK for 2
min. I hope it could help you. Profa. Dra. Sheila Garcia


Check out the following paper:

"Sequential treatment by phosphotungstic acid and uranyl acetate
enhances the adherence of lipid membranes and membrane proteins to
hydrophobic EM grids", A. N. Barnakov, Journal of Microscopy. Vol 175, Pt
2, August 1994, pp. 171-174.
3.Joe Neilly:Don,

Could you elaborate on how you would fix liposomes w/ Osmium tetroxide.
We have tried the negative stain approach with some success but have to
live with the obvious artifacts such as flattening. There are likely
other artifacts caused by ionic or chemical changes of the stain. The
chemical fixation sounds promising but I'm not sure how this could be done
on a liquid sample.
4.Charles Garber:For your information, we have never been successful in quenching a sample
fast enough (the larger sample used for SEM work) in order to keep the
vesicles from rupturing. So we do this solely by freeze fracture TEM.

Do you know the name of Richard Banfield in the UK? He pretty much was
the first person to really commercialize a cryo-SEM fracture system, when
he owned the former Hexland Ltd. company and which was purchased by Oxford
Instruments.

As of about three or four years ago, he confirmed to me that he too, had
never been able to visualize liposomes via cryo SEM because of the quench
rate and rupturing problem.

Should you figure out a way to quench and see the structures by SEM, a lot
of us would like to know the secret!
5.Ming Chen:The easiest way to do is by negative staining technique. A 1-2% PTA
(phosphotungstic acid) soultion is commonly used. It only take a few
minutes to do and you can examine it under TEM to see the distribution of
liposomes right away.
6. L.R. Melsen:We have looked at liposome using routine negative staining protocol. The
vesicles will flatten upon drying, but simple math can reconstruct the
volume of the sphere.
7. Charles Butterick: Try negative staining with a 2% ammonium molybdate (aq). Take a
coated grid (carbon, formvar, etc.), put a drop of liposomes on top
of the grid for a minute. Draw off drop with with a piece of torn
filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the ammonium
molybdate. After a minute, draw off drop as before and allow the
grid(s) to dry. Take it to the TEM. The above procedure is only a starting point. The concentration,
stain, and times can all be varied to achieve optimum results. You
might check out some EM texts on negative staining for other ideas.
Good luck.
8. Maria Ericsson: When I've prepared liposome suspensions for TEM I've just done a simple
negative staining and it's worked fine. I adsorb the suspension to a
carbon coated copper grid for about 1 minute, blot off excess liquid with
a filterpaper and stain with 1-2% aqueous Uranyl Acetate for 1 minute and
blot on a filterpaper again. (If there is phosphate in your buffer, you
will need to wash in a drop of water before the Uranyl Acetate staining)
9. Marc Schmutz:To observe liposomes without cryo systems is quit a difficult purpose.
Pure lipid systems can not be easily seen in negative staining (try always
Uranyl acetate and PTA or other stains). And they generaly undergo severe
structural changes during the staining process. So to calculate the volume
I will not try to do it and furthermore I will not believe in a volume
calculate from negative staining images. Myself I'm observing routinely
liposomes pure or with proteins or DNA associated and I always use cryo
TEM. It's really a easy approach and also very rapid. (You don't need more
than half a day per specimen) As you said you don't have access to such a
apparatus but why you don't consider collaborating with a lab equiped in
cryo ? If you need some more infos about cryo you can ask me and I will
try to help you.


Bernward Laube
University of Bielefeld
Faculty of Biology
Department Plant Morphology and Cell Ultrastructure
Universit„tsstrasse 25
Germany 33615 Bielefeld
phone: +49 521 1065592
fax: +49 521 1066039
e-mail: b.laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Pflanzenmorphologie





From: jrnelson :      jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 09:01:04 -0500
Subject: Re: Reflective in Laser Terminology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------B73E5AA6C975623FC057F918
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



"...reflector may be either a highly polish metal surface or ...coated.
The coating consists of a highly brilliant metallic deposit or a
dielectric material." Principles & Practice of Laser Technology.

While both wood & paper are dielectric, their fine porosity would preclude
100% reflective. Typical light reflective number for paper would be
70%. Special paper grades can be much higher. In the case of a coherent
laser beam, a porous surface or a surface comprised of fine particles
would cause significant scattering.

'Laser marker' refers to a family of products that are used to put bar
codes and other identifying markings on products. Since they mark by
burning/evaporating away the surface, a marking laser would not work on
a 100% reflective surface.

J. Roy Nelson
Material Testing Laboratory
jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com

"melim-at-qes.po.my"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
}
} Dear List,
} Can anyone explain what does "Reflective" means in Laser Terminology .
}
} I read through a article in a Magazine regarding Laser Marker and in the article the mentioned that Wood and Paper is 100% reflective . I am lost and confuse
}
} M.E.Lim
} Sr Regional Support Engineer
} QES(Asia Pacific) Sdn Bhd
} Tel : 603-7241188 ext 214
} Fax : 603-7244488
} Emails : melim-at-qes.po.my
--------------B73E5AA6C975623FC057F918
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begin:vcard
n:Nelson;Roy
tel;fax:(609) 737-7119
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x-mozilla-html:FALSE
adr:;;;;;;
version:2.1
email;internet:jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com
x-mozilla-cpt:;1
fn:Roy Nelson
end:vcard

--------------B73E5AA6C975623FC057F918--






From: B.Laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 08:00:36 -0600
Subject: thanks for the tips preparing liposomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all, thanks for the tips preparing liposomes for TEM observations. In
summary, most answers dealed with negativ staining of the liposomes. We'
ve tried so and got good results for an overview. I added all replies to
this message for all those who're interested in this topic. Bernward
1.Don Gantz
wrotes: To all who desired more info on fixing and staining of liposomes--
I apologize for the delay in my response. We had a major snowstorm and I
lost a day.
The initial query by Bernward Laube was about evaluating homogeneity
of liposome suspensions ( {100nm diam) and estimating particle volumes.
We have been using a osmium fix/negative stain technique for a number
of years to look at size distribution of VLDL, chylomicrons, and synthetic
lipid emulsions. The osmium fix firms up these particles nicely so that
flattening is greatly reduced. In fact, based upon metal shadowing exps.
the slight enlargement of diameter due to flattening after fixation is
negated by slight shrinkage of particles during processing. The result is
an excellent estimate of diameter and volume.

In regard to lipid vesicles/liposomes, our experience with
smaller ones of 50nm or so prepared by sonication and processed with
only negative stain is that they are preserved pretty well. We would
expect some flattening although we have not shadowed these. However, with
larger liposomes of 100nm+ diam, we believe OsO4 will aid in preservation
and stability and presumably reduce flattening.

If one requires differentiation of lamellar structure (uni vs multi)
among particles within a population, negative staining is unreliable
because of variability of stain penetration. For this purpose, we use
vitreous ice cryomicroscopy as we are fortunate to have it available.

In general our fixation/negative staining procedure is as follows:

1) Add 1 volume of 2% OsO4 in Cacodylate buffer to 2 volumes of
emulsion or liposome prep. Fix for 30 mins.+

2) Place small aliquot on freshly flow-discharged carbon formvar-coated
grid for a few seconds.

3) Remove and blot off excess fluid and immediately stain with 1% NaPT.

4) After a few seconds, remove and blot excess fluid. Air dry.

Optimum concentration is trial and error. Fixed suspension can be
diluted as needed. Hope this helps. 2.Sheila Garcia wrotes:I've just
finished my Doctorate Thesis, and I worked preparing liposome. I used
phosphotungstic acid in 2% aq solution, neutralized with KOH 1M (PTK).
But, before it, I used bacitracin 0,1mg/ml aq sol., as a wetting agent (
D.W.Gregory and B.J.S. Pirie-Journal of Microscopy, v.99,pt.3, dec.
1973,.261-265). Take a coated grid (carbon, formvar), put a drop of
bacitracin sol. for 2 min. Draw off drop with with a piece of
torn filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the
liposome (a dilueted solution), draw off again and add a drop of PTK for 2
min. I hope it could help you. Profa. Dra. Sheila Garcia


Check out the following paper:

"Sequential treatment by phosphotungstic acid and uranyl acetate
enhances the adherence of lipid membranes and membrane proteins to
hydrophobic EM grids", A. N. Barnakov, Journal of Microscopy. Vol 175, Pt
2, August 1994, pp. 171-174. 3.Joe Neilly:Don,

Could you elaborate on how you would fix liposomes w/ Osmium tetroxide. We
have tried the negative stain approach with some success but have to live
with the obvious artifacts such as flattening. There are likely other
artifacts caused by ionic or chemical changes of the stain. The chemical
fixation sounds promising but I'm not sure how this could be done on a
liquid sample. 4.Charles Garber:For your information, we have never been
successful in quenching a sample fast enough (the larger sample used for
SEM work) in order to keep the vesicles from rupturing. So we do this
solely by freeze fracture TEM.

Do you know the name of Richard Banfield in the UK? He pretty much was
the first person to really commercialize a cryo-SEM fracture system, when
he owned the former Hexland Ltd. company and which was purchased by Oxford
Instruments.

As of about three or four years ago, he confirmed to me that he too, had
never been able to visualize liposomes via cryo SEM because of the quench
rate and rupturing problem.

Should you figure out a way to quench and see the structures by SEM, a lot
of us would like to know the secret! 5.Ming Chen:The easiest way to do is
by negative staining technique. A 1-2% PTA (phosphotungstic acid) soultion
is commonly used. It only take a few minutes to do and you can examine it
under TEM to see the distribution of liposomes right away. 6. L.R.
Melsen:We have looked at liposome using routine negative staining
protocol. The vesicles will flatten upon drying, but simple math can
reconstruct the volume of the sphere. 7. Charles Butterick: Try negative
staining with a 2% ammonium molybdate (aq). Take a
coated grid (carbon, formvar, etc.), put a drop of liposomes on top
of the grid for a minute. Draw off drop with with a piece of torn
filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the ammonium
molybdate. After a minute, draw off drop as before and allow the
grid(s) to dry. Take it to the TEM. The above procedure is only a
starting point. The concentration, stain, and times can all be
varied to achieve optimum results. You might check out some EM texts
on negative staining for other ideas. Good luck.
8. Maria Ericsson: When I've prepared liposome suspensions for TEM I've
just done a simple negative staining and it's worked fine. I adsorb the
suspension to a carbon coated copper grid for about 1 minute, blot off
excess liquid with a filterpaper and stain with 1-2% aqueous Uranyl
Acetate for 1 minute and blot on a filterpaper again. (If there is
phosphate in your buffer, you will need to wash in a drop of water before
the Uranyl Acetate staining) 9. Marc Schmutz:To observe liposomes without
cryo systems is quit a difficult purpose. Pure lipid systems can not be
easily seen in negative staining (try always Uranyl acetate and PTA or
other stains). And they generaly undergo severe structural changes during
the staining process. So to calculate the volume I will not try to do it
and furthermore I will not believe in a volume calculate from negative
staining images. Myself I'm observing routinely liposomes pure or with
proteins or DNA associated and I always use cryo TEM. It's really a easy
approach and also very rapid. (You don't need more than half a day per
specimen) As you said you don't have access to such a apparatus but why
you don't consider collaborating with a lab equiped in cryo ? If you need
some more infos about cryo you can ask me and I will try to help you.


Bernward Laube
University of Bielefeld
=46aculty of Biology
Department Plant Morphology and Cell Ultrastructure
Universit=D1tsstrasse 25
Germany 33615 Bielefeld
phone: +49 521 1065592
fax: +49 521 1066039
e-mail: b.laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Pflanzenmorphologie







From: Virginia Tanner Crocker :      vtanner-at-codon.nih.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 09:52:15 +0400
Subject: Re: TEM-cells on Permanox slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sandy...

We use 4 and 8 well Labtek=A9 Chamber Slides (permanox slides)....
substituting Ethanol for the Propylene Oxide. They are my favorite slides
for processing cell cultures.

See the following publication for more information:

"Subcellular Localization of SV2 and Other Secretory Vesicle Components in
PC12 Cells by an Efficient Method of Preembedding EM Immunocytochemistry
for Cell Cultures", Tanner, Ploug and Tao-Cheng, Journal of Histochemistry
and Cyrtochemistry, Vol. 44, No. 12, pp. 1481-1488, 1996.

If you have any questions.. feel free to contact me.

Virginia Tanner Crocker


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


*******************************************************************
Virginia Tanner Crocker
Biologist
NIH, NINDS EM Facility,
Bldg 36, Room 3B24
Bethesda, MD 20892

phone: 301-496-0579 V/TT
=46ax: 301-402-6875
e-mail: vtanner-at-codon.nih.gov
*******************************************************************
=20







From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 10 Mar 1999 07:54:44 -0800
Subject: ETEC SEM, gone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Thanks to all who replied. The ETEC has been spoken for. If for some =
reason it does not leave as scheduled I will keep the names of those who =
responded, just in case, since it MUST GO.

Thanks again,
Judy Murphy

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us









From: MORETZ,DR,ROGER TX BIPUS :      rmoretz-at-BI-Pharm.com
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 12:27:35 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM-cells on Permanox slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by mail-ewr-3.pilot.net (Pilot/8.8.8) with ESMTP id MAA19999;
Wed, 10 Mar 1999 12:27:37 -0500 (EST)
Received: from ridexch1.rid.com ([148.189.116.16]) by mailgw.bi-pharm.com with ESMTP id MAA24037; Wed, 10 Mar 1999 12:28:05 -0500 (EST)
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id {F437PDQP} ; Wed, 10 Mar 1999 12:27:36 -0500
Message-ID: {5063A0AB7328D211BCAA0008C7A4467704758B-at-RIDMSG05}


Sandy:

The p.o. step is not necessary. Dehydration with any of the 812
replacements can be done through EtOH alone. I use at least 3x 100%, then
grade thru the EtOH:epoxy at 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2, then into pure resin. The
only caveat is that the EtOH and resin must be very carefully mixed--both to
ensure complete mixing and to avoid the creation of bubbles in the mix. I
also use only freshly prepared resin once I reach the 1:1 stage, but have
had no problem using older batches that were stored at -20 C and thawed just
prior to use.

Roger Moretz
Toxicology & Safety Assessment

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Sandy Perkins [SMTP:skperkin-at-vt.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 1999 11:01 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM-cells on Permanox slides
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi-
}
} I just scanned through postings about processing tissue cultures and
} coverslips for TEM, but I didn't see anything on processing cells grown on
} 8 well Permanox slides. I will be embedding in PolyBed 812, with a
} transition through propylene oxide. Unfortunately, the wells don't
} survive
} the p.o. step. I would appreciate hearing about any experiences with
} Permanox slides. Thank you very much.
}
} Sandy Perkins
}
} Laboratory for Neurotoxicity Studies
} Virginia-Maryland Regional College
} of Veterinary Medicine
} Virginia Tech
}
}





From: B.Laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de -at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 08:00:36 -0600
Subject: thanks for the tips preparing liposomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20


Dear all, thanks for the tips preparing liposomes for TEM observations. I=
n
summary, most answers dealed with negativ staining of the liposomes. We'
ve tried so and got good results for an overview. I added all replies to
this message for all those who're interested in this topic. Bernward
1.Don Gantz
wrotes: To all who desired more info on fixing and staining of liposomes-=
-
I apologize for the delay in my response. We had a major snowstorm and I
lost a day.
The initial query by Bernward Laube was about evaluating homogeneity
of liposome suspensions ( {100nm diam) and estimating particle volumes.
We have been using a osmium fix/negative stain technique for a number
of years to look at size distribution of VLDL, chylomicrons, and syntheti=
c
lipid emulsions. The osmium fix firms up these particles nicely so that
flattening is greatly reduced. In fact, based upon metal shadowing exps.
the slight enlargement of diameter due to flattening after fixation is
negated by slight shrinkage of particles during processing. The result i=
s
an excellent estimate of diameter and volume.

In regard to lipid vesicles/liposomes, our experience with
smaller ones of 50nm or so prepared by sonication and processed with
only negative stain is that they are preserved pretty well. We would
expect some flattening although we have not shadowed these. However, wit=
h
larger liposomes of 100nm+ diam, we believe OsO4 will aid in preservation
and stability and presumably reduce flattening.

If one requires differentiation of lamellar structure (uni vs multi)
among particles within a population, negative staining is unreliable
because of variability of stain penetration. For this purpose, we use
vitreous ice cryomicroscopy as we are fortunate to have it available.

In general our fixation/negative staining procedure is as follows:

1) Add 1 volume of 2% OsO4 in Cacodylate buffer to 2 volumes of
emulsion or liposome prep. Fix for 30 mins.+

2) Place small aliquot on freshly flow-discharged carbon formvar-coated
grid for a few seconds.

3) Remove and blot off excess fluid and immediately stain with 1% NaPT.

4) After a few seconds, remove and blot excess fluid. Air dry.

Optimum concentration is trial and error. Fixed suspension can be
diluted as needed. Hope this helps. 2.Sheila Garcia wrotes:I've just
finished my Doctorate Thesis, and I worked preparing liposome. I used
phosphotungstic acid in 2% aq solution, neutralized with KOH 1M (PTK).
But, before it, I used bacitracin 0,1mg/ml aq sol., as a wetting agent (
D.W.Gregory and B.J.S. Pirie-Journal of Microscopy, v.99,pt.3, dec.
1973,.261-265). Take a coated grid (carbon, formvar), put a drop of
bacitracin sol. for 2 min. Draw off drop with with a piece of
torn filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the
liposome (a dilueted solution), draw off again and add a drop of PTK for =
2
min. I hope it could help you. Profa. Dra. Sheila Garcia


Check out the following paper:

"Sequential treatment by phosphotungstic acid and uranyl acetate
enhances the adherence of lipid membranes and membrane proteins to
hydrophobic EM grids", A. N. Barnakov, Journal of Microscopy. Vol 175, Pt
2, August 1994, pp. 171-174. 3.Joe Neilly:Don,

Could you elaborate on how you would fix liposomes w/ Osmium tetroxide. W=
e
have tried the negative stain approach with some success but have to live
with the obvious artifacts such as flattening. There are likely other
artifacts caused by ionic or chemical changes of the stain. The chemical
fixation sounds promising but I'm not sure how this could be done on a
liquid sample. 4.Charles Garber:For your information, we have never been
successful in quenching a sample fast enough (the larger sample used for
SEM work) in order to keep the vesicles from rupturing. So we do this
solely by freeze fracture TEM.

Do you know the name of Richard Banfield in the UK? He pretty much was
the first person to really commercialize a cryo-SEM fracture system, when
he owned the former Hexland Ltd. company and which was purchased by Oxfor=
d
Instruments.

As of about three or four years ago, he confirmed to me that he too, had
never been able to visualize liposomes via cryo SEM because of the quench
rate and rupturing problem.

Should you figure out a way to quench and see the structures by SEM, a lo=
t
of us would like to know the secret! 5.Ming Chen:The easiest way to do is
by negative staining technique. A 1-2% PTA (phosphotungstic acid) soultio=
n
is commonly used. It only take a few minutes to do and you can examine it
under TEM to see the distribution of liposomes right away. 6. L.R.
Melsen:We have looked at liposome using routine negative staining
protocol. The vesicles will flatten upon drying, but simple math can
reconstruct the volume of the sphere. 7. Charles Butterick: Try negative
staining with a 2% ammonium molybdate (aq). Take a
coated grid (carbon, formvar, etc.), put a drop of liposomes on top
of the grid for a minute. Draw off drop with with a piece of torn
filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the ammonium
molybdate. After a minute, draw off drop as before and allow the
grid(s) to dry. Take it to the TEM. The above procedure is only a
starting point. The concentration, stain, and times can all be
varied to achieve optimum results. You might check out some EM text=
s
on negative staining for other ideas. Good luck.
8. Maria Ericsson: When I've prepared liposome suspensions for TEM I've
just done a simple negative staining and it's worked fine. I adsorb the
suspension to a carbon coated copper grid for about 1 minute, blot off
excess liquid with a filterpaper and stain with 1-2% aqueous Uranyl
Acetate for 1 minute and blot on a filterpaper again. (If there is
phosphate in your buffer, you will need to wash in a drop of water before
the Uranyl Acetate staining) 9. Marc Schmutz:To observe liposomes without
cryo systems is quit a difficult purpose. Pure lipid systems can not be
easily seen in negative staining (try always Uranyl acetate and PTA or
other stains). And they generaly undergo severe structural changes during
the staining process. So to calculate the volume I will not try to do it
and furthermore I will not believe in a volume calculate from negative
staining images. Myself I'm observing routinely liposomes pure or with
proteins or DNA associated and I always use cryo TEM. It's really a easy
approach and also very rapid. (You don't need more than half a day per
specimen) As you said you don't have access to such a apparatus but why
you don't consider collaborating with a lab equiped in cryo ? If you need
some more infos about cryo you can ask me and I will try to help you.


Bernward Laube
University of Bielefeld
Faculty of Biology
Department Plant Morphology and Cell Ultrastructure
Universit=D1tsstrasse 25
Germany 33615 Bielefeld
phone: +49 521 1065592
fax: +49 521 1066039
e-mail: b.laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Pflanzenmorphologie









From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 13:12:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: quick microtome fix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello,
Does anyone have a suggesstion on how to fix/reset the advance
mechanism to a reichert e ultramicrotome. The mechanism on the left side
(0.5 um to 2 um advance) does not work, I have to get close with the
coarse knife advance then use the electronic advance which makes alignment
tedious. Thanks

Mike D






From: EMAD S A-HASSAN :      ehassan-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 14:17:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: T4 phage Size?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear all,

I would like to know the average size (and all dimensions) of T4 phages,
and the method by which that size was determined.

Thanks,

Emad
----






From: Caspar McConville :      mcconville-at-olsen.alfred.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 14:14:38 +0000
Subject: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner for use with TEM
negatives from our Jeol 2000-FX, and also for SEM negatives. A
scanner has been recommended to us: the Agfa Duoscan T2500, which
has a resolution (hardware) of 1250 x 2500 dpi and a density of 3.4D.
(The scans would be output to a Kodak DS 8650 PS printer)

We need the quality of the scans to match the quality of the standard
darkroom enlarger if possible, as we would like to 'go digital' at
least for routine work. Does anyone have experience of routine
negative scanning for TEM prints, with this or other scanners, and if
so, is it realistic to expect such high quality?

Also, what additional image processing software would people
recommend we got to go along with this?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Caspar

Caspar McConville, Ph.D.
Technical Specialist
New York State College of Ceramics
Alfred University





From: B.Laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de -at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 08:00:36 -0600
Subject: thanks for the tips preparing liposomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20


Dear all, thanks for the tips preparing liposomes for TEM observations. I=
n
summary, most answers dealed with negativ staining of the liposomes. We'
ve tried so and got good results for an overview. I added all replies to
this message for all those who're interested in this topic. Bernward
1.Don Gantz
wrotes: To all who desired more info on fixing and staining of liposomes-=
-
I apologize for the delay in my response. We had a major snowstorm and I
lost a day.
The initial query by Bernward Laube was about evaluating homogeneity
of liposome suspensions ( {100nm diam) and estimating particle volumes.
We have been using a osmium fix/negative stain technique for a number
of years to look at size distribution of VLDL, chylomicrons, and syntheti=
c
lipid emulsions. The osmium fix firms up these particles nicely so that
flattening is greatly reduced. In fact, based upon metal shadowing exps.
the slight enlargement of diameter due to flattening after fixation is
negated by slight shrinkage of particles during processing. The result i=
s
an excellent estimate of diameter and volume.

In regard to lipid vesicles/liposomes, our experience with
smaller ones of 50nm or so prepared by sonication and processed with
only negative stain is that they are preserved pretty well. We would
expect some flattening although we have not shadowed these. However, wit=
h
larger liposomes of 100nm+ diam, we believe OsO4 will aid in preservation
and stability and presumably reduce flattening.

If one requires differentiation of lamellar structure (uni vs multi)
among particles within a population, negative staining is unreliable
because of variability of stain penetration. For this purpose, we use
vitreous ice cryomicroscopy as we are fortunate to have it available.

In general our fixation/negative staining procedure is as follows:

1) Add 1 volume of 2% OsO4 in Cacodylate buffer to 2 volumes of
emulsion or liposome prep. Fix for 30 mins.+

2) Place small aliquot on freshly flow-discharged carbon formvar-coated
grid for a few seconds.

3) Remove and blot off excess fluid and immediately stain with 1% NaPT.

4) After a few seconds, remove and blot excess fluid. Air dry.

Optimum concentration is trial and error. Fixed suspension can be
diluted as needed. Hope this helps. 2.Sheila Garcia wrotes:I've just
finished my Doctorate Thesis, and I worked preparing liposome. I used
phosphotungstic acid in 2% aq solution, neutralized with KOH 1M (PTK).
But, before it, I used bacitracin 0,1mg/ml aq sol., as a wetting agent (
D.W.Gregory and B.J.S. Pirie-Journal of Microscopy, v.99,pt.3, dec.
1973,.261-265). Take a coated grid (carbon, formvar), put a drop of
bacitracin sol. for 2 min. Draw off drop with with a piece of
torn filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the
liposome (a dilueted solution), draw off again and add a drop of PTK for =
2
min. I hope it could help you. Profa. Dra. Sheila Garcia


Check out the following paper:

"Sequential treatment by phosphotungstic acid and uranyl acetate
enhances the adherence of lipid membranes and membrane proteins to
hydrophobic EM grids", A. N. Barnakov, Journal of Microscopy. Vol 175, Pt
2, August 1994, pp. 171-174. 3.Joe Neilly:Don,

Could you elaborate on how you would fix liposomes w/ Osmium tetroxide. W=
e
have tried the negative stain approach with some success but have to live
with the obvious artifacts such as flattening. There are likely other
artifacts caused by ionic or chemical changes of the stain. The chemical
fixation sounds promising but I'm not sure how this could be done on a
liquid sample. 4.Charles Garber:For your information, we have never been
successful in quenching a sample fast enough (the larger sample used for
SEM work) in order to keep the vesicles from rupturing. So we do this
solely by freeze fracture TEM.

Do you know the name of Richard Banfield in the UK? He pretty much was
the first person to really commercialize a cryo-SEM fracture system, when
he owned the former Hexland Ltd. company and which was purchased by Oxfor=
d
Instruments.

As of about three or four years ago, he confirmed to me that he too, had
never been able to visualize liposomes via cryo SEM because of the quench
rate and rupturing problem.

Should you figure out a way to quench and see the structures by SEM, a lo=
t
of us would like to know the secret! 5.Ming Chen:The easiest way to do is
by negative staining technique. A 1-2% PTA (phosphotungstic acid) soultio=
n
is commonly used. It only take a few minutes to do and you can examine it
under TEM to see the distribution of liposomes right away. 6. L.R.
Melsen:We have looked at liposome using routine negative staining
protocol. The vesicles will flatten upon drying, but simple math can
reconstruct the volume of the sphere. 7. Charles Butterick: Try negative
staining with a 2% ammonium molybdate (aq). Take a
coated grid (carbon, formvar, etc.), put a drop of liposomes on top
of the grid for a minute. Draw off drop with with a piece of torn
filter paper. Before the grid dries, add a drop of the ammonium
molybdate. After a minute, draw off drop as before and allow the
grid(s) to dry. Take it to the TEM. The above procedure is only a
starting point. The concentration, stain, and times can all be
varied to achieve optimum results. You might check out some EM text=
s
on negative staining for other ideas. Good luck.
8. Maria Ericsson: When I've prepared liposome suspensions for TEM I've
just done a simple negative staining and it's worked fine. I adsorb the
suspension to a carbon coated copper grid for about 1 minute, blot off
excess liquid with a filterpaper and stain with 1-2% aqueous Uranyl
Acetate for 1 minute and blot on a filterpaper again. (If there is
phosphate in your buffer, you will need to wash in a drop of water before
the Uranyl Acetate staining) 9. Marc Schmutz:To observe liposomes without
cryo systems is quit a difficult purpose. Pure lipid systems can not be
easily seen in negative staining (try always Uranyl acetate and PTA or
other stains). And they generaly undergo severe structural changes during
the staining process. So to calculate the volume I will not try to do it
and furthermore I will not believe in a volume calculate from negative
staining images. Myself I'm observing routinely liposomes pure or with
proteins or DNA associated and I always use cryo TEM. It's really a easy
approach and also very rapid. (You don't need more than half a day per
specimen) As you said you don't have access to such a apparatus but why
you don't consider collaborating with a lab equiped in cryo ? If you need
some more infos about cryo you can ask me and I will try to help you.


Bernward Laube
University of Bielefeld
Faculty of Biology
Department Plant Morphology and Cell Ultrastructure
Universit=D1tsstrasse 25
Germany 33615 Bielefeld
phone: +49 521 1065592
fax: +49 521 1066039
e-mail: b.laube-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Pflanzenmorphologie











From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 10:27:53 GMT+1200
Subject: JEOL WDS Spectrometers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-
Hi

I'm trying to cobble together a new probe.
So far, I have one WDS spectrometer which used to be on an 840.
Can anyone tell me exactly which JEOL SEMs it will fit on to?
I am pretty sure it will go onto 6300 and 6400, and maybe also the
733.
So far I've had no luck getting this info from JEOL, but if someone
within their organisation can help, great.
Also, does anyone know whether a two-crystal spectro can be
transformed into a 4-crystal type?
I've been told that it can't be done in the field, but can the
factory do it?

Anybody got any more of these spectros that they'd be willing to
sell?
And maybe also an 840 or 840A?


thanks

Ritchie

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999 9:14AM
Subject: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have been very happy with the results from my Polaroid Sprintscan 45
(~$8500). For a TEM neg, it will digitize at 2000dpi and it will output 12
bits. I can't remember the optical density but I think it is similar to
what you are quoting here, but you can look it up on their web site. For a
35 mm slide, it will do 4000 dpi. You have to ask them for a special TEM
negative carrier that fits into their 4x5 holder. I use 300 dpi as the
standard for what kind of enlargement I can get because my HP 890C (which
does a great job on photo deluxe paper) is 300 dpi and the two sub-dye
printers that I have access to are both 300 dpi. This gives a usable
enlargement factor of 2000/300 = 6.7x printing to these printers. It is
also very quick. I think that Polaroid could definitely improve their user
control interface a bit, but for the most part it works well. I have had
some problems with the computer recognizing the scanner on two systems, (one
with a Sprintscan 35 and the other with a Sprintscan 45) that have flatbed
scanners attached and that are on. The solution is simply to turn the
flatbed power off and reopen the program.

I think that the Duoscan is a flatbed. You have to be careful with putting
the negatives on the glass because you can get Newton rings in you images.
I have a Umax Powerlook II flatbed that is 600 x 1200 dpi that I sometimes
use and you can sometimes see them. You need a mask to lift it off the
glass. I have asked the listserver in the past if that defocuses the
scanned image, but I did not get a satisfactory answer. I use the flatbed
as a contact printer by scanning 6 images at once held in Neg-a-file sheets
and digitizing to 150 dpi. This is the minimum value that I can still read
the numbers on the JEOL negatives. This is actually better than making
contacts prints in the darkroom, because I can select areas to adjust the
contrast and brightness independently. This makes BF, DF, and diffraction
images come out well even if they are on one sheet.

I highly recommend Adobe Photoshop (version 4 is what I have) coupled with
John Russ' Image Processing Toolkit Plug-ins. I Import the images as 12
bits (16bit), adjust the levels to what I want, and then convert the images
to 8 bits. You can then use all of Photoshop's features.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."







----------
} From: Caspar McConville
To: Microscopy List Server
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.



We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner for use with TEM
negatives from our Jeol 2000-FX, and also for SEM negatives. A
scanner has been recommended to us: the Agfa Duoscan T2500, which
has a resolution (hardware) of 1250 x 2500 dpi and a density of 3.4D.
(The scans would be output to a Kodak DS 8650 PS printer)

We need the quality of the scans to match the quality of the standard
darkroom enlarger if possible, as we would like to 'go digital' at
least for routine work. Does anyone have experience of routine
negative scanning for TEM prints, with this or other scanners, and if
so, is it realistic to expect such high quality?

Also, what additional image processing software would people
recommend we got to go along with this?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Caspar

Caspar McConville, Ph.D.
Technical Specialist
New York State College of Ceramics
Alfred University





From: Keith Ryan :      kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 23:02:56 +0000
Subject: Quenching liposomes for SEM?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In answer to a comment in B. Laube's summary:

One approach might be to plunge freeze on filmed grids and
then clamp these to a standard cryoSEM specimen support.
The support could have a hole drilled through it for STEM.
Because of the water film thickness, it could be sublimed by
freeze drying, although any dissolved salts would be left
behind.

A similar approach would be to quench the liposomes on
something like aluminium foil, in a size & shape which could
then be clamped under a thin ring which is drilled to screw to
a standard suppport. These attachments can be done quite
easily under a shallow depth of liquid nitrogen in a
polystyrene container.

Hoping these ideas are useful to someone

Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association
Plymouth, UK





From: A. Greene :      ablue-at-io.com
Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999 6:08 PM
Subject: RE: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

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Hello,
The Newtonian Ring problem might be corrected the way it was done on
anti-Newton glass slides, in days gone by. They used glass which was
slightly etched on the side which went next to the film. I am not
suggesting you etch the glass face of your scanner but it might be worth
experimenting on a spare piece of glass. The etch is ever so slight; maybe
just acid fumes would do the trick. This didn't seem to degrade projected
slides. Just a suggestion. Good luck.

Alex Greene
SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTATION SERVICES, INC.
Number 499, Post Office Box 19400
Austin, Texas 78760 Phone 512/282-5507 Fax 512/280-0702

TEM & SEM Maintenance
-----Original Message-----
} From: Walck. Scott D. {walck-at-ppg.com}
To: Caspar McConville {mcconville-at-olsen.alfred.edu} ; Micro
{microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}






From: Wiggins, Winston :      WWiggins-at-carolinas.org
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 16:31:47 -0500
Subject: RE: EM safety book?

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Tamara,
The copy I have of "Safety in the EM Lab..." is from San Francisco Press,
ISBN 0-911302-56-5, 1985. You should be able to get it ordered with that
info. Good luck.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Winston W. Wiggins, Supervisor 09 Mar 1999 4:30 PM
CRC-Electron Microscopy Lab Ofc: 704-355-1267
Carolinas Medical Center Lab: 704-355-7220
P.O. Box 32861 Fax: 704-355-7648
Charlotte, NC 28232-2861 USA Eml: WWiggins-at-Carolinas.org
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Tamara Howard [SMTP:howard-at-cshl.org]
} Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 1999 9:49 AM
} To: Microscopy Listserver
} Subject: EM safety book?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Does anyone have or know of a good reference on EM lab safety? I thought
} there was a book called "Safety in the EM Laboratory"...but I haven't been
} able to find it. Probably imagined it.
}
} Thanks for any help anyone can give!
}
} Tamara Howard
} CSHL
}
}





From: Laszlo Veto :      vgraphic-at-bcinternet.net
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 20:32:43 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I think you are making an excellent choice with the new Agfa DuoScan T2500.
You will appreciate the 3.4 D on this unique flatbed scanner. The glass less
negative carriers fit into the lower tray, which slides into a precise
position. The negatives will not contact any surface. I have just ordered
also a DuoScan T2500. You will learn more about it at:

http://www.agfahome.com/products/prepress/scanners/duoscant2500.html

One of the most versatile imaging software is CorelDraw8 and
CorelPHOTO-PAINT8. It offers the highest image format manipulation with
Plug-ins, for most applications. Highly recommended.

Laszlo J. Veto











From: Mark Wall :      wall1-at-llnl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 23:15:12 -0800
Subject: SEM vacuum transfer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are looking for commercially available options for being able to
transfer a metallographic type sample from a sample preparation workstation
and into an SEM while under vacuum or inert atmosphere. We have a number of
make and model SEMs therefore just any general information is fine on this
subject.

thanks,

Mark A. Wall

Mr. Mark A. Wall
Sr. Scientific Assoc.
L-350
Chemistry & Materials Science Directorate
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Livermore, CA USA
94550

ph: 925 423-7162
fax: 925 422-6892







From: Laszlo Veto :      vgraphic-at-bcinternet.net
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 23:12:18 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I think you are making an excellent choice with the new Agfa DuoScan T2500.
You will appreciate the 3.4 D on this unique flatbed scanner. The glass less

negative carriers fit into the lower tray, which slides into a precise
position. The negatives will not contact any surface. I have just ordered
also a DuoScan T2500. You will learn more about it at:

http://www.agfahome.com/products/prepress/scanners/duoscant2500.html

One of the most versatile imaging software is CorelDraw8 and
CorelPHOTO-PAINT8. It offers the highest image format manipulation with
Plug-ins, for most applications. Highly recommended.

Laszlo J. Veto

Caspar McConville wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner for use with TEM
} negatives from our Jeol 2000-FX, and also for SEM negatives. A
} scanner has been recommended to us: the Agfa Duoscan T2500, which
} has a resolution (hardware) of 1250 x 2500 dpi and a density of 3.4D.
} (The scans would be output to a Kodak DS 8650 PS printer)
}
} We need the quality of the scans to match the quality of the standard
} darkroom enlarger if possible, as we would like to 'go digital' at
} least for routine work. Does anyone have experience of routine
} negative scanning for TEM prints, with this or other scanners, and if
} so, is it realistic to expect such high quality?
}
} Also, what additional image processing software would people
} recommend we got to go along with this?
}
} Any advice would be appreciated.
}
} Caspar
}
} Caspar McConville, Ph.D.
} Technical Specialist
} New York State College of Ceramics
} Alfred University








From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 09:03:20 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Thanks: Electrolytical thinning of Al

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I just want to say THANK YOU to all who responded to my question regarding
the electrolytical thinning of Al. Now I own a collection of serveral
different recipes! If anybody else is interested in it, just let me know.

Cheers,

Petra
--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpcu.lu/~wahlbrin






From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 03:32:07 -0500
Subject: Safety in EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

My first posting was placed whilst away from the office, now I am back I
can give you the full details of the safety data mentioned.

1. Safety in the Electron Microscope Room - S. K. Chapman, Microscopy &=

Analysis, March 89, 27-29, (only two pages of text)

2. Routine Handling of Resins, RMS E.M. Safety Committee, Single sheet
handout

OR from one of the same group

3. Resins: Toxicity, Hazards and Safe Handling - B. E. Causton,
Proceedings RMS, Vol 16/4, June 81, 265-269

4. Routine Handling of Fixatives, RMS E.M. Safety Committee, Single shee=
t
handout.

I am prepared to scan in part of 1, plus 2 and 3 and send as attachments
direct to those who ask.

As you can see I was not quite correct they are not all Royal Microscopic=
al
Society publications. Their address is 37/38 St. Clements, Oxford OX4 1AJ=
,
England

Steve Chapman

Senior Consultant E.M.
Protrain, 16 Hedgerley, Chinnor, Oxford OX9 4TN, England.
Tel & Fax 44 (0)1844 353161
Web Site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/protrain
For Consultancy and Courses in Electron Microscopy World Wide





From: Massimo Catalano :      massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 11:39:52 +0100
Subject: re: TEM scanning negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Caspar,

I believe the two scanners are both excellent, although I have a preference
for the Polaroid, that I am also going to buy (if can get the money).

As far as being capable of being able to use the scanner instead ot the
darkroom, I strongly believe that both scanner technology, and computer
technology is not yet capable of completely replacing a darkroom,
unfortunately, for all its applications.

Would appreciate very much a feedback on this subject.

Massimo
Dr. Massimo catalano
CNR-IME
Campus Universitario
Via Arnesano
73100 Lecce - ITALY
tel: + 39 0832 322362 *
fax: + 39 0832 325299 *
email: massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it

http://www.ime.le.cnr.it

* Please note that, effective June 1998, a zero has to be dialed
right after the country code (39) before the city code (832).








From: James.Passmore-at-sealedair.com -at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Tue, 9 Mar 1999 09:17:46 -0500
Subject: RE: Printers for SEM Images

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May I offer a word of caution about the approach below?

While you're correct in saying you need to optimize printing
conditions for your image and printer, there will probably be a
little more to it than setting up comparable number of pixels.
Your image is probably either a 256-level gray scale or a
16 million color (256 levels of red, green and blue). An inkjet
can't print that kind of color depth in each pixel. The concepts
of "halftoning" or "dithering" need to be considered. As I'm far
from the expert, and we don't need a complete textbook on the
listserver anyway, so I'll refer you to chapter 2 of "The Image
Processing Handbook" by John Russ. As we would expect from
Dr. Russ, the material is excellent.

That does bring up a question for me, though. The new HP
inkjets have a "PhotoREt" technology which, I believe is
supposed to be able to vary the size of the dots it produces,
therefore producing better photo-printing results. Has anyone
determined whether this is true, or just hype?

Jim Passmore
Sr. Analytical Chemist
Cryovac Division
Sealed Air Corporation

----------
} From: Harry.Ekstrom
} To: Microscopy
} Subject: FW: Printers for SEM Images
} Date: Monday, March 08, 1999 5:11PM
}
-------------
}
} I think an inexpensive inkjet is the way to go. However, you must try to
} set the DPI of the printer to match the resolution setting of your digital
} images. If you capture a digital image at 1024 X800 for instance, you have
} about 820K of information. Now lets say you plan to print a 4X5 image
} similar to a Polaroid, then your printer should be no less than 300dpi
} {4"x5" x (300)2=1.8Mpixel} to accommodate the amount of pixel information
} from the capturing rate of the image. Hence, a 2048X1600 resolution setting
} captures 3.2 Mpixels of info, so a 400DPI setting should be used. The idea
} being to match the capturing info with the amount of pixels the printer can
} resolve to minimize interpolation...be it upwards or downwards. Not sure
} what the human eye can resolve tho.
}
} Good Luck,
} Harry Ekstrom
}
}








From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 08:43:26 -0500
Subject: M & M '99 Golf Tournament

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To All:

The M & M '99 Golf tournament will be Sunday, Aug. 1, 1999 just outside
Portland, OR.
Hole sponsorships are available for $65.00 each on a first come, first
serve basis. Prizes for longest drive, longest putt etc. can also be
donated.
In addition, Logo gifts to be distributed to all participants will also
be most welcome.
To reserve your holes or to supply gifts/prizes etc. please notify me as
soon as possible.

Thank you,

John Arnott
Chairman

--
LADD RESEARCH
13 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495
TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
web site http://www.ladd.cc





From: John Shields :      jpshield-at-arches.uga.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 08:53:49 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: confocal computer repair

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We have an aging BioRad Confocal (1991!)with the associated computer
and software (COMOS ver.7.0a).
Has anyone replaced/upgraded their computer on this system other than
just purchasing an upgrade from BioRad?
What problems were encountered and what were some solutions?
Thanks in advance for any info.

History of unit is below:
Like an old car, different parts of the computer are beginning to need
replacement, but I understand that several of the boards are
specialized propietary boards (control of scan head and frame grabber)
and cannot be replaced with conventional boards. We want to "upgrade"
the computer, ie new mother board, more memory, etc...
The existing mother board is not compatible with any device drivers
other than SCSIs.


********************************************
John P. Shields
Center for Ultrastructural Research
151 Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-2403
(706)542-4080
jpshield-at-arches.uga.edu
********************************************






From: Jonathan Barnard :      J.Barnard-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 13:40:21 +0000
Subject: LM: Laser Emission Wavelength standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I need to know the wavelength of the main ~ 441.6nm emission
line from our He-Cd laser source to at least 5 significant figures,
if possible (wavelength in air atmosphere). Any references
containing other related data (emission lines) would be useful too.

--
*****************************************
Jonathan Barnard

Microstructural Physics,
H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory,
University of Bristol,
Tyndall Avenue,
Bristol BS8 1TL.

0117 928 9000 ext 8750

*****************************************







From: Robert McDonald :      R.McDonald-at-geology.gla.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 15:07:36 +0000
Subject: AN 10000 files

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Hi All:

I have recently taken over an SEM with an AN 10000 analyser and I was
wondering if anyone out there kows if it is possible to get the results
files out to a PC ?

Any help greatly appreciated.


