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From: PESTOEM-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2000 14:46:25 EST
Subject: Jeol 1200 Alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Happy New Year to all and especially all who responded to my call for help.
Thanks again. Best wishes for a great year. Sincerely, Peter A.
Stolzenberg,Pesto Inc.



From daemon Sat Jan 01 16:49:40 2000



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2000 14:39:45 -0600
Subject: Re: Potential for expansion of microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


sounds like a research grant to me. I don't believe the salary of
faculty in Chemistry departments of most major colleges would be
"soft money" requiring grant support. I commend the Society of
Analytical Chemists for trying to encourage this bridge. 20K of seed
money for a new line of research can make an important difference to
a junior faculty member.


} ---------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hum....so for a 2000 hour year, this works out to be $10 per hour.
} What a gift. And they probably want $30/hour of work in return.
}
} No matter how you package it, all of this babble does not measure
} up to today's standards. Unless SEM, etc. is a obscure and
} diminutive endeavor, I simply do not understand the cost-benefit
} ratio. Maybe this is not an annual salary. OK. Is this in addition
} to an existing income stream? Geeze, I hope it is the latter. But it
} sounds like the position is on-site. So, the candidate gets a full time
} job at McDonald's as well?
}
} All I can say is that I am glad and relieved that I do not have to
} work and try to survive in this type of environment. Welcome to H-2 visas.
}
} gary g.
}
}
} At 08:14 AM 12/31/99 , you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I just received this notification from the Society for Analytical Chemists
} } of Pittsburgh. Perhaps it will provide an important start for a new chem
} } prof who has an interest in expanding the use of microscopy and/or in
} } walking across the new bridge between microscopy and spectroscopy:
} }
} } "Twenty-first annual Analytical Chemistry Starter Grant Award"
} } The society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh will award one grant of
} } $20,000 to an assistant professor in the field of analytical chemistry.
} } The purpose of this grant is to encourage high-quality, innovative research
} } by a new analytical chemistry professor and to promote the training and
} } development of graduate students in this field. Assistant professors who
} } have accepted a US college or university appoint since December 31, 1996
} } are eligible. Application forms available from:
} } James Chadwick, Chairman
} } Starter Grant Committee
} } Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh
} } 200 Penn Center Blvd., Suite 332
} } Pittsburgh, PA 15235
} } Ph: 1-800-825-3221, Xt. 208
} } Fx: 412-825-3224
} }
} } Deadline for application receipt: February 29, 2000
} } Award winner announced: May 1, 2000
} }
} }
} } Best regards and welcome to the new millennium!
} } Barbara Foster
} } Consortium President
} } Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
} } productivity.
} }
} } 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
} } PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
} } Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
} } ******************************************************
} } MME is America's first national consortium providing
} } customized on-site workshops in all areas of
} } microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)



From daemon Sat Jan 01 17:10:58 2000



From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 01 Jan 2000 14:43:01 -0800
Subject: Re: Potential for expansion of microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Thanks for the info. I understand what is going on now. sounds like a great opportunity.

I discussed compensation before and don't want to clutter up the list with a repeat. But I
would appreciate an off-list communication which helps me better understand how the
mechanics of SEM and its personnel work in the big picture. I get asked often how to
get into the field. Since I use my SEM for personal research and photography only, I am
not in academia or companys' formal research departments. If I sound ignorant about
this, it is because I am. I work with some high school and upper level pre-high school
students at times using my SEM and LMs. What can be done with the SEM and LMs
turns them on as much as it still does me today. I'm hopelessly hooked.

But I lack facts and figures about this type of career. Rather than speculating about it,
what do you careerists think? Is this a good career? What is involved in getting into
the career at various levels? And what compensation is commensurate at these levels?

All responses will be kept confidential. Use PGP if you need to.

gary g.




At 12:39 PM 1/1/00 , you wrote:
} sounds like a research grant to me. I don't believe the salary of faculty in Chemistry departments of most major colleges would be "soft money" requiring grant support. I commend the Society of Analytical Chemists for trying to encourage this bridge. 20K of seed money for a new line of research can make an important difference to a junior faculty member.
}
}
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hum....so for a 2000 hour year, this works out to be $10 per hour.
} } What a gift. And they probably want $30/hour of work in return.
} }
} } No matter how you package it, all of this babble does not measure
} } up to today's standards. Unless SEM, etc. is a obscure and
} } diminutive endeavor, I simply do not understand the cost-benefit
} } ratio. Maybe this is not an annual salary. OK. Is this in addition
} } to an existing income stream? Geeze, I hope it is the latter. But it
} } sounds like the position is on-site. So, the candidate gets a full time
} } job at McDonald's as well?
} }
} } All I can say is that I am glad and relieved that I do not have to
} } work and try to survive in this type of environment. Welcome to H-2 visas.
} }
} } gary g.
} }
} }
} } At 08:14 AM 12/31/99 , you wrote:
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I just received this notification from the Society for Analytical Chemists
} } } of Pittsburgh. Perhaps it will provide an important start for a new chem
} } } prof who has an interest in exd, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


--CAB25050.946689051/kepler.fmph.uniba.sk--


The subject of the message is: tacky wax

The address to which the message has not yet been delivered is:

cg02-at-gre-wo-staff.greenwich.ac.uk

No action is required on your part. Delivery attempts will continue for
some time, and this warning may be repeated at intervals if the message
remains undelivered. Eventually the mail delivery software will give up,
and when that happens, the message will be returned to you.

} From MAILER-DAEMON Fri Dec 31 19:00 CST 1999
Received: from alta.gre.ac.uk (alta.gre.ac.uk [193.60.48.95]) by Sparc5.Microscopy.Com (8.6.11/8.6.11) with ESMTP id TAA01169 for {Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Fri, 31 Dec 1999 19:00:01 -0600
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for Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; Sat, 01 Jan 2000 01:00:25 +0000


-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Thanks for the info. I understand what is going on now. sounds like a great opportunity.

I discussed compensation before and don't want to clutter up the list with a repeat. But I
would appreciate an off-list communication which helps me better understand how the
mechanics of SEM and its personnel work in the big picture. I get asked often how to
get into the field. Since I use my SEM for personal research and photography only, I am
not in academia or companys' formal research departments. If I sound ignorant about
this, it is because I am. I work with some high school and upper level pre-high school
students at times using my SEM and LMs. What can be done with the SEM and LMs
turns them on as much as it still does me today. I'm hopelessly hooked.

But I lack facts and figures about this type of career. Rather than speculating about it,
what do you careerists think? Is this a good career? What is involved in getting into
the career at various levels? And what compensation is commensurate at these levels?

All responses will be kept confidential. Use PGP if you need to.

gary g.




At 12:39 PM 1/1/00 , you wrote:
} sounds like a research grant to me. I don't believe the salary of faculty in Chemistry departments of most major colleges would be "soft money" requiring grant support. I commend the Society of Analytical Chemists for trying to encourage this bridge. 20K of seed money for a new line of research can make an important difference to a junior faculty member.
}
}
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hum....so for a 2000 hour year, this works out to be $10 per hour.
} } What a gift. And they probably want $30/hour of work in return.
} }
} } No matter how you package it, all of this babble does not measure
} } up to today's standards. Unless SEM, etc. is a obscure and
} } diminutive endeavor, I simply do not understand the cost-benefit
} } ratio. Maybe this is not an annual salary. OK. Is this in addition
} } to an existing income stream? Geeze, I hope it is the latter. But it
} } sounds like the position is on-site. So, the candidate gets a full time
} } job at McDonald's as well?
} }
} } All I can say is that I am glad and relieved that I do not have to
} } work and try to survive in this type of environment. Welcome to H-2 visas.
} }
} } gary g.
} }
} }
} } At 08:14 AM 12/31/99 , you wrote:
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I just received this notification from the Society for Analytical Chemists
} } } of Pittsburgh. Perhaps it will provide an important start for a new chem
} } } prof who has an interest in expanding the use of microscopy and/or in
} } } walking across the new bridge between microscopy and spectroscopy:
} } }
} } } "Twenty-first annual Analytical Chemistry Starter Grant Award"
} } } The society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh will award one grant of
} } } $20,000 to an assistant professor in the field of analytical chemistry.
} } } The purpose of this grant is to encourage high-quality, innovative research
} } } by a new analytical chemistry professor and to promote the training and
} } } development of graduate students in this field. Assistant professors who
} } } have accepted a US college or university appoint since December 31, 1996
} } } are eligible. Application forms available from:
} } } James Chadwick, Chairman
} } } Starter Grant Committee
} } } Society for Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh
} } } 200 Penn Center Blvd., Suite 332
} } } Pittsburgh, PA 15235
} } } Ph: 1-800-825-3221, Xt. 208
} } } Fx: 412-825-3224
} } }
} } } Deadline for application receipt: February 29, 2000
} } } Award winner announced: May 1, 2000
} } }
} } }
} } } Best regards and welcome to the new millennium!
} } } Barbara Foster
} } } Consortium President
} } } Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
} } } productivity.
} } }
} } } 125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
} } } PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
} } } Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
} } } ******************************************************
} } } MME is America's first national consortium providing
} } } customized on-site workshops in all areas of
} } } microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)

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From daemon Sat Jan 01 17:50:59 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2000 17:17:47 -0600
Subject: Re: PDP EDS systems after December 31st

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



A simple fix will be to set your date to the year 1972. Since
the days of the week for 1972 = 2000, 1973 = 2001, etc...

It should hold you for a few years (at least it works on my old PDP).

Nestor





From daemon Mon Jan 03 07:35:45 2000



From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Sun, 02 Jan 2000 23:04:00 -0500
Subject: WTB: Looking for a Manual, for an AO-860 Microtome....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I am looking for a service and or operator's manual (an extra one you may have or a copy)
for an American Optics 860 sliding microtome.

Thank You

Best Regards

Joseph Passero

mailto:jp-at-spacelab.net



________________________________________________________
1stUp.com - Free the Web®
Get your free Internet access at http://www.1stUp.com



From daemon Mon Jan 03 17:30:19 2000



From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2000 11:54:50 -0500
Subject: COURSE ANNOUCMENT - Polarized Light Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I am posting this for the NY Microscopical Society.

This is a Very Good Course, at a Great Price.

Best Regards

Joseph Passero
mailto:jp-at-spacelab.net


New York Microscopical Society -- Course Announcement
====================================================

Bernard Friedman Memorial Workshop

Polarized Light Microscopy

April 8, 9, 15 & 16, 2000

An advanced course on polarized light microscopy which will cover the following topics:

The nature of polarized light

The origin and interpretation of interference colors

Birefringence and crystal orientation

The Indicatrix

Compensation and variable compensators

Interference figures and their interpretation

The workshop will consist of two consecutive weekends of lectures and hands on labs to cover
the theoretical and practical aspects of polarized light microscopy.

The course instructors include;

Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc.

John Reffner of Trace Consulting

N.Y.M.S. Instructor Donald O'Leary.

WHEN: April 8, 9, 15 & 16, 2000 from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.

WHERE:

New York Microscopical Society Facility
1244 McBride Avenue
West Paterson, NJ.

Phone (973) 812-8377

Web Site URL: http://www.nyms.org

(The facility has free parking and is accessible by public transportation, Information on
car pools and transportation will be provided.)

COST: $275 for N.Y.M.S. members, $295 for non-members (includes membership) Lunch and course
materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.

WHO: advanced course for those who have completed "The Use of the Microscope" or are
experienced in microscopy and familiar with the theory of its use.

HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.


For Further Information Contact

Donald O'Leary.

eMail: mailto:donoleary-at-worldnet.att.net

(201) 797 -8849 Voice Phone Number


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Registration Form

Polarized Light Microscopy

N.Y.M.S. Member ______________________ ($275) Non-Member _______________($295)

Name ___________________________________________________________________

Address __________________________________________________________________

City __________________________________ State ____________________ Zip Code
________________

Phone (W) _______________________ (H) ______________________ eMail
_____________________________



________________________________________________________
1stUp.com - Free the Web®
Get your free Internet access at http://www.1stUp.com



From daemon Mon Jan 03 17:30:21 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2000 12:56:07 -0500
Subject: Re: Potential for expansion of microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Tom,

Thanks for your on-target observations ...and especially for getting Gary
into a more positive perspective!

Best regards,

Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
At 02:39 PM 1/1/00 -0600, Tom Phillips wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Jan 03 17:30:21 2000



From: Lugosi1936-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2000 13:18:13 EST
Subject: Vickers Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am looking for any information (year of manufacture, company history, etc.)
about a Vickers Instruments, M1500974C microscope. I would especially like
to acquire a copy of the owners manual if possible. Please look at the
following pictures
for further identification.

{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic1a.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/l
ugosi1936/vic1a.jpg {/A}
{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic2.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
gosi1936/vic2.jpg {/A}
{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic3.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
gosi1936/vic3.jpg {/A}

Thanks for you help,
Dana Grantham





From daemon Mon Jan 03 17:30:22 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2000 13:20:39 -0500
Subject: LM: Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


American Chemical Society, "Applied Optical Microscopy"

3 days of exciting interactive lectures, lab, and demos on all aspects of
Light Microscopy, with a touch of video imaging
Learn how to
-match optics to your application
-interpret images from a variety of contrast techniques
-troubleshoot for artifacts and misinformation
-do simple measurement
-put a camera system on your microscope

New Orleans Hyatt Regency, Mar 10-12,2000
Tuition, books, coffee breaks: $895 for ACS members, $995 for non-members

While many of the examples used will be from materials science, this course
is NOT LIMITED TO CHEMISTS! Biologists are also welcome.

For a syllabus and enrollment information, visit MME's website:
www.MME-Microscopy.com/education (B. Foster is course coordinator)

Please reserve early. This course is given in conjunction with Pittcon,
the biggest analytical meeting in the country. Rooms fill up early.

Best regards .... and welcome to the positive side of Y2K!

Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}



From daemon Mon Jan 03 18:31:48 2000



From: Mei Lie Wong :      wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2000 16:03:51 -0800
Subject: CHROMOSOME 5 (5P-)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} I am forwarding this from someone who sent this to me. If anyone has any
} ideas for this person, please contact him through his email address which
} is listed.
}
} ML
}
} } From: "rwinn" {rwinn-at-mweb.co.za}
} } To: {wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu}
} } Subject: CHROMOSOME 5 (5P-)
} } Date: Fri, 31 Dec 1999 07:21:48 +0200
} } MIME-Version: 1.0
} } X-Priority: 3
} }
} } DEAR, MEI LEI WONG
} }
} } MY NAME IS RENEY WINN AND I AM MAILING YOU FROM SOUTH AFRICA.
} } I AM 25 YRS OLD AND HAS A BABY BOY OF 14 MTHS.
} }
} } I FOUND OUT THAT HE HAS CRI-DU-CHAT SYNDROME WHICH IS ALSO CALLED CAT-CRY
} } SYNDROME. HE HAS A DELETION ON THE SHORT ARM OF CHROMOSOME 5. HIS
} } DELETION ON THE SHORT ARM IS FROM THE 14.2 MARK WHICH EXTENDS TO THE 15.
} } MARK.
} }
} } I KNOW THAT THIS IS A VERY RARE SYNDROME AND HAVE BEEN IN TOUCH WITH THE
} } SUPPORT GROUPS IN AUSTRALIA AND U.K. HOWEVER..
} } I STILL FEEL THAT I NEED MORE HELP FROM LABRORATRIES OR SCIENTISTS. I AM
} } TRYING TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE SEVERITY OF MY SON'S CONDITION. I AM
} } TRYING TO FIND OUT HOW BADLY HE WILL BE AFFECTED BY HIS DELETION. I WOULD
} } JUST LIKE TO KNOW HOW HIS DELETION SIVERITY WOULD BE CLASIFIED AS. MAYBE
} } ON A SCALE OF 1-10 ONE AS BEING NONE SIVERE AND 10 AS MOST SEVERE. THIS
} } WAY I WOULD BE ABLE TO UNDERSTAND +- HOW SEVERE MY CHILD'S CONDITION IS. I
} } WOULD ALSO APPRECIATE IT IF YOU CAN TELL ME MORE OR LESS WHAT TO EXPECT
} } WITH HIS DELETION.
} }
} } MEI, IF THIS IS NOT SOMETHING YOU CAN HELP ME WITH, COULD YOU PLSE
} } FORWARD THIS MAIL TO SOMEONE WHO COULD PLSE. I AM VERY DESPERATE TO FIND
} } OUT MORE ABOUT THE SEVERITY OF MY CHILDS DELETION. THIS WOULD BE MUCH
} } APPRECIATED.
} }
} } BRGDS
} } RENEY WINN.
} } rwinn-at-mweb.co.z
Mei Lie Wong
Electron Microscope Laboratory
Department of Biochemistry
HHMI-UCSF
Ph. 415-476-4441 Fax 415-476-1902
http://util.ucsf.edu/agard/wong/index.html
email wong-at-msg.ucsf.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:52:22 2000



From: Mike Southwell :      mjsouth-at-flash.net
Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2000 18:44:05 -0800
Subject: BIO-Bacterial Growth Medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello all,

I know this is a little off the microscopy subject, but in the interest
of encouraging scientific exploration in a young person. I hope you will
indulge me.

I'm looking for materials for my daughter's science project. She is
testing the effectiveness of different mouthwashes in killing bacteria
found in the mouth. Her experiment matrix requires 12 petri dishes with
a bacterial growth medium. I can probably scrounge something to use as
petri dishes, but the growth medium is a problem. I'm not even sure
what it is properly called or what its makeup is. Is it something we
can easily purchase locally, or even better is there a recipe for making
a suitable substitute from ingredients found in the home?

Any and all suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Michael Southwell
JEOL USA INC.
Austin, TX




From daemon Tue Jan 04 07:29:31 2000



From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 09:33:21 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Metal 2000 in the Ostrava 16-18 May 2000

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Good morning,

In the Ostrava, Czech 16th-18 May 2000 are organizing
"Metal 2000" - 9th international metallurigcal conference,

about conference look at http://www.tanger.cz/metal2000

best regards

Krzysztof Jan Huebner

{hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl} :-)



From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:11:43 2000



From: Laurie Le Tarte :      lletarte-at-uamail.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 10:06:47 +0000
Subject: Seeking applicants for a postdoctoral research postion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Postdoctoral Research Associate

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
The University at Albany - State University at New York

The Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology at the University at
Albany - SUNY seeks applicants for a postdoctoral position with
established expertise in the area of analytical electron microscopy.
Demonstrated experience in the development and application of SEM
and/or TEM based analyses, including chemical analysis, is required to
achieve targeted technique development goals and to support an
expanding microscopy base at the Center. Experience with, or interest
in, scanning probe microscopy techniques is also desirable.
Candidates with a Ph.D. in applied physics, materials science and
engineering, chemistry or related fields are encouraged to apply.
This appointment is part of an ongoing multi-year investment in
personnel and new laboratory facilities for thin film technology
research areas at the Center.

The Center is a New York State sponsored high technology research and
development center with a $60M state-of-the-art infrastructure,
including class 1 clean rooms for back end IC manufacturing on 200 mm
wafers, and advanced processing, patterning and characterization
capabilities for single and multi-layered thin films. The Center is
currently assembling a 200 mm wafer facility for MEMS integration. In
addition, a new facility that will house a 25,000 ft2 class 1cleanroom
for 300 mm wafer pilot manufacturing and workforce training is
presently under construction.

Please send a letter of application including a summary of research
interests, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to:

William Harris, Director of Analytical Sciences
NYS Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
CESTM B110
251 Fuller Road
Albany, NY 12203



The SUNY/Research Foundation is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All
positions contingent upon availability of
funding.



From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:11:44 2000



From: Laurie Le Tarte :      lletarte-at-uamail.albany.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 10:30:36 +0000
Subject: Seeking applicants for an analytical support specialist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Analytical Support Specialist

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
The University at Albany - State University at New York

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology at the
University at Albany - SUNY is a fast growing, high technology
research and development program with a mission of supporting industry
and creating new jobs. This position will serve as the primary
infrastructure support person for the Center's scientific and
technical staff.

Job responsibilities include: performing routine maintenance and
calibration of a variety of surface spectroscopic and electron
microscopy instruments; performing analytical work with these
instruments; assisting students with the operation of this equipment;
diagnosing and repairing non-routine problems with the
instrumentation; and maintaining an adequate store of spare parts and
supplies.

The position requires: an associates degree in electronics, computer
science, or related technology and two to four years of directly
relevant experience; a working knowledge of high vacuum systems;
proficiency with related computer hardware/software; demonstrated
ability to work in a high energy, team oriented environment; and
excellent communication and analytical skills. Experience with surface
analysis and/or electron microscopy instrumentation is highly
desirable.

Please send a letter of application including a summary of research
interests, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to:

William Harris, Director of Analytical Sciences
NYS Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
CESTM B110
251 Fuller Road
Albany, NY 12203

The SUNY/Research Foundation is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All
positions contingent upon availability of
funding.



From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:11:43 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 10:05:11 -0500
Subject: Request for EELS data in EMSA Format -Windows Spectra Plotting pr

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

I am working on a spectra plotting program in Visual Basic 6 that is just
about ready for general release. I was hoping to put it out there in time
for the M&M MM meeting.

It started out just as a program that would take EMSA formatted EELS data
from Gatan's ELP and convert them into an Excel compatible file so that I
bring the file to a PC. Then I got carried away and used it to try to learn
Visual Basic. Currently, the program will open and overlay up to five
spectra, plot them in linear, log or rescale them and print them. They can
also be copied to the clipboard and pasted in other applications. They can
be re-colored and a couple other things as well. There is even a help
file!

I am trying to make the program more general and make it completely
compatible with the EMMFF standard for all spectra, EDS and EELS alike.I
have a couple of requests for information.

1) I would like to have some EELS spectra of different elements in EMMFF
format to test it out and include in a distribution packet that I can put on
the MAS-LIB. I am particularly interested in transition metal oxides.
Please send them to me if you have them and I could put them in the
deployment file. Who knows, this could be a poor man's EELS atlas.

2) I would like to know how much interest there is in this program.

3) What features would you like in such a program. It doesn't do any
analysis yet, but it may in the future.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)





From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:11:46 2000



From: Howard, Jean M. :      JMHoward-at-rmc.com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 10:48:26 -0500
Subject: SEM-Refurbishing multi-standards mount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,

I have a multi-element standards mount which over time has deteriorated and
become contaminated with salts. Three of the standards have fallen out of
the holder. The mount was made by C.M. Taylor Corp., Sunnyvale, Calif. in
1982, and it appears that this company no longer exists.
I am interested in finding someone to re-polish the mount and replace the
lost standards. Does anyone know of such a company/person?

Thanks in advance,

Jean M. Howard
Reynolds Metals Company
Materials Characterization-Electron Microscopy
E-mail: jmhoward-at-rmc.com
Office: 804.751.2554






From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:11:46 2000



From: Huggins, Bradley J :      HUGGINBJ-at-BP.com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 10:53:06 -0500
Subject: RE: SEM - epoxy mountants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tina,
I have not been reading all posts so you may have been provided with all the
help you needed, but I thought I would respond just in case...
We do a lot of work with similarly embedded specimens. The problem you have
is very familiar to me, and I believe you are right in your approach to
"Hold the samples in a vacuum for some period of time before putting them
into the scope" This is the best method that I have been able to come up
with. Assuming: 1) the resin is fully cured, 2) you have vacuum
infiltrated the resin into the specimen as thoroughly as practical, and 3)
you have minimized the size of high surface area specimens prior to
embedding, then there is not much more to try. In my experience the
outgassing is most often the result of contaminants within the porosity of
the specimen, and is not the result of the resin. If you still feel the
need to check this out further, you might try an embedding procedure using a
thermosetting resin (such as Bakelite) rather than a thermoplastic (epoxy).


If the sample prep involves polishing, then the source of the contamination
is probably the water or oil lubricant in that procedure. Minimize these
contaminants by preparing the smallest, and best vacuum infiltrated specimen
with as little porosity as possible. I do this by repetitive evacuation/N2
back filling (with heat if possible) prior to embedding. This "clears the
way" for better vacuum infiltration.

I have had polymerization problems with some resin/material combinations,
and I have usually overcome these by choosing a different resin polymer.
Epoxies and acrylics, for example, behave quite differently on various
substrates, so I will try LR White if I am having trouble with epoxy, and
visa versa. If you use LR White for the initial embedding, keep the
reaction volume small, and re-embed in a larger mount if necessary.
I do not know if there are any good references on the subject of vacuum
infiltration for porous materials, but these are the approaches I have
learned to take.
Good Luck!
Brad Huggins

} ----------
} From: Tina Carvalho[SMTP:tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, December 28, 1999 2:23 PM
} To: Microscopy Listserver
} Subject: SEM - epoxy mountants
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello, all-
}
} We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM that is mostly used for biological
} specimens. However, recently we have had a number of planetary geologists
} looking at sections of meteorites mounted on epoxy resin. About the time
} they started using the scope, we started having a number of problems that
} suggest that we are getting some outgassing and contamination. I'm not
} surprised; this happened before when looking at fish ear bones in similar
} resin, despite the resin manufacturer's clain their product was completely
} stable in the high vacuum and under the beam.
}
} My question is for those of you who routinely look at such samples: What
} do you do to minimize the potential problems? Hold the samples in a
} vacuum for some period of time before putting them into the scope? Paint
} the exposed epoxy areas with carbon paint or similar? For the biological
} samples we only require that the specimens be held over dessicant
} overnight, but I suspect that more heroic measures must be taken for these
} samples.
}
} Happy New Year to all!
}
} Tina
}
} **************************************************************************
} **
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
} *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251
} *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa *
} http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} **************************************************************************
} **
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 04 20:13:28 2000



From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 15:11:21 -0500
Subject: Philips400 LaB6 & Supplies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can someone suggest a reliable manufacturer for LaB6 filaments? I need the
sturdiest, most poor-vacuum-tolerant variety for a Philips EM400T in a
student lab! and I figure that users know best which filaments perform well
in the real world.

Also, I am looking for a source for Philips bulk-sample mounts, the type
used to carry SEM samples for the 6485/STEM system. (I need the mounts, not
the specimen rod.) I need both low-background carbon (preferred) or
beryllium for EDS, as well as standard copper carriers. My usual sources
tell me they have not stocked these items for years. Maybe someone has some
sitting unused in a cabinet somewhere?? or knows of a current supplier.

Offlist replies preferred, so as not to clog up the works... will summarize
and send info to others who are interested.

Thanks for your help.

Ann Hein-Lehman
Trinity College
Hartford, CT
860-297-4289
ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu




From daemon Tue Jan 04 18:42:23 2000



From: Karen Zaruba :      kszaruba-at-MMM.COM
Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2000 14:55:19 -0600
Subject: Re: Request for EELS data in EMSA Format -Windows Spectra Plotting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have a side question spurred by Scott Walck's post. Is there a simple low
cost program already available that would just allow me to view and print EMSA
format spectra under a Windows PC environment? I found some info. in the
archives regarding the EMMPDL site and the EMMFF software. I even got so far as
to download the sourcecode. But, I don't have a compiler to turn it into an
executable. Even so, I'm not sure from the documentation whether it will do
what I want. Also I came across NIST's DTSA but that's only for Mac.

Any suggestions out there? And if not, then to Scott yes there is some interest
from myself!
Thanks,
Karen Zaruba

"Walck. Scott D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear all,
}
} I am working on a spectra plotting program in Visual Basic 6 that is just
} about ready for general release. I was hoping to put it out there in time
} for the M&M MM meeting.
}
} It started out just as a program that would take EMSA formatted EELS data
} from Gatan's ELP and convert them into an Excel compatible file so that I
} bring the file to a PC. Then I got carried away and used it to try to learn
} Visual Basic. Currently, the program will open and overlay up to five
} spectra, plot them in linear, log or rescale them and print them. They can
} also be copied to the clipboard and pasted in other applications. They can
} be re-colored and a couple other things as well. There is even a help
} file!
}
} I am trying to make the program more general and make it completely
} compatible with the EMMFF standard for all spectra, EDS and EELS alike.I
} have a couple of requests for information.
}
} 1) I would like to have some EELS spectra of different elements in EMMFF
} format to test it out and include in a distribution packet that I can put on
} the MAS-LIB. I am particularly interested in transition metal oxides.
} Please send them to me if you have them and I could put them in the
} deployment file. Who knows, this could be a poor man's EELS atlas.
}
} 2) I would like to know how much interest there is in this program.
}
} 3) What features would you like in such a program. It doesn't do any
} analysis yet, but it may in the future.
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8161 (fax)

--
Karen S. Zaruba kszaruba-at-mmm.com
3M Company, St. Paul, MN





From daemon Tue Jan 04 19:18:31 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 19:13:46 -0600
Subject: Spectra in MSA/MSA Format How to Plot...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



As one of the co-authors of the MSA/MAS File format we
had a goal to make the format simple enough to be
useable in even a simple spreadsheet program.

A number of the major manufacturer's allow you to
translate their data files into this format directly
from their application programs. To use the data
in a spreadsheet, simply specify dual column (x,y)
format for the output file and
then you can import the data files directly into
a MS Excel spreadsheet, or even better a data
graphing program like KaleidaGraph (which runs
on both Mac's & PC's). Then plot to your hearts content.



Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.





From daemon Tue Jan 04 20:13:27 2000



From: McLean, Dorrance :      dmclea-at-sandia.gov
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 18:34:58 -0700
Subject: Mat: Cadmium Zinc Telluride thin foils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I've been working on thin foils of CZT and I'm looking for some suggestions
to help eliminate artifacts created by ion milling. So far I have polished
side one and etched (to remove polishing damage) with bromine-methanol and
then dimpled side two, ending with 0.1um alumina. I have been successful
obtaining a final sample thickness of about 8 to 10 microns. However, when
I put the samples into the PIPs (Gatan) to complete the thinning process I'm
seeing beam damage. I was hoping that someone might have a different
approach or suggestion that would eliminate the beam damage.
Thanks for your help.
Dorrance




From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:22:43 2000



From: Palatsides, Manuela :      m.palatsides-at-pmci.unimelb.edu.au
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 13:23:00 +1100
Subject: TEM: Staining yeast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I have an investigator who would like to stain just the cell wall of the
yeast S.cerevisae to distinguish it from the cell membrane at the EM level.
Any tips or references willbe appreciated.
Many thanks

Manuela Palatsides
Electron Microscopy
Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute
Locked Bag#1
A'Beckett Street
Melbourne 3000

Telephone: 03 96561244
Fax: 03 96561411
Email: m.palatsides-at-pmci.unimelb.edu.au





From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:22:49 2000



From: Nelson+ Conti :      NelsonC51-at-excite.com
Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2000 21:59:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: BIO-Bacterial Growth Medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





On Mon, 03 Jan 2000 18:44:05 -0800, Mike Southwell wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello all,
}
} I know this is a little off the microscopy subject, but in the interest
} of encouraging scientific exploration in a young person. I hope you will
} indulge me.
}
} I'm looking for materials for my daughter's science project. She is
} testing the effectiveness of different mouthwashes in killing bacteria
} found in the mouth. Her experiment matrix requires 12 petri dishes with
} a bacterial growth medium. I can probably scrounge something to use as
} petri dishes, but the growth medium is a problem. I'm not even sure
} what it is properly called or what its makeup is. Is it something we
} can easily purchase locally, or even better is there a recipe for making
} a suitable substitute from ingredients found in the home?
}
} Any and all suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Michael Southwell
} JEOL USA INC.
} Austin, TX
}
}
Michael -
I'm sure that any bacterial growth medium requries agar or, at home,
gelatin. If you were considering making it at home, then buy some clear
gelatin. You'll need to boil water first, though, and then add the gelatin
to make it liquid. Before it cools, pour the gelatin along with the
apprpriate growth medium into the petri plates (typically, a plate holds
about 10 ml of medium). This substance (err, the gelatin) acts primarily as
a hardener for the actual medium. It is generally considered to be
non-nutritive for most bacteria, although I believe that some may consider
it to be nutritious (spelling ?). As for the main nutrients ... I've been
dealing primarily with protozoa, but I'm pretty sure that bacteria can grow
on an extract of boiled lettuce or even wheat grains, etc.
I cannot tell you from my own experience, however, whether a boiled extract
in combination with gelatin does indeed work as a suitable growth medium,
only that I've heard that gelatin works and that, in my experience, a boiled
extract works well for supporting bacterial growth for protozoa.
If, instead, you have access to scientific catalogs, then it's fairly easy
simply to order proteose peptone, glucose, and agar. The peptone is a
standard component of typical "nutrient agar" plates that, I believe, can be
bought commercially, and the glucose may be needed as a sugar source and
carbon source (?). The agar serves to harden the medium much like gelatin is
supposed to.
I hope this helps.
Nelson Conti
[a graduate student formerly from San Francisco State University with a M.A.
degree in microbiology & a B. A. degree from UC Davis in Bacteriology ]





_______________________________________________________
Visit Excite Shopping at http://shopping.excite.com
The fastest way to find your Holiday gift this season




From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:22:53 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 00:07:03 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: SEM - epoxy mountants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear tina and others,
My experience with samples you have described makes me head for the
nearest exit! However, I have looked at samples such as expanded teflon,
and vascular castings mounted on nothing more than carbon sticky tabs.
Frequently I have clientes who do not want samples to be gold coated and
consequently, charging is an issue.

I frequently examine this specimens at an extremely reduced kV and adjust
the spot size and working distance to help in obtaining the best
resolution. The parameters will be different for a FESEM: I am using a
tungsten system. I would think a coating of colloidal carbon or silver to
ground would help under any circumstances. Any thoughts? Good luck!

Ken Tiekotter




On Tue, 28 Dec 1999, Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello, all-
}
} We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM that is mostly used for biological
} specimens. However, recently we have had a number of planetary geologists
} looking at sections of meteorites mounted on epoxy resin. About the time
} they started using the scope, we started having a number of problems that
} suggest that we are getting some outgassing and contamination. I'm not
} surprised; this happened before when looking at fish ear bones in similar
} resin, despite the resin manufacturer's clain their product was completely
} stable in the high vacuum and under the beam.
}
} My question is for those of you who routinely look at such samples: What
} do you do to minimize the potential problems? Hold the samples in a
} vacuum for some period of time before putting them into the scope? Paint
} the exposed epoxy areas with carbon paint or similar? For the biological
} samples we only require that the specimens be held over dessicant
} overnight, but I suspect that more heroic measures must be taken for these
} samples.
}
} Happy New Year to all!
}
} Tina
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}
}
}




From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:22:57 2000



From: TQ23TEAM-at-LHT.DLH.DE
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 10:30:53 +0100
Subject: Re: SEM-Refurbishment multi-standard mount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,

I have a multi-element standards mount which over time has deteriorated and
become contaminated with salts. Three of the standards have fallen out of
the holder. The mount was made by C.M. Taylor Corp., Sunnyvale, Calif. in
1982, and it appears that this company no longer exists.
I am interested in finding someone to re-polish the mount and replace the
lost standards. Does anyone know of such a company/person?

Thanks in advance,

Jean M. Howard
Reynolds Metals Company
Materials Characterization-Electron Microscopy
E-mail: jmhoward-at-rmc.com
Office: 804.751.2554

Dear Jean,

Plano W. Plannet GmbH is a supplier for electron microscopy. This company
offers refurbishment of SEM standards.
The company is situated in Germany.

Address: Ernst-Befort-Str.12
D-35578 Wetzlar

e-mail: plano-at-t-online.de, or plano-at-plano-em.com
http://www.plano-em.com

You might contact them to see if they can help you with your problem.

best regards
Mit freundlichen Gr٤en

Detlef Warmbold
Geb. 381 Raum 2152
Tel. / Fax +49/40-5070-3962/1411
E-mail TQ23Team-at-LHT.DLH.DE



From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:53:23 2000



From: Laurie Le Tarte :      lletarte-at-uamail.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 09:44:01 +0000
Subject: Seeking applicants for a postdoctoral research position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Postdoctoral Research Associate

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
The University at Albany - State University at New York

The Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology at the University at
Albany - SUNY seeks applicants for a postdoctoral position with
established expertise in the area of analytical electron microscopy.
Demonstrated experience in the development and application of SEM
and/or TEM based analyses, including chemical analysis, is required to
achieve targeted technique development goals and to support an
expanding microscopy base at the Center. Experience with, or interest
in, scanning probe microscopy techniques is also desirable.
Candidates with a Ph.D. in applied physics, materials science and
engineering, chemistry or related fields are encouraged to apply.
This appointment is part of an ongoing multi-year investment in
personnel and new laboratory facilities for thin film technology
research areas at the Center.

The Center is a New York State sponsored high technology research and
development center with a $60M state-of-the-art infrastructure,
including class 1 clean rooms for back end IC manufacturing on 200 mm
wafers, and advanced processing, patterning and characterization
capabilities for single and multi-layered thin films. The Center is
currently assembling a 200 mm wafer facility for MEMS integration. In
addition, a new facility that will house a 25,000 ft2 class 1cleanroom
for 300 mm wafer pilot manufacturing and workforce training is
presently under construction.

Please send a letter of application including a summary of research
interests, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to:

William Harris, Director of Analytical Sciences
NYS Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
CESTM B110
251 Fuller Road
Albany, NY 12203

The SUNY/Research Foundation is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All
positions contingent upon availability of
funding.



From daemon Wed Jan 05 09:03:24 2000



From: Laurie Le Tarte :      lletarte-at-uamail.albany.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 09:47:27 +0000
Subject: Seeking applicants for an analytical support position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Analytical Support Specialist

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
The University at Albany - State University at New York

The New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology at the
University at Albany - SUNY is a fast growing, high technology
research and development program with a mission of supporting industry
and creating new jobs. This position will serve as a primary
infrastructure support person for the Center's scientific and
technical staff.

Job responsibilities include: performing routine maintenance and
calibration of a variety of surface spectroscopic and electron
microscopy instruments; performing analytical work with these
instruments; assisting students with the operation of this equipment;
diagnosing and repairing non-routine problems with the
instrumentation; and maintaining an adequate store of spare parts and
supplies.

The position requires: an associates degree in electronics, computer
science or related technology and two to four years of directly
relevant experience; a working knowledge of high vacuum systems;
proficiency with related computer hardware/software; demonstrated
ability to work in a high energy, team oriented environment; and
excellent communication and analytical skills. Experience with surface
analysis and/or electron microscopy instrumentation is highly
desirable.

Please send a letter of application including a summary of research
interests, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to:

William Harris, Director of Analytical Sciences
NYS Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology
CESTM B110
251 Fuller Road
Albany, NY 12203

The SUNY/Research Foundation is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All
positions contingent upon availability of
funding.



From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:23:13 2000



From: Geoff Williams :      Geoffrey.Lloyd.Williams-at-cmich.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 08:30:43 -0500
Subject: GEN: ATTN: Lab Managers W/SEM&EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have a question for all of the SEM microscope labs with EDS.

What is the percent of Biological use that the EDS gets in your
facility?

This is going to be my first semester teaching a Biological EDS class.
The facility here sees very little, if any, biological EDS projects. It
is used here as in other places I am familiar with nearly 100% non
biological applications.

I would like as many responses as possible so I can give a
representative summary to the students in the class. A short reply
directly to me ( Geoffrey.Lloyd.Williams-at-cmich.edu or willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
) would be much appreciated. A rough % bio use, most popular bio
samples (plants or animals, type of organisms . . .) and most common
analysis (Quantitative, Qualitative, Dot mapping. . .).

Thank you in advance. If there is sufficient interest I would be
willing to put a summary up on the list for all.

-Geoff W.

--
Geoff Williams

Electron Microscope Facility Supervisor
Biology Department
Brooks Hall
Central Michigan University
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859

Geoffrey.Lloyd.Williams-at-cmich.edu
517 774-3576
517 774-3462 (fax)





From daemon Wed Jan 05 08:53:22 2000



From: Gillmeister, Russ :      RGillmeister-at-sdms.usa.xerox.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 09:15:28 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM - epoxy mountants

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ken, If you have a vacuum evaporator Ken, I would try indirect carbon. Most
metals will evaporate directionally only. Carbon will also evaporate
indirectly (around corners) although at a reduced thickness. The advantage
of this type of evaporation is the carbon will coat very convoluted surfaces
which are not line of site. Another advantage is the carbon will add very
little structure to your sample at high magnifications. Additionally heating
of the sample can be reduced due to shading of the source from the sample.
One caveat is, as you know, carbon is a very inefficient secondary producer
and the carbon will not have the efficiency of gold. Indirect carbon, with a
proper thickness, will prevent charging though. Just put a line of site
shield between your source and sample while keeping it as small as possible.
Good luck. Russ Gillmeister, Xerox

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ken Tiekotter [mailto:tiekotte-at-up.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2000 3:07 AM
To: Tina Carvalho
Cc: Microscopy Listserver


Dear tina and others,
My experience with samples you have described makes me head for the
nearest exit! However, I have looked at samples such as expanded teflon,
and vascular castings mounted on nothing more than carbon sticky tabs.
Frequently I have clientes who do not want samples to be gold coated and
consequently, charging is an issue.

I frequently examine this specimens at an extremely reduced kV and adjust
the spot size and working distance to help in obtaining the best
resolution. The parameters will be different for a FESEM: I am using a
tungsten system. I would think a coating of colloidal carbon or silver to
ground would help under any circumstances. Any thoughts? Good luck!

Ken Tiekotter




On Tue, 28 Dec 1999, Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello, all-
}
} We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM that is mostly used for biological
} specimens. However, recently we have had a number of planetary geologists
} looking at sections of meteorites mounted on epoxy resin. About the time
} they started using the scope, we started having a number of problems that
} suggest that we are getting some outgassing and contamination. I'm not
} surprised; this happened before when looking at fish ear bones in similar
} resin, despite the resin manufacturer's clain their product was completely
} stable in the high vacuum and under the beam.
}
} My question is for those of you who routinely look at such samples: What
} do you do to minimize the potential problems? Hold the samples in a
} vacuum for some period of time before putting them into the scope? Paint
} the exposed epoxy areas with carbon paint or similar? For the biological
} samples we only require that the specimens be held over dessicant
} overnight, but I suspect that more heroic measures must be taken for these
} samples.
}
} Happy New Year to all!
}
} Tina
}
}
****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
*
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251
*
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa *
http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
}
****************************************************************************
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 05 10:33:07 2000



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 10:15:07 -0600
Subject: SEM: Sputter coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

Due to some recent high-resolution requirements in our lab, I find myself
having to go back to Sputter Coating 101 (after years of just putting
specimens in the coater and turning it on without a second thought!). We
find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little structure as
possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.