*******************************************
Robert McDonald
EPMA & SEM Laboratories
Dept Geography - Earth Sciences Division
Gregory Building
LilyBank Gardens
University of Glasgow
Glasgow G12 8QQ
Scotland, UK
email: robert-at-earthsci.gla.ac.uk
Tel:- +44 (0)141 330 5505/5442
FAX:- +44 (0)141 330 4817
********************************************





From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 11 Mar 99 09:32:30 -0500
Subject: RE: SEM vacuum transfer

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--====55565649495052504957===1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"

Reply to: RE: SEM vacuum transfer =
For many years I used a simple permanent magnet to lift and transfer =
samples mounted on metallographic mounts with a steel washer epoxied onto =
the back surface. A hole in the circular magnet allowed a push rod to =
release the mount from the magnet. Possibly a small electromagnet could =
be made that would be easier to operate in your system-or even a vacuum =
powered suction cup to eliminate magnetic fields. Most likely you will =
need to make one.
=
Bernard Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, Il., 60439

Phone: (630) 252-4945 E-mail {kestel-at-anl.gov}
Mark Wall wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE =
WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: SEM vacuum transfer =

{/PRE}
{FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} For =
many years I used a simple permanent magnet =
to lift and transfer samples mounted on =
metallographic mounts with a steel washer =
epoxied onto the back surface. A hole in =
the circular magnet allowed a push rod to =
release the mount from the magnet. Possibly =
a small electromagnet could be made that =
would be easier to operate in your system-or =
even a vacuum powered suction cup to eliminate =
magnetic fields. Most likely you will need =
to make one. {BR}
{BR}
Bernard Kestel {BR}
=
Materials Science Division {BR}
Argonne =
National Laboratory {BR}
Argonne, Il., =
60439 {BR}
{BR}
Phone: (630) 252-4945 =
E-mail <kestel-at-anl.gov> {BR}
Mark =
Wall wrote: {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>-----------------------------------------------------------------------=
- {BR}
>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America {BR}







From: DORINA PAPAGEORGIOU :      tpapageo-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 11:32:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: T4 phage Size?

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by welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (8.9.1/8.9.1) with SMTP id LAA27032
for {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} ; Thu, 11 Mar 1999 11:32:42 -0500 (EST)




Dear all,

I would like to know the average size (and all dimensions) of T4 phages,
and the method by which that size was determined.

Thanks.






From: Mriglermas-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 11:36:03 EST
Subject: 2000 FX TEM and S 570 SEM available

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Currently we have two reconditioned microscopes available for purchase.
Please contact me at this email address for more details.

Mark W. Rigler, Ph.D.
Vice President
MAS, Inc.
Suwanee, GA





From: Ronnie Houston :      rhh1-at-airmail.net
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 11:10:09 -0800
Subject: For Peggy Sherwood

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Peggy,
Can you please contact me with your address, at your convenience?
My computer crashed and I lost your e-mail, and snail mail addresses.
I'll send the nerve staining info out when you reply.
Best wishes
Ronnie Houston
Cytochemistry & Molecular Pathology
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
2222 Welborn Street
Dallas, TX 75219





From: Scott Whittaker :      sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 13:03:30 +0000
Subject: Printing videos

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Have a couple of avi movies here and we need some stills printed from them.
Anyone have any ideas/shareware/freeware?




} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {
GO GATORS
Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
EM Technician Gainesville, FL 32610
University Of Florida ph 352-392-1184
ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
The home of " Tips & Tricks "










From: Jonathan Barnard :      J.Barnard-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 18:04:45 +0000
Subject: LM: Laser Emission Standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for any references that can give the emission wavelength of
a HeCd laser to
five significant figures (in air/vacuum). The line inparticular is the
441.6 nm line, but a
table of up to date measurements would be useful too.

--
*****************************************
Jonathan Barnard

Microstructural Physics,
H.H.Wills Physics Laboratory,
University of Bristol,
Tyndall Avenue,
Bristol BS8 1TL.

0117 928 9000 ext 8750

*****************************************







From: jgilkey-at-u.Arizona.EDU (John C. Gilkey)
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 13:05:51 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner...

Check out the Imacon FlexTight II. This is an affordable drum scanner
with magnetic carriers for various size media (2x2 skides up to at least
8x10 sheeets) that make it as easy to use as a flatbed scanner. The unit
has 5,760 dpi optical resolution (although this may drop to 4,800 dpi for
something the size of an EM negative), 12-bit grayscale, 24, 32 and 48-bit
color, and 14 bits (4.1 OD) of dynamic range, and it is fast.
For image editing, Photoshop is the best. Period.







From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 12:16:38 -0800
Subject: RE: HP's Photoret

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James writes ....

} That does bring up a question for me, though. The new HP
} inkjets have a "PhotoREt" technology which, I believe is
} supposed to be able to vary the size of the dots it produces,
} therefore producing better photo-printing results. Has anyone
} determined whether this is true, or just hype?

HP's statement, in itself, is explicid, so I doubt they could say it if
it weren't true. I own one of these printers (720C) and looking closely
it is hard to tell just how small the dots are, or when and where there
being used. Appearance is very close to "random dithering". A couple
of clues which would lead you to believe the technology is not just
hype: (1) the suggested DPI for the printer is 300dpi which is beyond
what would be calculated for a normal 600dpi dithering printer, and (2)
dithering can not be seen at all for the primary colors reb, green &
blue as created with cyan, magenta and yellow.

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 10:22:19 -1000 (HST)
Subject: TEM: apotosis/necrosis

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Hi, All-

A researcher would like to be able to tell the difference between apototic
cells and necrotic and/or other degenerating cells in an invertebrate
nervous system, using TEM. So far the only general statement I've come
across is that apototic cells will undergo autophagy within their plasma
membranes whereas necrotic cells tend to spill their contents and get
cleaned up by other cells.

Any additional tips will be appreciated!

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************






From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 09:28:20 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: Printing videos

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Dear Scott

I've just found a neat screen capture (and more) utility called
HyperSnap-DX, a free trial version can be had from
www.hyperionics.com, and registration is only $25!

cheers

rtch

} Have a couple of avi movies here and we need some stills printed from them.
} Anyone have any ideas/shareware/freeware?
}
}
} Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
} EM Technician Gainesville, FL 32610
} University Of Florida ph 352-392-1184
} ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
} sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
} The home of " Tips & Tricks "
}

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Bill Brady :      wmbrady-at-olg.com
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 99 15:43:23 -0400
Subject: RE: Printers for SEM Images

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"James.Passmore-at-sealedair.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com Wrote:

I'm not a microscopy expert, but a retired computer systems engineer.

An inkjet can produce high color if it uses CMYK inks (vs RGB).
Photo-realistic inkjet printers don't dither (screen) or halftone such as
with b&w printing. They attempt to produce a 1-1 relationship with the
input color data.
}
} That does bring up a question for me, though. The new HP
} inkjets have a "PhotoREt" technology which,

H-P's RET technology has been around for quite some time. I find it
introduces distracting patterns into the hardcopy. H-P sat on its laurels
for quite some time, and most experts say that they have fallen behind.
Unless they've changed, H-Ps use RGB ink.

I find that the Epson and newer Cannon printers do a credible job of
photo-color, both are CMYK.

However, you will find that the proper software will make a bigger
difference in the results than the printer. If you want high color
fidelity, then I recommend Adobe Photoshop, (even if you only use it for
printing), calibrated for the printers ink that you use. (Epson and
Cannon ink files are provided for Photoshop.) If you expect to manipulate
color on the computer screen and then print the same colors on the
printer, your computer has to have a "color system" such as Kodak
ColorSync (adjusts for your scanner, screen and printer). Color Systems
are pretty much free on the Macintosh, but you are may be out of luck if
you have a Windows box (I've not found one that works very well).

Your Color System has to "know" your hardware unless you have a means of
calibrating. (UMAX scanners provide a means to calibrate from a Kodak
target.)

The confusion arises out of the difference between the well established
printing industry and the newer technology of photorealistic inkjet
printing.

In short: make sure you can calibrate your scanner for color and that it
comes with a color system,

that ink files are available for your printer's ink for use by photoshop,
(even if you don't use Photoshop, other programs use the PS as a
standard),

and use Photoshop, and if possibe, get a Mac.

Hope this helps





From: Bobrowski, Walter :      Walter.Bobrowski-at-WL.com
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 15:52:36 -0500
Subject: RE: Photo Editors

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I will agree wholehearted that Adobe PhotoShop is best, but I'll bet that
most people never learn it properly to get their $600 worth. A very
impressive PhotoShop clone is Ulead Photo Impact ( http://www.ulead.com
{http://www.ulead.com} ) for ~$90.00 which does what most people use
PhotoShop for (TWAIN compliant, Image resizing and level adjustments), plus
Web-based image production is built in, not an add-on.) Try their 15-day
fully functional demo. Enough said on image editors.

Just passing along some unbiased information.

Walt Bobrowski
Subcellular Pathology
Parke-Davis Research
2800 Plymouth Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48105

TEL: (734) 622-7814
FAX: (734) 622-3478
Mailto:Walter.Bobrowski-at-WL.COM {mailto:Walter.Bobrowski-at-WL.COM}







From: EVERETT RAMER :      Everett.Ramer-at-fetc.doe.gov
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 16:23:19 -0500
Subject: Working Alone

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Over the years our workforce has dwindled to the point that I find myself =
working alone in the lab (metalographic sample prep/optical microscopy + =
image analysis) almost all the time. The lab doesn't have windows to the =
hallway, so it is difficult for people walking by to see if I am in the =
lab, and if I am OK. My manager is concerned about my safety and is asking =
me for suggestions. What do other labs do to make working alone safe?
Everett Ramer
Federal Energy Technology Center





From: Larry :      mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 13:28:24 -0800
Subject: confocal computer repair/upgrade

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I have replaced the original Compaq 386 with a Dell 486. I had no problems
with the BioRad MRC 600 system and comos software. BioRad people have told
of problems with some computers but I haven't seen any.


Larry D. Ackerman
Lily & Yuh Nung Jan Laboratories
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
UCSF, Box 0725, Rm U226
533 Parnassus Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94143

(415) 476-8751 FAX (415) 476-5774
mishot-at-itsa.ucsf.edu





From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 11 Mar 99 13:35:56 -0800
Subject: Birthday

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--====48525552525549495651===1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"

Dear Microscopists and Histologists,

This announcement is for colleagues of Don W. Fawcett, M.D. ("A textbook =
of histology", Bloom & Fawcett and "The Cell"), Professor Emeritus, =
Harvard University. =

This coming Sunday (3/14/99) he will be celebrating his 82nd birthday. A =
few e-mail greetings might surprize and please him. His e-mail address is =
{DFawc20586-at-aol.com} . =

I am sure he would appreciate good wishes from anyone inspired by his =
books and papers too.

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
--====48525552525549495651===1
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-Ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY} {FONT FACE=3D"Monaco" =
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Dear Microscopists and Histologists, {BR}
{BR}
This =
announcement is for colleagues of Don W. =
Fawcett, M.D. ("A textbook of histology", =
Bloom & Fawcett and "The Cell"), =
Professor Emeritus, Harvard University. =
{BR}
{BR}
This coming Sunday (3/14/99) he will =
be celebrating his 82nd birthday. A few =
e-mail greetings might surprize and please =
him. His e-mail address is < {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Monaco" =
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} DFawc20586-at-aol.com {/U} {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"=
Monaco" =
SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} >. {BR}
{BR}
I am sure he would =
appreciate good wishes from anyone inspired =
by his books and papers too. {BR}
{BR}
Paul Webster, =
Ph.D {BR}
House Ear Institute {BR}
2100 West Third =
Street {BR}
Los Angeles, CA 90057 {BR}
phone:213 =
273 8026 {BR}
fax: 213 413 6739 {BR}
e-mail: {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} pwebster-at-hei.org {/U} {/FONT} {=
FONT =
FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
{/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Monaco" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} http://www.hei.=
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--====48525552525549495651===1--







From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 16:47:11 -0500
Subject: Re: LM: Laser Emission Wavelength standard

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Jonathan Barnard wrote:
Dear Johnathan,

} I need to know the wavelength of the main ~ 441.6nm emission
} line from our He-Cd laser source to at least 5 significant figures,
} if possible (wavelength in air atmosphere). Any references
} containing other related data (emission lines) would be useful too.
}
Do such variables as pressure and composition (e.g., humidity)
of the air allow the wavelength to be determined to 5 sig figs? The
refractive index of air is related to pressure, and I think the cor-
rect expression is n-1 = kP. Since P can easily vary by ~3% at sea
level, depending on k, n could vary by more than 10^-5. The humidity
might be even more important (especially for any other emission lines
where water has n very different from that of air).
Yours,
Bill Tivol





From: Laura Garvey :      lkg95001-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 17:21:30 -0500
Subject: LM and TEM meiotic spindle microtubules

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Help!

We're trying to visualize meiotic spindle microtubules using LM and TEM. =
Our methods for fixing and embedding insect testes are fairly =
standard, however we are using 8% tannic acid in our fixative. This =
appears to be what others have used, but we were wondering if anyone has =
any warnings, hints or suggestions regarding microtubule preservation =
and TEM.

We are also experimenting with different methods of preparing insect =
testes for immunocytochemistry and LM. We are using various antibodies =
to microtubules and nucleoproteins. We would like to optimize our =
methods for the preservation of these structures. Is "live" tissue best =
or will fixed tissue suffice? What is the best way to get the cells =
spread onto slides? We've tried thumb "squashing" and cytospinning, but =
are not satisfied with the results. Any suggestions would be greatly =
appreciated!

Thanks,

Laura K. Garvey
Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut






From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 17:49:53 -0500
Subject: Re: AN 10000 files

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}
} I have recently taken over an SEM with an AN 10000 analyser and I was
} wondering if anyone out there kows if it is possible to get the results
} files out to a PC ?
}
Bob-

Several years ago I wrote a nunber of utilities that would allow you to do
just what you describe. You can write the files to an AN 10000 3.5" floppy
(I hope yours *is* a 3.5" system? - if not, my programs won't help), which
my utility will then read on a PC, copying the files to the PC in a
byte-for-byte format. Then I wrote other utilities that would convert
spectra and linescan files into tab-separated text files, and would extract
images from studies and convert them, or individual image files, to baseline
TIFF 6.0 files. I still use these utilities on a daily basis.

For a long while these were available on an FTP server here, but after aeons
of no hits, and in the general progression of computer hardware, this went
by the wayside. It would be the work of a few minutes to re-establish this,
if there is interest. In the meantime, Bob, you may try contacting Pat
Nicholson in the Dept. of Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow. I'm not sure,
but I may well have given him copies of these files. In any case, I'll post
the URL when I have re-established it.

Tony Garratt-Reed

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Anthony J. Garratt-Reed, M.A., D.Phil.*
* SEF Team Leader *
* MIT, Room 13-1027 *
* 77 Massachusetts Avenue *
* Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 *
* USA *
* Phone: (617) 253-4622 *
* Fax: (617) 258-6478 *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *







From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 16:57:42 -0600
Subject: Re: Printing videos

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If you have Windows, you should have everything you need already.

In DOS, the PrintScrn key used to dump a copy of the screen on the
dot-matrix printer. In Windows nothing apparently happens. However, if you
check the clipboard, PrintScrn snaps a copy of the desktop and stores it
for pasting. Try pressing PrintScrn and then try paste into Word, or
elsewhere. You will get a bitmap of the screen. Perhaps you don't want the
whole screen - then Alt-PrintScrn copies just the active application window
to the clipboard.

Using this process you end up with a lot or a little extra window junk
around the sides. Then I use MS Imager that came with Office 6.0 (and was
available on the MS website) to crop the image down to what I want.

I tried this using the AVI player from MS. I stopped the video, pulled the
slider to the frame I wanted, and pressed Alt-PrintScrn. I opened up MS
Imager, selected the File, New, Clipboard option and up came my AVI viewer
window as a bitmap. I saved copies of it before and after cropping. I will
send those to you directly. They are from the PICTURE.AVI movie that came
on the Windows 98 disk.

You can use your imagination to apply this technique for other things, like
producing your own instructions with snapshots showing what your EDS screen
looks like at various stages.

Hope this Tip and Trick helps.

Warren


At 01:03 PM 3/11/99 +0000, you wrote:
}
} Have a couple of avi movies here and we need some stills printed from them.
} Anyone have any ideas/shareware/freeware?
}
}
}
}
} } {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {
} GO GATORS
} Scott D. Whittaker 218 Carr Hall
} EM Technician Gainesville, FL 32610
} University Of Florida ph 352-392-1184
} ICBR EM Core Lab fax 352-846-0251
} sdw-at-biotech.ufl.edu http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/~emcl/
} The home of " Tips & Tricks "






From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Mar 1999 15:11:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE: Photo Editors

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A Mac application that delivers the most commonly used tools in Photoshop
(e.g. adjusting levels, assembling RGB images and montages) is Color-It!,
from MicroFrontiers. It retails for
about $50.

Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu

On Thu, 11 Mar 1999, Bobrowski, Walter wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I will agree wholehearted that Adobe PhotoShop is best, but I'll bet that
} most people never learn it properly to get their $600 worth. A very
} impressive PhotoShop clone is Ulead Photo Impact ( http://www.ulead.com
} {http://www.ulead.com} ) for ~$90.00 which does what most people use
} PhotoShop for (TWAIN compliant, Image resizing and level adjustments), plus
} Web-based image production is built in, not an add-on.) Try their 15-day
} fully functional demo. Enough said on image editors.
}
} Just passing along some unbiased information.
}
} Walt Bobrowski
} Subcellular Pathology
} Parke-Davis Research
} 2800 Plymouth Road
} Ann Arbor, MI 48105
}
} TEL: (734) 622-7814
} FAX: (734) 622-3478
} Mailto:Walter.Bobrowski-at-WL.COM {mailto:Walter.Bobrowski-at-WL.COM}
}
}
}
}






From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 14:16:48 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: Printing videos

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The nice thing about HyperSnap is that you can copy just any selected
rectangular portion from your screen, and then either print it, fool
around with it, or save it in an astonishing number of formats.

Ritchie

}
} If you have Windows, you should have everything you need already.
}
} In DOS, the PrintScrn key used to dump a copy of the screen on the
} dot-matrix printer. In Windows nothing apparently happens. However, if you
} check the clipboard, PrintScrn snaps a copy of the desktop and stores it
} for pasting. Try pressing PrintScrn and then try paste into Word, or
} elsewhere. You will get a bitmap of the screen. Perhaps you don't want the
} whole screen - then Alt-PrintScrn copies just the active application window
} to the clipboard.
}
} Using this process you end up with a lot or a little extra window junk
} around the sides. Then I use MS Imager that came with Office 6.0 (and was
} available on the MS website) to crop the image down to what I want.
}
} I tried this using the AVI player from MS. I stopped the video, pulled the
} slider to the frame I wanted, and pressed Alt-PrintScrn. I opened up MS
} Imager, selected the File, New, Clipboard option and up came my AVI viewer
} window as a bitmap. I saved copies of it before and after cropping. I will
} send those to you directly. They are from the PICTURE.AVI movie that came
} on the Windows 98 disk.
}
} You can use your imagination to apply this technique for other things, like
} producing your own instructions with snapshots showing what your EDS screen
} looks like at various stages.

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Michael BUCKER :      MBUCKER-at-dgs.state.va.us
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 08:26:49 -0500
Subject: Re: Working Alone

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Everett, if the door to your lab is of a "simple" configuration, it would be easy to replace it with a "windowed" door as long as your boss is willing to accept the cost as a price towards improved safety. Obviously, not a complete answer to the problem but a first step of common sense.

Mike Bucker
Feed Microscopy
Consolidated Labs of Va

} } } "EVERETT RAMER" {Everett.Ramer-at-fetc.doe.gov} 03/11 4:23 PM } } }
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Over the years our workforce has dwindled to the point that I find myself working alone in the lab (metalographic sample prep/optical microscopy + image analysis) almost all the time. The lab doesn't have windows to the hallway, so it is difficult for people walking by to see if I am in the lab, and if I am OK. My manager is concerned about my safety and is asking me for suggestions. What do other labs do to make working alone safe?
Everett Ramer
Federal Energy Technology Center








From: Heeschen, Bill (WA) :      WAHEESCHEN-at-dow.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 09:18:24 -0500
Subject: RE: Working Alone

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Everett and all:
I work at Dow Chemical and we have a fairly rigorous "lone operator"
system. If we are working in an isolated area or at a time when there
are few people in the building (evenings, weekends, etc.) we carry
little alert transmitters which call out to plant security (as well as
within the building). The building receivers are location sensitive and
we have a "lone-operator" login book at the building entrance with a
building map. The lone operator marks the map as s/he signs in.
Between the map and the alert location, they can find us pretty fast.

This is pretty elaborate, but maybe a mini version using something like
the "First Alert" products would work ("Help, I've fallen and I can't
get up") - have it tied into a siren or flashing light outside your lab
so that anyone along the corridor would know there was a problem. Maybe
even carry a cordless phone with an autodial button to your site
security - caller ID would get them to you pretty quick.

This is definitely NOT a trivial matter. It is always disconcerting to
me when I am working in an area with nobody else around - I hope you get
an effective solution soon.

Bill Heeschen
Microscopy Group
Dow Chemical





From: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk (HASWELL Malcolm)
Date: 12 March 1999 03:20
Subject: TEM: apotosis/necrosis

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Tina

there's lots of stuff on t.e,m, of apoptosis in vertebrate cells (it's very
popular in HIV, cancer, inflammation response etc) and much of it indicates
visible nuclear changes but relative stability of cytoplasm compared with
necrosis.
There was a review article (as a good starting point):
Microscopical Study of Cell Death via Apoptosis by S. Verhaegen
in MIcroscopy and Analysis, January 1998 pp5-7

but you could do a reference or citation 'trawl' on the authors: Kerr, J.F.;
Wyllie, A.H. or Currie

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
----------
} From: Tina Carvalho
To: Microscopy Listserver

Hi, All-

A researcher would like to be able to tell the difference between apototic
cells and necrotic and/or other degenerating cells in an invertebrate
nervous system, using TEM. So far the only general statement I've come
across is that apototic cells will undergo autophagy within their plasma
membranes whereas necrotic cells tend to spill their contents and get
cleaned up by other cells.

Any additional tips will be appreciated!

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *

* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*

****************************************************************************






From: Valdemar Furdanowicz :      rwafu-at-bsco.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 09:50:28 -0500
Subject: AN 10000 files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
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Reply-To: {rwafu-at-bsco.com}
{microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}


Yes, on my AN10000 there is a program called MSDOSCV.SV which converts files
between the Link (now Oxford) and PC DOS operating systems. It writes files
to 720kB 3.5" floppies that previously have been formatted to that density
on a PC.

An alternative that I sometimes resort to is to capture on a PC output meant
to go to the Facit printer over the serial connection.

If you need more details, contact me directly or seek support from Oxford
(they are very helpful), for example Ruth Murray ( ruth-at-oxford.usa.com ).

Valdemar Furdanowicz
Research Labs
Bethlehem Steel Co.
valdemar-at-fast.net or rwafu-at-bsco.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Robert McDonald [mailto:R.McDonald-at-geology.gla.ac.uk]
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 1999 10:08 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



Hi All:

I have recently taken over an SEM with an AN 10000 analyser and I was
wondering if anyone out there kows if it is possible to get the results
files out to a PC ?

Any help greatly appreciated.


*******************************************
Robert McDonald
EPMA & SEM Laboratories
Dept Geography - Earth Sciences Division
Gregory Building
LilyBank Gardens
University of Glasgow
Glasgow G12 8QQ
Scotland, UK
email: robert-at-earthsci.gla.ac.uk
Tel:- +44 (0)141 330 5505/5442
FAX:- +44 (0)141 330 4817
********************************************






From: Fagerland,Jane :      jane.a.fagerland-at-abbott.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 08:56:27 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM: apotosis/necrosis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Differentiating apoptosis and necrosis morphologically is based primari=
ly
upon nuclear changes, although there are characteristic cytoplasmic cha=
nges
as well. In general (note the wiggle words), necrotic cells swell and =
lyse,
whereas apoptotic cells shrink and fragment. Chromatin in apoptotic ce=
lls
forms electron-dense crescents at the nuclear envelope, then breaks up.=

Apoptotic cells fragment into "apoptotic bodies" that may contain bits =
of
chromatin. A good place to see characteristic ultrastructural changes =
of
apoptosis is in lymphoid tissues, where lymphocytes die via apoptosis a=
nd
then are phagocytosed by resident macrophages (the ones that are someti=
mes
called "tingible body macrophages" because of the staining properties o=
f the
apoptotic cell remnants in them.)

Differenting apoptosis from necrosis is a tricky deal. Apoptotic cells=
may
undergo secondary necrosis, during which they swell and lyse. So, just=

because you see necrotic cells doesn't mean that they didn't die
apoptotically. Like everything else, it's complicated; there is a cont=
inuum
of change with apoptosis and necrosis at opposite poles and a lot of st=
uff in
between!

There are lots of good reviews on this topic. The Aug 28, 1998 issue o=
f
Science had a special section on apoptosis, and on page 1302, there is =
a
series of three electron micrographs of neurons undergoing apoptosis. =
One
of the first reviews of the subject contains the best collection of
micrographs I've found - "Cell death: the significance of apoptosis" in=
the
International Review of Cytology 68:251-306, 1980. Another good revie=
w was
in Amer J of Pathol 146:3-15, 1995. The title is "Apoptosis, oncosis, =
and
necrosis: an overview of cell death."

Hope this helps!

Jane A. Fagerland, Ph.D.
Dept. Microscopy and Microanalysis
Abbott Laboratories
Abbott Park IL 60064-6202
=





From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 08:17:20 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Working Alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Everett,

In the past I have been on jobs where a great deal of the time was spent
isolated. Now days I think it is a huge safety liability. One time I had
appendicitis and had to drive myself to 50 miles on back roads to a clinic
with my knees up on the stearing wheel. The point here is, even though
you work in a laboratory complex, if something happened you probably
wouldn't get help until the cleaning crew found you. Bad news! the other
issue is: Life is short and work is long, and working alone sucks. It's
not emotionally healthy. Make a change. Consolidate in with other workers.

Bob
Derm Imaging Center
Microscopist
Ex-wood cutter

On Thu, 11 Mar 1999, EVERETT RAMER wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Over the years our workforce has dwindled to the point that I find myself working alone in the lab (metalographic sample prep/optical microscopy + image analysis) almost all the time. The lab doesn't have windows to the hallway, so it is difficult for people walking by to see if I am in the lab, and if I am OK. My manager is concerned about my safety and is asking me for suggestions. What do other labs do to make working alone safe?
} Everett Ramer
} Federal Energy Technology Center
}
}






From: Terry Black :      tblack-at-csc.albany.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 12:58:02 +0000
Subject: Senior Analytical Specialist Positions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
University at Albany - State University at New York announces the
following positions:

Senior Analytical Specialist (Two Positions Available)
The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology at
the University at Albany - SUNY is a fast growing, high technology
research and development program with a mission of supporting
industry and creating new jobs. This position will serve as a
primary, materials characterization, support person for the
Center's scientific and technical staff in our advanced surface
science facilities.

Job responsibilities include: performing day to day operation and
support of the advanced surface science laboratories; assisting in
data acquisition and analysis; participating in selected research
projects to ensure contractual deliverables are met; providing
materials characterization of microelectronic, optoelectronic and
photonic samples for faculty and staff; providing instrumentation
training to staff and student; and working with students on the
advanced analytical tools.

The position requires: a Ph.D. in materials science or related field
such as physics or chemistry and a minimum of three years experience
in the characterization of microelectronic, optoelectronic or
photonic materials or a bachelors degree with 10 years of relevant
work experience; demonstrated ability to work in a high energy, team
oriented environment; and excellent communication and analytical
skills. Preference will be given to those candidates with the
required work experience with Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray
Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-Ray
diffractometry, Atomic and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, or
Transmission Electron Microscopy. Salary and Benefits are highly
competitive and dependent upon experience.

Please submit a resume and cover letter to:

Jacqueline DiStefano
NYS Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
CESTM B110
251 Fuller Road
Albany, NY 12203

The SUNY/Research Foundation is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.





From: edelmare-at-casmail.muohio.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 13:18:58 -0500
Subject: Re: LM and TEM meiotic spindle microtubules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Well, the best method for presevering wonderfully empheral / delicate structures is
cryo-preservation and freeze subsitution. I see you are a little far from us to come
and try some freezing, but maybe you have some ready access to some rapid freezing.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
352 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."





From: James.Passmore-at-sealedair.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 13:36:25 -0500
Subject: RE: Photo Editors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'll second the opinion about getting your money's worth out of Adobe
Photoshop. I've used PhotoImpact (we have v 3 here at work; I've
not used v 4 which is out already) and agree it's good. My favorite,
though, is Paintshop Pro (Jasc, Inc.) which I bought for home after
trying a download version. I find it is a little more intuitive than
PhotoImpact (at least for me!). It handles layered images like
Photoshop, and runs most Photoshop plugins. I even use it with the
Image Processing Toolkit (Dr. John Russ); most of the plugins
run without problem, although a few tend to crash. PhotoImpact
also handles layers, I believe, but with an object-oriented approach.
I haven't tried the IP Toolkit plugins in PhotoImpact.

Paintshop Pro can probably be had for a little less than Photoimpact.
List price is probably $90 or $100, but I've seen it on some of the
on-line computer stores for much less. I think one may have even
had it for something like $58 (?). Check out info & demo at
http://www.jasc.com

Disclaimer: I have no ties to any of these software packages!

Jim Passmore
Cryovac Division
Sealed Air Corp.

----------
} From: Walter.Bobrowski
} To: Microscopy
} Subject: RE: Photo Editors
} Date: Thursday, March 11, 1999 3:52PM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Laszlo Veto :      vgraphic-at-bcinternet.net
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 12:34:00 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I think you are making an excellent choice with the new Agfa DuoScan T2500.
You will appreciate the 3.4 D on this unique flatbed scanner. The glass less

negative carriers fit into the lower tray, which slides into a precise
position. The negatives will not contact any surface. I have just ordered
also a DuoScan T2500. You will learn more about it at:

http://www.agfahome.com/products/prepress/scanners/duoscant2500.html

One of the most versatile imaging software is CorelDraw8 and
CorelPHOTO-PAINT8. It offers the highest image format manipulation with
Plug-ins, for most applications. Highly recommended.

Laszlo J. Veto




Caspar McConville wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner for use with TEM
} negatives from our Jeol 2000-FX, and also for SEM negatives. A
} scanner has been recommended to us: the Agfa Duoscan T2500, which
} has a resolution (hardware) of 1250 x 2500 dpi and a density of 3.4D.
} (The scans would be output to a Kodak DS 8650 PS printer)
}
} We need the quality of the scans to match the quality of the standard
} darkroom enlarger if possible, as we would like to 'go digital' at
} least for routine work. Does anyone have experience of routine
} negative scanning for TEM prints, with this or other scanners, and if
} so, is it realistic to expect such high quality?
}
} Also, what additional image processing software would people
} recommend we got to go along with this?
}
} Any advice would be appreciated.
}
} Caspar
}
} Caspar McConville, Ph.D.
} Technical Specialist
} New York State College of Ceramics
} Alfred University








From: Glenn Holm :      KARUZIS-at-wccf.mit.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 15:46:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Looking for Pseudocolor lookup tables

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi computer imagers,,

I am pseudocolorizing some data we have of cellular responses from striatum of
rats learning a T-maze from Ann Graybiel's tetrode recording project. What I
am looking for is any "standard" pseudocolor tables used by imagers to colorize
0-255 grey levels into RGB values.

I can apply a standard spectrum from 0 to 255
running from magenta (255 0 255 RGB) through blue, cyan, green, yellow to red
(255 0 0) or start with blue and go to red in a linear way. What this produces
is colors that are mostly in the middle. What I think imagers must be using
are tables weighted toward the red and blue, so transitions show up better. I
can play with my tables in Excel to boost the red and blue ends and then apply
them using Paint Shop Pro - what I was wondering was if you have or know where
I can find any standard tables, preferably of numerical RGB values used by the
pros in the field.


------------------------------------------------------------------
|Glenn Holm {mailto:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu} |
|Graybiel Lab (617)253-5780;fax (617)253-1599 |
|M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. Cambridge, MA 02139 |
------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Kim DeRuyter :      fnksd1-at-uaf.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 11:55:24 -0900
Subject: Removing gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of dinosaur bones and
teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if he could restore
them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold). Is there a good
nondestructive way to do this?

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs
University of Alaska Fairbanks






From: DUNNTEM-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 16:26:39 EST
Subject: Re: Working Alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 3/12/99 9:55:46 AM Hawaiian Standard Time,
underwoo-at-u.washington.edu writes:

{ { Bad news! the other issue is: Life is short and work is long, and
working alone sucks. It's not emotionally healthy. } }

Perhaps it is true for some that working alone is not emotionally healthy.
However, if you ARE emotionally healthy, then working alone can be emotionally
healthy and spiritually healthy also. It can be a time for focussed energy,
contemplative thought, creative thought - all without interruption. Personally
I love working alone and after the work I enjoy the company of my family and
friends.

Best wishes,

Ted Dunn
Maui, Hawaii





From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 19:11:40 -0600
Subject: Re: Working Alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: Robert Underwood {underwoo-at-u.washington.edu}

}
} In the past I have been on jobs where a great deal of the time was spent
} isolated. Now days I think it is a huge safety liability. One time I had
} appendicitis and had to drive myself to 50 miles on back roads to a clinic
} with my knees up on the stearing wheel. The point here is, even though
} you work in a laboratory complex, if something happened you probably
} wouldn't get help until the cleaning crew found you. Bad news! the other
} issue is: Life is short and work is long, and working alone sucks. It's
} not emotionally healthy. Make a change. Consolidate in with other workers.


I spent most of my life farming and ranching. Both rather dangerous
occupations.
You spend almost all your time alone and in the busy season I might be
alone 48 hours at a time so no one would even start looking for me for
a couple of days.

Not many people are killed because of the isolation. Your best protection'
is to think before you do something dangerous.

Gordon

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Owner PRAG-L PRactical AGriculture List www.couger.com/prag-l
Stillwater, OK 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00






From: request141-at-bigfoot.com
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 1999 20:21:01
Subject: gracemin@almatel.net

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


your invited to visit the worlds largest web site.


if interested, reply to sender.




if not reply to complaints 414hotmail.com



thank you.












From: Nathan Haese :      nathan_haese-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 00:48:46 -0500
Subject: Reply to Working Alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Everett Ramer's question regarding working-alone has ellicited
thoughtful and poignant reply. Useful reply as well, by Jerry Heeschen.

To level this solemn feeling, here is mine originally just shared with
Everett.

Nathan Haese
- at work, alone in a garage, on a new microscope, perhaps too alone.

Everett,

At a large chemical company that I once worked for, we had a badge
with a radio alert button that we wore when we worked alone on weekends. =
=

Pressing the button would alert the gate guard to come find us in the lab=




From: Nathan Haese :      nathan_haese-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 11:21:41 -0500
Subject: Try again, alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Everett Ramer's question regarding working-alone has ellicited
thoughtful and poignant reply. Useful reply as well, by Jerry Heeschen.

To level this solemn feeling, here is mine originally just shared with
Everett.

Nathan Haese
- at work, alone in a garage, on a new microscope, perhaps too alone.

Everett,

At a large chemical company that I once worked for, we had a badge
with a radio alert button that we wore when we worked alone on weekends. =
=

Pressing the button would alert the gate guard to come find us in the lab=




From: Damian Neuberger :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 10:47:38 -0600
Subject: Instructions for Reichert-Jung FC4E

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can anyone help me acquire an instruction manual for a Reichert-Jung FC4E
cyroultramicrotome attachment for a Reichert-Jung Ultracut E
ultramicrotome? I would be able to pay copy and mailing expenses.

Thanks

Damian Neuberger
Research Scientist
damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com







From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 18:39:17 -0600
Subject: Re: Try again, alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



There are some two way pagers that have a man down feature.
If the pager is in a horozonal postion for 10 seconds it beeps.
If the wearer doesn't acknoledge the beep it sends an alarm
to a central station. These pagers have a panic button as well and
will serve as regular alpha numeric pagers that allow yes/no
acknoledgement from the wearer.

Disclaimer:
I own a substantial share of Datalink System that manufactures
and selling these. See www.rfdata.net.
Gordon

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-rfdata.net
Datalink Systems www.rfdata.net
Stillwater, OK 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00
=================================

Everett Ramer's question regarding working-alone has ellicited
thoughtful and poignant reply. Useful reply as well, by Jerry Heeschen.

To level this solemn feeling, here is mine originally just shared with
Everett.

Nathan Haese
- at work, alone in a garage, on a new microscope, perhaps too alone.

Everett,

At a large chemical company that I once worked for, we had a badge
with a radio alert button that we wore when we worked alone on weekends.
Pressing the button would alert the gate guard to come find us in the lab=






From: sdangelo-at-batnet.com (steve d'angelo)
Date: Sat, 13 Mar 1999 20:03:28 -0600
Subject: Knife Sharpener Info

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does any one have an instruction/operations manual for an American Optical
microtome knife sharpener?
Or if it's basic enough to enlighten me just put it in an email?
Thanks in advance
Steve D'Angelo







From: Structural Virology :      kisv-at-csb.ki.se
Date: Sun, 14 Mar 1999 13:47:11 +0100 (MET)
Subject: To Richard and Nigel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Bridget and Bob,

Let's join and pay our tribute to Drs Richard Henderson & Nigel Unwin for
their Aminoff Award.. Cheers!

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Gregori
Aminoff prize in crystallography for 1999 to dr. Richard Henderson and dr.
Nigel Unwin, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, England, for
their development of methods for structure determination of biological
macromolecules using electron diffraction. The prize is presented at the
Annual Meeting of the Academy 31. March 1999. The Aminoff symposium 29 -
30. March is organised to the honour of the prize-winners.

The symposium is supported by the Academy through its Nobel Institute for
Chemistry.


Aminoff Symposium
Structure Determination of Macromolecules
with Electron Diffraction
29 - 30. March 1999

Monday 29. March

13.00 - 13.15 Opening of the symposium: Erling Norrby
Introduction: Ivar Olovsson

General and non-biological Systems

13.15 - 14.15 Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy in Biology
Richard Henderson

14.15 - 15.00 Imaging Individual Atoms by Electron Microscopy
Sven Hovmller, Stockholm

15.00 - 15.30 Coffee/Tea

Diffraction Studies of Membrane Proteins

15.30 - 16.30 Different methods for the study of membrane
structures. Matti Saraste, EMBL, Heidelberg

16.30 - 17.15 Electron Crystallography of Membrane-bound Enzymes
Hans Hebert, Stockholm

17.15 - 18.00 Structural Studies on the Cytochrome bc1 Complex
So Iwata, Uppsala

18.00 - 18.30 General discussion

18.30 Dinner in the Club House of the Academy

Tuesday 30. March

Studies of Virus Structures

09.00 - 10.00 Combination of Different Methods in Virus Studies
Michael Rossmann, Purdue

10.00- 10.45 Virus Studies, Essence of Supermolecular Symmetry
Holland Cheng, Stockholm

10.45 - 11.15 Coffee/Tea


Non-crystalline Materials

11.15 - 12.00 Visualization of Single Protein Molecules
by Electron tomography. Ulf Skoglund, Stockholm

12.00 - 13.00 0 - dimensional Crystallography
Marin van Heel, Imperial College

13.00 - 14.30 Lunch in the Club House

Concluding talks

14.30 - 15.30 Making Light Work:
The Membrane Proteins of Plant Photosynthesis
Werner Khlbrandt, Frankfurt

15.30 - 16.00 Coffee/Tea

16.00- 17.00 The Acetylcholin Receptor Channel -
Approaching Atomic Resolution
Nigel Unwin

17.00 - 17.30 General Discussion



For more information, please contact,

Ivar Olovsson /chairman
E-mail: {ivar.olovsson-at-kemi.uu.se}


Address for correspondence:

Angstrm Laboratory
Inorganic Chemistry
Box 538
S- 751 21 Uppsala, Sweden










__________________________________________________________________________
Course email: kisv-at-csb.ki.sv; fax: 08-774 55 38
Lena Hammar, phone 08-6089130, email lena.hammar-at-cbt.ki.se
Holland Cheng, phone 08-6089131, email holland.cheng-at-csb.ki.se
Structural Virology Group, Department of Biosciences, Karolinska Institute
141 57 Huddinge /Visiting address: Halsovagen 7, NOVUM, Huddinge






From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Sun, 14 Mar 1999 16:13:43 +1000
Subject: RE: Removing gold from fossils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Getting gold off museum fossil pieces is nay impossible. Al
would be easier but basically its the same problem. C
coating is good enough for low powers, but again, Curators
do not like that dark coating,
To view these "hard, dry and non-conducting" specimens
uncoated, the best solution is a poor vacuum SEM; a fully
fledged Environmental SEM would also do well, but its a
more expensive instrument for that job. Poor vacuum SEM's
(I believe at least a couple of the major manufacturers
make instruments with that facility) use only mechanical
pump vacuum in the specimen chamber and because of a vacuum
limiting aperture retain high vacuum in the gun chamber.
Secondary mode is impossible, but a Robinson detector gives
excellent images for this type of work. Magnifications
under these conditions are limited to about 2000x, but
details in fossils do not warrant higher magnifications;
its the SEM's superior depths of field that wins out over
light microscopy.
Kim - all you require now is one of those scopes!
Years ago I modified an Etec Autoscan to function
reversibly as a poor vacuum instruments. It worked well but
it was a fair bit of trouble to accomplish the required
modifications.
Our online contain a link to an archive collated by Scott
Wight. This contains listserver contributions concerned
with Environmental and Poor Vacuum SEM.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Saturday, March 13, 1999 6:55 AM, Kim DeRuyter
[SMTP:fnksd1-at-uaf.edu] wrote:
}
} Hi,
} A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of
} dinosaur bones and
} teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if
} he could restore
} them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold).
} Is there a good
} nondestructive way to do this?
}
} Kim DeRuyter
} Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs
} University of Alaska Fairbanks
}






From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 14 Mar 1999 13:50:12 EST
Subject: Just For Fun Micrograph Contest

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Due to the response (and fun) of our contest at last years MSA/MAS Conference,
we will repeat the contest this year in Portland. The concept of the contest
is based on composite micrographs, each made up from two or more images - one
of which must be microscopical in nature. Prizes of value will be awarded and
one will not have to be present to win. If of interest, kindly advise by
return email and I will see that you receive full contest detail.
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today





From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 08:32:02 +0000
Subject: Re: Removing gold

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Many years ago I worked in a hospital basement EM lab. One day my boss
and I came out of the inner TEM room and wondered why the hallways were
deserted. Then a fire marshall came by demanding to know why we hadn't
vacated the building during the fire drill!

The following email notice arrived from our university safety office:
------------


Kim

I seem to remember a story - a long time ago - about about dipping the sample in liquid mercury - the gold is taken into the liquid as an amalgam and leaves the specimen clean. I have never tried it. I do not know what any Safety person would say about that these days!



Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
Citadel Hill
Plymouth
Devon PL1 2PB
England

Tel. 0044 1752 633249 (International)
Tel. 01752 633294 (National)

Fax. 0044 1752 633102 (International)
Fax. 01752 633102 (National)

e-mail: k.ryan-at-pml.ac.uk






From: CMontana4-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 08:27:57 EST
Subject: Re: Removing gold

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In a message dated 3/12/99 9:45:34 PM Mid-Atlantic Standard Time,
fnksd1-at-uaf.edu writes:

{ {
Hi,
A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of dinosaur bones and
teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if he could restore
them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold). Is there a good
nondestructive way to do this?

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs
University of Alaska Fairbanks } }
Good Morning!
A less destructive way to analyze these samples would be to coat them with
carbon instead of gold, and then ashing the carbon off with O2. Gold is tricky
to remove on most materials (I work mostly with semiconductors), but would be
very difficult to remove on dinosaur bones. (This is assuming your samples are
small enough to fit into an available asher or RIE tool). There are several
labs that could perform both the coating and ashing - let me know if you have
trouble locating one close to your area.
Lisa Montanaro
Consultant, MME





From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 3/12/1999 3:55 PM
Subject: Re: Removing gold

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


im,
A good way to handle specimens of this sort is to make casts of the
surface and examine the casts in the SEM. This way there is no damage to
the original artifact. I had an anthropology grad student do this with
human teeth for his thesis research. He worked out a very inexpensive, low
tech, but reliable method to do the casting. He can be reached at the
following for full details of his method:
Dr. Chris Schmidt
Indianapolis University
cschmidt-at-indy.edu

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Microscopy Center in Agriculture FAX: 765-494-5896
Dept. of Botany & Plant Pathology E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Purdue University
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057


--------------------------------------


Hi,
A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of dinosaur bones and
teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if he could
restore
them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold). Is there a good
nondestructive way to do this?

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs
University of Alaska Fairbanks




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From: Gary Dietrich Chinga :      garyc-at-stud.ntnu.no
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 16:00:13 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Microm-Heidelberg HM350

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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by dj.stud.ntnu.no (8.9.1/8.9.3) with ESMTP id QAA03224;
Mon, 15 Mar 1999 16:01:30 +0100 (MET)


I have the same problem with the Microm-Heidelberg, Heavy duty Microtome
HM 350. We would also be able to pay copy and mailing expenses.