We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples days or weeks
after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its ugly head. We
intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.

My questions are:

1) I seem to remember a string on this listserver suggesting that lower
deposition currents yield finer coating structure. Is this right? Does a
low deposition current for a longer time yield a finer coating than a higher
current for a shorter time? (I'm running some tests to check this, but
would be very interested in others' experiences, too.)

2) Deposition current can be controlled by the initial current setting
(i.e., the knob on the machine) and by the argon flow through the chamber.
Is there any difference in the coating when adjusting the deposition current
by either of these two ways?

3) Charts I have seen indicate that deposition current is directly
proportional to coating rate. Is the same true for coating time? I.e., is a
one minute coating twice as thick as a 30 sec. coating? It would seem so
intuitively, but you know what they say about the word "assume".

My apologies if these are very basic questions, but, like I said, back to SC
101!

I'll be happy to summarize the responses for anyone who is interested.

Thanks!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine Bldg.
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)882-8304
tindallr-at-missouri.edu
http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/




From daemon Wed Jan 05 10:33:07 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 08:30:38 -0800
Subject: Re: Mat: Cadmium Zinc Telluride thin foils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,

You can probably use Agar, this is commonly used to grow yeast cultures for
brewing. This is a vegetable based gelatin like substance. You can buy it
at some organic type stores in the bulk section (you don't need much
probably 10 tbsp) it costs about $100/ounce.

I don't remember the exact proportions but I think you use something like
1-3 tsp per 2cups of water and 1 tbsp of a complex sugar (brown sugar will
probably be fine). You just get it al boiling for 5-10 min to sterilize it
and pour into sterile glass dishes WITH LIDS. I use small Ball jars. Put
it in the fridge and it should harden in 10-15 min. If not, then my
proportions are off.

After it is hard, just wipe some saliva on the media and watch the green and
red goo grow.

Good luck
-andrew

----- Original Message -----
} From: Mike Southwell {mjsouth-at-flash.net}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 03, 2000 7:44 PM


Dear Dorrance,
It seems to me that the etching step is redundant. The ion-milling should
remove any polishing deformation and the etching will introduce surface
profiling. I recall that the CZT is very soft and may require some
modification to the ion beam voltage or current to reduce damage. Sounds
like you are close to getting good results.
At 06:34 PM 1/4/00 -0700, you wrote:
}
} Hi,
} I've been working on thin foils of CZT and I'm looking for some suggestions
} to help eliminate artifacts created by ion milling. So far I have polished
} side one and etched (to remove polishing damage) with bromine-methanol and
} then dimpled side two, ending with 0.1um alumina. I have been successful
} obtaining a final sample thickness of about 8 to 10 microns. However, when
} I put the samples into the PIPs (Gatan) to complete the thinning process I'm
} seeing beam damage. I was hoping that someone might have a different
} approach or suggestion that would eliminate the beam damage.
} Thanks for your help.
} Dorrance
}
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca




From daemon Wed Jan 05 11:42:58 2000



From: Donna Wagahoff :      DWAGAHOFF-at-siumed.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 11:08:12 -0600
Subject: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
of a spill outside the hood.)
Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
are welcomed.
Thanks.

Donna Wagahoff
SIU School of Medicine
PO Box 19627
Springfield, IL 62794-9627
217-782-0898
fax217-524-3227



From daemon Wed Jan 05 12:12:54 2000



From: Mike Dalbey :      dalbey-at-biology.ucsc.edu
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 10:07:45 -0800
Subject: Re: BIO-Bacterial Growth Medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,

This experiment is very popular in the science fair circuit; it is only
slightly less popular than "What kind of music do plants like best?".
Moreover (as a topic RELEVANT TO THE LIST) van Leeuwenhoek showed more than
300 years ago, BY MICROSCOPY, that the experiment as usaully performed is
invalid as a test of mouthwash efficacy in situ. You might want to consult
his observations on the topic.

Prepared agar media can be purchased from educational scientific supply
houses such as Carolina Biologicals or Ward's, both of which maintain web
sites. They both offer "instant" formulations designed for preparation of
Petri dishes without autoclaving. You would want a medium capable of
supporting growth of Streptococcus species, which are an important
component of the oral microflora. The streptococci are somewhat fastidious
in their nutritional requirements. Therefore, select something rich in
organic nutrients such as amino acids. Tryptic Soy Medium would probably
work best. The proteose peptone/glucose composition suggested by a previous
respondent would also probably work. Lettuce or wheat grain extract would
probably not give satisfactory results.If you wish to make your own medium
at home from local sources, I suggest table sugar, beef bullion (more
concentrated than in culinary use) and agar (often available at health food
stores). A pressure cooker would help to ensure sterility during
preparation. Be advised that many of the bacteria in the oral cavity are
obligate anaerobes; they will not grow on any medium if it is in contact
with the atmosphere.

Best wishes for the success of your daughter's work!
Mike Dalbey
Biology Dept.
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

831-459-3674



From daemon Wed Jan 05 13:12:48 2000



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 13:34:49 -0500
Subject: Fine SEM coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Randy Tindall wrote:
=================================================
{snip}
We find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little structure
as possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.

We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples days or weeks
after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its ugly head. We
intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.

{snip}
===================================================
One (maybe the only) solution to the problem is to coat with osmium metal in
the osmium plasma coater. Pt grain size can be on the same size magnitude
as your nanostructures. You can get information about this coater on our
website at URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/osmi-coat.html

One does not need to worry about grain size because it is an (apparently
completely) amorphous layer and since it is a precious group metal, it has
the intertness of Au and Pt and will essentially last forever.

The physics of the process is explained in the US Patent #5855682 which can
be clicked to from the above URL.

We would be happy to coat some demo samples for you in our demo unit at any
time, just let us know.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies distributes the line of Osmium Plasma Coaters,
manufactured by Nippon Laser and Electronics Ltd.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.spi.cc
########################
============================================



From daemon Wed Jan 05 13:12:48 2000



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 13:34:49 -0500
Subject: Fine SEM coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Randy Tindall wrote:
=================================================
{snip}
We find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little structure
as possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.

We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples days or weeks
after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its ugly head. We
intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.

{snip}
===================================================
One (maybe the only) solution to the problem is to coat with osmium metal in
the osmium plasma coater. Pt grain size can be on the same size magnitude
as your nanostructures. You can get information about this coater on our
website at URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/osmi-coat.html

One does not need to worry about grain size because it is an (apparently
completely) amorphous layer and since it is a precious group metal, it has
the intertness of Au and Pt and will essentially last forever.

The physics of the process is explained in the US Patent #5855682 which can
be clicked to from the above URL.

We would be happy to coat some demo samples for you in our demo unit at any
time, just let us know.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies distributes the line of Osmium Plasma Coaters,
manufactured by Nippon Laser and Electronics Ltd.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.spi.cc
########################
============================================



From daemon Wed Jan 05 12:42:51 2000



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 12:41:26 -0600
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Agar can be purchased from some Asian stores at much cheaper rate if you can find them. It is made into strands, so, don't expect powder form.



Ann Fook Yang
EM Unit,
Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre,
Rm 2091, K.W. Neatby Bldg.,
Central Experimental Farm,
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0C6

Phone: 613-759-1638
Fax; 613-759-1701

} } } "Andrew Cahill" {cahill-at-colorado.edu} 01/05 11:15 AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Mike,

You can probably use Agar, this is commonly used to grow yeast cultures for
brewing. This is a vegetable based gelatin like substance. You can buy it
at some organic type stores in the bulk section (you don't need much
probably 10 tbsp) it costs about $100/ounce.

I don't remember the exact proportions but I think you use something like
1-3 tsp per 2cups of water and 1 tbsp of a complex sugar (brown sugar will
probably be fine). You just get it al boiling for 5-10 min to sterilize it
and pour into sterile glass dishes WITH LIDS. I use small Ball jars. Put
it in the fridge and it should harden in 10-15 min. If not, then my
proportions are off.

After it is hard, just wipe some saliva on the media and watch the green and
red goo grow.

Good luck
-andrew

----- Original Message -----
} From: Mike Southwell {mjsouth-at-flash.net}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 03, 2000 7:44 PM


Agar can be purchased from some Asian stores at much cheaper rate if you can find them. It is made into strands, so, don't expect powder form.



Ann Fook Yang
EM Unit,
Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre,
Rm 2091, K.W. Neatby Bldg.,
Central Experimental Farm,
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0C6

Phone: 613-759-1638
Fax; 613-759-1701

} } } "Andrew Cahill" {cahill-at-colorado.edu} 01/05 11:15 AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Mike,

You can probably use Agar, this is commonly used to grow yeast cultures for
brewing. This is a vegetable based gelatin like substance. You can buy it
at some organic type stores in the bulk section (you don't need much
probably 10 tbsp) it costs about $100/ounce.

I don't remember the exact proportions but I think you use something like
1-3 tsp per 2cups of water and 1 tbsp of a complex sugar (brown sugar will
probably be fine). You just get it al boiling for 5-10 min to sterilize it
and pour into sterile glass dishes WITH LIDS. I use small Ball jars. Put
it in the fridge and it should harden in 10-15 min. If not, then my
proportions are off.

After it is hard, just wipe some saliva on the media and watch the green and
red goo grow.

Good luck
-andrew

----- Original Message -----
} From: Mike Southwell {mjsouth-at-flash.net}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 03, 2000 7:44 PM


I store my osmium in a glass bottle with plastic cap (Schott bottle -
orange cap - commonly used for tissue culture work). The inside
portion of the cap turns black quite rapidly but the solution is
stable for months at room temperature. I store this glass bottle
inside an aluminum-foiled plastic container in my fume hood at room
temp. The clear plastic of this outer container gets translucent
black within weeks no matter how carefully I seal the glass bottle.
I think the storage of osmium in any single container (except a
sealed ampule) in the refrigerator is foolish and unnecessary. Due
to University regulations, we are required to store our aldehyde
fixatives and other toxic chemicals inside the refrigerator in
"secondary containment" containers. We keep the glass bottles of
aldehydes in small plastic containers and transport them this way to
the fume hood for use.

}
}
}
} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.
} Thanks.
}
} Donna Wagahoff
} SIU School of Medicine
} PO Box 19627
} Springfield, IL 62794-9627
} 217-782-0898
} fax217-524-3227

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)



From daemon Wed Jan 05 13:22:45 2000



From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 14:16:01 -0500
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donna Wagahoff wrote:

} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.

Dear Donna,
How about putting the glass containers inside plastic containers?
There are also padded and styrofoam containers which you could use for
the transportation step. These can usually be made out of waste packaging
material--better than sending it to a landfill.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From daemon Wed Jan 05 13:32:43 2000



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 11:20:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: BIO-Bacterial Growth Medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} I know this is a little off the microscopy subject, but in the interest
} of encouraging scientific exploration in a young person. I hope you will
} indulge me.
}
} I'm looking for materials for my daughter's science project. She is
} testing the effectiveness of different mouthwashes in killing bacteria
} found in the mouth. Her experiment matrix requires 12 petri dishes with
} a bacterial growth medium. I can probably scrounge something to use as
} petri dishes, but the growth medium is a problem. I'm not even sure
} what it is properly called or what its makeup is. Is it something we
} can easily purchase locally, or even better is there a recipe for making
} a suitable substitute from ingredients found in the home?
}
} Any and all suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
}
Mike -

You're a supportive parent! I agree with you that purchasing prepared
microbiological groth media doesn't have as much learning potential as
starting from scratch, but it's undeniably easier. And probably cheaper.
How old is she? Since you obviously don't know any microtechnique, I worry
about the adequacy of her "experiment matrix". Some degree of sterile
technique is required, implying the use of an alcohol lamp-sterilized wire
loop.

If you want to cook your own, you'll need a pressure cooker and the
instructions available in Zook et al., "The Microcosmos guide to exploring
microbial space" (see the MICRO bibliography! URL below). I can send you
photocopied pages, but if this is a major project you may want the book.
Or you can buy prepared sterile plates (and the agarose that you'd need for
home cooking) from any large biological supply house, such as Carolina
Biological (800-334-5551). You may even have a medical supply source in
town.

Caroline


Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html





From daemon Wed Jan 05 15:32:24 2000



From: rfelten-at-Macdermid.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 16:16:31 -0500
Subject: Looking for a Contract laboratory that does AFM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Rick Felten-at-MACDERMID
01/05/2000 04:16 PM
I have a couple of Ni/Au Samples that I need analyzed using AFM. The
conductive samples would need to be scanned over a 10 X 10 micron region.
Were are located in Waterbury Ct and the closer to us the better.

Any Help would be appreciated.

Ric





From daemon Wed Jan 05 16:02:18 2000



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 13:43:33 -0800
Subject: Image distortion correction?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


HI:

Is there a way to remove a moderate barrel distortion from an image? I have
images taken with a 17 mm wide angle lens that are slightly distorted and
wish to make some area measurements from them.

I have a picture of a grid of known size so it seems like there should be a
way to 'stretch' the picture into shape in something like Photoshop, I just
don't know where to look. Any help or ideas?

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu





From daemon Wed Jan 05 16:12:20 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 12:04:59 -1000 (HST)
Subject: TEM, Sectioning, Need Ultracut belt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, all-

The drive belt on our Reichert (Leica) Ultracut E broke last night,
leaving a number of people in a state of panic. Leica does not have any
of these in the US, and the Vienna group is still on holiday.

I would appreciate and forever be indebted to anyone who could quickly
send me the appropriate belt, which I could either pay for (list $38.34,
plus shipping) or replace when ours come in.

Mahalo!
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 05 16:32:18 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 17:22:52 -0500
Subject: RE: Spectra in MSA/MSA Format How to Plot...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nestor,
The Gatan ELP option for MSA formatted files outputs the files to 5 columns
serial. There are other ASCII options, but they are not MSA format. I have
found that Noran does the same thing in our new system. It is not easy to
parse the data for a spreadsheet when it is in that format. I would have
been happy if they had done it with the two column option that is available
in the standard or if they simply used a single column. Once it is in that
format, it's easy to do in a spreadsheet. With multiple columns, I had to
go into the file with a word processor, take out the hard returns at the end
of each row, and then replace all of the commas with hard returns. Then I
could open them easily in the spreadsheet. That's how I got started with
the Basic program -simply to read them in and output them to a two column
text with the MSA format. Then I got carried away with VB.

-Scott



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Nestor J. Zaluzec [mailto:zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2000 8:14 PM
} To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Spectra in MSA/MSA Format How to Plot...
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
}
} As one of the co-authors of the MSA/MAS File format we
} had a goal to make the format simple enough to be
} useable in even a simple spreadsheet program.
}
} A number of the major manufacturer's allow you to
} translate their data files into this format directly
} from their application programs. To use the data
} in a spreadsheet, simply specify dual column (x,y)
} format for the output file and
} then you can import the data files directly into
} a MS Excel spreadsheet, or even better a data
} graphing program like KaleidaGraph (which runs
} on both Mac's & PC's). Then plot to your hearts content.
}
}
}
} Nestor
} Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 05 17:42:07 2000



From: mykkb-at-juno.com
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 18:28:19 -0500
Subject: Re:Bio Bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is a Bacterial Growth Medium Kit for grades 3-6 in the Carolina
K-6 Science Catalog ( I have the Fall 1998 Catalog). It contains 2 cans
of Beef Browth, 2 Boxes of Unflavored Gelatin, Multivitamins, 20 sterile
Petri Dishes and 10 sterile Cotton-Tipped Applicators. It recommends the
use of a pressure cooker or autoclave for "complete" sterility.
It costs $26.43 per kit (1998 price) Phone: 1-800-334-5551
Most of the items are available at the supermarket. The petri dishes and
sterile applicators are more difficult to get. A local college
microbiology department might give a hand or even some sterile Nutrient
Agar Plates.

Mike Baxter
Lehman College




From daemon Wed Jan 05 17:42:09 2000



From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 17:37:02 -0600
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Donna,

Whenever I tried storing osmium solutions in plastics they always reacted
with the plastic causing it to blacken. This took place even in Teflon
altho at a much slower rate.

Why not use a glass that has been coated with plastic and rendered
breakproof. I see that many chemicals (like acids) come in such reagent
bottles.

Hint: maybe one of the EM vendors may know about this.

John



} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.

####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Micro-Imaging and Analysis Center
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################





From daemon Wed Jan 05 18:12:04 2000



From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2000 15:41:36 -0800
Subject: Mag. Calibration for JEOL 5800

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

The newer SEMs require software access to do some fundamental
adjustments: magnification, high voltage, crt brightness, etc.

I am attempting to calibrate the magnification on a JEOL 5800 SEM. I am
guessing this requires a sequence of keystrokes to access the computer
in "service" mode. Does anyone have the keystroke sequence or know of
the calibration procedure for the JEOL 5800?

Thank You,
Earl Weltmer




From daemon Thu Jan 06 07:35:21 2000



From: jim :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 10:51:49 +1000
Subject: RE: SEM-Refurbishing multi-standards mount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We could quote on that and certainly, if it involved repolishing and re-coating
only this would be worthwhile. In this case the separated standards would need
to be identified, remounted and thoroughly polished. If much thickness is lost
during the polishing there may be a problem with other standards.
Certainly its possible but I expect that the cost will come close to our new
standard blocks, complete with micro-engraving. I suggest that you check it out
in our online.
Disclaimer: ProSciTech supplies WDS/EDS standards.

Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Wednesday, January 05, 2000 1:48 AM, Howard, Jean M. [SMTP:JMHoward-at-rmc.com]
wrote:
}
} Dear listers,
}
} I have a multi-element standards mount which over time has deteriorated and
} become contaminated with salts. Three of the standards have fallen out of
} the holder. The mount was made by C.M. Taylor Corp., Sunnyvale, Calif. in
} 1982, and it appears that this company no longer exists.
} I am interested in finding someone to re-polish the mount and replace the
} lost standards. Does anyone know of such a company/person?
}
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Jean M. Howard
} Reynolds Metals Company
} Materials Characterization-Electron Microscopy
} E-mail: jmhoward-at-rmc.com
} Office: 804.751.2554
}
}
}




From daemon Wed Jan 05 20:51:40 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2000 21:29:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: old Kinney evap instruc bk avail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Some time ago I sent out a Kinney High Vacuum manual. There were 4
interested parties; one got the original; others, copies. I have now
found a 2nd one of these antiques, and would be happy to send it to the
highest bidder (i.e., free to the first to reply). The date in the front is
listed as June, 1961.

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735




From daemon Thu Jan 06 08:07:04 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 07:59:23 -0600
Subject: RE: Spectra in MSA/MSA Format How to Plot...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott etal...

Perhaps it is time to point out to some of the Manufacturers that they should
implement the MSA/MAS standard with an option to specify
the number of columns in the output file ( like the demo/test
copy does). That would be in the spirit of how the format
was originally designed so that "additional" programs code
would not have to be written. They generally listen to customers
so speak your mind!

In the mean time I'll look into also putting a version of the
demo translator on-line.


(Grinning Devilishly)

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:58 2000



From: Lou Solebello :      microls1297-at-mindspring.com
Date: Thursday, January 06, 2000 4:30 PM
Subject: SEM- service companies in Mexico

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Good Lord.......So this is what NAFTA brings us to.......Third world
companies undermining real science with a New Brand of Burger King products
and services? Care for an Enchilada while you wait for your SEM
images?.....$5.95 please.......

Just a cynical comment that is much closer to the truth than I care to think
about.
-----Original Message-----
} From: Paul Rennie (KIDDE) {Paul.Rennie-at-kidde-hq.com}
To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com {microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}


Dear All,

Having just purchased a new SEM, our old instrument, a Cambridge S200 is
destined to be sent to one of our companies in Cuidad Victoria, Mexico
(Although I'm trying to persuade management that it's not worth it).
Although we will probably be installing the instrument ourselves, I would
welcome details of any service companies in Mexico. Additionally, who sells
consumables within Mexico, or is it best to purchase over the border in the
USA.

Thanking you in advance.

Paul Rennie

Kidde International Research
Mathisen Way
Colnbrook
Slough
Berks SL3 0HB
UK

Tel: 44 (0) 1753 683245
Fax: 44 (0) 1753 683810
http://www.kidde-int.com





From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:52 2000



From: Paul Rennie (KIDDE) :      Paul.Rennie-at-kidde-hq.com
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 15:54:44 +0000
Subject: SEM- service companies in Mexico

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

Having just purchased a new SEM, our old instrument, a Cambridge S200 is
destined to be sent to one of our companies in Cuidad Victoria, Mexico
(Although I'm trying to persuade management that it's not worth it).
Although we will probably be installing the instrument ourselves, I would
welcome details of any service companies in Mexico. Additionally, who sells
consumables within Mexico, or is it best to purchase over the border in the USA.

Thanking you in advance.

Paul Rennie

Kidde International Research
Mathisen Way
Colnbrook
Slough
Berks SL3 0HB
UK

Tel: 44 (0) 1753 683245
Fax: 44 (0) 1753 683810
http://www.kidde-int.com



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:52 2000



From: :      UICPRINT-at-uic.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 00 08:41:26 CST
Subject: FREE SCREENINGS IN JANUARY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For Sale:

JEOL 100B - Disassembled, great source for Parts . $2,000 Cash and Carry.

PHILLIPS 201C - Will be taken out of service this month. Excellent working
condition. Maintained on OEM Service Contracts since day one. Make an offer.

--
Ford M. Royer, MT(ASCP)
Analytical Instruments, Ltd
(Refurbished Histology, Cytology, & General Lab Equipment)
9921 13th Ave. N.
Minneapolis, MN 55441-5004
800-565-1895 phone
612-929-1895 fax
web site: http://www.aibltd.com




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Message-Id: {200001061637.KAA00322-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}



The UIC Physicians Group at Central Station, 1550 South Indiana Avenue,
(312) 957-0049, is offering FREE SCREENINGS/TALKS in JANUARY:

"Stress Management"
Learn to manage the stress in your busy life.
All Fridays in January, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

"Bone Density Screening"
For the detection of osteoporosis
January 19--call for appointments

"Bowel and Bladder Management"
Tuesday, January 18, 9:30-11 a.m.
Friday, January 28, 9:30-11 a.m.

Special Feature
Are you overweight? Not sure? Find out your body mass index (BMI) and body
fat percentage. Also learn about UIC's new weight loss program and all
available options.
January 26, 9-11 a.m.




From: :      UICPRINT-at-uic.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 00 08:41:26 CST
Subject: FREE SCREENINGS IN JANUARY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:52 2000



From: Robert Plano :      RPLANO-at-cea.com
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 08:47:59 -0800
Subject: RE: Looking for a Contract laboratory that does AFM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
id {CF52CAJP} ; Thu, 6 Jan 2000 08:48:07 -0800
Message-ID: {EAF569A980E4D21185380090271F40EB125F35-at-EXCHANGE}
{Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ,
"',rfelten-at-Macdermid.com'"
{,rfelten-at-Macdermid.com}


Rick,

While we are not too close to Connecticut (California to be exact), we have
a great deal of experience in analyzing all types of samples with the AFM
and overnight delivery services can make turnaround times very short. What
information are you looking for from the samples? Please give me a call at
650-962-8767 or respond to this email so we can help you out.

-Rob

Robert J. Plano
Staff Analyst, SPM Services
Surface Science Labs
(650)962-8767, ext. 742
http://www.cea.com
http://www.surface-science.com


} -----Original Message-----
} From: "rfelten-at-Macdermid.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} [mailto:"rfelten-at-Macdermid.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2000 1:17 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Looking for a Contract laboratory that does AFM
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListser} ver/FAQ.html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
}
}
} Rick Felten-at-MACDERMID
} 01/05/2000 04:16 PM
} I have a couple of Ni/Au Samples that I need analyzed using AFM. The
} conductive samples would need to be scanned over a 10 X 10
} micron region.
} Were are located in Waterbury Ct and the closer to us the better.
}
} Any Help would be appreciated.
}
} Ric
}
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:56 2000



From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2000 12:11:25 -0600
Subject: 8 inch 10 megabyte bernoulli flexible disk cartridges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have about 45 USED 8 inch 10 megabyte bernoulli flexible disk cartridges
that I will ship to the first person that emails me at rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu.
Due to shipping charges, I will only ship to a continental U.S. address.

We have gotten rid of our computer that uses these disks and I thought
someone out there that still needed them might appreciate them (since you
can't buy them anymore!).

Robin Griffin
Materials and Mechanical Engineering
The University of Alabama at Birmingham



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:57 2000



From: Corazon Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 12:35:35 -0600
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


*******************************************************
Corazon D. Bucana, Ph.D.
Department of Cancer Biology
U.T. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Blvd. Box 173
Houston, Texas 77030
Phone: (713) 792-8106
FAX: (713) 792-8747
Email:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
FAX: (713) 792-8747




From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:00:59 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 15:24:14 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM- service companies in Mexico

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Paul,

Contact Gordon Grau Scientific (407-282-5749)

While they are in Florida, they deal extensively with Latin America. As
for either Dr. Neddy Fookes or Dr. Barry Fookes... tell them I sent you.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.


At 03:54 PM 1/6/00 +0000, Paul Rennie (KIDDE) wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:01:01 2000



From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 16:11:22 -0500
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Osmium vapors can penetrate and blacken plastics. The long term effects
are uncertain. If you can find a Teflon bottle this might work.

Probably best to stay with glass bottles with Teflon colsures and do not
hand carry the solution (i.e. use a lab cart for transport). Hope this
is some help.

Charles Duvic, Ph.D.
Chief Chemist

--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
web site http://www.ladd.cc



From daemon Thu Jan 06 18:01:02 2000



From: jjerome-at-wfubmc.edu (Jay Jerome)
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 16:38:45 -0500
Subject: Survey of Graduate Students

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This was sent to the MSA Education Committee. It seems to be a worthwhile
endeavor, so I am passing it along to those on the listserver.
Jay Jerome

Adam Fagen wrote:

} Dear Microscopy Community:
}
} The National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS) has
} recently received a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to conduct a
} survey of doctoral students on their graduate school experiences. The
} survey will be completed on the Web {http://survey.nagps.org/} by current
} and recent doctoral students from January - May 2000, and the results made
} publicly available on the Web on a department specific basis in September.
}
} This effort is a follow-up to a more limited survey which occurred this
} past spring, which was aimed at science and engineering doctoral students.
} The aggregate results from that survey are available at
} {http://www.phds.org/survey/results/} .
}
} The survey we are conducting is unique in at least two important ways: it
} collects information on a department-specific basis, not only averaged
} over entire institutions or disciplines (though discipline-level results
} will also be available). So it will be possible to look at, for instance,
} responses from individual biology programs, or to rank history departments
} based on faculty mentoring. And it makes this data publicly available on
} the Internet in Fall 2000. So we'll be opening the door about the
} situation in individual departments for wider viewing by graduate
} students, prospective students, faculty, administrators, etc.
}
} The survey is based upon best practices and covers issues in a number of
} areas, including information for prospective students, curriculum breadth
} and flexibility, career guidance and placement services, faculty
} mentoring, time to degree, department climate, teaching, professionalism,
} and overall satisfaction. In other words, the sort of best practices and
} concerns outside of the reputation. The NAGPS survey itself will run from
} January 18-May 1, 2000, and will be available on the Web at
} {http://survey.nagps.org/} (which already has a number of resources).
}
} For this survey to be useful, it is vital that we reach as many current
} and recent doctoral students (anyone who has been enrolled for at least
} one semester in the past five years) as possible. We are hoping that we
} can encourage a significant percentage of students to respond so that the
} results will represent a broad range of experiences and a realistic
} picture of department and institutional practices.
}
} In order to realize this level of participation, getting the word out is
} obviously very important. One of the publicity strategies we're employing
} is trying to reach current and recent doctoral students through the major
} professional societies and organizations, such as the MSA. (Other
} strategies include messages to relevant e-mail listservs, coverage in
} campus and national media, and working through graduate student
} organizations, department chairs and graduate deans, other organizations,
} etc.)
}
} Since the MSA reaches so many current and recent graduate students, it is
} certainly one of the organizations of prime importance for getting the
} word out. We have thought of a few strategies for spreading the word
} among your membership (and would welcome additional ideas and
} suggestions): (1) distribution on e-mail listservs that reach a high
} number of graduate students and recent graduates, those who have left
} their programs, etc.; (2) notice in newsletters and other publications
} that current and former students might see; and (3) publicity at meetings
} and conferences. We are happy to provide whatever resources and materials
} that would facilitate distribution (e.g., flyers, letters, posters, etc.).
} We would certainly appreciate any insight you have on publicity within
} (and outside of) the MSA.
}
} As a bit of background on our organization, NAGPS represents nearly
} 900,000 graduate and professional students on 150 member campuses and is
} dedicated to improving the quality of graduate and professional student
} life and education by actively promoting the interests and welfare of
} graduate- and professional-degree-seeking students.
}
} Of course, I'd be happy to answer any questions or provide any more info.
} Thanks for your assistance in this important effort!
}
} --Adam Fagen
}
} Adam Fagen, Chair
} Ad Hoc Committee on Faculty-Student Relations
} National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS)
}
} NAGPS Web: http://www.nagps.org/
} The National Doctoral Program Survey: http://survey.nagps.org/
}
} Adam Fagen \ afagen-at-fas.harvard.edu
} Molecular Biology/Education / http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~afagen/
} Harvard University GSAS \ http://mazur-www.harvard.edu/

--
Jay
----------------------------------------------
- AKA: W. Gray Jerome, Ph.D. -
- Department of Pathology -
- Wake Forest University School of Medicine -
- Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1092 -
- Ph: 336-716-4972, 336-716-2675 -
- Fax: 336-716-6174 -
- E-mail: jjerome-at-wfubmc.edu -
----------------------------------------------





From daemon Fri Jan 07 07:08:42 2000



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 16:46:43 -0800
Subject: Image montage software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can anyone recommend image montaging software? That is, software that
assists you in compositing several images into one larger image. I am
familiar with the offerings from GATAN for their Digital Micrograph and
QuickStitch from Enroute Software. Also, can anyone offer an evaluation of
the QuickStitch software?

TIA


Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
530 754 7536 fax
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Fri Jan 07 07:08:49 2000



From: jim :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 15:11:32 +1000
Subject: RE: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Plastic is oxidized and so part of the osmium is exhausted in the vials. Even
when frozen osmium diffuses through plastic containers. So you may save a rare
breakage, but you are certain to have osmium in your refrigerator. It's just a
bad idea to pack osmium in plastic. You could use a secondary container, be it
plastic or glass, to increase overall safety.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 06, 2000 3:08 AM, Donna Wagahoff
[SMTP:DWAGAHOFF-at-siumed.edu] wrote:
}
} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.
} Thanks.
}
} Donna Wagahoff
} SIU School of Medicine
} PO Box 19627
} Springfield, IL 62794-9627
} 217-782-0898
} fax217-524-3227




From daemon Fri Jan 07 07:08:49 2000



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 10:24:22 +0000
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would not recommend storing osmium in ordinary laboratory
plastics containers used on their own. Osmium penetrates
polyolefin plastics (PE, PP) to some depth, and reacts with them,
so containers made from these plastics or of polystyrene or
polycarbonate with polyolefin closures cannot be recommended.
Mostly, osmium is supplied in some protective packaging, but if
you want to improve security still further I would consider placing
the glass ampoules inside a polyethylene or polypropylene tube.
That would give considerable shock-protection, and if the ampoule
did break would protect against leakage, but only for the short
period required to get it to a fume cupboard. The same principle
can be applied to osmium solutions prepared in glass bottles -
enclosure in an outer polyethylene bottle will give shock-protection
and temporary containment. It will also indicate by its blackening
how much leakage is occurring from your supposedly closed glass
container. Speaking of which, we have a rule that osmium solutions
are NEVER stored in the laboratory refrigerator. Why? because
even when greatest care is taken, osmium blackening of the fridge
walls and other objects in the fridge takes place, indicating that
vapour is escaping into the fridge atmosphere. If you must store
osmium at low temperatures, I recommend you consider installing
a compact refrigerator in your fume hood or in a fan-ventilated
cupboard.

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.
} Thanks.
}
} Donna Wagahoff
} SIU School of Medicine
} PO Box 19627
} Springfield, IL 62794-9627
} 217-782-0898
} fax217-524-3227
}


=====================================================================
DR CHRIS JEFFREE
BIOSEM - BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES EM FACILITY
UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JH, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 131 650 5345
FAX. #44 131 650 6563
Mobile 0410 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
SEM / TEM bookings sem-at-ed.ac.uk
=====================================================================



From daemon Fri Jan 07 07:38:57 2000



From: Petra Wahlbring :      wahlbrin-at-crpgl.lu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 14:16:32 +0100
Subject: Mat: Cutting of small semiconductor specimen?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



A happy New Year to everybody!

I just solved (with the help of some of you) my last problem with the
carbon extraction replicas but the next specimen causing difficulties is on
my desk...

I got a small semiconducor specimen with a layered structure that should be
investigated. If I say small I mean it: it has a shape like a cube with a
side length of about 250um. And now comes the real difficulty: We need to
cut this one precious specimen into several slices in order to allow other
investigations with other analytical methods. In fact we have five
specimens to try with, but they are not completely identical to the one we
have finally to investigate.

We are equipped with everything we need to do a TEM preparation of bulk
materials and also of interfaces as long as the specimens are large enough
(saw, disk cutter, dimpler, ion etcher, mounting tools, ...) but I don't
see how I could be successful with such a small specimen.

Any ideas?

Petra


--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpgl.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpgl.lu/~wahlbrin



From daemon Fri Jan 07 07:58:55 2000



From: Petra Wahlbring :      wahlbrin-at-crpgl.lu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 14:16:32 +0100
Subject: Mat: Cutting of small semiconductor specimen?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



A happy New Year to everybody!

I just solved (with the help of some of you) my last problem with the
carbon extraction replicas but the next specimen causing difficulties is on
my desk...

I got a small semiconducor specimen with a layered structure that should be
investigated. If I say small I mean it: it has a shape like a cube with a
side length of about 250um. And now comes the real difficulty: We need to
cut this one precious specimen into several slices in order to allow other
investigations with other analytical methods. In fact we have five
specimens to try with, but they are not completely identical to the one we
have finally to investigate.

We are equipped with everything we need to do a TEM preparation of bulk
materials and also of interfaces as long as the specimens are large enough
(saw, disk cutter, dimpler, ion etcher, mounting tools, ...) but I don't
see how I could be successful with such a small specimen.

Any ideas?

Petra


--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpgl.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpgl.lu/~wahlbrin



From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:50 2000



From: Eric Windsor :      Eric.Windsor-at-nist.gov
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 09:40:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Mat: Cadmium Zinc Telluride thin foils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dorrance,

I think I can make several suggestions and point you toward several references
that may help.

First, can you or have you tried dipping your ion milled (to perforation)
samples into your bromine/methanol etch as the final step in your procedure?
Yu et al (J.of Elec. Micro.Tech./18/315-324/1991) dipped their perforated
samples in 0.5% Br2/Ch3OH for 1or 2 seconds followed by 20 seconds in HF/HCL of
volume ratio 1:1. This technique worked well for them.

As you may know, reducing the energy during the final step(s) of ion milling
can reduce the severity and/or the number of artifacts produced. If you have
access to a mill that allows milling in the 100eV to 1keV range you may want to
try this as the final step in your milling procedure.

The following techniques have also been used to prepare type II-VI compound
semiconductors:

(1) Reactive ion milling. This can be done 2 different ways. In one
method
Iodine gas is used instead of Argon. The iodine gas is ionized to form I+,
which is then used for milling (Cullis and Chew/ MRS symposium proceedings/
115/ 3-14/1988). In the second method, Iodine gas is introduced into the
“Atmosphere” of the milling chamber during Ar+ milling (Pecz and Barna
/Vacuum/45/1-3/1994). The authors have applied these techniques to type II-VI
compound semiconductors of CdTe, ZnS, and ZnSe in addition to other compound
semiconductors. CAUTION must be used when introducing iodine gas into your ion
mill. The gas is very corrosive and may damage mill parts and vacuum systems.
I recommend that you check with the manufacturer of your ion mill before
proceeding.
(2) Chemomechanical polishing. Sabinina and Gutakovsky
(Ultramicroscopy/45/411-415/1992) eliminated the need for ion milling
completely by using this technique. They prepare samples of HgCdTe using a
bromine-methanol etchant in a technique that is very similar to dimpling using
padded tools.


Are you familiar with the Small Angle Cleavage Technique (SACT)? This
technique may or may not work for your materials. I am not aware of any
references for preparing II-VI materials using SACT but that certainly does not
imply that it can’t be done. I have used this technique to prepare samples of
thin films on silicon substrates. It is quick and relatively easy to learn.
The technique was developed by John McCaffrey and a good step by step procedure
is given by Walck and McCaffrey (MRS symposium proceedings/480/149-171/1997).

The references listed above are meant to be a starting point and are by no
means a complete listing.

Hope this helps.

E. Windsor

Eric Windsor
Physical Scientist
NIST
100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371
(301) 975-3930
fax: (301) 417-1321
eric.windsor-at-nist.gov

Dorrance McClean originally wrote:

Hi,
I've been working on thin foils of CZT and I'm looking for some suggestions
to help eliminate artifacts created by ion milling. So far I have polished
side one and etched (to remove polishing damage) with bromine-methanol and
then dimpled side two, ending with 0.1um alumina. I have been successful
obtaining a final sample thickness of about 8 to 10 microns. However, when
I put the samples into the PIPs (Gatan) to complete the thinning process I'm
seeing beam damage. I was hoping that someone might have a different
approach or suggestion that would eliminate the beam damage.
Thanks for your help.
Dorrance




From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:48 2000



From: David Rohde :      drohde-at-zuul.noran.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 08:41:45 -0600
Subject: Image montage software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Soft Imaging Systems has a program called analySIS that has a montage module
called MIA. Have a look at their web site at: www.soft-imaging.de

David Rohde
NORAN Instruments

-----Original Message-----
} From: Rick Harris [mailto:raharris-at-ucdavis.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2000 6:47 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Can anyone recommend image montaging software? That is, software that
assists you in compositing several images into one larger image. I am
familiar with the offerings from GATAN for their Digital Micrograph and
QuickStitch from Enroute Software. Also, can anyone offer an evaluation of
the QuickStitch software?

TIA


Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
530 754 7536 fax
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:49 2000



From: mcannon-at-bio.umass.edu (Maura Cannon)
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 09:53:47 -0500
Subject: in situ hyb

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Subscribers,
I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has experience in in situ
hybridization to mRNA. I am working with immature embryos of Arabidopsis
and would like to recieve replies and comments to the following questions:

1. For embedding, Paraffin is mostly used.
Why not use LR-White (London Resin)?
or BMM (Butylmethylmethacrylate)?
or another acrylic material?
These hydrophilic materials should be easier to remove, or is it necessary
to remove them for mRNA exposure?
If it is necessary, what is best for removing them? Perhaps acetone?

2. About the probe itself, obviously RNA is best. Has anyone tried DNA
oligos (~20 nucleotides) for less abundant mRNAs?

3. Has anyone used tailed oligos?

4. Is DIG significantly better to use than biotin labelled probes?

Many thanks to anyone who is prepared to take the time to help reveal the
unknowns of plant embryogenesis.
Maura
____________________
Dr. Maura C. Cannon
Dept. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Lederle Graduate Research Center
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003






From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:49 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 09:54:45 -0500
Subject: RE: Cutting of small semiconductor specimen?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ron Anderson has a technique that might do the trick for you. He took an
ultrasonic drill and made a small cavity in a piece of Si at the surface.
The drill was solid spherical end. He then epoxied his small sample into
the hole. You might want to mount it on another piece of Si first and then
put it in the hole. He then used the Tripod Polishing technique to examine
it. The benefit is that he has the Si to gauge the thickness of the sample.
I though that it was pretty slick.

Your other option and the one most easy to do if you have access to an
instrument is to have the sample FIB'd.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--


} -----Original Message-----
} From: Petra Wahlbring [mailto:wahlbrin-at-crpgl.lu]
} Sent: Friday, January 07, 2000 8:17 AM
} To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Mat: Cutting of small semiconductor specimen?
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
}
} A happy New Year to everybody!
}
} I just solved (with the help of some of you) my last problem with the
} carbon extraction replicas but the next specimen causing
} difficulties is on
} my desk...
}
} I got a small semiconducor specimen with a layered structure
} that should be
} investigated. If I say small I mean it: it has a shape like a
} cube with a
} side length of about 250um. And now comes the real
} difficulty: We need to
} cut this one precious specimen into several slices in order
} to allow other
} investigations with other analytical methods. In fact we have five
} specimens to try with, but they are not completely identical
} to the one we
} have finally to investigate.
}
} We are equipped with everything we need to do a TEM
} preparation of bulk
} materials and also of interfaces as long as the specimens are
} large enough
} (saw, disk cutter, dimpler, ion etcher, mounting tools, ...)
} but I don't
} see how I could be successful with such a small specimen.
}
} Any ideas?
}
} Petra
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Petra Wahlbring
} Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann
} Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
} 162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
} tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
} e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpgl.lu
} Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpgl.lu/~wahlbrin
}



From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:53 2000



From: rlvaughn-at-unmc.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 09:30:03 -0600
Subject: Re: Osmium in plastic bottle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Every plastic container we have seen turns black and some seals break down.
Our current method is similar to Bill Trivol's. We use a 25ml Pyrex media
bottle with the orange plastic lid (it does not seem affected). This is
placed in a spare metal can (that the ampules of osmium crystals were
shipped in) with paper padding. This new bottle (with parafilm around
cap) also solved our osmium fumes in the refrig. problem. Everything is
small enoug to transport from refrig. to hood.