Gary.
NTNU
Norway.
}
}
} Can anyone help me acquire an instruction manual for a Reichert-Jung FC4E
} cyroultramicrotome attachment for a Reichert-Jung Ultracut E
} ultramicrotome? I would be able to pay copy and mailing expenses.
}
} Thanks
}
} Damian Neuberger
} Research Scientist
} damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com
}
}
}






From: Richard Leapman :      leapman-at-helix.nih.gov
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 11:08:57 -0400
Subject: Postdoctoral Fellowships at the NIH

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{fontfamily} {param} Times {/param} {bigger} {bigger} Postdoctoral
Fellowships at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

________________________________________________________


Two postdoctoral fellowships are available immediately in the
Supramolecular Structure and Function group in the Bioengineering &
Physical Science Program at the NIH. Our laboratory is looking for a
physical scientist (e.g., physics or materials) and biological
scientist (e.g., biophysics) to help develop and apply new methods
based on electron microscopy and spectroscopy. There is considerable
flexibility in the scope of research which includes the following:

(i) development of EELS spectrum-imaging in the STEM to map phosphorus,
calcium and other elements in macromolecular assemblies and cells.

(ii) development of energy-filtered TEM to establish elemental
detection limits and to map elemental distributions.

(iii) development of x-ray microanalysis and cryo-preparation
techniques for studies in cell biology.

(iv) image processing techniques to determine the structures of large
macromolecular assemblies using cryo-EM and STEM.

(v) applications of any of the above methods to biomedical research in
collaboration with investigators in other NIH laboratories.


Our laboratory is equipped with field-emission scanning transmission
electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS),
energy-filtered electron microscopy (EFTEM), x-ray microanalysis
(EDXS), cryo-electron microscopy, and UNIX-based image processing.



Preference will be given to candidates with less than five years of
relevant postdoctoral experience. Candidates from the United States or
from overseas are welcome to apply.


For additional information see: http://www.nih.gov/od/ors/beps/ssfr/


Please send curriculum vitae and bibliography to:


Dr. Richard Leapman

Biomedical Engineering & Physical Sciences Program

National Institutes of Health

Bldg. 13, Rm. 3N17

Bethesda, MD 20892

Tel: (301) 496-2599

FAX: (301) 496-6608

e-mail: leapman-at-helix.nih.gov


(NIH is an Equal Opportunity Employer)






{/bigger} {/bigger} {/fontfamily}







From: Karen Rethoret :      rethoret-at-yorku.ca
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 11:20:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Canadian Microscopy Society Conference

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- Eye on Imaging -
MSC/SMC Conference May 26-28, 1999


Sponsored by the Microscopical Society of Canada

We are pleased to annouce the 26th annual meeting of the Microscopical
Society of Canada. This spring meeting and exhibition will be taking place
for three days, May 26-28, 1999, on the campus of the University of Guelph
in Guelph, Ontario.
Many interesting speakers have agreed to participate including Dr. John Russ
(author of the Image Processing Handbook, Dr. P.C. Cheng (multi-photon
microscopy and microscope construction) , Dr. Chris Yip (AFM), Dr. Nestor
Zaluzec (Tele-Presence microscopy), Dr. Nick White (3-D quantitative
analysis and multi-photon microscopy) and Dr. Brian Kaye (Fractal analysis)
amongst others.
We are also offering a variety of afternoon workshops as well as
a commercial exhibition offering a full range of Microscopy and Imaging
equipment and supplies. Please visit our web site for information and
registration packages:

http://www.uoguelph.ca/botany/rootlab/msc99.htm

Please pass this link along to anybody that may be interested. Deadline
for submission of abstracts and pre-registration is April 6, 1999.
Hope you can make it,


George Harauz
Microscopical Society of Canada
Chairman, Local Organizing Committee
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario
gharauz-at-uoguelph.ca








From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 10:50:09 -0600
Subject: Re: Looking for Pseudocolor lookup tables

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You might look into utilities that allow you to adjust the color LUT and
data separately of each other. Then you should be able to stretch the
colors to fit like you want. If that is not easily possible with your
software, then you might try playing with the gamma, contrast and
brightness on your image before applying the pseudo-color and you should be
able to get your weighting as you like it.

If you absolutely need help, I might be able to fabricate a color table
here if you can send me a typical image and your color table.

At 03:46 PM 3/12/99 -0500, you wrote:
} Hi computer imagers,,
}
} I am pseudocolorizing some data we have of cellular responses from
striatum of
} rats learning a T-maze from Ann Graybiel's tetrode recording project. What I
} am looking for is any "standard" pseudocolor tables used by imagers to
colorize
} 0-255 grey levels into RGB values.
}
} I can apply a standard spectrum from 0 to 255
} running from magenta (255 0 255 RGB) through blue, cyan, green, yellow to red
} (255 0 0) or start with blue and go to red in a linear way. What this
produces
} is colors that are mostly in the middle. What I think imagers must be using
} are tables weighted toward the red and blue, so transitions show up better. I
} can play with my tables in Excel to boost the red and blue ends and then
apply
} them using Paint Shop Pro - what I was wondering was if you have or know
where
} I can find any standard tables, preferably of numerical RGB values used by
the
} pros in the field.
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} |Glenn Holm {mailto:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu} |
} |Graybiel Lab (617)253-5780;fax (617)253-1599 |
} |M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. Cambridge, MA 02139 |
} ------------------------------------------------------------------






From: Kenneth Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 13:14:30 -0800
Subject: Re: Removing gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Kim DeRuyter wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi,
} A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of dinosaur bones and
} teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if he could restore
} them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold). Is there a good
} nondestructive way to do this?
}
} Kim DeRuyter
} Histology and Electron Microscopy Labs
} University of Alaska Fairbanks
Kim,
One thing that no one has mentioned, yet, is low kV operation. If
your instrument will operate at 5kV or lower (perferably around 1kV) and
you limit your beam current, you should be able to view uncoated
specimens at at least a couple of kX. Some intruments will go much
higher at that voltage range. Grains of quartz may still present a
problem because SiO2 is such a good insulator, but many other minerals
will work fine under those conditions.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA





From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-MIT.EDU
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 12:43:51 -0500
Subject: LINK/Oxford files

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I have set up an FTP site at prism.mit.edu, port 2101, with the files I
mentioned that will convert LINK/Oxford AN10/eX/L files. Apologies
if the documentation is sparse!

To access a non-standard port in FTP you will need to know how your FTP
program works. In Netscape, use the following URL:

ftp://prism.mit.edu:2101

In WS_FTP you have to change the port number in the Advanced tab. From a
command line ftp program (e.g. Unix, or DOS from Win 95/98/NT), first invoke
the program without a server name, i.e. just enter

ftp

The program responds with the ftp prompt ftp} . Then you enter:

open prism.mit.edu 2101

The user is anonymous, and the password is unimportant. I don't know how
you would do it with other FTP programs. Sorry about the difficulty, but I
am already using the standard FTP port for another, non-public, purpose!

Tony.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Anthony J. Garratt-Reed, M.A., D.Phil.*
* SEF Team Leader *
* MIT, Room 13-1027 *
* 77 Massachusetts Avenue *
* Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 *
* USA *
* Phone: (617) 253-4622 *
* Fax: (617) 258-6478 *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *







From: Paulo César Soares Júnior :      ppcs-at-iris.ufscar.br
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 14:45:50 -0300
Subject: Looking for people who works with TEM and glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

Does anybody know who in the USA has research activities centered on
characterization of glass structure, using TEM and diffraction methods.

Thanks.

Paulo C. Soares Jr.
ppcs-at-iris.ufscar.br
S=E3o Carlos - Brazil






From: Laszlo Veto :      vgraphic-at-bcinternet.net
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 09:48:27 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM: Scanning Negatives?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I think you are making an excellent choice with the new Agfa DuoScan T2500.
You will appreciate the 3.4 D on this unique flatbed scanner. The glass less

negative carriers fit into the lower tray, which slides into a precise
position. The negatives will not contact any surface. I have just ordered
also a DuoScan T2500. You will learn more about it at:

http://www.agfahome.com/products/prepress/scanners/duoscant2500.html

One of the most versatile imaging software is CorelDraw8 and
CorelPHOTO-PAINT8. It offers the highest image format manipulation with
Plug-ins, for most applications. Highly recommended.

Laszlo J. Veto

Caspar McConville wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We are thinking of purchasing a negative scanner for use with TEM
} negatives from our Jeol 2000-FX, and also for SEM negatives. A
} scanner has been recommended to us: the Agfa Duoscan T2500, which
} has a resolution (hardware) of 1250 x 2500 dpi and a density of 3.4D.
} (The scans would be output to a Kodak DS 8650 PS printer)
}
} We need the quality of the scans to match the quality of the standard
} darkroom enlarger if possible, as we would like to 'go digital' at
} least for routine work. Does anyone have experience of routine
} negative scanning for TEM prints, with this or other scanners, and if
} so, is it realistic to expect such high quality?
}
} Also, what additional image processing software would people
} recommend we got to go along with this?
}
} Any advice would be appreciated.
}
} Caspar
}
} Caspar McConville, Ph.D.
} Technical Specialist
} New York State College of Ceramics
} Alfred University








From: Frank herbert :      fherbert-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 15:01:29 -0600
Subject: TEM of Lymphocytes

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} From: Self {miller.TEX.TAFA}
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com


Howdy all,
There is a graduate student here who is trying to look at a possible stem
cell line under TEM. The problem is that they are quite small, don't seem
to pellet very well, and he has only been able to get me a few thousand
cells at a time.
We have tried to embed the cells in 2% Agar after fixation but this hasn't
worked.
Is it possible to filter the media and cells, and then process the filter
with the cells stuck onto it? Maybe use a cytospin to spin the cells into a
filter?
Is there anyone with experience with this? Any suggestions or ideas would
be greatly appreciated.


Thanks in advance
Frank Herbert
Technician
Integrated Microscopy Core
Department of Cell Biology
Baylor College of Medicine






From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 16:24:29 -0500
Subject: arsenic and no old lace

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Somewhere in the deep receses of my mind I recall a cytochemical test for
arsenic. I think it was for EM but I am not sure. Does anyone out there
know it??

Or was it all just a bad dream?

Greg
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611







From: Bob Miller :      miller-at-tafa.com
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 16:32:21 -0600
Subject: Instrument Quality vs. Budget

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We are trying to equip our lab with a reflected light BF/DF
microscope (+ trinocular head, B&W video system, 4X5" Polaroid
system), for two basic needs:
1. viewing and photographing our fine metal, ceramic, and carbide
powders for QA purposes (e.g. visual standards), and
2. viewing and photographing mounted/polished thermal spray
powder and coating samples prepared at our parent company's
facility.

Our budget allows for a used (reconditioned or demo) top-name
microscope (e.g. Nikon, Olympus, Leitz, Zeiss) or a new lesser-
name scope (e.g. Meiji...) with the same basic features. Not being
professional microscopists ourselves, we ask you to comment on
aspects of the above tradeoff, based on your experience. Our main
concern is flatness of field and sharpness of image at
magnifications up to 500X. Thanks for your help!


Sincerely,

Robert A. Miller
TAFA Material Technologies, Inc.
1702 Mykawa Road
Pearland TX 77581 USA
PHONE: 281-485-7765
FAX: 281-485-0211
EMAIL: miller-at-tafa.com








From: McCaffrey, John (IMS) :      John.McCaffrey-at-nrc.ca
Date: 1999-03-15 12:45
Subject: Looking for people who works with TEM and glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Paulo,

IMHO, the Glass King of TEM is Scott Walck.

Dr. Scott Walck
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd=20
P.O. Box 11472=20
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com
tel: (412) 820-8651

Cheers
John

John P. McCaffrey
Institute for Microstructural Sciences
National Research Council of Canada
M-50 Montreal Rd.
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6
Canada

Tel: 613-993-7823
Fax: 613-990-0202
email: john.mccaffrey-at-nrc.ca
------------------------------------------------------------------------=
----
--
REPLY FROM: McCaffrey, John
Microsoft Mail v3.0 (MAPI 1.0 Transport) IPM.Microsoft Mail.Note
} From: Paulo C=E9sar Soares J=FAnior
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------=
----
--

=
------------------------------------------------------------------------=

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
=
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.=



Hi,

Does anybody know who in the USA has research activities centered on
characterization of glass structure, using TEM and diffraction methods.

Thanks.

Paulo C. Soares Jr.
ppcs-at-iris.ufscar.br
S=E3o Carlos - Brazil






From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 18:08:02 -0500
Subject: liver or another sample

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by dogwood.botany.uga.edu (8.9.1/8.9.1) with SMTP id RAA17081
for {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.com} ; Mon, 15 Mar 1999 17:56:43 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: {199903152256.RAA17081-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


Hi,
I'm trying to find out if the elemental imaging system on my scope (a Zeiss
902A TEM) is working...or if it is a problem with the sample.
Does anyone have a sample they could spare for elemental imaging?

In October, I had a great sample grid (30nm liver sections with no stain).
We were able to get nice images of iron. The scope had its annual service
in November and the elemental imaging system has not worked correctly since
that time. The serviceman is suggesting that the sample is fried (no pun
intended). I think the scope is whacked. So I'm trying to get another liver
sample (my source for the first sample retired) or I'm willing to try
something else. I need a "known" sample, cut 30 nm thick, no support film
(600 mesh grids help) or staining.

Any help or suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated!

Sincerely,
Beth Richardson

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
**************************************







From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 16:02:38 -0800
Subject: Re: Just For Fun Micrograph Contest

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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I'm interested.
Elaine


Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Biosciences Electron Microscopy Facility
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca







From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 17:45:48 -0800
Subject: imaging standard glass mounted specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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hello members. here is a probable dumb question.
Maybe an impossible situation.

Suppose that I have a prepared microscope slide--
1"x3" glass slide with specimen under cover slip.
Ordinary LM analysis works fine. Is there some other
analysis method besides confocal that would offer
better resolution and increased depth of field?
The idea is to not have to prepare TEM specimens.

Is this possible?
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Modern surfers use PC boards. You can too at
http://photoweb.net
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





From: Damian Neuberger :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 22:41:29 -0600
Subject: Responses for Manual

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Thanks to everyone for your fantastic responses to my request for a
Reichert-Jung FC4E manual. The folks from Leica have been especially
helpful and quick to respond and I'm most grateful for the help.

Thanks again.

Damian Neuberger







From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Varga_L=E1szl=F3?= :      varguc-at-freemail.c3.hu
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 04:51:10 -0000
Subject: Re: AN 10000 files

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Dear Robert,

As Valdemar Furdanowicz wrote you, you can transfer LINK files to the PC =
with
their MSDOSCV program. However, you can also use the serial port of the =
LINK=20
computer and it can be a little bit faster. What I don't know, however, =
is whether you
can connect the the two machines directly. When I worked in the electron =
beam lab of
Hungalu Engineering, we had a little box between the serial ports=20
of the machines, made by Oxford.
You can try any terminal program on the PC if it has an option for the =
well-known XMODEM protocol.
Once transferred, the files have to be converted from one format to =
another , because
the numbers are formatted differently on the LINK and the PC.
With fixed point numbers the only difference is the order of the bytes, =
but
with floating point numbers the problem is more serious.=20
Your opportunities for file conversion are very limited with the MSDOSCV =
program.=20
Of course you have to know the structure of the files, if you want to =
convert them.=20
You can find this information in the Oxford manuals.

I wrote some programs to solve the above mentioned problems:
1. File transfer: with our XMODEM program we can transfer multiple files =
using wildcards in=20
the file specifications. For this purpose the PC program prepares the =
necessary LINK macros,
which are sent as a first step.
2. File inspection: with a little utility program one can look at the =
files obtained from the LINK
computer and compare their content with the documentation.=20
3. File conversion: I have worked out simple conversion programs for =
image files,
DIGISCAN image anal. result files and X-ray spectra.

With a private letter I can send you anything from these programs, but =
there are still some minor=20
problems with that. When I worked for Hungalu, I was the only user of my =
programs, and
I didn't have enough time for a better user interface. They are written =
for the DOS platform, and
they send Hungarian messages to the screen.
Now I work as a computer programmer in a very different field, and =






From: Birgit Neubohn :      neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 08:04:52 +0100
Subject: TEM: antibodies bind to formvar

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Hello,

in our group we are using formvar-coated grids to stabilize ultrathin
sections for immunogold-labelling.
Sometimes the formvar is *heavily* labelled by gold particles. This is no=
t
due to binding of the gold grains, but depends only on the primary antibo=
dy
that had been used. It can happen both with Protein A-gold or goat anti
rabbit-gold, but using other primary antibodies the formvar is clean.
What is the reason for this binding of antibodies to formvar?
Is there any blocking reagent that would provide this?
Thanks in advance

Birgit


-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----
Dr. Birgit Neubohn
Institut fuer Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung (IPK)
(Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research)
Corrensstr. 3
D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany

Phone.: (+49) 039482 5447
Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----=0D=9D







From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 09:14:58 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: liver or another sample

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Hi Beth,

there might be a number of other sources for your problem beside the
microscope itself. You could have trouble with your camera and/or image
processing system.
Please give more details what equipment you are using to acquire an
elemental map (SIT or CCD camera, what software, etc. ...)
Due to the principle of the energy-filter of your microscope (Castaing-Henry
electrostatic mirror type) you would probably not be able to see an image at
all if it would malfunction. But to make things clear you could insert a
fairly thick biological sample and check: 1. If you the a normal spectrum on
the final screen if you are switching from image mode to spectrum mode and
2. if you are able to see the contrast change if you acquire filtered images
before and above the carbon edge. If both works fine, you should search the
problem elsewhere.
Are the intensities of the filtered images before and on the iron edge high
enough to allow the system to calculate a useful result? Did you change any
other important parameters since your last successful try (slit width,
energy losses, acquisition time, background correction, ...)?
You can contact me directly if you like to discuss this a little more in detail.

Cheers,

Petra


beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu wrote:

} Hi,
} I'm trying to find out if the elemental imaging system on my scope (a Zeiss
} 902A TEM) is working...or if it is a problem with the sample.
} Does anyone have a sample they could spare for elemental imaging?
}
} In October, I had a great sample grid (30nm liver sections with no stain).
} We were able to get nice images of iron. The scope had its annual service
} in November and the elemental imaging system has not worked correctly since
} that time. The serviceman is suggesting that the sample is fried (no pun
} intended). I think the scope is whacked. So I'm trying to get another liver
} sample (my source for the first sample retired) or I'm willing to try
} something else. I need a "known" sample, cut 30 nm thick, no support film
} (600 mesh grids help) or staining.
}
} Any help or suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated!
}
} Sincerely,
} Beth Richardson
--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpcu.lu/~wahlbrin






From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 09:39:41 +0100
Subject: Re: Instrument Quality vs. Budget

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Hi Bob,

Perhaps a second-hand Reichert Zetopan equipped for reflected light could
fit the bill.

These are available from time to time at +/- decent prices in the USA
(about $ 1000 - 2000, depending on condition and accessories mounted on the
stand). (Some) spare parts are available in Germany or Austria.

Reichert had objectives for incident light for Zetopan 5.5x/0.15; 11x/0.25;
32x/0.65, 45x/0.95. I don't know about higher magnifications... The
objectives mentioned are still available trough at least one German dealer.


I don't know about their quality regarding flatness of field and sharpness:
I use a Zetopan equipped for biological work/transmitted light. Contact me
offline if you are interested (I have no financial interests in this).

Yvan Lindekens.
----------
} Van: Bob Miller {miller-at-tafa.com}
} Aan: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Onderwerp: Instrument Quality vs. Budget
} Datum: maandag 15 maart 1999 23:32
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We are trying to equip our lab with a reflected light BF/DF
} microscope (+ trinocular head, B&W video system, 4X5" Polaroid
} system), for two basic needs:





From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 12:56:04 +0000
Subject: UMAX technologies UK phone number

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Hello everyone,
does anybody out there know the phone number of UMAX technologies UK
?
Thanks in advance
Martin Roe





From: KEYSER.DIETMAR :      FB4A001-at-nw01.rrz.uni-hamburg.de
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 14:14:30 +0200
Subject: Removing gold

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Dear Kim,
an old method which I used a long while ago and now and then recently
to remove gold from calcareous surfaces of REM-samples is to leave
the sample in a solution of NaCN and NaOH and let air bubble through
by means of a small glass pipette. The amount of NaCN is about 1-2%
and NaOH should be 1 N or more. You may try it on a fresh part of
bone perhaps it works.
Dietmar Keyser
PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN TELEFON AND FAX
Dr.Dietmar Keyser
Zoologisches Institut und Museum
Martin-Luther-King Platz 3
D-20146 Hamburg
Germany
Tel. +49 40/428 38 4232
Fax: +49 40/428 38 3937
E-mail: Keyser-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de





From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 14:08:33 +0100
Subject: EUREM 12 - 2nd Circular will be distributed

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EUREM XII
12th European Congress on Electron Microscopy
Brno, Czech Republic, July 9-14, 2000
http://www.eurem2000.isibrno.cz/
--------------------------------------------------------
Second Circular and Call for papers will be distributed in May 1999
to pre-registered scientists. DO NOT FORGET TO PRE-REGISTER YOURSELF
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE! PRE-REGISTRATION FORM CAN BE COMPLETED DIRECTLY
ON THE WEB SITE:

http://www.eurem2000.isibrno.cz/regform.html


Petr Schauer

+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dr. Petr Schauer, Vicechairman of the Or- | tel.: (+420 5) 41514313 |
| ganization Committee of the 12th EUROPEAN | fax : (+420 5) 41514404 |
| CONGRESS ON ELECTRON MICROSCOPY | (+420 5) 41514337 |
| (Brno, Czech Republic, July 9 - 14, 2000) | e-mail: petr-at-isibrno.cz |
| Kralovopolska 147, CZ-612 64 Brno | eurem2000-at-isibrno.cz |
| Czech Republic |www.eurem2000.isibrno.cz |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+





From: Linda Fox :      LFOX1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 07:44:59 -0600
Subject: fish-CPD and SEM

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Greetings Friends,
Does anyone have tips for critical point drying and SEM viewing of
fresh fish samples including skin/scale layers? They seem to be VERY
oily, and I am wondering if this will hamper the CPD process or muck
up the vacuum in the SEM. Any food or fish scientists out there?
Thanks,
Linda
lfox1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu





From: de Lillo Enrico :      delillo-at-agr.uniba.it
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 15:00:39 +0100
Subject: SEM S100 Cambridge: scintillator and light guide

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Dear listers,
have you experience in replacing the scintillator and light guide for a
Cambridge S100? Could you give me some details and notes?

Thanks a lot.

dr Enrico de Lillo
Istituto di Entomologia agrraia - Universit=E0 Bari - Italy
tel. +39 080 5443105
fax +39 080 5442876
email: delillo-at-agr.uniba.it







From: Nigel Browning :      browning-at-uic.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 09:55:11 -0600
Subject: "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution", Tuesday

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{bold} "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution" {/bold}



There will be a Materials Science symposium at Scanning 99 entitled
"Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution". Scanning 99 is
being held at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare in Rosemont, IL from April 11-14
1999. The "Analyzing Materials at Atomic Resolution" symposium is
scheduled for Tuesday April 13th. The details of the conference can be
found at http://www.scanning.org or can be requested from Mary
Sullivan (e-mail: scanning-at-fams.org, tel:201-818-1010). Registration
for members of the Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society is at
the reduced rates of $150 (regular $ 235) for the whole conference or
$50 (regular $ 95) for a single day (all attendees of the MMMS
symposium held at UIC last May are members of MMMS).




{bold} Speakers {/bold}



9.00 {bold} M. Haider-CEOS GmbH, Germany {/bold}

"Towards sub-Angstrom resolution by correction of spherical
aberration"


9.30 {bold} O. Krivanek-University of Washington {/bold}

"Towards sub-Angstrom electron probes by Cs-corrected STEM."



10.00 Break



10.30 {bold} E. M. James-University of Illinois at Chicago {/bold}

"Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy on the
200kV FEGTEM"


11.00 {bold} S. J. Pennycook-Oak Ridge National Lab {/bold}

"Probing the Origin of Interfacial Properties by STEM"


11.30 {bold} D. A. Muller-Lucent Technologies {/bold}

"The End of the Roadmap for Silicon Dioxide: The Electronic Structure
of Hyper-Thin Gate

Oxides at the Atomic Scale"


12.00 {bold} D. B. Williams-Lehigh University {/bold}

"Atomic-Resolution X-ray Microanalysis in the AEM"



12.30 Lunch



2.00 {bold} L. D. Marks-Northwestern University {/bold}

"Picometer structure determination using Electron Diffraction"


2.30 {bold} J. M. Gibson -University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign {/bold}

"Statistical Measurement of Electron Scattering Fluctuations in
Amorphous

Materials - A new Structural Tool"



3.00 Break



3.30 {bold} M. Gajdardziska-Josifovska-University of Wisconsin at
Milwaukee {/bold}

"Quantitative surface microscopy and diffraction over the length
scales: Morphology and

crystallography of polar oxide surfaces. "


4.00 {bold} M. Tanaka-NRIM, Tsukuba, Japan {/bold}

"Nano-behavior of Small Metal Particles in the Electron Beam"











___________________________________________________________________________


Nigel D. Browning, PhD

Assistant Professor

University of Illinois at Chicago

Department of Physics

845 West Taylor Street,

Chicago

IL 60607-7059. USA


Tel: 312-413-8164

Fax: 312-996-9016



http://interface.phy.uic.edu


___________________________________________________________________________







From: Luis Giles :      giles-at-mpi-halle.mpg.de
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 17:34:58 MET
Subject: Re: Looking for people who works with TEM and glass

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Hi Paulo,

I would like to establish some contacts with the TEM comunity in
Brazil and I thought that perhaps you could give me some information
concerning TEM-oriented Materials Science groups in Brazil.

Regards,

LF Giles

*****************************************
Luis Felipe Giles, PhD

MPI of Microstructure Physics
Weinberg 2, D-06120, Halle (Saale)
Germany

Phone: + 49 345 5582 673
Fax: +49 345 5511 223
e-mail: giles-at-mpi-halle.mpg.de
****************************************





From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 08:42:32 -0800
Subject: RE: Removing gold

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} Kim DeRuyter wrote:
} ...
}
} Hi,
} A student in the lab is looking at museum samples of dinosaur bones
and
} teeth on the SEM. He could get access to more samples if he could
restore
} them to their original condition ( ie, remove the gold). Is there a
good
} nondestructive way to do this?
}
} ...

Of all the suggestions, I believe you'll want to develop the
casting procedure for your facility. I can give you the e-mail
address for Dr Robert Pastor who can let you know which resin
materials he used, but he used two ... one for the field while
casting the pliable negative mold of ancient Pakastani teeth,
and another casting resin for the durable positive mold in the
lab. You'd then be able to coat with gold and archive these
specimens for all types of future study ... and I was quite
impressed with the detail of the micr-wear and lack of artifacts.

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 16 Mar 99 11:56:32 -0500
Subject: RE: casting method

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I sent the following message out yesterday with the incorrect Email. I
talked to Chris who has gone from human teeth to mastodon teeth (a bit
large to cast for SEM!!) and he would be happy to provide details and answer
questions about his casting method. The correct Email is:
cschmidt-at-uindy.edu

Sorry for the mistake.
Debby
-------------

Kim,
A good way to handle specimens of this sort is to make casts of the
surface and examine the casts in the SEM. This way there is no damage to
the original artifact. I had an anthropology grad student do this with
human teeth for his thesis research. He worked out a very inexpensive, low
tech, but reliable method to do the casting. He can be reached at the
following for full details of his method:
Dr. Chris Schmidt
Indianapolis University
cschmidt-at-indy.edu

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Microscopy Center in Agriculture FAX: 765-494-5896
Dept. of Botany & Plant Pathology E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Purdue University
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057







From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 12:32:07 -0500
Subject: Re: fish-CPD and SEM

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(SMTPD32-4.06) id A372AEA00BC; Tue, 16 Mar 1999 12:22:58 EST
Message-Id: {3.0.3.32.19990316123207.00ea5d10-at-mail.map.com}
X-Sender: mme-at-mail.map.com
X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Pro Version 3.0.3 (32)


Dear Linda,

The world class expert on fish scales is Dr. Gilbert Hartley in the UK.
You can probably get his contact information by contacting the Royal
Microscopical Society, 37/38 St. Clements Street, Oxford, England.

Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


At 07:44 AM 3/16/99 -0600, Linda Fox wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 12:45:21 -0500
Subject: stem cells under TEM

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If you are growing stem cells in a culture well plate and they're fairly
confluent you can do all the processing in the dish, including embedding.
This saves alot of time as you dont have to spin between changes, etc. If
the plates are Permanox, any resin will work as will PO. However if
they're in something like Falcon or Corning you need to use Eponate 12 and
skip the PO. I've tried lots of resins and most will partially dissolve
the plastic. After polymerization you simply pop the capsules off the dish
and section. This works very well if you have a fairly large population of
cells. Otherwise you just need to cut several blocks. I can send you our
protocol if you'd like.
Good luck!

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky






From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 13:51:10 -0500
Subject: Re: Removing gold

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I believe that the 1 N NaOH is unecessarily strong to accomplish the purpose
and would result in damage to some specimens. A very brief exposure to NaCN
with a stronger oxidant such as ammonium persulfate or hydrogen peroxide
would probably accomplish the result without prolonged exposure to the
reagents which would lead to their becoming more deeply absorbed into
capillaries that may exist.

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist

KEYSER.DIETMAR wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Kim,
} an old method which I used a long while ago and now and then recently
} to remove gold from calcareous surfaces of REM-samples is to leave
} the sample in a solution of NaCN and NaOH and let air bubble through
} by means of a small glass pipette. The amount of NaCN is about 1-2%
} and NaOH should be 1 N or more. You may try it on a fresh part of
} bone perhaps it works.
} Dietmar Keyser
} PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN TELEFON AND FAX
} Dr.Dietmar Keyser
} Zoologisches Institut und Museum
} Martin-Luther-King Platz 3
} D-20146 Hamburg
} Germany
} Tel. +49 40/428 38 4232
} Fax: +49 40/428 38 3937
} E-mail: Keyser-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de








From: Gerald Harrison :      jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 16:26:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Choosing a confocal

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Dear fellow microscopists,

We are in the final phases of deciding which confocal microscope to
purchase. We are down to the following two which are comparably equipped
and priced. We are having difficulty resolving this decision and would like
some input from those who may have some experience with these instruments,
the software and support service.

Here are our two choices:
*******
Nikon PCM - 2000 MultiLine 3 Confocal w/Compix Software

8 bit capture
2 monitors
3 PMT's
Fiber Optic Image capture
*******
Olympus Flouview
12 bit capture
1 monitor
2 PMT's
Direct optical light
*******

We are experienced with standard light microscopes, SEM and TEM but
are novices with the subtleties of making a good choice in the purchase of a
confocal microscope. Please ask me about any additional information I
haven't listed that is pertinent to a clear comparison.

Any suggestions about these instruments and the issues we need to
consider would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your help, Gerald Harrison
Biochemistry/Dental
Univ. of Penn.






From: Phoebe J Doss :      pjdoss-at-okstate.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 15:33:17 -0600
Subject: Macrophages/Neutrophils

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I am forwarding this message for a Ph. D student in our department.

"Does anyone have references for or a working procedure for differentiating
between macrophages and neutrophils in tissue sections processed for TEM.
I am
currently trying to determine the lineage of inflammatory cells present in dog
muscle. These cells harbor a parasite, H. americanum. Preliminary TEM data
suggests that these cells are modified macrophages but I need to positively
confirm the lineage. I would be grateful for any information or ideas as
to how
to positively determine that these cells are really macrophages or of a
monocyte
lineage".

Thanks.

Phoebe J. Doss
Manager, Electron Microscope Lab
Oklahoma State University







From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 15:44:12 -0600
Subject: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

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I need vendors that can sell me the set-up for getting digital images from
our Phillips 515 SEM. Any suggestions?

Robin Griffin
rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu





From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 15:32:12 -0600
Subject: New Negative scanner question

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I've read with interest the comments regarding negative scanners for TEM
because I'm currently starting to look for scanners for X-ray film.
Questions:

1) The resolution info. I've gotten for x-ray film scanners is that they
can scan to 50 micron resolution. How do I convert between the dpi
resolution quoted on the microscopy listserver to this type of number? My
back of the envelope calculations seems wacky when I convert.

2) The x-ray film is much thicker and darker than TEM film. Do the TEM
scanner folk talk about what the scanners are capable of blasting through?







From: ricardo :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:22:26 +1100
Subject: Removing gold from Insects

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I am wonder if Dietmar method could be used for beetles...

Regards

Ricardo
www.coleoptera.org

-----P=F9vodn=ED zpr=E1va-----
Od: KEYSER.DIETMAR {FB4A001-at-nw01.rrz.uni-hamburg.de}
Komu: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Datum: Wednesday, March 17, 1999 7:42 AM
P=F8edm=ECt: Removing gold


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From: Melvyn Dickson :      M.Dickson-at-unsw.edu.au
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:57:14 +1100
Subject: Re: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

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At 15:44 16/03/99 -0600, you wrote:
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U.S.A.
Contact Jim Hilton
Advanced Database Systems
7931 S. Broadway #322
Littleton CO 80122
U.S.A.
Tel: + 1 303 761-5635
Fax: + 1 303 761-592


}
*****************************************************
Mel Dickson,
Director.
Electron Microscope Unit,
University of New South Wales.
Sydney NSW 2052 Australia

Phone (+612) 9385-6383
Fax (+612) 9385-6400
Website {http://srv.emunit.unsw.edu.au}
*****************************************************





From: Soumitra Ghoshroy :      ghoshroy-at-nmsu.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 15:36:03 -0700
Subject: EM user fees

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Dear all EM users,

We are thinking about revising the user fees (including tech support) for
our TEM, SEM and all related equipments. However, before doing so, we would
very much appreciate some feedback about user fee structures in place and
current rates. This is a centralized, university EM facility serving both
biological and material people.

Secondly, the university acquired a new confocal microscope and it is going
to be a part of the EM facility. I would also like to get some user fee
structures for this instrument.

Thanks in advance,

Soumitra
Soumitra Ghoshroy Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Lab
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001
Tel: 505-646-1531/3600
Fax: 505-646-5665
e-mail: ghoshroy-at-nmsu.edu





From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 18:12:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM of Lymphocytes

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On Mon, 15 Mar 1999, Frank herbert wrote:

} Date: Mon, 15 Mar 1999 15:01:29 -0600
} From: Frank herbert {fherbert-at-bcm.tmc.edu}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM of Lymphocytes
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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}
}
} Howdy all,
} There is a graduate student here who is trying to look at a possible stem
} cell line under TEM. The problem is that they are quite small, don't seem
} to pellet very well, and he has only been able to get me a few thousand
} cells at a time.
} We have tried to embed the cells in 2% Agar after fixation but this hasn't
} worked.
} Is it possible to filter the media and cells, and then process the filter
} with the cells stuck onto it? Maybe use a cytospin to spin the cells into a
} filter?
} Is there anyone with experience with this? Any suggestions or ideas would
} be greatly appreciated.
}
}
} Thanks in advance
} Frank Herbert
} Technician
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Department of Cell Biology
} Baylor College of Medicine
}
I presume, from your description, the cells are non-adherent?

Pellet the cells. Remove media with pipet. Add small amount of 2-4%
glut (depends on size of tube--?maybe 1/2 ml). Resuspend cells, place
into very tiny tube with pointed end, and IMMEDIATELY pellet. Let sit in
fix. Do not resuspend pellet. After an hour or so, remove most of the
fix, and cut off the tip of the tube just below cells, then slice the
tube above the pellet.
You end up with cells in the center of a log of plastic. Gently dislodge
cells with paper clip. Drain with wedge of filter paper, but don't allow
to dry out--should be the consistency of thick oat meal. Cut into 1 mm
cubed pieces if necessary. Coat each pile of cells with 1% molten, cooled
agar (Do not fix the agar in glut). Wash in buffer. Fix in Os. Proceed as
with tissue. This method was printed in Microscopy Today sometime back.
Also try:

Miller SE. 1983. Electron microscopy of tissue culture. In
Jones BR, Hayes RL (eds.) Techniques in Electron Microscopy: A
Laboratory Workbook. Burgess Publishing Co., Minneapolis, MN. pp. 478-512.

OR reprinted as

Miller SE. 1985. Electron microscopy of tissue culture. In
Jones BR (ed.) Electron Microscopy: 41 Exercises by 17 Scientists.
Library Research Associates, Monroe, NY. pp. 293-315.

Good luck,
Sm

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tuesday, March 16, 1999 4:32PM
Subject: New Negative scanner question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Robin,

I got 12.7 um for 2000 dpi (1/2000 in x 25400 um/in) and half that if it is
4000 dpi. You should know that the Fuji plate system was originally
developed for X-ray plates and was at 50 um. They had to get that down to
at least 25 um for TEM usage. They key to blasting is optical density of
the scanner (assuming that you have enough light and exposure control). It
should be at least 3.4 or higher but costs as this goes up. See the book,
Real World Photoshop (3,4,or 5). It has a very good section on scanners and
buying considerations. You should also get something that outputs with a
depth of 12 bits per channel or higher. It really helps in getting contrast
and brightness correct in the final TEM image. I would avoid scanner
software that automatically converts it to 8 bits -you can do better. You
do need a software platform (NIH Image, Photoshop, Digital Micrograph, etc.)
that will handle 16 bit images so that you can convert them to 8 bits.

-Scott
----------
} From: "rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


I've read with interest the comments regarding negative scanners for TEM
because I'm currently starting to look for scanners for X-ray film.
Questions:

1) The resolution info. I've gotten for x-ray film scanners is that they
can scan to 50 micron resolution. How do I convert between the dpi
resolution quoted on the microscopy listserver to this type of number? My
back of the envelope calculations seems wacky when I convert.

2) The x-ray film is much thicker and darker than TEM film. Do the TEM
scanner folk talk about what the scanners are capable of blasting through?







From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 18:38:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: antibodies bind to formvar

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On Tue, 16 Mar 1999, Birgit Neubohn wrote:

} Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 08:04:52 +0100
} From: Birgit Neubohn {neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM: antibodies bind to formvar
} =20
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} =20
} =20
} Hello,
} =20
} in our group we are using formvar-coated grids to stabilize ultrathin
} sections for immunogold-labelling.
} Sometimes the formvar is *heavily* labelled by gold particles. This is no=
t
} due to binding of the gold grains, but depends only on the primary antibo=
dy
} that had been used. It can happen both with Protein A-gold or goat anti
} rabbit-gold, but using other primary antibodies the formvar is clean.
} What is the reason for this binding of antibodies to formvar?
} Is there any blocking reagent that would provide this?
} Thanks in advance
} =20
} Birgit
} =20
} =20
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----
} Dr. Birgit Neubohn
} Institut fuer Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung (IPK)
} (Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research)
} Corrensstr. 3
} D-06466 Gatersleben, Germany
} =20
} Phone.: (+49) 039482 5447
} Fax: (+49) 039482 5139
} e-mail: neubohn-at-ipk-gatersleben.de
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----=9D
} =20
We use Formvar routinely for ultrathin cryosections. There should be no=20
gold on the plastic. You should block your sections with a protein=20
before the primary, and use protein in the antibody solutions as well. =20
Bovine serum albumen (BSA) and fetal calf serum (FCA) are commonly used. =
=20
We wash grids in 5% FCS in PBS 10 min, PBS with 100 mM ammonium=20
chloride--quenches aldehydes in cryo sections (you don't say what kind=20
of sections), PBS, then primary, then 6 washes in FCS/PBS, then=20
secondary in PBS with FCS, 6 more washes; wash off protein with water=20
before proceeding. Next step will depend on what kind of sections you=20
have. Results: no background.

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710=20
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735






From: David Vowles :      vowles-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:03:01 +1100
Subject: PCVisionplus Framegrabber Information

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for configuration details for a PCVisionplus framegrabber - =
specifically, the board jumper settings. These are all listed in the =
hardware manual (which we have mislaid). If anyone has this info, could =
you please email or fax me, as below.
The PCVisionplus card was very popular a few years ago, as one of the =
preferred framegrabbers for a variety of image analysis packages (JAVA, =
Optimas, etc).

Cheers,


David Vowles
Senior Technical Officer
Electron Microscopy Unit
Australian National University
PO Box 475
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia
Tel: +61 2 6249 3543
Fax: +61 2 6279 8525
Email: vowles-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au






From: rarewolf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 1999 22:38:58 -0800
Subject: Re: New Negative scanner question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


rgriffen asks ...
}
} ...
}
} 1) The resolution info. I've gotten for x-ray film scanners is that
they
} can scan to 50 micron resolution. How do I convert between the dpi
} resolution quoted on the microscopy listserver to this type of number?
My
} back of the envelope calculations seems wacky when I convert.

My calculations at this late hour would imply 50 microns converts to
500 "per inch", but since "resolution" is the distance between two
resolvable points (with something between), a 50u resolution scanner
would need scan "optically" at 1000 pixels/inch (the distance between
the centers of 2 black pixels with a white pixel between).

}
} 2) The x-ray film is much thicker and darker than TEM film. Do the
TEM
} scanner folk talk about what the scanners are capable of blasting
through?


This is a good question ... most transparency and film scanners
don't do very well for dense areas. Presumably if the manufacturer
advertises a relatively high "dynamic range" it will do better ... but
do evaluate for detail and noise in those areas.

cheerios, shAf







From: Gerhard Frank :      frank-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:07:34 +0100
Subject: Re:Removing gold from Insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ricorado asked:

} I am wonder if Dietmar method could be used for beetles...
}
} Regards
}
} Ricardo
} www.coleoptera.org

Hello Ricardo!
Especially for insects have a look at:

C. Arno': Removal of gold coatings from biological SEM specimens,
European Microscopy and Analysis, July 1998, p.13

In this suggestion bromine vapors are used. If you have problems to get
this article, let me know your fax number. I then will send a fax copy
--
Gerhard Frank
UNIVERSITAET ERLANGEN-NUERNBERG Phone: +49 9131 85 28606
Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaften VII Fax: +49 9131 85 28602
Cauerstr. 6, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany frank-at-ww.uni.erlangen.de





From: Jan Leunissen :      leunissen-at-aurion.nl
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:40:46 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM: antibodies bind to formvar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Dr. Neubohn,
In our experience there is a huge variety in stickiness of primary rabbit
antibodies. We have the impression that this originates from different
degrees of hydrophobicity, the more hydrophobic the protein, the easier it
sticks to a hydrophobic surface (formvar, resins and so on). If this
problem shows itself it is almost always with rabbit species.
Possible solutions are:
1. make the primary less hydrophobic.
Some have done this by pre-incubating the primary antibody with free
protein A, but this would make a detection with protein A/gold complexes
impossible. If you need a reference I can look it up.
An alternative is sometimes, but not always, to use Fab or Fab2 fragments
of the primary, but then you would have to use a (goat)-anti-rabbit
conjugate.
2. make the substratum less hydrophobic.
In general parlodion films seem to be less sticky, but with formvar films
possibilities are to use glow discharged films, and a carbon coating. An
appropriate blocking step will deal efficiently with hydrophobic binding
sites on the substratum. Albumin is suited and a relatively long blocking
time helps, as more albumin molecules tend to share larger surface areas
with the substratum, resulting in a more efficient blocking with time.
If you work with resin sections, you might consider to use Tween-20 (0.1%,
not less!) in PBS for an incubation buffer. At concentrations above the
critical micel concentration the detergent will prevent hydrophobic
interactions like the one you describe. This approach may not be suited for
cryo sections, since they are much easier affected by detergents.
Good luck,
Jan
===========================
Jan Leunissen
AURION http://www.aurion.nl
Costerweg 5
The Netherlands
phone: 31-317-497676
fax: 31-317-415955
You will find more technical info on our web site





From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-gecm.com
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:09:50 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: New Negative scanner question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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rgriffin,
I've recently had a few attempts at using my Linotype-Hell Saphir Ultra scanner to digitise X-ray radiographs and topographs. I usually use the scanner for TEM negs, and it does a fair job for those as long as they're not too full of contrast (haven't gone in the darkroom since I bought it).
I have found it woefully inadequate for X-ray images recorded on nuclear emulsion (grain size 5 or 10 um). The 'real' (supposedly non-interpolated) resolution of the scanner is 1200 dpi, even though it will interpolate up to 5000 dpi. (2.54 cm/1200 = 21 um pixel size). Nearly all of the image detail is lost in a scanned image, even at the maximum resolution setting. And yes, you have to have a fairly weak-looking negative to cope with the contrast produced by a gold wire in a radiograph.
My current way of dealing with these images is to use a digital camera on a microscope, which is fine for detail of wire bonds, etc. However, I know I'll have to go into the darkroom today since I have some topographs which are several inches square. I'll scan the prints. In a couple of weeks I'll have a macro lens for the camera and may be able to take pictures from a light box.
Unless scanners have improved massively since last year, I wouldn't recommend using one as your only way of getting an image. (I believe 2000 dpi is standard now, and maybe 15% better range in optical density.)

As usual, try before you buy.


Richard Beanland
Marconi Materials Technology Ltd.,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ

e-mail richard.beanland-at-gecm.com

Tel. +44 1327 356363
Fax. +44 1327 356389
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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} ---------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I've read with interest the comments regarding negative scanners for TEM
} because I'm currently starting to look for scanners for X-ray film.
} Questions:
}
} 1) The resolution info. I've gotten for x-ray film scanners is that they
} can scan to 50 micron resolution. How do I convert between the dpi
} resolution quoted on the microscopy ListServer to this type of number? My
} back of the envelope calculations seems wacky when I convert.
}
} 2) The x-ray film is much thicker and darker than TEM film. Do the TEM
} scanner folk talk about what the scanners are capable of blasting through?
}
}







From: Louie Kerr :      lkerr-at-mbl.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 08:59:35 -0500
Subject: Re: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Robin,

I have been using a system by Orion with my JEOL 840 SEM. I have been
using the DOS version and am in the process of upgrading to the Windows NT
version. You can visit their web site at: http://www.OrionMicroscopy.com/

Louie Kerr

At 3:44 PM -0600 3/16/99, "rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)
508-292-0289 (Cell phone)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu







From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 10:09:36 -0400
Subject: Re: fish-CPD and SEM

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Hi Linda,
Although I haven't tried this with
oily fish scales, I've managed to defat raw food
samples (at different stages of refining
and production). In preparation for CPD,
samples can be dehydrated through a gradient
series of ethanol or acetone. If the sample still
contains oil, you might try hexane followed by
acetone before going to CPD.
A common alternative to CPD is to use
hexamethyldisilizane (HMDS) x3 following the final
100% ethanol wash. Your samples can then be air dried.
Do some trial runs on samples on test samples. The
HMDS is available from EMS or other EM supply companies.
Let me know how this project works out.
Rosemary








From: Donald P. Lesher :      dlesher-at-cisnet.com
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:05:58 -0500
Subject: Wanted - Microspec WDX-2A Spectrometer

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Hello Microprobers and Microscopists

I am interested in acquiring a used Microspec WDX-2A spectrometer.
Anyone having one that they would like to part with should contact:

Don Lesher
Advanced MicroBeam, Inc.
4217C King Graves Rd
PO Box 610
Vienna OH 44473-0610
Phone: 330-394-1255
Fax: 330-394-1834
Email: donlesher-at-advancedmicrobeam.com
Web: www.advancedmicrobeam.com
==================================







From: Louie Kerr :      lkerr-at-mbl.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:07:30 -0500
Subject: Re: fish-CPD and SEM

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Linda,

We have prepared fish parts including scales for SEM and TEM without
problems. The standard preparation protocols of fixation, washes,
dehydration and CPD should result in clean dry samples. One problem with
scales is that they sometimes tend to curl up as they dry. Usually we just
work around that problem but you can try to process them more slowly or try
to hold them flat through the processing.

Louie

At 7:44 AM -0600 3/16/99, Linda Fox wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Louie Kerr
Research and Education Support Coordinator
Marine Biological Laboratory
7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543
508-289-7273
508-540-6902 (FAX)
508-292-0289 (Cell phone)

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.mbl.edu







From: Mike Wombwell :      mwombwell-at-vgscientific.com
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 14:11:44 +0000
Subject: Removing gold from Insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On the general subject of removing sputtered of evaporated metal from
SEM samples. I am told that removing silver can be a relatively
simple.
The following paper describes a method using "Farmer's"
reducer, a dilute aqueous solution of potassium ferricyanide and
sodium thiosulphate.

"Silver as a removable conductive coating for scanning electron
microscopy" by A.A. Mills Dept. Geology, University of Leicester. UK

Scanning Microscopy, Vol. 2, No. 3 1998 (pages 1265 - 1271)




Best regards
Mike Wombwell
Polaron range Business Manager
V G Microtech
The Birches Industrial Estate
Imberhorne Lane
East Grinstead
West Sussex
RH19 1UB
UK
Direct line: +44 (0)1342 310296
Switchboard: +44 (0)1342 327211
Fax: +44 (0)1342 315074
http://www.vgmicrotech.com/polaron-range
E&OE





From: Paul VANDERLINDEN :      orion-at-euronet.be
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:35:07 +0100
Subject: Re: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 03:44 PM 3/16/99 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

Our company, E.L.I. Belgium has designed a very powerful image grabbing s=
ystem
for SEMs: Orion 5 for Windows.

This system connects to ANY SEM.
Its resolution goes up to 8k x 8k (only depending on the SEM resolution).
A lot of useful functions are easily available: zoom, distance measuremen=
ts,
image extraction, text inclusions,...=20
Orion is the only frame grabber with FULL electrical isolation between th=
e SEM
and the PC.
Orion is fully programmable with macro commands.
The Orion system is fully configurable: up to 64 image sizes stored in a
driver
file.
Orion runs under Windows 3.1x, Windows 95 and Windows NT.
Continuous software updates guarantee the evolution of the Orion system.=20
It is a fully passive device that tracks the SEM scanning signals - easy
connection
Orion is open to the outside world: all =93 popular =94 image file format=
s (TIFF,
BMP, TGA, JPG...) can be used.

Please visit our web site (orionmicroscopy.com) to get more info and also=
to
download a demo program to evaluate the different functions without any
cnnection to an SEM or contact us directly to know our nearest dealer.






Best regards,

Paul Vanderlinden.
Sales Manager.

*********************************************************************
See our web site: http://www.orionmicroscopy.com

To contact us:

E.L.I. sprl (Belgium)
Technical support:
Jean-Louis LECLEF: Phone: +32 67 84 =
26 97
Fax: +32 67
84 26
98
Email: =20
oriontech-at-euronet.be

Sales support:
Paul VANDERLINDEN: Phone: +32 2 726 31 02
Fax: +32 =
2 726
08 65
Email: =20
orion-at-euronet.be
**********************************************************************=20

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{div} >----------------------------------------------------------------=
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America {/div}

Best regards, {br}
{br}
Paul Vanderlinden. {br}
Sales Manager. {br}
{br}
********************************************************************* {br}
See our web site:
{a href=3D"http://www.orionmicroscopy.com/" eudora=3D"autourl"} {b} http://=
www.orionmicroscopy.com {br}
{br}
{/a} {/b} To contact us: {br}
{br}
E.L.I. sprl (Belgium) {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
sp;        {/x-tab} Technical
support: {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
sp;        {/x-tab} {x-tab}   &=
nbsp;      {/x-tab} Jean-Louis
LECLEF: {x-tab}        {/x-tab} {x-tab}  &n=
bsp;       {/x-tab} Phone:
+32 67 84 26 97 {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
sp;        {/x-tab} {x-tab}   &=
nbsp;      {/x-tab} {x-tab}     =
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ab} Fax:      
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support: {br}
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VANDERLINDEN: {x-tab}        {/x-tab} Phone:&nb=
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From: Paul VANDERLINDEN :      orion-at-euronet.be
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:55:08 +0100
Subject: Re: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

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At 03:44 PM 3/16/99 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America=20

Our company, E.L.I. Belgium has designed a very powerful image grabbing s=
ystem
for SEMs: Orion 5 for Windows.

This system connects to ANY SEM.
Its resolution goes up to 8k x 8k (only depending on the SEM resolution).
A lot of useful functions are easily available: zoom, distance measuremen=
ts,
image extraction, text inclusions,...=20
Orion is the only frame grabber with FULL electrical isolation between th=
e SEM
and the PC.
Orion is fully programmable with macro commands.
The Orion system is fully configurable: up to 64 image sizes stored in a
driver
file.
Orion runs under Windows 3.1x, Windows 95 and Windows NT.
Continuous software updates guarantee the evolution of the Orion system.=20
It is a fully passive device that tracks the SEM scanning signals - easy
connection
Orion is open to the outside world: all =93 popular =94 image file format=
s (TIFF,
BMP, TGA, JPG...) can be used.

Please visit our web site (orionmicroscopy.com) to get more info and also=
to
download a demo program to evaluate the different functions without any
cnnection to an SEM or contact us directly to know our nearest dealer.






Best regards,

Paul Vanderlinden.
Sales Manager.

*********************************************************************
See our web site: http://www.orionmicroscopy.com

To contact us:

E.L.I. sprl (Belgium)
Technical support:
Jean-Louis LECLEF: Phone: +32 67 84 =
26 97
Fax: +32 67
84 26
98
Email: =20
oriontech-at-euronet.be

Sales support:
Paul VANDERLINDEN: Phone: +32 2 726 31 02
Fax: +32 =
2 726
08 65
Email: =20
orion-at-euronet.be
**********************************************************************=20

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Best regards, {br}
{br}
Paul Vanderlinden. {br}
Sales Manager. {br}
{br}
********************************************************************* {br}
See our web site:
{a href=3D"http://www.orionmicroscopy.com/" eudora=3D"autourl"} {b} http://=
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{br}
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bsp;       {/x-tab} Phone:
+32 67 84 26 97 {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
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VANDERLINDEN: {x-tab}        {/x-tab} Phone:&nb=
sp; 
+32 2 726 31 02 {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
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ab} Fax:        
+32 2 726 08 65 {br}
{x-tab}          {/x-tab} {x-tab} &nb=
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From: Russell E. Cook :      cook-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 09:28:08 -0600
Subject: Leafscan 45 now Bremson 45HS

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Several people in the recent past have asked about the discontinued
Leafscan 45 film scanner. Leaf transferred the technology to Bremson, Inc.
of Kansas. Their web page can be found at www.bremson.com . The page
detailing the specs for the scanner can be found at
www.bremson.com/products/45hsprod.htm .

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Russell E. Cook, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory
Building 212
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439
(630)252-7194
FAX: (630)252-4798
cook-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov







From: Fagerland,Jane :      jane.a.fagerland-at-abbott.com
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 10:05:34 -0600
Subject: Re: Macrophages/Neutrophils

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The biggest difference between these cell types is in the nucleus.
Neutrophils have a multilobed nucleus, and in thin sections this will a=
ppear
as multiple small, unconnected profiles. The nucleus of macrophages ma=
y be
deeply indented, but it will usually not be seen as multiple, unconnect=
ed
profiles. The cytoplasm of neutrophils is generally more electron dens=
e than
macrophages, and there will be more granules in the neutrophil cytoplas=
m.
Macrophages will have a distinct Golgi region with lots of vesicles and=

secretory granules of many sizes.

The best way to learn to differentiate the cell types is to get a buffy=
coat
sample and fix it without disturbing the cell layers. Neutrophils and
eosinophils will layer nearest to the erythrocyte layer, lymphocytes an=
d
macrophages will be next, and platelets will be at the top. I've got a=
n easy
procedure for processing buffy coats for TEM, if you'd like to have it.=


Jane A. Fagerland, Ph.D.
Abbott Laboratories
Abbott Park IL 60064-6202
=





From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 10:28:57 -0600
Subject: image analysis density measurements

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We're new to making density measurements on digital images. I'm looking for
basic papers/books on the topic. I already have John Russ's "The Image
Processing Handbook" and "Computer Assisted Microscopy". Is there any other
good stuff out there?

Thanks,

Robin Griffin





From: Anita Garg :      Anita.Garg-at-lerc.nasa.gov
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 11:31:24 -0500
Subject: C in solution?

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,
What is the best way of determining Carbon in solution in Ni-base superalloys?
Chemical analysis strikes to me as one of the best ways, but I don't have
enough material.
Thanks.
Anita







From: Margaret Springett :      hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 10:31:00 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

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Margaret Springett
e-mail hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu
IEM Specialist at Mayo Foundation
1426 Guggenheim
Rochester, Mn. 55905







From: Sue Danielson :      sdaniels-at-post.its.mcw.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:02:42 -0600
Subject: Laboratory Technologist position

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} Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:01:15 -0600
} To: Histonet-at-Pathology.swmed.edu
} From: Sue Danielson {sdaniels-at-post.its.mcw.edu}
} Subject: Laboratory Technologist position
}
} The Department of Neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin has an
immediate opening in their Neuromuscular Diagnostics Laboratory for a
Clinical Laboratory Technologist. Our fast-paced, growing laboratory
receives muscle & nerve biopsies from hospitals & clinics throughout
Wisconsin and Northern Illinois.
}
} Applicants should possess a Bachelors' degree in the Biological or related
Sciences or an MT/HT certification. Laboratory experience in histology
(cryosectioning and muscle enzyme histochemistry) and transmission electron
microscopy techniques a plus. Excellent organizational skills and ability
to work independently as well as with physicians and medical students is
essential.
}
} Excellent salary and benefits package offered including health and dental
insurance, 403B retirement plan and tuition reimbursement. This is a
full-time, 40hr/wk salaried position (no weekend or evening hrs required)
available immediately.
}
} Applicants may contact/submit resume to:
}
} Susan K. Danielson, MS
} Neuromuscular Laboratory Coordinator
} Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital - West
} Muscle/Nerve Lab, Rm 1132
} 9200 W. Wisconsin Ave.
} Milwaukee, WI 53226
}
} Ph: (414) 259-3836
} Fax: (414) 454-7905
} email: sdaniels-at-mcw.edu
}






From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 14:33:55 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Choosing a confocal

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Gerald-
I have worked with the Fluoview system from Olympus, and the BioRad
MRC600, but not the Nikon system. I prefer the BioRad over Olympus.
My advice is to sit down and work with the software, with each of the
systems you are considering. Time at the scope is the only way to
understand the quirks of each. If you don't have the time, assign
someone you trust to do the comparison. Get both scopes set up as DEMOS
for at least 2-4 weeks. Run them trough their functions, collect images,
edit images, transport to various other SW programs, print to various
printers, etc.
All systems have bugs, most are in the software, file formats, the ability
to transfer images from one platform to another is essential... find the
bugs, decide if you can live with them.

Good luck
-Mike

disclaimer- I have no financial interest in any of the above mentioned
companies.


On Tue, 16 Mar 1999, Gerald Harrison
wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear fellow microscopists,
}
} We are in the final phases of deciding which confocal microscope to
} purchase. We are down to the following two which are comparably equipped
} and priced. We are having difficulty resolving this decision and would like
} some input from those who may have some experience with these instruments,
} the software and support service.
}
} Here are our two choices:
} *******
} Nikon PCM - 2000 MultiLine 3 Confocal w/Compix Software
}
} 8 bit capture
} 2 monitors
} 3 PMT's
} Fiber Optic Image capture
} *******
} Olympus Flouview
} 12 bit capture
} 1 monitor
} 2 PMT's
} Direct optical light
} *******
}
} We are experienced with standard light microscopes, SEM and TEM but
} are novices with the subtleties of making a good choice in the purchase of a
} confocal microscope. Please ask me about any additional information I
} haven't listed that is pertinent to a clear comparison.
}
} Any suggestions about these instruments and the issues we need to
} consider would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Thanks in advance for your help, Gerald Harrison
} Biochemistry/Dental
} Univ. of Penn.
}
}
}






From: Gerald Harrison :      jerry-at-biochem.dental.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 1999 17:02:47 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Choosing a confocal

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Dear fellow microscopists,

Thanks to the several contributors who posted very helpful
information to me regarding our choice between a Nikon and Olympus confocal.
We were restricted to these two choices by budgetary constraints.

I have just emerged from what is the last meeting for making this
decision and we went over the many good questions and comments I've
received. They were a significant aid in our being able to focus on the
kind of unique considerations facing us.

We believed, from on-site demonstrations of both instruments and
comments I received from the List, that image quality could be considered
equivalent. Olympus was also including an additional remote workstation to
compensate for the advantage of the Nikon's Compix compatibility with
Windows NT.
We were swayed by the apparently more powerful software for the
Nikon, but because we will be a multi-user facility primarily doing routine
visible fluorescence imaging, and the person who will work with users is
already familiar with the Olympus package and believes it is easier for a
novice to learn basic image acquirement, we will go with the Olympus.

Again, the department personnel involved in making this choice are
very grateful for all the helpful input.

Gerald Harrison
Biochemistry/Dental
Univ. of Penn.






From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Varga_L=E1szl=F3?= :      varguc-at-freemail.c3.hu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 00:09:36 -0000
Subject: TO: AN 10000 files

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-----Eredeti =FCzenet-----
Felad=F3: Varga L=E1szl=F3 [SMTP:varguc-at-freemail.c3.hu]
K=FCldve: 1999. m=E1rcius 15. 4:51
C=EDmzett: 'Robert McDonald'; microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
T=E1rgy: Re: AN 10000 files

Dear Robert,

When I posted this letter for the first time, something went wrong, and =
the last
10 percent were lost.

As Valdemar Furdanowicz wrote you, you can transfer LINK files to the PC =
with
their MSDOSCV program. However, you can also use the serial port of the =
LINK=20
computer and it can be a little bit faster. What I don't know, however, =
is whether you
can connect the the two machines directly. When I worked in the electron =
beam lab of
Hungalu Engineering, we had a little box between the serial ports=20
of the machines, made by Oxford.
You can try any terminal program on the PC if it has an option for the =
well-known XMODEM protocol.
Once transferred, the files have to be converted from one format to =
another , because
the numbers are formatted differently on the LINK and the PC.
With fixed point numbers the only difference is the order of the bytes, =
but
with floating point numbers the problem is more serious.=20
Your opportunities for file conversion are very limited with the MSDOSCV =
program.=20
Of course you have to know the structure of the files, if you want to =
convert them.=20
You can find this information in the Oxford manuals.

I wrote some programs to solve the above mentioned problems:
1. File transfer: with our XMODEM program we can transfer multiple files =
using wildcards in=20
the file specifications. For this purpose the PC program prepares the =
necessary LINK macros,
which are sent as a first step.
2. File inspection: with a little utility program one can look at the =
files obtained from the LINK
computer and compare their content with the documentation.=20
3. File conversion: I have worked out simple conversion programs for =
image files,
DIGISCAN image anal. result files and X-ray spectra.

With a private letter I can send you anything from these programs, but =
there are still some minor=20
problems with that. When I worked for Hungalu, I was the only user of my =
programs, and
I didn't have enough time for a better user interface. They are written =
for the DOS platform, and
they send Hungarian messages to the screen.
Now I work as a computer programmer in a very different field, and =
microscopy remained
only a hobby for me. Well, I would like to port my programs to Windows =
for my previous colleagues,=20
but I can work on them only in my spare time. =20
(And maybe, I would like to earn a little money if they can afford to =
pay.)
Anyhow, you can try to convert the image files with Photoshop. They can =
be read by Photoshop
as raw bitmaps. Here you don't have byte order problems, because the =
LINK machine usually stores=20
every pixel on one byte. Even black and white pictures use eight bits =
for every single pixel.=20
(Such files can be packed with PKZIP on the PC with 50 to 100:1 ratios.)
There is only one thing you have to do: remove the header from the
beginning of the file. As far as I can remember, it is 256 bytes long.

Good luck!

*******************************************
Mr. L=E1szl=F3 Varga
M=C1V Informatika Ltd.
H-1012 Budapest,
Krisztina Krt. 37/a
Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 457-9387
email: varguc-at-freemail.c3.hu
********************************************=09
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
-----------
Robert McDonald wrote:
Hi All:

I have recently taken over an SEM with an AN 10000 analyser and I was
wondering if anyone out there kows if it is possible to get the results
files out to a PC ?=20







From: George Theodossiou :      george.theodossiou-at-rmit.edu.au
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 14:59:49 +1100
Subject: Photographic Enlargers

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G'Day all

I'm looking for spares for a Durst M800 Enlarger and a Fujimoto G70 Dichro =
Enlarger. Some bright spark has dropped the negative carrier in both =
cases and broken the glass plates. If I can get a replacement negative =
carrier or just replacement glass plates that would be great. I'd also =
like to get some specs on the plates, so if need be I can get replacement =
plates made up. =20
If anyone has a complete unit that they want to get rid of rather then the =
parts, let me know, we might be in a position to buy for a reasonable =
price. =20

Thanks=20

George

If at first you do succeed, try not to look surprised!

George Theodossiou
Dept Applied Physics
RMIT
GPO Box 2476V
Melbourne 3001
Victoria Australia
Ph: +61 3 9925 3394
Fax: +61 3 9925 5290
Email: george.theodossiou-at-rmit.edu.au

Home Ph: +61 3 9808 9085






From: Malcolm Roberts :      malc-at-rock.ru.ac.za
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 16:37:56 +0200
Subject: Theprice we pay

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Dear All,
We are in the process of mulling over the question of how much we
should charge for various services on offer within the department to
in-house users, external users and industry. The aim is to revise the
charges at some practical level, neither frighteningly expensive nor
laughably cheap. However, in order to come up with realistic values, I
thought that some input on what the wider world charges would be of use. Of
course, I could just sit down and calculate a figure for each of the things
that we can do, but this is complicated as some of the variables are unknown
- we don't get an electricity or water bill!! Also, there will be some
discrepancies between different countries due to currency and the cost of
living, but nevertheless, to know would be of undoubted help.
So, please let me know how you price microprobe usage, XRF usage and
sample preparation, and thin-section preparation.
Yours gratefully,
Malc.
Dr MP Roberts
Department of Geology
Rhodes University
Grahamstown 6140
South Africa
Tel: +27 46 6038316
Fax: +27 46 6229715
*******************************
"A sleep is as good as a walk to a legless insomniac" Anon.






From: Best, Christine (BEST) :      best-at-juniata.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 09:48:46 -0500
Subject: FW: Digitizing Philips 515

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} ----------
} From: John Best[SMTP:jbest-at-elmdas.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, March 17, 1999 1:53 PM
} To: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
} Cc: Best, Christine (BEST); jbest-at-elmdas.com
} Subject: Digitizing Philips 515
}
} Dear Dr. Griffin,
}
} Your request for information regarding updating a Philips 515 with
} digital imaging was recently forwarded to me.
}
} We manufacture just such a system, and have installed it on Philips 500
} series SEM's owned and operated at several Philips manufacturing or
} research facilities.
}
} It has active control of the SEM probe, and will therfore add features
} like frame averaging to your SEM. Perhaps the best approach is to check
} out our website at http:\\www.elmdas.com.
}
} I look forward to hearing from you.
}
} Regards,
} John Best
}
}
} ELMDAS Co. ELectron
} Microscopy
} Data
} Acquisition
} Systems
}
} Mailing & Shipping: RD1 Box 62A,
} Alexandria, PA 16611
} Phone: 814-669-4474
} Email: jbest-at-elmdas.com
} Our Website: http://www.elmdas.com
}





From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 10:04:22 -0600
Subject: Maintenance contracts

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Hi,

I'm looking for feedback from labs having experience with insurance
companies that provide programs replacing traditional manufacturer's service
contracts on scopes and other lab equipment. According to the companies'
claims these programs provide substantial savings over regular contracts,
with service continuing to be from the provider of choice. In other words,
they seem to be saying that we can save huge amounts of money with no
decline in service. This is a very attractive proposition for the
cost-cutters, but can it be real?

Feel free to reply directly to me, if you like. (And thanks to those of you
who have already spoken with me by phone!)

Thanks.
Randy


Randy Tindall
Electron Microscope Core
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri - Columbia
Phone: 573-882-8304






From: Fagerland,Jane :      jane.a.fagerland-at-abbott.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 10:34:14 -0600
Subject: TEM of blood cells

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I've received several requests for this protocol. Phil Oshel asked tha=
t I
write it up for Microscopy Today, so it will be available to subscriber=
s
there, as well.

PREPARATION OF BLOOD SAMPLES FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

1. Collect blood in standard EDTA tube.

2. Spin blood sample in clinical centrifuge to obtain visible buffy co=
at
(about 3500 rpm for 20 minutes).

3. Carefully remove straw-colored plasma layer with pipette, without
disturbing the buffy coat layer. It won't hurt to leave some plasma ab=
ove
the buffy coat.

4. Gently add buffered glutaraldehyde by running it dropwise down the =
sides
of the tube, again without disturbing the buffy coat layer. 3% glut in=
0.1M
cacodylate or Sorensen's phosphate buffer, pH 7.2- 7.4 works fine.

5. After about 30 minutes, test the plug to see if it's fixed - it sho=
uld
feel rubbery with gentle prodding. If it is not firm, replace the fixa=
tive
with fresh and allow it to fix for another 15 - 30 minutes.

6. Remove the fixed buffy coat plug from the tube. A small spatula or=

sharpened wooden stick works well. This step can get a little messy, b=
ut the
idea is to get the plug out as a coin-shaped disk with only a small amo=
unt of
adherent erythrocytes on the underside. Erythrocytes can be washed off=
with
buffer, if needed.

7. Place the plug with the erythrocyte-side down on dental wax and cut=
out a
long transverse slice. Take the slice and slice it again crossways int=
o
tissue-sized blocks (1-2 mm thick). Each block will contain all cell t=
ypes
with erythrocytes on the bottom, then granulocytes (neutrophils, eosino=
phils,
and basophils), then macrophages (often mixed with large lymphocytes), =
small
lymphocytes, and finally platelets at the top.

8. Place the blocks into a processing vial, and fix for an additional =
hour
in glutaraldehyde.

9. Wash in buffer, 2 x 10 minutes each.

10. Post-fix in 1% osmium tetroxide in 0.1 M buffer (same type as used =
in
glut fixative).

11. Rinse several times in distilled water.

12. Dehydrate in ethanol: 50, 70, and 95%, 15 minutes in each.

13. Absolute ethanol: 2 x 15 minutes each.

14. Propylene oxide: 2 x 15 minutes each.

15. Propylene oxide: epoxy resin (1:1) - 1 hour.

16. 100% resin - 2 x 8 hours

17. Orient for embedding so that the largest face of the block will be
sectioned (to get all the cell layers in the section).

18. Polymerize blocks as usual.

The dehydration and infiltration schedule is what I've used and know wo=
rks.
Other methods will most likely work (e.g., acetone dehydration, differe=
nt
infiltration schedules).

If there are any further details needed, please contact me.

Good luck!

Jane A. Fagerland, Ph.D.
Dept. Microscopy and Microanalysis
Abbott Laboratories
Abbott Park IL 60064-6202
=





From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 08:50:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: MSA Job Listing?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hidee-ho Boarders,

Does the MSA have a web site or something that lists EM & LM job
postings? Someone told me that it exists but I don't know where to look.
So please drop me a line and I'll fish around in the listings.

With things going swimmingly well,


Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 08:51:28 -0800
Subject: Re: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Robin,
I have had the Quartz PCI digital imaging system for several years and I am
very happy with it. The software runs on Windows 95, NT and 98, is very
robust (even my students can't crash it) and it can attach to any SEM. It
really transforms older SEMs.
You can contact them at:
http://www.quartzimaging.com/
You wrote:
}
} I need vendors that can sell me the set-up for getting digital images from
} our Phillips 515 SEM. Any suggestions?
}
} Robin Griffin
} rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca






From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 12:31:07 -0500
Subject: EM user fees

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Regarding the question about charges in a centralized EM facility--We have
the same situation but without sem. The federally mandated cost accounting
standard has made things difficult but since all universities must now
comply, we have no choice. Because of this, your rates should vary based
on cost of equipment (and therefore depreciation), cost of personnel and
the number of hours the facility is used by paying customers.
Our facility charges $25.00 per hour for a Hitachi H7000 TEM and will be
charging $35.00 for a new TEM with digital capabilities. Technical help is
35.00 per hour, an inverted multi-photon confocal is $25 per hour and a 3
laser upright confocal with nomarski is $15 per hour. We offer two hours of
training at no charge. Use of the darkroom which covers chemicals and the
service on our processor is $10 per hour. We charge cost plus shipping on
any supplies or chemicals people use. After hours rates are the same. These
rates vary yearly depending upon usage. Unfortunately we can't charge what
it really cost to operate the facility or we'd have no business--so the
university subsidizes us.
Hope this helps,

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky






From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 11:34:11 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Crime Dogs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

It's me again. I've just been asked to speak to a group of high
school kids about EM, and how I got to where I am today (I'm not gonna tell
them about all the little people I squashed along the way). Actually what
I wanted to know is if there are any folks out there doing Forensic EM.
You know analysis of blood, guts, bullets, things like that. You know that
if I gross the kids out they'll think that EM is coolest thing since ice
cubes.
So if anybody does that sort of stuff or knows of anybody I can
talk to about it, let me know.
Cuz y'all know there's nothing better than gettin' a great big
EEEEWWWW out of the young'uns.


Gotta go, I hear my microtome calling me,


Paula :-)






Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: Andrew Cahill :      ac-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 14:32:50 -0700
Subject: RE: Vendors for getting digital images from our SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Robin,
We (Soft Imaging System SIS)have a few options that you may want
to look at for acquiring digital images from your SEM. This is where
you can find a listing of our products on the web:
http://www.soft-imaging.de/products/p_one.htm

The first solution is our ADDA II, slow-scan interface for
active or passive digital image acquisition from SEM/STEM. Technical
data: Resolution: 4096 x 4096 pixel, 4096 gray values. 8 analog (ADC)
inputs. 16 logical input and output channels.
http://www.soft-imaging.de/products/hardware/h_add.htm

The second solution is our framegrabber (the grabBit) and our
software (analySIS) for acquisition of standard video images generated
on your microscope. The image quality, S/N ratio, is much worse for
video images than it is for the slow-scan interface.

Our software is a state-of-the-art image acquisition,
processing, analysis, and archiving package. We have application
specific modules, like STEREO, for generating and viewing height mapped
images from a stereo pair.

Please contact me if you have any further questions about either
of these solution. I would be glad to send out brochures describing our
products, or discuss your specific application. By telephone, (888)
FIND SIS, or e-mail ac-at-soft-imaging.com

-Sincerely,

Andrew Cahill
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
web: www.soft-imaging.com, www.soft-imaging.de
email: ac-at-soft-imaging.com


At 03:44 PM 3/16/99 -0600, you wrote:
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
-
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America=20




From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 11:17:00 -0500
Subject: Plexiglas developing tank -problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We bought several large Plexiglas developing tanks from Energy Beam Sciences
for developing TEM negatives. Several of them split their seams after a few
months and we sent them out for repair. After a few months, they split
again. Has anyone else had problems with these tanks? They are model
DT-111 and are 1-1/2 gallon size (approx. 8-3/4" x 12" x 8").

Please contact me off-line.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)






From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 18:29:12 -0400
Subject: Cold stages for OLM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,
We are planning to purchase a cold stage for
a Zeiss Axioplan and would welcome your experience with
vendors in this field. It will primarily be used for imaging
food products at temps from -20C to -120C.
Thanks in advance!
Rosemary







From: MIKE ROCK :      merock-at-du.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 15:37:56 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Maintenance contracts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Randy-
from my experience these Insurance policies are valid, however the biggest
variable is timeliness of service. You will not be at the top of the
priority list once you leave the manufacturer and use a middle man to
schedule your service needs.
-Mike

On Thu, 18 Mar 1999, Tindall, Randy D. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} I'm looking for feedback from labs having experience with insurance
} companies that provide programs replacing traditional manufacturer's service
} contracts on scopes and other lab equipment. According to the companies'
} claims these programs provide substantial savings over regular contracts,
} with service continuing to be from the provider of choice. In other words,
} they seem to be saying that we can save huge amounts of money with no
} decline in service. This is a very attractive proposition for the
} cost-cutters, but can it be real?
}
} Feel free to reply directly to me, if you like. (And thanks to those of you
} who have already spoken with me by phone!)
}
} Thanks.
} Randy
}
}
} Randy Tindall
} Electron Microscope Core
} College of Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri - Columbia
} Phone: 573-882-8304
}
}
}






From: Laura Robles :      lrobles-at-cas.csudh.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 15:13:34 -0800
Subject: PAP pen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We encircle our tissue samples using a PAP pen to keep the solutions in
place during immunocytochemical procedures. We just received a new PAP pen
and we think they changed the formula!!

The PAP material lifts off the slides during incubation whereas with the old
pens the material stayed put until we removed it.

Do you all have any suggestions regarding something else we could use in
place of the PAP pen??

Thanks,

Laura Robles







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Thu, 18 Mar 1999 17:15:44 -0600
Subject: Re: MSA Job Listing? => Placement Office

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues

MSA's Placement Office is the location to look for this information. It is
located on the MSA WWW Site. Look under General Society Information.
at http://www.msa.microscopy.com

Here is the Direct URL to that page

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/PlacementOffice/JobListings.html

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.


}
}
} Hidee-ho Boarders,
}
} Does the MSA have a web site or something that lists EM & LM job
} postings? Someone told me that it exists but I don't know where to look.
} So please drop me a line and I'll fish around in the listings.
}
} With things going swimmingly well,
}
}
} Paula :-)
}
} Paula Sicurello
} UC Berkeley
} Electron Microscope Lab
} psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
} phone: 510-642-2085
} fax: 510-643-6207
} http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML








From: ricardo :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 22:00:52 +1100
Subject: Confocal laser microscopes for beetles...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Three years ago almost to the day we had a discussion on ENTOMO-L about
confocal laser microscopes, which several contributors believed would
eventually largely replace the use of electron microscopes in insect
taxonomy and morphology. One huge advantage is that images are "captured"
directly into a computer, where they can be stored and manipulated later.
As Richard L. Brown wrote, with regard to insect genitalia, "The confocal
can take
images every two microns (or more) from the top to bottom and then
reconstruct the photo-sections to provide a flat or 3-D image (with
resolution comparable to SEM at lower magnifications). The stored data
from all the sections can then be compiled and used to provide an image at
any level of the structure or a movie or photo of the whole genitalia as it
rotates, allowing one to see areas of the genitalia that are obscured by
overlaying structures."

Our University has now purchased such a microscope system, and it has
recently been installed. Can a confocal laser microscope be used to view
entire objects, or just slide mounts?? I called the technician who will be
training us in its use, and he had only heard of using it with microscope
slides. I went through the email discussion we had on the list, and
nowhere is this limitation stated. My desire is to use it with very small
beetles (0.6 mm up to whatever the limit is, max. for my taxa about 12 mm)
which cannot be dissected or slide mounted because they are type material
or otherwise special specimens.

Perhaps we could hear generally, again, the potential uses for these
instruments in entomological research. Surely much has happened since Mar.
1996?

Lawrence
.....................................................................
Lawrence R. Kirkendall lawrence.kirkendall-at-zoo.uib.no
Associate Professor FAX: +47 55 58 96 73
Univ. Bergen Dept. of Zoology TELEPHONE:+47 55 58 23 42
Allegaten 41, N-5007 BERGEN Norway time = GMT + 1 hour
Home ph. (if you can't beat the time zone differences):+47 55 95 00 34

Keep care and be of good cheer.

Regards

(name) Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptiste
(surname) of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Collorado-Mansfeld

Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
(incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)

University of Sydney
The Wentworth Bldg.,
P.O.Box 62
NSW 2006
AUSTRALIA
phone : +61 414 540 465
e-mail: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
ricardo-at-ans.com.au
(before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
and ricardo-at-login.cz )

http://www.coleoptera.org

Home address:
32 Girrawheen Ave.
Kiama NSW 2533
Australia

Only after the last tree has been cut down,
only after the last river has been poisoned,
only after the last fish has been caught,
only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.







From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 08:14:05 -0500
Subject: Keyboard for Kevex 770 XRF

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0022_01BE71E0.74614FA0
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi,

We are having problems with our Kevex 770 keyboard. They seem to =
print out random letters and numbers when you press certain keys. Does =
anyone have a spare that they are willing to part with. thanks.

______________________
Roberto Garcia
Senior Analyst, Metallography
North Carolina State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif

------=_NextPart_000_0022_01BE71E0.74614FA0
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

{!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"}
{HTML} {HEAD}
{META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
http-equiv=3DContent-Type}
{STYLE} {/STYLE}

{META content=3D'"MSHTML 5.00.0910.1309"' name=3DGENERATOR} {/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D3} Hi, {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV}     {FONT size=3D2} We are having problems with our =
Kevex 770=20
keyboard. They seem to print out random letters and numbers when you =
press=20
certain keys. Does anyone have a spare that they are willing to part =
with.=20
thanks. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D3} ______________________ {BR} Roberto Garcia {BR} Senior =
Analyst,=20
Metallography {BR} North Carolina State University {BR} Analytical =
Instrumentation=20
Facility {BR} Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC {BR} Raleigh, NC=20
27695-7531 {BR} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com {BR} http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif {/FONT=
} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_0022_01BE71E0.74614FA0--






From: fplatek-at-ora.fda.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 99 6:42:07 EST
Subject: Forensic EM lectures for youth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Paula:

I have read with some concern your request for forensic EM assistance.

********************************************************
{Paula Sicurello} wrote:


I've just been asked to speak to a group of high
school kids about EM, and how I got to where I am today (I'm not gonna tell
them about all the little people I squashed along the way). Actually what
I wanted to know is if there are any folks out there doing Forensic EM.
You know analysis of blood, guts, bullets, things like that. You know that
if I gross the kids out they'll think that EM is coolest thing since ice
cubes.
So if anybody does that sort of stuff or knows of anybody I can
talk to about it, let me know.
Cuz y'all know there's nothing better than gettin' a great big
EEEEWWWW out of the young'uns.

********************************************************

I would be glad to talk to you about forensic applications of scanning
electron microscopy as that is my job, however......you should understand
"forensic EM" goes far beyond the common opinion of " analysis of blood,
guts, bullets, things like that". An electron microscopist performing
airborne particle analysis for possible occupational/environmental exposure to
harmful particulates or the pathologist using electron microscopy to identify
a pathogen/toxin induced lesion or foreign object are also performing forensic
EM analyses. Forensic means "Of or used in legal proceedings or in public
debate" (The American Heritage Dictionary, 2nd Edition). The investigative
accountant analyzing data in the investigation of corporate illegal dealings
for prosecution and the forensic scientist in the laboratory matching bloody
fibers or a bullet found at a crime scene are both performing forensic
analyses.

Is the point of your giving this talk to "gross them out" and generate " a
great big EEEEWWWW out of the young'uns" or are you teaching to really
stimulate some young minds and show them other areas of science that use
microscopy for possible careers? High school students are not "young'uns" and
you may have a profound impact on a few futures. You can either encourage and
stimulate OR you can deter further interest altogether. Many of us were
originally guided to our profession by a good speaker or teacher.

As one who both instructs and lectures extensively on forensic applications of
electron microscopy, I have found the audiences (high schools, colleges,
forensic science and microscopist societies) all enjoy the case history (not
gore) from an investigation. The myriad of television shows on the subject
speak to the popularity of this current "hot" topic. I'm sure the
international emphasis on the "Crime of the Century" has contributed greatly
to the recent popularity in forensic science and scientific evidence. You
propose to SHOCK your audience with raw crime scene photos when the students
are not used to seeing "the real thing". This is counter productive as they
will be discussing the shock image(s) the whole time you are trying to explain
the science/EM in the investigation. The "gore" is primarily what they will
remember and take away with them.

If you really want to TEACH these high school students, show them how to
identify objects from two places (exa. - particles such as soil samples from
the "crime scene" with particles from a suspect's shoes - SEM/TEM/EDX) or how
to find specific particles that confirm a scenario (exa. - specific lake
diatoms in "lung fluids" indicating respiration of water from a lake in a
possible drowning victim). You can make up your own "scenarios" and supply
the "evidence" from the crime scene. Make up a class exercise "crime" and
lead them through an investigation of the evidence by EM. Make your
SEM/TEM/EDX lecture slides in advance and discuss possible
conflicts/artifacts, etc.. You won't need "blood, guts, bullets, things like
that" to impress and instruct the students. Leave that for "Hollywood" and
the criminal investigator in the proper arena (the court room or instructing
other forensic scientists).

You may want to attend the SCANNING 99 meeting in Chicago (April 11-14, 1999)
where an all day short course (FORENSIC SCIENCE AND SCANNING MICROSCOPY) will
be offered followed by a second day symposium (SCANNING MICROSCOPY
APPLICATIONS IN FORENSIC SCIENCE). For information on that International
Meeting, call Mary K. Sullivan (201) 818-1010 , web site {
http://www.scanning-fams.org } .

Again, I offer my assistance with some other ideas if you are interested.
Feel free to contact me off line or by DIRECT E-mail.

Sincerely,

S. Frank Platek
Research Biologist/Electron Microscopist
Forensic Chemistry Center
US Food and Drug Administration
6751 Steger Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45237-3097
(513) 679-2700 , [FAX] (513) 679-2761 E-mail: fplatek-at-ora.fda.gov

DISCLAIMER: THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED ARE SOLELY MY OWN AND DO NOT REPRESENT
THOSE OF THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION OR ANY OTHER AGENCY OF THE U.S.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OR THE FOUNDATION FOR ADVANCES IN MEDICINE AND SCIENCE
(FAMS, INC.).





From: Ingber, Bruce F. :      bingber-at-commserver.srrc.usda.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 08:20:21 -0600
Subject: FW: Plexiglas developing tank -problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Scott,

We purchased two of those tanks this past January. One of them had a leak,
but it was suggested to use a silicon adhesive to repair the split (instead
of returning the tank). So far the tank is fine. In retrospect, I should
have stuck with the stainless steel developing tanks. } } } Bruce

Bruce F. Ingber
Biologist- Electron Microscopy
USDA-ARS, SRRC
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124-4305

(504) 286-4270; fax (504) 286-4419
bingber-at-nola.srrc.usda.gov


} ----------
} From: Walck. Scott D.[SMTP:walck-at-ppg.com]
} Sent: Thursday, March 18, 1999 10:17 AM
} To: Micro
} Subject: Plexiglas developing tank -problems
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We bought several large Plexiglas developing tanks from Energy Beam
} Sciences
} for developing TEM negatives. Several of them split their seams after a
} few
} months and we sent them out for repair. After a few months, they split
} again. Has anyone else had problems with these tanks? They are model
} DT-111 and are 1-1/2 gallon size (approx. 8-3/4" x 12" x 8").
}
} Please contact me off-line.
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} P.O. Box 11472 (letters)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8161 (fax)
}
}





From: Eric Steel :      eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 09:27:18 -0500
Subject: Re: Working Alone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have been experimenting with telepresence for this purpose. One can get
high quality zoom-pan cameras with over-the-web control for less than about
$1000 or a simple static camera for about $100. Creating a web page with
this view is not very difficult and allows coworkers to monitor each others
safety from any place that has network access.

Eric B. Steel, Leader e-mail: eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Microanalysis Research Group Office: 301-975-3902
N.I.S.T. FAX: 301-417-1321
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371



} Over the years our workforce has dwindled to the point that I find myself
working alone in the lab (metalographic sample prep/optical microscopy +
image analysis) almost all the time. The lab doesn't have windows to the
hallway, so it is difficult for people walking by to see if I am in the
lab, and if I am OK. My manager is concerned about my safety and is asking
me for suggestions. What do other labs do to make working alone safe?
} Everett Ramer
} Federal Energy Technology Center






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 10:07:40 -0500
Subject: Re: Confocal laser microscopes for beetles...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Ricardo,

When I worked at Sarastro a decade ago, applications specialists in our
parent company in Sweden had taken pictures of aphids, orchid seeds, and
various other 3D objects very successfully with the confocal. As long as
the structures of interest are either autofluorescenct, reflective, or can
be stained with a fluorescent tag so that they can be imaged, the confocal
is a great instrument for this type of work.

The only caveats:
(1) make sure to match the numerical aperture of the objective (which
governs the depth of field) to the vertical step height so that you get
continiguous information (no gaps in the image)
(2) be aware of the size of the image file so that you will have enough
room on your computer/tape to handle the file
(3) check out various types of reconstruction to see which ones best
reproduce the information you are seeking. I seem to remember that "look
through projections" worked really well but this is an area which has grown
tremendously in the recent past. See what is available on your particular
system.

Best of luck,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


At 10:00 PM 3/19/99 +1100, ricardo wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From: Charles Thomas :      cthomas-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 10:21:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Fwd: Confocal laser microscopes for beetles...

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} } Three years ago almost to the day we had a discussion on ENTOMO-L about
} } confocal laser microscopes, which several contributors believed would
} } eventually largely replace the use of electron microscopes in insect
} } taxonomy and morphology. One huge advantage is that images are "captured"
} } directly into a computer, where they can be stored and manipulated later.

Just an aside here, many SEMs can also capture images digitally. Also,
(although it involves an additional step) photographs can be scanned at
very high resolutions and bit depths, and subsequently digitally
manipulated and stored.

} } Our University has now purchased such a microscope system, and it has
} } recently been installed. Can a confocal laser microscope be used to view
} } entire objects, or just slide mounts??