Rick Vaughn




From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:52 2000



From: JIM ROMANOW :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 11:22:11 -0500
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


ON 1/7/00 DR CHRIS JEFFREE WROTE:

Speaking of which, we have a rule that osmium solutions
are NEVER stored in the laboratory refrigerator. Why? because
even when greatest care is taken, osmium blackening of the fridge
walls and other objects in the fridge takes place, indicating that
vapour is escaping into the fridge atmosphere. If you must store
osmium at low temperatures, I recommend you consider installing
a compact refrigerator in your fume hood or in a fan-ventilated
cupboard.

With all due respect Chris for over 20 years we have used our lab
refrigerator to store Osmium with no blackening of the plastic walls. A
25ml 4% solution of Osmium is put into a 60 ml glass stopper bottle with
the stopper tightly wrapped in parafilm. Next, that bottle is placed in a
waxed 6" long x 3" diameter screw capped cardboard mailing tube. We prepare
the waxed tubes by pouring hot paraffin inside and rotated quickly and
evenly until the entire surface area is well coated. We also coat the
inside of the metal screw cap but not the outside of the tube. Mailing
tubes are available from the local shipping supply house and our waxed
containers have lasted decades.
Regards
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-2131
Storrs, CT 06269-2131
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:53 2000



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 12:48:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Osmium in plastic bottle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have been using teflon bottles for many yeas with success. We
got them from Fisher Sci

At 09:30 AM 1/7/00 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:57 2000



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 11:57:20 -0800
Subject: Re: osmium's stability in a plastic container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donna Wagahoff wrote:

} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However, we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium procedures
} are welcomed.

Dear Donna,

In my point of view polypropylene and polyethylene are compatible with
osmium tetroxide solutions. Only problem - to hold that nasty stuff inside
the vial. Some plastics may partially be penetrable by osmium tetroxide.

I had some limited experience to store aqueous osmium tetroxide solutions
in the polypropylene (?) NUNC 2 or 5 ml cryo-vials. I aliquot solution
into that vials and store it at -40oC. For extra protection I stored
cryo-vials in the 15 ml cell-culture tubes. Cryo-vial's seal may penetrate
by osmium tetroxide vapors a little bit but second tube provides complete
protection. 2-4% aqueous osmium tetroxide solutions (no buffer, please)
are stable for at least 1-2 month in the dark at -20 - 40oC in that plastic
containers.

Good luck.

Sergey.

_________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
http://www.bol.ucla.edu/~sryazant





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:08:57 2000



From: Bill Chissoe :      wchiss-at-ou.edu
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 14:21:38 -0600
Subject: SEM of biofilms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List,

There is a researcher at our Med. School who wants to do SEM on biofilms

on ear biopsies. He says the biopsies will be approximately 1mmX1mm. I
proposed a standard glut.-osmium fix, Et-oh dehydration, CPD, mount,
sput coat protocol. Is this sufficient? Do we need to affix the biopsies

to a substrate first? I would appreciate any suggestions. If anybody has
reprints that contain a good protocol, I would certainly appreciate
getting a copy. My address is in the footer and my FAX is 405-325-7619.
Thanks for your help.

Bill Chissoe


--
=============================================================
Bill Chissoe III
Electron Microscopist
University of Oklahoma
770 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, Ok. 73019
E-mail: wchiss-at-ou.edu Ph. (405)325-4391
=============================================================





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:09:01 2000



From: John Chandler :      chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 15:55:56 -0700
Subject: Vac Evap: Special needs request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A user of our facility wishes to do some special vacuum evaporation
processes. He is looking for ceramic coated tungsten boats for the
purpose, but has not been able to locate a source. Any help would be
appreciated.

Replies offline would be welcome. Please reply to the list only if you
have generally useful information.

Thanks,

John Chandler
Colorado State University
chandler-at-lamar.colostate.edu





From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:09:01 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 17:23:00 -0600
Subject: BSE imaging artifact - Help!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All,

For years, I have been using my diode GW BSE system with high beam currents
and
high gain (contrast) to yield electron channeling contrast on polished
specimens.

FWIW: Contrary to some reports I have read, lower kV works better than
higher.
Since it is imperative to use high beam currents at the required resolution,
I
wonder if difficulty in achieving sufficient current at lower potentials may
have been influencing opinions.

I have also been a very good customer for GW Electronics. When the detector
is
new, I generally have no problem, but as it ages, the same operating
conditions
will produce artifacts. A new detector every year or so is a bit expensive,
but
fixes the problem.

I now have a new detector (and SEM :) which produces this artifact and am
now
trying to find the reason.

The artifact can be described as video brightness overshoot from black to
white
when the black is strongly saturated. It occurs when the (very high gain)
BSE
signal goes from saturated black to some median gray. A low-Z inclusion or
deep
pore in the field of view will produce this artifact. When the beam leaves
the
inclusion/pore, it overshoots to white then settles back to the appropriate
level. The effect is a black pore with a white "comet tail" pointing in the
sweep direction. This problem does not manifest itself when using less
extreme
operating conditions.

Any suggestions about how to avoid the artifact?

TIA for your comments and help.

Woody White
McDermott Technology, Inc.



From daemon Fri Jan 07 18:09:01 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2000 17:41:00 -0600
Subject: More on BSE artifact

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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PS...

I certainly cannot exclude the possibility that the detector is not the
direct
cause. The amount of signal gain (contrast) is not calibrated (nor have I
paid
much attention to the position of the adjustment) . If the detector simply
loses some sensitivity, I would make up the difference in amplifier gain and
not
realize I was not at exactly the same operating conditions. ...Thus, the
artifact could be amplifier gain related rather than simply a detector
problem.

Woody



From daemon Sat Jan 08 07:54:27 2000



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 08 Jan 2000 00:16:19 -0500
Subject: Shipping to Mexico

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Paul Rennie wrote:
===============================================
Having just purchased a new SEM, our old instrument, a Cambridge S200 is
destined to be sent to one of our companies in Cuidad Victoria, Mexico
(Although I'm trying to persuade management that it's not worth it).
Although we will probably be installing the instrument ourselves, I would
welcome details of any service companies in Mexico. Additionally, who sells
consumables within Mexico, or is it best to purchase over the border in the
USA.
================================================
With regard to the method of purchasing consumables from within Mexico, the
situation is entirely analogous to that that exists in the UK vis a vis
purchasing items from the USA directly or via a distributor in the UK. It
is a matter of institutional policy and also, personal preference.

The main manufacturers of consumables all have local distributors in Mexico
and those firms can be found on the websites of those respective firms. On
the other hand, with the implimentation of NAFTA, making a shipment to a
point in Mexico from the USA is not really all that different from making a
shipment to some other point in the USA. So again it is a matter of
institutional policy and personal preference.

Chuck


============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.spi.cc
########################
============================================



From daemon Sat Jan 08 12:07:30 2000



From: Lugosi1936-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2000 12:41:36 EST
Subject: LM Vickers Microscope M1500974C

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have been trying for some time to find any information about a Vickers
Instrument Company microscope. I had never heard of the Company but the scope
looked interesting. I have searched hundreds of websites, posted messages on
newsgroups and also on Microscopy, UK. So far I've had only two responses.
The sum total of what I have learned is that the company was in York and that
they closed in 1989. Cooke, Troughton and Simms were taken over by Vickers

The rather lengthy description of the scope follows:

Head: Binocular configuration, adjustable for interpupillary distance and
dioptric differences. Interpupillary adjustment range, 50 to 72mm.
Eyepieces(2): 10X, DIN standard. Objectives(4): Vickers microplan,
Planachromatic objectives. Include 5X (0.15 N.A.), 10X (0.25 N.A.), 20X (0.50
N.A. spring loaded), 40X (0.65 N.A. spring-loaded), DIN standard objectives.
All are parfocal, parcentered, and coated to resist reflection. Stage:
Precision-machined mechanical stage with oversized, low-position, coaxial
control knobs. Chemical-resistant finish with glass insert. This stage is
exceptionally smooth in movement with a 3.25 x 2.75-inch range of motion.
Focus Control: Low-position, coaxial, coarse/fine controls. . Condenser: Abbe
condenser, fitted with an iris diaphragm. Illumination: Diascopic lower
illumination features variable-intensity quartz halogen lamp ( 12V, 100 watt
) with metered solid-state control as well as field iris, condenser and
centering adjustments. Episcopic illumination (30-watt lamp) is also of
variable intensity via an independent control on front of the microscope
base. Upper illuminator housing fitted with iris and condenser controls. As
shown in the photos, the microscope can be separated from the 100-watt
illuminator base Finish chemical-resistant paint with "hammertone" finish.

I have included some pictures that I have posted to help with the
identification:

{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic1a.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/l
ugosi1936/vic1a.jpg {/A}
{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic2.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
gosi1936/vic2.jpg {/A}
{A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic3.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
gosi1936/vic3.jpg {/A}

I am trying to find any information about the company and about the scope
itself. I understand that this is rather difficult (impossible?) because of
the practice of the company not to use serial numbers. I would especially
like to be able to aquire a copy of the owners manual and a copy of the
Vickers catalog.

When I began to attempt to collect information about the Vickers I never
guessed that I would run into a blank wall. If you could assist me in any way
at all it would be greatly appreciated.

Best regards,
Dana



From daemon Sun Jan 09 10:49:57 2000



From: Melany H. Chapin :      mchapin-at-ntbg.org
Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2000 13:42:27 -1000
Subject: Histochemical test for lipids/oils in plant tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for a simple method to indicate the presence of lipids /oils
in plant tissue. Specifically palm fruit tissues. Ideally, if there is a
procedure that I can used on fruits fixed in FAA that would be the best. I
have tried Sudan Black B without success. Thank you in advance for your
ideas or suggestions. Please reply via email to : mchapin-at-ntbg.org

________________________________________________________________________

Melany H. Chapin Herbarium (PTBG)
Curator & Plant Records Manager ph: 808-332-7324 ext. 133
National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG) fax: 808-332-9765

3530 Papalina Road email: mchapin-at-ntbg.org
Kalaheo, Kauai, Hawaii 96741 www.ntbg.org
USA
___________________________________________________________________________





From daemon Sun Jan 09 10:50:14 2000



From: Campbell36-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 9 Jan 2000 10:45:02 EST
Subject: Re: Vac Evap: Special needs request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The item you are looking for should be available from R.D. Matis. The
following contact information is from www.vacuum.org. There are several
vendor listed in the subsection for filaments if you care to browse. I have
no financial interest in R.D. Matis.

R.D. Mathis Company
2840 Gundry Avenue Long Beach, CA 90806
Phone: 562-426-7049
FAX: 562-595-0907

Description

Specializes in the manufacture of hi-vacuum evaporation sources. We offer a
comprehensive selection of tungsten, molybdenum and tantalum sources as well
as custom fabrication to meet your specific needs. Display will be a variety
of evaporation sources along with one of our "LV Series" low voltage high
current power supplies and our "GP 100" inert gas purifier to compliment your
evaporation process.

Product Categories
Filaments



Good luck

Jim Campbell

James Campbell
36 Van Drive
Bordentown, NJ 08505
Tel: 609-298-9206
Fax: 609-278-6969
e-mail campbell36-at-aol.com



In a message dated 1/7/00 9:56:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU writes:

} Subj: Vac Evap: Special needs request
} Date: 1/7/00 9:56:09 PM Eastern Standard Time
} From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} A user of our facility wishes to do some special vacuum evaporation
} processes. He is looking for ceramic coated tungsten boats for the
} purpose, but has not been able to locate a source. Any help would be
} appreciated.
}
} Replies offline would be welcome. Please reply to the list only if you
} have generally useful information.
}
} Thanks,
}
} John Chandler
} Colorado State University
} chandler-at-lamar.colostate.edu



James Campbell
36 Van Drive
Bordentown, NJ 08505
Tel: 609-298-9206
Fax: 609-278-6969
e-mail campbell36-at-aol.com



From daemon Sun Jan 09 19:10:36 2000



From: Michael L. Boucher :      mboucher-at-isd.net
Date: Sun, 9 Jan 2000 13:58:37 -0600
Subject: Vickers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dana:
This may not help, but I have a book I purchased about 1970 that was
published by Vickers entitled:
The Polarizing Microscope by A.F. Hallimond.
It is an excellent work and has many pictures of the Vickers line of
polarizing scopes and accessories from the late 60s. They did buy out Cooke,
Troughton and Simms and marketed a number of innovative and competitively
priced (cheaper than Leitz and Zeiss) scopes. Dr Hallimond was one of their
consultants on design. I am sure you can find the book in a large University
Geology department library ( I hope). Or try interlibrary loan. It is still
an excellent and definitive reference for polarizing light microscopes and
their use.

Michael L. Boucher Sr.
mboucher-at-isd.net
http://www.isd.net/mboucher




From daemon Sun Jan 09 19:10:39 2000



From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 09 Jan 2000 15:50:09 -0800
Subject: Low Z contrast quantitative analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am trying to quantify the alloy amount of Al/Si. The standard
alloy ratio is 1-3 wt % Si/Al. However, with Z of each only 1 unit
apart, and low Z at that, EDAX and AES cannot detect the Si.
My next attempt is to try dynamic SIMS and then time of flight SIMS.

The specimen is a microcircuit die. I am analyzing the bonding pad
metalization.

Has anyone done this sort of thing before and had success? If so,
how did you do it?

gary g.




From daemon Sun Jan 09 19:10:39 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Sun, 09 Jan 2000 18:53:50 -0500
Subject: Re: LM Vickers Microscope M1500974C

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dana,

Vickers was a well known British manufacturer of microscopes. I have had
the privilege of using some of their more interesting measuring equipment.
Several contacts come to mind, most of them from the UK: Clive Cowan, Micro
Instruments in Oxford (UK) 199-388-9616 and Gerard Turner, who is a curator
in microscopy at the Museum of Science at Oxford University, Dr. Savile
Bradbury, retired from Oxford (but could probably be reached by letter
there; also, if you are interested, I can probably get a more recent
address), and Dr. Cecile Fox at Molecular Histology in Gaithersburg
(301-216-1564). Cecile put together major microscopy exhibits for both the
Smithsonian and the Am. Mus. of Natural History in the mid- 1980's. Please
give my regards to them (Gerard may only remember me as an RMS student from
the distant past) and best of luck on your search.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************
MME is America's first national consortium providing
customized on-site workshops in all areas of
microscopy, sample preparation, and image analysis.




At 12:41 PM 1/8/00 EST, Lugosi1936-at-aol.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Jan 10 08:06:03 2000



From: jim :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 13:39:27 +1000
Subject: RE: Sputter coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Do you have an evaporator in the lab? Simultaneous evaporation of Pt (wire) and
carbon gives a very fine and permanent coating.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 06, 2000 2:15 AM, Tindall, Randy D.
[SMTP:TindallR-at-missouri.edu] wrote:
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Due to some recent high-resolution requirements in our lab, I find myself
} having to go back to Sputter Coating 101 (after years of just putting
} specimens in the coater and turning it on without a second thought!). We
} find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little structure as
} possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.
}
} We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples days or weeks
} after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its ugly head. We
} intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
} experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.
}
} My questions are:
}
} 1) I seem to remember a string on this listserver suggesting that lower
} deposition currents yield finer coating structure. Is this right? Does a
} low deposition current for a longer time yield a finer coating than a higher
} current for a shorter time? (I'm running some tests to check this, but
} would be very interested in others' experiences, too.)
}
} 2) Deposition current can be controlled by the initial current setting
} (i.e., the knob on the machine) and by the argon flow through the chamber.
} Is there any difference in the coating when adjusting the deposition current
} by either of these two ways?
}
} 3) Charts I have seen indicate that deposition current is directly
} proportional to coating rate. Is the same true for coating time? I.e., is a
} one minute coating twice as thick as a 30 sec. coating? It would seem so
} intuitively, but you know what they say about the word "assume".
}
} My apologies if these are very basic questions, but, like I said, back to SC
} 101!
}
} I'll be happy to summarize the responses for anyone who is interested.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} W122 Veterinary Medicine Bldg.
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} (573)882-8304
} tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/
}




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:35 2000



From: rschoonh-at-sph.unc.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 09:54:45 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Re: LM Vickers Microscope M1500974C

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dana,

I'm not 100% sure but I thought that the Microscience Division of Bio-Rad bought
Vickers some years ago. You might want to give them a shot.

best regards,
Bob
Robert Schoonhoven
Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis
Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering
University of North Carolina
CB#7400
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
Phone
office 919-966-6343
Lab 919-966-6140
Fax 919-966-6123

Don't go around saying the world owes you a living; the world owes you
nothing; it was here first.
Mark Twain [Samuel Langhornne Clemens] (1835-1910)

-- Begin original message --
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} I have been trying for some time to find any information about a Vickers
} Instrument Company microscope. I had never heard of the Company but the scope
} looked interesting. I have searched hundreds of websites, posted messages on
} newsgroups and also on Microscopy, UK. So far I've had only two responses.
} The sum total of what I have learned is that the company was in York and that
} they closed in 1989. Cooke, Troughton and Simms were taken over by Vickers
}
} The rather lengthy description of the scope follows:
}
} Head: Binocular configuration, adjustable for interpupillary distance and
} dioptric differences. Interpupillary adjustment range, 50 to 72mm.
} Eyepieces(2): 10X, DIN standard. Objectives(4): Vickers microplan,
} Planachromatic objectives. Include 5X (0.15 N.A.), 10X (0.25 N.A.), 20X (0.50
} N.A. spring loaded), 40X (0.65 N.A. spring-loaded), DIN standard objectives.
} All are parfocal, parcentered, and coated to resist reflection. Stage:
} Precision-machined mechanical stage with oversized, low-position, coaxial
} control knobs. Chemical-resistant finish with glass insert. This stage is
} exceptionally smooth in movement with a 3.25 x 2.75-inch range of motion.
} Focus Control: Low-position, coaxial, coarse/fine controls. . Condenser: Abbe
} condenser, fitted with an iris diaphragm. Illumination: Diascopic lower
} illumination features variable-intensity quartz halogen lamp ( 12V, 100 watt
} ) with metered solid-state control as well as field iris, condenser and
} centering adjustments. Episcopic illumination (30-watt lamp) is also of
} variable intensity via an independent control on front of the microscope
} base. Upper illuminator housing fitted with iris and condenser controls. As
} shown in the photos, the microscope can be separated from the 100-watt
} illuminator base Finish chemical-resistant paint with "hammertone" finish.
}
} I have included some pictures that I have posted to help with the
} identification:
}
} {A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic1a.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/l
} ugosi1936/vic1a.jpg {/A}
} {A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic2.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
} gosi1936/vic2.jpg {/A}
} {A HREF="http://members.aol.com/lugosi1936/vic3.jpg"} http://members.aol.com/lu
} gosi1936/vic3.jpg {/A}
}
} I am trying to find any information about the company and about the scope
} itself. I understand that this is rather difficult (impossible?) because of
} the practice of the company not to use serial numbers. I would especially
} like to be able to aquire a copy of the owners manual and a copy of the
} Vickers catalog.
}
} When I began to attempt to collect information about the Vickers I never
} guessed that I would run into a blank wall. If you could assist me in any way
} at all it would be greatly appreciated.
}
} Best regards,
} Dana
}
}

-- End original message --




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:37 2000



From: Michael Reiner :      michael.reiner-at-Smail.Uni-Koeln.de
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 16:23:07 +0100
Subject: EM: Shelf life of LR-Gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear members of the list,

first, I would like to wish you all the best for the new year.
Now my question:
Does anyone know the shelf-life/usability of LR-Gold stored in a fridge?
Is it that delicate as LR-White (Meanwhile I don«t use LR-W older than
half a year). My bottle which was not opened many times, could be
roundabout three years old.

Thanks a lot,
Michael

Michael Reiner
Department of Anatomy I
University of Cologne
Germany
michael.reiner-at-smail.uni-koeln.de




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:37 2000



From: carol williams :      cswill-at-acd.tusk.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 09:23:30 -0600
Subject: gamma correction - image analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please send me (if possible) a brief explanation of gamma correction in
image analysis and a good reference source (book, papers, etc) to get
the details... Thanks



From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:40 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 08:48:07 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM: Sputter coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Randy,
There was a good series of articles in the Scanning Electron Microscopy,
1980, volume I (pp. 143--218), that examined a number of thin-film
deposition methods and measured the films for feature size, mostly using
TEM. They found that lower kV made for finer films, using Mo, W or Ta made a
more featureless coating, Pt was a little finer than Au/Pd and that lowering
the temperature of the substrate also made the films finer.
In my own experience I found that, on smoother specimens, even a two second
coating would sometimes be enough to stop charging. Try very short times and
turn the specimen and coat again for a very short time, if the first one
isn't enough. I used 700V, if your coater can change voltage.
If you can find the Scanning Electron Microscopy articles, they have other
good suggestions.
At 10:15 AM 1/5/00 -0600, you wrote:

} Hi,
}
} Due to some recent high-resolution requirements in our lab, I find myself
} having to go back to Sputter Coating 101 (after years of just putting
} specimens in the coater and turning it on without a second thought!). We
} find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little structure as
} possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.
}
} We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples days or weeks
} after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its ugly head. We
} intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
} experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.
}
} My questions are:
}
} 1) I seem to remember a string on this listserver suggesting that lower
} deposition currents yield finer coating structure. Is this right? Does a
} low deposition current for a longer time yield a finer coating than a higher
} current for a shorter time? (I'm running some tests to check this, but
} would be very interested in others' experiences, too.)
}
} 2) Deposition current can be controlled by the initial current setting
} (i.e., the knob on the machine) and by the argon flow through the chamber.
} Is there any difference in the coating when adjusting the deposition current
} by either of these two ways?
}
} 3) Charts I have seen indicate that deposition current is directly
} proportional to coating rate. Is the same true for coating time? I.e., is a
} one minute coating twice as thick as a 30 sec. coating? It would seem so
} intuitively, but you know what they say about the word "assume".
}
} My apologies if these are very basic questions, but, like I said, back to SC
} 101!
}
} I'll be happy to summarize the responses for anyone who is interested.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
Best of luck,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:43 2000



From: Joanne Crudele :      Joanne.Crudele-at-unilever.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 12:01:46 -0600
Subject: CryoTEM or SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Is anyone willing to do some contract cryoSEM or TEM in the Chicagoland area? I
have a primary emulsion with particle size less than 1.0 micrometers. 2 samples.
Please contact me via the server. Joanne Crudele-Unilever-Rolling Meadows Il.
Give a price estimate per sample.



From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:42 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: 1/8/00 7:11 PM
Subject: Re: More on BSE artifact

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



John,

You are corrrect in that the time constant of diode BSE detectors is
relatively
slow. Unfortunatly, I am already sweeping about as slowly as possible to
minimize the effect and help the signal to noise ratio.

Woody
____________________Reply Separator____________________

Woody,
Is the problem independent of scan speed? Slower scan speeds
often overcome distortion using solid state BEI detectors.


At 05:41 PM 1/7/00 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Jan 10 08:06:03 2000



From: IKSM :      IKSM-at-aphy.iphy.ac.cn
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 19:3:24 +0800
Subject: IKSM: latest news -- call for paper

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
id AA30574; Mon, 10 Jan 2000 19:01:49 +0800
Message-Id: {200001101101.AA30574-at-aphy.iphy.ac.cn}


Hi, Microscopist,

International Kunming Symposium on Microscopy (IKSM)
will be held on July 2-5, 2000, in Kunming, one of the
most attractive tourist destinations in China.

Call-for-paper circular and pre-registration form for
International Kunming Symposium on Microscopy (IKSM)
are available on request by email. For more information,
pls visit http://www.iphy.ac.cn/microsc/IKSM.html .

Happy a new year 2000.

Regards,
IKSM secretariat
IKSM-at-aphy.iphy.ac.cn




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:48 2000



From: rfelten-at-Macdermid.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 16:20:40 -0500
Subject: Re: Image montage software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Rick Felten-at-MACDERMID
01/10/2000 04:20 PM
Whenever I wanted to merge images I used corel draw 8. I inserted the
images where I wanted them and exported the entire image as a tiff. Seem
to work ok. Not sure if it is the most efficient way. In fac, it is the
only thing that I liked about corel draw over MS publisher.

Ric





From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:48 2000



From: MICHAEL DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-mail.jhmi.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 16:43:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Spotty artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



To the Board,
We have a problem with spotty,black,amorphous artifacts on our
SEM samples visible at 200X and up. The problem seems to arise only
with one sample type, epoxy resin casts made with amine-blush resistant
hardener. We use professional dental impression molds,a two part process, base
and catalyst to make the flexible mold (President, polyvinylsiloxane). Then
Araldite 506 epoxy with HY 356 hardener is poured and cured at room temp
overnight. Sputter coating glass slides with gold palladium does not
seem to cause the artifact, but another question, is gold palladium more
susceptible to oxide formation than pure gold, and do oxides look like
the above described artifact. Also, etching the sample does not help.
Any suggesstions will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Mike D.




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:50 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 18:13:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Osmium in plastic bottle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We store Os in a glass bottle with Parafilm around the top, inside a
larger plastic jar with a corn oil-soaked paper towel taped to the
inside of the lid, and then the outer container is Parafilmed around the
top. No black frig. (Change the oil-soaked towel periodically.)

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735




From daemon Mon Jan 10 17:49:50 2000



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 17:25:02 -0600
Subject: RE: Sputter coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I use Denton spatter coater with Au/Pd target for magnifications
up to 100,000 without any problems. I can observe collagen striations
and other fine details and do not see coating structure.
Parameters for coating: current 15 ma, time 5-10 sec. Some charging can occur
for samples with "multilayer" surface, but it is tough case
for almost any coating anyway. I have also magnetron Cr coater, but
do not use it often because it's much more time consuming.

Vladimir


Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Tindall, Randy D. [mailto:TindallR-at-missouri.edu]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2000 10:15 AM
} To: 'microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com'
} Subject: SEM: Sputter coating
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Due to some recent high-resolution requirements in our lab, I
} find myself
} having to go back to Sputter Coating 101 (after years of just putting
} specimens in the coater and turning it on without a second
} thought!). We
} find ourselves in need of very thin coatings with as little
} structure as
} possible, in order to image samples down in the nanometer range.
}
} We have a chromium coater, but often need to revisit samples
} days or weeks
} after the initial coating. The oxidation problem rears its
} ugly head. We
} intend to purchase a platinum target, but don't yet have one, so we're
} experimenting with our venerable Au/Pd coater.
}
} My questions are:
}
} 1) I seem to remember a string on this listserver suggesting
} that lower
} deposition currents yield finer coating structure. Is this
} right? Does a
} low deposition current for a longer time yield a finer
} coating than a higher
} current for a shorter time? (I'm running some tests to check
} this, but
} would be very interested in others' experiences, too.)
}
} 2) Deposition current can be controlled by the initial current setting
} (i.e., the knob on the machine) and by the argon flow through
} the chamber.
} Is there any difference in the coating when adjusting the
} deposition current
} by either of these two ways?
}
} 3) Charts I have seen indicate that deposition current is directly
} proportional to coating rate. Is the same true for coating
} time? I.e., is a
} one minute coating twice as thick as a 30 sec. coating? It
} would seem so
} intuitively, but you know what they say about the word "assume".
}
} My apologies if these are very basic questions, but, like I
} said, back to SC
} 101!
}
} I'll be happy to summarize the responses for anyone who is interested.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} W122 Veterinary Medicine Bldg.
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} (573)882-8304
} tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/
}
}



From daemon Mon Jan 10 18:48:38 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 18:41:35 -0600
Subject: Osmium Vapor- A Safety Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Posted at author's request to remain anonymous....


} To: zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 01:20:59 +0530
} Subject: Nestor, would you post this for me?
}
} Osmium Vapor- A Safety Question
}
} The last time I mentioned a safety concern about the rumor of an possible
} "explosive" warning about some Ruthenium compound , I got "Battered" by
} certain vendors(for quite a while too I might add..certainly didn't help
} my previously supportive, pro-vendor position-since I used to be one!) .
} I was warned and pestered frequently and asked to retract any suggestion
} of such a possibility, but I refused. So here we go again....
}
} On approximately January 6, 2000 I noticed a request under the
} title:
}
} : Donna Wagahoff {DWAGAHOFF-at-siumed.edu}
}
} "....Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in
} plastic?..."
}
} and the only responses on the list server were:
}
} " How about putting the glass containers inside plastic containers?
} There are also padded and styrofoam containers which you could use for
} the transportation step."
}
} and
}
} ......" I store this glass bottle inside an aluminum-foiled plastic
} container in my fume hood at room
} temp. The clear plastic of this outer container gets translucent black
} within weeks no matter how carefully I seal the glass bottle".......
}
} ( I'm sure these were very fine suggestions..but..)
}
} This concerns me for several reasons:
}
} 1. I believe there is a considerably more dangerous situation here than
} many of us may realize, or..will discuss. We must check, and we may find
} that Osmium and Ruthenium compounds(and others?) may penetrate all
} plastics and we may only see this at a macroscopic level long after the
} heavy metal compounds or there derivatives have penetrated many layers
} and possible contaminated at some lower and less visible level( but
} undetermined danger level that may be a health risk) a much larger area.
} Many of us may have seen the effect in EM refrigerators as the interior
} blackens over a long period of storage of Osmium.
}
} 2. There doesn't seem to be an acceptable safe level of these compounds
} or known affects, but probably fixation or contamination and loss of
} function at some level occurs(microscopic?).
}
} 3.Also venting these vapors through hoods should be scrubbed or
} absorbed(?), reduced,etc.( "I'm no chemist") and the level of the output
} probably should be carefully and technically monitored.
}
} 4. The safety level must be obvious to those who receive bottles of
} solutions in sealed glass(or Pirex?) and the factories that manufactor
} them.(What glass type materials are safe?)
}
} Does anyone know of the level of danger(or safety) or know of some good
} research sites or periodicals that have dealt with these issues? Any
} personal experience, or are we all afraid of retribution and retaliation?
} The MSDS's seem a little less than thorough to me. I'm sure I'm again not
} alone here in this concern and only wish to continue this difficult and
} frequently dangerous craft(EM) with more care for myself , my associates
} and my community.
}
} Anonymous (chicken....)
} (...and Vendors and manufacturers are our backbone and our support!
} Thank you all!)
}
}
}
}





From daemon Mon Jan 10 18:49:56 2000



From: ELMA Cortinas :      ECORTI-at-childmed.dallas.tx.us
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 18:44:54 -0600
Subject: Negative film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have an idea of a good negative film scanner to use for
TEM negatives? I am trying to eliminate the darkroom printing
process. These are the stipulations:
1. Must be able to scan 3 1/4 x 4 inch negatives. (Kodak 4489
film)
2. Must be compatible to a PC.
3. Need to know what software is needed.
4. Must be priced under $3,000.00
5. Must provided the best quality resolution for diagnostic
results.

Thanks in advance!





From daemon Mon Jan 10 18:59:46 2000



From: Mike Mizell :      MMizell-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 18:47:22 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM: Sputter Coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Randy;

It is our experience, at South Bay Technology, that Cr films deposited by
ion beam sputtering remain conductive for a short time. The amount of time
depends on the film thickness and sample surface topography. Because Cr
deposition requires a water vapor free environment, usually not possible in
a sputter coater, you may have more success with Ir target. Under 200Kx,
ion beam deposited Ir (better than Pt since Ir films minimize beam damage)
does not display any artifacts (grains cannot be seen) or specimen damage.
We recommend using Cr (or Ti, W or Ta) only when looking at mag } 200Kx.

An Ir target in your sputter coater may work well and an Ir target in your
"Cr coater" may solve the oxidation problem more effectively.

Some advantages of Ion Beam Sputtering:
- Controlled thickness on angstrom level since the average deposition rates
are 10A/min
- Precise thickness measurements reported by quartz thickness monitor as
result of low energy sputterant energy striking crystal
- No damage or artifacts as a result of 30ev sputterant energy
- Any material can be deposited although Cr is suggested for } 200Kx mags,
Ir for {200Kx
- C like metal films are amorphous. C ddoes not display grains or create
damage
- X-ray production from 10A films is lost in the noise
- Image improvement results from increased signal to noise as well as
conductivity

Disclosure: South Bay Technology is the manufacturer of the IBS/E Ion Beam
Sputtering and Etching System and therefore has a vested interested
interest in promoting it use.

Regards, Mike Mizell

*************************************************************************
Michael K. Mizell Tele: 949-492-2600
VP Sales & Marketing Fax: 949-492-1499
South Bay Technology
1120 Via Callejon mizell-at-southbaytech.com
San Clemente, Ca 92673 USA
**************************************************************************
South Bay Technology is an American manufacturer of precision
sample preparation equipment and supplies for metallography
crystallography and electron microscopy.

} } } } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { { { { {





From daemon Mon Jan 10 21:45:09 2000



From: Pauline C. Yu :      splene-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 16:57:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Microtomes available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The following items are available to anyone who wants to pay for
shipping or pickup:

American Optical Microtome Knife Sharpener with Grit and Glass Planes

American Optical 820 Rotary Microtome with extra knives

Labline/Hooker (Sledge-type) Plant Microtome

Pauline Yu
pyu-at-pw.usda.gov
510-559-5938
Microscopist Technician
USDA-ARS-WRRC




From daemon Mon Jan 10 21:45:09 2000



From: sumka :      sumka-at-vsnl.com
Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 19:06:50 -0600
Subject: what is a nomarski disc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to know what is a nomarski disc. What it is used for? Is there
any difference between this and the routine phase contrast condenser we use
in light microscopy. Regards, M. Angou SUMKA SONS INSTRUMENTATION1137-B,
THADAGAM ROAD,R S PURAM, COIMBATOREINDIA - 641002 FAX: 
91-422-473227TEL:91-422-474378 URL:www.sumka.com





From daemon Tue Jan 11 18:01:06 2000



From: Michael Reiner :      michael.reiner-at-Smail.Uni-Koeln.de
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 17:25:46 +0100
Subject: EM: Shelf life of LR-Gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear members of the list,

first, I would like to wish you all the best for the new year.
Now my question:
Does anyone know the shelf-life/usability of LR-Gold stored in a fridge?

Is it that delicate as LR-White (Meanwhile I don«t use LR-W older than
half a year). My bottle which was not opened many times, could be
roundabout three years old.

Thanks a lot,
Michael

Michael Reiner
Department of Anatomy I
University of Cologne
Germany
michael.reiner-at-smail.uni-koeln.de





From daemon Tue Jan 11 18:01:08 2000



From: JIM ROMANOW :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 11:52:55 -0500
Subject: Negative film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We scan our 4489 negs with a UMAX PowerLook III regularly on a Mac G3. The
UMAX is compatable with PCs too, cost about 1100 dollars last summer with
the transparancy adaptor and has 1200x2400 dpi actual resolution. We had to
modify the 4x5" transparancy holder (easy) to fit the smaller EM negs. UMAX
tech help could improve but the scanner works well. Stand alone or
PhotoShop plug-in software. Connect via SCSI.

Other units to check out are the Agfa DuoScan T2500 and Microtek ScanMaker 5.

The major electronic trade show meetings are soon so all of the new
'improved' equipment will be ordered and available for summer/fall 2000.
The remaining stock of last year's discontinued models will be discount
priced by Spring.
Good Luck



} Date: Mon, 10 Jan 2000 18:44:54 -0600
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} From: "ELMA Cortinas" {ECORTI-at-childmed.dallas.tx.us}
} Subject: Negative film scanner
}

}
} Does anyone have an idea of a good negative film scanner to use for
} TEM negatives? I am trying to eliminate the darkroom printing
} process. These are the stipulations:
} 1. Must be able to scan 3 1/4 x 4 inch negatives. (Kodak 4489
} film)
} 2. Must be compatible to a PC.
} 3. Need to know what software is needed.
} 4. Must be priced under $3,000.00
} 5. Must provided the best quality resolution for diagnostic
} results.
}
} Thanks in advance!
}

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
U-2131
Storrs, CT 06269-2131
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax





From daemon Tue Jan 11 18:01:11 2000



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 13:09:22 -0600
Subject: Negative film scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Elma,

We are using an Epson Expression 800 and have been very happy with it. We
routinely scan in at 600 dpi, which has been more than enough for
publication quality, in our experience. The unit is capable of higher
resolutions than that. I don't remember what we paid, but it was
considerably less than $3000. It came with a transparency adapter and all
necessary software, including SilverFast, text recognition software,
calibration software, etc. Ours works through Adobe Photoshop's Import
functions, but may be usable in other programs, too.

Best wishes,
Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine Bldg.
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573)882-8304
tindallr-at-missouri.edu
http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/


-----Original Message-----
} From: ELMA Cortinas [mailto:ECORTI-at-childmed.dallas.tx.us]
Sent: Monday, January 10, 2000 6:45 PM
To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com


Does anyone have an idea of a good negative film scanner to use for
TEM negatives? I am trying to eliminate the darkroom printing
process. These are the stipulations:
1. Must be able to scan 3 1/4 x 4 inch negatives. (Kodak 4489
film)
2. Must be compatible to a PC.
3. Need to know what software is needed.
4. Must be priced under $3,000.00
5. Must provided the best quality resolution for diagnostic
results.

Thanks in advance!





From daemon Tue Jan 11 18:01:13 2000



From: Kenneth A. Taylor :      taylor-at-bio.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 15:39:52 -0500
Subject: Postdoctoral Position Available Immediately

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{fontfamily} {param} Times_New_Roman {/param} {smaller} Postdoctoral
position available immediately to study the 3-D structure of insect
flight muscle. The research project, recently renewed for a 4 year
period, involves several experimental and theoretical approaches to
studying crossbridge structure in different states. Approaches include
electron microscope tomography, alignment and classification of 3-D
crossbridge structures (see recent publication (Winkler & Taylor,
Ultramicroscopy 77:141-152 (1999) for details) and fitting of atomic
coordinates of actin and myosin S1 into the envelope of the 3-D images.
Emphasis is on the study of quick-frozen, contracting muscle,
freeze-substituted for thin section electron microscopy and 3-D image
reconstruction. We use stretch activated muscle as well as an
isometrically contracting state dubbed stretch activation. Specimens
are mechanically monitored right up the point of freezing to facilitate
the interpretation of the structures in terms of muscle force and
stiffness. Parallel X-ray diffraction experiments make for thoroughly
characterized specimens. Please see recent publication (Taylor et al.,
Cell 99:421-431 (1999)) for current status of this project. This
project is a collaboration with Michael and Mary Reedy (Duke Univ. Med.
Center), Yale Goldman and Clara Franzini-Armstrong (U. Penn. Med.
School) and Richard Tregear (MRC, Cambridge, UK). Successful applicants
can work on any of several aspects of the problem of identifying
structural features and relating them to the generation of tension in
muscle. The project has evolved to the point that most of the effort
needs to be put on classification and averaging, model building, model
refinement and interpretation of X-ray data. An individual with
experience in either image reconstruction or protein structure and
function who is interested in gaining further experience in the
interpretation and correlation of diverse experimental data on a
topical biophysical problem would be ideal for this position. The
experimental emphasis of correlating high resolution structures with
lower resolution EM data is expected to become a growth area for
structural biology. Our laboratory is equipped with Silicon Graphics
workstations, one of which is dedicated to this position, a cluster of
3 DEC Alpha compute servers, a Perkin-Elmer PDS 1010M microdensitometer
and a Philips CM300-FEG electron microscope. Salary is commensurate
with relevant experience. Successful candidates will join a strong
Program in Structural Biology with 4 groups using primarily X-ray
diffraction, 3 using NMR, 2 using EPR and one using EM. The Program
enjoys close ties with the National High Field Magnetic Laboratory and
the Supercomputer Computation Research Institute on campus. Additional
information about the Structural Biology Program can be found at
http://www.sb.fsu.edu/. Interested applicants should send their CV and
names, addresses and phone numbers of 3 references to Dr. Kenneth A.
Taylor, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University,
Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. E-mail address is taylor-at-bio.fsu.edu.
Phone number 1-850-644-3357, FAX 1-850-561-1406.


The Institute of Molecular Biophysics and Florida State University are
located in Tallahassee, the capitol of Florida. The city has a
population of ~200,000. The city is surrounded by rolling hills and
pine forests and is 35 miles from pristine beaches on the coast of Gulf
of Mexico. Tallahassee residents enjoy many cultural and sporting
events.



{/smaller} {/fontfamily}
{ { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {}


Kenneth A. Taylor, Ph.D. Office phone: 850-644-3357

Institute of Molecular Biophysics Lab phone: 850-644-4104

Florida State University EM room phone: 850-644-8769

Tallahassee, FL 32306-4380 Fax: 850-561-1406

E-mail: taylor-at-bio.fsu.edu

Home pages: http://www.sb.fsu.edu/~taylor/

http://www.fsu.edu/~biology/faculty/Taylor/kat.html


{ { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {} } { { { {}





{/x-rich}



From daemon Tue Jan 11 18:01:13 2000



From: wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:25:35 -0500
Subject: Re: Osmium Vapor- A Safety Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Posted at author's request to remain anonymous....

Dear Anon,

} Osmium Vapor- A Safety Question
}
} The last time I mentioned a safety concern about the rumor of an possible
} "explosive" warning about some Ruthenium compound , I got "Battered"...
}
The EM Safety Handbook also warns of the risk of explosion from RuO4.

} On approximately January 6, 2000 I noticed a request under the
} title:
}
} : Donna Wagahoff {DWAGAHOFF-at-siumed.edu}
}
} "....Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in
} plastic?..."
}
} and the only responses on the list server were:
}
} " How about putting the glass containers inside plastic containers?
} There are also padded and styrofoam containers which you could use for
} the transportation step."
}
} and
}
} ......" I store this glass bottle inside an aluminum-foiled plastic
} container in my fume hood at room
} temp. The clear plastic of this outer container gets translucent black
} within weeks no matter how carefully I seal the glass bottle".......
}
} ( I'm sure these were very fine suggestions..but..)
}
} This concerns me for several reasons:
}
} 1. I believe there is a considerably more dangerous situation here than
} many of us may realize, or..will discuss. We must check, and we may find
} that Osmium and Ruthenium compounds(and others?) may penetrate all
} plastics...
}
This is very likely.