My $0.02, based on my previous experience...

Several years ago I worked with Prof. Dan Young of our entomology Dept. on
doing some coleopteran cranial morphology studies. The samples in question
were, in some cases, one-of-a-kind museum pieces; the only known examples
of their species. For this reason dissection and platinum coating of the
beetle heads was not a possiblility.

We had some good luck using autofluorescence of the exoskeleton to capture
striking tilt-stereo images of the beetle heads, which could then be
displayed as 3D stereo-pairs. The dense, opaque, and reflective nature of
the exoskeletal material was such that the laser didn't penetrate it
readily, so traditional confocal z-series and reconstruction was not
possible. We arrived at a protocol that worked, however, in order to
capture these pictures, most of the advantages of the confocal had to be
circumvented. We used a 3.5x lens with the pinhole open as far as it would
go so that we could get a large area and depth of field to capture the
large (for microscopy; about 3 x 2 mm) specimens.

It is my opinion that we would have been much better off using a good
quality dissecting scope with a and a color video camera to obtain our
tilt-stereo images. For smaller and less opaque organelles, there is the
possibility that the confocal would work quite well. But for 3D
tilt-stereo capture of the larger external features, I would recommend that
people try out a good quality, video-equipped dissecting scope.




--
Charles Thomas
4D Software Engineer
4D Imaging Coordinator
Integrated Microscopy Resource
Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison
1675 Observatory Dr.
Madison, WI 53706
608-263-6288 Office
608-265-4076 Fax

cthomas-at-facstaff.wisc.edu

VISIT OUR WEB SITE:
http://www.bocklabs.wisc.edu/imr/facility/4D/4d.htm







From: paru2946-at-yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 01:23:27
Subject: re your web site

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From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 12:05:26 -0500
Subject: LM: looking for 4x5 cone for Leitz Photomacroscopes

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Hi,

A colleague is looking for the following:
Leitz Accessory 10-419-613 4x5 cone for the Photomacroscopes (connection
point is circular; needs to fit into an MPS 11 manual shutter)

If your lab has one and is interested in selling it, please contact Dennis
O'Leary of MicroOptical Methods: 518-482-8200

Thanks
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.






From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-leland.Stanford.EDU
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 11:18:04 -0800
Subject: RSI

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I am wondering how many microscopists are suffering from RSI (repetitve
stress injuries). I have recently developed DeQuervain's tendonitis in my
thumb and I am wondering if it is from moving the specimen drive control
knob on the E.M. with my thumb for many years. Not to mention the knobs on
the microtome. We work with alot of knobs, some easy to turn and some not
Here at Stanford, 3 out of 5 electron microscopists ( 2 are no longer
working here but not because of RSI), suffer from hand problems. I thought
I would take a survey to find out the prevalence of this condition among
microscopists.





From: Nelson Fava :      nfava-at-guarany.cpd.unb.br
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:57:11 -0300
Subject: Re: Keyboard for Kevex 770 XRF

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Dear Sirs,

I have the same problem with our Kevex Delta sr#501634-1121 keyboard.
Does anybody have one to sell?

Thanks in advance,

Sincerely,

Nelson FAva
EPMA Lab
U. Brasilia. Brazil.
CAMEBAX SX50.






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:53:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: light microscopy: dual output monitor

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Olympus has discontinued a dual output module for their AX and BX line of
optical microscopes. This accessory allows two lamps (e.g., halogen and
mercury) to be mounted to a vertical illuminator; either source can be
used by flipping a mirror. I am told the decision to discontinue the
accessory was due to liability concerns that could arise if an operator
switched from a halogen to UV lamp source without engaging an appropriate
fluorescence cube (with barrier filter).

Several microscope vendors have told me that third-party accessories are
available, but can or will not provide any documentation. One company
mentioned is 20-20 Technology.

I am seeking referrals to a company providing such an accessory, or a
microscopist who wishes to part with one.

Thank you.

James Martin
Director of Analytical Services and Research
Williamstown Art Conservation Center
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm


Research Scientist in Chemistry
Williams College
www.williams.edu
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin






From: Sai Prakash :      sprakash-at-hart.cems.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:17:24 -0600
Subject: Quantitative Stereomicroscopy

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Does anyone know of an authoritative source explaining the deduction of
quantitative information (such as void volume, etc.) from
stereomicroscopy of membrane microstructures?
Thanks,
Sai


********************************************************************
Sai S. Prakash, M.S.
Doctoral Student / Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant
(Research Area: Cryo-SEM of Coating Microstructures)
Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Department
University of Minnesota
421 Washington Avenue SE, Box 137
Minneapolis, MN 55455. USA.
Tel: 612 625 4809
Fax: 612 626 7246
Email: sprakash-at-cems.umn.edu
********************************************************************







From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 20:16:08 -0500
Subject: Image processing software

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Is anyone familiar with reasonably priced software programs that can
manipulate 16-bit gray scale images? While Adobe Photoshop can read 16-bit
images, you have to change the images to 8-bit before you can run filters
etc. Gatan's Digital Micrograph can work with 16-bit images, but its price
is a little steep for equipping several computers. What are the
capabilities of other packages? I would like to use the software to work
with diffraction patterns as well as images.

TIA,
Henk

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility (614) 292-0674
"An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
A pessimist fears that this is true."





From: Sharon Godkin :      GodkinS-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Fri, 19 Mar 1999 20:48:57 -0500
Subject: old Reichert - thanks!!

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Dear lister:

WOW!! Thanks for all the advice and info!! You folks are really
wonderful!

I'm sorry to take so long to get back to you; I have been "down and out"
with a killer cold. Then trying to get caught up on all the "urgent" jobs that
always seem to appear just when all you really feel good for is a
doorstop.

I'll try to answer everyone at once, to not clutter the list with a bunch of
messages. Yes, I think it must be a Zetopan. That name rings a faint
bell in the old belfrey. But it is an older model than the one in the image
Yvan kindly sent. No, I don't have an image of mine; but I was able to dig
up the original inventory entry for it. It was purchased in 1955! And
retired to storage in 1981, apparently because it was impossible to get a
bulb that would fit it. Yvan, that is interesting about the "Reichert
adapter" for the bulb you mentioned. We have quite a few bulbs
(apparently bought for it), but they are not long enough to reach the
contact at the base of the socket. This was no doubt the problem way
back then - our "Mr. Fix-it" (who keeps this place running) has now
solved that problem by soldering a tiny washer onto the contact at the
base of the socket so that when the bulb is screwed in all the way, it
makes contact with the washer. And we have light! The bulbs we have
are Osram BPA 554, 6V 5A. There is also a burned-out Osram 8100
with it (was in the socket) but it is even shorter than the BPAs., so didn't
meet the contact either. Maybe someone threw out the adapter with
the last bulb? Both types of bulbs are the same diameter so have the
same tight fit into the bulb housing. There is no identification on the
housing as to illuminator type; and the rheostat/transformer has been
replaced with one from another make of microscope.

The bulb housing at the back looks like the one in Laslo's image, not
Yvan's. There is no "Epi" attachment though; and no "flip-in" phase
telescope. Between "6" and "7" in Yvan's image (objective lens turret
and eyepiece attachment) my scope has two filter holder slides (empty
of course; one with a hole about dime-sized, the other about
nickle-sized) and the lever to send the light up the photo tube.

Many, many thanks to Barbara for taking the time to send such detailed
instructions re phase set-up! Unfortunately... I can't get past the first
step! My scope doesn't have a turret condenser with a brightfield option.
I said "dedicated phase" and I should have said "phase only" to be
clearer. Sorry. This condenser is strictly one-size-fits-all! It doesn't
have an "aperture iris" either. But, it does have a knurled ring around its
bottom and a measuring scale (like a ruler) stamped around its front.
Turning the knurled ring screws the innards of the condenser up and
down through a total of about 15 divisions (I don't know what units) on
the scale. It also has the following stamped on its front above the scale:
"Objektragerdicke 1,0 mm". I'm sure that means something important! So
one can focus the condenser by the usual control that moves the entire
gizmo in its fork mount, as well as this "internal" focus. I have, eons ago,
set up phase on another scope with a turret condenser, so the steps
you detailed are familiar. I don't recall ever using a condenser
like this one. But many thanks for the procedure!

Wayne; great! I'd like to have a manual if you have one that might apply
to this old microscope.
Julian and Susan; I would like bits and pieces ( like a condenser
with brightfield option! and brightfield objectives) if you wouldn't have a
problem sending them to Canada. I'm appending my address below.
Unfortunately we have no money (as usual) for servicing, or new parts.
I've just been told to have the manual etc. sent COD, and we'll deal with it
when it arrives. I guess it had better not exceed what's in petty cash
that day!

Again, many thanks.

Sharon Godkin
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Centre for Plant Health
8801 East Saanich Road
Sidney, B.C.
Canada
V8L 1H3







From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 13:59:48 +1100
Subject: Removing gold from fossils/SE detection

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I agree with Jim that the best way to deal with gold on museum specimens, =
artwork, taxonomic type specimens, fossils etc is to leave it off in the =
first place where possible. The material can sometimes be viewed in a =
normal SEM by keeping kV and probe current low, or generally more =
conveniently by using one of several types of variable pressure SEM. =
Until recently the cheaper versions, working up to about 2 torr, were =
restricted to non-SE detection modes (BSE, CL, absorbed current etc) but =
several SE detector systems working in this range have become commercially =
available. =20
We have just installed a new Robinson detector which allows convenient=
BSE and/or SE detection to low kV, in high vacuum or variable pressure =
conditions, on a small Hitachi NSEM. (1992) and find the combination mode =
in particular gives very good results for topographic imaging.
=09
beats explaining a caustic cyanide stew to your friendly curator, I should =
think.

cheers

Sally





Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator
Australian National University EM Unit
Research School of Biological Sciences
Box 475,
ACT 2601, Canberra, Australia
FAX 06 (0)2 6279 8525






From: Cono Passione :      iami-at-nauticom.net
Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 10:40 PM
Subject: light microscopy: dual output monitor

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James ,
I don't understand how the light from the mercury illuminator could get to
the observers eyes
without a filter in place. If a filter position is blank and in place the
light from the illuminator has
no beam splitter or prisim to direct light to the eyepieces. There fore the
light remains enclsoed
within the illuminator module... Also there should be a stop on the
illuminator to block any light
coming through.
Leica has the same option built into the stand of their DMR series
microscope and does not
seem to have a problem with light reaching the observer unfiltered.. This
is probably another
argument why the Leica is preferred over tthe competition.. Another is
being the Lecia optics
tend to absorb the harmful UV more so then its inferior Japanese
competitors. Did you ever
notice the Olympus has the filter shield in place so you don't see the uv
light coming out of the
objectives at the sample. Thats there for a reason....Harmful UV........
In answer to your question, I do not know of anyone who has one of these
devices but would check
with some of the larger Olympus dealers. Since it was not such a good idea
maybe some of them
still have units unsold on the shelf waiting to unload...
Good Luck
C YA CIP
-----Original Message-----
} From: James Martin {James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}






From: Lawrence Kordon :      nikon-at-jagunet.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 10:23:37 -0500
Subject: Re: light microscopy: dual output monitor

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James,

That Olympus reasoning is absurd! We (Nikon), Zeiss and Leica all still
manufacture this part! In any event, here are a few third-party sources where
you can get such an item. Try Opti-Quip, Inc., Highland Mills, NY (914)
928-2254 or MicroTec, Inc. Milford, NJ (800) 724-5508. I have used the MicroTec
one (product #MIT-001), just specify Olympus adapter fittings.

Good Luck,

Lawrence Kordon
Nikon, Inc.
Columbia, Maryland
nikon-at-jagunet.com

Cono Passione wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} James ,
} I don't understand how the light from the mercury illuminator could get to
} the observers eyes
} without a filter in place. If a filter position is blank and in place the
} light from the illuminator has
} no beam splitter or prisim to direct light to the eyepieces. There fore the
} light remains enclsoed
} within the illuminator module... Also there should be a stop on the
} illuminator to block any light
} coming through.
} Leica has the same option built into the stand of their DMR series
} microscope and does not
} seem to have a problem with light reaching the observer unfiltered.. This
} is probably another
} argument why the Leica is preferred over tthe competition.. Another is
} being the Lecia optics
} tend to absorb the harmful UV more so then its inferior Japanese
} competitors. Did you ever
} notice the Olympus has the filter shield in place so you don't see the uv
} light coming out of the
} objectives at the sample. Thats there for a reason....Harmful UV........
} In answer to your question, I do not know of anyone who has one of these
} devices but would check
} with some of the larger Olympus dealers. Since it was not such a good idea
} maybe some of them
} still have units unsold on the shelf waiting to unload...
} Good Luck
} C YA CIP
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: James Martin {James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 10:40 PM
} Subject: light microscopy: dual output monitor
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Olympus has discontinued a dual output module for their AX and BX line of
} } optical microscopes. This accessory allows two lamps (e.g., halogen and
} } mercury) to be mounted to a vertical illuminator; either source can be
} } used by flipping a mirror. I am told the decision to discontinue the
} } accessory was due to liability concerns that could arise if an operator
} } switched from a halogen to UV lamp source without engaging an appropriate
} } fluorescence cube (with barrier filter).
} }
} } Several microscope vendors have told me that third-party accessories are
} } available, but can or will not provide any documentation. One company
} } mentioned is 20-20 Technology.
} }
} } I am seeking referrals to a company providing such an accessory, or a
} } microscopist who wishes to part with one.
} }
} } Thank you.
} }
} } James Martin
} } Director of Analytical Services and Research
} } Williamstown Art Conservation Center
} } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm
} }
} }
} } Research Scientist in Chemistry
} } Williams College
} } www.williams.edu
} } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin
} }
} }
} }






From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 11:45:01 -0500
Subject: Re: light microscopy: dual output monitor

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Cono Passione and James Martin,

A point that Cono seems to miss in the criticism of the Olympus scope (with the
U.V. filter flange over the objective nosepiece) is that scattered U.V. from
the sample is not a function of the quality of the optics or the manufacturer
but rather a function of the type of excitation in use.

Some users, particularly biologists, use a mercury or xenon lamp but are not
relying upon the U.V. output per se. In some filter combinations a high level
of excitation in a certain short wavelength region of the visible spectrum is
the most efficient for stimulating emission from a fluorochrome which emits in
the longer wavelength region of the visible. Sometimes the cubes which are
optimized for this effect limit the amount of short-wave U.V. which reaches the
sample. Therefore, scattered light from the sample surface is lower in
proportion of U.V. than the proportion emitted from the lamp.

However, people who make use of intrinsic U.V. fluorescence in unlabeled
specimens, or cascade effects, often use cubes which pass a significant
quantity of U.V. directly to the sample. The scatter or reflected light may be
correspondingly high in it's proportion of U.V. Those in forensics and art
conservation who rely on this mechanism for all or part of their work are
dealing with a different situation by intention rather than accident and must
take precautions regardless of the manufacturer.

John Twilley
Art Conservation Scientist
P.O. Box 2324
Sag Harbor, NY 11963-0113

Cono Passione wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} James ,
} I don't understand how the light from the mercury illuminator could get to
} the observers eyes
} without a filter in place. If a filter position is blank and in place the
} light from the illuminator has
} no beam splitter or prisim to direct light to the eyepieces. There fore the
} light remains enclsoed
} within the illuminator module... Also there should be a stop on the
} illuminator to block any light
} coming through.
} Leica has the same option built into the stand of their DMR series
} microscope and does not
} seem to have a problem with light reaching the observer unfiltered.. This
} is probably another
} argument why the Leica is preferred over tthe competition.. Another is
} being the Lecia optics
} tend to absorb the harmful UV more so then its inferior Japanese
} competitors. Did you ever
} notice the Olympus has the filter shield in place so you don't see the uv
} light coming out of the
} objectives at the sample. Thats there for a reason....Harmful UV........
} In answer to your question, I do not know of anyone who has one of these
} devices but would check
} with some of the larger Olympus dealers. Since it was not such a good idea
} maybe some of them
} still have units unsold on the shelf waiting to unload...
} Good Luck
} C YA CIP
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: James Martin {James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 10:40 PM
} Subject: light microscopy: dual output monitor
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Olympus has discontinued a dual output module for their AX and BX line of
} } optical microscopes. This accessory allows two lamps (e.g., halogen and
} } mercury) to be mounted to a vertical illuminator; either source can be
} } used by flipping a mirror. I am told the decision to discontinue the
} } accessory was due to liability concerns that could arise if an operator
} } switched from a halogen to UV lamp source without engaging an appropriate
} } fluorescence cube (with barrier filter).
} }
} } Several microscope vendors have told me that third-party accessories are
} } available, but can or will not provide any documentation. One company
} } mentioned is 20-20 Technology.
} }
} } I am seeking referrals to a company providing such an accessory, or a
} } microscopist who wishes to part with one.
} }
} } Thank you.
} }
} } James Martin
} } Director of Analytical Services and Research
} } Williamstown Art Conservation Center
} } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm
} }
} }
} } Research Scientist in Chemistry
} } Williams College
} } www.williams.edu
} } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin
} }
} }
} }








From: mariomm-at-ux5.lbl.gov
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 10:25:15 -0800
Subject: Re: Image processing software

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Hendrik,

Depends on what you mean by reasonably priced. I am a firm believer that
Research Systems (RSI) IDL software is the most complete quantitative image
analysis software available. It runs on UNIX, VMS, Windows, and Mac OS. I
have used all versions except Windows, but I expect it to work like the
others. It is not cheap; $1500 single user licence. Has been as low as $500
for .EDU institutions. The software comes with an enormous number of canned
routines and its own procedural programming language. It will also
interface with external routines and has been used for many years to run
the Scanning X-ray Microscope (STXM) at the National Synchrotron Light
Source, Brookhaven. It handles any data format you want 8, 16, 24 bit
images, 3-D data sets, etc. You do have to spend a week or two learning the
basics but I don't consider it difficult. Frequently we ended up hiring
work study students to do any special programming. These were biology
students not programmers. So if you want something that is complete,
extensible, more color tables than you'd ever want, and handles any data
format, get IDL. I know this sounds like a commercial but I have no
financial interest in RSI or anyother imaging software company.

As an alternative I recommend NIH-Image for the Mac and its equivalent
Scion-Image for PCs obtainable from the site shown below. Just remember to
check the "calibrate box" and use the import file option. It cannot export
16-bit tiff but with calibrate turned on it will do calculations using 16
bit for projecting 3-D data, numerical calculations,etc. These programs
will import image stacks only limited by the amount of available computer
ram. For raw data, the import dialog under "custom" requires you to tell
how many frames to import. Best of all these programs are free. However,
they are not suitable for diffraction analysis. IDL is. Good luck.

http://www.scioncorp.com


}
} Is anyone familiar with reasonably priced software programs that can
} manipulate 16-bit gray scale images? While Adobe Photoshop can read 16-bit
} images, you have to change the images to 8-bit before you can run filters
} etc. Gatan's Digital Micrograph can work with 16-bit images, but its price
} is a little steep for equipping several computers. What are the
} capabilities of other packages? I would like to use the software to work
} with diffraction patterns as well as images.
}
} TIA,
} Henk
}
} Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
} OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility (614) 292-0674
} "An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
} A pessimist fears that this is true."


Mario M. Moronne, Ph.D.
Material and Life Science Div. M/S 6-2100
University of California
Berkeley Lab
1 Cyclotron Rd.
Berkeley, CA
94720

ph (510) 486-4236
FAX (510) 528-8076
mariomm-at-ux5.lbl.gov or biostar-at-aldecoa.com





From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 16:15:24 -0500
Subject: Re: old Reichert - thanks!!

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Sharon,

Am headed out of town and don't have time to track down the Reichert
manuals, but the phase system you describe sounds amazingly like the
"anopteral phase" which I have on my system. Will be back in about a week
and will check back with you then.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


At 08:48 PM 3/19/99 -0500, Sharon Godkin wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 16:16:45 -0500
Subject: Re: Image processing software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hendrik,

Check with Media Cybernetics. I am pretty sure that their Image Pro is at
least 16 bit now. They are in Silver Spring MD and on the web.

Best of luck
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.

At 08:16 PM 3/19/99 -0500, Hendrik O. Colijn wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:46:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: light microscopy: dual output monitor

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Cono:

The dual output accessory couples two lamp housings to the back end of the
vertical illuminator. A mirror is used to reflect light from either lamp
housing down the vertical illuminator to a rotating turret, situated over
the nosepiece, that contains filter cubes. A variety of
excitation/emission cubes would be used for fluorescence examination (UV
or visible excitation) using a mercury or xenon source. A brightfield
cube would be used for visible light examination using a halogen source.
If a mercury or xenon source was used with a normal brightfield cube (not
designed for use with a UV source), an observer would not be protected
from UV wavelengths reflected or fluoresced from a sample. Of course,
this sort of mistake, followed by examination, ought not to occur in
practice. However, the possibility does exist with such multipurpose
illumination systems. I hope this helps to answer your most reasonable
question.

James Martin
Director of Analytical Services and Research
Williamstown Art Conservation Center
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm

Research Scientist in Chemistry
Williams College
www.williams.edu
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin

On Sat, 20 Mar 1999, John Twilley wrote:

} Cono Passione and James Martin,
}
} A point that Cono seems to miss in the criticism of the Olympus scope (with the
} U.V. filter flange over the objective nosepiece) is that scattered U.V. from
} the sample is not a function of the quality of the optics or the manufacturer
} but rather a function of the type of excitation in use.
}
} Some users, particularly biologists, use a mercury or xenon lamp but are not
} relying upon the U.V. output per se. In some filter combinations a high level
} of excitation in a certain short wavelength region of the visible spectrum is
} the most efficient for stimulating emission from a fluorochrome which emits in
} the longer wavelength region of the visible. Sometimes the cubes which are
} optimized for this effect limit the amount of short-wave U.V. which reaches the
} sample. Therefore, scattered light from the sample surface is lower in
} proportion of U.V. than the proportion emitted from the lamp.
}
} However, people who make use of intrinsic U.V. fluorescence in unlabeled
} specimens, or cascade effects, often use cubes which pass a significant
} quantity of U.V. directly to the sample. The scatter or reflected light may be
} correspondingly high in it's proportion of U.V. Those in forensics and art
} conservation who rely on this mechanism for all or part of their work are
} dealing with a different situation by intention rather than accident and must
} take precautions regardless of the manufacturer.
}
} John Twilley
} Art Conservation Scientist
} P.O. Box 2324
} Sag Harbor, NY 11963-0113
}
} Cono Passione wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } James ,
} } I don't understand how the light from the mercury illuminator could get to
} } the observers eyes
} } without a filter in place. If a filter position is blank and in place the
} } light from the illuminator has
} } no beam splitter or prisim to direct light to the eyepieces. There fore the
} } light remains enclsoed
} } within the illuminator module... Also there should be a stop on the
} } illuminator to block any light
} } coming through.
} } Leica has the same option built into the stand of their DMR series
} } microscope and does not
} } seem to have a problem with light reaching the observer unfiltered.. This
} } is probably another
} } argument why the Leica is preferred over tthe competition.. Another is
} } being the Lecia optics
} } tend to absorb the harmful UV more so then its inferior Japanese
} } competitors. Did you ever
} } notice the Olympus has the filter shield in place so you don't see the uv
} } light coming out of the
} } objectives at the sample. Thats there for a reason....Harmful UV........
} } In answer to your question, I do not know of anyone who has one of these
} } devices but would check
} } with some of the larger Olympus dealers. Since it was not such a good idea
} } maybe some of them
} } still have units unsold on the shelf waiting to unload...
} } Good Luck
} } C YA CIP
} } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: James Martin {James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu}
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 10:40 PM
} } Subject: light microscopy: dual output monitor
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Olympus has discontinued a dual output module for their AX and BX line of
} } } optical microscopes. This accessory allows two lamps (e.g., halogen and
} } } mercury) to be mounted to a vertical illuminator; either source can be
} } } used by flipping a mirror. I am told the decision to discontinue the
} } } accessory was due to liability concerns that could arise if an operator
} } } switched from a halogen to UV lamp source without engaging an appropriate
} } } fluorescence cube (with barrier filter).
} } }
} } } Several microscope vendors have told me that third-party accessories are
} } } available, but can or will not provide any documentation. One company
} } } mentioned is 20-20 Technology.
} } }
} } } I am seeking referrals to a company providing such an accessory, or a
} } } microscopist who wishes to part with one.
} } }
} } } Thank you.
} } }
} } } James Martin
} } } Director of Analytical Services and Research
} } } Williamstown Art Conservation Center
} } } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm
} } }
} } }
} } } Research Scientist in Chemistry
} } } Williams College
} } } www.williams.edu
} } } http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin
} } }
} } }
} } }
}
}
}
}






From: Ed Zaborski :      zaborski-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 17:12:44 -0600
Subject: LM - which Nikon DIC slider?

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I've been looking at purchasing a dry 60x objective for use on a Nikon E600
microscope (application is temporary and permanent mounts of soil
invertebrates, particularly soil mites, nematodes, etc.). The particular
lens I'm trying right now is the CFI PLAN APO Phase 60x Dry DM objective.
According to the sales rep, a DIC slider is not made specifically for this
objective, and Nikon suggests that users try different combinations and
choose what they like best. We've mixed and matched what the rep had
available, and the best image was with CD DIC slider for the Plan Fluor
ELWD (extra long working distance) DLL 60x C Phase objective. This
objective is for an inverted microscope and is meant to look through a lot
more material than one coverslip. I'd like to know if anyone on the list
uses this Plan Apo objective for DIC, and what slider they use. Does this
seem right to have to mix and match DIC sliders and objectives?
______________________________________________________________________
Edmond R. Zaborski phone (217) 265-0330
Soil Invertebrate Ecology
Center for Economic Entomology FAX (217) 333-8076
Illinois Natural History Survey zaborski-at-uiuc.edu
607 E. Peabody Dr.
Champaign, Illinois 61820 U.S.A. http://www.inhs.uiuc.edu/
______________________________________________________________________





From: Chris Parks :      Chris_Parks-at-Maxtor.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 99 17:46:03 MST
Subject: Help with EBIC or Voltage Contrast

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Hello,

I am a neophyte to the microscopy world and am curious about EBIC and
Voltage Contrast. I am wondering if there are good resources on the
general mechanics of setting up the system. I also am having trouble
finding basic information/ uses for EBIC. The Goldstein et al book does
not delve too much into the topic of EBIC and am not sure of any other
good SEM resource books.

Thanks
CP





From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 19:54:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: old Reichert - thanks!!

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Sharon Godkin says:
} I'll try to answer everyone at once, to not clutter the list with a bunch
} of messages. Yes, I think it must be a Zetopan. That name rings a faint
} bell in the old belfrey. But it is an older model than the one in the
} image Yvan kindly sent.

The *shape* should be roughly the same. The *color* would be black in
your case (the old model).

} No, I don't have an image of mine; but I was able to dig up the original
} inventory entry for it. It was purchased in 1955!

(:-) [but doesn't the recond say what microscope it is?]

} And retired to storage in 1981, apparently because it was impossible to
} get a bulb that would fit it.

Osram 8100 should fit. See below.

} Yvan, that is interesting about the "Reichert
} adapter" for the bulb you mentioned. We have quite a few bulbs
} (apparently bought for it), but they are not long enough to reach the
} contact at the base of the socket. This was no doubt the problem way
} back then - our "Mr. Fix-it" (who keeps this place running) has now
} solved that problem by soldering a tiny washer onto the contact at the
} base of the socket so that when the bulb is screwed in all the way, it
} makes contact with the washer. And we have light! The bulbs we have
} are Osram BPA 554, 6V 5A. There is also a burned-out Osram 8100
} with it (was in the socket) but it is even shorter than the BPAs., so didn't
} meet the contact either. Maybe someone threw out the adapter with
} the last bulb?

I think this is EXACTLY the case: somebody "discarded" the bulb adapter
(probably because another idiot soldered the bulb TO the adapter instead
of just screwing it in - Yvan told me about one such incident).

} Both types of bulbs are the same diameter so have the same tight fit
} into the bulb housing.

Hmm... This is to the experts to comment on.

} There is no identification on the
} housing as to illuminator type; and the rheostat/transformer has been
} replaced with one from another make of microscope.

No worries - the one I got also came with a "foreign" transformer.
Who cares (unless you are a collector :-).

} The bulb housing at the back looks like the one in Laslo's image, not
} Yvan's. There is no "Epi" attachment though; and no "flip-in" phase
} telescope.

No Epi - because it was configured for transmitted light. No flip-in
Bertrand lens ("phase telescope") - because yours is an older model
(mine is "younger" than yours but still doesn't have Bertrand lens).


} Between "6" and "7" in Yvan's image (objective lens turret
} and eyepiece attachment) my scope has two filter holder slides (empty
} of course; one with a hole about dime-sized, the other about
} nickle-sized) and the lever to send the light up the photo tube.

One slot (the lower narrow one, going 45 degrees) is for a compensator
(don't know the details). The wider one is of course for the filter
slider. Your swivelling head is identical to mine.


} It also has the following stamped on its front above the scale:
} "Objektragerdicke 1,0 mm". I'm sure that means something important!

I suspect it says "object-vertical-thickness 1mm". Might it apply
to the specimen slide?

As for bits and pieces - hey, me too! Objectives, condensers, TL DIC,
etc.! Please e-mail with whatever Zetopan parts you're willing to
part, and how much you'd like for it.
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}





From: Vladislav V. Speransky :      vladis-at-MAINE.EDU
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 01:09:51 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM of Lymphocytes

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Hello Frank and everybody,
I hope this will be of some help:

Dr. Pickett-Heaps recently published (Journal of Phycology 34:1088)
a solution that, I remember, just mesmerized me with its elegance.
"A rapid, highly efficient method... for fixation, dehydration, and
embedding of small (e.g. planktonic) cells dispersed in large volumes
of culture medium... based on continuous filtration..." -- so that
you never really pellet the cells, just gently concentrate them over
a cellulose filter in a standard Millipore apparatus while gradually
adding the fixatives-washes-dehydrant-resin from the top. Seems
worth trying , doesn't it? And yet the setup is VERY simple.

Just contact me directly if you can't get the journal.
And if you do try it, I would ask you to please comment about the
outcome. I have not yet made the time to try that for myself and will
be MOST INTERESTED to hear how it worked for, say, lymphocytes.
Or maybe somebody else uses something similar routinely?

Sincerely yours,
Vlad.

}
} Howdy all,
} There is a graduate student here who is trying to look at a possible stem
} cell line under TEM. The problem is that they are quite small, don't seem
} to pellet very well, and he has only been able to get me a few thousand
} cells at a time.
} We have tried to embed the cells in 2% Agar after fixation but this hasn't
} worked.
} Is it possible to filter the media and cells, and then process the filter
} with the cells stuck onto it? Maybe use a cytospin to spin the cells into a
} filter?
} Is there anyone with experience with this? Any suggestions or ideas would
} be greatly appreciated.
}
}
} Thanks in advance
} Frank Herbert
} Technician
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Department of Cell Biology
} Baylor College of Medicine
}
}
}
Vladislav V. Speransky
School of Marine Sciences
University of Maine
5722 Deering Hall
Orono, ME 04469-5722
Phone: 207 581 2998
Fax: 207 581 2969
Email: vladis-at-maine.maine.edu





From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 10:12:47 +0100
Subject: Re: old Reichert - thanks!!

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Hi Barbara, Sharon and the other contributors,

The description provided by Sharon and some educated guesses:

..."... The bulbs we have are Osram BPA 554, 6V 5A..."

I didn't found that one in older Osram catalogues, but these doesn't go
back to the 50's. I can send some pages from Osram with descriptions of
bulbs that could fit and their most important parameters (voltage and
current, foot type, dimensions of lamp and filament, relative position of
the filament....).

"Longer" bulbs are:

* 8001 (6V, 4.35A, E14 foot, filament (4 x 0.9 mm) at 57mm from the middle
contact of the foot, overall dimensions the same as 8100)

* 8025 (6V, 5A, BA20d foot, filament (2.2 x 2 mm) at 54 mm from the
"bottom" of the foot, overall dimensions about the same as 8100, length is
60mm instead of 65 in the 8100)

* ...

..."... My scope doesn't have a turret condenser with a brightfield
option.
I said "dedicated phase" and I should have said "phase only" to be
clearer. Sorry. This condenser is strictly one-size-fits-all! It doesn't
have an "aperture iris" either. But, it does have a knurled ring around
its
bottom and a measuring scale (like a ruler) stamped around its front.
Turning the knurled ring screws the innards of the condenser up and
down through a total of about 15 divisions (I don't know what units) on
the scale. It also has the following stamped on its front above the scale:
"Objektragerdicke 1,0 mm". ..."...

"Objektragerdicke 1,0 mm" means: thickness of slides (to be used with this
condenser): 1mm

As Barbara suggested (unless I misunderstand that) the condenser could be a
"MS1.40" condenser, usable with phase and/or Anoptral inserts (the
"UV-inserts"), but the MS1.40 is a brightfield condenser usable too for
fluorescence and it doesn't has a ".... knurled ring around its bottom and
a measuring scale (like a ruler) stamped around its front. Turning the
knurled ring screws the innards of the condenser up and down through a
total of about 15 divisions...". Could the curled ring device be an insert
in the condenser that can be removed? (The MS 1.40 uses magnetic inserts
that can easily be removed, you just have to pull these out of the
condenser...). If it's the same condenser as the one I have, it should
read on the top lens "UV". Sure it's not an adjustable DF-condenser?

Can send you some pictures of different condensers offline if you like...
Can't send pictures to the list as it's considered poor netiquette (I had
some reactions regarding that after sending the Zetopan picture...).


Regards,

Yvan Lindekens.






From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 13:26:47 +0100
Subject: Re: old Reichert - thanks!!

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There seems to be some misunderstanding regarding the 6V, 5A bulb for the
"LUX FNI" illuminator for Zetopan:

Uri: "...
} I think this is EXACTLY the case: somebody "discarded" the bulb adapter
} (probably because another idiot soldered the bulb TO the adapter instead
} of just screwing it in - Yvan told me about one such incident)....".

Ussualy the bulb + the adapter were discarded. reichert sold these bulbs
soldered in their individual adapter, thus providing a fully precentered
and preadjusted bulb for the Zetopan. desoldering the bulb and replace it
for an osram 8100 in the original adapter is just a way of fixing the
problem that the bulbs are rather rare now...

Sharon: I'm preparing a multipage tif-file containing information and
pictures on bulbs, lamphouses, filterholders and condensers for Zetopan.
Interested?

Yvan Lindekens.






From: Jerome D. Schick :      JDSchick-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 08:13:33 -0500
Subject: SEM EBIC & VC

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Chris,
For a number of years I performed what we call "electrical failure
analysis" using electron beam techniques on semiconductor devices and
integrated circuits. My favorite was Electron Beam Induced Current
measurements. I found no definitive text or reference for that or the
other measurements, Voltage Contrast, Specimen Absorbed Current,
Electron Bean Induced Voltage, Charge Contrast, although I do have a few
publications which discuss them. I have included in-depth discussions
of these techniques in classes, and have assembled a number of example
analyses which help to explain them. Send me a personal note if you
have an interest in any of this. Or respond with a particular question
that might be of interest to the e-beam community on the list. Jerry

_______________________
Jerome D. Schick, Ph.D.
Semiconductor Devices and Electron Microscopy
26 Kuchler Drive
LaGrangeville, NY 12540
Bus (914)223-7393
FAX (914)227-2743
jdschick-at-worldnet.att.net



Chris Parks wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello,
}
} I am a neophyte to the microscopy world and am curious about EBIC and
} Voltage Contrast. I am wondering if there are good resources on the
} general mechanics of setting up the system. I also am having trouble
} finding basic information/ uses for EBIC. The Goldstein et al book does
} not delve too much into the topic of EBIC and am not sure of any other
} good SEM resource books.
}
} Thanks
} CP





From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Sun, 21 Mar 1999 10:46:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Zetopan manuals, anybody?

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Hello,

I'm looking for Zetopan manuals (preferably in English):
- Zetopan Service manual;
- Zetopan-POL (polarization);
- Phase-Contrast and Anoptral-Contrast;
- Micro-flash;
- Incident-light Interference Contrast;
- Transmitted-light Interfeence Contrast.

Anybody can send me a copy (xeroxed would be great)? If so - e-mail
and we'll agree on the details.

Thanks!!
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}





From: Dr Eric E. Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 09:58:58 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: RSI

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JoAnn,
About 5 years ago I developed a bad case of
tendonitis which our occupational health adviser attributed
to the magnification knob in our SEM. She advised on a
modification which our worksops made up. This effected a
rapid improvement in my condition, although I still get
some discomfort if I do a lot of typing.

Eric

----------------------
Dr Eric E. Lachowski
University of Aberdeen
Department of Chemistry
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 1224 272934
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk








From: jrnelson :      jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 07:55:43 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM EBIC & VC

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Jerome D. Schick, Ph.D.
Semiconductor Devices and Electron Microscopy
26 Kuchler Drive
LaGrangeville, NY 12540
Bus (914)223-7393
FAX (914)227-2743
jdschick-at-worldnet.att.net

March 22, 1999

We are currently doing a very small R&D project for an electrical
contector company which involves SEM EBIC. I would love to read any
articles or notes that you may have on the subject.

J. Roy Nelson, Ph.D
Material Testing Laboratory
Pennington, NJ 08534
(609) 730-0575
FAX 737-7119
jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com





From: EVERETT RAMER :      Everett.Ramer-at-fetc.doe.gov
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 08:19:31 -0500
Subject: Working Alone - Summary

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Hi,
Several people have asked for a summary of the responses to this question, =
and there were many. Thanks to all for some good suggestions.
Everett Ramer
Federal Energy Technology Center

The solutions suggested were:
1. call a coworker/secretary/boss/security every hour
2. a pendant call button worn around neck---some have location capabilities=
to guide rescuers to wearer's location.
3. a pendant worn around neck that automatically calls for help when the =
wearer is in the horizontal position.
4. a pager with built-in motion detector that beeps after several minutes =
of inactivity. If wearer does not shut off the beeping, the pager =
automatically calls security.
5. a zoom-pan camera with over-the-web control with a web page that allows =
coworkers to monitor each other safety from any place that has network =
access.






From: alvin.schatte-at-banctec.com () (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 07:58:21 -0600
Subject: Question about Replacement Optical Microscope Objective lenses

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Colleagues

Can any of you answer this question about Optical Microscope Objective
lenses? I can not. Reply directly back to alvin.schatte-at-banctec.com .

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

--------------------------------------------------------


Email: alvin.schatte-at-banctec.com
Name: Alvin Schatte

Question: I recently purchased an older B&L microscope w/
3 objectives and a prism inclined eyepiece. I
think this model of microscope is from the 50's
or 60's. That is all that I know of the model
as there are no other markings that I can find
to this regard. I was wanting to get a 4X & 20X
objective for it and was wondering if AO Spencer
objectives would fit. I have an opportunity to
get these over the Web, but cannot try them out
prior to purchase. We are planning to use the
microscope to augment our childrens' studies and
perhaps allow my oldest who is interested in
cattle use it to examine parasites.

Thanks for your help,

Al Schatte

---------------------------------------------------------------------------







From: ALEX BLACK :      ALEXANDER.BLACK-at-NUIGALWAY.IE
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 14:24:31 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Polyurethane sponge

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Dear all,
Does anyone know of a good reliable TEM protocol for polyurethane
sponges?
I'll be really grateful for any information.



Alex






From: James Martin :      James.S.Martin-at-williams.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 09:37:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: summary: vendors of dual illumination modules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Replies to my inquiry about vendors of dual illumination modules are
summarized below:

Opti-Quip, Inc.
Highland Mills, NY
(914) 928-2254
Model 1030 Universal Mirror housing will adapt to just about any
microscope. The price is $998.00. For the Olympus there are 3 models:
Olympus IMT2 (Part number: 1030E), Olympus BH (Part number: 1030-F) and
Olympus B MAX (Part number: 1030-G)

MicroTec, Inc.
Milford, NJ
(800) 724-5508
#MIT-001

Thank you for your assistance.

James Martin
Director of Analytical Services and Research
Williamstown Art Conservation Center
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin/dasrhome.htm


Research Scientist in Chemistry
Williams College
www.williams.edu
http://members.tripod.com/~James_Martin






From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 21 Mar 1999 16:31:18 -0800
Subject: Vibration Tables

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Hi,
I need to get information (specs and quotations) rather quickly on =
vibration tables for ultramicrotomes, light microscopes, and an atomic =
force microscope.
If any manufacturers of such equipment read the list, would you =
please contact my e mail directly with information.
This is for our new building and we need to get updated info into the =
state in a very short time.

Thanks in advance,
Judy M.



Judy Murphy, PhD
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us







From: Murphy, Judy :      murphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: 21 Mar 1999 16:41:13 -0800
Subject: Neg Processors

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Hi,
I am trying to find a good negative processor that will process the =
following films:
EM film (Kodak4489,SO163,etc.)
Ektapan (4162) and
Kodak 4127 (for SEM) i.e. 4 x 5 sheet film.

1. We want to go from dry film to dry film, thus do not want tank develop=
ment.
2. We now have Mohr processors however in 3 yrs have not been able to =
get rid of things like roller marks, etc. Believe me, we have tried =
every solution that everyone has suggested. We are of course open to new =
ones.
3. Does anyone know of other possibilities out there? possibly from our =
photographic friends.
4. We need to specify something very quickly, but I haven't come up with =
a solution.

Any help is appreciated.
Thanks
Judy M.

Judy Murphy
Microscopy Technology Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209/954-5284
FAX 209/954-5600
e-mail; jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us







From: Soumitra Ghoshroy :      ghoshroy-at-nmsu.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 07:06:41 -0700
Subject: Thank you

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Thanks to everyone who took their time to respond to my inquiry about
microscope user fees. It was a big help.

Best wishes,

Soumitra



Soumitra Ghoshroy Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Lab
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001
Tel: 505-646-1531/3600
Fax: 505-646-5665
e-mail: ghoshroy-at-nmsu.edu





From: Jerome D. Schick :      JDSchick-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 10:50:07 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM EBIC & VC

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Dr. Nelson,
I have FAXed you a short five page article I wrote describing VC,
SAC, and EBIC. Remember, traditionally, EBIC refers to the measurement
of currents generated in the specimen, usually a semiconductor with a PN
junction at least, and the function of the electron beam is to excite
hole-electron pairs in the sample. In this measurement, the primary
electrons do not significantly contribute to the current measured. It
sounds like your project for a connector company may not involve a
semiconductor material as the sample, in which case the wiring
connections of the sample, the current amplifier, the time constants,
and the interpretation might be somewhat different. When I get a
chance, I shall dig around for a few more references which may be of
use. I hope the FAXed copy is legible.
Jerry

jrnelson wrote:
}
} Jerome D. Schick, Ph.D.
} Semiconductor Devices and Electron Microscopy
} 26 Kuchler Drive
} LaGrangeville, NY 12540
} Bus (914)223-7393
} FAX (914)227-2743
} jdschick-at-worldnet.att.net
}
} March 22, 1999
}
} We are currently doing a very small R&D project for an electrical
} contector company which involves SEM EBIC. I would love to read any
} articles or notes that you may have on the subject.
}
} J. Roy Nelson, Ph.D
} Material Testing Laboratory
} Pennington, NJ 08534
} (609) 730-0575
} FAX 737-7119
} jrnelson-at-nj1.aae.com





From: david.l.akerson-at-exgate.tek.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 09:56:35 -0800
Subject: Size of microscopy industry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am working on a business project that requires an analysis of the
microscopy market and am hoping someone can direct me to a good source of
information.
Defining Microscopy to include all techniques which employ a probe such as:
photons (including x-rays), electrons, ions, mechanical and/or
electromagnetic radiation to form a representation or characterization of
the morphology, crystallography, elemental, chemical or electronic structure
of any material in either physical and/or life sciences applications.
The questions I am trying to answer are:
How large is the microscopy community in the US and worldwide?
What technology has the greatest number of users? (Optical microscopy, x-ray
microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy,
atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning ion
microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, electron microprobe, x-ray
energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, electron
diffraction, convergent beam diffraction, high resolution electron
microscopy, high voltage electron microscopy, etc.)
Thank you for your assistance.
Dave Akerson
Tektronix CPID
682-7471
800-825-6100, ext. 7471
david.l.akerson-at-tek.com {mailto:david.l.akerson-at-tek.com}





From: Steve Beck :      becks-at-sunynassau.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 14:34:39 -0500
Subject: Buffy Coat Protocol

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Colleagues,

Last week, there was a posting regarding the preparation of buffy coats for
the TEM. Unfortunately, I didn't save the message and I now have a student
who would benefit from the protocol. If you saved the protocol (or are the
author of the email) could you please forward it to me offline.