} 2. There doesn't seem to be an acceptable safe level of these compounds
} or known affects, but probably fixation or contamination and loss of
} function at some level occurs(microscopic?).
}
The EM Safety Handbook gives a TLV--threshold limit value, defined as
a concentration
"to which *it is believed* (emphasis is mine) *nearly* all workers may be
repeatedly exposed day
after day without adverse effects."--of 2parts in 10^10. Note the very
small value and the cautionary
wording.

} 3.Also venting these vapors through hoods should be scrubbed or
} absorbed(?), reduced,etc.( "I'm no chemist") and the level of the output
} probably should be carefully and technically monitored.
}
Since OsO4 is a powerful oxidant, and since it reacts with unsaturated
lipids, I had heard
the recommendation that corn oil be used to clean up spills; however, the
EM Safety Handbook
recommends ascorbate powder "as it reacts quickly", and, come to think of
it, is more suited for
treating an aqueous solution than is an immiscible oil.

} 4. The safety level must be obvious to those who receive bottles of
} solutions in sealed glass(or Pirex?) and the factories that manufactor
} them.(What glass type materials are safe?)
}
I doubt that any particular glass is less safe (but would not be
surprised to be corrected).
Any glass which doesn't oxidize shouldn't react with OsO4.

} Does anyone know of the level of danger(or safety) or know of some good
} research sites or periodicals that have dealt with these issues? Any
} personal experience, or are we all afraid of retribution and retaliation?

The extensively-quoted EM Safety Handbook is a good source.

} The MSDS's seem a little less than thorough to me.

Although, the existance of an MSDS for di-hydrogen oxide (flamed here
some time ago)
would seem to argue otherwise. There is further info available from
company web sites and phone
lines (listed in some instances on the MSDS), and your safety office should
have other relevant info.

} I'm sure I'm again not
} alone here in this concern and only wish to continue this difficult and
} frequently dangerous craft(EM) with more care for myself , my associates
} and my community.
}
} Anonymous (chicken....)
} (...and Vendors and manufacturers are our backbone and our support!
} Thank you all!)
}
I'd say the first order of safety is to be concerned, next is to get
all the info available.
Yours in chickenhood,
Bill Tivol





From daemon Tue Jan 11 20:28:02 2000



From: c j day :      wa5ekh-at-juno.com
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 19:55:07 -0600
Subject: Vapor Stains-Safety Issue Discussion Please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This technology needs more thorough discussion, I believe. There are
several rather serious safety issues that, I believe, we might find some
better solutions to here, if we open this area for discussion . For
example vapor level and detection, penetration, permeability, scrubbing,
reactive absorption, isolation, etc.. Some plastics stain easily and some
do not, but all are apparently permeable.
On the productive side the commercially astute might find several
new product ideas valuable to this community.
'JD'

previously:

Plastic is oxidized and so part of the osmium is exhausted in the vials.
Even
when frozen osmium diffuses through plastic containers. So you may save a
rare
breakage, but you are certain to have osmium in your refrigerator. It's
just a
bad idea to pack osmium in plastic. You could use a secondary container,
be it
plastic or glass, to increase overall safety.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 06, 2000 3:08 AM, Donna Wagahoff
[SMTP:DWAGAHOFF-at-siumed.edu] wrote:
}
} We have always kept our osmium solutions in glass containers. However,
we
} are in the process of evaluating our safety procedures and discussed
the
} idea of increasing the safety of the transport of osmium from the
} refrigerator to the fume hood by putting the osmium solution in plastic
} containers. (If they are dropped, they would not break and cause the
danger
} of a spill outside the hood.)
} Does anyone have experience with osmium stored in plastic? Any
comments
} about this particular subject or any of your safety with osmium
procedures
} are welcomed.
} Thanks.
}
} Donna Wagahoff
} SIU School of Medicine
} PO Box 19627
} Springfield, IL 62794-9627
} 217-782-0898
} fax217-524-3227





From daemon Tue Jan 11 20:41:33 2000



From: c j day :      wa5ekh-at-juno.com
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 20:24:00 -0600
Subject: ESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Recently an E3 Electroscan has become available and I'm becoming aware
of a much different SEM technology than I'm used to seeing over the last
30 years. It obviously operates only at vacuum levels in the torr range,
right? I am still a little confused how resolution can be maintained in
these vacuum levels. And dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, does this
broaden the peaks and what happens to spectral resolution? It also
appears that this particular design cannot pump down below 10-4(?).
There are some complex gas background issues that are different. Are
there ways of using these design parameters to the benefit of the
materials imaging analysis in samples that are not hydrated or partially
volatile?
'JD'/Texas





From daemon Wed Jan 12 07:38:15 2000



From: Krzysztof Jan Huebner :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 11:50:25 +0100 (MET)
Subject: ICVGIP2000 (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Our apologies if you receive multiple copies of this announcement.
Please circulate this announcement to your friends and other
researchers.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Indian Conference on Computer Vision, Graphics and
Image Processing

Dec 20-22, 2000
Bangalore, INDIA

Email: icvgip-at-cair.res.in
URL: http://www.cair.res.in/~icvgip
Phone: +91 80 226 5609 Fax: +91 80 225 5615
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Call for Participation
----------------------

Continuing in the line of ICPIC '95 held at IIT, Kharagpur and
ICVGIP '98 held at IIT, Delhi, ICVGIP 2000 will be organized by the
Centre for Artificial Intelligence & Robotics at Bangalore during
December 20-22, 2000. The conference is intended to bring together
the Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing communities together with
a special emphasis on India. A high quality technical track will be
augmented by presentations from various R&D institutions in the
country and the industry.

Important Dates:
----------------

Submissions due: May 15, 2000
Notifiation of acceptance: Sep 01, 2000
Final papers due: Oct 15, 2000
Conference dates: Dec 20-22, 2000

Topics:
-------

We strive to host a high quality conference in India. An additional
goal his to bring the community of Indian practitioners of these
areas together at a single forum. We encourage papers related to
system development, innovative applications etc., in addition to
research papers. We especially encourage papers by student. The
topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

Computer Vision Image Processing
Computer Graphics Signal Processing
Virtual Reality Multimedia
Document Analysis Pattern Recognition & Matching
Applications Image Processing Architectures
ASIC Design Software & Hardware Tools


Submissions:
------------

Electronic submissions are highly encouraged. Acceptable formats
are: Acrobat PDF, standard PostScript, self-contained LaTeX with
psfig, and Word 7.0. Check the official web page for details on
electronic submission. Manuscripts should not exceed 20
double-spaced pages including figures and tables. The submission
should include a cover page with the title, the authors' names,
abstract and keywords. Those submitting hard-copy manuscripts
should send four copies to the following address:

ICVGIP 2000 Secretariat
Centre for Artificial Intelligence & Robotics (CAIR)
Raj Bhavan Circle, High Grounds
Bangalore, 560 001. INDIA

Further Information:
--------------------

Email address: icvgip-at-cair.res.in
URL: http://www.cair.res.in/~icvgip
Fax: +91 80 225 5615 (Attn: ICVGIP 2000)

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Patrons:
--------
Prof. M. Vidyasagar, CAIR
Prof. R. Narasimha, NIAS

General Chair:
--------------
Dr. P. J. Narayanan, CAIR pjn-at-cair.res.in

Program Co-Chairs:
------------------
Prof. Ramakant Nevatia, USC nevatia-at-usc.edu
Prof. Jayanta Mukherjee, IIT, KGP jay-at-cse.iitkgp.ernet.in

Organizing Chair:
-----------------
Prof. Swamy Manohar, IISc manohar-at-csa.iisc.ernet.in

Plenary Chair:
--------------
Dr. P. Anandan, Microsoft anandan-at-microsoft.com

Publications Chair:
-------------------
Dr. C. V. Jawahar, CAIR jawahar-at-cair.res.in

Treasurer:
----------
Dr. Subrata Rakshit, CAIR subrata-at-cair.res.in

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Organized by Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR)
--------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Wed Jan 12 07:38:15 2000



From: Greg Ketley :      greg.ketley-at-snet.net
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 06:18:28 -0500
Subject: Denton coater service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all-
I am looking for someone to provide in house service for a Denton
Sputter Coater in the Rhode Island area. Please feel free to contact me
offline.

Thanks
Greg Ketley
greg.ketley-at-snet.net



From daemon Wed Jan 12 07:38:16 2000



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 08:41:30 -0400
Subject: Re: ESEM (longish)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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----------
} From: c j day {wa5ekh-at-juno.com}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: ESEM
} Date: January 11, 2000 10:24 PM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Recently an E3 Electroscan has become available and I'm becoming aware
} of a much different SEM technology than I'm used to seeing over the last
} 30 years. It obviously operates only at vacuum levels in the torr range,
} right? I am still a little confused how resolution can be maintained in
} these vacuum levels. And dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, does this
} broaden the peaks and what happens to spectral resolution? It also
} appears that this particular design cannot pump down below 10-4(?).
} There are some complex gas background issues that are different. Are
} there ways of using these design parameters to the benefit of the
} materials imaging analysis in samples that are not hydrated or partially
} volatile?
} 'JD'/Texas
}
} This is exactly the model we've been using here for the past 7 or so
years. In fact, the instrument can be operated in "normal" high vacuum
mode, too (if your samples don't mind it). The resolution is not bad, even
in "wet" mode - say, 2 - 10 torr. There is a certain amount of beam
diffusion, of course, in a wet atmosphere, but we've been doing EDS for the
past 5 or 6 years with pretty good, reproducible, results. (We have a NORAN
ultra-thin window detector and Voyager 3 software.)
Since we have a LaB6 gun in ours, there is also an ion pump, and the gun
vacuum is maintained at a little better than 10 -6 torr.
As you know, the instrument can be used with, instead of water vapour,
inert gases as an atmosphere in the chamber. As it happens, we don't do
that with our instrument, so I couldn't really comment. I suspect that
there probably aren't any major advantages in using an instrument like
this for materials studies, except that it has a very large specimen
chamber that can accomodate several types of stage. And, of course, the
fact that samples generally require no coating before examination. Much of
our usage is earth sciences, and it's nice not to have to coat type fossils
with carbon or metals.
There are two major disadvantages with the E3's. One is that the field of
view is very small - you can't really image anything larger than about 1 mm
in length or diameter, because of the configuration of the ESD
detector/final aperture assembly. This can be a major pain. Another is
that, with the standard stage, samples can not be thicker than about 25 mm
or so, especially if you want to do EDS.
FWIW, our instrument has been dead reliable since it's installation. Other
than biannual column cleanings, the odd hose leak, and an occasional glitch
with some miscellaneous part, the machine is hardly ever down. (Kind of
like my Harley - there may even be a few shared parts :-).
If you do wind up acquiring the E3, the Philips service rep for the
American southeast is (or at least was a couple years ago) Steve Booth.
(You probably know that Philips bought out ElectroScan a few years ago, so
they handle the service contracts now). Steve was here twice to do service
calls on ours, because both times, the regular US Northeast guy was
unavailable. Steve runs a horse ranch somewhere in Texas, I believe, but
knows his E3's pretty well, too.
This might be a whole lot more than you wanted to know, but I'll admit to
being a bit of a fan of our instrument - like my bike, it's ruggedly built,
but is no more complex than it has to be. Just last week, myself and a
local SEM service tech who'd never seen an ESEM before completed a biannual
column cleaning, and it all went very well - takes a day or two to get the
gun vacuum down to operating levels again, though.


No connection with Philips Electron Optics, etc......

F.C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada
B3L 4C8



From daemon Wed Jan 12 08:20:05 2000



From: Giles Sanders :      g.sanders-at-ic.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 07:44:17 -0600
Subject: Fw: CCD Video camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List, can you help me once again. Can anyone recommend a sub $1500
video camera for video microscopy.  It will be generally used for
relatively high intensity fluorescence microscopy (imaging GFP bacteria)
and basic microscopy. At present we have a Sony XC-999P (752x582 pixels)
and are looking to upgrade - preferably in resolution and sensitivity -
but resolution is the most important factor. If people wish they can
respond off=list and I will produce a prŽcis of the information I receive.
Thanks.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------Dr. Giles SandersZeneca / SmithKline Beecham Centre
for Analytical SciencesChemistry DepartmentImperial College of Science,
Technology and MedicineLondonSW7 2AY (44) - 0171-594-5749 Never
express yourself more clearly than you think. --  Niels Bohr
(1885-1962) Danish physicist
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------





From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:31:53 2000



From: Tracey M. Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 09:24:09 -0600
Subject: N'tl Geographic/Scharf

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All!
I guess National Geographic Explorer Magazine will be showing some of
David Scharf's work in the next "Explorer" show on TBS (Turner Broadcasting
System-yes it's not the Braves or Clint Eastwood!) on January 16th. They
will show some of his work imaging parasites with the modified
SEM. Should be cool! I love it when they show electron microscopy on TV.
Just thought you might want to know!

Tracey Pepper
Supervisor
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa State University
ph: 515-294-3872
fax: 515.294.1337




From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:31:54 2000



From: Heeschen, Bill (WA) :      WAHEESCHEN-at-dow.com
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 10:38:50 -0500
Subject: ESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A few of the simpler advantages of an ESEM (we have a model E3):
No need to coat a sample
saves a few minutes (at least)
allows for back-and-forth work with a light microscope
No need to pre-pump to remove volatiles - the differential pumping system
handles this (although your rough pump oil becomes your trap)
Gas evolution (degradation on heating, for example)is not a problem (see
above)
Aging/dynamic studies don't get compromised due to sample coating.
near-atmospheric pressure minimizes sublimation without cryogenics
You can study influence of water (swelling, for example)or other sample/gas
interactions
ESD detector is light-insensitive, so you can watch the sample as you
position it. Also as you poke/prod it with the micromanipulator option.


As for EDX, yes, there is a significant beam spread from the imaging gas. I
typically line up the region-of-interest, then dial the chamber pressure to
zero before collecting spectra. The spread is significantly reduced.

Without trying to touch off arguments, my practical experience is that above
about 20,000X I don't collect images worth writing home about. They are
useful, but not beautiful.

It's an instrument that fills an interesting niche, even for a materials
scientist. (The real forte' is biological/wet stuff. That's where the fun
really begins!)

Bill Heeschen
The Dow Chemical Company

-----Original Message-----
} From: c j day [mailto:wa5ekh-at-juno.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2000 9:24 PM
To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com


Recently an E3 Electroscan has become available and I'm becoming aware
of a much different SEM technology than I'm used to seeing over the last
30 years. It obviously operates only at vacuum levels in the torr range,
right? I am still a little confused how resolution can be maintained in
these vacuum levels. And dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, does this
broaden the peaks and what happens to spectral resolution? It also
appears that this particular design cannot pump down below 10-4(?).
There are some complex gas background issues that are different. Are
there ways of using these design parameters to the benefit of the
materials imaging analysis in samples that are not hydrated or partially
volatile?
'JD'/Texas





From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:03 2000



From: Bob Wise :      wise-at-vaxa.cis.uwosh.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 11:07:13 -0500
Subject: flat sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have a method for flattening 0.5 um thick epoxy (Spurr)
sections for LM? We are using water pickup and mild heat drying onto glass
slides and that doesn't seem to be doing the trick.

TIA

Bob
Dr. Robert R. Wise
Department of Biology
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Oshkosh, WI 54901
(920) 424-3404
wise-at-uwosh.edu
http://www.uwosh.edu/departments/biology/wise/wise.html



From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:31:54 2000



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 10:09:29 -0600
Subject: TEM membrane lipid visualization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I want to look at what I hypothesize is a densely packed array of
membranes in TEM. In routine osmium fixed, LR White and Epon
embedded specimens, the image is not overwhelming. I plan to try
ruthenium tetroxide ala the skin people looking at lamellar bodies.
I am wondering whether I am missing another obvious approach. Any
ideas gratefully accepted. Tom

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)



From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:00 2000



From: John Balk :      balk-at-kjhsgi.me.jhu.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 13:18:10 -0400
Subject: TEM: preparation of gold foils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,

I am currently working on preparing TEM foils of single crystalline gold.
The electropolishing was completely fruitless, until I tried Bernie Kestel's
solution "BK-2". This has worked wonders, giving a very smooth and shiny
surface. FYI, I use a Struers Tenupol twin-jet electropolisher, so my
conditions are slightly different than with the South Bay polisher. One
problem remains: the electron-transparent edges of the foil are very prone
to bending, and thus I have regions that are full of bend contours. This
isn't terribly surprising, since the gold is from a grown single crystal and
has been subjected only to about 1% plastic strain. Any ideas on reducing
the amount of bending, so that I can see the dislocations more easily? Are
there any specific profiles for foil perforations that will help keep the
edges rigid (other than a smooth, small hole)? Any ideas, either for
improving specimen prep, or for "fixing" foils I already have, would be
greatly appreciated.

Regards,

John
--
____________________________________
John Balk
200 Latrobe Hall
Johns Hopkins University
3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
ph: (410) 516-8284
fax: (410) 516-4316
e-mail: balk-at-kjhsgi.me.jhu.edu




From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:31:57 2000



From: Yuhui_Xu :      Yuhui_Xu-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 12:18:24 -0500
Subject: CCD Cameras for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues:

We are in the market for a CCD camera for a JEOL 1200CX TEM. I would
appreciate any information regarding to this type of products available on the
market.
Thank you.

Yuhui




From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:01 2000



From: Damian :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 12:45:29 -0600
Subject: Re: Vapor Stains-Safety Issue Discussion Please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Those of you who know me can understand that I agree completely with JDs
comment below. The whole issue of safety in handling laboratory chemicals
is one that, I believe, has still not been completely addressed and
accepted by everyone. We all know the short term effect that exposure to
toxic levels of OsO4 can have on a person, eyes is one that comes to
mind. Formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde are others that I and a pathologist,
who I just met yesterday, are now well aware of its possible long term
effects. But what about long term, synergistic effects of some chemicals
that are by themselves relatively innocuous? Combinations of two, three,
four? The only answer is to develop and follow safely procedures for
handling each chemical as if it were very toxic. There is no reason not
to, you already do it for some chemical, and there are many reasons to do so.

For those who don't know me and need a little motivation, think "bilateral,
single sequential lung transplant" .

Damian


At 07:55 PM 1/11/00 -0600, c j day wrote:

} This technology needs more thorough discussion, I believe. There are
} several rather serious safety issues that, I believe, we might find some
} better solutions to here, if we open this area for discussion . For
} example vapor level and detection, penetration, permeability, scrubbing,
} reactive absorption, isolation, etc.. Some plastics stain easily and some
} do not, but all are apparently permeable.
} On the productive side the commercially astute might find several
} new product ideas valuable to this community.
} 'JD'




From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:02 2000



From: Sally Stowe :      stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 07:17:01 +1100
Subject: Re: Vapor Stains-Safety Issue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



What is the longterm effect of exposure to osmium on the brittleness and
permeability of common plastics? We leave exposed polymer block faces in
osmium vapour overnight before sectioning.


Sally



From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:02 2000



From: Robert Palmer :      rjpalmer-at-dir.nidcr.nih.gov
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 15:27:11 -0500
Subject: ESEM in DC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all! We are looking for an ESEM in the greater Washington DC area
for a limited amount of work (maybe a dozen samples over a two-month
period). This could be a contractual situation, although we are rather
hoping for the owner's generosity....
Please reply off-list to: rjpalmer-at-dir.nidcr.nih.gov
Robert J. Palmer Jr., Ph.D.
Natl Inst Dental Craniofacial Res - Natl Insts Health
Oral Infection and Immunity Branch
Bldg 30, Room 310
30 Convent Drive
Bethesda MD 20892
ph 301-496-2088
fax 301-402-0396



From daemon Wed Jan 12 17:32:07 2000



From: Harrison, Gail :      Gail.Harrison-at-reichhold.com
Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2000 16:44:43 -0500
Subject: Optical Scope Needs Servicing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have a Reichert compound microscope that needs servicing. The number I
have for the company who used to service my microscope is no longer valid.
Is there anyone in the RTP, NC area who could recommend a service vendor?
Please respond to gail.harrison-at-reichhold.com

Many thanks in advance

Gail Harrison
Reichhold
RTP, NC



From daemon Thu Jan 13 07:47:04 2000



From: simon baconnier :      simonb-at-bgumail.bgu.ac.il
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 15:32:39 +0200
Subject: Pineal gland

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I'm a post graduate student, and i'm working on the pineal gland, a gland
located in the middle of the brain.

I'd like to know what would be the better way to prpare it for a thin cut
and a hard fixation??

Thank you for answering!!

Simon




From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:49:58 2000



From: Jaci Lett :      jmlett-at-cid.wustl.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 09:20:44 -0600
Subject: STAIN: Toluidine Blue removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have a solution for this problem? I managed to get a spot ( {3mm
around) of Toluidine Blue on the cuff of my new shirt (the only part
extending beyond my lab coat). Is there any way to get rid of all (or most)
of the stain without it spreading? The shirt is 100% cotton. (I don't care
if it gets on my lab coat, but this is the first time in over fourteen years
that I've gotten it on my clothes.)

If I don't get any response, my inclination is to try a sodium tetraborate
paste applied with a cotton swab.

Jaclynn Lett, Research Assistant jmlett-at-cid.wustl.edu

Fay and Carl Simons Center for the Biology of Hearing and Deafness
Central Institute for the Deaf
818 S. Euclid Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63110

voice: 314-977-0257 fax: 314-977-0030




From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:02 2000



From: Downey, Kevin E :      Kevin.Downey-at-hrl.bsco.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 13:42:47 -0500
Subject: TEM Extraction Replicas

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am having great difficulty extracting large carbides from a steel
specimen using the standard single stage carbon extraction technique.
The film is either not releasing or it is breaking up into unusable
pieces. My standard practice is as follows:

1) Etch polished surface in 2% Nital for 15 to 45 seconds
2) Release sections in 10% Nital
3) Float sections in Dist. water and retrieve

I have used an electrolytic process to aid in releasing the sections
but often this process tends to create somewhat dirty replicas.

I also am going to try a two-stage replication technique, but would prefer
to have sucessful single stage replicas.

Does anyone have any suggestions that would be of assistance in my
single stage replication technique? Thank you for your consideration.

Kevin Downey
Research Analyst
Bethlehem Steel Corp.
e-mail: rkedo-at-bsco.com



From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:02 2000



From: pmoore-at-wfubmc.edu (Paula Moore)
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 13:43:54 -0500
Subject: Re: STAIN: Toluidine Blue removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Does anyone have a solution for this problem? I managed to get a spot ( {3mm
} around) of Toluidine Blue on the cuff of my new shirt (the only part
} extending beyond my lab coat). Is there any way to get rid of all (or most)
} of the stain without it spreading? The shirt is 100% cotton. (I don't care
} if it gets on my lab coat, but this is the first time in over fourteen years
} that I've gotten it on my clothes.)

We have some stuff called Erada-Stain. Its made for histological stain removal
from hands, glassware, etc. We've had our tube of it for forever(15 years +)
but it seems like it would be one of those things you should still be able to
find.
Its always worked for me when I had a clothes splash.
Good Luck

Paula Moore
Wake Forest Univ. Baptist Medical Center
EM Lab
pmoore-at-wfubmc.edu




From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:02 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 12:56:00 -0600
Subject: TIFF image dpi format ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,

Embeded in TIFF images is data describing the "print" size, X inches by Y
inches at N dpi. Of course, this is directly related to the pixel matrix
size.

My problem is that my digital imaging equipment (Hitachi S-3500 and IXRF
EDS)
saves the image data at 72 (or less) dpi. The pixel array size is correct,
but
at {= 72 dpi, many programs (like PhotoShop) want to print a huge image.

I can overcome this by (in P.S. for example) resetting the image to 300 dpi
and
adjusting the print size so that the pixel array is not altered. At the
very
least, this is cumbersome and time consuming when a large number of images
must
be printed.

I would like to find a way to change the file saving default value for the
dpi
to avoid image resizing for most print applications.

Any suggestions???

Thanks,
Woody White
McDermott Technology



From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:03 2000



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 11:27:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Mattel QX3 toy microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've received a lot of inquiries about the education potential of the $100
(or less, in some stores) toy digital microscope introduced by Mattel just
before Christmas; it's a plastic-bodied scope with simple image processing
software which requires a wired connection to a Windows 98 computer (I'm a
Mac user and I don't often feel envious, but...). It's been hard to get
good information, but Jim Harper has just posted an excellent article on
the web. He describes its capabilities well - far better than any of the
other reviews that I've read. And he gives detailed instructions on how to
mount it on ANY light microscope! Don't miss the hotlinks at the end of
his piece.

Educationally, it's no substitute for the one student - one microscope
approach of Project MICRO and "Microscopic Explorations", its manual. But
it has exciting potential for classroom demonstrations and science fair
projects. And listserver readers who are looking for low cost digital
recording of LM may find that it's adequate for a lot of applications.
Please let us know if it works for you.

The site is http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artjan00/jhqx3.html

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html





From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:06 2000



From: bozzola-at-siu.edu (John J. Bozzola)
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 14:36:41 -0600
Subject: SYMPOSIUM CALL FOR PAPERS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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==============================================

ANNOUNCEMENT, AN INVITATION TO OUR SYMPOSIUM:

I am soliciting contributors (or names of potential contributors) for a
symposium for the natiional Microscopy & Microanalysis Annual Meeting to be
held on August 13-17, 2000 in Philadelphia, Pa.

Talks may range in length from 25 to 45 minutes. Deadline for receipt of 2
page absracts is Feb 15, 2000.

A description of the symposium follows.

SYMPOSIUM: MICROORGANISMS: THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UNUSUAL

This symposium will deal with microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, parasites,
prions) found in the environment as well as in higher life forms (animals
and plants). Newly discovered pathogens or organisms with unique
capabilities (detoxification, invasiveness, resistance to antibiotics) are
of interest in this symposium. Of particular interest are those orgamisms
that represent extremes, as for example: the ability to grow in extreme
environments, having extreme virulence or invasiveness, or being difficult
to visualize using conventional prepartory procedures. Hopefully, the
participants shall describe some of the features of extreme organisms that
give rise to these capabilities. Finally, many of these organisms are often
difficult to visualize using standard preparatory procedures. Papers
describing procedures to prepare the specimens for visualization would be
germane to this symposium.


==============================================







####################################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Micro-Imaging and Analysis Center
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
####################################################################





From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:07 2000



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 13:31:24 -0800
Subject: Re: TIFF image dpi format ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Hello All,
}
} Embeded in TIFF images is data describing the "print" size, X inches by Y
} inches at N dpi. Of course, this is directly related to the pixel matrix
} size.
}
} My problem is that my digital imaging equipment (Hitachi S-3500 and IXRF
} EDS)
} saves the image data at 72 (or less) dpi. The pixel array size is correct,
} but
} at {= 72 dpi, many programs (like PhotoShop) want to print a huge image.
}
} I can overcome this by (in P.S. for example) resetting the image to 300 dpi
} and
} adjusting the print size so that the pixel array is not altered. At the
} very
} least, this is cumbersome and time consuming when a large number of images
} must
} be printed.
}
} I would like to find a way to change the file saving default value for the
} dpi
} to avoid image resizing for most print applications.
}

I also have a Hitachi S-3500N. Use the Action Palette in PhotoShop to
change the print size and adjust the pixel array with a single key stroke.



Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
530 754 7536 fax
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 13 17:50:09 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2000 18:12:08 -0500
Subject: RE: TIFF image dpi format ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I suggest getting a hold of ThumbsPlus. I print everything from it. It can
stretch an image to full scale and can print annotation text with the image.
It is a graphics database program that works very well. In addition, it can
convert from almost any format to any other format.

What it can do for you is to convert your image from 72 dpi -big to 300
-small and keep it in the same format, e.g. Tiff. You can do a batch
convert easily.

Find out more at www.cerious.com

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



} -----Original Message-----
} From: White, Woody N [mailto:Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com]
} Sent: Thursday, January 13, 2000 1:56 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: TIFF image dpi format ?
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hello All,
}
} Embeded in TIFF images is data describing the "print" size,
} X inches by Y
} inches at N dpi. Of course, this is directly related to the
} pixel matrix
} size.
}
} My problem is that my digital imaging equipment (Hitachi
} S-3500 and IXRF
} EDS)
} saves the image data at 72 (or less) dpi. The pixel array
} size is correct,
} but
} at {= 72 dpi, many programs (like PhotoShop) want to print a
} huge image.
}
} I can overcome this by (in P.S. for example) resetting the
} image to 300 dpi
} and
} adjusting the print size so that the pixel array is not
} altered. At the
} very
} least, this is cumbersome and time consuming when a large
} number of images
} must
} be printed.
}
} I would like to find a way to change the file saving default
} value for the
} dpi
} to avoid image resizing for most print applications.
}
} Any suggestions???
}
} Thanks,
} Woody White
} McDermott Technology
}



From daemon Thu Jan 13 20:01:28 2000



From: Dave Phelan :      emudp-at-mail.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 11:56:52 +1100
Subject: X-Ray mapping problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


G'day

I have a problem doing x-ray mapping on my Philips XL30 (W) with
an attached Oxford ISIS 200 EDS system. I'm running the ISIS
software on the same pc that controls the XL30, a 133 Pentium
with 32Mb memory, running NT4 with service pack 3. I have ISIS
v3.32 and XL v5.5 software. When I try to collect say 6 elemental
maps using the SPEEDMAP software the system locks after 2 or
3 scans and the computer has to be re-booted. I have tried
increasing the memory up to 80Mb but this had no effect. I did not
have this problem when running Windows 3.1, although the system
would give 'out of memory' errors which is why I upgraded to NT.
The problem also occurs when collecting an image using the ISIS
AUTOBEAM software and integrating several frames. Single frame
acquisitions are ok.
If you have a similar system configuration would you please let me
know it you experience this problem? I know of stand alone NT
systems that are ok, so can only assume it is some conflict with
my particular software/hardware combination.

Thanks

Dave







Dave Phelan
EM/X-Ray Unit
University of Newcastle
NSW 2308
AUSTRALIA
Ph 02 4921 5667
Fax 02 4921 7019
emudp-at-mail.newcastle.edu.au




From daemon Fri Jan 14 07:48:17 2000



From: Mel Dickson :      m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 16:52:03 +1100
Subject: Hitachi FESEMs in NY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello EM Listers,

We are having antifield systems from Lindgren RF Enclosures , fitted on our
two Hitachi FESEMs, an S-4500II and an S-900.

It would be very advisable for the installing engineer to inspect columns
of these models before they set out for Sydney.

Could any operator of these models around New York who would allow
inspection of their microscopes please mail me?

thanks,


Dr. Mel Dickson,
Deputy Director, The Electron Microscope Unit,
Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Microbiology & Immunology
The University of New South Wales Sydney, Australia.
Phone +612 9385 6383 Fax +612 9385 6400



From daemon Fri Jan 14 07:48:20 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 09:24:55 +0000
Subject: gutaraldehyde safety

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Microscopists

Revisiting an old chestnut - safety and aldehyde fixatives.

In the UK, the Health & Safety Commission have just lowered exposure
limits for glutaraldehyde.

Formalin/formaldehyde has a MEL (maximum exposure limit) of 2 ppm or
2.5 mg/cu m - this is measurable and legally enforcible.
Glutaraldehyde used to have an OES (occupational exposure standard) of
0.2 ppm or 0.83 mg/cu m. over a 15 minute period. OES is a standard to
aim for, but not prosecutable if you weren't achieving it.

Now, glutaraldehyde suddenly has a MEL of 0.05 ppm, both for 15
minute short term reference limit AND THE 8 HOUR TIME WEIGHTED AVERAGE
EXPOSURE!! This is a quarter of what it previously was and 40 times
lower than that for formaldehyde! Does anyone know why or have
evidence or anecdotes of glutaradehyde-related health problems? Is it
so nasty??

I appreciate that it is used in bulk as a bacteriocide in hospitals
and possibly in horticulture/agriculture.

I am trying to contact HSC specialist committees for a response and
will post anything that I receive. I suspect that may be very
little.

Regards - Keith (reincarnated after "early retirement")

PS - Hello, Daniele! And those who know her!
_______________________________
Dr. Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
The Laboratory
Citadel Hill
Plymouth
Devon PL1 2PB
England

Tel. ++44 (0)1752 633249
Tel. ++44 (0)1752 633279
The 279 number has an answering machine

Fax ++44 (0)1752 633102

e-mail: kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk




From daemon Fri Jan 14 07:48:23 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 07:34:00 -0600
Subject: TIFF dpi follow-up...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks for the replies, but...

There may be some confusion about my question. Perhaps I can clarify....

I can resize/fix the image size parameters ok. Either totally manually or
with
a macro from PhotoShop, etc.

My goal is to NOT have to do that. If the original images are SAVED at the
appropriate print dpi this would not be required.... That is my goal. That
is... Is there any way to modify the SAVING software (Hitachi PC-SEM/IXRF
Iridium) so that the images are, for example, 300 dpi rather than 72 or 26
which
is what the software(s) does now.

Woody



From daemon Fri Jan 14 18:31:54 2000



From: HILDEGARD CROWLEY :      hcrowley-at-du.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 09:57:38 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: STAIN: Toluidine Blue removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Thu, 13 Jan 2000, Paula Moore wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} } Does anyone have a solution for this problem? I managed to get a spot ( {3mm
} } around) of Toluidine Blue on the cuff of my new shirt (the only part
} } extending beyond my lab coat). Is there any way to get rid of all (or most)
} } of the stain without it spreading? The shirt is 100% cotton. (I don't care
} } if it gets on my lab coat, but this is the first time in over fourteen years
} } that I've gotten it on my clothes.)
}
} We have some stuff called Erada-Stain. Its made for histological stain removal
} from hands, glassware, etc. We've had our tube of it for forever(15 years +)
} but it seems like it would be one of those things you should still be able to
} find.
} Its always worked for me when I had a clothes splash.
} Good Luck
}
} Paula Moore
} Wake Forest Univ. Baptist Medical Center
} EM Lab
} pmoore-at-wfubmc.edu
}
}
}
Hi,

To destain a slide which has been contrasted with toluidine blue (or any
of the other blues), soak the slide in acid alcohol. To one liter of 70%
ethanol, add 10ml of conc hydrochloric acid. Soak the cuff in that. If
that does not do it, paint your cuff. I have done this frequently. Use
laundry marking stick or magic marker or whatever. If I have a lot of
staining to do, I
simply wear a multicolor blue blouse. No problem.

Hildy Crowley,




From daemon Sun Jan 16 07:07:06 2000



From: HILDEGARD CROWLEY :      hcrowley-at-du.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 09:57:38 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: STAIN: Toluidine Blue removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Thu, 13 Jan 2000, Paula Moore wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} } Does anyone have a solution for this problem? I managed to get a spot ( {3mm
} } around) of Toluidine Blue on the cuff of my new shirt (the only part
} } extending beyond my lab coat). Is there any way to get rid of all (or most)
} } of the stain without it spreading? The shirt is 100% cotton. (I don't care
} } if it gets on my lab coat, but this is the first time in over fourteen years
} } that I've gotten it on my clothes.)
}
} We have some stuff called Erada-Stain. Its made for histological stain removal
} from hands, glassware, etc. We've had our tube of it for forever(15 years +)
} but it seems like it would be one of those things you should still be able to
} find.
} Its always worked for me when I had a clothes splash.
} Good Luck
}
} Paula Moore
} Wake Forest Univ. Baptist Medical Center
} EM Lab
} pmoore-at-wfubmc.edu
}
}
}
Hi,

To destain a slide which has been contrasted with toluidine blue (or any
of the other blues), soak the slide in acid alcohol. To one liter of 70%
ethanol, add 10ml of conc hydrochloric acid. Soak the cuff in that. If
that does not do it, paint your cuff. I have done this frequently. Use
laundry marking stick or magic marker or whatever. If I have a lot of
staining to do, I
simply wear a multicolor blue blouse. No problem.

Hildy Crowley,




From daemon Fri Jan 14 18:31:58 2000



From: Linda Fox :      LFOX1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 13:43:26 -0600
Subject: Barr bodies in TEM prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings friends,
A researcher wants to know how to stain for, or find by TEM, Barr
bodies that are already prepped and embedded in resin for TEM. Any
advise that you can supply will be most appreciated.
Thanks,
Linda M. Fox
Loyola University
Stritch School of Medicine
Core Imaging Facility
2160 S. First Ave.
Maywood, Il 60153
Bld. 102 Room 0617
1-708-216-3395
lfox1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu



From daemon Fri Jan 14 18:31:59 2000



From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 22:01:18 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM Extraction Replicas

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I spent a lot of time many years ago working on 316 stainless. Many
of the specimens I made were single stage carbon extraction replicas.
The technique I found most effective was to use dilute hydrochloric
acid and electrolytic activation. I used this both to etch the
surface prior to carbon coating and also to release the carbon
replica. I also used the same process on ferritic steels. It was very
effective it even released large sheets of M23C6 carbides from grain
boundaries. The only 'precipitate' it would not work on was ferrite
in austenite.

regards,
--
Larry Stoter
17, Rocks Park Road, Uckfield, E. Sussex, TN22 2AT, UK
email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk, Home Phone/Fax: +44 (0)1825 767967



From daemon Sun Jan 16 07:06:55 2000



From: Sally Stowe :      stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 11:45:00 +1100
Subject: EM Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Position open at the Australian National University , Canberra
www.anu.edu.au/hr/jobs

RESEARCH SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY UNIT
ELECTRON MICROSCOPIST
ANU OFFICER GRADE 7 (TECHNICAL)
$43,506 - $47,010 per annum (Plus generous superannuation
provisions)

Reference No: G000011. The ANU Electron Microscopy Unit, a
multidisciplinary research and teaching
support facility with four SEMs, three TEMS and ancillary equipment,
requires a skilled and experienced
person to join its team of 5-6 staff. The successful applicant will have a
history of work in electron
microscopy in a diversified research-oriented environment, preferably with
some administrative experience,
and areas of expertise that support and complement those of existing staff.
They will have up-to-date
expertise in a number of areas of electron microscopy and image analysis.
Among these, experience with
quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, research projects in plant
or animal cell biology, and
cryopreparation techniques is a necessity.

The ANU EMU website is http://online.anu.edu.au/EMU

Contact for selection documentation: Ms Susan Toscan , ph (02) 6249 4752,
email:
susan.toscan-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
For further information contact: Dr Sally Stowe, email:
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Closing date: 31st January 2000.




From daemon Sat Jan 15 06:23:38 2000



From: Shaffer-at-physics.niu.edu
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 20:30:14 -0600
Subject: Tenure-Track Faculty Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Condensed Matter: Electron
Microscopist. The candidate should have a strong background in
transmission electron microscopy and diffraction, and an interest in the
applications of advanced TEM techniques to materials physics. The
candidate would be expected to have a broad knowledge of electron
diffraction theory, of high resolution microscopy and electron
spectroscopy and of materials physics. Possible areas of interest
include (but are not limited to), microscopy of magnetic and/or
superconducting materials, including holography; defects and interfaces
in materials; ferroelectrics; diamond films and film growth; nanoscale
materials; amorphous materials; quantitative microscopy; and 3-D
tomography. Although not essential, an interest in electron optics
would be valuable. The candidate will have the opportunity to establish
a joint program with the Electron Microscopy Center in The Materials
Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. Send curriculum vitae
and references by March 17, 2000 to: Physics Dept., NIU, DeKalb, IL
60115, Attn: J. C. Shaffer, Chairman. NIU is an AA/EEO Institution.






From daemon Sat Jan 15 06:23:40 2000



From: jean michel Wulveryck :      jm.wulveryck-at-univ-reims.fr
Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 15:36:39 +0100
Subject: Information about Beam blanking ....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try Scripps their metrology does contract AFM.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography Analytical Facility

http://sioaf.ucsd.edu/flyer/



----- Original Message -----
} From: {"rfelten-at-Macdermid.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2000 2:16 PM


Dear colleagues,

Would you please give us some information about a beam blanking device
and a cryostat which can be set inside the microscope chamber. In fact,
we would like to modify our old Phillips microscope (SEM 505) with these
two devices. In particularly, could you give us the quotation for these
two devices,

Thanking you in advance,
Cordially,

email adresse for the answer :
abdelillah.elhdiy-at-univ-reims.fr




From daemon Mon Jan 17 07:16:46 2000



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sun, 16 Jan 2000 09:44:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Mattel QX3 toy microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've received a lot of inquiries about the education potential of the $100
(or less, in some stores) toy digital microscope introduced by Mattel just
before Christmas; it's a plastic-bodied scope with simple image processing
software which requires a wired connection to a Windows 98 computer (I'm a
Mac user and I don't often feel envious, but...). It's been hard to get
good information, but Jim Harper has just posted an excellent article on
the web. He describes its capabilities well - far better than any of the
other reviews that I've read. And he gives detailed instructions on how to
mount it on ANY light microscope! Don't miss the hotlinks at the end of his
piece.

Educationally, it's no substitute for the one student - one microscope
approach of Project MICRO and "Microscopic Explorations", its manual. But
it has exciting potential for classroom demonstrations and science fair
projects. And listserver readers who are looking for low cost digital
recording of LM may find that it's adequate for a lot of applications.
Please let us know if it works for you.

The site is http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artjan00/jhqx3.html

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html





From daemon Mon Jan 17 07:16:54 2000



From: Mel Dickson :      m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 17:32:50 +1100
Subject: position open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



University of New South Wales,
Sydney, Australia

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE UNIT

Laboratory Assistant

REF. 063NET

FIXED TERM - Total Remuneration: Level 3 (38 hours): A$35,824 - A$41,251
per year. (Salary Level 3: A$30,272 - A$34,858 per year plus up to 17%
employer superannuation plus leave
loading.)