Thanks for your assistance!

Steve

Stephen J. Beck
Associate Professor
Bio-Imaging Center/Electron Microscopy
Department of Biology
Nassau Community College
Garden City, NY 11530
Voice Mail: (516) 572-7829
Email: {becks-at-sunynassau.edu}
URL: {http://www.sunynassau.edu/webpages/biology/becks.htm}







From: Gordon J.Holtslander :      holtslander-at-skyway.usask.ca
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 13:37:34 -0600
Subject: JOB: ELECTRON MICROSCOPE/ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

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ELECTRON MICROSCOPE/ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

Biology Dept., University of Saskatchewan
http://www.usask.ca.biology

The individual will be responsible for the departemntal Electron
Microscope facility, consisting of 2 Philips TEMs, an SEM and
related vacuum and preparatory equipment. Duties will include
alignment and maintenance of the instuments, assisting and
training students, faculty and outside users in their use, and
providing general electronics and instrumentation expertise to
the Department.

Required qualifications: Grade XII, post-secondary technical
qualifiactions in electronics, and five years of relevant
experience, including experience in EM maintenance. A strong
interest in computer technology is also desireable. Salary range
$36,336 - $46,320 depending on qualifications, with good fringe
benefits. Starting date May 1, 1999. Forward resume with names,
addresses and phone numbers of references to:

Dr. L.C. Fowke, Head
Department of Biology
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Sask., S7N-5E2
phone: (306) 966-4400

The posting is directed in the first instance to Canadian citizens and
permanent residents. The University is committed to employment equity.





From: psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu (Paula Sicurello)
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 11:40:08 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Thanks!

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Thank-you to all the listers who sent me the web address of the MSA job
vacancy page.

For those of you who'd like to know it also (and didn't see Nestor's note)
here it is:

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/PlacementOffice/JobListings.html


There is a really cool looking job in Wisconsin on there right now. Too
bad I'm not going there, sigh.....



Thanks Again!!!


Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
UC Berkeley
Electron Microscope Lab
psic-at-uclink4.berkeley.edu
phone: 510-642-2085
fax: 510-643-6207
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML







From: James Roberts :      James.Roberts-at-mail.co.ventura.ca.us
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 17:19:00 -0800
Subject: Forensic EM lectures for youth -Reply

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I would second Franks comments. As he points out not all
"Forensic" labs do criminal case analysis for law
enforcement agencies that you think of when the phrase
comes up. I happen to work in one that does. To a great
extent our work is not "gore" related. Though you do have to
deal with it on a routine basis, the science is the interesting
part not the "gore". After a few years you hardly notice it is
there most of the time, the tissue on a bullet removed from a
body, for example, (I guess that is what you'd classify as
"gore") is just something you have to get past to get to the
fibers that may tell you something when you turn them over
the hair and fiber specialist.

I am a Firearm and Toolmark Examiner that also does some
SEM work. As such I work mostly Homicide and other
crimes aginst people type cases. Light microscopy makes
up the majority of Firearms analysis (The bullets or cartridge
case comparison to a given firearm) or Toolmark Analysis.
Before they go to the comparison scope, stereo microscopy
is the majority of the non comparative examination of
bullets and cartridge cases, (though this information is still
comparitive in nature). Bullets are looked at for trace
evidence and GRC (General Rifling Charicteristics) on the
stereo microscope then taken to the comparison scope.
Most firearms comparison is carried out between 10 and 40
power on a forensic comparison microscope. The unknown
bullet being mounted on one scope (stage) with a standard
(known) bullet fired from the firearm in question on the other,
the two fields of view being observed through the comparison
bridge (though this is a highly intagrated unit in modern
firearms scopes and thought of as a single scope). Stereo
scopes are also used in examining clothing items for bullet
holes, gunpowder, etc.. The SEM is a good tool for the
examination of trace evidence, but the application of the
SEM to the comparison of bullets is unnecessary and
provides no additional information (the James E. Ray appeal
claims not withstanding) beyond that seen on the stereo and
comparison scopes if you are considering comparison to a
firearm only. Only SEMs designed for direct comprison of
two fields are sutable for bullet or toolmark comparison.
Manipulation of captured images is dificult compared to the
Comparison microscope and not considered appropriate
without the real time control of the two images. As no
properly trained firearms examiner would make an
identification from a photograph you would also run into
problems with acceptability in court if not using a
comparison SEM (only a few exist that I am aware of). The
SEM can be highly useful for examination of trace evidence
on bullets.

LMs of various types plays a big part in trace evidence
examinations, as can SEM/EDS. Blood and other
physiologic fluid analysis (serology) relies on LM and other
techniques but older methods are quickly being replaced by
DNA analysis (this is out of may area). Guts? Our
toxicologists do stomach contents for toxicological
materials at times using some LM I think (also out of my
area). Gun Shot Residue is one of the heavy uses of SEM in
the Forensic Science Labs of police agencies (firearms
examiners tend to stay clear of this work -do to our
contamination from shooting and handling firearms all the
time).

War Stories have their place but usually are only interesting
if in answer to a question or from the speakers personal
experience. Show them the interesting information they can
learn with EM and maybe you'll get a different kind of
"EEEEWWWW ."

I hope this fills in some of the gaps for you but don't think its
really went where you wanted to go. You can probably get
some "war storys" (we all have them) at Scanning '99 if
your there, but the real information will be more interesting
(to you and the students at the HS I suspect).

Jim Roberts
Firearm and Toolmark Examiner

} } }
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Dear Paula:

I have read with some concern your request for forensic EM
assistance.

********************************************************
{Paula Sicurello} wrote:


I've just been asked to speak to a group of high
school kids about EM, and how I got to where I am today
(I'm not gonna tell
them about all the little people I squashed along the way).
Actually what
I wanted to know is if there are any folks out there doing
Forensic EM.
You know analysis of blood, guts, bullets, things like that.
You know that
if I gross the kids out they'll think that EM is coolest thing
since ice
cubes.
So if anybody does that sort of stuff or knows of
anybody I can
talk to about it, let me know.
Cuz y'all know there's nothing better than gettin' a
great big
EEEEWWWW out of the young'uns.

********************************************************

I would be glad to talk to you about forensic applications of
scanning
electron microscopy as that is my job, however......you
should understand
"forensic EM" goes far beyond the common opinion of "
analysis of blood,
guts, bullets, things like that". An electron microscopist
performing
airborne particle analysis for possible
occupational/environmental exposure to
harmful particulates or the pathologist using electron
microscopy to identify
a pathogen/toxin induced lesion or foreign object are also
performing forensic
EM analyses. Forensic means "Of or used in legal
proceedings or in public
debate" (The American Heritage Dictionary, 2nd Edition).
The investigative
accountant analyzing data in the investigation of corporate
illegal dealings
for prosecution and the forensic scientist in the laboratory
matching bloody
fibers or a bullet found at a crime scene are both performing
forensic
analyses.

Is the point of your giving this talk to "gross them out" and
generate " a
great big EEEEWWWW out of the young'uns" or are you
teaching to really
stimulate some young minds and show them other areas of
science that use
microscopy for possible careers? High school students are
not "young'uns" and
you may have a profound impact on a few futures. You can
either encourage and
stimulate OR you can deter further interest altogether.
Many of us were
originally guided to our profession by a good speaker or
teacher.

As one who both instructs and lectures extensively on
forensic applications of
electron microscopy, I have found the audiences (high
schools, colleges,
forensic science and microscopist societies) all enjoy the
case history (not
gore) from an investigation. The myriad of television shows
on the subject
speak to the popularity of this current "hot" topic. I'm sure
the
international emphasis on the "Crime of the Century" has
contributed greatly
to the recent popularity in forensic science and scientific
evidence. You
propose to SHOCK your audience with raw crime scene
photos when the students
are not used to seeing "the real thing". This is counter
productive as they
will be discussing the shock image(s) the whole time you
are trying to explain
the science/EM in the investigation. The "gore" is primarily
what they will
remember and take away with them.

If you really want to TEACH these high school students,
show them how to
identify objects from two places (exa. - particles such as
soil samples from
the "crime scene" with particles from a suspect's shoes -
SEM/TEM/EDX) or how
to find specific particles that confirm a scenario (exa. -
specific lake
diatoms in "lung fluids" indicating respiration of water from a
lake in a
possible drowning victim). You can make up your own
"scenarios" and supply
the "evidence" from the crime scene. Make up a class
exercise "crime" and
lead them through an investigation of the evidence by EM.
Make your
SEM/TEM/EDX lecture slides in advance and discuss
possible
conflicts/artifacts, etc.. You won't need "blood, guts,
bullets, things like
that" to impress and instruct the students. Leave that for
"Hollywood" and
the criminal investigator in the proper arena (the court room
or instructing
other forensic scientists).

You may want to attend the SCANNING 99 meeting in
Chicago (April 11-14, 1999)
where an all day short course (FORENSIC SCIENCE AND
SCANNING MICROSCOPY) will
be offered followed by a second day symposium
(SCANNING MICROSCOPY
APPLICATIONS IN FORENSIC SCIENCE). For information
on that International
Meeting, call Mary K. Sullivan (201) 818-1010 , web site {
http://www.scanning-fams.org } .

Again, I offer my assistance with some other ideas if you are
interested.
Feel free to contact me off line or by DIRECT E-mail.

Sincerely,

S. Frank Platek
Research Biologist/Electron Microscopist
Forensic Chemistry Center
US Food and Drug Administration
6751 Steger Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45237-3097
(513) 679-2700 , [FAX] (513) 679-2761 E-mail:
fplatek-at-ora.fda.gov

DISCLAIMER: THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED ARE
SOLELY MY OWN AND DO NOT REPRESENT
THOSE OF THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
OR ANY OTHER AGENCY OF THE U.S.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OR THE FOUNDATION FOR
ADVANCES IN MEDICINE AND SCIENCE
(FAMS, INC.).






From: mike boykin :      mike_boykin-at-mindspring.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 20:56:06 -0500
Subject: TEM / SEM Sample Prep Workshop

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TEM & SEM Sample Preparation of Materials

A Two Part Workshop & Seminar


Leica Microsystems, Diatome US, Electron Microscopy Sciences, and Bal-Tec
announce another in a series of EM Specimen Preparation workshops. These
seminars will focus on the following techniques:

Ultramicrotomy of Materials

Embedding of industrial samples Specimen trimming

Ultramicrotomy of hard materials Ultramicrotomy of polymers

Collection & handling of sections Staining of polymer sections

Low temperature ultramicrotomy


Ion Beam Milling of Materials

Ion Milling of plan view samples for TEM

Ion Milling of cross section samples for TEM

SEM preparation of interfaces using fast slope cutting technique

TEM / SEM preparation of temperature sensitive specimens

SEM / LM preparation of surface structures with ion milling


The format of our workshop is half day lecture and half day bench work.
Samples will be supplied by the course instructors. Participants are
encouraged to bring their own samples to work with as time allows.


Course Speakers & Instructors

Ultramicrotomy of Materials

Dr. Tom Malis
CANMET
Characterization Group Leader
Materials Technology Laboratory
Ottawa, Ontario

Mr. Bob Vastenhout
DOW Chemical
Polymer Microscopist
Analytical Science Department
Terneuzen, The Netherlands

Mr. Helmut Gnaegi
Product Manager
Microtomist Extaordinaire
Diatome, Ltd., Switzerland

Ion Beam Milling

Dr. Wolfgang Gruenewald
Bal-Tec
Head of Applications Laboratory
Liechtenstein

Mr. Arthur Buechel
Bal-Tec
Product Manager
Liechtenstein



Hosted by: JoAn Hudson
Clemson University
Microscopy Facility
Clemson, SC

When: Ion Milling June 7-8, 1999

Ultramicrotomy June 9-11, 1999

Tuition: Ion Milling $400.00

Ultramicrotomy $1,400.00

Ion Milling & Ultramicrotomy $1,700.00

Includes lodging at the lakefront Conference Center & Inn at Clemson
University, continental breakfast and lunch daily, one group dinner, course
supplies, and lab charges.

Contact: Mike Boykin, Leica Microsystems, Inc. 800-248-0665 X5092





From: Wright, John D. :      jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 13:37:52 -0700
Subject: Ryter-Kellenberger Fixation

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I'm sorry to bother everyone, again, with a question about fixation of
bacteria. I greatly appreciate the responses I received a few weeks
ago. At one time Ryter-Kellenberger fixation was considered the
standard. It produced an image with a relatively clear nucleoid
containing fibrillar chromatin. Is this now considered to be an
artifact of preparation?

John Wright
West Desert Test Center
(435) 831-3017





From: wahlbrin-at-crpcu.lu (Petra Wahlbring)
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 11:52:17 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Help with EBIC or Voltage Contrast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Chris,

have you red the chapter about EBIC in the book of Ludwig Reimer?

Here is the reference:

Reimer, L: Scanning Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation and
Microanalysis. Springer Series in Optical Sciences Vol. 45 Chapter 7:
Electron-Beam-INduced Current, Cathodoluminescence and Special Techniques
p.272-312 (Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, Tokyo, 1985) ISBN
3-540-13530-8

Petra


} Hello,
}
} I am a neophyte to the microscopy world and am curious about EBIC and
} Voltage Contrast. I am wondering if there are good resources on the
} general mechanics of setting up the system. I also am having trouble
} finding basic information/ uses for EBIC. The Goldstein et al book does
} not delve too much into the topic of EBIC and am not sure of any other
} good SEM resource books.
}
} Thanks
} CP

--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public Centre Universitaire (CRP-CU)
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpcu.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpcu.lu/~wahlbrin






From: Frank-Martin Haar :      Frank-Martin.Haar-at-embl-heidelberg.de
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 13:04:51 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1999 - Scientists - Multiphoton Technology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A phantastic opportunity to meet well-kmown scientists and an excellent
chance to see and to compare the latest equipment for confocal and
multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Attend an excellent meeting and see
the most recent technological developments.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

Dear all,

we would like to invite you to attend this years "Focus on Microscopy"
conference.

Many of the well known scientists in this field will present their recent
progress.

Here is a list of the plenary speakers:
- G.J. Brakenhoff, Amsterdam
- Christoph Cremer
- Winfried Denk
- Timothy Holmes
- Anthony A. Hyman
- Stefan Hell
- Satoshi Kawata
- Karsten K=F6nig
- Andres Kriete
- Ulrich Kubitscheck
- Eric Manders
- Colin Sheppard
- Ernst H.K. Stelzer, Heidelberg
- Kevin F Sullivan
- Tony Wilson
- Daniele Zink

--------------------------------------------------------

The commercial exhibition offers an excellent overview. The modern
instruments of all major microscope manufacturers as well as microscope
accessories are on display. This is the 1999 event focussed on microscopy=
in
Europe.

Highlights of the commercial exhibition include:

Hamamatsu Photonics: ORCA Series - state of the art digital imaging
=B7 Progressive scan interline transfer CCD with 1280x1024 pixel
=B7 Lens-on-chip technology, TE cooling and optimized readout guarantee
highest sensitivity
=B7 Black & white cameras with 10-14 bit output
=B7 Color cameras with RGB matrix filter or filterwheel
=B7 Plug & play set incl. framegrabber and comfortable TWAIN driver avai=
lable

Leica Microsystems GmbH: Two-Photon Confocal System Leica TCS MP -
http://www.llt.de/mp1.html

L.O.T. Oriel GmbH & Co KG: Nanopositioning Unit and Fiber Laser

Molecular Probes: New fluorescent reagents for Cell Biology and Imaging
highly - Fluorescent Alexa dyes - click here for more details

Nikon GmbH: Two compact confocal microscopes + fully automatic motorized
research microscope

Olympus Optical Co. GmbH Confocal Laser-Scanning-Microscope with two-phot=
on
excitation

Omicron Vakuumphysik GmbH Scanning Near Field Optical Microscope (SNOM)

Visitron Systems GmbH: 2D/3D Fluorescence Imaging System based on Cooled
Digital Camera System

Wallac Distribution GmbH:
1. EG&G Wallac LSR UltraView, confocal fluorescence microscope for "real
time" images. It is the first presentation of this instrument in Germany.
2. EG&G Wallac Signifer, fluorescence microscope for recording images wi=
th
the time resolved fluorescence prinziple.
3. EG&G Berthold NightOWL, a universal imaging system for low level
luminescence images.

--------------------------------------------------------

Do not miss this one and only opportunity to gather information about the
latest developments in microscopy.

Go ahead simply register online now:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

Day tickets are available in Heidelberg.

Ernst H.K. Stelzer
Frank-Martin Haar

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

Meeting Announcement:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

Confocal microscopy, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution techniques =
are
increasingly applied in the study of three-dimensional structures such as
are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
Three-dimensional analysis and representation are crucial tasks in
subsequent data assessment. These conferences offer a most efficient meet=
ing
point for developers and users working in these rapidly evolving fields a=
nd
play an important role in the dissemination of information about new
developments. Special attention will be given to the dramatic development=
s
in live cell imaging and manipulation, such as the role of the green
fluorescent protein.
Further information:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy


Local Organizing Committee:
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Heidelberg
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen

Under the auspices of The International 3D Microscopy Society:
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University


Mailing address:
Focus on Microscopy 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Meyerhofstrasse 1
69117 Heidelberg
P.O. Box 102209
69012 Heidelberg
Germany

This e-mail was produced by Ernst H.K. Stelzer
EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany






From: Frank-Martin Haar :      Frank-Martin.Haar-at-embl-heidelberg.de
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 13:19:39 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 1999 - Scientists - Multiphoton Technology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A phantastic opportunity to meet well-kmown scientists and an excellent
chance to see and to compare the latest equipment for confocal and
multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Attend an excellent meeting and see
the most recent technological developments.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

Dear all,

we would like to invite you to attend this years "Focus on Microscopy"
conference.

Many of the well known scientists in this field will present their recent
progress.

Here is a list of the plenary speakers:
- G.J. Brakenhoff, Amsterdam
- Christoph Cremer, Heidelberg
- Winfried Denk, Murray Hill
- Timothy Holmes, Watervliet
- Anthony A. Hyman, Heidelberg
- Stefan Hell, Goettingen
- Satoshi Kawata, Osaka
- Karsten K=F6nig, Jena
- Andres Kriete, Giessen
- Ulrich Kubitscheck, Muenster
- Eric Manders, Amsterdam
- Colin Sheppard, Sydney
- Ernst H.K. Stelzer, Heidelberg
- Kevin F Sullivan, La Jolla
- Tony Wilson, Oxford
- Daniele Zink, Munich

--------------------------------------------------------

The commercial exhibition offers an excellent overview. The modern
instruments of all major microscope manufacturers as well as microscope
accessories are on display. This is the 1999 event focussed on microscopy=
in
Europe.

Highlights of the commercial exhibition include:

Hamamatsu Photonics: ORCA Series - state of the art digital imaging
=B7 Progressive scan interline transfer CCD with 1280x1024 pixel
=B7 Lens-on-chip technology, TE cooling and optimized readout guarantee
highest sensitivity
=B7 Black & white cameras with 10-14 bit output
=B7 Color cameras with RGB matrix filter or filterwheel
=B7 Plug & play set incl. framegrabber and comfortable TWAIN driver avai=
lable

Leica Microsystems GmbH: Two-Photon Confocal System Leica TCS MP -
http://www.llt.de/mp1.html

L.O.T. Oriel GmbH & Co KG: Nanopositioning Unit and Fiber Laser

Molecular Probes: New fluorescent reagents for Cell Biology and Imaging
highly - Fluorescent Alexa dyes - click here for more details

Nikon GmbH: Two compact confocal microscopes + fully automatic motorized
research microscope

Olympus Optical Co. GmbH Confocal Laser-Scanning-Microscope with two-phot=
on
excitation

Omicron Vakuumphysik GmbH Scanning Near Field Optical Microscope (SNOM)

Visitron Systems GmbH: 2D/3D Fluorescence Imaging System based on Cooled
Digital Camera System

Wallac Distribution GmbH:
1. EG&G Wallac LSR UltraView, confocal fluorescence microscope for "real
time" images. It is the first presentation of this instrument in Germany.
2. EG&G Wallac Signifer, fluorescence microscope for recording images wi=
th
the time resolved fluorescence prinziple.
3. EG&G Berthold NightOWL, a universal imaging system for low level
luminescence images.

--------------------------------------------------------

Do not miss this one and only opportunity to gather information about the
latest developments in microscopy.

Go ahead simply register online now:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy

Day tickets are available in Heidelberg.

Ernst H.K. Stelzer
Frank-Martin Haar

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

Meeting Announcement:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 1999

12th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
11th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy
April 11th-15th, 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

Confocal microscopy, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution techniques =
are
increasingly applied in the study of three-dimensional structures such as
are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
Three-dimensional analysis and representation are crucial tasks in
subsequent data assessment. These conferences offer a most efficient meet=
ing
point for developers and users working in these rapidly evolving fields a=
nd
play an important role in the dissemination of information about new
developments. Special attention will be given to the dramatic development=
s
in live cell imaging and manipulation, such as the role of the green
fluorescent protein.
Further information:

http://www.embl-heidelberg.de/Conferences/FocusOnMicroscopy


Local Organizing Committee:
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL, Heidelberg
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen

Under the auspices of The International 3D Microscopy Society:
Prof. Colin Sheppard, University of Sydney
Dr. Andres Kriete, University of Giessen
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam
Prof. P-C. Cheng, SUNY at Buffalo
Prof. Tony Wilson, University of Oxford
Dr. Carol Cogswell, University of Sydney
Dr. Vyvyan Howard, University of Liverpool
Dr. Guy Cox, University of Sydney
Dr. Ernst H.K. Stelzer, EMBL
Prof. S. Kawata, Osaka University


Mailing address:
Focus on Microscopy 1999
European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
Meyerhofstrasse 1
69117 Heidelberg
P.O. Box 102209
69012 Heidelberg
Germany

This e-mail was produced by Ernst H.K. Stelzer
EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany






From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 07:46:54 -0800
Subject: RE: Size of microscopy industry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


David asks ...
}
}
} I am working on a business project that requires an analysis of the
} microscopy market and am hoping someone can direct me to a
} good source of information.
} ...

The best jump off point is the WWW-Virtual Library ...

http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/www-vl/ ...

... hope this helps :o)

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 10:40:48 -0600
Subject: Re: Ryter-Kellenberger Fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It is possible to use a variety of other fixatives to preserve bacteria.
However, we find that when all else fails, the R-K procedure nearly always
gives a good fixation on organisms that otherwise look poorly preserved.
The buffer is somewhat cumbersome to prepare since the veronal (sodium
barbitol) is a controlled substance.



} I'm sorry to bother everyone, again, with a question about fixation of
} bacteria. I greatly appreciate the responses I received a few weeks
} ago. At one time Ryter-Kellenberger fixation was considered the
} standard. It produced an image with a relatively clear nucleoid
} containing fibrillar chromatin. Is this now considered to be an
} artifact of preparation?

####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################







From: Elaine M. Mohrbach :      emohrbac-at-zoo.uvm.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 12:12:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Tem-Fix for Xenopus Oocytes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can someone suggest a fixative for Xenopus oocytes?

Thank you,

Elaine Mohrbach
emohrbac-at-zoo.uvm.edu








From: Stephen McCartney :      stmccart-at-vt.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 15:43:55 -0500
Subject: TEM of low density polyethylene

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for a procedure to do TEM of low density polyethylene films. I
would like to stain the film so I can then microtome at room temperature.
For high density films we use chlorosulfonic acid at 60C but this dissolves
the low density material. I can cryo-microtome the low density films and
then stain the sections with ruthenium tetroxide but this is giving only
marginal results. I would really like to be able to room temperature
microtome the material. Any help greatly appreciated.


------------------------------
Stephen McCartney
Research Associate
Virginia Tech
Materials Institute
2108 Hahn Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344
USA

TEL: 540-231-9765
FAX: 540-231-8517
------------------------------






From: Cesar D. Fermin Ph.D. :      cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 15:08:09 -0600
Subject: DNA-TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Need a simplified recipe for viewing circular DNA ~5000KB in a gamish of
linear DNA. No special marker or complementary sequence available.
Thanks.

*Disclaimer: Whatever... is not Tulane opinion!
Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology & Otolaryngology
web:[ http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/ferminlab/] or
[http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/imaging/] Internet:
[cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu]
1430 Tulane Ave/SL79 New Orleans, La 70112-2699
Fax 504 587-7389, Voice 584-2521, Main Office 588-5224






From: micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 16:56:22 -0600
Subject: photographer needs microscopy info

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear collegues,

I've received the following query and thought I'd post it so the various
types of microscopists out there besides me might like to help this fellow
out. Please reply directly to his eddress since he's not on the listserver.


Many thanks,

Dee Breger

hello:

my name is francisco sandoval, and I live in Guatemala in central
america.

I am a photographer, and I am interested in microscope photography, but
I do not know where to begin, could you help me with it.

I guess I do not understand the kind of microscope you are using. I do
not know anything about microscopes..... If you do not mind helping me,
tell me where to begin..... Thanks

Francisco Sandoval

kikophoto-at-geocities.com
jfse30-at-hotmail.com

www.geocities.com/paris/jardin/4108/

____________________________________________________________________________
Automatic note: Sometimes I don't receive incoming emails (with no notice
to the sender). If I don't respond to your message, please send it again!
____________________________________________________________________________
_
Dee Breger
Manager, SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Route 9W
Palisades NY 10964 USA

T: 914/365-8640
F: 914/365-8155
I: www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro







From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 16:40:16 -0700
Subject: RE: Image processing software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


As a company that produces image processing systems (see disclaimer
below), I would like to invite you to check out our website at
http://www.soft-imaging.com or http://www.soft-imaging.de. We routinely
deal with 12 to 16 bit gray scale images as most digital cameras supply
them.

If you need further information, don't hesitate to contact us at one of
the URLs or numbers below.

Thank you.

Michael Bode

*******************************************************
Disclaimer:
Soft Imaging System produces and sells image acquisition
and processing systems. We therefore have a vested
interest in some of the items mentioned above.
*******************************************************

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: info-at-soft-imaging.com

} ----------
} From: Hendrik O. Colijn[SMTP:colijn.1-at-osu.edu]
} Sent: Friday, March 19, 1999 6:16 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Image processing software
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
} Is anyone familiar with reasonably priced software programs that can
} manipulate 16-bit gray scale images? While Adobe Photoshop can read
} 16-bit
} images, you have to change the images to 8-bit before you can run
} filters
} etc. Gatan's Digital Micrograph can work with 16-bit images, but its
} price
} is a little steep for equipping several computers. What are the
} capabilities of other packages? I would like to use the software to
} work
} with diffraction patterns as well as images.
}
} TIA,
} Henk
}
} Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
} OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility (614) 292-0674
} "An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
} A pessimist fears that this is true."
}





From: Gene & Dana Young :      gyoung1-at-computron.net
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 21:05:15 -0600
Subject: RE: TEM of low density polyethylene

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I provide third party maintenance for EM in the midwest, so take the
following as a somewhat biased view. I'd also like to apologize in advance
for my typically long and meandering response. I don't pull punches, so
perhaps I should start adding a disclaimer that the following are my
opinions - if that's not enough, go ahead and sue, I don't have anything
anyway.

An insurance company's primary usefulness is to large organizations that can
off-load the responsibility for a large amount of equipment. Their
customers will contract with them for all of their equipment, they handle
the paperwork and arrange service. In these cases, a good portion of the
cost savings can be in the customer's reduction in paperwork - one contract
as opposed to hundreds. To do the service, they hire the manufacturer
(don't know how many manufacturers go along with this, not all do) or an
independant service provider (I have been approached a number of times,
haven't done it yet) on an hourly basis to do the work, usually negotiating
reduced rates. I am sure that, here in the early stages, they are
underestimating their costs and will raise their rates as they gain a
greater understanding.

A number of direct problems. Mainly, they will have a hard time
guaranteeing response time. For any manufacturer or independant, contract
customers come first. You are also at their mercy for who comes to work on
your equipment, it may even be a different organization each time. From my
point of view, you run a risk of never getting someone who has some long
term interest or commitment in your needs, even if they use the original
equipment manufacturer. The OEM will no longer bear any responsibility
other than providing service when needed (and the more often the better for
their bottom line when hourly).

Service used to be a loss-leader, a way for a company to increase their
sales by creating good will and a positive corporate image. Question this,
just count up the number of JEOLs sold in the last fifteen years. They made
a conscious effort to provide exceptional service and sold like crazy on the
basis of those efforts. A couple of decades ago, most companies found that
there are profits to be made in service and have run their service
accordingly and made the industry an increasingly tempting market for new
manufacturers, third party service providers and the new insurance
companies.

If you only have a few pieces of equipment, you'd do better to find a local
independant. You'll probably find that an independant can be very flexible
in contract terms. Consider asking them to remove the 'insurance' aspects
of a service contract by removing parts coverage. You could still get PMs
and emergency labor, but the service provider would not have to be escrowing
a good chunk of money just in case an expensive part goes. That, of course,
would require you to do so. There is some insurance value to the contract
labor rates, but generally not much. A good technician can do a lot to
prevent future service needs and it is a lot less traumatic to a small
operation to spend extra time fixing an instrument than it is to replace
that $10,000 whiz-bang that blew.

You can also, of course, handle your service on a billable basis with
manufacturer or independent. Watch out for the manufacturers, though. Some
like to charge a premium (I've seen over $300/hour) in order to encourage
you to go under contract. Independents may play this game too, but not to
that extent (I don't know of any who do). While I am obviously biased
towards the independents, I truely think that supporting them is the only
way to keep any real competition in this or any other industry.

Frankly, the insurance companies are hoping to become the big kid on the
block in the future so that they can create their own terms with the
manufacturers. Instrumental service rates are bad enough already, but this
squeeze play could eventually hurt the industry the same way managed care
and HMOs have hurt the medical industry. Manufacturers have income goals
that will be met, one way or another. If the insurance companies squeeze
out their service profits, manufacturer's prices on remaining contracts will
go up which will then force more users to go to the insurance companies.
Manufacturers will also have to increase the selling price for their
equipment. We are merely adding another layer of for-profit companies to
take a bite out of your pocket.

There is a potentially insidious effect of organizations like this. In
claiming to reduce costs for a few, they wind up increasing costs for all.
Rather than introducing new competition, they manipulate a market to the
point where some existing competitors leave the market. They bring no new
instruments to market, work counter to free enterprise by attempting to be
the arbitor of pricing without actually providing the service and, as the
market becomes saturated by them, will go into bidding wars between
themselves reducing services in order to lower their costs. There will be
some manufacturers that won't be able to stay competitive with the external
pressure and others that won't want to bend to those pressures. Look to a
future of greater cutbacks and mergers as these new players are accommodated
in the market.

We are also already seeing another aspect of this. In attempting to cut
costs, manufacturers may cut back their own sales efforts, relying on others
instead. The EM markets are getting large enough and there are enough
manufacturers that we may eventually see 'distributers' added on the front
end, yet another layer of for-profit companies taking a piece of the pie.
It is common for a company to enter a new national market through marketing
arrangements. ISI has for a long time had direct sales presence in the US.
While this is a company that has had its share of problems, their new
marketing arrangement is a cutback in its sales force that is in large part
due to its poor service history and poor profits in sales and service.
While not precipitated by the insurance companies, it still may offer a view
of their future effects.

It will not benefit any manufacturer to take part in these plans in the long
run. Doing so would be giving up all control over a very important sector
of their public relations, cut into their profits and resolve them to having
other companies dictate their policies and pricing. Look for some
manufacturers to resist because doing so allows them to distinguish
themselves in the market by maintaining their own high level of service
responsiveness and performance. However, as this snowballs we may well
reach a critical mass where all manufacturers will have to participate in
order to survive.

Good luck, whatever you choose.

Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, IL 60174
PH 630.513.7093 FAX 630.513.7092 Email: ars-at-sem.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Tindall, Randy D. {TindallR-at-missouri.edu}
To: 'microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com' {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Stephen,

The following procedure has been adapted from the literature (I don't have
the references with me):

The method that I normally use to image LLDPE is to first embed a strip of
the film with Epofix epoxy using a silicone mold. After curing the epoxy,
face-off the end of the specimen block to expose the film (assuming you want
a cross-section) and then attach the block to a piece of double-sided tape
on a glass microscope slide. The next step involves staining the specimen
block with the vapor of a mixture of 0.2 g of ruthenium trichloride
trihydrate and 10 ml of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (regular household
bleach). This produces a fairly aggressive RuO4 vapor. The staining mixture
and the slide should be kept in a glass jar with a loosely fitting lid for 2
to 3 hours -at- room temp. Occasionally, the temp. needs to be elevated for
higher density polyolefins. Do all of the staining in a fume hood!!

After staining is complete, remove the slide/specimen, rinse well and allow
to dry. The specimen block can be trimmed and microtomed at room
temperature. I normally orient the film parallel to the edge of the diamond
knife. This helps prevents delamination from the epoxy.

I hope this procedure helps. I've been using this technique for several
years with great success.

Gene Young
Microscopy/Microanalysis Group
Dow Chemical USA
Freeport, TX

------------------------------
Original message:

I am looking for a procedure to do TEM of low density polyethylene films. I
would like to stain the film so I can then microtome at room temperature.
For high density films we use chlorosulfonic acid at 60C but this dissolves
the low density material. I can cryo-microtome the low density films and
then stain the sections with ruthenium tetroxide but this is giving only
marginal results. I would really like to be able to room temperature
microtome the material. Any help greatly appreciated.


------------------------------
Stephen McCartney
Research Associate
Virginia Tech
Materials Institute
2108 Hahn Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344
USA

TEL: 540-231-9765
FAX: 540-231-8517
------------------------------






From: dmrelion-at-world.std.com (donald j marshall)
Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 23:08:50 -0500
Subject: Re: photographer needs microscopy info

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} Date: Tue, 23 Mar 1999 16:56:22 -0600
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: photographer needs microscopy info
}
}
} Dear collegues,
}
} I've received the following query and thought I'd post it so the various
} types of microscopists out there besides me might like to help this fello
} out. Please reply directly to his eddress since he's not on the listserver
}
}
} Many thanks,
}
} Dee Breger
}
} hello:
}
} my name is francisco sandoval, and I live in Guatemala in central
} america.
}
} I am a photographer, and I am interested in microscope photography, but
} I do not know where to begin, could you help me with it.
}
} I guess I do not understand the kind of microscope you are using. I do
} not know anything about microscopes..... If you do not mind helping me,
} tell me where to begin..... Thanks
}
} Francisco Sandoval
}
} kikophoto-at-geocities.com
} jfse30-at-hotmail.com
}
} _________________________________
}
Francisco, I don't know if it is still available but the booklet by Eastman
Kodak, Photography through the Microscope, is quite good. It isKodak
Publication P-2 CAT 152 8371. Published in 1980


Don Marshall

Donald J. Marshall
Relion Industries
P.O. Box 12
Bedford, MA 01730
Ph: 781-275-4695
FAX: 781-271-0252
email dmrelion-at-world.std.com

"A weed is a flower out of place."

(Please note: Do not send email with attachments to this address. Instead, send it to donbarlen-at-aol.com. Thank you.)





From: Robert H. Olley :      R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 09:11:28 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: TEM of low density polyethylene

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Tue, 23 Mar 1999, Stephen McCartney wrote:

} I am looking for a procedure to do TEM of low density polyethylene films. I
} would like to stain the film so I can then microtome at room temperature.
} For high density films we use chlorosulfonic acid at 60C but this dissolves
} the low density material. I can cryo-microtome the low density films and
} then stain the sections with ruthenium tetroxide but this is giving only
} marginal results. I would really like to be able to room temperature
} microtome the material. Any help greatly appreciated.

I'm an etcher, not a stainer, but we do have some experience of staining
materials in bulk. Possibly a room temperature chlorosulphonation might
help. I've never used RuO4, but it might also work in bulk on a thin
enough film. I'll have to ask a colleague, when he's in his office.

If you're interested in larger scale variations in morphology, then
permanganic etching followed by reflection optical microscopy (Nomarski)
is very useful.

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 08:47:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Biologist needs help from Material Scientists!!

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Dear Leslie,

Before you do anything, including cleaning the ball bearings, find out
their history! The goop on the surface may be part of the story.

My advice: try light microscopy first. Reflected light DIC may tell you
alot about the surface. Also try interferometry (I'll be back in the
office Monday; call or contact me directly for further info). I had a
similar project for a client some years ago with ball bearings for jet
engines. If the height of the asperities was too tall, they would break
off, leaving metallic residue in the raceway which caused the lubricant to
polymerize and freeze up. Needless to say, not a desirable outcome for an
airplane at 30,000+ feet!

If the bumps on the ball bearings are not the problem, then you might want
to try SEM + EDS to see if there is some problem in the alloy.

Best of luck and let me know how things turn out.

Barbara Foster
125 Paridon Street Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com








At 10:53 AM 3/4/99 -0500, Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From: Mriglermas-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 22 Mar 1999 20:56:06 -0500
Subject: TEM / SEM Sample Prep Workshop

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Dear Friendly Sysop - Nestor:

I've attached a recent announcement for a workshop as an example of an item
"for sale." I believe that items for sale, whether services, supplies, or
instruments all require the same kind of response you gave to my posting for
"instruments available" recently. Please see that workshops for profit are
stricken from the Listserver so that you are consistent with your own policy
or, change your posting policy.

I believe that any of us who are in this field should be able to post any kind
of useful informative item that would be of interest to those on the list.
The availability of microscopes is a useful piece of info for someone who has
a legitimate need for a used scope. There are a lot of people looking for
microscope users and owners as a trusted resource rather than the
manufacture's sales reps. Please consider this in the future.


Thanks for your attention to this matter.

Mark W. Rigler, Ph.D.
VP, MAS, Inc.

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TEM & SEM Sample Preparation of Materials

A Two Part Workshop & Seminar


Leica Microsystems, Diatome US, Electron Microscopy Sciences, and Bal-Tec
announce another in a series of EM Specimen Preparation workshops. These
seminars will focus on the following techniques:

Ultramicrotomy of Materials

Embedding of industrial samples Specimen trimming

Ultramicrotomy of hard materials Ultramicrotomy of polymers

Collection & handling of sections Staining of polymer sections

Low temperature ultramicrotomy


Ion Beam Milling of Materials

Ion Milling of plan view samples for TEM

Ion Milling of cross section samples for TEM

SEM preparation of interfaces using fast slope cutting technique

TEM / SEM preparation of temperature sensitive specimens

SEM / LM preparation of surface structures with ion milling


The format of our workshop is half day lecture and half day bench work.
Samples will be supplied by the course instructors. Participants are
encouraged to bring their own samples to work with as time allows.


Course Speakers & Instructors

Ultramicrotomy of Materials

Dr. Tom Malis
CANMET
Characterization Group Leader
Materials Technology Laboratory
Ottawa, Ontario

Mr. Bob Vastenhout
DOW Chemical
Polymer Microscopist
Analytical Science Department
Terneuzen, The Netherlands

Mr. Helmut Gnaegi
Product Manager
Microtomist Extaordinaire
Diatome, Ltd., Switzerland

Ion Beam Milling

Dr. Wolfgang Gruenewald
Bal-Tec
Head of Applications Laboratory
Liechtenstein

Mr. Arthur Buechel
Bal-Tec
Product Manager
Liechtenstein



Hosted by: JoAn Hudson
Clemson University
Microscopy Facility
Clemson, SC

When: Ion Milling June 7-8, 1999

Ultramicrotomy June 9-11, 1999

Tuition: Ion Milling $400.00

Ultramicrotomy $1,400.00

Ion Milling & Ultramicrotomy $1,700.00

Includes lodging at the lakefront Conference Center & Inn at Clemson
University, continental breakfast and lunch daily, one group dinner, course
supplies, and lab charges.

Contact: Mike Boykin, Leica Microsystems, Inc. 800-248-0665 X5092


--part0_922290541_boundary--





From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 11:06:02 -0500
Subject: C film thickness

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi. I was recently asked of a way to determine C film thickness. I =
remember that using a polished brass specimen and observing the color is =
one way. Does anyone have a source in the literature for this method? =
Thanks.

______________________
Roberto Garcia
Senior Analyst, Metallography
North Carolina State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01BE75E6.4E13C940
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{META content=3D'"MSHTML 5.00.0910.1309"' name=3DGENERATOR} {/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D2} Hi. I was recently asked of a way to determine C =
film=20
thickness. I remember that using a polished brass specimen and observing =
the=20
color is one way. Does anyone have a source in the literature for this =
method?=20
Thanks. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D3} ______________________ {BR} Roberto Garcia {BR} Senior =
Analyst,=20
Metallography {BR} North Carolina State University {BR} Analytical =
Instrumentation=20
Facility {BR} Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC {BR} Raleigh, NC=20
27695-7531 {BR} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com {BR} http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif {/FONT=
} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01BE75E6.4E13C940--






From: Debby Sherman :      sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Date: 24 Mar 99 12:15:57 -0500
Subject: Tetrahymena Fix

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I have a student who has done confocal on tetrahymena and now wants
to move on to TEM. She is primarily interested in the microtubular arrays
in the cilia and also within the body of the organism, especially at
division. However, we also would like to get the best possible preservation of
the entire organism.

Since these two needs may conflict, I would appreciate hearing from
anyone with experience with this or similar organisms.

Possible approaches could include:
a) using tannic acid to stabilize the microtubules (percent?, in all
solutions or only primary fix?, best buffer system?, etc)
b) using a combined glutaradyhde-osmium fix followed by straight
osmium (recommended by Hayat.

Thanks in advance for the assistance.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Microscopy Center in Agriculture FAX: 765-494-5896
Dept. of Botany & Plant Pathology E-mail: sherman-at-btny.purdue.edu
Purdue University
1057 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907-1057







From: Heide Schatten :      schattenh-at-umc-mail02.missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 12:56:35 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral or graduate student position available

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id HMDAAJC2; Wed, 24 Mar 1999 12:54:34 -0600
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Ph.D. graduate student or post-doctoral student (D.V.M. or M.D.)
position available for research in the area of protozoal parasitology.
Research will involve electron microscopy and cellular biology studies
utilizing in vitro derived Sarcocystis spp. , Neospora spp. and
Toxoplasma gondii parasites. Individual will work with a
multi-disciplinary team at the University of Missouri-Columbia, in the
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology and the Molecular Biology Program
Electron Microscopy Core facility. Successful candidate should have
background in tissue/cell embedding and processing for light and
electron microscopy, and demonstrated proficiency in written and spoken
English. Molecular biology and cell culture skills are helpful, but not
a necessary requirement. U.S. citizenship is not required.
For further information contact Dr. A.E. Marsh at ph: 573-884-2673,
fax: 573-884-5414, or email: marshae-at-missouri.edu
{mailto:marshae-at-missouri.edu} .






From: RMacKay :      rmackay-at-IS.Dal.Ca
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 15:26:38 +0000
Subject: Re: C film thickness

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Robert,

Try The American Mineralogist, Volume 58, pages 920-925, 1973.
The role of Carbon Film Thickness in Electron Microprobe
Analysis - Kerrick DM, Eminhizer LB amd Villaume JF.

Bob



-----------------------------------------------------------------------

} From: "Roberto Garcia" {rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu}

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01BE75E6.4E13C940
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi. I was recently asked of a way to determine C film thickness. I =
remember that using a polished brass specimen and observing the color is =
one way. Does anyone have a source in the literature for this method? =
Thanks.

______________________
Roberto Garcia
Senior Analyst, Metallography
North Carolina State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01BE75E6.4E13C940
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charset="iso-8859-1"
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{META content=3D'"MSHTML 5.00.0910.1309"' name=3DGENERATOR} {/HEAD}
{BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D2} Hi. I was recently asked of a way to determine C =
film=20
thickness. I remember that using a polished brass specimen and observing =
the=20
color is one way. Does anyone have a source in the literature for this =
method?=20
Thanks. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT size=3D3} ______________________ {BR} Roberto Garcia {BR} Senior =
Analyst,=20
Metallography {BR} North Carolina State University {BR} Analytical =
Instrumentation=20
Facility {BR} Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC {BR} Raleigh, NC=20
27695-7531 {BR} rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com {BR} http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif {/FONT=
} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_0017_01BE75E6.4E13C940--



Robert MacKay
Department of Earth Sciences
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
B3H 3J5
Tel: 902 494-7087
Fax: 902 494-6889
e-mail rmackay-at-ac.dal.ca





From: Bob Price :      price-at-dcsmserver.med.sc.edu (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 16:02:12 -0600
Subject: job opening: South Carolina School of Medicine

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Subject: job opening
} Priority: normal
} X-mailer: Pegasus Mail for Windows (v2.42a)
} Message-ID: {5586A5401D-at-dcsmserver.med.sc.edu}

}
} Hi,
}
} We currently have a position open for a microscopist in the
} University of South Carolina School of Medicine Instrumentation
} Resource Facility. Primary responsibilities involve assisting
} faculty, staff and students in the use of confocal and electron
} microscopes and in digital preparation of images (primarily Adobe
} Photoshop). Secondary responsibilities involve assistance a flow
} cytometer and a BioRad phosphorimager.
}
} All current work in the facility is biological. Applicants should
} have a masters degree or equivalent experience. The
} position is listed as a Research Specialist II with a salary range
} from $24,618-$35,081. Please reply directly to me at


} Price-at-med.sc.edu.
} Robert L. Price
} Director, Instrumentation
} Resource Facility
} USC School of Medicine
} Garner's Ferry Road
} Columbia, SC 29208
} Phone: 803-733-3393
} Fax:803-733-1533








From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 17:13:22 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM / SEM Sample Prep Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am one of the people involved in the "for sale" example that Mark feels to
be equivalent to his "instruments available" posting, which, I must confess,
I don't remember seeing, or Nestor's apparent striking of it from the
Listserver. I have participated in 8 of these TEM specimen prep workshops
for Leica and RMC over the years, plus I have taken part (with many others)
in similar workshops or short courses that are university-based, with the
famous Lehigh short courses being the most widely-known example. I think
that there are 2 key points you are missing, Mark:

1) These workshops are not designed to make money. If they break even, the
companies that organize them are ecstatic.

2) These workshops are highly educational, which is the justification used
by the students attending to their superiors (and confirmed by attendee
feedback). As a supervisor, I continually look for such workshops on the
Listserver for professional upgrading and/or career changes for my
scientists and technologists.

When I want a new (or used) research tool, I tend not to look to the
Listserver, but talk to vendors or colleagues, walk the floor at the MSA
commercial exhibition, etc, etc. Whether or not your posting meets Nestor's
criteria is not up to me, but let's not confuse apples with oranges (or the
difficulty in properly using a complex instrument with the initial purchase
of the instrument).

Tom Malis
Group Leader - Characterization
Materials Technology Laboratory
Natural Resources Canada (Govt. of Canada)
568 Booth St., Ottawa, Canada
ph. 613-992-2310
FAX 613-992-8735
email: malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca


} ----------
} From:
} "Mriglermas-at-aol.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com[SMTP:"Mriglermas-at-aol.com"-at-Sparc
} 5.Microscopy.Com]
} Sent: March 24, 1999 10:49 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Cc: Mriglermas-at-aol.com
} Subject: Fwd: TEM / SEM Sample Prep Workshop
}
} { {Message: TEM / SEM Sample Prep Workshop} }
} Dear Friendly Sysop - Nestor:
}
} I've attached a recent announcement for a workshop as an example of an
} item
} "for sale." I believe that items for sale, whether services, supplies, or
} instruments all require the same kind of response you gave to my posting
} for
} "instruments available" recently. Please see that workshops for profit
} are
} stricken from the Listserver so that you are consistent with your own
} policy
} or, change your posting policy.
}
} I believe that any of us who are in this field should be able to post any
} kind
} of useful informative item that would be of interest to those on the list.
} The availability of microscopes is a useful piece of info for someone who
} has
} a legitimate need for a used scope. There are a lot of people looking for
} microscope users and owners as a trusted resource rather than the
} manufacture's sales reps. Please consider this in the future.
}
}
} Thanks for your attention to this matter.
}
} Mark W. Rigler, Ph.D.
} VP, MAS, Inc.
}





From: Vladislav V. Speransky :      vladis-at-MAINE.EDU
Date: Wed, 24 Mar 1999 21:41:35 -0500
Subject: Re: Ryter-Kellenberger Fixation/Delayed Second Fixation

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} I'm sorry to bother everyone, again, with a question about fixation of
} bacteria. I greatly appreciate the responses I received a few weeks
} ago. At one time Ryter-Kellenberger fixation was considered the
} standard. It produced an image with a relatively clear nucleoid
} containing fibrillar chromatin. Is this now considered to be an
} artifact of preparation?
}
} John Wright
} West Desert Test Center
} (435) 831-3017
}

Two of the more recent reviews by the same E. Kellenberger ("The
bacterial nucleoid revisited" (1994) in Microbiol Rev 58:211-32; and
"Functional consequences of improved structural information on
bacterial nucleoids" (1991) in Res Microbiol 142:229-38) should
answer your question in great detail. They also make a most
enjoyable reading!

Briefly, the nucleoid, according to the results obtained with rapid
freezing-freeze substitution, "is now more granular than fibrillar",
thus, conceivably, reflecting the natural supercoiled state of the
DNA. It has a "coralline" shape, and "the excrescencies reach far
into the cytoplasm. Membrane contact is no longer excluded".
Interestingly, but the liquid-crystalline form of the DNA also
appears to be native in some cases...

The classic Ryter-Kellenberger method still makes a standard for a
good chemical fixation. It is beneficial sometimes to add an aldehyde
prefixation step or make other minor modifications, but treatment with
AQUOEUS uranyl acetate before dehydration remains the most critical
for good nucleoid preservation. Bacterial "chromosome" lacks the
proteins that keep eukaryotic chromatin from collapse during
dehydration, and only aqueous uranyl acetate, following conventional
fixation, cross-links the nucleoid in that "liquid-crystalline"
state.

I remember your original posting also generated discussion about
delayed secondary fixation, or for how long the material can be left
in glut. For fine ultrastructure work, I would not leave bacteria (as
well as anything else) at any step longer than necessary. Even if the
osmotic pressure is adjusted to minimize swelling/shrinking, you will
most likely end up with a specific unpleasant granularity of the
cytoplasm in your bacteria if you leave them in a glutaraldehyde
fixative for too long. To split the protocol into two days, it is
best to leave the material overnight in 70% ethanol in the
refrigerator. But for just diagnostic, etc., purposes, it is, of
course, O.K., and sometimes simply unavoidable, to store the samples
for quite a while in a glutaraldehyde fixative in a refrigerator.

Please feel free to contact me directly if you can't find the
journals or if other questions arise.
Sincerely,
Vlad.

Vladislav V. Speransky
School of Marine Sciences
University of Maine
5722 Deering Hall
Orono, ME 04469-5722
Phone: 207 581 2998
Fax: 207 581 2969
Email: vladis-at-maine.maine.edu





From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-czapla.IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 09:08:31 +0100 (MET)
Subject: STERMAT 2000

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=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D

FIRST CIRCULAR AND CALL FOR PAPERS STERMAT 2000

Adress; "http://www.mech.pk.edu.pl/stermat/ "

Conference scope:=20

Theoretical stereology Mathematical morphology Advances in image=20
analysis, Modern techniques in microscopy /image acquisition=20
Quantitative fractography 3-D modelling and analysis dissemination of=20
stereology and image analysis applications=20

Conference language English, no translations anticipated

Conference program (proceedings will be distributed prior to the=20
conference)=20

No parallel sessions Invited lectures (25') Oral presentations (15')=20
Poster presentations combined with panel discussion=20

Deadlines=20

Preliminary registration, October 31, 1999=20
Second circular, December 31, 1999=20
Final papers, March 31, 2000=20
Final registration, May 31, 2000=20
Final circular with conference program, July 31, 2000=20


Correspondence:

STERMAT 2000

Institute of Materials Science
Cracow University of Technology
Al. Jana Paw=B3a II 37
31-864 Krak=F3w, Poland

fax: (48 12) 648 44 36, 413 96 57

e-mail: {wojnar-at-mech.pk.edu.pl}

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
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=09best regards

Krzysztof Jan Huebner=20

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl} :-)=20

Instytut Odlewnictwa=20
ul Zakopianska 73 telefon (0-12) 2618111 wew 356
30-418 Krakow faks (0-12) 2660870






From: publishing-at-mailcity.com
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 99 02:22:09 EST
Subject: Publishing Company for Sale!

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From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 09:09:52 -0500
Subject: Thickness of carbon films.

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Roberto, We used a thin gold coating on the shiny side of household =
aluminum
foil. This works great for relative thicknesses. Russ

-----Original Message-----
} From: Roberto Garcia [mailto:rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, March 24, 1999 11:06 AM
To: MSA Microscopy




The accurate control of the thickness of evaporated carbon films.

Principle.
When carbon is deposited onto gold, it forms interference colors that are
well defined. They can be used to determine the thickness of the carbon.

The colors.
If carbon is evaporated onto gold, as the thickness of the carbon
increases, the color changes through the following sequence: gold, orange,
red, blue, grey. The change of color from red to blue is particularly
sharp and clear. The change of color from red to blue occurs when the
thickness of the carbon is 24.0 nm +/- 0.5nm.
This result was obtained by people at Balzers using a multibeam
interference technique for calibration.

Details.
1 Take a glass slide (or any other suitable substrate) and evaporate onto
it a layer of gold. The thickness is not critical as long as the gold is
thick enough to give an opaque film that looks like gold.
2 Mount the slide in the same chamber with the specimen to be coated with
carbon. the thickness of the carbon on the slide will be 24 nm so arrange
the distance of the slide and the sample so that (by the inverse square
law) the desired thickness on the sample will occur when the thickness on
the slide is 24 nm.
3 Evaporate the carbon; stop the evaporation as the color changes form red
to blue. If you are using a normal arc for the carbon evaporation, the
light from the arc will allow you to see the colors. The bell jar will
need to be reasonably clean.

Example.
Suppose you need to deposit a carbon film of thickness T nm. Let d be the
distance from the carbon arc to the gold slide; let D be the distance from
the carbon arc to the specimen. Then [d/D]squared = T/24.

Reference: My thesis (1967).

Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu






From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 25 Mar 99 09:38:53 -0500
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

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microscopy {microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 25 Mar 99 09:38:53 -0500
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

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Reply to: RE: Thickness of carbon films.
Re: Carbon Film Thickness
When great accuracy of film thickness is not needed, we simply =
place a small metal washer upon a glass slide near the "specimen area".
after evaporation the step height between the shaded and coated areas is =
measured optically on a bench interference microscope. Ours is a Zeiss =
two beam unit that is good for 30 nanometer resolution, (+ or -), with no =
physical contact with the film. It works for ANY reflective metallic film =
and fairly well even on "dull" carbon coatings because it has three =
different reference mirrors that can be quickly changed. Each mirror has a =
different reflectivity that one merely tests to get reasonable =
interference fringes which can also be photographed via polaroid or 35 mm. =
film.
Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division =
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Ave.
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail {kestel-at-anl.gov} FAX: (630) 252-4289

Alwyn Eades wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America =

{HTML} {HEAD} {/HEAD} {BODY}
{PRE =
WIDTH=3D"132"}
Reply to: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

{/PRE}
{FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D3 COLOR=3D"#000000"} Re: =
Carbon Film Thickness {BR}
When =
great accuracy of film thickness is not =
needed, we simply place a small metal washer =
upon a glass slide near the "specimen =
area". {BR}
after evaporation the step =
height between the shaded and coated areas =
is measured optically on a bench interference =
microscope. Ours is a Zeiss two beam unit =
that is good for 30 nanometer resolution, =
(+ or -), with no physical contact with =
the film. It works for ANY reflective metallic =
film and fairly well even on "dull" =
carbon coatings because it has three different =
reference mirrors that can be quickly changed. =
Each mirror has a different reflectivity =
that one merely tests to get reasonable =
interference fringes which can also be photographed =
via polaroid or 35 mm. film. {BR}
Bernie =
Kestel {BR}
Materials Science Division {BR}
=
Argonne National Laboratory {BR}
9700 South =
Cass Ave. {BR}
Argonne, Il., 60439 {BR}
{BR}
=
E-mail <kestel-at-anl.gov> FAX: =
(630) 252-4289 {BR}
{BR}
Alwyn Eades wrote: {/FONT} {FONT =
FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 COLOR=3D"#000000"} {BR}
>-----------------------------------------------------------------------=
- {BR}
>The =
Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy =
Society of America {BR}
They can be used to determine the thickness =
of the carbon. {BR}
> {BR}
>The colors. {BR}
>If =
carbon is evaporated onto gold, as the thickness =
of the carbon {BR}
>increases, the color =
changes through the following sequence: =
gold, orange, {BR}
>red, blue, grey. The =
change of color from red to blue is particularly {BR}
>sharp =
and clear. The change of color from red =
to blue occurs when the {BR}
>thickness =
of the carbon is 24.0 nm +/- 0.5nm. {BR}
>This =
result was obtained by people at Balzers =
using a multibeam {BR}
>interference technique =
for calibration. {BR}
> {BR}
>Details. {BR}
>1 Take =
a glass slide (or any other suitable substrate) =
and evaporate onto {BR}
>it a layer of gold. =
The thickness is not critical as long as =
the gold is {BR}
>thick enough to give an =
opaque film that looks like gold. {BR}
>2 Mount =
the slide in the same chamber with the specimen =
to be coated with {BR}
>carbon. the thickness =
of the carbon on the slide will be 24 nm =
so arrange {BR}
>the distance of the slide =
and the sample so that (by the inverse square {BR}
>law) =
the desired thickness on the sample will =
occur when the thickness on {BR}
>the slide =
is 24 nm. {BR}
>3 Evaporate the carbon; =
stop the evaporation as the color changes =
form red {BR}
>to blue. If you are using =
a normal arc for the carbon evaporation, =
the {BR}
>light from the arc will allow =
you to see the colors. The bell jar will {BR}
>need =
to be reasonably clean. {BR}
> {BR}
>Example. {BR}
>Suppose =
you need to deposit a carbon film of thickness =
T nm. Let d be the {BR}
>distance from =
the carbon arc to the gold slide; let D be =
the distance from {BR}
>the carbon arc to =
the specimen. Then [d/D]squared =3D T/24. {BR}
> {BR}
>Reference: =
My thesis (1967). {BR}
> {BR}
>Alwyn Eades {BR}
>Department =
of Materials Science and Engineering {BR}
>Lehigh =
University {BR}
>5 East Packer Avenue {BR}
>Bethlehem {BR}
>Pennsylvannia =
18015-3195 {BR}
> Phone 610 758 4231 {BR}
> Fax =
610 758 4244 {BR}
> {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" SIZE=3D1 =
COLOR=3D"#0000FF"} {U} jae5-at-lehigh.edu {/U} {/FONT} {FONT FACE=3D"Geneva" =
SIZE=3D1 =
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> {BR}
> {BR}
> {BR}
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From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 25 Mar 99 09:38:53 -0500
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: Heijligers, H.J.M. :      H.J.M.Heijligers-at-tue.nl
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 16:50:39 +0100
Subject: RE: C film thickness

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Hallo Roberto,

In the first edition of "Electron Microprobe Analysis" of S.B.J. Reed
(Cambridge University Press 1975) you can find the next table.
for Carbon on polished brass

Thickness in nm Colour

15 Orange
20 Indigo red
25 Blue
30 Bluish green
35 Green blue
40 Pale green
45 Silver gold

We determined the thickness with our thin layer program and found out that
the values were very good.
The table is not found in newer editions of Reed's book.

Ir.Hans Heijligers
Solid State and Materials Chemistry Lab.
STO 2.45, Eindhoven University of Technology
POBox 513 NL-5600 MB Eindhoven
E-mail: H.J.M.Heijligers-at-TUE.NL
Tel.: +31 (0)402473051
Fax.: +31 (0)402445619



Hi. I was recently asked of a way to determine C film thickness. I remember
that using a polished brass specimen and observing the color is one way.
Does anyone have a source in the literature for this method? Thanks.

______________________
Roberto Garcia
Senior Analyst, Metallography
North Carolina State University
Analytical Instrumentation Facility
Box 7531, Room 303 EGRC
Raleigh, NC 27695-7531
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.com
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif






From: Steven J. Fliesler :      fliesler-at-SLU.EDU
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 10:51:05 -0800
Subject: need a good, inexpensive film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm in the market for a good quality, but inexpensive, film scanner-
e.g., for scanning 35mm slides into my PC. I've heard Nikon makes a
good one (model LS2500), but it runs a hefty $2,500 or so (too
expensive for me). Got any suggestions?

--
Steven J. Fliesler, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Ophthalmology
Saint Louis Univ. School of Med.
1755 S. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63104-1540
Phone: (314) 577-8259
Fax: (314) 771-0596
E-mail: Fliesler-at-slu.edu







From: Laura Robles :      lrobles-at-cas.csudh.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 09:06:00 -0800
Subject: Microwave tissue processing

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I am thinking of purchasing a microwave tissue processor. I would
appreciate your opinion as to the pro's and con's of this type of tissue
preparation.

Laura Robles







From: Glenn Poirier :      glennp-at-eps.mcgill.ca
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 13:27:43 -0500
Subject: C Film thickness

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If you have access to an AFM, accurate measurement of C thickness takes
about 4 minutes.
If I'm looking at flat samples, I use a toothpick to remove a thin line o=
f
carbon. I then can bring the sample to the AFM and directly measure the
height of the step betwwen the sample and the top of the carbon film.
Alternatively, if I can't work directly on the sample I coat a plain glas=
s
slide (making sure it is the same distance from the arc as the sample) an=
d
measure the C thinckness on it.
Hope this helps

Glenn
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Glenn Poirier Tel: (514) 398 6774
MicroAnalysis Laboratrory Fax: (514) 398 4680
Earth and Planetary Sciences email: glennp-at-eps.mcgill.ca
Rm. 238, 3450 University St. http://castaing.eps.mcgill.ca
Montr=E9al, Qc
H3A 2A7
Millennium hand and shrimp
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}








From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 18:39:37 +0000
Subject: Young cancer patient needs our help

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Hello everyone,
A friend of mine has informed me that there is a young boy in the
south of England who has a terminal cancer and is close to the end
of his suffering. Apparently, he wishes to enter the Guiness Book of
Records for the largest collection of buisness cards. Could you all
take the time to help boost this young man's collection. I was asked
to tell everyone else to forward this information to as many other
people as possible. His particulars are:
Master Gary Richard,
30 Selby Road,
Carshalton,
Surrey,
England,
U.K.

Regards
Martin Roe
Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
Aberdeen
Scotland
AB15 8QH
U.K.





From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 3/25/99 2:34 PM
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

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---------------------- Original Message Follows ----------------------

Reply to: RE: Thickness of carbon films.
Re: Carbon Film Thickness
When great accuracy of film thickness is not needed, we
simply place a small metal washer upon a glass slide near the "specimen area".
After evaporation the step heigth between the shaded and coated areas is
measured optically on a bench interference microscope. Ours is a Zeiss
two beam unit that is good for 30 nanometer resolution, (+ or -), with no
physical contact with the film. It works for ANY reflective metallic film
and fairly well even on "dull" carbon coatings because it has three
different reference mirrors that can be quickly changed. Each mirror has a
different reflectivity that one simply tests to get reasonable interference
fringes which can also be photographed via polaroid or 35 mm. film.
Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Ave.
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail {kestel-at-anl.gov} FAX: (630) 252-4289

Alwyn Eades wrote:
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From: Michael Coviello :      coviello-at-mae.uta.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 15:15:34 -0600
Subject: EM-KEVEX DELTA UPGRADE

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Dear Listservers:

Has anyone upgraded their Kevex Delta system from the old 44mb
Bournoulli to an inexpensive, more readily available drive (it should be

scuzzi and have a TDL12 interface). Kevex offers an Winstation upgrade

for $1550.00, but we'd like to go cheaper. Does anyone out there have
experience with this? Thank you in advance for your help.

Mike Coviello
UT Arlington







From: Norman_C_Miller-at-res.raytheon.com
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 15:13:29 -0600
Subject: SEM/EDS available

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SEM community,

We have a Cambridge S240 scanning electron microscope that is
available, that needs a new lab home. The S240 was wrapped up recently when
we unexpectedly received a field emission SEM. The S240 is a digital frame
store SEM; has a LaB6 source; and a second backplate that adapts to a
Microspec WDS spectrometer. The S240 also includes a mating Noran thin
window EDS detector. The S240 was well maintained under service contract
for 11 years, and still would be in use if the FESEM has not suddenly
become available from another Raytheon facility.

We also can include a used Kevex 8000 EDS analyzer with the interfaces
to the Noran detector. In addition, I know where that Microspec
spectrometer can be obtained.

We would like to trade the Cambridge SEM/Noran detector, and if
desired, the Kevex analyzer, for a new Noran Vantage upgrade to our Noran
EDS analyzer. We would like to hear from anyone who is interested.

N. Carl Miller
Raytheon Co.
781-860-3334







From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 3/25/99 9:38 AM
Subject: FWD: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

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Reply to: RE: Thickness of carbon films.


Re: Carbon Film Thickness
When great accuracy of film thickness is not needed, we simply place a
small metal washer upon a glass slide near the "specimen area".
after evaporation the step height between the shaded and coated areas is
measured optically on a bench interference microscope. Ours is a Zeiss
two beam unit that is good for 30 nanometer resolution, (+ or -), with no
physical contact with the film. It works for ANY reflective metallic film
and fairly well even on "dull" carbon coatings because it has three
different reference mirrors that can be quickly changed. Each mirror has a
different reflectivity that one merely tests to get reasonable interference
fringes which can also be photographed via polaroid or 35 mm. film.
Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Ave.
Argonne, Il., 60439

E-mail {kestel-at-anl.gov} FAX: (630) 252-4289

Alwyn Eades wrote:
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Date: 25 Mar 99 09:38:53 -0500
From: Bernard Kestel {kestel-at-anl.gov}
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.
To: Alwyn Eades {jae5-at-lehigh.edu} ,
microscopy {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
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From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 13:51:50 -0800
Subject: RE: Thickness of carbon films.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by darkwing.uoregon.edu (8.9.3/8.9.3) with SMTP id NAA13960;
Thu, 25 Mar 1999 13:51:51 -0800 (PST)


Alwyn writes ...

} The accurate control of the thickness of evaporated carbon films.
}
} ...
}
} The colors:
} If carbon is evaporated onto gold, as the thickness of the carbon
} increases, the color changes through the following sequence:
} gold, orange, red, blue, grey. The change of color from red to
} blue is particularly sharp and clear. The change of color from
} red to blue occurs when the thickness of the carbon is
} 24.0 nm +/- 0.5nm.

We also find the red-} blue transistion the most easily
recognized and the most consistent, even for a multiple-user
facility ... and altho it may be considered a bit thick, the
transistion is sharp enough to use for EPMA without need for
coating standards and unknowns at the same time.
However, for the sake of clarification ... the Mineralogy
reference would imply "blue" is 24nm ... are you claiming the
red-} blue transistion (i.e., "purple") is 24nm?? We have been
writing our technique up as 22(+/-1)nm.

cheerios, shAf :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: Lawrence Kordon :      nikon-at-jagunet.com
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 17:58:48 -0500
Subject: Re: need a good, inexpensive film scanner

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Steven,

Nikon also makes the LS-30 (Coolscan III) street price around $900. Check
out the specs at ......

http://www.nikonusa.com/products/products.cfm?department=imaging#productslist

Regards,

Lawrence Kordon
Nikon, Inc.
Columbia, MD
nikon-at-jagunet.com

"Steven J. Fliesler" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm in the market for a good quality, but inexpensive, film scanner-
} e.g., for scanning 35mm slides into my PC. I've heard Nikon makes a
} good one (model LS2500), but it runs a hefty $2,500 or so (too
} expensive for me). Got any suggestions?
}
} --
} Steven J. Fliesler, Ph.D.
} Professor
} Dept. of Ophthalmology
} Saint Louis Univ. School of Med.
} 1755 S. Grand Blvd.
} St. Louis, MO 63104-1540
} Phone: (314) 577-8259
} Fax: (314) 771-0596
} E-mail: Fliesler-at-slu.edu






From: Gillian Bond :      gbond-at-nmt.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 16:07:56 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Phone number for Dunaway Stockroom

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Hi all:

Can anyone out there help us out with a current phone number for Dunaway -
or with anyone else that might have replacement heaters for a diffusion
pump?

Many thanks in advance

Gill Bond
Department of Materials & Met. Eng.
New Mexico Tech






From: baumannc-at-dino.nci.nih.gov (Chris Baumann)
Date: Thu, 25 Mar 1999 21:27:02 -0500
Subject: Re: need a good, inexpensive film scanner

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Steve,
It depends on the resolution you need. Microtek sells a scanner with a 35
mm film attachment (X6EL) for under $200. You can also get better ones for
$600-1000 with a second scan bed designed for slides. If you only have a
few slides, we have even taken slides apart and scanned them directly on a
flat bed scanner with a transparency adapter.

Best regards,

Chris Baumann

"Steven J. Fliesler" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm in the market for a good quality, but inexpensive, film scanner-
} e.g., for scanning 35mm slides into my PC. I've heard Nikon makes a
} good one (model LS2500), but it runs a hefty $2,500 or so (too
} expensive for me). Got any suggestions?
}
} --
} Steven J. Fliesler, Ph.D.
} Professor
} Dept. of Ophthalmology
} Saint Louis Univ. School of Med.
} 1755 S. Grand Blvd.
} St. Louis, MO 63104-1540
} Phone: (314) 577-8259
} Fax: (314) 771-0596
} E-mail: Fliesler-at-slu.edu






From: erich-at-ento.csiro.au (Eric Hines)
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 13:56:24 +1100
Subject: spares for H450

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Dear all,
Does anyone have an old Hitachi H450 SEM lying around that they would like
to donate or sell cheaply for parts?
Eric Hines
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Entomology
Canberra.







From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 04:21:29 +0100
Subject: Reichert Zetopan manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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For those interested: I've placed a copy of the Zetopan manual on:

http://users.skynet.be/sky95421/

KJust clikck on the link "Zetopan.zip".

Beware: it's a large multi-page zipped *.tiff-file (about 1.4MB)...

The other link isn't operational at this time.

I'll put copies of my other Reichert manuals on that page in a few days...

Hope this is of some help...

Yvan Lindekens.





From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 99 00:54:12 -0500
Subject: Duniway Stockroom location

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gil Bond wrote:
===============================================
Can anyone out there help us out with a current phone number for Dunaway -
or with anyone else that might have replacement heaters for a diffusion pump
?
===============================================
The information for Duniway is the following:
Duniway Stockroom Corporation
1305 Space Park Way
Mountain View, California USA 94043
Toll Free: 800-446-8811
Phone: 650-969-8811
Fax: 650-965-0764
E-MAIL: info-at-duniway.com
WEB: www.duniway.com

If they don't have it, one place that seems to always have the odd-ball item
others don't have is the following:

TORR International, Inc.
12 Columbus Street
New Windsor, NY USA 12553
Ph: 1-914-565-4027
Fax:1-914-561-7731
E-mail: torr.intl-at-juno.com
WEB: www.torr.com
Ask for Dr. Masud Naraghi

We have no interest in either of these firms, however we have done some
amount of business as a satisfied customer with both.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Jim J Darley :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 15:42:58 +1000
Subject: RE: C Film thickness

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Glenn Poirier and Bernard Kestel (both messages appended)=20
advocate very accurate means of determining C film=20
thickness. No doubt these means have some applications.=20
However, for most applications it is rather more convenient=20
to determine thickness at the time of coating with fairly=20
good accuracy.
It is no use to an analyst to break the vacuum to determine=20
that another 3nm of carbon are required. For these reason=20
the polished brass slide method and the still more=20
convenient, auto-terminating thickness monitors are the=20
preferred means to determine coating thickness.
Incidentally, for WDS/EDS I used indigo red - 20nm; its=20
enough C to prevent charging on flat specimens and absorbs=20
fewer light X-rays.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy=20
PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Phone +61 7 4774 0370 Fax: +61 7 4789 2313
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
********************** www.proscitech.com.au *****



On Friday, March 26, 1999 4:28 AM, Glenn Poirier=20
[SMTP:glennp-at-eps.mcgill.ca] wrote:
} =20
----------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.ht
} ml
} =20
----------------------------------------------------------
} -------------.
}
}
} If you have access to an AFM, accurate measurement of C
} thickness takes
} about 4 minutes.
} If I'm looking at flat samples, I use a toothpick to
} remove a thin line of
} carbon. I then can bring the sample to the AFM and
} directly measure the
} height of the step betwwen the sample and the top of the
} carbon film.
} Alternatively, if I can't work directly on the sample I
} coat a plain glass
} slide (making sure it is the same distance from the arc=20
as
} the sample) and
} measure the C thinckness on it.
} Hope this helps
}
} Glenn
} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
} Glenn Poirier Tel: (514) 398 6774
} MicroAnalysis Laboratrory Fax: (514) 398 4680
} Earth and Planetary Sciences email: glennp-at-eps.mcgill.ca
} Rm. 238, 3450 University St.=09
} http://castaing.eps.mcgill.ca
} Montr=E9al, Qc
} H3A 2A7
} Millennium hand and shrimp
} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}

When great accuracy of film thickness is not needed, we=20
simply place a small metal washer upon a glass slide near=20
the "specimen area".
after evaporation the step height between the shaded and=20
coated areas is measured optically on a bench interference=20
microscope. Ours is a Zeiss two beam unit that is good for=20
30 nanometer resolution, (+ or -), with no physical contact=20
with the film. It works for ANY reflective metallic film=20
and fairly well even on "dull" carbon coatings because it=20
has three different reference mirrors that can be quickly=20
changed. Each mirror has a different reflectivity that one=20
merely tests to get reasonable interference fringes which=20
can also be photographed via polaroid or 35 mm. film.
Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory







From: Martin J. Roe :      mi596-at-mluri.sari.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 13:00:40 +0000
Subject: Re: Young cancer patient needs our help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John, you are possibly right; a similar thought did occur to me
before sending it to the list (what if it's bogus and is really
someone trying to get marketing, company information, or even a
non-cancer patient who is building up a collection for himself etc.)
and I questioned my friend as to how reliable her information was. Of
course she could not guarantee that this wasn't a hoak but in the
absence of any evidence to the contary I was prepared to take this
more or less at face value and I thought well what if it is true?
It's not much of an effort to help someone out and nothing has been
lost in doing so even if it turns out not to be genuine.

Regards


Martin Roe
Macaulay Land Use Research Institute
Aberdeen
Scotland
AB15 8QH

John Mansfield wrote:
} } I hate to pour cold water on this, but it looks like another of
} } those net myths.


U.K.





From: shAf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 08:51:11 -0800
Subject: RE: need a good, inexpensive film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steven writes ...
}
}
} I'm in the market for a good quality, but inexpensive, film scanner-
} e.g., for scanning 35mm slides into my PC. I've heard Nikon makes a
} good one (model LS2500), but it runs a hefty $2,500 or so (too
} expensive for me). Got any suggestions?
}
} ...

I believe you mean the LS-2000 ... and it can be found for less $$.
For example, http://www.pricewatch.com will show you many places for
which it can be purchased for near $1600. There are lesser expensive
scanners and I've seen a comparison of the Nikon with the new HP
Photosmart scanner with will only leave you with why would you pay so
much more for the Nikon. Still, the Nikon comes with "dust removal"
software which works very well, and you also have an option for 4X and
16X multiple scans for removing LED noise in the dense areas of the
slide or negative. Both the Nikon and new HP will deliver 48bit files
to image editors which can handle that color depth (e.g., Photoshop).

for more information see:

http://www.sphoto.com/ls2000.html
http://photo.net/photo/slide-scanners.html
http://imaging-resource.com/SCAN1.HTM
http://johnp.simplenet.com/psmart/
http://www.cix.co.uk/~tsphoto/tech/filmscan/menu.htm#INTRO

and a search for "LS-2000" at metacrawler.com turned up nearly 100
wwwsites for you to explore.

... hope this helps :o)

cheerios, shAf

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - ICQ 210524
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu - http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~mshaf/






From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 12:04:36 -0500
Subject: Thickness of carbon films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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More on the thickness of carbon films.

I agree with Jim Darley when he says=20
=93However, for most applications it is rather more convenient=20
to determine thickness at the time of coating with fairly=20
good accuracy.=94
What I find hard to understand is the assumption he and other contributor=
s
to this thread have made that the interference color method allows you to
evaporate carbon of only one thickness. The brass (or in the method I
gave, gold) test sample has always the same thickness of carbon but the
thickness of carbon on the sample can be what you like. The idea is that
the brass/gold test piece is placed at a distance from the source which i=
s
different from the distance between the source and the sample to be coate=
d.
Then the thickness on the sample can be calculated from the inverse squa=
re
law. When I first used this technique, I used it to apply a coating only=
1
nm thick.




Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu






From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 08:51:23 -0800
Subject: Re: need a good, inexpensive film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Steven,
I have the top model Hewlett-Packard flat bed scanner and that comes with a
35 mm slide scanning attachment that works very well. Cost ~ $500.
You wrote:

}
} I'm in the market for a good quality, but inexpensive, film scanner-
} e.g., for scanning 35mm slides into my PC. I've heard Nikon makes a
} good one (model LS2500), but it runs a hefty $2,500 or so (too
} expensive for me). Got any suggestions?
}
} --
} Steven J. Fliesler, Ph.D.
} Professor
} Dept. of Ophthalmology
} Saint Louis Univ. School of Med.

Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca






From: Heide Schatten :      schattenh-at-umc-mail02.missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 16:57:14 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral or graduate student position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ph.D. graduate student or post-doctoral student (D.V.M. or M.D.)
position available for research in the area of protozoal parasitology.
Research will involve electron microscopy and cellular biology studies
utilizing in vitro derived Sarcocystis spp. , Neospora spp. and
Toxoplasma gondii parasites. Individual will work with a
multi-disciplinary team at the University of Missouri-Columbia, in the
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology and the Molecular Biology Program
Electron Microscopy Core facility. Successful candidate should have
background in tissue/cell embedding and processing for light and
electron microscopy, and demonstrated proficiency in written and spoken
English. Molecular biology and cell culture skills are helpful, but not
a necessary requirement. U.S. citizenship is not required.
For further information contact Dr. A.E. Marsh at ph: 573-884-2673,
fax: 573-884-5414, or email: marshae-at-missouri.edu
{mailto:marshae-at-missouri.edu} .







From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 19:22:07 -0600
Subject: SEM problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A colleage at our university needs servicing on an ISI Alpha 9 SEM. The
problem is related to the manually valved vacuum system. The hand-turned
knob for valving does not appear to be actually moving the vacuum cylinder
(plunger) up and down. Either it has come off of the main shaft or the
vacuum cylinder (plunger) is jammed.

Does anyone service these instruments commercially? Any directions
available for opening the vacuum system (for example, to change the
diffusion pump oil)? Thanks.


####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Center for Electron Microscopy
Neckers Building, Room 146 - B Wing
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901
U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################







From: Randy Anderson :      randy_anderson-at-ameritech.net
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 20:31:09 -0600
Subject: Certification?

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My name is Randy Anderson and I am a senior at Northern Il University. I
am currently finishing the second semester of a TEM/SEM independent
study. The reason that I am writing is to find out how I can apply for
an E.M. certification and to see how the best way to look for a job
position in the E.M. field when I graduate in the summer of 99. Thank
you for taking the time to answer my questions as the information will
be a valuable assest.

Thank-you

Randy





From: Igor Ivanov :      iivanov-at-home.com
Date: Fri, 26 Mar 1999 19:02:11 -0800
Subject: WTB or rent: FE-SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listservers:
We are looking for a short-term lease or rent of a FE-SEM.
Please contact me at iivanov-at-cutek.com
Thank you





From: Yvan Lindekens :      yvan.lindekens-at-skynet.be
Date: Sat, 27 Mar 1999 08:07:06 +0100
Subject: Reichert Zetopan manuals 2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've put copies of my Reichert Zetopan manuals on
http://users.skynet.be/sky95421/

Availlable manuals
? Zetopan.zip
Instruction manual for the Zetopan.Large research Microscope. In Englisch=
. 1
298 kb.
Contains one page from an older Osram-catalogue regarding much used bulbs
for older European microscopes.

? Zetopol.zip
Instruction manual for the Zetopan-Pol .Large Polarization Microscope. In
French. 487 kb.

? reflight.zip
Instruction manual for the Universal polarization illuminator for opaque
objects. In French.
179 kb.

? micflash.zip
Instruction manual for the Universal microflasch equipment for Zetopan. I=
n
German. 523 kb.

? MS140.zip
Instruction manual for the MS 1.40 multisystem condenser. In German. 319 =
kb.

? Binolux.zip
Instruction manual for the Binolux III twin lamp unit. In Englisch. 1 063
kb.


uri-at-watson.ibm.com has devised a procedure to treat these files when you =
are
using Unix (thanks Uri=85)


Yvan Lindekens.







From: John van Marsdijk :      marsdijk-at-wxs.nl
Date: Sat, 27 Mar 1999 09:10:41 +0100
Subject: papnet

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Are there any users of the PAPnet, and what are they going to do now NSI
doesn't do to well ?

--
met vriendelijke groet,



John



*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*

| John van Marsdijk |

* email: marsdijk-at-wxs.nl *

| Veenslag 31 |

* 3905 SJ Veenendaal *

| The Netherlands |

* *

| tel: (+31) 06-53 44 2176 |

*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*







From: Linda Chicoine :      lchicoine-at-snet.net
Date: Sun, 28 Mar 1999 06:50:14 -0400
Subject: Dye sub printers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listservers:
I would like to know which brands/models of dye sub printers do people
find give the best quality images. Thanks. Linda Chicoine






From: Klaus.Teufel-at-t-online.de (Klaus Teufel)
Date: Sun, 28 Mar 1999 21:22:10 +0200
Subject: "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution", Tuesday April

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Nigel Browning schrieb:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} {bold} "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic
Resolution" {/bold}
}
}
}
} There will be a Materials Science symposium at Scanning 99 entitled
} "Analyzing Materials Interfaces at Atomic Resolution". Scanning 99 is
} being held at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare in Rosemont, IL from April 11-14
} 1999. The "Analyzing Materials at Atomic Resolution" symposium is
} scheduled for Tuesday April 13th. The details of the conference can be
} found at http://www.scanning.org or can be requested from Mary
} Sullivan (e-mail: scanning-at-fams.org, tel:201-818-1010). Registration
} for members of the Midwest Microscopy and Microanalysis Society is at
} the reduced rates of $150 (regular $ 235) for the whole conference or
} $50 (regular $ 95) for a single day (all attendees of the MMMS
} symposium held at UIC last May are members of MMMS).
}
}
}
}
} {bold} Speakers {/bold}
}
}
}
} 9.00 {bold} M. Haider-CEOS GmbH, Germany {/bold}
}
} "Towards sub-Angstrom resolution by correction of spherical
} aberration"
}
}
} 9.30 {bold} O. Krivanek-University of Washington {/bold}
}
} "Towards sub-Angstrom electron probes by Cs-corrected STEM."
}
}
}
} 10.00 Break
}
}
}
} 10.30 {bold} E. M. James-University of Illinois at Chicago {/bold}
}
} "Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy on the
} 200kV FEGTEM"
}
}
} 11.00 {bold} S. J. Pennycook-Oak Ridge National Lab {/bold}
}
} "Probing the Origin of Interfacial Properties by STEM"
}
}
} 11.30 {bold} D. A. Muller-Lucent Technologies {/bold}
}
} "The End of the Roadmap for Silicon Dioxide: The Electronic Structure
} of Hyper-Thin Gate
}
} Oxides at the Atomic Scale"
}
}
} 12.00 {bold} D. B. Williams-Lehigh University {/bold}
}
} "Atomic-Resolution X-ray Microanalysis in the AEM"
}
}
}
} 12.30 Lunch
}
}
}
} 2.00 {bold} L. D. Marks-Northwestern University {/bold}
}
} "Picometer structure determination using Electron Diffraction"
}
}
} 2.30 {bold} J. M. Gibson -University of Illinois at
} Urbana-Champaign {/bold}
}
} "Statistical Measurement of Electron Scattering Fluctuations in
} Amorphous
}
} Materials - A new Structural Tool"
}
}
}
} 3.00 Break
}
}
}
} 3.30 {bold} M. Gajdardziska-Josifovska-University of Wisconsin at
} Milwaukee {/bold}
}
} "Quantitative surface microscopy and diffraction over the length
} scales: Morphology and
}
} crystallography of polar oxide surfaces. "
}
}
} 4.00 {bold} M. Tanaka-NRIM, Tsukuba, Japan {/bold}
}
} "Nano-behavior of Small Metal Particles in the Electron Beam"
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} ___________________________________________________________________________
}
}
} Nigel D. Browning, PhD
}
} Assistant Professor
}
} University of Illinois at Chicago
}
} Department of Physics
}
} 845 West Taylor Street,
}
} Chicago
}
} IL 60607-7059. USA
}
}
} Tel: 312-413-8164
}
} Fax: 312-996-9016
}
}
}
} http://interface.phy.uic.edu
}
}
} ___________________________________________________________________________
}
}
}







From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Friday, March 26, 1999 6:57 PM
Subject: SEM problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Mr. Bozzola,

I work on virtually everything in EM but have not worked on that model. Is
that one of ISI's integrated vacuum valves, i.e. a hand operated valve with
a number of individual positions for backing, roughing, etc. (usually just
marked 0, 1, 2)? Or is it an individual valve with a single function?

I suspect that it is one of their integrated models, similar to manual and
electrically operated models common to many of their instruments. They do
come completely apart and have a very simple mechanism. There is probably a
spring or taper pin that connects the hand turned portion to the central
shaft. In some models, the shaft is visible from the top. If the shaft is
not turning with the knurled hand piece then that pin has sheared off.
While the pin can be easily driven out and replaced, this would also be a
good time to rebuild the valve as there might be a problem inside that
caused the pin to shear (these pins are often used a 'fuses' to prevent
excessive force being applied to a mechanism).


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, IL 60174
PH 630.513.7093 FAX 630.513.7092 Email: ars-at-sem.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: John J. Bozzola {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}






From: rarewolf :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Sun, 28 Mar 1999 15:23:48 -0800
Subject: Re: Dye sub printers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Linda asks ...
}
} Dear listservers:
} I would like to know which brands/models of dye sub printers do people
} find give the best quality images. Thanks. Linda Chicoine
}

A timely question ... 6-10 months ago photographic quality and
trouble-free dye-subs were $5k-$10k printers ... plus $3/page. While
you can buy a dye-sub today for { $700, it is still very much a case of
how well the printer's software works with your application and OS and
the quality of its color profile. I believe the consensus at one time
was Kodak and Fujitsu for photographic and color quality. Today Alps
should be considered in any decision because it has broken the price
barrier to allow it to be considered along with color ink jets. I've
been keeping an eye on lists and newsgroups without a good feeling for
how well Alps supports its printers (... tech support, and ICC profiles
..) ... but the demo print they sent me was definitely excellent
quality.
If I were you I'd indicate which computer platform you use, and with
what applications ... someone may reply with specific problems
associated with less expensive dye-subs.

cow ... rare wolf






From: Andrew McNaughton :      andrew.mcnaughton-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 12:06:50 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?M=E4rzh=E4user?= MRC-3 Stage Control from a Macintosh?

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We have a M=E4rzh=E4user MRC-3 which is used to control stage movement and
focusing by a joystick. The equipment is capable of being controlled from a
computer but due to the need to write Basic instructions most users are put
off this option. A similar problem exists using NIH Image macros. All very
sad for the stereologists who would like to be able to have random
sampling, montages, etc. The main problem is we use a Power Macintosh for
the image processing side of things so would like to find a stage control
program compatable with a Mac. At this point things grind to a halt, has
anyone any knowledge of a Mac compatable stage control program with a user
friendly interface?

Thanks

Andrew McNaughton

____________________________________________________________________________=
__
Andrew McNaughton
South Campus Electron Microscope Unit
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
University of Otago
PO Box 913, Dunedin
NEW ZEALAND

Telephone: 64-03-479 7308
=46acsimile: 64-03-479 7254

e-mail: andrew.mcnaughton-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
____________________________________________________________________________=
__
=00







From: baumannc-at-dino.nci.nih.gov (Chris Baumann)
Date: Sun, 28 Mar 1999 20:43:24 -0500
Subject: Re: Dye sub printers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Linda,

We have great luck with the Codonics NP1600. However, Ii have recently
talked with a Tektronix rep who tells me that they are geting out of the dye
sub market and focusing on color laser and solid ink technologies.
According to him, with the current color laser printers on the market, you
can approach dye sub quality for between 2 and 3 k but the cost per sheet is
} $.30 where a Codonics print costs $1.90.

Regards,

Chris Baumann

Linda Chicoine wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear listservers:
} I would like to know which brands/models of dye sub printers do people
} find give the best quality images. Thanks. Linda Chicoine






From: Mohan Kalyanaraman :      mohan_kalyanaraman-at-EMail.mobil.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 08:41:10 -0400
Subject: Re: Dye sub printers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Linda,

You might consider the Fuji Pictrography. We have one here and it delivers very
high
quality prints. I believe the price is competitive with dye-subs.