The Electron Microscope Unit is a central infrastructural research
facility, containing nine principal instruments, which support a wide range
of projects. The Unit seeks a self-motivated, enthusiastic person to offer
technical support to assist in the smooth running of the Unit. The
successful applicant will be required to perform a range of routine
laboratory tasks such as film processing, specimen preparation and assist
users of the Unit with operation of microscopes.

Essential criteria: familiarity with the operation of both scanning and
transmission
electron microscopes and with microscope specimen preparation techniques;
previous
experience in research laboratory environment; familiarity with common
windows-based
software packages; good interpersonal skills and a knowledge of EEO/AA
principles.

Desirable criteria: experience with microscopy of biomedical specimens,
experience with
cryomicroscopy techniques; ability to use image processing and analysis
software.
This is a fixed term position to 31 December 2000

Information about the Unit can be found on its website:
http://srv.emunit.unsw.edu.au

Enquiries may be directed to Associate Professor Paul Munroe on telephone
(02) 9385 4435, facsimile (02) 9385 6400 or email: p.munroe-at-unsw.edu.au.

Applications close 28 January 2000.

Dr. Mel Dickson,
Deputy Director, The Electron Microscope Unit,
Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Microbiology & Immunology
The University of New South Wales Sydney, Australia.
Phone +612 9385 6383 Fax +612 9385 6400



From daemon Mon Jan 17 07:29:13 2000



From: Alex_Liversage-at-bio-rad.com
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 07:17:37 -0600
Subject: problematic immunogold labelling references

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear readers


I have been looking for some relevant references to put in my PhD
thesis which are applicable to the work undertaken.

I was trying to immunogold label (using 5nm gold conjugated to Fab) an
epitope on the giant muscle protein titin within muscle fibre bundles
(all Ab labelling was done prior to sample fixation). However, the
labelling seen was low and inconsistent.

Labelling with FITC conjugated Ab or unconjugated Ab labelled samples
which were then stained was fine though.

Does anyone one know of similar work where immunogold labelling has
failed and possible reasons for this has been explicitly mentioned
within the paper.

Many thanks


Alex Liversage





From daemon Mon Jan 17 19:12:52 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 09:48:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Plan Apo Objectives for Leitz Aristoplan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have inherited a Leitz Aristoplan microscope for integration into a
digital imaging system for histopathology. Unfortunately, the mid-range
objectives (10, 25, 40x) are all fluors, although the scope is not equipped
for fluorescence. I would like to acquire planapochromats for each of these
magnifications. The Aristoplan is a fixed tube length (160mm) instrument
that is excellent optically, but the fluotars cause significant vignetting
at all magnifications, even with the correct C mount. If you can provide
any or all of these lenses, please contact me off-list with pricing
information and purchasing details.

Roger Moretz
Dept of Toxicology





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com




From daemon Mon Jan 17 19:12:54 2000



From: ancq3f1nkrz5xza-at-lll.de
Date: Mon, 17 Jan 2000 12:34:37
Subject: Need To Reach Thousands Of Prospects Every Month?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

S P E C I A L R E P O R T -

How To Reach Thousands Of Prospects Every Month

_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

Our research has found that many people have tried one or more of
the following...

Free Classifieds? (They just don't work anymore)
Web Site? (Takes thousands of surfers)
Banners? (Expensive and losing their punch)
E-Zine? (Hope they have a -huge- subscriber list)
Search Engines? (Forget it, unless you're in the top 20)

S O W H A T D O E S W O R K ?

Although often misunderstood, there is one method that has proven
to succeed time-after-time.

E - M A I L M A R K E T I N G ! !

IT'S A FACT... It was found that if you're not using your
computer to generate income, GOOD income, you're leaving money
on the table.

For those not interested in this research, or, if you're
financially independent... just hit delete.

But, "the proof is in the pudding", and if $50,000 to $151,200.00
per year makes you tingle with excitement, then this message is
for you. Don't worry, this has nothing to do with Gambling, The
Stock Market, Real Estate, or any of the many offers you receive,
this is pure and simple E-MAIL MARKETING...

Here is an example of potential earnings if you have a product or
service that brings you a profit of around $30. Remember, on the
Internet, you can make money 7 days a week, 24 hours a day...
even while you sleep, orders come from all over the world!


Orders
Per Day Weekly Monthly Yearly

1 $ 210 $ 840 $ 10,080
2 420 1,680 20,160
3 630 2,520 30,240
5 1,050 4,200 50,400
10 2,100 8,400 100,000
15 3,150 12,600 151,200


The way to reach thousands of people, generate orders and build
wealth is person-to-person direct - and with that thought comes
two VERY important questions...

1. How do you find the millions of people on the Internet?

2. What are you going to tell them when you do reach them?


HERE'S THE ANSWER TO QUESTION #1

M I L L I O N S V O L U M E 7

***New - 10 Million addresses - Just Released***

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world, BAR NONE! We're proud to offer it.

We took eight (8) computers, worked them nonstop for weeks
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with close to 200 (Two Hundred) Million addresses. WOW!!!

O N E O F A K I N D

This CD is a first. No one... and we mean NO ONE has put in
the kind of work it takes to produce a CD of this quality.

Remember those 200 million lines of addresses, here's what
we did with them...

1. Cleaned and eliminated all duplicates. This process,
alone, reduced the list into a manageable number.

2. Next, we brought in a filter list of 400+ words/phrases
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An address list so clean you'll want to take it home to
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N O B R A G - J U S T F A C T


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Our 10 Million, Volume 7, address CD will result in:

* Higher Response Rates
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Remember that potential income chart at the beginning of
this message? Can you imagine the kind of money you could
make if you mailed one million pieces and sold only one
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This product will prove to be the best of it's kind compared
to ANY CD in terms of hours and money spent bringing it to
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We've been in the list brokerage business for over 4 years and
we've never compromised on quality, and you can be sure we won't
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test.

This is not a rental list that is restricted to a one time
mailing. You are purchasing the list for your own personal
mailings and may use it over-and-over.

DON'T HESITATE on this offer or you will miss out on the
most effective way to market anywhere...PERIOD!

_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

F R E E B O N U S E S

Order within 72 hours and we'll include the following FREE
Bonuses... we call this our "BUSINESS ON A CD" bonus.

It's sad, but many people purchase address cd's...and then
spend additional hundreds buying the specialized software to
enable them to send their mail out. Then they have to
search for days-and-months on end to find a product that
will sell on the 'net.

We've solved that problem entirely with our exclusive
"BUSINESS ON A CD" bonus offer:

1. Not one, but *TWO* FREE mailing programs: "STEALTH" 3.O and
"EXPRESS MAIL SERVER". These two programs are proven
Professional Mailing Software that have sold for as high as
$499.00 each. They are not demo's, but the full working versions
that you may license and register in your name. "Stealth" and
"Express Mail Server" are what the pro's have used for years and
they've been regarded as simply THE BEST in commercial mailing
software (SORRY, SINCE THEY ARE FREE WE CANNOT OFFER ANY
TECHNICAL SUPPORT, however set-up instructions are included).

2. Every survey has always indicated that the easiest and
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INFORMATION! If you have an "information" type product,
then there is no easier way to become financially
independent.

Our "BUSINESS ON A CD" gives you 650 reports/manuals/books
that that are yours to use. You may instantly start your
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Just think, you can reproduce a complete book on a floppy
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the same books that have sold for $99. "Special Reports"
cost you pennies to produce and can be sold for as high as
$15... or the whole group for as high as $140.00.

3. "THE BULK E-MAIL SURVIVAL GUIDE" A manual/guide that
addresses the Bulk E-Mail business. Especially useful for
beginners. "THE BULK E-MAIL SURVIVAL GUIDE" will answer
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exclusive for our customers... INCLUDED FREE.

4. "LISTMATE" - This is the software the Pro's use to manage
their mailing lists. We've included two versions, both are
fully functional demo's, the only limit is the file size.

5. "SCIENTIFIC ADVERTISING"! This is the book that is
responsible for untold millions of dollars in sales and
profits. Many of today's Internet "gurus" have used this
powerful book as the foundation for marketing courses that
they have written and sold for as much as $495. Marketeer's
that have studied this book have been so deeply inspired,
that it has changed their entire way of doing business, and
they've gone on to make fortunes -- it's yours FREE with
your order!

This "BUSINESS ON A CD" bonus is yours absolutely FREE if
you order within the next 72 hours --- After that...

Poof!... it's gone!

***SPECIAL BONUS*** Order within the next 72 hours and receive
over 300,000 additional cleaned & verified addresses as a prompt
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_/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/ _/

D O N ' T H E S I T A T E on this effective means to get a
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effective and fastest way to market anywhere... PERIOD!

O R D E R N O W . . . SAME DAY SERVICE (M-F) if your order
is received before 2pm Pacific. 24hour fax service, just fax
to: 1-435-404-1340

To order, via credit card simply cut/paste and print out the
EZ ORDER FORM below and fax to our office today.

***** MILLIONS CD - Volume 7 *****

***** NOW ONLY $235! *****

This "Special Price" is in effect for the next seven days,
after that we go back to our regular price of $299.00 ...
Don't delay... you can be in business tomorrow!

We accept Visa, Mastercard, Amex and Checks by Fax.
Fax your order to: 1-435-404-1340

----------------------Cut & Paste----------------------
---------------------EZ Order Form---------------------

_____Yes! I want everything! I am ordering within 72 hours.
Include my FREE "Business On A CD" bonus along with your 10
Million Vol. 7 E-Mail address CD (plus 300,000 additional
addresses) for the special price of only $235.00 + s&h.

_____I missed the 72 hour special, but I am ordering Vol. 7,
10 Million, super clean e-mail addresses, within 7 days for the
"special" price of only $235.00 + s&h.

_____Oop's I missed the 72 hour and 7 day "specials". I am
ordering Vol. 7 at the regular price of $299.00 + s&h.

***PLEASE SELECT YOUR SHIPPING OPTION***

____I would like to receive my package FedEx OVERNIGHT. I am
including $15 for shipping. (Hawaii & Alaska $20 - Canada $25,
all other International add an *additional* $25 [$40 total] for
shipping)

____I would like to receive my package FedEx 2 DAY delivery.
I'm including $10 for shipping. (Sorry no Alaska, Hawaii, Canada
or International 2nd day delivery - Continental U.S. shipping
addresses only).

***Please Print Carefully***

NOTE: Orders cannot be shipped without complete information
including your signature. No exceptions!


NAME____________________________________________________

COMPANY NAME____________________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________________________
(FedEx can only ship to street addresses - no P.O. boxes)

CITY, STATE, ZIP________________________________________

PHONE NUMBER____________________________________________
(required for shipping & tracking)


EMAIL ADDRESS___________________________________________
(Print Carefully - required in case we have a question and to
send you a confirmation that your order has been shipped)

TYPE OF CREDIT CARD:

______VISA _____MASTERCARD _____AMEX

CREDIT CARD# __________________________________________

EXPIRATION DATE________________________________________

NAME ON CARD___________________________________________

TOTAL AMOUNT (Including Shipping): $___________________

DATE:x__________________

(Required) SIGNATURE:x_________________________________
I understand that I am purchasing the Millions Vol. 7 e-mail
address CD, the addresses are not rented, but are mine to use for
my own mailing, over-and-over. Free bonuses are included, but
cannot be considered part of the financial transaction. It is
the users responsibility to comply with any laws applicable to
their local area. As with all software, once opened the CD may
not be returned, however, if found defective it will be replaced
with like product at no charge.

You may fax your order to us at: 1-435-404-1340

CHECK BY FAX SERVICES!

Please Note: Sorry, we can only accept checks drawn on U.S.
banks.

If you would like to fax a check, tape your check below and
fax it to our office along with the EZ Order Form to:
1-435-404-1340

******************************************************

***24 HOUR FAX SERVICES*** PLEASE PASTE YOUR

CHECK HERE AND FAX IT TO US AT 1-435-404-1340

*******************************************************

If You fax a check, there is no need for you to mail the
original. We will prepare a one-time draft, with the exact
information on your original check. All checks will be
held for bank clearance. (7-10 days) Make payable to:
"CD-Marketing"





























********************************************************
Do not reply to this message -
********************************************************
To register your e-mail address for future removal, visit:
http://www.OptList.com/register.html.
********************************************************



From daemon Tue Jan 18 07:43:45 2000



From: Stephen Griffiths :      s.griffiths-at-ucl.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 12:59:53 -0000
Subject: LM: Large slides for large sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Everyone

One of our Ph.D students has to mount some large sections of flattened
visual cortex.
The sections are about 10 to 12 cm square.

I cannot find any supplier of microscope slides, that big, in our
catalogues.

Does anyone know of a supplier/manufacturer of large glass slides?
They must exist, surely?
UK supplier preferred, but anyone, anywhere if necessary.

TIA

Stephen
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Stephen Griffiths
Visual Science Department
Institute of Ophthalmology
Bath Street, London. EC1V 9EL
e-mail:- s.griffiths-at-ucl.ac.uk (work)
or stephen.griffiths-at-dial.pipex.com (home)
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}




From daemon Tue Jan 18 18:53:24 2000



From: Evans Stephen SJ :      Stephen.Evans-at-aguk.zeneca.com
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 14:58:48 -0000
Subject: LM: Efficient clearing of Arabidopsis seed coats

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello!

Not having a lot of microscopy experience, I was wondering if anyone could
recommend some solutions for effectively clearing Arabidopsis seed coats. I
would like to use as non-toxic a solution as possible (no Xylene!) and also
one which works quickly. Can anyone give me some handy hints?

Thanks for you help!

Stephen Evans
Wheat Improvement Centre
Norwich Research Park
Colney
Norwich NR4 7UH
stephen.evans-at-aguk.zeneca.com




From daemon Thu Jan 20 07:35:25 2000



From: Michael Coviello :      coviello-at-mae.uta.edu
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 10:40:29 -0600
Subject: Getting back to you

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Roy:
Sorry I haven't gotten back with you sooner, but I was off for the
holidays. Do you still need equipment? Give me a call so we can
discuss what you need.
Regrards,
Mike Coviello
817 272-5496



From daemon Tue Jan 18 18:53:27 2000



From: Marisa Ahmad :      mahmad-at-semiconductor.com
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 12:34:22 -0500
Subject: re: pump lifetimes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I received this question from a co-worker. Please respond directly to me.

thanks in advance,
Marisa Ahmad

--------------------

Small question. We have a Leybold mechanical pump hooked to a Reactive Ion
Etcher. It is running 24 hrs/ day, and pumps actively on the chamber about
35 times per day. How often should a pump under these conditions be rebuilt?
The reason I am asking is the pump seems to be blowing seals and requires
rebuilding about once a year, the manufacturer says this is normal...is it?
If not, what should we do to improve the time between rebuilds?



From daemon Wed Jan 19 08:04:47 2000



From: Dr G. R. Coulton [bs_mp] :      g.coulton-at-ic.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 10:16:23 +0000
Subject: 11th International Congress of Histochemistry and

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Michael Davidson at Florida State University has an excellent demonstration
of the QX3 microscope at:
http://microscopy.fsu.edu

Don O'Leary
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Caroline Schooley" {schooley-at-mcn.org}
To: {Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Sunday, January 16, 2000 12:44 PM


11th International Congress of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry (ICHC 2000)

ON-LINE REGISTRATION NOW AVAILABLE


Dear Collegues,

I have mentioned before the upcoming meeting ICHC 2000 3-8 Sept. 2000 York, UK

There will a range of sessions that will I am sure be of great interest to
this group. Please take a look at our web-site at
http://www.med.ic.ac.uk/external/ichc_2000

Hope to see you their

Best wishes

Gary Coulton
Organiser ICHC 2000



Dr. Gary Coulton
Molecular Pathology
Division of Biomedical Sciences
Imperial College School of Medicine
The Sir Alexander Fleming Building
South Kensington
London SW7 2AZ

tel 0044 (0)171 594 3190
fax 0044 (0)171 594 3022

e-mail g.coulton-at-ic.ac.uk

-------------------------------------
Announcing the 11th International Congress of Histochemistry and
Cytochemistry (ICHC 2000)

"Understanding Biocomplexity: The Post-Genome Challenge"

September 3-8, 2000, York, United Kingdom

ICHC 2000 will comprise 27 symposia addressing the latest developments and
applications of histochemistry and cytochemistry in the life sciences
including medicine.

Many leading experts to speak

On-line registration now open!!!!!!!!!!

For further details of the meeting and how to pre-register please visit our
web-site at http://www.med.ic.ac.uk/external/ichc_2000

Hope to see you there.



From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:41 2000



From: john grazul :      grazul-at-physics.bell-labs.com
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 10:02:34 -0500
Subject: Need Sony printer drivers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




john grazul wrote:

} Fellow Microscopists,
}
} I "found" a Sony Mavigraph UP-D7000 Digital Color Printer with 2 cases
} of consumables. What I could not find is any of the software to run the
} little beast; and besides it was suppose to go on a Unix system, so
} even if I found the software it would be useless {I think}.
}
} I went to the Sony Web site and found no downloads, any other
} suggestions or even some discs etc... would be a great help. BTW, the
} Sony will be on a PC.
}
} Thanks,
}
} John Grazul
} Lucent




From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:46 2000



From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 12:18:50 -0500
Subject: Martian summer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I thought I'd beat Tina to the weather report. Here in
Albany, NY (where cryo-microscopy means working with the
windows open) we are having Martian summer--yesterday's
high was -15 C.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:47 2000



From: Tamara Howard :      howard-at-cshl.org
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 13:11:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Robert Derby search

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry to bug everyone, but I'm trying to reach Robert Derby. If you are
out there, please e-mail me! Or if anyone has a contact address for him,
could you send it to me?

Thanks!

Tamara Howard
CSHL





From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:47 2000



From: Beth Dickey :      ecdickey-at-engr.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 13:41:02 -0500
Subject: Job Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{fontfamily} {param} Times_New_Roman {/param} {bigger}

{/bigger} {/fontfamily} {bigger} {bold} {fontfamily} {param} Times {/param} {bigger} RESEARCH
ASSOCIATE

Electron Microscopy Facility

University of Kentucky


{/bigger} {/fontfamily} {/bold} {fontfamily} {param} Times {/param} {bigger} The
University of Kentucky invites applications for a Research Associate in
the area of electron microscopy. The Electron Microscopy Facility
houses two SEMs, two TEMs one AFM and extensive sample preparation
equipment that are used by undergraduate and graduate students in
support of research and education. The primary responsibility of the
Research Associate will be to oversee the JEOL 2010F Field Emission TEM
and auxiliary equipment, including an Oxford energy dispersive x-ray
spectrometer (EDS), Gatan electron energy loss imaging filter and
acquisition hardware and software. S/he will be responsible for
coordinating and administering maintenance, access, training and use of
the equipment by internal and external users. S/he will also be
encouraged to develop sponsored research programs and collaborate with
university faculty members. The qualified candidate will have a Ph.D.
and practical experience in analytical electron microscopy and
demonstrate good communication skills. The salary will be commensurate
with qualifications and experience. The University of Kentucky offers
comprehensive insurance and benefits packages and is an equal
opportunity employer. Please send applications to:


Professor Elizabeth Dickey

Director, Electron Microscopy Facility

University of Kentucky

A254 ASTeCC Bldg.

Lexington, KY 40506-0286

{/bigger} {/fontfamily} {/bigger}

***********

Elizabeth C. Dickey

Assistant Professor

Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

University of Kentucky

177 Anderson Hall

Lexington, KY 40506-0046

ph: 606.257.2300 ext.288

FAX: 606.323.1929

http://www.engr.uky.edu/CME/faculty/dickey/



{/x-rich}



From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:48 2000



From: UIC Network Services Kit User :      netid-at-machine.cc.uic.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 12:43:40 -0600
Subject: frozen sections, need help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, I am trying to get frozen sections of rat skin about 10 um thick.
The tissue was perfusion fixed w/ 4% para in PBS then cryoprotected in
sucrose/ PBS and mounted with OTC compound. More often then not my
sections are sticking to the knife edge and are hard to remove even with
a brush. I'm a bit knew to cryo-sectioning so any tips would be greatly
appreciated.
Thanks, Andy




From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:48 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 09:04:38 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Martian summer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Dear Listers,
} I thought I'd beat Tina to the weather report. Here in
} Albany, NY (where cryo-microscopy means working with the
} windows open) we are having Martian summer--yesterday's
} high was -15 C.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol


OK, OK, it's in the 70sF, raining with enough sun for spectacular
rainbows, and there's a break in the winter North Shore surf
season. But I'm stuck in a windowless lab just like the rest of you guys!

http://wavetrak.surfline.com/pipecam.asp

My condolences on your winter blues.

Aloha,
Tina


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:50 2000



From: John Bonevich :      john.bonevich-at-nist.gov
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 15:38:24 -0500
Subject: Re: Need Sony printer drivers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello, I have version 1.1 of a plugin for Adobe Photoshop
(Macintosh). I can send you a copy to try. You'll be printing
"pink" images in no time.

John Bonevich


} john grazul wrote:
}
} } Fellow Microscopists,
} }
} } I "found" a Sony Mavigraph UP-D7000 Digital Color Printer with 2 cases
} } of consumables. What I could not find is any of the software to run the
} } little beast; and besides it was suppose to go on a Unix system, so
} } even if I found the software it would be useless {I think}.
} }
} } I went to the Sony Web site and found no downloads, any other
} } suggestions or even some discs etc... would be a great help. BTW, the
} } Sony will be on a PC.
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } John Grazul
} } Lucent


--------------------------
John Bonevich, Ph.D.
NIST, Metallurgy, Stop 8554
100 Bureau Drive
Gaithersburg, MD 20899 USA
TEL: (301) 975-5428
FAX: (301) 975-4553



From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:52 2000



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 13:42:19 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Mattel QX3 "toy" microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please don't consider this a "commercial" posting; my goal is to encourage
lots of experimentation. The Mattel microscope
(http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artjan00/jhqx3.html )lists for $100,
but Toys-R-Us is now selling it for $69.95, in both its retail stores and
website. And if you go to www.etoys.com, you can download a Mattel $30
rebate certificate, good till 4/29. So it looks like you can get one for
~$40. Have fun, folks!

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/PCI/pci.html





From daemon Wed Jan 19 19:14:54 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 19:43:21 -0500
Subject: Anti-vibration platform for EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a Micro-g anti-vibration platform that our JEOL 1200EX TEM was
sitting on until recently. This allowed us to do decent microscopy on a
vibration prone second floor with very good results. We no longer have a
need for this unit. It could be used with a TEM or SEM.

What we would like to do is trade it for a new Mac. We can not buy Macs.
If you need a platform, let's talk trade. I think that this would be a good
deal.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)





From daemon Wed Jan 19 23:19:53 2000



From: Kristen Lennon :      kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 17:29:23 -0800
Subject: Freeze Fracture retirement sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
We have a Balzars 301 Freeze Fracture with quartz thin film monitor, double
replica accessory, and electron guns for both platinum and carbon up for
grabs. New seals on the mechanical pump. Original equipment bought circa
1977. Last used 1998, and was perfectly fine. Free, as is. Recipient will
pay for moving.
Kristen

Kristen A. Lennon
Cell, Molecular & Developmental Biology Group
Department of Botany & Plant Sciences
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521
kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 19 23:30:53 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2000 23:20:22 -0600
Subject: confocal vs deconvolution microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
We're investigating both confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence
combined
with de-convolution software for a multi-user facility. I'm requesting
input from directors and managers of other shared technology laboratories
regarding systems chosen and whether the system has met their expectations.
Please include websites which include FAQs and clarification of terms.
Thanks in advance for your input.
Rosemary Walsh
EM Facility for the Life Sciences
Life Science Consortium & Biotechnology Institute
Penn State University
University Park, PA. 16802
(814) 865-0212





From daemon Thu Jan 20 07:25:21 2000



From: pogany-at-power.szfki.kfki.hu (Pogany Lajos)
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 10:06:12 +0100
Subject: Mattel QX3 driver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear ALL,
there is a lot of good news about the QX3 microscope (toy-)attachment, and I
would like to try it under Windows95 or Windows NT4. Is there any driver for
this systems?
any thanks
Lajos Pogany




From daemon Thu Jan 20 07:25:22 2000



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 10:33:03 +0100
Subject: steel precipitates analysis by EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear fellow microscopists,

I have the task to analyse (by EELS technique) precipitates in steel.
I would greatly appreciate some hints coming from people who are
already familiar with the difficulties connected with:
1. carbon analysis. It is obvius that a carbon film support for the
precipitates extracted from the steel is to be avoided. Has anyone
experince on the use of other kind of supporting film
(silicium monoxide ?, beryllium ?). I have the same problem with
using copper grids, because the precipitates are supposed to
contain copper too. What kind of grids is most appropriate?

2. would it be a better solution to perform precipitate analysis on
thinned steel specimens ? Can it occurr an annoying interference
originating in the material surrounding the precipitate ?

3. last but not least, I would greatly appreciate some bibliographical
hints on that very specific topics.

Thank you in advance.

Corneliu Sarbu
MTM Dept. of KULeuven, Belgium



From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:28 2000



From: Donald Delaney :      delaneyd-at-mcw.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 08:25:58 -0600
Subject: 2 questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello List

I have two questions to ask the List

1) Does anyone have a used TEm ultrathin microtome for sale and if so, how
much?

2) Does anyone know refernces or protocols for both immunogold labelling
and microwave embedding?





From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:28 2000



From: Dan Kremser :      dkremser-at-levee.wustl.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 08:50:19 -0600
Subject: Biological Standards for Microprobe Work

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings:

Recently, an interesting medical school project has appeared at my lab
door. I've been asked to quantify Ca and P in scar tissue found in
sections of hamster hearts. Obtaining appropriate standards is critical.
Are there commercially available biological standards or procedures to
create such standards out there? Any suggestions would be appreciated and
thanks for your time.

Dan



=====================================================
Dan Kremser
Washington University
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences/Campus Box 1169
(Wilson Hall, Room 108-----for packages)
One Brookings Dr.
St. Louis, MOÊ 63130-4899

VOICE: (314) 935-5605Ê FAX: (314) 935-7361
E-MAIL: dkremser-at-levee.wustl.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:36 2000



From: Anita Garg :      Anita.Garg-at-lerc.nasa.gov
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 10:51:15 -0500
Subject: Re: glue for cross-section

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues
What is the best glue for making cross-section samples to study ~ 30
micron reaction layer formed by a coating on a Ni-base superalloy?
The M-bond 610 which used to work great for Si and ceramic samples
does not seem to work here. Though the glue I have is pretty old.
TIA
Anita



From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:38 2000



From: Sobocinski, Gregg :      Gregg.Sobocinski-at-WL.com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 11:32:10 -0500
Subject: Need Recommendations for Digital Image Database/organization Soft

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anyone have any recommendations for organizing digital images and associated
data in electronic form in a GLP environment? I'm going crazy trying to find
something that will be easy to use, will link the image with associated data
information, and will have restriction or audit capabilities to track any
changes to the data that may be made.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Gregg Sobocinski
Parke-Davis Pharmaceuticals
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA
Gregg.Sobocinski-at-wl.com





From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:38 2000



From: John F. Mansfield :      jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 12:00:18 -0500
Subject: Re: Mattel QX3 driver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} What about the Mac? :-)
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




John Mansfield PhD CPhys MInstP
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
417 SRB, University of Michigan
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143
Phone: (734) 936-3352 FAX (734) 763-2282 Cellular Phone: (734) 358-7555
(Leaving a phone message at 936-3352 is preferable to 358-7555)
Email: jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
URL: http://emalwww.engin.umich.edu/people/jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html
Location: Lat. 42¡ 16' 48" Long. 83¡ 43' 48"



From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:45 2000



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 12:54:27 -0500
Subject: MAT: making silicon oxide layers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I need to make some ~100nm thick oxide layers on silicon to align an ion
gun in an auger system. I assume that most people use thermal oxidation to
grow the films.

Does anyone have a recipe for making these films? (time, temperature,
atmosphere) It would be really great if the recipe allowed me to get an
exact thickness too!

Thanks,
Henk

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
A pessimist fears that this is true.




From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:40 2000



From: anderron-at-us.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 13:17:14 -0500
Subject: Re: glue for cross-section

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


According to the data sheet packed with M-Bond 610, the room temp pot life,
after mixing, is six weeks.

We note that it fails quickly, i.e. it works fine one day and doesn't the
next. As we can't abide samples coming unglued, we toss mixed M-Bond 610
after 30 days and mix fresh.

Also, M-Bond 610 works best bonding smooth surfaces. If we have rough
surfaces we use GATAN G-1 (Epo-Tec 353ND).

Ron



Ron Anderson, IBM, Hopewell Jct., New York, USA. anderron-at-us.ibm.com

IBM Analytical Services; http://www.chips.ibm.com/services/asg



Anita Garg {Anita.Garg-at-lerc.nasa.gov} on 01/20/2000 10:51:15 AM

To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:


Dear Colleagues
What is the best glue for making cross-section samples to study ~ 30
micron reaction layer formed by a coating on a Ni-base superalloy?
The M-bond 610 which used to work great for Si and ceramic samples
does not seem to work here. Though the glue I have is pretty old.
TIA
Anita







From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:40 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 08:27:24 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Mattel QX3 driver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} } What about the Mac? :-)

Remember - this thing was developed by Intel!


Aloha,
Tina

It's raining cats and dogs, and it's cold and miserable. Feel better,
now?

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************





From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:42 2000



From: MICHAEL MOHN :      MMOHN-at-mail.monroe.cc.mi.us
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 14:24:07 -0500
Subject: LM-Bausch & Lomb Research II Metallograph

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone have technical manuals or documentation for a B&L Research II Metallograph which I could copy. MCCC just received one as a donation.
Thanks!

Michael Mohn
Assistant Professor of Materials Technology
Monroe County Community College
Phone: 734-384-4122 Fax: 734-242-9711
http://www.monroe.cc.mi.us/mmohn




From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:46 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 17:51:29 -0400
Subject: Re: Mattel QX3 driver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} It's raining cats and dogs, and it's cold and miserable. Feel better,
} now?
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************

But what you call cold and what we call cold are two very different
animals! Its been snowing all day in the Northeast, and the temps haven't
nosed above (or even near) freezing) in days!

Lee

Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175





From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:47 2000



From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 17:08:23 -0500
Subject: Re: steel precipitates analysis by EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I attempted to do this many years ago. I made replicas using aluminium. This
was written up in the proceedings of a conference on microanalysis
("Measurement
of carbon in V(C,N) precipitates extracted from HSLA steels in aluminum
replicas," by A.J. Garratt-Reed, in "Quantitative Microanalysis with High
Spatial Resolution," The Metals Society, London, Book No. 277, 1981, p. 165.)
Then someone else tried to replicate my work (for the moment I can't remember
his name, but he was at Strathclyde University in Glasgow) and could not get
consistent results. He concluded that the aluminum was somehow catalysing the
oxidation of the carbon in the carbides. I expect he published the results,
but I can't now remember where. I have some memory that he used silicon
monoxide to make replicas, but when I tried that, the replicas would break up
because of beam-induced charging. Of course, it would have defeated the point
to have put a carbon coat on the films!

When copper has been an issue, I have often used nickel, which are very
satisfactory. You can also get grids of many other materials, including Ti,
Al, Au, Mo, etc., etc. - check your EM suppies catalogues.

Tony G-R.




At 10:33 AM 01/20/2000 +0100, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6479
**





From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:25:47 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 17:44:19 -0500
Subject: RE: making silicon oxide layers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Henk,
Ta is usually used for measuring sputter rates and you can see where the
beam was put. You electrochemically grow a specific thickness and measure
the sputter rate. If you want to pursue this, I can give you a referral to
a couple of surface scientists who have done this. They are in your neck of
the woods.

Another thing that you might want to try is something that I wrote up a
number of years ago in JVST as a shop note for aligning an ion gun system
where I could not see the beam. Take Double sticky tape and put it on your
sample holder. It works in a UHV system well enough, trust me. Then push
the sample holder into yellow WO3 powder to cover the sticky tape. Where
the beam hits the sample, the WO3 will turn blue. A couple of sample
transfers and you have it.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--


} -----Original Message-----
} From: Hendrik O. Colijn [mailto:colijn.1-at-osu.edu]
} Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2000 12:54 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: MAT: making silicon oxide layers
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi all,
}
} I need to make some ~100nm thick oxide layers on silicon to
} align an ion
} gun in an auger system. I assume that most people use
} thermal oxidation to
} grow the films.
}
} Does anyone have a recipe for making these films? (time,
} temperature,
} atmosphere) It would be really great if the recipe allowed
} me to get an
} exact thickness too!
}
} Thanks,
} Henk
}
} Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
} Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
} (614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
} An optimist believes that we live in the best of all possible worlds.
} A pessimist fears that this is true.
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 20 19:45:45 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 18:40:25 -0500
Subject: RE: steel precipitates analysis by EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I read Tony's answer to your question and I can't add anything to that.
However, I just have a minor point. If you are using EELS, why are you
worried about the grids? The grids would not show up in the EELS spectrum.
Of course it would interfere if you are using EDS.

You can get your grids in almost any material you want nowadays. Ni, Mo,
Be, Al, Cu, C, etc. Just pick one that doesn't interfere with your EDS
spectrum.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Corneliu Sarbu [mailto:Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
} Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2000 4:33 AM
} To: microscopy-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: steel precipitates analysis by EELS
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Dear fellow microscopists,
}
} I have the task to analyse (by EELS technique) precipitates in steel.
} I would greatly appreciate some hints coming from people who are
} already familiar with the difficulties connected with:
} 1. carbon analysis. It is obvius that a carbon film support for the
} precipitates extracted from the steel is to be avoided. Has anyone
} experince on the use of other kind of supporting film
} (silicium monoxide ?, beryllium ?). I have the same problem with
} using copper grids, because the precipitates are supposed to
} contain copper too. What kind of grids is most appropriate?
}
} 2. would it be a better solution to perform precipitate analysis on
} thinned steel specimens ? Can it occurr an annoying interference
} originating in the material surrounding the precipitate ?
}
} 3. last but not least, I would greatly appreciate some bibliographical
} hints on that very specific topics.
}
} Thank you in advance.
}
} Corneliu Sarbu
} MTM Dept. of KULeuven, Belgium
}



From daemon Thu Jan 20 18:41:07 2000



From: Gaener Rodger :      grodger-at-molbiol.ox.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 18:32:55 -0600
Subject: information about current TEM and Confocal technologies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear users,

I am celating information about current TEM and Confocal technologies with
the intention of setting up both a confocal suite and an EM suite at a new
facility. However, I am new to this field and would like some advice on
the pros. and cons. of different systems based on other user experiences,
to give me an idea of what I should be looking out for. Specifically, the
confocal suite would allow the study of both live (EGFP) and fixed
samples. Thus, the type of confocal needed should have good resolution
for both live and fixed samples as well as good phase contrast.
Importantly, this will probably be a multi-user facility, which needs
reliable lasers that do not need to be realigned often. It would also be
important to have good quality microscope, filters and objectives as well
as extras such as a heated stage, video and CCD cameras, appropriate
computer workstations and software. Any advice that you could offer on
such equipment would be very much appreciated.

Thanking you in advance,


Dr Gaener Rodger.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr Gaener Rodger
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology
University of Oxford
South Parks Road
Oxford
UK.





From daemon Thu Jan 20 19:15:46 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 19:08:26 -0600
Subject: Microscopy Society of America - Council Election Results

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues

The results of the recent election of officers to the Society are now official
The current list of elected officers is below.



The new officers elected this year are:

President-Elect
RON ANDERSON

Secretary
JANET H. WOODWARD (2000-2002)

Director, Physical Sciences
THOMAS F. KELLY (2000-2002)

Director, Biological Sciences
SARA E. MILLER (2000-2002)

-------------------------------------------
The complete list of officers is given below
and on the MSA WWW site
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MSADocs/MSAOfficers.html
--------------------------------------------



MSA COUNCIL 2000

President
KEN DOWNING
326 Donner Lab
Lawrence Berkeley Lab
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 486-5941; Fax (510) 486-6488
Email: khdowning-at-lbl.gov

President-Elect
RON ANDERSON
IBM Analytical Services
IBM Zip-41E
Hopewell Junction, NY 12533
(914) 892-2225; Fax (914) 892-2555
E-mail: ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com

Past-President
DAVID JOY
Rm.232 Science and Engineering Research Facility
Univ. of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996-0810
(865) 974-3642, Fax (865) 974-9449
and
Rm. S189, High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064
(865) 574-6799
E-mail: djoy-at- utk.edu

Secretary
JANET H. WOODWARD (2000-2002)
Buckman Laboratories, Inc.
1256 N. McLean Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38108-1241
(901) 272-6408; Fax (901) 272-6451
E-mail: jhwoodward-at-buckman.com

Treasurer
KATHI ALEXANDER (1999-2001)
Los Alamos National Lab
MST-8 G755 P. O. Box 1663
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 665-4750, Fax (505) 667-8021
Email: kbalexander-at-lanl.gov

Directors, Physical Sciences

J. MURRAY GIBSON (1998-2000)
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division
Argonne, Ill 60439 {p}
Email:gibson-at-anl.gov

THOMAS F. KELLY (2000-2002)
2021 Chamberlain Ave.
Madison, WI 53705-4076
(608) 263-1073; Fax (608) 262-8353
E-mail: tfkelly-at-engr.wisc.edu

MIKE KERSKER (1999-2001)
JEOL USA
11 Dearborn Rd
Peabody MA 01960
(508) 535-5900 Fax (508) 536-2205
E-mail: kersker-at-jeol.com

Directors, Biological Sciences
SARA E. MILLER (2000-2002)
Duke Medical Center, Pathology
Box 3712
Durham, NC 27710
(919) 684-3452; Fax (919) 684-8735
E-mail: saram-at-acpub.duke.edu

AVRIL SOMLYO (1998-2000)
Dept. of Molecular Physiol. & Bio. Phys.
Box 10011, Health Sciences Center
Univ. of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22906-0011
(804) 982-0825; Fax (804) 982-1616
E-mail: avs5u-at-virginia.edu

JOHN BOZZOLA (1999-2001)
EM Ctr - Mailcode 4402
Southern Illinois Univ
Carbondale IL 62901
(618) 453-3730, Fax (618) 453-2665
E-mail: bozzola-at-siu.edu

Director, Local Affiliated Societies
EV OSTEN (2000-2002)
3M Company
3M Center, Bldg. 201-BE-16
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(651) 736-0104; Fax (651) 733-0648
E-mail: efosten-at-mmm.com


==============================================
Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp






From daemon Fri Jan 21 07:34:51 2000



From: Debbie Nieuwenhuis :      watersci-at-sauk.com
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 2000 20:01:02 -0600
Subject: reticle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I was wondering if anyone could tell me how to properly install a reticle in
an Olympus microscope eyepiece. The eyepiece housing does not seem to come
apart, although there are two tiny round holes on either site of the lens.
Is there a special tool needed?

Thanks!

Deb




From daemon Fri Jan 21 10:20:51 2000



From: Anthony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 10:55:08 -0500
Subject: RE: steel precipitates analysis by EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have to admit that until I read Scott's posting, I had missed the point
about the elemental interference from the grid not being a problem with
EELS analysis.

However, in the case of copper, there is another effect to worry about when
making replicas, if the process involves any sort of flotation on, or
picking the sample up from, water. Because of its electronegativity,
copper can dissolve in the water and then ion-exchange with other elements
from the sample, replacing them. Then you really do have copper in the
sample. The problem isn't particularly severe with extraction replicas
from steels (but then, I have never used extraction replicas from steels to
try to analyze for small amounts of copper in the precipitates), but has
been terrible, for example, when looking at iron sulphides, which actually
had a visible shell of copper sulphide (but I was also fishing those
samples out of brine, not distilled water!). The problem doesn't seem to
occur with nickel grids, which I use in preference to copper for this type
of application, just to be on the safe side.

BTW, I'm glad you got my posting, Scott - I haven't seen it come back to
myself yet. I guess the poor mail redirector gets indigestion with the
volume it has to deal with!

Tony.



** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6479
**





From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:19:15 2000



From: Robert Derby :      rjderby-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 08:22:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Me

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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************************************************
Robert J. Derby
New Mexico Institute of Technology
Socorro, N.M.
Phone - 505-835-5866
E-mail - rjderby-at-excite.com
************************************************
I have heard through the grapevine that Tamara Howard from Cold Spring
Harbor is looking for me.
I was told it was posted here but I never got it.
Tamara call me at 505-835-5866(Iam 2 hours behind you)
Robert





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com




From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:19:15 2000



From: Neal Leddy :      nleddy-at-tcd.ie
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 16:27:58 -0000
Subject: Polymerising Epoxy Resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Group,

Just a quick question, I was wondering if anyone had ever tried using a
microwave oven to harden their resin??? And if so what sort of results were
achieved.
Another question I have is how to remove / dissolve hardened resin from an
aluminium surface???

I would appreciate any suggestions or advice.
Thank you

Neal Leddy




From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:19:16 2000



From: Ford M. Royer :      froyer-at-bitstream.net
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 10:32:09 -0600
Subject: TEM Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anyone interested in the following TEMs FOR SALE?

Phillips 201C
Complete system, fully operational, taken out of service in December.

JEOL model JEM-100B. - Parts Unit Only

--
Ford M. Royer, MT(ASCP)
Analytical Instruments, Ltd
(Refurbished Histology, Cytology, & General Lab Equipment)
9921 13th Ave. N.
Minneapolis, MN 55441-5004
800-565-1895 phone
612-929-1895 fax
web site: http://www.aibltd.com





From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:19:16 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 17:19:40 +0000
Subject: glutaraldehyde safety - summary (M)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all

Many thanks to all who responded on and off-line to my request for
information. I hope I acknowledged each one individually.

My quest was to find the real reason for lowering the exposure limit.
I won't summarise the replies but: (1) pulmonologists at one hospital
are thinking that long term, low level exposure to formaldehyde and
glutaraldehyde may cause idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, (2) I was told
of a serious skin burn caused by a splash.