Mohan Kalyanarman

Materials Characterization
Catalyst Technology Group
Mobil Technology Company
PO Box 480
Paulsboro, NJ 08066
609-224-3989 (ph)
609-224-3608 (fax)
mohan_kalyanaraman-at-email.mobil.com







From: Janet H. Woodward :      jhwoodward-at-buckman.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 10:29:56 -0600
Subject: SPM of Polymers

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0075_01BE79CF.1702C040
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charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

My company's R&D group is interested in visualizing several of our =
polymers. The M&M '99 session, "Developments in Scanned Probe =
Microscopy of Polymers", will be helpful. However, we would like some =
basic/general information prior to the meeting. Any suggestions of =
review articles, textbooks, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

In advance, thanks!


Janet H. Woodward, Ph.D.
Corporate Technical Specialist - Microscopy & Microbiology
Buckman Laboratories
1256 N. McLean Street
Memphis, TN 38108
(901) 272-6408
jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com

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http-equiv=3DContent-Type}
{META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR}
{/HEAD}
{BODY}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} My company's R&D group is interested in =
visualizing=20
several of our polymers.  The M&M '99 session, =
"Developments in=20
Scanned Probe Microscopy of Polymers", will be helpful.  =
However, we=20
would like some basic/general information prior to the meeting.  =
Any=20
suggestions of review articles, textbooks, etc. would be greatly=20
appreciated. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} In advance, thanks! {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} {/FONT}   {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} Janet H. Woodward, Ph.D. {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} Corporate Technical Specialist - Microscopy =
&=20
Microbiology {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} Buckman Laboratories {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} 1256 N. McLean Street {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} Memphis, TN  38108 {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} (901) 272-6408 {/FONT} {/DIV}
{DIV} {FONT color=3D#000000} {A=20
href=3D"mailto:jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com"} jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com {/A} {/FONT=
} {/DIV} {/BODY} {/HTML}

------=_NextPart_000_0075_01BE79CF.1702C040--






From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 11:48:05 -0500
Subject: EMPA of wood references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Good morning:

I'm seeking references on EMPA of wood samples. Please reply directly to
may address below. Thanks.

Owen



=============================
Owen P. Mills
Michigan Technological University
Metallurgical & Materials Engineering
Rm 512 MME Building
Houghton, MI 49931
906-487-2002
906-487-2934 FAX
opmills-at-mtu.edu





From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 11:08:29 PST
Subject: HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project
at Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am
starting work with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL
163). We are trying to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the
immunolocalization of Cx43 within this cell line. I have outlined the
prep protocols from 6 papers that utilized immunoEM below. I am looking
for any suggestions or recommendations on which protocol might yield the
greatest success. Any other thoughts or ideas would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in October when I began
this project!! Please reply offlist at: aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland
PB = phosphate buffer
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996}
Au conj. = gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12
hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning: 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr

2. Human Smooth Muscle
PB = phosphate buffer
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization: cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning: parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:750} (1 hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing:
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr

3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles
PB = phosphate buffer PBS = phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA &
0.05% sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5%
glutaraldehyde (1.5 hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr

4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.) poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding
of membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum
(1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation: 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr

5. Heart Gap Junctions
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or
1:100} (1.5 hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly) PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr

6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila
PBS = phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989}
DW = distilled water
wash buffer = 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20
min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2
X 3 hr in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG +
1% ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody + [1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. “Differential Expression of Gap
Junction Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual
Glands.” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p
49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ
GJ, Spray DC. “Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between
Smooth Muscle Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.” Journal of Urology June
1993;149: p 1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. “Gap Junction of Stratum
Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron
Microscopy.” Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. “Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.” Journal
of Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP.
“The 43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I),
Topology (II), and Functional Domains (III).” Journal of Cell Biology
June 1989;108:p 2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. “Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in
Drosophila.” Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.


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From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-leland.Stanford.EDU
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 11:28:30 -0800
Subject: Microwave tissue processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I am thinking of purchasing a microwave tissue processor. I would
appreciate your opinion as to the pro's and con's of this type of tissue
preparation.

Laura Robles


Hi Laura. I have been using my Pelco microwave for over a year now and I
am very happy with it. I can process tissue in 2 hours instead of 2 days.
It is especially useful for dehydration and infiltration. I would highly
recommend getting one. It will pay for itself in the amount of time saved
very quickly. The only con is that you have to experiment to find the
best parameters for your tissue since there are few published protocols. Try it!





From: Wharton Sinkler :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 12:46:33 -0600
Subject: dimpling soft alloys

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Does anyone have tips for dimpling soft metal alloys for TEM sample prep?
I'm having difficulty dimpling an aluminium composite alloy. It appears
that the abrasive (2-4 um cubic BN slurry) is getting embedded into the
surface of the alloy. This then attacks the dimpling wheel (phosphor
bronze).

Thanks,
Wharton

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403
Tel: (208) 533-7724
FAX: (208) 533-7863

mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov





From: Amy Gambrell :      Amy.Beth.Gambrell-at-cmich.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 15:22:03 -0500
Subject: Please post this vacancy announcement to the Listserve

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Central Michigan University
Electron Microscope Facility Supervisor
Biology Department

Central Michigan University is looking for an electron microscopy
technician to supervise teaching/research EM facility. Assists in
teaching introductory TEM and SEM classes. Solicits externally funded
contracts. Required qualifications include education equivalent to
Bachelor's degree; two years qualifying work experience; working
knowledge of the principles and techniques of transmission and scanning
electron microscopy, ultramicrotomy, vacuum evaporation, critical point
drying and biological specimen preparation; general knowledge of
solid-state electronics; proficiency with TERM, SEM, EDS, digital
imaging and light microscopy. Experience with routine maintenance of
EM and optical microscopes desired.

Review of applications will begin on May 1, 1999, and will continue
until the position is filled. Please send resume materials to Central
Michigan University, Human Resources/Staff, Rowe 109, Mt. Pleasant, MI
48859. CMU provides flexible benefits, an excellent retirement program
with tax deferred investment options, tuition waiver for employee and
family, and competitive salaries in an environment committed to
excellence and customer service.

--
Amy B. Gambrell Phone: 517.774.3339
Human Resources/Staff Fax: 517.774.3256
109 Rowe Hall E-mail: Amy.Beth.Gambrell-at-cmich.edu
Central Michigan University http://www.sps.cmich.edu
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859

To find out about exciting job opportunities at CMU, click here:
http://www.sps.cmich.edu/jobs.html





From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 12:34:53 PST
Subject: HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project
at Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am
starting work with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL
163). We are trying to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the
immunolocalization of Cx43 within this cell line. I have outlined the
prep protocols from 6 papers that utilized immunoEM below. I am looking
for any suggestions or recommendations on which protocol might yield the
greatest success. Any other thoughts or ideas would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in October when I began
this project!! Please reply offlist at: aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland
PB = phosphate buffer
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996}
Au conj. = gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12
hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning: 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr

2. Human Smooth Muscle
PB = phosphate buffer
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization: cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning: parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:750} (1 hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing:
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr

3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles
PB = phosphate buffer PBS = phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA &
0.05% sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5%
glutaraldehyde (1.5 hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr

4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.) poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding
of membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum
(1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation: 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr

5. Heart Gap Junctions
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or
1:100} (1.5 hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly) PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr

6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila
PBS = phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989}
DW = distilled water
wash buffer = 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20
min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2
X 3 hr in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG +
1% ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody + [1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. “Differential Expression of Gap
Junction Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual
Glands.” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p
49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ
GJ, Spray DC. “Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between
Smooth Muscle Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.” Journal of Urology June
1993;149: p 1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. “Gap Junction of Stratum
Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron
Microscopy.” Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. “Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.” Journal
of Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP.
“The 43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I),
Topology (II), and Functional Domains (III).” Journal of Cell Biology
June 1989;108:p 2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. “Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in
Drosophila.” Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.



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From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 12:35:38 PST
Subject: HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project
at Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am
starting work with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL
163). We are trying to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the
immunolocalization of Cx43 within this cell line. I have outlined the
prep protocols from 6 papers that utilized immunoEM below. I am looking
for any suggestions or recommendations on which protocol might yield the
greatest success. Any other thoughts or ideas would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in October when I began
this project!! Please reply offlist at: aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland
PB = phosphate buffer
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996}
Au conj. = gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12
hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning: 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr

2. Human Smooth Muscle
PB = phosphate buffer
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization: cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning: parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:750} (1 hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing:
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr

3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles
PB = phosphate buffer PBS = phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA &
0.05% sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5%
glutaraldehyde (1.5 hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr

4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.) poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding
of membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum
(1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation: 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr

5. Heart Gap Junctions
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or
1:100} (1.5 hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly) PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr

6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila
PBS = phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989}
DW = distilled water
wash buffer = 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20
min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2
X 3 hr in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG +
1% ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody + [1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. “Differential Expression of Gap
Junction Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual
Glands.” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p
49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ
GJ, Spray DC. “Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between
Smooth Muscle Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.” Journal of Urology June
1993;149: p 1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. “Gap Junction of Stratum
Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron
Microscopy.” Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. “Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.” Journal
of Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP.
“The 43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I),
Topology (II), and Functional Domains (III).” Journal of Cell Biology
June 1989;108:p 2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. “Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in
Drosophila.” Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.



Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com





From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-welch.jhu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 15:39:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: New RMC cryo attachment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hey people,
Anyone have any experience with the new RMC crx cryounit that can
attach to a Riechert E? It is supposedly much cheaper than Leica's but
is it as good? Does anyone have any general experience with RMC. Thanks.

Mike D.






From: manoj misra :      Manoj.Misra-at-unilever.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 14:56:52 -0500
Subject: ESEM Tensile Stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I am interested in finding out if there is any facility that has an ESEM
Tensile Stage with Peltier capabilities for structure/function studies using
ESEM.

Manoj

*****************************
Manoj Misra
Advanced Imaging and Measurement
Unilever Research, Edgewater, NJ 07020
(201) 840-2702 (V)
(201) 840-8299 (F)
E Mail: Manoj.Misra-at-unilever.com
****************************






From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 15:42:14 -0500
Subject: Re: SPM of Polymers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Janet,


SPM of Polymers is one of the hottest new trends in microscopy. I am in
the middle of writing a review of "What's New in Microscopy at PITTCON"
(May, 1999, American Lab) and this topic was well represented by new
offerings from several companies. I'd suggest you visit the websites for

1. Digital Instruments - they have lots of great app notes on this
topic

2. ThermoMicroscopes (previously known as Park Scientific and
Topometrix) and look for information on the new Explorer PolymerSystem
SPM (integrated microthermal analysis and pulsed force mode imaging)

3. JEOL - their new SPM has a full hot/cold stage which runs from 130K to
800K, for watching thermal transitions.


Other relevant technology I found at Pittcon included the new thermal
stage in Philips' ESEM, the new Continuum microscope for full microscopy
imaging (Including DIC) integrated with FTIR from SpectraTech, and a
number of interesting systems for Raman/confocal from Renishaw and
Instruments SA.


Hope this "preview" was helpful.


CAVEAT: Neither Barbara Foster nor MME has any commercial interest in any
of these instruments.


Best regards,

Barbara Foster

Consortium President

Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.


125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118

PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com

Visit our web site { {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}

******************************************************

MME is America's first national consortium providing

customized on-site workshops in all areas of

microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


At 10:29 AM 3/29/99 -0600, Janet H. Woodward wrote:

} } } }

{excerpt} My company's R&D group is interested in visualizing several of
our polymers. The M&M '99 session, "Developments in Scanned Probe
Microscopy of Polymers", will be helpful. However, we would like some
basic/general information prior to the meeting. Any suggestions of
review articles, textbooks, etc. would be greatly appreciated.



In advance, thanks!





Janet H. Woodward, Ph.D.

Corporate Technical Specialist - Microscopy & Microbiology

Buckman Laboratories

1256 N. McLean Street

Memphis, TN 38108

(901) 272-6408

{ {mailto:jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com} jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com


{/excerpt} { { { { { { { {










From: agr821s :      agr821s-at-mail.smsu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 15:17:34 -0600
Subject: I AM NOT SPAM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project at
Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am starting work
with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL 163). We are trying
to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the immunolocalization of Cx43
within this cell line. I have outlined the prep protocols from 6 papers that
utilized immunoEM below. I am looking for any suggestions or recommendations
on which protocol might yield the greatest success. Any other thoughts or
ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in
October when I began this project!! Please reply offlist at:
aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland=09
PB =3D phosphate buffer
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996} =09
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12 hr)
Post Fixation:=09 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning:=09 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr
=09
2. Human Smooth Muscle =09
PB =3D phosphate buffer
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}
=09
Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:=09
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization:=09 cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning:=09 parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB] {1:750} (1
hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing: =09
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr
=09
3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles=09
PB =3D phosphate buffer PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}
=09
Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C)=09 anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5% glutaraldehyde
(1.5 hr)
Post Fixation:=09 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:=09
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr
=09
4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.)=09 poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding of
membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum (1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation:=09 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation:=09 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr
=09
5. Heart Gap Junctions=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5 hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: =095 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly)=09PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr
=09
6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989} =09
DW =3D distilled water
wash buffer =3D 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20 min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2 X 3 hr
in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C)=09 antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG + 1%
ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody +
[1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. =93Differential Expression of Gap Junction
Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual Glands.=94
Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p 49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ GJ,
Spray DC. =93Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between Smooth Muscle
Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.=94 Journal of Urology June 1993;149: p
1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. =93Gap Junction of Stratum Granulosum
Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron Microscopy.=94
Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. =93Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.=94 Journal of
Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP. =93The
43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I), Topology
(II), and Functional Domains (III).=94 Journal of Cell Biology June 1989;108:p
2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. =93Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in Drosophila.=94
Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.






From: agr821s :      agr821s-at-mail.smsu.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 15:18:17 -0600
Subject: I AM NOT SPAM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project at
Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am starting work
with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL 163). We are trying
to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the immunolocalization of Cx43
within this cell line. I have outlined the prep protocols from 6 papers that
utilized immunoEM below. I am looking for any suggestions or recommendations
on which protocol might yield the greatest success. Any other thoughts or
ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in
October when I began this project!! Please reply offlist at:
aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland=09
PB =3D phosphate buffer
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996} =09
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12 hr)
Post Fixation:=09 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning:=09 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr
=09
2. Human Smooth Muscle =09
PB =3D phosphate buffer
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}
=09
Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:=09
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization:=09 cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning:=09 parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB] {1:750} (1
hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing: =09
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr
=09
3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles=09
PB =3D phosphate buffer PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}
=09
Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C)=09 anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5% glutaraldehyde
(1.5 hr)
Post Fixation:=09 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:=09
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr
=09
4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.)=09 poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding of
membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum (1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation:=09 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation:=09 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr
=09
5. Heart Gap Junctions=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5 hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: =095 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly)=09PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:=09
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr
=09
6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila=09
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989} =09
DW =3D distilled water
wash buffer =3D 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20 min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2 X 3 hr
in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C)=09 antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG + 1%
ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody +
[1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. =93Differential Expression of Gap Junction
Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual Glands.=94
Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p 49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ GJ,
Spray DC. =93Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between Smooth Muscle
Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.=94 Journal of Urology June 1993;149: p
1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. =93Gap Junction of Stratum Granulosum
Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron Microscopy.=94
Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. =93Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.=94 Journal of
Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP. =93The
43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I), Topology
(II), and Functional Domains (III).=94 Journal of Cell Biology June 1989;108:p
2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. =93Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in Drosophila.=94
Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.






From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 13:20:47 PST
Subject: HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project
at Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am
starting work with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL
163). We are trying to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the
immunolocalization of Cx43 within this cell line. I have outlined the
prep protocols from 6 papers that utilized immunoEM below. I am looking
for any suggestions or recommendations on which protocol might yield the
greatest success. Any other thoughts or ideas would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in October when I began
this project!! Please reply offlist at: aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland
PB = phosphate buffer
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996}
Au conj. = gold conjugated

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12
hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning: 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr

2. Human Smooth Muscle
PB = phosphate buffer
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization: cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning: parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:750} (1 hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing:
Fixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr

3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles
PB = phosphate buffer PBS = phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. = gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}

Fixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA &
0.05% sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
Fixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5%
glutaraldehyde (1.5 hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr

4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.) poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding
of membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum
(1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation: 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr

5. Heart Gap Junctions
PBS = phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or
1:100} (1.5 hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly) PBS
Fixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr

6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila
PBS = phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989}
DW = distilled water
wash buffer = 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

Fixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20
min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2
X 3 hr in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG +
1% ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody + [1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. “Differential Expression of Gap
Junction Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual
Glands.” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p
49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ
GJ, Spray DC. “Gap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between
Smooth Muscle Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.” Journal of Urology June
1993;149: p 1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. “Gap Junction of Stratum
Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron
Microscopy.” Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. “Biochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.” Journal
of Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP.
“The 43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I),
Topology (II), and Functional Domains (III).” Journal of Cell Biology
June 1989;108:p 2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. “Electron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in
Drosophila.” Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.



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From: crow-at-aloha.net (MHC)
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 11:49:26 -1000 (HST)
Subject: looking for compound scope & microscopy instruments

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We are a non-profit botanical garden conducting plant anatomy research. We
are looking for donations or second hand low-cost microscopy equiptment. We
can pay for the shipping of the following items:

Compound research/student style microscope

We are looking for a Riechert Sliding Microtome & knives from
anyone/institution wishing to dispose of one.

We are also looking for non-disposible blades for a Spencer 820 rotary microtome

& just the INSTRUCTIONS for a Sensaur microtome knife sharpener:
Aloe - Cat # V60041; Model # SH 67-R; Serial # 1107; 115 Vac 50/60 C 5A

Please reply to my email: crow-at-aloha.net
Thanks very much in advance

_______________________________________________________________
Melany
email: crow-at-aloha.net

"The light which puts out our eyes is darkness to us. Only that day dawns
to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning
star."

HDT
________________________________________________________________







From: Chao-ying Ni; Office 312 SPL; Phone 1013 :      ni-at-me.udel.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 17:15:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: dimpling soft alloys

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Dear Wharton:

Try one, two, three or all of the following:
1. Use a stainless steel wheel instead of a bronze wheel;
2. Decrease the balance load;
3. Change slurry (size, abrasive particles etc. etc....)
4. If I were you, I would also completely skip the dimpling procedure and
try a Grind Holder (such as Gatan's) or Tri-pod (such as south Bay
Tech's) and put the specimen on ion-mill right after obtaining {20um thick
foil.

Hope the above helps.

-cy, Rodelee-to-be




On Mon, 29 Mar 1999, Wharton Sinkler wrote:

} Does anyone have tips for dimpling soft metal alloys for TEM sample prep?
} I'm having difficulty dimpling an aluminium composite alloy. It appears
} that the abrasive (2-4 um cubic BN slurry) is getting embedded into the
} surface of the alloy. This then attacks the dimpling wheel (phosphor
} bronze).
}
} Thanks,
} Wharton
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Wharton Sinkler
} Argonne National Laboratory West
} P. O. Box 2528
} Idaho Falls, ID 83403
} Tel: (208) 533-7724
} FAX: (208) 533-7863
}
} mailto:wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
}
}






From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 11:20:28 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: I AM NOT SPAM

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Dear Aaron

Politeness would suggest that you enter something a little more
informative in your subject field!

To just say "I AM NOT SPAM" makes you look suspiciously like spam,
but also somehow manages to suggest that you think that, compared to
YOUR important message, others may be spam.

rtch

} Hello,
}
} My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project at
} Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am starting work
} with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL 163). We are trying
} to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the immunolocalization of Cx43
} within this cell line. I have outlined the prep protocols from 6 papers that
} utilized immunoEM below. I am looking for any suggestions or recommendations
} on which protocol might yield the greatest success. Any other thoughts or
} ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in
} October when I began this project!! Please reply offlist at:
} aaronrea-at-hotmail.com
}

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand





From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 1999 19:56:07 -0600
Subject: HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43 Localization

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Hello, could you please post my message below to the list with the title
of the subject being, "HELP! ImmunoEM Prep for Cx43 Localization".
Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
Aaron Rea
439 E. Madison #7
Springfield, MO 65806
aaronrea-at-hotmail.com
----------------
Hello,

My name is Aaron Rea. I am working on an undergraduate research project
at Southwest Missouri State University (Springfield, MO USA). I am
starting work with a BALB 3t3 mouse fibroblast cell line from ATCC (CCL
163). We are trying to develop a specimen preparation protocol for the
immunolocalization of Cx43 within this cell line. I have outlined the
prep protocols from 6 papers that utilized immunoEM below. I am looking
for any suggestions or recommendations on which protocol might yield the
greatest success. Any other thoughts or ideas would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks to all who responded back in October when I began
this project!! Please reply offlist at: aaronrea-at-hotmail.com

Thanks again:)

Aaron
-----------------

1. Rat Submandibular gland, Sublingual gland
PB =3D phosphate buffer
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1996}
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated

=46ixation: 1% paraformaldehyde-0.1M PB
Sectioning: 30 mm
Rinsing: PBS (24 hr)
Blocking: BSA-PBS (30 min)
1st Incubation:(4 C) antibody+[BSA-PBS] {1:1000} (12 hr)
Washing: (4 C) PBS (12 hr)
2nd Incubation: (4 C) Au conj. anti-mouse IgG+[BSA-PBS] {1:20} (12
hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide-0.1 M PB (1 hr)
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thin Sectioning: 80 nm
Mounting: mesh grids
Total Time: 61.5 hr

2. Human Smooth Muscle
PB =3D phosphate buffer
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(post-embedding) {1993}

=46ixation: 0.5% glutaraldehyde- 0.175 M cacodylate buffer
Dehydraton:
Embedding: (4 C) LR White
Polymerization: cold+UV light (?? hr)
Ultra-thin Sectioning: parallell to plane of c-slip
Mounting: formvar, 200 Ni mesh grids
Blocking: 0.01 M glycine+1% NFDM+0.5% gelatin+0.1 M PB (?? hr)
1st Incubation: (R.T.) rabbit anti-Cx43 serum+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:750} (1 hr)
Washing: (entensive) PB
2nd Incubation: (R.T.) Au conj. goat anti-rabbit IgG+[NFDM+gelatin+PB]
{1:10} (1hr)
Washing:
=46ixation: (brief) 2% glutaraldehyde+PB
Rinsing: water
Drying: air
Staining: uranyl acetate and Reynold's lead citrate
Total Time: ?? hr

3. Stratum Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles
PB =3D phosphate buffer PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
Au conj. =3D gold conjugated
(pre-embedding) {1993}

=46ixation: 1% paraformaldehyde- 0.1 M PB (2-4 hr)
Sectioning: 80 mm
Rinsing: PB
Blocking: PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05% sapoinin (30 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) anti-Cx43 rabbit serum+[PBS containing 1% BSA &
0.05% sapoinin] {1:200} (28-40 hr)
Washing: PBS (5 hr)
2nd Incubation: 5 nm Au conj. Antibody+[PBS containing 1% BSA & 0.05%
sapoinin] {1:3} (22-24 hr)
Washing: PBS (4-6 hr)
=46ixation: sodium cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4, 0.1 M) + 2.5%
glutaraldehyde (1.5 hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide (1.5 hr)
Dehydration: ethanol & propylene monoxide
Embedding: Epon 812
Ultra-thing Sectioning:
Mounting: formvar-film coated single-slot grids
Staining: uranyl acetate and lead citrate solutions
Total Time: 64.5 - 82.5 hr

4. Rat Heart Gap Junction Membranes
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1990}

1st Incubation: (R.T.) poly-L-lysine coated 96-well plates (unbouding
of membranes??) (14 hr)
Blocking: PBS containing 5% BSA (1 hr)
2nd Incubation: 25-to-100 fold dilution of preimmune or immune serum
(1 hr)
---or---
2nd Incubation: 80-115 mg ml-1 affinity purified antibodies
Washing: PBS
3rd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10} (1 hr)
Washing: PBS
=46ixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 15+ hr

5. Heart Gap Junctions
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline
(pre-embedding) {1989}

Blocking: 200 ml of 5% BSA in PBS (15 min)
1st Incubation: antiserum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or 1:100} (1.5
hr)
---or---
1st Incubation: preimmune serum + [5% BSA in PBS] {1:20, 1:50, or
1:100} (1.5 hr)
Washing: PBS
2nd Incubation: 5 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody+[5% BSA in PBS] {1:10, 1:20, or 1:40} (1 hr)
Washing: (thoroughly) PBS
=46ixation: 2% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.2) (?? hr)
Post Fixation: 1% osmium tetroxide
Staining: uranyl acetate
Dehydration:
Embedding: Epon
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 6+ hr

6. Gap Juctions in Drosophila
PBS =3D phosphate buffered saline (150mM NaCl, 6mM Na2HPO4, 4mM KH2PO4)
(post-embedding) {1989}
DW =3D distilled water
wash buffer =3D 0.5 M NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20 in PBS

=46ixation: (4 C) 2% paraformaldehyde/0.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS (3 hr)
Dehydration: (4 C) 1 X 5 min in 50%, 70%, 95%, and 100% ethanol (20
min)
Embedding: (-20 C) 100% ethanol + Lowicryl K4M resin {1:1} (16 hr), 2
X 3 hr in Lowicryl K4M resin in BEEM capsules (6hr)
1st Polymerization: (-20 C) UV light (16 hr)
2nd Polymerization: (R.T.) UV light (24 hr)
Sectioning: 10 nm sections gathered on parlodion-coated gold grids
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
1st Incubation: (4 C) antibody, preimmune serum, or non-immune IgG +
1% ovalbumin in wash buffer (16 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Blocking: 3% ovalbumin in wash buffer (10 min)
2nd Incubation: 10 nm colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG
antibody + [1% ovalbumin in wash buffer] {1:25} (1 hr)
Washing: 5 X 5 min in wash buffer (25 min)
Washing: 1 X 5 min with DW (5 min)
Staining: lead citrate and uranyl acetate
Total Time: 83.5 hr
----------------------------------------------------------------------1.
Muramatsu T, Hashimoto S, Shimono M. =ECDifferential Expression of Gap
Junction Proteins Connexin32 and 43 in Rat Submandibular and Sublingual
Glands.=EE Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 1996;44(1): p
49-56.
2.
Campos de Carvalho AC, Roy C, Moreno AP, Melman A, Hertzberg EL, Christ
GJ, Spray DC. =ECGap Junctions Formed of Connexin43 are Found Between
Smooth Muscle Cells of Human Corpus Cavernosum.=EE Journal of Urology June
1993;149: p 1568-75.
3.
Koike K, Watanabe H, Hiroi M, Tonosaki A. =ECGap Junction of Stratum
Granulosum Cells of Mouse Follicles: Immunohistochemistry and Electron
Microscopy.=EE Journal of Electron Microscopy 1993;42: p 94-106.
4.
Laird DW, Revel JP. =ECBiochemical and immunochemical analysis of the
arrangement of connexin43 in rat heart gap junction membranes.=EE Journal
of Cell Science 1990;97: p 109-17.
5.
Yancey SB (I), John SA (II), Ratneshwar L (III), Austin BJ, Revel JP.
=ECThe 43-kD Polypeptide of Heart Gap Junctions: Immunolocalization (I),
Topology (II), and Functional Domains (III).=EE Journal of Cell Biology
June 1989;108:p 2241-54.
6.
Ryerse J. =ECElectron Microscope Immunolocation of Gap Junctions in
Drosophila.=EE Tissue & Cell 1989;21(6): p 835-39.



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From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 00:11:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Zetopan docs?

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Barbara Foster says:
} Uri, Let me see what I can dig out. I'm headed out on an extended
} business trip... will be back around 3/15. Could you send me a reminder?

Barbara, since my attempts to contact you via e-mail failed so
far, I decided to post the reminder here, hoping that it will
reach you.

Do you (or anybody else on this list) have any Zetopan manuals,
especially for Phase Contrast, Anoptral Contrast, transmitted
light Interference Contrast, Fluorescence, Zetopan-POL?
[Needless to say, I need those.]

Thank you.
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}





From: Robert H. Olley :      R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 09:29:07 +0100 (BST)
Subject: Re: SPM of Polymers

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On Mon, 29 Mar 1999, Janet H. Woodward wrote:

} My company's R&D group is interested in visualizing several of our
} polymers. The M&M '99 session, "Developments in Scanned Probe
} Microscopy of Polymers", will be helpful. However, we would like some
} basic/general information prior to the meeting. Any suggestions of
} review articles, textbooks, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

Janet,

It strikes me that it is better not to limits oneself to SPM. This
technique is powerful, but limited in its application. Etching and
staining can often do better - it really depends which polymers you're
lloking at. If you can get hold of "Atlas of Polymer Morphology" by
Arthur E. Woodward (distributed in USA by Oxford University Press, New
York, ISBN 0-19-520758-0) this would give you a lot of ideas.

If staining interests you, the following article is superb. However, the
author is out of reprints, so it might be better to use some form of
library loan, if you don't take the journal.

TI: Reflections on the use of microtomy for materials science specimen
preparation
AU: Plummer_HK
NA: FORD MOTOR CO,RES LAB,MAIL DROP 3028,SRL,DEARBORN,MI,48121
JN: MICROSCOPY AND MICROANALYSIS, 1997, Vol.3, No.3, pp.239-260
IS: 1431-9276
DT: Review

If you are into polyethylene or polypropylene, and also some blends,
etching might be useful. You can see a few pictures on my home page by
following the link "Picture Gallery" and also on:

http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spshosir/gallery.htm

from a colleague. If you want to follow this further, please let me know.

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

} Janet H. Woodward, Ph.D. Corporate Technical Specialist - Microscopy &
} Microbiology Buckman Laboratories 1256 N. McLean Street Memphis, TN
} 38108 (901) 272-6408 jhwoodward-at-bbuckman.com







From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 08:39:41 -0500
Subject: For Sale Sorvall Porter-Blum Microtome.....

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At LabAuction NO RESERVE.

As of March 30, 1999 the highest bid was $100.00.

When was the last time you purchased a microtome for less than
$1,000.00?

Bid Closes Tue., April 06 4:00 PM CST

You can see photo's and bid at;

http://www.labx.com/v2/adsearch/Detail3.CFM?adnumb=18976&adtype=LabAuction

Thank You
Joseph Passero
jp-at-spacelab.net





From: Aaron Rea :      aaronrea2-at-hotmail.com
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 09:24:38 PST
Subject: My Applogies for the Multiple Messages

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Dear List,

I was having problems with my e-mail account yesterday and wasn't sure
if I was getting my message through. I now have the problem figured out
and this will not happen again. I am truly sorry for any inconvenience
or annoyance this caused. A special thanks to those who responded with
Cx43 protocol ideas!

Sincerely,

Aaron Rea
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com





From: Roger Craig :      Roger.Craig-at-ummed.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 20:29:19 -0600
Subject: Job Opening - TEM/Image analysis

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*****************************************************
Electron Microscopy/Image Analysis Technician

An NIH-funded position is available immediately for an electron
microscopist to study the molecular structure and function of muscle.
Projects involve determination of the 3D molecular structure of actin
and myosin filaments and the structural changes underlying contraction.
Our main approaches involve electron microscopy (negative staining,
cryo-EM) and 3D image analysis (helical and tomographic reconstruction)
combined with biochemical, immunological and molecular biological
methodology.
Candidates should be motivated individuals with a good background in
molecular level electron microscopy and/or image processing. Our
laboratory is equipped with Philips CM120 cryo, CM10 and EM400 TEMs,
Gatan cryoholder and TV system, ancillary EM equipment (freeze plungers,
freeze fracture, evaporators, etc), optical diffractometer, scanning
densitometer, Silicon Graphics image processing workstations, etc.
Applicants should provide a CV and names and addresses of 3
references to Dr Roger Craig, Department of Cell Biology, University of
Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester MA 01655. Tel: (508) 856 2474;
Fax: (508) 856 6361; Email: Roger.Craig-at-ummed.edu.
*****************************************************







From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 20:29:44 -0600
Subject: Al2O3-Al MMC (metal matrix composite) samples

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Dear Wharton,
I have successfully dimpled Al2O3-Al MMC (metal matrix composite) samples,
using the VCR Dimpler. The dimpling abrasive is 3 um diamond paste diluted
in water and the wheel is steel. In the notes, this problem of embedding the
abrasive in a soft work piece is addressed and recommends using a softer
abrasive or a diamond tool. You might contact VCR at:
650-875-1000 for advice.
You wrote:

}
} Does anyone have tips for dimpling soft metal alloys for TEM sample prep?
} I'm having difficulty dimpling an aluminium composite alloy. It appears
} that the abrasive (2-4 um cubic BN slurry) is getting embedded into the
} surface of the alloy. This then attacks the dimpling wheel (phosphor
} bronze).
}
} Thanks,
} Wharton
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Wharton Sinkler
} Argonne National Laboratory West

No financial interest, just a happy customer.
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca







From: uri :      uri-at-watson.ibm.com
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 20:31:01 -0600
Subject: Manuals on Transmitted Light

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Barbara Foster says:
} I have a general manual which outlines all the transmitted light functions.
} Unfortunately, there is only a small amount on Anoptral Phase --- they
} refer to a "separate manual" for that. There are also other accompanying
} materials which discuss Fluorescence.

I am interested in the Fluorescence materials. The general manual - I got it,
thanks to Yvan and Wayne.

} Also, Yvan Lindekens has posted his copy of the Zetopan manual at
} {http://users.skynet.be/sky95421} . I am having trouble with my unzip files
} so have not been able to open his manual to compare it to mine, but suggest
} you see what is there.

I was probably the first who got Yvan's copy of the manual (:-). It's
a pretty good one, in case anybody cares to know.

After you unzip it, you get one large TIFF file. So now you need software
that (a) can deal with multi-page TIFF's, or (b) can convert TIFF to
something the printers like better [such as PostScript]. See my
comments on Yvan's Web site.

Yvan, please get in touch with me off-line - I need to figure out how
to scan a few manuals myself, and put them on your Web site.
--
Regards,
Uri uri-at-watson.ibm.com
-=-=-=-=-=-=-
{Disclaimer}







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 20:46:12 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Listserver Back On-line

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Colleagues

The Listserver system went bizzare today in synchronism with my
attempts to check for viruses. As a result, a number of of mail messages
were rejected.

I believe all is well again. Those of you that were rebuffed please
accept my apology.

Sorry., I screwed up...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp







From: Birna Gudbjornsdottir :      birna-at-rfisk.is
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 10:40:38 +0000
Subject: SEM and wood

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Good day

My name is Birna Gu=F0bj=F6rnsd=F3ttir working at Icelandic Fisheries
Laboratories as a food scientist. This field is quite new to me and I am
looking for information how I can prepare wood samples, both wet nad dry,
for SEM. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.


Birna

Rf, Icelandic Fisheries Laboratories
*****************************************************

Birna Gu=F0bj=F6rnsd=F3ttir
Food Scientist
P.O. Box 1405
Sk=FAlagat 4
121 Reykjav=EDk
Iceland
} *****************************************************
} Tel. +354 5620240
} Fax +354 5620740
} e-mail birna-at-rfisk.is
} http://www.rfisk.is
}





From: Birna Gudbjornsdottir :      birna-at-rfisk.is
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 11:08:27 +0000
Subject: SEM and wood

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Good day

My name is Birna Gu=F0bj=F6rnsd=F3ttir working at Icelandic Fisheries
Laboratories as a food scientist. This field is quite new to me and I am
looking for information how I can prepare wood samples, both wet nad dry,
for SEM. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.


Birna

Rf, Icelandic Fisheries Laboratories
*****************************************************

Birna Gu=F0bj=F6rnsd=F3ttir
Food Scientist
P.O. Box 1405
Sk=FAlagat 4
121 Reykjav=EDk
Iceland
} *****************************************************
} Tel. +354 5620240
} Fax +354 5620740
} e-mail birna-at-rfisk.is
} http://www.rfisk.is
}





From: Joergen Bilde-Soerensen 5802 :      j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 16:02:08 +0200
Subject: Re: SEM and wood

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Birna wrote:
} My name is Birna Gudbjoernsdottir working at Icelandic Fisheries
} Laboratories as a food scientist. This field is quite new to me and I am
} looking for information how I can prepare wood samples, both wet nad dry,
} for SEM. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Dear Birna,

If you wish to keep the wood wet, you will have to use an
environmental SEM (ESEM), in which you can examine the sample with a
pressure above 5 torr (the equilibrium pressure of water vapour just
above 0 degree C) in the specimen chamber. If you can accept that the
wood slowly dries, you may use a low-vacuum SEM (LVSEM) where you can
work with a pressure of up to 1-2 torr. Both ESEM and LVSEM allows
the examination of electrical insulators.

In the conventional high vacuum SEM you cannot have wet wood. Dry
wood may be examined, but then the surface must be made conductive
e.g. by sputtering gold onto the sample.

Best regards,
Joergen.


J. B. Bilde-Soerensen
Senior Research Scientist, Ph. D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 46 77 58 02 (direct)
phone: +45 46 77 46 77 (switchboard)
fax: +45 46 77 57 58
website: http://www.risoe.dk/afm/Personal/jqbi/jqbi.htm





From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 08:01:00 -0600
Subject: Re:EM-KEVEX DELTA UPGRADE

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I have been using Syquest 230 EZ Flier dirves on my TDL12 8000/Delta system
for
some time. Other than the reliability problem of the Syquest hardware and
the
posibility of little future support from Syquest, they work well and are
rather
faster than the bernoulliis. A "sort-of" special cable is needed to
interconnect the drives. The interface instructions simply address the
setup of
DMON (nowdays that would be called a driver, I guess). The disks are
formatted
rt11 and instead of 230MB, hold 44Mb, but it was an overall improvement. I
would guess that similar, more current external SCSI-1 drives could also be
made
to work.

Woody White
McDermott Technology





From: Sandra Perkins :      skperkin-at-vt.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 14:10:19 -0500
Subject: contamination on thin sections

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Hi-

First, thanks to everyone who responded to my question on fixation of cells
grown on chambered Permanox slides. As soon as I try the suggested
procedures (the cells crashed!), I will post a summary of responses to the
list.

My question today has to do with the presence of "pepper" on TEM sections.
We process rather large tissue blocks (4X5 mm) of nervous tissue that we
have dissected from perfused animals (5% glut. in PB is routine perfusate).
Post-fixation is in osmium tetroxide in PB and all buffer rinses are done
in PB. We dehydrate using an ethanol series, transition through propylene
oxide (although we are experimenting with ethanol with no succes so far)
and infiltrate/embed in PolyBed 812. The pepper shows up most obviously
on the cytoskeletal elements of nerves, mitochondria, and collagen. I have
tried pretreating the sections with 0.5-1.0 N HCl or 1% EDTA (Mollenhauer,
1987)prior to staining with uranyl acetate/lead citrate.....no luck. I
can visualize the pepper on unstained sections. I seem to recall that this
may have something to do with phosphate buffer, but the details are hazy.
I would appreciate any suggestions.

Thank you very much!

Sandy Perkins







From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 99 15:37:31 -0500
Subject: SEM of wood

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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Birna Guðbjörnsdóttir wrote:
===================================================
My name is Birna Guðbjörnsdóttir working at Icelandic Fisheries Laboratories
as a food scientist. This field is quite new to me and I am looking for
information how I can prepare wood samples, both wet nad dry, for SEM. Any
information would be greatly appreciated.
===================================================
Assuming you would have just a conventional SEM at your disposal, we have
generally had good results in our own laboratory, when the need has arisen
in the past, to examine wood, to dry it with critical point drying. A
second (but we believe inferior) approach is to use the HMDS drying protocol
, which tends to be favored by those without access to a CPD unit. Whatever
the drying method, since the sample itself will be nonconductive, it should
be made conductive via the application of a thin layer of gold, or for
higher resolution work, chromium or (more recently) osmium (metal).

Information about CPD and HMDS and also metal coaters can be found on our
website given below or the websites of the other major manufacturers and
suppliers of sample preparation equipment and consumable supply items for
SEM laboratories.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================





From: Terry Robertson :      terryr-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 1999 07:50:52 +0800
Subject: Glass Scoring Wheel for LKB 2178 Knife Maker II

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Does anyone involved in Electron Microscopy know where I can obtain =
spare glass scoring wheels for an LKB 2178 Knife Maker II. Any helpful =
advise would be welcome as our machine requires a replacement scorer =
ASAP.

Dr Terry Robertson (PhD)
Senior Research Fellow
Department of Pathology
University of Western Australia
Nedlands 6907

Phone 618 9346 2935
Fax 618 9346 2891
Mobile phone 618 0415 986531
email terryr-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au







From: Emond W F de Roever :      ederoever-at-nalco.com
Date: 3/29/99 2:56 PM
Subject: ESEM Tensile Stage

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The Swedish Pulp and Paper Research Institute has a tensile stage on
the ESEM 2020 (+ Peltier) and has used it extensively. Contact

joanna.hornatowska-at-stfi.se

Not nearby; with best regards, Emond de Roever


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello,

I am interested in finding out if there is any facility that has an ESEM
Tensile Stage with Peltier capabilities for structure/function studies using
ESEM.

Manoj

*****************************
Manoj Misra
Advanced Imaging and Measurement
Unilever Research, Edgewater, NJ 07020
(201) 840-2702 (V)
(201) 840-8299 (F)
E Mail: Manoj.Misra-at-unilever.com
****************************









From: Cesar D. Fermin Ph.D. :      cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 15:13:48 -0600
Subject: Micro-fees

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by majestic.tcs.tulane.edu (8.9.3/8.9.3) with SMTP id PAA21132;
Wed, 31 Mar 1999 15:13:53 -0600 (CST)
Message-Id: {199903312113.PAA21132-at-majestic.tcs.tulane.edu}


Dear Colleagues:
Sometime ago I posted a request for information on microscopy fees. I
received several wonderful information packages and thank those who
contributed. Before submitting a proposal internally at Tulane, I would
like to build a table with a comparison among several institutions.
Thus, I need information on fees charged as shown in the sample below.
Additional information on structure and function of morphology cores and
microscopy coresis welcome as well. You do not have to be specific, and
I will not disclose your name or associate it with the information
outside. I will only use your name inside Tulane if you authorize it.
Thus far not a single institution can recoup costs from fees. Thus, what
I need to demonstrate is that such fact is not just an idea, and for that
I need your input.

} Our facility charges $25.00 per hour for a Hitachi H7000 TEM and will be
} charging $35.00 for a new TEM with digital capabilities. Technical help is
} 35.00 per hour, an inverted multi-photon confocal is $25 per hour and a 3
} laser upright confocal with nomarski is $15 per hour. We offer two hours of
} training at no charge. Use of the darkroom which covers chemicals and the
} service on our processor is $10 per hour...Unfortunately we can't charge }
} what it really cost to operate the facility or we'd have no business--so }
} the university subsidizes us.


When all is done, I will summarize information received (leaving out
names and institutions unless specifically asked to leave in the posting)
and post for MSA users. Thanks in advance for your help.

*Disclaimer: Whatever... is not Tulane opinion!
Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology & Otolaryngology
web:[ http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/ferminlab/] or
[http://www.tmc.tulane.edu/imaging/] Internet:
[cfermin-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu]
1430 Tulane Ave/SL79 New Orleans, La 70112-2699
Fax 504 587-7389, Voice 584-2521, Main Office 588-5224






From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 16:38:11 -0800
Subject: ISI DS-130 Summing Amplifier

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Hi All,

Does anyone have a ISI (Topcon) DS-130 summing amplifier that they are
willing to part with. Please contact me offline with details and
pricing.

Earl Weltmer





From: David E. Pearson :      dpearson-at-coalpetrography.com
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 1999 20:32:58 -0800
Subject: Zeiss Epi-Achromat oil objective wanted.

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Hello:

I am looking for a Zeiss Epi-Achromat 40x/0.85 pol oil immersion lens,
Zeiss Cat#46 20 09. They appear to be as rare as hen's teeth. Can you help?

Thanks in advance.

Dave Pearson

Pearson Coal Petrography,
South Holland,
Illinois.






From: LI Kun :      k-li-at-imre.org.sg
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 1999 14:12:49 +0800
Subject: Etching of gold wires

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Hi,

We are trying to study the microstructure of cold drawn 25 =B5m gold =
wires.
We meet the difficulty in etching the gold wires to reveal the grain
structure in SEM and optical observations. Could somebody give us some
suggestions on how to etch the wires.

Thanks in advance!

Best regards,

Kun Li

Kun Li, Ph. D
Institute of Materials Research and Engineering
BLK S7, Level 3
Office: BLK S13, #02-13d
National University of Singapore
Lower Kent Ridge Road
Singapore 119260

Tel: 65-874 8187(Office); 65-874 3253(TEM Lab); 65-874 2999(Surface =
Lab)
Fax: 65-872 0785; e-mail: k-li-at-imre.org.sg.




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