I have now heard from the UK Health & Safety Commission's Advisory
Committee on the Toxicity of Substances (ACTS). I have copy from: HSE
Review 1997, published 1999, section C58 (consisting of 4 pages).
Quotes from this are below.

The official reason for lowering the exposure limit is that it has
not been possible to set a no-observed adverse effect level for
glutaraldehyde with regard to the induction of asthma.

Carcinogenicity is not supported by the available good-quality
evidence to date.
________________________________________

Glutaraldehyde must be labelled under the Chemicals (Hazard
Information and Packaging for supply) Regulations 1994 (CHIP) as
Toxic, Corrosive, Sensitising and Dangerous for the Environment.

Several thousand tonnes are imported into the UK each year. It is
primarily used as a biocide and disinfectant in the health care,
off-shore, paper-making and agricultural sectors.

.. it is estimated that a considerable number of (health care)
workers are intermittently exposed, given the widespread use in that
sector. Similarly, ....... for several hundred workers in the
manufacture of glutaraldehyde solutions.

..... available exposure data relates mainly to use in the health
care sector....... suggests that under normal operational conditions
short term exposures are generally less than 0.2 ppm. This can be
exceeded during the cleaning of endoscopes ...... or the wiping of
surfaces.

HEALTH EFFECTS - ANIMAL STUDIES.
Glutaraldehyde is acutely toxic to rats by inhalation, oral and
dermal routes. The principal effects are due to its irritant
properties.

Glutaraldehyde is clearly a skin sensitiser in rabbits, guinea pigs,
rats and mice.

Glutaraldehyde is clearly mutagenic in vitro, in bacterial and
mammalian cells. ............. No firm conclusions can be drawn from
the available evidence on chromosomal aberrations, but glutaraldehyde
clearly causes sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and unscheduled DNA
synthesis (UDS) in mammalian cells.

......... However, the clearly negative results of recent,
good-quality bone marrow cytogenetics and peripheral blood
micronucleus tests, together with those of the liver UDS assay,
provide reassurance that the genotoxic effects shown in vitro are
unlikely to be expressed in vivo.

No reports of carcinogenicity studies of glutaraldehyde by the
inhalation or dermal routes of administration are currently available.
A recent oral study provided no convincing evidence ... in rats .....
drinking water for up to two years.

No significant effects on reproduction were reported in a modern two
generation study ........... There were no indications of significant
gonadal effects in 13 weeks inhalation studies carried out in rats or
mice, or in a lethal assay in mice.

HUMAN DATA
Glutaraldehyde is irritant to to human skin at concentrations of
2-10%, but not 0.5%. Higher concentrations have not been
investigated.

There is substantial evidence that glutaraldehyde is a skin
sensitiser in humans. Concentrations as low as 0.13% have induced
allergic contact dermatitis. The majority of cases have been reported
in health or funeral workers.

A fair body of evidence ............. indicates that glutaraldehyde
has the potential to cause occupational asthma.

.......... several workplace studies with exposure data in which no
cases of asthma have been found among contemporary workers. .....
However, superimposed on these data are other reports of sensory
irritation and / or asthma in endoscopy nurses where the reported
levels of exposure overlap with those in the above studies.
.................. From the data available, it has not been possible
to determine a NOAEL (no-observed adverse effect level) for the
induction of asthma.

No information is available in genotoxicity in humans.

The only available mortality study is of limited value, but does not
provide any evidence that glutaraldehyde caused cancer or increased
mortality in glutaraldehyde production workers.

On the basis of the very limited information available, it does not
appear that glutaraldehyde causes reproductive toxicity in humans.

REFERENCE: Glutaraldehyde: Criteria document for an occupational
exposure limit EH/65/32. HSE Books ISBN 0 7176 1443 3.
_________________________________________________

Dr. Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
The Laboratory
Citadel Hill
Plymouth
Devon PL1 2PB
England

Tel. ++44 (0)1752 633249
Tel. ++44 (0)1752 633279
The 279 number has an answering machine

Fax ++44 (0)1752 633102

e-mail: kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk

PS - Daniele, you're still here! Keep smiling!! That was a nice
evening in Strasbourg. Do you know which Gewurztraminer we all had as
an aperatif? Now the world will wonder?!




From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:19:21 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 14:18:24 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Images to PowerPoint

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


************************************************
Robert J. Derby
New Mexico Institute of Technology
Socorro, N.M.
Phone - 505-835-5866
E-mail - rjderby-at-excite.com
************************************************
Does anyone or any company know of a ccd that will capture single photon at
the 852-872 wavelength?
This is needed for a special project.
Any help would be of great help
Thanks,

Robert





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com



1256 N. McLean Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38108-1241
(901) 272-6408; Fax (901) 272-6451
E-mail: jhwoodward-at-buckman.com

Treasurer
KATHI ALEXANDER (1999-2001)
Los Alamos National Lab
MST-8 G755 P. O. Box 1663
Los Alamos, NM 87545
(505) 665-4750, Fax (505) 667-8021
Email: kbalexander-at-lanl.gov

Directors, Physical Sciences

J. MURRAY GIBSON (1998-2000)
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division
Argonne, Ill 60439 {p}
Email:gibson-at-anl.gov

THOMAS F. KELLY (2000-2002)
2021 Chamberlain Ave.
Madison, WI 53705-4076
(608) 263-1073; Fax (608) 262-8353
E-mail: tfkelly-at-engr.wisc.edu

MIKE KERSKER (1999-2001)
JEOL USA
11 Dearborn Rd
Peabody MA 01960
(508) 535-5900 Fax (508) 536-2205
E-mail: kersker-at-jeol.com

Directors, Biological Sciences
SARA E. MILLER (2000-2002)
Duke Medical Center, Pathology
Box 3712
Durham, NC 27710
(919) 684-3452; Fax (919) 684-8735
E-mail: saram-at-acpub.duke.edu

AVRIL SOMLYO (1998-2000)
Dept. of Molecular Physiol. & Bio. Phys.
Box 10011, Health Sciences Center
Univ. of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22906-0011
(804) 982-0825; Fax (804) 982-1616
E-mail: avs5u-at-virginia.edu

JOHN BOZZOLA (1999-2001)
EM Ctr - Mailcode 4402
Southern Illinois Univ
Carbondale IL 62901
(618) 453-3730, Fax (618) 453-2665
E-mail: bozzola-at-siu.edu

Director, Local Affiliated Societies
EV OSTEN (2000-2002)
3M Company
3M Center, Bldg. 201-BE-16
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(651) 736-0104; Fax (651) 733-0648
E-mail: efosten-at-mmm.com


==============================================
Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp





--CAB19553.948442177/styx.services.ou.edu--


} From MAILER-DAEMON Fri Jan 21 02:09 CST 2000
Received: from localhost (localhost) by Sparc5.Microscopy.Com (8.6.11/8.6.11) with internal id CAA00349; Fri, 21 Jan 2000 02:09:34 -0600


Hello, all-

I'm hoping to hear from those of you who have worked out the optimum size
and resolution to make images in e.g., Photoshop that are destined for
PowerPoint to be made into transparencies. An image that is 4 x 5 inches
and 400-600 dpi seems to be overkill for a 35mm slide.

Your opinions?

Mahalo,
Tina
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Fri Jan 21 18:49:25 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2000 18:35:08 -0600
Subject: Inconel 718 Polish

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Nick:

I found the following recipe from Bernie Kestel. He states that this is
used for surface polishing using the beaker method. Although he did not
use it for "jet polishing", it may be a good starting point.

Inconel 718 (annealed)
10% HClO4
90% Ethanol
Temperature = -60C
Current: 275mA
Volts: as required

There is some more information about stir rate, sample orientation etc.
that is only relevant for the beaker method. If you'd like to try this
approach, I would be happy to send you the entire reference.

I hope this helps.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 10:14:39 AM on 01/21/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by Schryvers Dominique
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I'm looking for a good electropolishing solution + conditions for
as-received and annealed Inconel 718 for use with a Tenupol 3 system to
produce well thinned matrix + precipitates for TEM work. Any suggestions?

Nick Schryvers






From daemon Sat Jan 22 11:28:25 2000



From: Larry Stoter :      LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2000 09:55:54 -0600
Subject: Re: steel precipitates analysis by EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

A minor observation ...........

While the issue of overlaps is generally not a problem with EELS (as
opposed to EDS), if can arise with steel precipates. The vanadium L
and Oxygen K edges are really quite close, so if you have vanadium
precipatates, a silicon oxide support film will cause problems for
quantitation.

regards,
--
Larry Stoter
17, Rocks Park Road, Uckfield, E. Sussex, TN22 2AT, UK
email: LPS-at-teknesis.demon.co.uk, Home Phone/Fax: +44 (0)1825 767967





From daemon Sat Jan 22 11:28:25 2000



From: COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 22 Jan 2000 12:19:05 EST
Subject: Re: Martian summer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yikes! Great! set the microscope near the window and get those snow flake
pictures! It has been close to 80 degrees a few days this week here in
Arizona!
I have a great batch of infusion brewing on the back patio.

Got the happage win TV card to add to the computer....Have the c-mount ccd
camera I found for $100.... now... I should be able to share pictures soon!

Ed Sharpe
archivist for SMECC

{ { Subj: Martian summer
Date: 1/22/00 7:50:37 AM Pacific Standard Time
From: tivol-at-wadsworth.org (William Tivol)
Sender: tivol-at-wadsworth.org
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Dear Listers,
I thought I'd beat Tina to the weather report. Here in
Albany, NY (where cryo-microscopy means working with the
windows open) we are having Martian summer--yesterday's
high was -15 C.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
} }



From daemon Sun Jan 23 16:27:39 2000



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 01:16:18 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Server Replaced this weekend

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues

The main Microscopy Server was replaced this weekend (read
that as many blurry eyed hours in front of a monitor, and lots
of cursing at new formats of configuration files for DNS and SENDMAIL).

The old beast was growing increasing unreliable with hardware
crashes nearly daily. I believe that most of the services have been
restored however until all databases are reconfigured and tested there
will be some glitches. Please be patient.

I think I have been able to capture the few messages that were sent
over the weekend. If those of you that posted items over the weekend
don't see things in the next day please repost them.

Cheers...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp




From daemon Mon Jan 24 07:52:03 2000



From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 01:26:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Images to PowerPoint

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Tina,
Our medical photography dept. requests that files submitted for
slides are at least 1 Mb and no more than 3 Mb in size. Less than this
doesn't have enough pixels to adequately fill the image (similar to a thin
negative), and more is unneeded. I create the slide figure, set to 300 dpi
and adjust dimensions to put the file size into that range.

Regards,
Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu

On Fri, 21 Jan 2000, Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello, all-
}
} I'm hoping to hear from those of you who have worked out the optimum size
} and resolution to make images in e.g., Photoshop that are destined for
} PowerPoint to be made into transparencies. An image that is 4 x 5 inches
} and 400-600 dpi seems to be overkill for a 35mm slide.
}
} Your opinions?
}
} Mahalo,
} Tina
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}
}
}




From daemon Mon Jan 24 07:52:03 2000



From: Pnina Ari-Gur :      arigurp-at-wmich.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 01:26:54 -0600
Subject: Faculty Position Materials Science

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Position: Full/Associate/Assistant Professor of Materials Science and
Engineering. This is a full time, tenure track teaching and research
position beginning Fall 2000.

Rank and Salary: Rank will depend upon background and experience; salary
competitive.

Responsibilities: Teach undergraduate and graduate courses in materials
science and engineering, advise undergraduate and graduate students,
seek and conduct funded research, supervise theses and projects, and
serve on university, college and department committees.

Academic
Qualifications: Earned Ph.D. in materials science and/or engineering or
a closely related field is required. Demonstrated experience in research
and grant seeking is highly desired. Prior teaching experience a plus.

Experience
Qualifications: Demonstrated experience in research and grant seeking is
highly desired. Prior teaching experience a plus.

Department: The Department of Construction Engineering, Materials
Engineering and Industrial Design at Western Michigan University
currently offers two undergraduate BSE -- Materials Engineering and
Construction Engineering and Management, and BS in Industrial Design.
The Department also offers two Master of Science programs - Materials
Science and Engineering and Construction Management.

University: Western Michigan University, with a student body of
approximately 28,000 is located in southwest Michigan. Kalamazoo is
halfway between Chicago and Detroit and 45 miles south of Grand Rapids.
The population of the greater Kalamazoo area is approximately 200,000.
Its industry is highly diversified and it is the center of many cultural
and sporting events.

Applications: Review of applications will begin on January 10, 2000, and
will continue until the position is filled. Please send the following
credentials: Letter of Application addressing qualifications, Vitae,
Transcripts from all institutions, and the names/addresses,
telephone/fax numbers of three references

Contact: Please send credentials to:

Dr. Roman Rabiej, Chair
Western Michigan University
Department of Construction, Materials, & Industrial Design
2007 Kohrman Hall
Kalamazoo, MI 49008

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
Western Michigan University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. In
addition, it has embarked upon a vigorous affirmative action program and
encourages the applications of women and members of minority groups.
==============================
Pnina Ari-Gur, D.Sc., Professor of
Materials Science and Engineering
Western Michigan University
Kalamazoo, MI 49008
(616) 387-3372 FAX: (616) 387-6517
email: pnina.ari-gur-at-wmich.edu
http://www.wmich.edu/cmd/arigur.htm
==============================




From daemon Mon Jan 24 07:52:02 2000



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 01:26:57 -0600
Subject: PCD for JEOL 840 wanted

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Happy New Year

Does anyone have a Probe Current Detector accessory for a JEOL 840
surplus to requirements and available for purchase?
I think its designation is PCD40, it's the pneumatically-operated
thing which mounts on the column opposite to the objective aperture
holder, and shoots a Faraday cup across into the beam.

thanks

Ritchie Sims


Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand




From daemon Sun Jan 23 16:27:44 2000



From: de Lillo Enrico :      delillo-at-agr.uniba.it
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 14:41:14 +0100
Subject: Re: EURAAC meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dr. Fashing,
it is a pleasure receiving news from you. I have to apologize for the
trouble you have reported in your letter and I hope to help you.

First of all, the website is going to be updated because of the second
circular is ready to be sent.

The second point is that you have enough time to submit your paper or
poster. The deadline for submission has been established on 30 April 2000.
I hope you answered to the first circular (my database has not been
recently updated - Migliorini is working on this and he has the complete
and updated archive), so in this case you will receive the second circular
directly on your computer. Otherwise I suggest you to fill the application
on the web site.

Let me know if I could help you more. I will be glad to do that.

My best wishes and see you in Siena


Enrico


} Dear Dr. De Lillo,
}
} I am interested in attending the EURACC symposium in Siena this July,
} and would greatly appreciate receiving information concerning that
} meeting. I keep checking the meeting homepage on the web site
} (http://www.unisi.it/ricerca/dip/bio_evol/sitoeuraac/siena2000.html),
} but very little information is given. I also contacted the e-mail
} address (euraac2000-at-unisi.it) a few months back and have not yet
} received a reply. I wrote to Dr. Leo P. S. van der Geest, the EURAAC
} Secretary, yesterday and he gave me your e-mail address and thought
} perhaps you could help.
}
} I would like to present a paper at the meeting (probably a poster)
} and need to know when titles and abstracts are due and to whom they
} should be sent. Also the format that should be used for submitting
} the paper.
}
} Many thanks for your help; it is greatly appreciated. I look forward
} to hearing from you.
}
} Sincerely,
}
} Norm
}
} Norm Fashing
} Professor of Biology
} Department of Biology
} College of William and Mary
} P.O. Box 8795
} Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
} 757 221-2221 (Office)
} 757 221-6483 (FAX)
} njfash-at-facstaff.wm.edu
} http://www.wm.edu/biology/Fashing.html


dr Enrico de Lillo
Istituto di Entomologia agraria - Universitˆ Bari - Italy
via Amendola, 165/A - 70126 Bari - Italy
tel. +39 080 5443105
fax +39 080 5442876
email: delillo-at-agr.uniba.it
http://193.204.185.103/de_lillo.htm




From daemon Mon Jan 24 08:04:35 2000



From: Marti, Jordi :      jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 06:46:26 -0700
Subject: Reichert Ultracut E with cryo FC 4D

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The power supply in our cryo microtome is having problems which might be
related to the transformer. I was told by the service engineer that the
transformer is no longer supported by Reichert. Does any one know where I
can get a replacement ?

Thanks

Jordi Marti



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:21 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 11:04:49 -0400
Subject: Re: Administrivia: Server Replaced this weekend

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Nestor,
Thanks for taking such good care of us.
Lee

Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175




From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:23 2000



From: Sobocinski, Gregg :      Gregg.Sobocinski-at-WL.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 10:05:22 -0500
Subject: Ignore This Message (Testing)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a test to see if my messages are being posted to the listserver.




From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:24 2000



From: Sobocinski, Gregg :      Gregg.Sobocinski-at-WL.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 10:35:13 -0500
Subject: Need Recommendations for Digital Image Database/organization Soft

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anyone have any recommendations for organizing digital images and associated
data in electronic form in a GLP environment? I'm going crazy trying to find
something that will be easy to use, will link the image with associated data
information, and will have restriction or audit capabilities to track any
changes to the data that may be made.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Gregg Sobocinski
Parke-Davis Pharmaceuticals
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA
Gregg.Sobocinski-at-wl.com



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:24 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 10:41:36 -0500
Subject: RE: Inconel 718 polish

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Contact Robin Griffin at UAB. I bought that unit there and we worked on 718
and developed the polishing conditions for it. I believe that we used the
butyl cellusolve(SP?)/perchloric acid solution at low temp to do it. She
should have the recipe or know who to contact. Her Email address is
rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu or you might get a hold of Ray Thompson whose student
did the work. As I recall, the as-cast material was very difficult to do
and had very narrow conditions. The annealed samples were a little easier.
To save time, we had the samples initially cut out of the bulk samples using
an EDM machine.

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Schryvers Dominique [mailto:schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be]
} Sent: Friday, January 21, 2000 2:53 AM
} To: Microscopy MAIL
} Subject: Inconel 718 polish
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} I'm looking for a good electropolishing solution + conditions for
} as-received and annealed Inconel 718 for use with a Tenupol 3
} system to
} produce well thinned matrix + precipitates for TEM work. Any
} suggestions?
}
} Nick Schryvers
}
}
} *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
} *=* *=*
} *=* Dr. D. Schryvers *=*
} *=* Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT) *=*
} *=* University of Antwerp, RUCA *=*
} *=* Groenenborgerlaan 171 *=*
} *=* B-2020 ANTWERP *=*
} *=* Belgium *=*
} *=* tel: 32-3-2180247 *=*
} *=* fax: 32-3-2180257 *=*
} *=* e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be *=*
} *=* homepage: http://www.ruca.ua.ac.be/EMAT *=*
} *=* *=*
} *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
}
}



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:25 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 09:45:39 -0600
Subject: Re: Images to PowerPoint

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The short answer to you question would be an image of about 1024 pixels
across should be adequate for a slide used for a presentation. The slide
will appear to most people as a 8x10"-print held at arm's length, or as a
computer screen at 4 to 6 feet. If you cannot make out the pixels in those
images, then you probably have enough pixels in your image for PowerPoint.

I think I start seeing the pixels when the resolution drops to 800 or 640
pixels across. I might see a benefit in raising the pixels to 1280 across,
but I am not able to see improvement beyond that point. This would give you
an image of about 1 million pixels.

Now if you are shooting your slide with a 35-mm camera, it might be good to
use 24-bit color on the image if your output device (e.g., printer) can
well render it. However, since the slide is only for a presentation, you
can probably get by with much less color depth if file size per slide is an
issue. I venture to say that 8-bit color at 1024 pixels across is plenty
adequate for most presentations.

Remember, the above considerations are only for images for slide
presentations. If the slides are meant to archive the images for other
purposes, then you probably want every bit of resolution and color depth
that your technology allows and justifies.

Warren

At 02:18 PM 1/21/2000 -1000, you wrote:
} Hello, all-
}
} I'm hoping to hear from those of you who have worked out the optimum size
} and resolution to make images in e.g., Photoshop that are destined for
} PowerPoint to be made into transparencies. An image that is 4 x 5 inches
} and 400-600 dpi seems to be overkill for a 35mm slide.
}
} Your opinions?
}
} Mahalo,
} Tina



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:34 2000



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 14:24:57 -0400
Subject: just a test

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just checking to see if I'm still "wired to the world".....


F.C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada B2Y 4A2



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:34 2000



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 13:33:28 -0500
Subject: Bio Cryo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Periodically questions appear on this list concerning the use of cryostats
for cutting histological sections. I usually reply to the sender off line
and offer a copy of a handout that I got from a workshop at a Histochem
Meeting some years ago. Even though it is old, cryostat sectioning has not
changed a lot. I think there is some valuable info there, especially for
beginners. I thought it might be helpful to make this available on the net
for whomsoever might want to take a look.
It can be found at :
http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/

Look for the snowflake

It was written by Bruce Quinn, then of MIT. I hope he has no objections
to my posting it.

Greg Erdos
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611





From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:34 2000



From: David H. Hall :      hall-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 13:51:22 -0500
Subject: EM technician position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TECHNICAL POSITION AVAILABLE

A full time position is available immediately for a highly motivated
individual to work in the Center for C. elegans Anatomy at the Albert
Einstein College of Medicine, located in the Bronx, New York. The
candidate should have a Bachelor's degree in Biology or some related
science, and some previous laboratory experience. We are particularly
looking for an individual with training in transmission electron microscopy
and thin section microtomy. Experience with immunocytochemistry and/or
computerized image analysis is helpful but not required.

The College offers a generous compensation package including 4 weeks
vacation and tuition reimbursement. Qualified candidates should submit a
resume and a list of references to:

Dr. David Hall
Department of Neuroscience
Albert Eistein College of Medicine
1410 Pelham Parkway
Bronx, NY 10461

email: hall-at-aecom.yu.edu
FAX: 718 430-8821
phone: 718 430-2195



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:36 2000



From: Cieslinski, Robert (RC) :      RCCIESLINSKI-at-dow.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 13:33:07 -0600
Subject: uProbe - Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Position Available:

Electron Microprobe Analyst

Company: The Dow Chemical Company

Location: Midland, Michigan

Qualifications (education, certification, language, etc.) and Experience
required:
A candidate with a BS or MS or PHD degree in physical science is preferred.
Prior experience in electron probe microanalysis is essential.


Job Overview:
The Surface/Microscopy/X-ray (SMX) Group in Dow's Corporate R&D Analytical
Science Laboratory has one professional level full time opening for an
electron microprobe analyst. The candidate should have theoretical and
practical experience in electron beam techniques, including quantitative
x-ray microanalysis, digital imaging, digital x-ray imaging, electron
beam/solid interactions, scanning electron microscopy and material science.
Good computer skills are very desirable. Good written and oral
communication skills and the ability to work both independently and in a
team environment are extremely important.


Key responsibilities will include:
1. Extensive problem solving on a wide variety of Dow materials and
processes
2. Operation and routine maintenance of a CAMECA SX-50 electron microprobe.
3. Some sample preparation including microtomy and metallography
4. Operation of light microscopes.
5. Operation of scanning and transmission microscopes as needed.
6. Interpretation of images.
7. Documentation of work.
8. Compliance with safety and quality systems


Interested:
Please e-mail or send your resume and cover letter, with reference to this
ad to:
Email: R&D-at-Dow.com or The Dow Chemical Company, Workforce Planning, P. O.
Box 150, Plaquemine, Louisiana 70765-0150. E-mail respondents must list Job
006145 and their last name as the first and second items on the Subject
line. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Only U.S.
citizens or aliens who are authorized to work in the United States will be
considered for employment.

We are an equal opportunity employer and offer a competitive compensation
and benefits package including 401k, stock purchase, tuition reimbursement
and performance incentives. The Dow Chemical Company is the fifth largest
chemical company in the world with annual sales of US$20billion. Dow
manufactures and supplies chemicals, plastics and agricultural products for
customers in 164 countries and employs approx. 43,000 people worldwide. For
more news and information about Dow, please visit our web site at
www.dow.com.






Robert C. Cieslinski
The Dow Chemical Company
Microscopy & Microanalysis
(517) 636-6875
email: rccieslinski-at-dow.com



From daemon Mon Jan 24 15:07:39 2000



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 13:08:38 -0700
Subject: Need Recommendations for Digital Image Database/organization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We successfully import our digital images into a PDF file using Adobe
Acrobat.

Harry Ekstrom

-----Original Message-----
} From: Sobocinski, Gregg [mailto:Gregg.Sobocinski-at-WL.com]
Sent: Monday, January 24, 2000 8:35 AM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Anyone have any recommendations for organizing digital images and associated
data in electronic form in a GLP environment? I'm going crazy trying to find
something that will be easy to use, will link the image with associated data
information, and will have restriction or audit capabilities to track any
changes to the data that may be made.

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Gregg Sobocinski
Parke-Davis Pharmaceuticals
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA
Gregg.Sobocinski-at-wl.com



From daemon Mon Jan 24 21:02:20 2000



From: Robert Derby :      rjderby-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 20:46:41 -0600
Subject: CCD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone or any Company know of a CCD that will do single photon
detection at 852 wavelength?
This is for a very specialized app.
Thanks in advance




************************************************
Robert J. Derby
New Mexico Institute of Technology
Socorro, N.M.
Phone - 505-835-5866
E-mail - rjderby-at-excite.com
************************************************





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com




From daemon Tue Jan 25 07:33:19 2000



From: Michael Reiner :      michael.reiner-at-Smail.Uni-Koeln.de
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 07:52:03 +0100
Subject: EM: Shelf life of LR-Gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear members of the list,

first, I would like to wish you all the best for the new year.
Now my question:
Does anyone know the shelf-life/usability of LR-Gold stored in a fridge?

Is it that delicate as LR-White (Meanwhile I don«t use LR-W older than
half a year). My bottle which was not opened many times, could be
roundabout three years old.

Thanks a lot,
Michael

Michael Reiner
Department of Anatomy I
University of Cologne
Germany
michael.reiner-at-smail.uni-koeln.de



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:12 2000



From: Schryvers Dominique :      schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 00 15:50:33 +0100
Subject: glass: TEM sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear all,

we're starting a project of HRTEM on small (nanoscale) colouring metal
particles in glass. Does anyone have experience with sample preparation
for this type of material. We prefer ion-milling as this retains the
relative positions of the particles with respect to the surface. Any
suggestions, also on literature, are welcome.

Many thanks in advance,

Nick Schryvers




*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
*=* *=*
*=* Dr. D. Schryvers *=*
*=* Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT) *=*
*=* University of Antwerp, RUCA *=*
*=* Groenenborgerlaan 171 *=*
*=* B-2020 ANTWERP *=*
*=* Belgium *=*
*=* tel: 32-3-2180247 *=*
*=* fax: 32-3-2180257 *=*
*=* e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be *=*
*=* homepage: http://www.ruca.ua.ac.be/EMAT *=*
*=* *=*
*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:12 2000



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 09:50:51 -0500
Subject: Re: cryo bio

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) id IAA06203
for dist-Microscopy; Tue, 25 Jan 2000 08:53:13 -0600 (CST)
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by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with SMTP id IAA06200
for "MicroscopyFilteredEmail-at-msa.microscopy.com"; Tue, 25 Jan 2000 08:52:42 -0600 (CST)
Received: from snarl.biotech.ufl.edu (snarl.biotech.ufl.edu [128.227.60.109])
by ultra5.microscopy.com (8.9.1b+Sun/8.9.1) with ESMTP id IAA06193
for {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ; Tue, 25 Jan 2000 08:52:31 -0600 (CST)
Received: from empc1 by snarl.biotech.ufl.edu (8.8.5/4.09)
id JAA02445; Tue, 25 Jan 2000 09:47:10 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: {4.2.0.58.20000125094650.00a545f0-at-biotech}
X-Sender: gwe-at-biotech
X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Pro Version 4.2.0.58


Some people have trouble and some do not. It is an Acrobat . After you
get the blank screen, try hitting the reload button on your browser
menu. This has worked for some people. I need to consult a web expert to
see why my PDF files cause trouble.

Nestor, are you out there?????

If you still have trouble, let me know and I will put it into an HTML file.
My apologies to anyone having trouble.

Greg Erdos


At 09:39 AM 01/25/2000 -0500, you wrote:
} Dear Greg;
} I was most interested to look at your tips etc. for cryo sectioning,
} but when I clicked on the snowflake, all I ended up with was a blank
} screen. Any idea what I did wrong (or is my computer system to blame?)
}
} thanks in advance
} shea
}
}
}
} Dr. S. Shea Miller
} Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
} Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre
} 2068 K.W. Neatby Bldg
} Central Experimental Farm
} Ottawa, Ontario
} Canada K1A 0C6
} email: millers-at-em.agr.ca
} phone: 613-759-1760
} fax: 613-759-1701

Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611





From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:29 2000



From: McCaffrey, John :      John.McCaffrey-at-nrc.ca
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 11:42:08 -0500
Subject: glass: TEM sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Dominique,

Your best source of advice would be Scott Walck, at these contacts:

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)

Scott has been in the 'TEM of glass' business for years and has developed a
series of techniques relevant to the preparation of cross-sections of this
material, which I assume you require when you say, "we prefer ion-milling as
this retains the
relative positions of the particles with respect to the surface." As Scott
will probably tell you, there is a small-angle cleaving technique that you
may find preferable to ion milling.

Cheers
John

John P. McCaffrey
National Research Council of Canada
M-50, Montreal Rd.
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0R6 CANADA

tel: +613-993-7823
fax: +613-990-0202
email: john.mccaffrey-at-nrc.ca


-----Original Message-----
} From: Schryvers Dominique [mailto:schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be]
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2000 9:51 AM
To: Microscopy MAIL


Dear all,

we're starting a project of HRTEM on small (nanoscale) colouring metal
particles in glass. Does anyone have experience with sample preparation
for this type of material. We prefer ion-milling as this retains the
relative positions of the particles with respect to the surface. Any
suggestions, also on literature, are welcome.

Many thanks in advance,

Nick Schryvers




*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
*=* *=*
*=* Dr. D. Schryvers *=*
*=* Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT) *=*
*=* University of Antwerp, RUCA *=*
*=* Groenenborgerlaan 171 *=*
*=* B-2020 ANTWERP *=*
*=* Belgium *=*
*=* tel: 32-3-2180247 *=*
*=* fax: 32-3-2180257 *=*
*=* e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be *=*
*=* homepage: http://www.ruca.ua.ac.be/EMAT *=*
*=* *=*
*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:59 2000



From: Yali Tang :      ytang-at-ameslab.gov
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 17:53:48 +0100
Subject: BG by OM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





Dear all,

we're starting a project of patterning on BG of YBCO films. I got
difficulties to find the BG by using opital microscope, because we
can not etch the sample before patterning. Does anyone have
experience with checking the GB by OM? We appraciate any suggestions
or references.

Thanks in advance,

Yali Tang
--



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:36 2000



From: Mark Aindow :      maindow-at-ims.uconn.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 12:14:09 -0500
Subject: Postdoc Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


University of Connecticut
Institute for Materials Science

Postdoctoral Research Position in Electron Microscopy

The Institute for Materials Science (IMS) at UConn is an
interdisciplinary center with the threefold mission of fostering
education, research and outreach in all areas of the materials
sciences. Due to a re-organization of the IMS Microscopy
Unit, a Postdoctoral Position has become available in the area
of transmission electron microscopy. The appointee will be
involved in a range of academic and industrial projects, and
will assist in developing the TEM facilities. Candidates should
hold a PhD in Materials Science, Physics or a related discipline
and must have extensive hands-on experience in a broad range
of electron microscopy techniques. Experience in instrument
development and/or computer image processing/simulation
would be beneficial. The appointment is for one year in the
first instance and is available immediately. Screening of the
applications will begin immediately and will continue until the
post is filled. Applications from under-represented groups,
including minorities, women and people with disabilities are
encouraged.

Interested candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including
publication list, and the names of at least three referees with
postal addresses, telephone numbers and Email addresses to:
Prof. M. Aindow, Institute for Materials Science, University of
Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, U-3136, Storrs,
CT 06269-3136 USA. Email: maindow-at-ims.uconn.edu




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:41 2000



From: Neilly,Joseph :      joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 13:20:09 -0600
Subject: Mattel QX3 on the Mac

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I recently asked Michael Davidson of FSU (http://microscopy.fsu.edu/) if he
had any success running the QX3 on a Mac w/ USB and he said "It works with a
windows 98 emulator, but very very slowly."

Several people have had success running the QX3 with twain drivers from other
programs such as Paint Shop Pro and Photoshop
(http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/qx3). Does anybody know of a twain driver that
would run the QX3 from a Mac?

Joe Neilly
MMMS Educational Outreach Chair
voice: (847)-938-5024
fax: (847)-938-5027
e-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:42 2000



From: Mitch McCartney :      Mitch.McCartney-at-alconlabs.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 13:30:47 -0600
Subject: EM Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Position Title: (Technical-Level) Scientist-Electron Microscopy

Company: Alcon Laboratories, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Nestle,
S.A., has 10,000 employees and worldwide sales of $2.4 billion. It is the
global leader in the discovery, development, manufacture and marketing of
ophthalmic pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Alcon expects to double its
sales over the next five years and has achieved a profit growth rate of
approximately 11% over the last several years. Historically, the company
commits 10% of sales to research and development. Products developed in the
last ten years generate 50% of current sales. The current product pipeline
is strong. Alcon was just renamed to the Fortune List of the 100 Best
Companies to Work for in America.

Location: Fort Worth was recognized by USA Today as one of the 20 best
cities in which to live and work.

Position Responsibilities: The EM Unit is a core resource for R&D, witnessed
by the fact that the staff of three generated 9,350 electron micrographs
from 1,160 processed specimens in 1998 alone. The successful candidate will
be a key member of the EM Unit who processes, examines and provides
preliminary interpretation of ophthalmic devices as well as human and animal
tissue specimens from a wide variety of R&D groups. S/he will provide
electron microscopic research and method development directed towards the
discovery of new drug candidates and unique ophthalmic devices, the
understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and the identification of new
therapeutic agents. S/he will handle the EM Unit commitment to several
groups: Surgical-Intraocular Lens, Toxicology, and Degenerative Diseases, as
well as contributing to Glaucoma Therapeutic Research, Surgical,
Formulations, Consumer Technical Support, Physical Characterization and
Pharmacokinetics.

Responsibilities include preparing ophthalmic devices for SEM and x-ray
analysis and human and animal tissue for TEM and SEM; use and daily
maintenance of Zeiss CEM-902, Cambridge Stereoscan-120 and Zeiss DSM-940,
and PGT System 4+ x-ray system; developing and implementing EM techniques
for various research projects; assisting with human and animal tissue
procedures; and providing preliminary interpretation of EM data.

Preferred Qualifications: Candidates should possess a Bachelor of Science
degree in a related discipline plus at least seven years of significant EM
experience related exclusively to human and animal tissue. Collaborative
and problem solving skills are essential for this position. The successful
candidate will also demonstrate highly refined interpersonal and technical
writing skills. Certification by or eligibility to be certified by the MSA
is a plus.

Alcon professionals enjoy state-of-the-art facilities in a year-round
business casual environment. Our company offers competitive salaries and a
wide array of excellent benefits: a very generous retirement plan and
dollar-for-dollar matching (up to 5%) 401K, medical, dental, vision, life,
and accident insurance, death, dismemberment, illness and disability
benefits, tuition reimbursement, employee credit union, adoption assistance,
dependent care, and wellness programs, on-site fitness center, running
track, cafeteria, and company store, innovative paid time off and holidays,
and retiree medical coverage.

An Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. Pre-employment drug
testing.

Please email your resume and salary requirements to:
Job28_1261-at-careers.alconlabs.com
Reference Code: EM




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:43 2000



From: Mandayam V. Parthasarathy :      mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 14:43:14 -0500
Subject: Subject: Bio Cryo/pdf file

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Apparently several were unable to read the cryostat technique pdf file that
Dr. Greg Erdos had generously posted at his website. The answer to the
problem could be the version of Acrobat used. I had the "blank page"
problem with version 3.0 but no problem at all with version 4.0 (Mac).



*******************************************************************

M.V. Parthasarathy
Prof. of Plant Biology, Adjunct Prof. of Biomedical Sciences (Vet), &
Director, Cornell Integrated Microscopy Center (CIMC)
Section of Plant Biology
228 Plant Science Building
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
E-Mail: mvp2-at-cornell.edu
Plant Biology Office: 268 Emerson; Telephone: 607-255-1734
Plant Biology Fax: 607-255-5407
CIMC Office: C1 054 Vet. Med. Center; Telephone: 607-253-3803
CIMC Office Fax: 607-253-3803
CIMC web site: http://www.cimc.cornell.edu




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:46 2000



From: wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 15:14:36 -0500
Subject: Cold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html






}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} It's raining cats and dogs, and it's cold and miserable. Feel better,
} now?
}

But what you call cold and what we call cold are two very different
animals! Its been snowing all day in the Northeast, and the temps haven't
nosed above (or even near) freezing) in days!


Dear Lee,
Fair is fair. Often wind and rain at slightly above freezing is more
miserable
than snow at a few degrees below--having been both in San Francisco for the
first
condition and Albany NY for the second, I can say this with first-hand
authority.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:49 2000



From: wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 16:03:37 -0500
Subject: Repair/overhaul of a Kevex Detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Appropriate vendors,
I have a Kevex detector which has been giving peak widths
larger than specs. It probably just needs an overhaul, but there may
be some repair necessary for the pre-amp and FET. Could anyone
who can undertake this please respond to me off-list with estimates
for various contingencies? TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:54 2000



From: Ronald C. Decker :      decker-at-utcdayton.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 17:42:35 -0500
Subject: TEM & Aerospace lubrication - Researcher Needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

Our Ohio company is seeking an engineer / scientist to research the
relationships between the chemistry and microstructure of solid lubricant
and hard coatings and their performance in the lubrication of aerospace
systems. Research will involve a variety of surface analytical tools (XPS,
Raman, etc.) so that fundamental mechanisms of lubrication can be
elucidated. Emphasis on microstructure will require expertise with TEM and
SEM including preparation of SEM & TEM specimens of thin films and wear
scars on steel and ceramic substrates. Research will also involve
correlating thin film properties with deposition plasma characteristics and
making recommendations for improving lifetime and performance of such
materials in different environments: e.g., vacuum, moist air, high
temperature, etc.

It is important that candidates have capabilities in cross-section TEM,
analytical TEM, analysis of unique microstructures; and understand TEM of
thin films on a fundamental level. It is desirable that the candidate have
knowledge of tribological materials and experience with TEM/XTEM of wear
tracks.

Contact Ronald Decker - mailto:decker-at-utcdayton.com

{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Ronald C. Decker
Program Manager
Universal Technology Corporation
1270 N FAIRFIELD RD
DAYTON OH 45432-2600

Voice (937) 426-8530, Fax (937) 426-7753
(Voice mail is available at my extension, 270)

http://www.utcdayton.com/
mailto:decker-at-utcdayton.com
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}




From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:54 2000



From: Pete :      pjpns-at-worldnet.att
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 17:51:25 -0500
Subject: Spectrophotometer Schematics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Schematics for Carl Zeiss Spectrophotometer DM4, DMR21, PMQII being discarded. Please
respond by 1/31/00 if interested.

Pete Dondl
pjpns-at-worldnet.att.net



From daemon Tue Jan 25 18:19:58 2000



From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 15:28:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Mattel QX3 on the Mac

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


While browsing news from the latest MacWorld Expo I came across a brief
comment about a USB video microscope for the Mac. Further searches at the
MacWorld Expo website or at Apple's web site have not turned up anything
more about it, although there were announcements that Data Translation and
National instruments
have released additional PCI and USB I/O boards for the Mac. Has anyone
heard more of this?


Regards,
Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu





From daemon Tue Jan 25 19:30:11 2000



From: Snow, David B. :      snowdb-at-pweh.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 19:17:31 -0600
Subject: Job Opening:High Resolution Scanning Electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopist/Engineer


United Technologies Research Center is seeking an engineer to fill the
HR-SEM operator/engineer position at the United Technologies Research
Center in East Hartford, CT. This position will provide support to the
United Technologies Corporation Business Unites including Pratt & Whitney,
Carrier, Sikorsky, Hamilton Sundstrand and Otis. The SEM operator/engineer
will be responsible for the full utilization of both high-resolution
secondary and back-scattered imaging to characterize a wide range of
metallic and non-metallic materials, including surface coatings and
advanced structural materials including metals and ceramics. In addition,
the ability to recognize fracture modes and origins of fractures is
strongly desired. The candidate should be experienced in the use of EDS
for both qualitative and quantitative analyses, including compositional
mapping and line profiles. The qualified candidate must be capable of
judging the optimal combinations of imaging and EDS to yield t!
he most informative characterization of a particular specimen. Good
communication and interpersonal skills are essential. Experience with
electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a plus.

Qualified candidates will have BS in Materials Science or an equivalent
discipline, with a minimum of 2 years SEM experience. U.S. citizenship or
permanent resident status is required.

Please visit our web site at http://www.utrc.utc.com for additional general
information. Interested parties should send a letter of application and a
resume to Employment Opportunities, Code MATS-2050-9049, United
Technologies Research Center, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06108 or
e-mail employment-at-utrc.utc.com. United Technologies Research Center is an
equal opportunity employer.




From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:08:20 2000



From: Damian :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 20:13:24 -0600
Subject: Re: Subject: Bio Cryo/pdf file

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I tried to open the file with Acrobat 4.0 in Windows 98. No luck.

Damian Neuberger
etc., etc.



} Apparently several were unable to read the cryostat technique pdf file that
} Dr. Greg Erdos had generously posted at his website. The answer to the
} problem could be the version of Acrobat used. I had the "blank page"
} problem with version 3.0 but no problem at all with version 4.0 (Mac).



From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:08:25 2000



From: Bill Carmichael :      billc-at-jvlnet.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 21:58:42 -0600
Subject: ISI SS40 parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

We have an ISI SS40 SEM that is in need of a discontinued part. It is a
NEC transistor, number D588. It is used in the filament current
control circuit. I'm having trouble locating the part because it has
not been manufactured by NEC since 1984. Does anyone know of a source
for this part or a substitute transistor?

Thanks in advance,

Bill Carmichael

______________________________________
Bill Carmichael
Electron Microscopy Faculty
Madison Area Technical College
3550 Anderson St.
Madison, WI 53704
608-243-4309
wcarmichael-at-madison.tec.wi.us

http://electron-microscopy.madison.tec.wi.us




From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:08:25 2000



From: phil.swab-at-depsci.com (Phil Swab)
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2000 20:11:00 -0800
Subject: glass: TEM sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dominique,
Glass is readily microtomed with a diamond knife and may be a suitable
inexpensive technique for you to consider. Particularly if the materials
of your sample are sufficiently dissimilar in reaction to the chemical and
ion etching of some techniques. I've been embedding and sectioning coated
glass, optics, and other hard materials for 18 years (even diamond coated
silicon in Microscopy Research and Technique, vol. 31, p. 308, 1995). The
imaging and analysis of nano-structures in micron sized areas near the
surface of glass is routine, fast, and inexpensive for physical
microstructure and chemistry. Mechanical artifacts generated in
ultramicrotomy tend to be quite large, readily visible, and easily ignored
but may interfere with the analysis of naturally occurring deformation
features (i.e. twinning, slip, etc.). Any good diamond knife will work
with meticulous and careful technique, but experience has shown that 35
degree knives yield the best results with hard and ultra-hard materials.

The critical elements for microtomy of hard, non-porous materials include:
1. Minimize the cross-sectional area to be sectioned. An easy way is to do
this is to pop concoidal micro-chips from the surface. These tend to be
very thin at the edges and may be further broken to form very pointed thin
samples. [Time = ~20 minutes]
2. Optimize sample orientation for sectioning and preferred orientation.
Some physical microstructures are anisotropic and are difficult to
interpret when viewed in the wrong orientation. [Time = ~10 minutes]
3. Maximize adhesion to the resin through the selection of an appropriate
resin (low viscosity and non-reactive with your sample), meticulous and
contamination-free sample prep, and the addition of adhesion promoters
(such as Dow Corning Z-6040). [Time = ~1 hour, with an over night epoxy
cure]
4. Section using standard procedures, but minimize the sectioning speed
(optimize cutting speed). [Time = ~1 hour]

These times are approximate for 1 sample, and there could be economy in
numbers. As always, each case will require individual attention.
Cheers,

Phil Swab
Engineering Development
Deposition Sciences Inc.
Santa Rosa, CA
707-566-3718
phil.swab-at-depsci.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Schryvers Dominique [SMTP:schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be]
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2000 6:51 AM
To: Microscopy MAIL


Dear all,

we're starting a project of HRTEM on small (nanoscale) colouring metal
particles in glass. Does anyone have experience with sample preparation
for this type of material. We prefer ion-milling as this retains the
relative positions of the particles with respect to the surface. Any
suggestions, also on literature, are welcome.

Many thanks in advance,

Nick Schryvers




*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
*=* *=*
*=* Dr. D. Schryvers *=*
*=* Electron Microscopy for Materials Research (EMAT) *=*
*=* University of Antwerp, RUCA *=*
*=* Groenenborgerlaan 171 *=*
*=* B-2020 ANTWERP *=*
*=* Belgium *=*
*=* tel: 32-3-2180247 *=*
*=* fax: 32-3-2180257 *=*
*=* e-mail: schryver-at-ruca.ua.ac.be *=*
*=* homepage: http://www.ruca.ua.ac.be/EMAT *=*
*=* *=*
*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*





From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:08:57 2000



From: Petra Wahlbring :      wahlbrin-at-crpgl.lu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:42:35 +0100
Subject: Re: glass: TEM sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Nick,

we are analyzing frequently this kind of specimens. In our case the
particles are silver. Depending on density and size distribution they are
changing the color of the glass.
Since we are interested in the depth distribution starting at the interface
with a silver containging layer on the glass, we need to do a
cross-sectional preparation. Therefore, we use several steps of preparation
as described below:

á gluing of two coated glass surfaces face to face

á cutting and polishing of the obtained block to a size of 2 x 1 x 10 mmÒ
with the interface plane running parallel to the 2 mm x 10 mm face and in
the middle of the block

á gluing of this block in a steel-cylinder of 3 mm diameter and 10 mm
length with a 1 mm x 2 mm rectangular hole along the cylinder axis

á cutting of 0.5 - 1 mm thick slices perpendicular to the cylinder axis

á fine polishing of one face of the obtained disk (lowest grain size: 1µm)

á grinding of the disk from the opposite face down to 100 µm thickness with
subsequent fine polishing

á dimpling of a crater into one face of the disk with a residual thickness
in the middle of the disk of about 10 µm

á ion etching of the flat side of the sample with argon ions of 4 kV under
an angle of 2 - 4 degrees with a current of about 12 µA until electron
transparency is reached in the region of the interface.

Some of the results were presented on the FEMMS-Meeting in Irsee, Germany,
1998.
For more details, you might contact me directly.

Hope this helps,

Petra

At 15:50 25.01.00 +0100, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Petra Wahlbring
Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann
Laboratoire d'Analyse des Materiaux (LAM)
162a, av. de la Faiencerie L-1511 Luxembourg
tel. +352-466644-402 fax +352-466644-400
e-mail: petra.wahlbring-at-crpgl.lu
Visit our WWW site! http://www.crpgl.lu/~wahlbrin



From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:28:08 2000



From: Hyman, S.C. :      sch10-at-leicester.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 14:00:54 -0000
Subject: SEM - Halophilic bacteria preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can anybody offer a method for the preparation of Halophilic bacteria for
'standard' SEM observation? post fixation washing appears to produce cell
lysis!.



From daemon Wed Jan 26 08:28:09 2000



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:19:58 -0500
Subject: Cryostat info.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For those who are unable to view the PDF file of Cryostat information that
I posted, I have also posted it in ugly HTML. I am still trying to find
out why some can read the PDF and others cannot. The Version of Acrobat
does not seem to be the answer.

My apologies to anyone who got frustrated.
Once again the site is:
www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/

Greg Erdos
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph. 352-392-1295
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580 Fax:
352-846-0251
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611





From daemon Wed Jan 26 09:29:37 2000



From: Ann-Fook Yang (Ann-Fook Yang) :      yanga-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:39:51 -0500
Subject: No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please keep weather reports private.



} } } {"wft03-at-health.state.ny.us"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} 01/25 3:14 PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} It's raining cats and dogs, and it's cold and miserable. Feel better,
} now?
}

But what you call cold and what we call cold are two very different
animals! Its been snowing all day in the Northeast, and the temps haven't
nosed above (or even near) freezing) in days!


Dear Lee,
Fair is fair. Often wind and rain at slightly above freezing is more
miserable
than snow at a few degrees below--having been both in San Francisco for the
first
condition and Albany NY for the second, I can say this with first-hand
authority.
Yours,
Bill Tivol






From daemon Wed Jan 26 09:29:37 2000



From: Ann-Fook Yang (Ann-Fook Yang) (Ann-Fook Yang) :      yanga-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:43:30 -0500
Subject: No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please keep weather reports private.

Ann Fook



} } } {"wft03-at-health.state.ny.us"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} 01/25 3:14 PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} It's raining cats and dogs, and it's cold and miserable. Feel better,
} now?
}

But what you call cold and what we call cold are two very different
animals! Its been snowing all day in the Northeast, and the temps haven't
nosed above (or even near) freezing) in days!


Dear Lee,
Fair is fair. Often wind and rain at slightly above freezing is more
miserable
than snow at a few degrees below--having been both in San Francisco for the
first
condition and Albany NY for the second, I can say this with first-hand
authority.
Yours,
Bill Tivol






From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:00:50 2000



From: Peter Guthrie :      Peter.Guthrie-at-hsc.utah.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:28:03 -0700 (MST)
Subject: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It would be convenient to be able to bring a video camera into an
elementary school classroom, hook it up to a microscope (with an eyepiece
adaptor) and display the microscope image for an entire classroom to see.
If there is a video monitor (or a TV with a video input), this is fairly
easy. If there is not an available monitor, I should be able to bring in a
laptop and display the image on the laptop screen.

I am looking for an inexpensive lightweight video camera (with a C-mount)
with either a firewire or USB linkage.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks

Peter Guthrie
Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy
University of Utah School of Medicine
50 N Medical Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84132
(801) 581-8336 (801) 581-4233 fax
Peter.Guthrie-at-hsc.utah.edu




From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:00:51 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 08:39:59 -0800
Subject: Re: Repair/overhaul of a Kevex Detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


DearBill,
When my Kevex detector showed degraded resolution, I turned off the bias and
grounded the BNC plug with a paper clip, then warmed it up completely to get
rid of ice and frost in the detector. This brought back my resolution, but
degraded my LN2 holding time. Then I had a friend in Physics pump out the
dewar and now I'm back to peak performance.
04:03 PM 1/25/00 -0500, you wrote:
} Appropriate vendors,
} I have a Kevex detector which has been giving peak widths
} larger than specs. It probably just needs an overhaul, but there may
} be some repair necessary for the pre-amp and FET. Could anyone
} who can undertake this please respond to me off-list with estimates
} for various contingencies? TIA.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:00:53 2000



From: Dan Kremser :      dkremser-at-levee.wustl.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 11:16:41 -0600
Subject: Biological Standards for Microprobe Work

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings all:

Recently, an interesting medical school project has appeared at my lab
door. I've been asked to quantify Ca and P in scar tissue found in
sections of hamster hearts. Obtaining appropriate standards is critical.
Are there commercially available biological standards or procedures to
create such standards out there? Any suggestions would be appreciated and
thanks for your time.

Dan


=====================================================
Dan Kremser
Washington University
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences/Campus Box 1169
(Wilson Hall, Room 108-----for packages)
One Brookings Dr.
St. Louis, MOÊ 63130-4899

VOICE: (314) 935-5605Ê FAX: (314) 935-7361
E-MAIL: dkremser-at-levee.wustl.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:00:55 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 11:44:14 -0600
Subject: Re: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How about using a device like Dazzle or Snappy to display the video stream
from your video camera on a laptop? It would require a little software
setup but should work. The models I am familiar with used parallel port
connections, but there ought to be models around that would use USB.

At 09:28 AM 1/26/2000 -0700, you wrote:
} It would be convenient to be able to bring a video camera into an
} elementary school classroom, hook it up to a microscope (with an eyepiece
} adaptor) and display the microscope image for an entire classroom to see.
} If there is a video monitor (or a TV with a video input), this is fairly
} easy. If there is not an available monitor, I should be able to bring in a
} laptop and display the image on the laptop screen.
}
} I am looking for an inexpensive lightweight video camera (with a C-mount)
} with either a firewire or USB linkage.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions?
}
} Thanks



From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:00:54 2000



From: hank adams :      hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 13:38:41 -0600
Subject: sperm fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Listservers,
Can anyone lead me to a good reference for processing human sperm for TEM? Or if you have a procedure can you please forward the details.
TIA
Hank Adams
Integrated Microscopy Core
Molecular and Cell Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX



From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:01:19 2000



From: A. K. Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 17:15:30 -0500
Subject: Re: sperm fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hank,

Here are three good references:

Stefanini M, De Martino C, Zamboni L. 1967. Fixation of ejaculated
spermatozoa for electron microscopy. Nature 216:173-174.

Meschede D, Keck C, Zander M, Cooper TG, Yeung CH, Nieschlag E. 1993.
Influence of three different preparation techniques on the results of human
sperm morphology analysis. Int J Androl 16:362-369.

Phillips DM. 1995. Fixation of mammalian spermatozoa for electron
microscopy. In: Dentler W, Witman G (Eds.), Methods in Cell Biology, Vol
47, vol 47. Academic Press Inc (San Diego), pp 199-204.

Kent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
Office: 2703A Medical Science II Building
Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
E-mail: akc-at-umich.edu
http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--On Wed, Jan 26, 2000 1:38 PM -0600 hank adams {hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu} wrote:

} Listservers,
} Can anyone lead me to a good reference for processing human sperm for
} TEM? Or if you have a procedure can you please forward the details. TIA
} Hank Adams
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Molecular and Cell Biology
} Baylor College of Medicine
} Houston, TX




From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:01:19 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 17:13:00 -0600
Subject: Re:USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter,

If you intend to use a "video" camera, you may need a capture card rather
than,
or in addition to, a USB or Firewire interface. Most video cams are analog
(NTSC in the US, SECAM or PAL elsewhere in the world). Others can certainly
have digital circuits internal (like the new digital camcorders or the
PCcams
used for video conferencing on the net). ...You first need to determine
the
source format.

Warren's suggestion implements an inexpensive external NTSC* video frame
grabber
(Snappy). Which will "grab" an analog video frame and digitize it. *May do
PAL
too??

Parallel port I/O is a bit slow (or is that a byte slow :) for pictures
containing lots of data, but is cheap and works since the inherent
resolution of
typical NTSC video is { 640x480. USB is very much faster and Firewire
faster
yet (and usually a lot more $$ for the interface card). For applications
other
than full frame rate/resolution streaming video, USB is fine.

Woody White



From daemon Wed Jan 26 19:16:54 2000



From: Lawrence Kordon :      nikon-at-jagunet.com
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 20:04:33 -0500
Subject: Re: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter,

Take a look at this site....

http://www.dazzlemultimedia.com/html/products/index.htm

They have a USB version and the software interface is great. It is easy to use
and has a street price of about $180!

Good Luck,

Lawrence Kordon
Nikon, Inc.
Columbia, Maryland
nikon-at-jagunet.com

***I have no affiliation with Dazzle, Inc.***


"White, Woody N" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Peter,
}
} If you intend to use a "video" camera, you may need a capture card rather
} than,
} or in addition to, a USB or Firewire interface. Most video cams are analog
} (NTSC in the US, SECAM or PAL elsewhere in the world). Others can certainly
} have digital circuits internal (like the new digital camcorders or the
} PCcams
} used for video conferencing on the net). ...You first need to determine
} the
} source format.
}
} Warren's suggestion implements an inexpensive external NTSC* video frame
} grabber
} (Snappy). Which will "grab" an analog video frame and digitize it. *May do
} PAL
} too??
}
} Parallel port I/O is a bit slow (or is that a byte slow :) for pictures
} containing lots of data, but is cheap and works since the inherent
} resolution of
} typical NTSC video is { 640x480. USB is very much faster and Firewire
} faster
} yet (and usually a lot more $$ for the interface card). For applications
} other
} than full frame rate/resolution streaming video, USB is fine.
}
} Woody White



From daemon Wed Jan 26 23:12:23 2000



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-hei.org
Date: 26 Jan 00 17:52:26 -0800
Subject: Re:No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} Please keep weather reports private.
}
} Ann Fook

Why? A little light heartedness never hurt anyone.
For the record, LA was sunny as usual today. Happy I don't live in CT anymore.

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Associate Scientist & Director
Ahmanson Advanced Electron Microscopy & Imaging Center
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third St.
Los Angeles, CA 90057

Phone: (213) 273-8026
Fax: (213) 413-6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm



From daemon Wed Jan 26 23:12:28 2000



From: Lou Ann Miller :      lamiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 20:39:59 -0600
Subject: Re: Firewire Video & no need for capture board

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I currently video with a Sony DV Video camera, fire wire connect to
my computer with no capture board.

It does require special software however, We bought Final Cut Pro,
But from trying out the demo and reading, It appears Adobe Priemier
also will allow firewire capture without a board. Though Adobe's is
one I have not tried, I'd call first.

This works fine for video, and I can pull off individual frames for
low res images for the web, and ok small images to print if very
small.

But, in emailing to and from Sony, It was my understanding that if I
were to firewire images, I WOULD need a board.

My video camera will do both images and video. FinalCut Pro pulls
off the video, but I can't seem to get it to recognize the individual
image shots. So I believe Sony, though I may just not have selected
the right buttons etc.

If pulling in video by fire wire, especially pulling it onto a
firewire hard drive ( ie VST) It is pretty close to real time video.

Lou Ann
***************************
Lou Ann Miller
Service Supervisor
Microscopic Imaging Lab
College of Vet. Medicine
University of Illinois
2001 S Lincoln Ave
Urbana,Illinois 61801
217-244-1566
lamiller-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Microscopy Home Page:
http://treefrog.cvm.uiuc.edu

Central States Microscopy Society
http://treefrog.cvm.uiuc.edu/csmms

Personal Home Page:
http://treefrog.cvm.uiuc.edu/lam



From daemon Wed Jan 26 23:12:33 2000



From: jim :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 13:38:03 +1000
Subject: RE: SEM - Halophilic bacteria preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I did some TEM work on the extreme holophile bacterias (they grow in saturated
NaCl solutions) some 30 years ago. Very difficult specimens, it seems no
fixation is complete and can prevent osmotic shock.

I have not tried SEM on halophiles, but I suggest this:
You could try excessive fixation, using 2 hours at room 20 degrees.
I would use a several molar solution of ammonium acetate to rinse the specimen
after fixation. Ammonium acetate is a volatile salt solution and leaves no
crystals after evaporation.
The still wet sample (mounted on a 10mm coverslip) could then be placed in a
glass Petrie dish which has a double layer of filter paper, saturated with
chloroform.
Place the closed Petrie dish in the fridge for a day or two. Warm the dish
before opening (to avoid condensation) and metal coat prior to SEM.

Ah, your first problem could be the fixation. The osmium (I'd forget GA), would
need to go into the bacteria's growth medium, or use vapour fixation only. Even
then, I expect much damage before any further processing.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 27, 2000 12:01 AM, Hyman, S.C.
[SMTP:sch10-at-leicester.ac.uk] wrote:
}
}
} Can anybody offer a method for the preparation of Halophilic bacteria for
} 'standard' SEM observation? post fixation washing appears to produce cell
} lysis!.



From daemon Wed Jan 26 23:12:32 2000



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 00:31:22 -0800
Subject: No weather report please. Why not?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Message-ID: {388FBBF2.61FF-at-mail.superlink.net}


Message-ID: {388FBBF2.61FF-at-mail.superlink.net}


Moreover, it is well known that weather may affect the quality of EM
samples. For instance, humidity is very critical for many EM techniques. I
utilized very unusual technique for holey-film preparation with
calcium-rhodanide. This technique is extremely sensitive for
humidity/temperature combination. When I was working in Russia (without
conditioner in the room), I was able predict the weather changes using that
technique. Again, it was tricky to work when temperature in the room was
around 7oC (at winter). The guys from East Coast may have something like
that. Why not to share experience how to work at different weather
conditions?

Have a good weather!

Sergey

} Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 17:52:26 -0800
} From: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} Subject: Re:No weather report please
} To: MSA listserver submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Reply-to: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.4 (Mac)
} X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by
ultra5.microscopy.com id
} TAA11085
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
http://www.bol.ucla.edu/~sryazant




From daemon Thu Jan 27 06:51:48 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 00:57:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: sperm fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Hank and others,
I have had good success this Stefanini's buffered picric acid
paraformaldehyde (PAF) for spermatozoan. I do not have the fixative
formula at my fingertips, but the reference is: Nature Vol. 216, OCT 14.
1967.

I will look it up if you are interested and get back to you or you can
email me-at- tiekotte-at-up.edu.
-Ken

Ken Tiekotter
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000 N Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97303



On Wed, 26 Jan 2000, hank adams wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listservers,
} Can anyone lead me to a good reference for processing human sperm for TEM? Or if you have a procedure can you please forward the details.
} TIA
} Hank Adams
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Molecular and Cell Biology
} Baylor College of Medicine
} Houston, TX
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 27 06:51:58 2000



From: Shu-You Li :      syli-at-mail.uni-mainz.de
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 11:36:12 +0100
Subject: Re: Cryostat info.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dr. Erdos,

Perheps it is due to the difference between Netscape and IE. I got a blank
page with netscape but read it correctly with IE4.0.

Shu-You Li
**************************************************
Shu-You Li, Dr.
Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie
Johannes Guttenberg Universitaet
Jakob-Welder-Weg 11
D-55099 Mainz, Germany

E-mail: syli-at-mail.uni-mainz.de; syli16-at-hotmail.com
Fax: +49-6131-3923768
Tel: +49-6131-3923148(O)
**************************************************



} From: Greg Erdos {gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Cryostat info.
} Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:19:58 -0500
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} For those who are unable to view the PDF file of Cryostat information that
} I posted, I have also posted it in ugly HTML. I am still trying to find
} out why some can read the PDF and others cannot. The Version of Acrobat
} does not seem to be the answer.
}
} My apologies to anyone who got frustrated.
} Once again the site is:
} www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/
}
} Greg Erdos
} Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph.
} 352-392-1295
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} PO Box 110580 Fax:
} 352-846-0251
} University of Florida
} Gainesville, FL 32611
}



From daemon Thu Jan 27 06:52:00 2000



From: Tony Bruton :      bruton-at-EMU.UNP.AC.ZA
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 14:29:04 +0200
Subject: Re: No weather report please. Why not?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers

I think that we are proceeding slightly tongue-in-cheek here - but to continue the 'serious' note;

The most weather sensitive task I have ever tackled is the production of formvar films. With the extremely high humidities we experience here there are times when the formvar will simply NOT separate from the substrate, despite 'air-conditioning'.

Tony



Tony Bruton
Head, Centre for Electron Microscopy
University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg
Tel +27 (0) 33 260 5155
Fax +27 (0) 33 260 5776
website via:http:www.nu.ac.za
Email:bruton-at-emu.unp.ac.za
postal address;
Private Bag X01,
Scottsville, 3209
KwaZulu-Natal
South Africa

} } } Sergey Ryazantsev {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} 01/27/00 10:31AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Moreover, it is well known that weather may affect the quality of EM
samples. For instance, humidity is very critical for many EM techniques. I
utilized very unusual technique for holey-film preparation with
calcium-rhodanide. This technique is extremely sensitive for
humidity/temperature combination. When I was working in Russia (without
conditioner in the room), I was able predict the weather changes using that
technique. Again, it was tricky to work when temperature in the room was
around 7oC (at winter). The guys from East Coast may have something like
that. Why not to share experience how to work at different weather
conditions?

Have a good weather!

Sergey

} Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 17:52:26 -0800
} From: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} Subject: Re:No weather report please
} To: MSA listserver submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Reply-to: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.4 (Mac)
} X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by
ultra5.microscopy.com id
} TAA11085
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
http://www.bol.ucla.edu/~sryazant






From daemon Thu Jan 27 07:12:03 2000



From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes :      rpowell-at-lihti.org
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 08:02:45 -0500
Subject: Light microscopy:Fluorogold suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Light Microscopists:

Can anyone tell me who currently makes and sells the retrograde neuronal
tracer, Fluorogold? We have a customer who is confusing it with our
FluoroNanogold products (not the first time this has happenned) and I would
lkke to point them to the right source!

Thanks,

Rick Powell


**********************************************************************
* NANOPROBES, Incorporated | US Toll-free: (877) 808-2101 *
* 25 East Loop Road, Suite 113 | Tel: (919) 510-0590 *
* Stony Brook, NY 11790-3350, | Fax: (919) 510-0590 *
* USA | rpowell-at-lihti.org *
* *
* NOW EASY TO FIND ON THE WEB: http://www.nanoprobes.com *
**********************************************************************




From daemon Thu Jan 27 07:36:36 2000



From: Robinson John :      emxray-at-server.uwindsor.ca
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 08:09:45 -0500
Subject: Test

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





From daemon Thu Jan 27 07:41:58 2000



From: RAHBARI, RAMIN :      RAMIN.RAHBARI-at-WL.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 09:29:54 -0500
Subject: sperm fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Some time ago, Kent Christensen, Univ. of Michigan, (akc-at-umich.edu) kindly
supplied to me the following:


Zamboni's Fixative

FROM:rj.wilson-at-qut.edu.au (Russell J. Wilson)
The following is the composition of the Zamboni's Fixative

0.2M Na2HPO4.....................390mL
0.2M NaH2PO4.....................110mL
16% Paraformaldehyde.............25mL
Saturated Picric Acid............15mL
Distilled Water..................10mL
...........................................................................
.................

The main reference is: Stefanini et al., 1967, Nature 216:173.


Ramin Rahbari
PARKE-DAVIS Pharmaceutical Research
Worldwide Preclinical Safety
2800 Plymouth Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
Voice (734) 622-3383
Fax (734) 622-5001
Ramin.Rahbari-at-WL.COM


-----Original Message-----
} From: hank adams [mailto:hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2000 2:39 PM
To: 'microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com'


Listservers,
Can anyone lead me to a good reference for processing human sperm
for TEM? Or if you have a procedure can you please forward the details.
TIA
Hank Adams
Integrated Microscopy Core
Molecular and Cell Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:49 2000



From: Sally Schroeter :      sally.schroeter-at-mcmail.vanderbilt.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 09:36:51 -0600
Subject: video to laptop display

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


As far as I could discover, Dazzler and Snappy are for Windows
machines only. Are there similar devices available for Macintoshes?




From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:55 2000



From: john grazul :      grazul-at-physics.bell-labs.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 11:29:14 -0500
Subject: Re: No weather report please. Why not?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




If anyone remembers I use to end all my e-mails to the listees with a quite
sarcastic weather and/or olfactory report from the garden state. Either no one
read my posts or they just didn't get the East Coast thing.

Cold, windy and something smells real odd under the Pulaski Skyway...Aloha!

John Grazul
Lucent

Sergey Ryazantsev wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Moreover, it is well known that weather may affect the quality of EM
} samples. For instance, humidity is very critical for many EM techniques. I
} utilized very unusual technique for holey-film preparation with
} calcium-rhodanide. This technique is extremely sensitive for
} humidity/temperature combination. When I was working in Russia (without
} conditioner in the room), I was able predict the weather changes using that
} technique. Again, it was tricky to work when temperature in the room was
} around 7oC (at winter). The guys from East Coast may have something like
} that. Why not to share experience how to work at different weather
} conditions?
}
} Have a good weather!
}
} Sergey
}
} } Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 17:52:26 -0800
} } From: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} } Subject: Re:No weather report please
} } To: MSA listserver submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} } Reply-to: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} } X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.4 (Mac)
} } X-MIME-Autoconverted: from quoted-printable to 8bit by
} ultra5.microscopy.com id
} } TAA11085
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } } Please keep weather reports private.
} } }
} } } Ann Fook
} }
} } Why? A little light heartedness never hurt anyone.
} } For the record, LA was sunny as usual today. Happy I don't live in CT
} anymore.
} }
} } Regards,
} }
} } Paul Webster, Ph.D.
} } Associate Scientist & Director
} } Ahmanson Advanced Electron Microscopy & Imaging Center
} } House Ear Institute
} } 2100 West Third St.
} } Los Angeles, CA 90057
} }
} } Phone: (213) 273-8026
} } Fax: (213) 413-6739
} } e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
} } http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
} }
} }
} }
} _____________________________________
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
} Electron Microscopy
} UCLA School of Medicine
} Department of Biological Chemistry
} Box 951737
} Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737
}
} Phone: (310) 825-1144
} Pager: (310) 845-0248
} FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
} http://www.bol.ucla.edu/~sryazant



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:55 2000



From: J.F. Bailey :      jfb-at-uidaho.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 08:34:11 -0800
Subject: ultramicrotome service

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Is anyone aware of a company who would service an old LKB Ultratome
III? If so, please contact me at: jfb-at-uidaho.edu

Thank you.



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:57 2000



From: Karen Zaruba :      kszaruba-at-MMM.COM
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 10:50:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Light microscopy:Fluorogold suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Molecular Probes sells hydroxystilbamidine, methanesulfonate (cat. # H-7599)
which I beleive is the active chemical in Fluorogold. (see paper by Martin W.
Wessendorf in Brain Res 553(1): 135-48. Jul 1991).

Karen Zaruba

P.S. I have no interest in Molecular Probes other than a satisfied customer.


Rick Powell at Nanoprobes wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello Light Microscopists:
}
} Can anyone tell me who currently makes and sells the retrograde neuronal
} tracer, Fluorogold? We have a customer who is confusing it with our
} FluoroNanogold products (not the first time this has happenned) and I would
} lkke to point them to the right source!
}
} Thanks,
}
} Rick Powell
}
} **********************************************************************
} * NANOPROBES, Incorporated | US Toll-free: (877) 808-2101 *
} * 25 East Loop Road, Suite 113 | Tel: (919) 510-0590 *
} * Stony Brook, NY 11790-3350, | Fax: (919) 510-0590 *
} * USA | rpowell-at-lihti.org *
} * *
} * NOW EASY TO FIND ON THE WEB: http://www.nanoprobes.com *
} **********************************************************************

--
Karen S. Zaruba kszaruba-at-mmm.com
3M Company, St. Paul, MN




From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:57 2000



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 09:07:18 -0800
Subject: Cynthia Shannon-Are you there?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tried to respond to a message posted here from Cynthia Shannon re: a used
TEM, it keeps bouncing. Cynthia, if you are out there, how can I contact
you?

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:58 2000



From: hank adams :      hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 11:27:02 -0600
Subject: EM position opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNICIAN
The Integrated Microscopy Core, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology,
Baylor College of Medicine is expanding and has an immediate full-time
opening for an electron microscopy technician. The Integrated Microscopy
Core is a growing, state-of-the-art facility with 2 TEMs, deconvolution, laser
scanning confocal, 2 CCD-based fluorescent microscopes and multiple PC and
Silicon Graphics workstations for imaging software. The applicant should
have at least one year of experience in various aspects of sample
preparation for biological TEM including fixation, embedding, ultrathin
sectioning and staining. The applicant should have darkroom experience and
experience in the operation of TEMs. Other duties include preparation of
solutions, embedding media and the maintaining of records. The position
offers excellent opportunities for training in advanced light and electron
microscopy techniques, including immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling,
laser scanning confocal and deconvolution microscopy, as well as live
imaging of GFP-tagged proteins. Training in several image computer-based
imaging programs will also be available (PhotoShop, MetaMorph, SoftWorks).
The position requires a minimum of a Bachelors degree and will start as a
Lab Technician II; salary will be commensurate with experience, and includes
the standard Baylor benefits package.

Send CV and letter of research/technical interests to:

Hank Adams
Laboratory Manager
Integrated Microscopy Core
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
One Baylor Plaza
Houston, TX 77030
Email submissions to: hpadams-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Fax submissions to: 713 790 0545

Baylor College of Medicine is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action and
Equal Access Employer.



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:58:00 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 09:45:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Cryostat info.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I can't see how it can be netscape vs IE, since I got the blank page using
IE4. I haven't tried netscape or IE5 (have both at home--but not here at
work). Acrobat seems to work on every other PDF file I have opened (the
intranet and internet standard here for public documents in a read-only
setting), so I don't think the version of Acrobat is the problem either. I
tried Dr. Erdos' original work-around, but still got the blank page.
????


On Thu, 27 Jan 2000 11:36:12 +0100, Shu-You Li wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Dr. Erdos,
}
} Perheps it is due to the difference between Netscape and IE. I got a
blank
} page with netscape but read it correctly with IE4.0.
}
} Shu-You Li
} **************************************************
} Shu-You Li, Dr.
} Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie
} Johannes Guttenberg Universitaet
} Jakob-Welder-Weg 11
} D-55099 Mainz, Germany
}
} E-mail: syli-at-mail.uni-mainz.de; syli16-at-hotmail.com
} Fax: +49-6131-3923768
} Tel: +49-6131-3923148(O)
} **************************************************
}
}
}
} } From: Greg Erdos {gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu}
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: Cryostat info.
} } Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2000 09:19:58 -0500
} }
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } For those who are unable to view the PDF file of Cryostat information
that
} } I posted, I have also posted it in ugly HTML. I am still trying to
find
} } out why some can read the PDF and others cannot. The Version of
Acrobat
} } does not seem to be the answer.
} }
} } My apologies to anyone who got frustrated.
} } Once again the site is:
} } www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/
} }
} } Greg Erdos
} } Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph.
} } 352-392-1295
} } Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} } PO Box 110580
Fax:
} } 352-846-0251
} } University of Florida
} } Gainesville, FL 32611
} }
}


Roger C Moretz, Ph.D.





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:58:00 2000



From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 10:48:26 -0700
Subject: Re: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I think, there is some confusion out there about digital and analog
cameras and different protocols and interfaces. Woody's posting is
correct, but perhaps a look at some of the current implementations might
help:

1) Cameras come either with a digital output or analog output. As Woody
mentions, there are several different analog standards (PAL, NTSC,
RS-170,...) and formats for transmitting the data (RGB, S-VHS,
composite, ...)

2) Regardless of what the signal is, there must be some "device" that
translates the incoming signals into "numbers" that the computer can
understand. Sometimes this is implemented on the motherboards (USB), or
needs an additional card (frame grabber). It depends on the age of the
computer and its make and Operating system which of the different
options are supported.

3) Currently there are 3 ways of getting the signals into a PC (other
than serial RS-232 and parallel ports which are way to slow):

a) USB
b) 1394 or firewire
c) PCI boards

USB

USB is a serial interface that is now supported on most computers out of
the box. The bandwidth of a USB connection is a maximum of 12
MegaBIT/second, which translates of course into 1.5 Mega-BYTE per
second. This is too slow for video (about 4-5 MegaByte per second), but
enough for still images, unless the video is compressed. Compression is
OK for "consumer" video, but not acceptable for "scientific" video
unless it is lossless (JPEG and MPEG is usually not). Several devices on
the USB bus can compete for bandwidth.

1394

1394 (or firewire) is also a serial interface with a maximum bandwidth
of 400 Mega-BIT per second (or 50 Mega-BYTES per second). This is fast
enough for video. However, I believe that again more than one device can
be attached to a 1394 port which will again compete for bandwidth.
Firewire is not generally available on PCs (I believe the newer Macs
have it), so that for a firewire implementation on a PC normally a card
is necessary that fits into a PCI slot.

PCI

PCI boards, while a bit more cumbersome to install, have the highest
throughput. I think, they are now implementing a new PCI-X specification
that allows up to 1 GigaBYTE per second, i.e., about 20 times faster
than firewire. The reason is of course that PCI is a parallel standard
and not a serial like USB or firewire.

So, there are various ways to attach a camera:

Analog camera: There is no other way than to use a board to transform
the analog signals into digital signals and then send them to the
computer. This can be through a PCI or other card or other electronics
for example on the video card, but the translation is necessary.

Digital cameras: Digital cameras essentially put the digitizer into the
camera and then transmit digital signals. They can then be transferred
through USB (slow but available everywhere), firewire (faster, currently
on Macs (I believe) and PCs with additional card), or through boards for
the PCI bus (fastest, widely available, require board installation).

So, for most users (of PCs at least) there is currently no real
difference between using a firewire or other camera, as they either have
to install a PCI-} firewire card, or another PCI card for image
acquisition. That may change if the motherboard manufacturers start
building firewire circuitry into the motherboards and the operating
systems start supporting this option. For highest performance, however,
I believe that we will see PCI boards for some time to come. Firewire
may run into a performance problem in the future for image streams with
large images. A 1600x1200 image stream with 24 bit color and 30 frames
per second requires a bandwidth of about 170 MBytes/second uncompressed.

I hope I have not confused anybody with this.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================


} ----------
} From: White, Woody N[SMTP:WOODY.N.WHITE-at-MCDERMOTT.COM]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2000 4:13:00 PM
} To: "Peter Guthrie" ; Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Re:USB or firewire cameras
} Auto forwarded by a Rule
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Peter,

If you intend to use a "video" camera, you may need a capture card
rather
than,
or in addition to, a USB or Firewire interface. Most video cams are
analog
(NTSC in the US, SECAM or PAL elsewhere in the world). Others can
certainly
have digital circuits internal (like the new digital camcorders or the
PCcams
used for video conferencing on the net). ...You first need to
determine
the
source format.

Warren's suggestion implements an inexpensive external NTSC* video frame
grabber
(Snappy). Which will "grab" an analog video frame and digitize it.
*May do
PAL
too??

Parallel port I/O is a bit slow (or is that a byte slow :) for pictures
containing lots of data, but is cheap and works since the inherent
resolution of
typical NTSC video is { 640x480. USB is very much faster and Firewire
faster
yet (and usually a lot more $$ for the interface card). For
applications
other
than full frame rate/resolution streaming video, USB is fine.

Woody White


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================




From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:58:03 2000



From: Damian :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 12:50:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Cryostat info.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greg,

I just downloaded from Netscape 4.6 and opened it with Acrobat 3.0

Damian



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:58:03 2000



From: Scott Wight :      scott.wight-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 14:15:53 -0500
Subject: Re: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Michael

The IMAC DV comes with a firewire port standard and a firewire cable.
Connection to a Sony DV camcorder is easy and it gives you complete control
from the computer. See http://www.apple.com/firewire/ for more information.

To get firewire into a PCI (mac or windows) machine Sony sells this card
http://www.sel.sony.com/SEL/consumer/ss5/office/digitalvideo/minidvcamcorderspro
ducts/dvbk-2000_specs.shtml for around $350 which gives similar controls
for live video and digital stills.

No interest in either company except as a satisfied customer.
Scott


}
} 1394 (or firewire) is also a serial interface with a maximum bandwidth
} of 400 Mega-BIT per second (or 50 Mega-BYTES per second). This is fast
} enough for video. However, I believe that again more than one device can
} be attached to a 1394 port which will again compete for bandwidth.
} Firewire is not generally available on PCs (I believe the newer Macs
} have it), so that for a firewire implementation on a PC normally a card
} is necessary that fits into a PCI slot.
}
..snip...
} So, for most users (of PCs at least) there is currently no real
} difference between using a firewire or other camera, as they either have
} to install a PCI-} firewire card, or another PCI card for image
} acquisition. That may change if the motherboard manufacturers start
} building firewire circuitry into the motherboards and the operating
} systems start supporting this option. For highest performance, however,
} I believe that we will see PCI boards for some time to come. Firewire
} may run into a performance problem in the future for image streams with
} large images. A 1600x1200 image stream with 24 bit color and 30 frames
} per second requires a bandwidth of about 170 MBytes/second uncompressed.
}
} Michael Bode, Ph.D.

-------------------note: new mailing address----------------------
Scott Wight e-mail: scott.wight-at-nist.gov
NIST 222/A113 W voice: 301-975-3949
100 Bureau Dr STOP 8371 | fax: 301-417-1321
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371 \|/ disclaimer: Any opinion expressed
is my own and does not represent those of my employer.




From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:58:06 2000



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 13:08:57 -0700
Subject: Re:No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree...

Chill out Fook

Sunny and 70 in Phoenix

-----Original Message-----
} From: Paul Webster [mailto:pwebster-at-hei.org]
Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2000 6:52 PM
To: MSA listserver submission


} Please keep weather reports private.
}
} Ann Fook

Why? A little light heartedness never hurt anyone.
For the record, LA was sunny as usual today. Happy I don't live in CT
anymore.

Regards,

Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Associate Scientist & Director
Ahmanson Advanced Electron Microscopy & Imaging Center
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third St.
Los Angeles, CA 90057

Phone: (213) 273-8026
Fax: (213) 413-6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm



From daemon Thu Jan 27 17:57:45 2000



From: Pierre Ruterana :      ruterana-at-lermat8.ismra.fr
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2000 16:47:52 -0800
Subject: Positions available in Europe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Collegues

We would apreciate to inform interested young researcher of the
following available positions in our research project.
Thank you very much for getting this circulated.
Pierre

Pierre Ruterana
Laboratoire d'Etude et de Recherche sur les Materiaux (LERMAT)
Unite associee CNRS No 6004
Institut Superieur de la Matiere et du Rayonnement(ISMRA)
6, Bd Marechal Juin
14050 Caen Cedex
France
Tel: (33 2) 31 45 26 53
Fax:(33 2) 31 45 26 60 e-mail: ruterana-at-lermat8.ismra.fr




Research Training Network EC Contract N¡: HPRN-CT-1999-00040
Interface analysis at atomic level and Properties of Advanced Materials
(IPAM)

Eight positions are immediately available, eligible young ( { 35 years)
researchers must be citizens
of EC or associated countries (Norway, Island, Israel, Lichtenstein,
Bulgaria, the Czech Republic,
Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and
Letonia), however any
foreigner who has spent five years in an EC country may apply. Women
candidates are particularly
encouraged to apply and equal opportunity between women and men will
govern our choice.
Following the mobility criteria, the young researchers will not apply
for a position in their native
country.

1. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society,
Berlin,
Germany
A postdoctoral position at the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin (Germany)
is available in the group
"Surface morphology and growth of semiconductors" under the supervision
of Dr. Joerg
Neugebauer. The research will be mainly focused on the theoretical
modeling of electronic
properties and atomic structure of interfaces and interfacial defects
employing first principles total
energy calculations. The basic materials for this project will be
gallium nitride based
semiconducting layers where extended defects are well known to occur in
large concentrations. The
research will be performed in close collaboration with experimental,
industrial, and theoretical
partners within the EC. Strong interaction with the other groups is
therefore expected. The
successful candidate should have a PhD in Physics, Chemistry or
Materials Science, and have a
strong interest on microscopic simulations. Preference will be given to
candidates with strong
background in any (or several) of these fields: electronic structure
calculations, molecular
modeling, density functional theory, empirical potentials, and analysis
of transmission electron
microscopy measurements.
Interested candidates should send immediately a CV, list of
publications, name and address
(including email) of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Dr Joerg Neugebauer
E-mail: neugebauer-at-fhi-berlin.mpg.de, Phone: ++49 30 8413 4826, Fax:
++49 30
8413 4701, www: http://www.fhi-berlin.mpg.de/th/JG

2. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya,
Barcelona, Spain
A postdoctoral position is available at the department of Applied
Mathematics in the UPC. We are
seeking a computational materials scientist interested in modeling the
atomic structure of interfaces
and defects in crystals, mainly gallium nitride based materials. A PhD
in Physics, Materials Science
or related discipline and having experience with atomic simulations is
required. It is highly
desirable an ability to develop empirical interatomic potentials. It is
intended that he/she visits the
other laboratories working in the project to learn how to interpret the
experimental observations and
how to use the theoretical concepts.
Interested candidates should send immediately a CV, list of
publications, name and address
(including email) of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Prof. Anna Serra
E-Mail: a.serra-at-upc.es, Phone: ++34 93 401 68 86, Fax: ++ 34 93 401 18
25

3. A FULL TIME PhD STUDENT at CRHEA, Valbonne, France
These last years, CRHEA-CNRS has implemented an expertise in the growth
of
heteroepitaxial GaN layers on different substrates: sapphire, SiC and Si
by different techniques,
MBE, MOVPE and HVPE. The group has developed a proprietary Epitaxial
Lateral Overgrowth
(ELO) technology which allows to decrease by orders of magnitude the
density of dislocations in
GaN heteroepitaxial layers on sapphire, SiC or Si. Therefore, a great
interest in the procurement of
high quality GaN substrates currently exists. The successful candidate
will strongly support our
present effort to produce self-supported GaN of ELO quality by combining
ELO-MOVPE and
HVPE. Parallel to the growth, he will contribute to the development of
in depth analysis of basis
mechanisms linked to the generation and propagation of threading
dislocations(TDs). More
precisely, it is planned to determine the core structure of defects in
ELO GaN, their electronic
structures (by EELS), the mechanism of bending of these TDs, to
implement new ways of further
decreasing the density of dislocations. He will be able to use two
MOVPE, one HVPE reactor and
all basic characterisation tools (double X-ray diffraction,
magnetotransport, low temperature
photoluminescence, HRTEM,.).
Candidates should send immediately a CV, name and address (including
email) of two references,
preferably by email or fax, to:
Dr Pierre Gibart, email: Pierre.Gibart-at-crhea.cnrs.fr, Tel: ++33 4 93 95
42 27, Fax: ++33 4
93 95 83 61
CHREA-CNRS is located at the French Riviera near Nice ( see:
http://www.crhea.cnrs.fr/)

4. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at ISMRA Caen, France
Candidates should preferably have a Phd with experience in electron
microscopy and/or atomic
structure modeling. The project will involve experimental high
resolution electron microscopy and
image analysis. In parallel, atomic structure modeling of defects and
interfaces will use empirical
and tight binding methods. A connection will be established with ab
initio techniques developed in
partner groups and the successful candidate will undertake quantitative
comparison of experimental
and simulated images. The overall aim is the understanding of the role
of defects and interfaces on
the optoelectronic properties in the Ga based nitride semiconductors.
Candidates should send immediately a CV, list of publications, name and
address (including email)
of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Dr Gerard Nouet on ++33 2 31 45 26 47,
email:gerard.nouet-at-labolermat.ismra.fr or Dr
Pierre Ruterana on ++33 2 31 45 26 53 email: ruterana-at-lermat8.ismra.fr

5. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at University of Liverpool, Great Britain
A three year full-time appointment funded by the European Commission is
available to study defect
mechanisms in gallium nitride based electronic device structures within
the III-V semiconductor
materials group. Candidates should preferably have postgraduate
experience in the growth or
processing of semiconductor device materials. The project will involve
the chemical beam epitaxy
of GaN based materials and the fabrication of model device structures.
The influence of processing
parameters on defect propagation will be investigated using analytical
methods such as electron
microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and surface analytical techniques. This
appointment is part of a
Research Training Network and eligible candidates must be citizens of EC
member countries other
than the United Kingdom.
Candidates should send immediately a CV, list of publications, name and
address (including email)
of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Dr Paul Chalker: ++44 151 794 4313, email pchalker-at-liv.ac.uk or Prof
Robert Pond: ++44
151 794 43 13 / 46 60, email R.C.Pond-at-liverpool.ac.uk

6. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at UniversitŠt Erlangen-NŸrnberg, Germany
Focus of the work in Erlangen university will be on direct correlation
of structural, optical and
electrical properties of extended defects in (i) group-III nitrides (ii)
group III-nitride based
heterostructures. Experimental work is based on (scanning) transmission
electron microscopy
((S)TEM) at all levels of resolution. These comprise high resolution
imaging with atomic
resolution, optical characterisation by cathodoluminescence in the STEM
and analysis of electrical
properties (electrical activity of extended defects, diffusion length of
minority carriers) by the
electron beam induced current (EBIC) both in the SEM and the STEM.
Theoretical analyses are
based on TEM contrast simulation for defect analysis, analysis of the
tetragonal distortion from
high resolution TEM images and finite element simulations of the
strained state of heterostructures.
Candidates should send immediately a CV, list of publications, name and
address (including email)
of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Prof Horst Strunk, Tel: ++49 9131 85 2 8601, Fax: ++49 9131 85 2 8602,
email:
strunk-at-cmp03ww7.ww.uni-erlangen.de, Dr Martin Albrecht, Tel.: ++49
9131 85 2 8613,
Fax: ++49 9131 85 2 8602, e-mail: albrecht-at-cmp04ww7.ww.uni-erlangen.de,


7. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,
Greece
A research opportunity is available for postdoctoral candidates with a
background in Electron
Microscopy, Crystal Growth, Materials Science. The primary
responsibility of the candidate will
be the study of the structure and properties of the heterophase
interfaces between thin films on
gallium nitride based materials. The project will offer the necessary
training for the specific skills
to meet the requirements of the job.
Candidates should send immediately a CV, list of publications, and name
and address (including
email) of three references, preferably by email or fax, to:
Prof Philomela Komninou, Tel: ++30 31 99 81 95 / Fax: ++30 31 99 80 61
e-mail: komnhnoy-at-auth.gr

8. A FULL TIME PhD STUDENT at The University of Cambridge, Great Britain
A three year research studentship position leading to a PhD degree is
available to study the
microscopy and analysis of defects in gallium nitride layers and device
structures. This exciting
project will use a wide range of state-of-the-art electron microscopy
and analysis techniques to
study the atomic structure of defects (using high resolution electron
microscopy), their chemical
composition and electronic properties (using x-ray spectroscopy and
electron energy loss
spectroscopy), including which defects give rise to states in the band
gap. This project is part of a
European Research Training Network aimed at optimising devices in
GaN-based materials. The
research student will form strong links with the other European partners
in this project. Eligible
candidates should have a top quality degree in physics, chemistry,
materials science or electrical
engineering.
Candidates should send immediately a CV, name and address (including
email) of two references,
preferably by email or fax, to:
Prof Colin Humphreys on +44 1223 334457, email
{colin.humphreys-at-msm.cam.ac.uk} , or
Dr Dave Tricker on +44 1223 334469, email {dmt1000-at-cus.cam.ac.uk}


The Candidates will gain time by sending a copy of their CV also to
Prof. Philomela
Komninou, leader of the Training Programme. Tel: ++30 31 99 81 95 /
Fax: ++30 31 99 80 61
e-mail: komnhnoy-at-auth.gr; Please indicate the position of interest.


Caen, January 27 2000
Dr. Pierre Ruterana
Coordinator



From daemon Fri Jan 28 07:53:17 2000



From: jim :      jim-at-proscitech.com.au
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 15:13:15 +1000
Subject: RE: Shelf life of LR-Gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It seems nobody replied to Michaels question. Perhaps because there is no
single answer. LR White and LR Gold I would expect to have a very similar
shelf-life - under similar conditions.

The trouble is to know the starting point. LR White slowly "goes off" from
when the catalyst is added. At room temperature or higher this happens at a
much faster rate than when it's kept refrigerated. Catalyzed LR White could be
kept at the room temperatures for some months. Because the shipping time (even
by air) to our home-market (Australia) from the UK is too long and often at
high temperatures, much and an indeterminable part of the shelf-life would be
expired prior to sale.

Consequently we only procure uncatalysed LR White and the end-user must add and
thoroughly mix the catalyst prior to first use. Our users expect a full year of
refrigerated shelf-life. Shelf-life is really a "when, how long and at what
temperature" question.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
www.proscitech.com

On Tuesday, January 25, 2000 4:52 PM, Michael Reiner
[SMTP:michael.reiner-at-Smail.Uni-Koeln.de] wrote:
}
}
} Dear members of the list,
}
} first, I would like to wish you all the best for the new year.
} Now my question:
} Does anyone know the shelf-life/usability of LR-Gold stored in a fridge?
}
} Is it that delicate as LR-White (Meanwhile I don?t use LR-W older than
} half a year). My bottle which was not opened many times, could be
} roundabout three years old.
}
} Thanks a lot,
} Michael
}
} Michael Reiner
} Department of Anatomy I
} University of Cologne
} Germany
} michael.reiner-at-smail.uni-koeln.de



From daemon Fri Jan 28 07:53:25 2000



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 09:42:49 CET
Subject: Re:No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


*Date sent: 26 Jan 00 17:52:26 -0800
*From: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
*Subject: Re:No weather report please
*To: MSA listserver submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
*Send reply to: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}

*------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Jan 28 07:53:33 2000



From: Timothy Dimitri :      tdimitri-at-us.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 07:56:57 -0500
Subject: SEM - Manufactures of Microcleave tools for silicon wafers???

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I am looking for the names of any manufactures (other than SELA) that
have a product that can cleave sub micron features on silicon wafers...

Thank you

Timothy Dimitri
ASTC Failure Analysis Laboratory
IBM Microelectronics Division



From daemon Fri Jan 28 08:08:17 2000



From: McGill, Ricky L :      rlmcgill-at-eastman.com (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 07:55:51 -0600
Subject: Spring 2000 AReMS Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear list members,
The intent of this note is to formally announce a call for papers
for the upcoming Spring 2000 AReMS (Appalachian Regional Microscopy
Society) meeting to be held in Raleigh, NC.The meeting dates are March 30
and 31.
The theme for this meeting is "Recent Advances in Microscopy for
2000",specifically we would like to focus on recent (but not limited to)
advances in microscopical instrumentation and applications therefrom.


Please forward any abstracts, papers or related items to me at
mailto:\\rlmcgill-at-eastman.com or you may contact me at the number
below.

The most recent meeting info is -at-
http://www.wise.virginia.edu/cvc/arems/raleigh.html

Thanks in advance for your interest!


Rick McGill
Microscopy Research
Eastman Chemical Company
- - - Phone: (423) 229-5473
- - - Fax: (423) 229-4558
- - - e-mail: rlmcgill-at-eastman.com




From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:12 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 14:13:01 +0000
Subject: Re: RE: No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You should logon to Histonet - they're much friendlier!

Had a beautiful drive from old Plymouth to Reading, Berkshire, with
my retired boss yesterday to collect x-ray microanalysis equipment.
Clear blue sky, -2 to +5 degrees. Saw the most gorgeous scenes of
trees covered by thick hoar frost - photographers' dream. Met two
nice ladies - Hello, Jill and Hilary! Thanks for the help!

Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
PS - Don't read this if you don't like the weather !
PPS - See, Paul, I did get there!
PPS - Hello, Daniele - time to write!



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:09 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 14:23:12 +0000
Subject: Re: No weather report please. Why not?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You ought to logon to "Histonet" - they're much friendlier!

I agree about the weather being important to EM. 20-30 years ago we
had some seaweed hanging in the microtome room (about 100 m from the
sea). If it was damp we didn't even try cutting some resins!

Had a car trip yesterday from old Plymouth to Reading, Berkshire,
collect EM equipment., -2 to +5 degrees, clear blue sky, gorgeous
scenes of thick hoar frost on the winter trees - a photographers'
dream. Bonus - met two nice girls - Hello, Jill and Hilary, thanks for
the help!

Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
PS - Don't read this if you don't like weather!
PPS - Paul, I made it!
PPPS - Hello, Daniele, its time you wrote!



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:18 2000



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.cdl.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 11:14:34 -0600 (CST)
Subject: weather & Formvar films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Microlisters,

Neither rain nor sleet, snow nor heat, humidity, hell nor highwater can keep me
from getting Formvar films off glass slides. Only time can...see below.

My secret? Just rinse glass slides - both sides & all around edges, except for
the end you are holding onto - with 95% ethanol and air dry. Then use right away
- dunk into Formvar solution (.25 to .5% w/v in ethylene dichloride), drain and
air dry. Score around edges to break film and float off onto clean water
surface. I like to score the edge by using the corner of a razor blade to score
on the top surface of the slide, near the edge, in addition to scoring the
actual corner edge of the slide with the blade held perpendicular to the edge -
know what I mean? Also, score across the slide near the "top" edge of the
Formvar film, near the end you are holding on to, for clean release of the end
of the film.

Second point, Formvar film solutions older that 3 months tend to stick to glass.
I've been tracking that for years. Put mix date on bottle of fresh solution,
after 3 months expect poor release effects to appear.

Gib

P.S. I tend to agree with Fook that this forum should not be used to discuss the
weather ONLY, but if someome wants to put a current local weather "tag" at the
end, AFTER the Microscopy stuff, with their signature, thats OK with me.
Everyone is entitled to their (short) bit of poetry, sage sayings, or weather
commentary there.

For example: "The weather here is unremarkable at this time."

Gib Ahlstrand
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept. Plant Pathology
495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)625-8249
612-625-9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.cdl.umn.edu
http://biosci.umn.edu/MIC/consortium.html



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:19 2000



From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 11:52:18 -0600
Subject: TEM: Help with Microtoming Nanophase Metals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All,
I have a user who is trying to make TEM samples from nanophase metals.
They come out of the process as a fine (10 to 100um) powder. The study is
to compare the microstructure at different processing temperatures (77K to
400K). The current sample preparation technique is to embed the powder in
epoxy, slice and polish, and finish with l-N2 ion milling (BTW, direct
dispersion of the powder does not work as the edges are too thick). There
are several problems with this technique, the worst being that we have
found these materials age rapidly even at room temperature. The epoxy cure
and ion milling thermal budgets may be a problem.
I am considering ultramicrotomy for these samples, but I have zero
experience in this field. McMahon and Malis (1995 Micro Res & Tech v31 267)
worked on a similar system and outline the use of thermally cured LR-White
as the embedding material, so I think it is an appropriate option, but I am
worried about the thermal budget. My question is:
Does any one have experience with low-temperature, UV cured resins for
materials of these type? If so I would greatly appreciate any advice.

Thanks in advance,
Ray


*************************
Ray D. Twesten, PhD
Center for Microanalysis of Materials
University of Illinois
(217) 244-6177 fax:(217) 244-2278




From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:22 2000



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 15:21:14 -0600
Subject: Re: ICC label on cell walls

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Please see request below. If you have any suggestions, either send to the list and I will forward them to the investigator, or send them directly to Dale.
Thanks for the input.
Debby Sherman

--------------------------------------


Greetings,
I can make two suggestions.

1) Ignore the staining in the cell wall. Since you know that
your protein of interest is not there and you know also that
secondary cell wall must be outside of the cell, this should not
interfere with staning inside the cell.

2) Try to pre-absorb with "wood". The idea here would be to
incubate your serum with some sort of wood pulp, and then spin out
the wood pulp presumably taking with it all the ab's that bind wood,
but leaving behind the ones of interst. I am not sure how best to
make a suitable pulp of wood. Maybe take a pencil sharpener and grind
a dowell, and then grind the shavings further in a mortar and pestle
or maybe use a homogenizer of some sort. I am guessing wildly here.
Certainly the wood bits should be easy to spin after absorption.

Hope this helps,
Tobias.


}
} Date: Thursday, January 27, 2000
} } From: Dale Karlson {dtk-at-omni.cc.purdue.edu}
}
}
}
} QUESTION: How to minimize artifact labelling with secondary cell walls
}
}
} To whom it may concern:
}
} I am attempting to localize protein in a woody plant and consistently
} observe an interaction with secondary cell walls. This is an artifact, we
} know that the protein does not exist in the cell wall. We are using a
} polyclonal antibody that was raised against a protein that was excised
} from an SDS gel, suspended in Freund's complete adjuvant and used for the
} immunization (in chicken). Chicken antibodies were purified by an
} ammonium sulfate precipiation method described by Song et al. (Song, C.S.,
} J.H. Yu, D.H. Bai, P.Y. Hester, and K.H. Kim. 1985. Antibodies to the
} 5-subunit of insulin receptor from eggs of immunized hens. Journal of
} Immunology 135: 3354-3359). I have tried Western blot affinity
} purification of the antigen and antibody and it has not solved this
} problem. We do not have access to a "purified" form of the protein, so
} affinity purification with a purified protein is not an option.
}
} It is obvious that the chicken had an "allergy" that was not visible
} during our screening process (with western blots) to select the host
} animal. The chicken obviously has specific antibodies to some secondary
} wall component, and I would like to know what it might be and how I could
} remove this artifact.
}
} Any input would be greatly appreciated.
}
}
} -------------------------------------------
}
} Debbie,
}
} let me know if this is suitable..or if it is way too long etc.
}
} Thanks,
}
} -Dale
}
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________________________________
}
} Dale Karlson .***. .***. .***.
} 1165 Horticulture Building * | | | * | | | * * | | | *
} Purdue University * | | | * * | | | * * | | | *
} W.Lafayette. IN 47907-1165 * | | | * * | | | * | | | *
} '***' '***' '***'
}
} Home Phone: (765) 742-8379
} Lab Phone: (765) 494-1345
} _______________________________________________________________________

_ ____ ^ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ University of Missouri
/ | / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/___/ /__ /___ \ \ \__ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO 65211-7400 USA
/ / / \ \ \ voice: 573-882-0173
/ /____ / \ \__/ \____ fax: 573-882-0123



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:27 2000



From: Jim Goodman :      jgoodman-at-utsi.edu
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 14:07:42 -0800
Subject: TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To All,

The decision has been made to get rid of the following piece of equipment. We obtained the unit approximately five years ago when an outside Contractor brought the system very near operational state. Numerous distractions and circumstances have prevented the TEM from becoming the valuable research investigative tool we had planned.

HITACHI H-600 TEM

1) Model H-600-1 Analytical Electron Microscope
2) Model H-6015 EDX Interface Kit
3) Model H-6012 Micro-Diffraction Unit
4) Spot Scan
5) Model H-6006 Auto Data Display Unit
6) Reduced Area Scan Unit
7) Polaroid Camera w/ Adaptor
8) Model H-6007 High Resolution CRT
9) Model H-5001-C Cobling Holder
10) 2 ea. Overhauled Mechanical Vacuum Pumps & 1 ea. Diffusion Pump

Anyone interested in requesting a Bid Form should contact me at following address:

Jim Goodman
University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI)
411 B. H. Goethert Pkwy.
Tullahoma, TN 37388
TEL: (931) 393-7494
FAX: (931) 393-7543
e-mail: jgoodman-at-utsi.edu



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:21 2000



From: Jo Dee :      jofish-at-burnham-inst.org
Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2000 22:32:52 -0800
Subject: Re: No weather report please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes, I also agree. Today in San Diego it is about 68 degrees with 76% humidity.
Great for cryoultramicrotomy and regular cutting!
Take care all,
Jo Dee

Witold Zielinski wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} *Date sent: 26 Jan 00 17:52:26 -0800
} *From: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
} *Subject: Re:No weather report please
} *To: MSA listserver submission {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} *Send reply to: Paul Webster {pwebster-at-hei.org}
}
} *------------------------------------------------------------------------
} *The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} *To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} *On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} *-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} *
} *
} *} Please keep weather reports private.
} *}
} *} Ann Fook
} *
} *Why? A little light heartedness never hurt anyone.
} *For the record, LA was sunny as usual today. Happy I don't live in CT anymore.
} *
} *Regards,
} *
} *Paul Webster, Ph.D.
} *Associate Scientist & Director
} *Ahmanson Advanced Electron Microscopy & Imaging Center
} *House Ear Institute
} *2100 West Third St.
} *Los Angeles, CA 90057
} *
} *Phone: (213) 273-8026
} *Fax: (213) 413-6739
} *e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
} *http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm
} *
} *
} I agree with you Paul.
} In Warsaw, Poland yesterday was snow on the ground today is
} rain and no chance for sunshine.
} Stay cool,
} Witold

--
Jo Dee Fish
Electron Microscopy Assistant
The Burnham Institute
10901 N. Torrey Pines Rd.
La Jolla, CA 92037
858-646-3100 ext.3620




From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:52 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 11:13:44 +0000
Subject: Double weather report - sorry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The first one took a long time to appear - so I thought it hadn't made
it. Must've encountered head winds!

Keith



From daemon Sat Jan 29 08:54:53 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 11:17:31 +0000
Subject: Re: No weather report please. Why not?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry for wasting time with two messages.

The first weather report took so long to appear that I thought it
hadn't made it. Must've encountered headwinds!

Enough - Keith Ryan
Marine Biological Association of the UK
- where its now wet and windy
PS - Hi Daniele



From daemon Sat Jan 29 13:04:49 2000



From: Diane G. Miller :      millerd-at-coho.net
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 09:12:49 -0600
Subject: Cutting live cells on Vibratome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Is anyone cutting live cells on a vibratome? These are from cell cultures.
If anyone has had experience with this, I would appreciate the information.

Thanks
Diane
millerd-at-coho.net




From daemon Sat Jan 29 13:04:48 2000



From: Cochran :      fisher-at-meganet.net
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 10:30:45 -0500
Subject: service providers needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

This request is posted on behalf of an associate who does not subscribe
to this list. He has assumed responsibility for the following equipment
and is looking for service providers. Equipment is located in south
central Massachusetts.

Jeol 840A sem
Kevex delta 5 EDS & XRF with Syquest drive upgrade

He should be contacted off line by e-mail at LapradeB-at-burle-eo.com

Thanx,
Ray



From daemon Sat Jan 29 13:04:52 2000



From: IMZartTchr-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 13:09:29 EST
Subject: microbiological staining technique

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



what microbiological staining technique could be used to allow you
to differeniate Bordetella bronchiseptica from Vibrio cholerae with certainty?



From daemon Sun Jan 30 08:44:58 2000



From: Damian :      dneuberger-at-mindspring.com
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 18:40:43 -0600
Subject: Re: USB or firewire cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Michael,

FYI, I just tested an Optronics digital camera that had a on board firewire
connection to a Gateway 366MHz notebook computer. One can also get PCMCIA
card to connect to most notebook computers. Nice camera but should be for
$13k, without notebook computer!

Damian


} 1394 (or firewire) is also a serial interface with a maximum bandwidth
} of 400 Mega-BIT per second (or 50 Mega-BYTES per second). This is fast
} enough for video. However, I believe that again more than one device can
} be attached to a 1394 port which will again compete for bandwidth.
} Firewire is not generally available on PCs (I believe the newer Macs
} have it), so that for a firewire implementation on a PC normally a card
} is necessary that fits into a PCI slot.



From daemon Sun Jan 30 08:45:03 2000



From: Dr. Raj Lartius :      rlartius-at-novascan.com
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2000 21:54:07 -0600
Subject: Looking for Ion Beam sputter coater or similar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm trying to find a used ion beam sputter coater or something similar...
The system I am used to is the old VCR group ion beam sputter coater. Any
leads that you might have would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks,

Raj

*********************************************
Raj Lartius, Ph.D.
NovaScan Technologies
Iowa State University Research Park
2501 North Loop Drive
Ames, Iowa USA 50010

Email: rlartius-at-novascan.com
Web: www.novascan.com
**********************************************



From daemon Sun Jan 30 12:05:00 2000



From: bobrob-at-uswest.net
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 10:18:55 -0700
Subject: TEM/EDS Detector Wanted

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are interested in acquiring an EDS detector for our JEOL
JEM-1200EXII.
Will trade a Kevex Be-windowed 30mm2 that was formerly attached to an
EM400 for a Kevex/TN/Noran 10mm2/30mm2 Be or UTW. Need detector
only (no MCA, P. Processor, etc). Will purchase or trade.

If you have a suitable detector and are in a position to trade/sell
immediately,
please reply off line to sender.

Bob Roberts
EM Lab Services, Inc
2409 S. Rural Rd
Tempe, Arizona 85282
(480) 967-3946



From daemon Mon Jan 31 07:34:26 2000



From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 11:53:22 -0500
Subject: Double immunofluorescence artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have been reading about FRET and have a question about dual label
imaging with probes like FITC/RHo or Cy3/Cy5. We have to worry about
excitation of the long wavelength probe at the shorter probe
wavelength, and FRET as two ways in which we can be mislead about the
co-localization of two probes. I am wondering to what extent one
also has to worry about non-FRET energy transfer. It seems that
there is some possibility that, for example, Cy5 could become excited
by absorbing photons from Cy3 emission. My presumption is that the
density of photons is low, and this would limit the effect, but it
seems that as proximity gets closer, the chances of this radiative
exchange (rather than resonance exchange) would become greater. Are
there any experimental guidelines as to when to worry about this?
Thanks- Dave
--

************************************************************

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
75 N. Eagleville Rd. U-125
Storrs, CT 06269
Knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html
************************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 31 07:34:26 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 20:08:22 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Bio Cryo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Mon, 24 Jan 2000 13:33:28 -0500, Greg Erdos wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Periodically questions appear on this list concerning the use of
cryostats
} for cutting histological sections. I usually reply to the sender off
line
} and offer a copy of a handout that I got from a workshop at a Histochem
} Meeting some years ago. Even though it is old, cryostat sectioning has
not
} changed a lot. I think there is some valuable info there, especially for

} beginners. I thought it might be helpful to make this available on the
net
} for whomsoever might want to take a look.
} It can be found at :
} http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/
}
} Look for the snowflake
}
} It was written by Bruce Quinn, then of MIT. I hope he has no
objections
} to my posting it.
}
} Greg Erdos
} Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D. Ph.
352-392-1295
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} PO Box 110580
Fax:
} 352-846-0251
} University of Florida
} Gainesville, FL 32611
}
}
}
Finally got onto things here at home, and using Netscape 4.5 and Acrobat
3.0, the document opens up the way it should. Thanks for the info and link,
Greg.

Roger C Moretz, Ph.D.





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com



From daemon Mon Jan 31 07:34:37 2000



From: simon watkins :      swatkins+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 08:57:00 -0500
Subject: 2nd annual course in fluorescence microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Timothy

A method I've used for controlling the position of the cleave in silicon
wafers is to use focused ion beams (FIBs) to mill micro-cleaving grooves
into the silicon. I found that the grooves can determine the position of a
cleave to within 200 nm.

If you want any more details I can forward you a pre-print on the technique.

Richard

--------------------------------------------------------------
Richard M Langford

Department of Materials, University of Oxford
Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH, UK

Tel: +44 (0)1865 273729, Fax: +44 (0)1865 273794
email: richard.langford-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk

----- Original Message -----
} From: Timothy Dimitri {tdimitri-at-us.ibm.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 28, 2000 12:56 PM


Folks:
I thought I should let you all know about the Second annual course in
Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy to be taught between june 19 and 24th
2000 at the Mount Desert Island Marine Biology Laboratories in Arcadia
National Park in Maine. This team taught course led by Dave Piston
(Vanderbilt), Mike Nathanson (Yale), Guillermo Romero (Pittsburgh) and
myself focusses specifically on the development and application of modern
fluorescence microscopic methods. This intensive course covers all aspects
of the technology from microscope and dye design, cameras, confocal
microscopy, live cell microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and GFP.
Considerable attention is also given to quantitative analysis in 2 and 3
dimensions and time. The specific focus of the course allows an in depth
treatment of these methods. The goal of the course it to teach students how
to best implement these methods within their labs, using either their own
cells and tissues or using material supplied by the course. An extensive
array instrumentation, provided by all the major microscope and associated
software, hardware and camera manufacturers will be available for students
to use.
Last year it was a very successful event and we were encouraged to give the
course again. A full description of the course lectures together with
lecture outlines, registration etc. is available at
http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu/microscopy. I would encourage you to spread the
word, or sign up if you are interested. The total number of students is
limited to 20, enrollment is decided by the course faculty.
If you have any further questions please feel free to contact me
Thanks
Simon


-----------------------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRCPath
Associate Professor
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
tel:412-648-3051
fax:412-648-8330
URL: http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
-----------------------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRCPath
Associate Professor
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
tel:412-648-3051
fax:412-648-8330
URL: http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:41 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 11:02:16 -0400
Subject: Re: microbiological staining technique

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 1:09 PM -0500 1/29/0, "IMZartTchr-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

***********
If you don't get an answer from MSA people, try the listserver for the
histologists out there:
"HistoNet Server" {HistoNet-at-Pathology.swmed.edu}

Lee

Lee Cohen-Gould
EM & Confocal Facilities
Weill Medical College of Cornell U.
(212)746-6146
Rms A-105, LC-207




From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:48 2000



From: ctschristopher :      ctschristopher-at-samiot.uct.ac.za
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 17:36:52 +0300
Subject: TEM Video imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi folks

The Cape Town weather is great today, beautiful clear blue skies and a nice
warm 25 C.

We have a Philips TEM 420 which has an EDAX system attached (which is
non-functional at the moment). We are looking for video / digital image
grabbing system that we can use to grab images for prints and possibly Image
analysis. Is this possible on the 420 ? Can anyone suggest a system?

Thanks

Phil


Phillip Christopher
Cardiovascular Research,UCT
Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925
27-21-4066613/6476(tel)
27-21-4485925(fax)
ctschristopher-at-samiot.uct.ac.za



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:49 2000



From: Joyce Craig :      j-craig-at-CSU.EDU
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 10:06:12 -0600
Subject: TEMSEM Halophytes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A graduate student here (Rita Ware) had some success fixing halophilic
bacteria for TEM several years ago. She used the growth medium as a
buffer. She made a poster presentation at an MSA meeting.



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:50 2000



From: Sara Miller :      saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 11:54:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Reichert Ultracut E with cryo FC 4D

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Call TekNet: 800 835-6386

On Mon, 24 Jan 2000, Marti, Jordi wrote:

} Date: Mon, 24 Jan 2000 06:46:26 -0700
} From: Marti, Jordi {jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com}
} To: 'Microscopy' {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Subject: Reichert Ultracut E with cryo FC 4D
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} The power supply in our cryo microtome is having problems which might be
} related to the transformer. I was told by the service engineer that the
} transformer is no longer supported by Reichert. Does any one know where I
} can get a replacement ?
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3020
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-8735



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:51 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 12:06:45 -0500
Subject: SEM - Manufactures of Microcleave tools for silicon wafers???

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Timothy:

South Bay Technology, Inc. manufactures an SEM Cleaving System which
provides a means to precisely and quickly cleave a wafer while in the
inspection mode. A wafer is mounted to a vacuum chuck which is positioned
under an optical microscope. The exact area of interest is located
visually and the sample is cleaved at that point. SEM compatible versions
of the cleaving system are under development which will allow the user to
image and cleave while mounted in the SEM. The Cleaving System is quick,
easy to operate and precise. It allows anyone to quickly and repeatably
prepare SEM cross sections.

If you have an interest, please let me know and we can discuss your
requirements in detail.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 11:48:36 AM on 01/28/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.


Message text written by Timothy Dimitri
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello,

I am looking for the names of any manufactures (other than SELA) that
have a product that can cleave sub micron features on silicon wafers...

Thank you

Timothy Dimitri
ASTC Failure Analysis Laboratory
IBM Microelectronics Division


{



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:51 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 12:06:43 -0500
Subject: TEM - Manufactures of Microcleave tools for silicon wafers???

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Timothy:

I forget to mention in my original posting that South Bay Technology also
produces the MicroCleave kit which is designed for TEM cross sectioning.
Again, if you have an interest, please let me know and I'll get you
additional information.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 11:53:19 AM on 01/28/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.
Message text written by Timothy Dimitri
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello,

I am looking for the names of any manufactures (other than SELA) that
have a product that can cleave sub micron features on silicon wafers...

Thank you

Timothy Dimitri
ASTC Failure Analysis Laboratory
IBM Microelectronics Division

{



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:51 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 12:06:40 -0500
Subject: Looking for Ion Beam sputter coater or similar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dr. Lartius:

While I don't have any leads on a used IBS system, I wanted to let you know
that we at South Bay Technology, Inc. are continuing the manufacture of the
IBS system formerly produced by VCR Group. Actually, we have updated the
system and are now offering the IBS/E. The IBS/E now adds the capability
of etching samples as well as coating and will accommodate samples up to 2"
in diameter.

If you would like additional information, please feel free to contact me.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 9:48:22 AM on 01/31/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by "Dr. Raj Lartius"
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I'm trying to find a used ion beam sputter coater or something similar...
The system I am used to is the old VCR group ion beam sputter coater. Any
leads that you might have would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks,

Raj

*********************************************
Raj Lartius, Ph.D.
NovaScan Technologies
Iowa State University Research Park
2501 North Loop Drive
Ames, Iowa USA 50010

Email: rlartius-at-novascan.com
Web: www.novascan.com
**********************************************

{



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:54 2000



From: HILDEGARD CROWLEY :      hcrowley-at-du.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 11:06:50 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Sandbox Squabble-Weather

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi,

Are we like kids sitting in a sandbox and squabbling? Yes weather, no
weather! He said it first! She started it! I don't want weather on the
listserver. I want to read about weather in the boondocks. Who cares
about you, anyway? Sort of funny when you think of it that way, isn't it?

Bye guys,
Hildy Crowley



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:30:57 2000



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 08:49:42 -1000 (HST)
Subject: SEM: JEOL JSM840-AM1000

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, microscopists-

A friend has the chance to buy a used JEOL JSM840 - AM1000 with EDX and
all the bells and whistles. He has asked if this is a good instrument,
and worth the price (whatever that is - he won't tell me). Since I
haven't seen the instrument and I don't know JEOLs at all, I told him I
would ask the experts.

If anyone can tell me a little about the instrument and what it might be
worth (the second part of the question being more difficult), I would
appreciate it.


In Honolulu it is gloriously clear and sunny, with temperatures near 80F
during the day and about 60F at night, which is unusually cold but really
nice.

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:31:10 2000



From: Steve Barlow :      sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 13:32:03 -0800
Subject: Teaching/Outreach call for papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You are invited to participate in a symposium of remote access microscopy,
and /or teaching microscopy to take place at the Microscopy &
Microanalysis Annual Meeting August 13-17, 2000 in Philadelphia, Pa.

Platform and poster contributions are welcome. Please contact me
directly for more information about the symposium.

Deadline for receipt of a 2page abstract is Feb 15, 2000. For
registrationand abstract forms, see
http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html

ADVANCES IN INSTRUMENTATION AND TECHNIQUES SYMPOSIUM 19: TEACHING
MICROSCOPY IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM

Organizer: Steve Barlow

The use of computers to control microscope operations, the ability to
control microscopes remotely over the Internet, and the creation of
microscope computer simulations allow researchers and students to access
microscopes in new ways. These developments mean changes in the way
microscopy can be taught to students and researchers. This symposium will
examine different ways to teach microscopy and microscope theory and
operation to reseachers and students of all levels, in the context of new
laboratory configurations, computer simulations, remote access usage, and
classroom exercises.


Dr. Steven Barlow, Associate Director
EM Facility/Biology Department
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619)594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
website: http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility/

Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
promoting access to microscopes
Microscopy Society of America http://www.msa.microscopy.com/




From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:31:28 2000



From: Valerie Leppert :      vjleppert-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 15:43:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi there;

We have a new (to us) Philips CM-12 TEM in our lab and are wondering how
to get the intermediate lens focused on the diffraction aperture (for
making the first image plane and the diffraction aperture coincident
prior to obtaining a SAED pattern). It doesn't seem to be covered in the
manual.

Any help would be appreciated as this is a completely new microscope to
us.

Thanks,
Valerie Leppert



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:31:30 2000



From: Earl Weltmer :      earlw-at-pacbell.net
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 15:59:18 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM: JEOL JSM840-AM1000

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The JEOL 840 is an excellent instrument: very reliable & very easy to use.
Enjoy with confidence.

Earl Weltmer

P.S.: Does your friend need someone to install the SEM? I would love to install
it assuming it is in Hawaii.



Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi, microscopists-
}
} A friend has the chance to buy a used JEOL JSM840 - AM1000 with EDX and
} all the bells and whistles. He has asked if this is a good instrument,
} and worth the price (whatever that is - he won't tell me). Since I
} haven't seen the instrument and I don't know JEOLs at all, I told him I
} would ask the experts.
}
} If anyone can tell me a little about the instrument and what it might be
} worth (the second part of the question being more difficult), I would
} appreciate it.
}
} In Honolulu it is gloriously clear and sunny, with temperatures near 80F
} during the day and about 60F at night, which is unusually cold but really
} nice.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 31 18:31:31 2000



From: Kristen Lennon :      kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 16:22:55 -0800
Subject: historesin supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All,
Does anyone know of a supplier for Historesin, formerly Cambridge, Leica,
LKB? And, the weather in SoCal is quite lovely today - it finally rained.
Thanks,
Kristen
Kristen A. Lennon
Cell, Molecular & Developmental Biology Group
Department of Botany & Plant Sciences
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521
kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 31 20:32:35 2000



From: Chuck Butterick :      cbutte-at-ameripol.com
Date: 1/31/00 11:06 AM
Subject: Sandbox Squabble-Weather

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The whole weather thing has been pretty silly.

Chuck Butterick
Engineered Carbons, Inc.


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



Hi,

Are we like kids sitting in a sandbox and squabbling? Yes weather, no
weather! He said it first! She started it! I don't want weather on the
listserver. I want to read about weather in the boondocks. Who cares
about you, anyway? Sort of funny when you think of it that way, isn't it?

Bye guys,
Hildy Crowley






From daemon Tue Feb 01 07:28:29 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2000 23:44:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Wanted:Used TEM for virus work

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Would you be interested in a Zeiss 9s2 TEM? 60k is the top magnification.
It has been a nifty scope as we have upgraded to a Zeiss 109. If you are
interested let me know.
Cheers!
-Ken
------------
Ken Tiekotter
Dept. of Biol.
The University of Portland
5000 Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97303

On Wed, 26 Jan 2000, Cynthia Shannon wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Subject: Wanted: Used TEM for virus work
} Date: Tues, 26 Jan 2000
} } From: cshannon-at-nctimes.net
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
}
} Does anyone have an old TEM for virus work?
} I am the electron microscopist for the county veterinarian. We are short
} of funds. Please contact me by email.
} Thanks.
} Cindy Shannon
}
}
}



From daemon Tue Feb 01 07:28:46 2000



From: Asbj¿rn Skogstad :      asbjorsk-at-stami.no
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2000 12:17:19 +0100
Subject: LM,fluorescence - aggregation of bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-Obviously an advantage for many bacteria species, but a nightmare for
the microscopist who wants to count
them. For several reasons we want to split the aggregates of bacteria
into single cells before counting.
We have tried mild detergent treatment and ultrasound though with
limited success. The samples are initially
taken, as filter samples in working atmospheres were bacteria could be
airborne, e.g. farm work. Afterwards
the bacteria are washed off the filter, resuspended, stained (AO),
refiltered on black pc-filter, mounted and
counted. Any suggestions for a treatment, which will de-aggregate the
bacteria, are most welcome.

Asbjorn Skogstad
National Inst. of Occup. Health,
Oslo, Norway
asbjorn.skogstad-at-stami.no



From daemon Tue Feb 01 07:40:49 2000



From: Tony Bruton :      bruton-at-EMU.UNP.AC.ZA
Date: 1/31/00 11:06 AM
Subject: Sandbox Squabble-Weather

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chuck 'an all

That's why I tried to bring in a useful element to it by mentioning, a little tongue in cheek, my humidity vs formvar films question. But thanks to the silly weather thread I had some useful and interesting responses. May I be forgiven for saying that there's a silver lining..............

Tony Bruton
University of Natal
South Africa

} } } "Chuck Butterick" {cbutte-at-ameripol.com} 02/01/00 04:06AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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The whole weather thing has been pretty silly.

Chuck Butterick
Engineered Carbons, Inc.


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



Hi,

Are we like kids sitting in a sandbox and squabbling? Yes weather, no
weather! He said it first! She started it! I don't want weather on the
listserver. I want to read about weather in the boondocks. Who cares
about you, anyway? Sort of funny when you think of it that way, isn't it?

Bye guys,
Hildy Crowley








From daemon Sun Feb 20 13:53:24 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2000 16:42:48 -0500
Subject: DTSA Geometry setup for JEOL 2000FX in Experimental Header(Kevex

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Quantum)


Does anyone have the geometry settings for a Kevex Quantum detector on a
JEOL 2000FX? I am using DTSA and need the values. I would like to have the
sample to detector distance and the azimuthal angle. I am using +45 for the
azimuthal angle and 90 for the detector angle. Are these correct? I know
that the takeoff angle is 70.
-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)




From daemon Sun Feb 20 13:53:24 2000



From: David Lockwood :      d.lockwood-at-mailbox.uq.edu.au
Date: Sun, 20 Feb 2000 09:13:45 +1000
Subject: Fluoro - GFP, Nikon filters, fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all. I have just joined this list and am posting without the usual
"lurking time" due to time constraints - please forgive if recently
covered. I am also a novice in all microscopy techniques, especially
fluorescence.

I am trying to detect GFP-containing cells in liver tissue and having
some problems.

1. I can't determine the spectra for the filter blocks I am using (on a
Nikon Eclipse TE300 with TE-FM Epifluorescence attachment). The blocks
are marked "UV", "B-2" (blue from source, green in field) and "G" (green
from source, red in field). I have e-mailed Nikon and to be fair
they've only had a few days but I'm under some pressure. No help from
the manual. I have been using B-2 for GFP.

2. I get quite a lot of background fluorescence even with frozen
sections (fixed in neutral buffered formalin). Can anyone suggest a way
to reduce this? (eg any extra filters?)

3. I have read conflicting opinions on fixation. Most previous work has
used thick sections (50 microns cut eg with Vibratome, ? to avoid having
to embed tissue blocks). GFP is interfered with by acetone (and probably
other organic solvents) but I would have thought that after fixation
with formalin it should be stabilized and resistant to the
xylene/alcohol used in paraffin embedding. I have seen fluorescence
retained after this treatment but perhaps it can be improved.

4. For those with liver fluoro experience - on "UV" setting I see bright
fluorescence which photobleaches. I believe I am looking at retinoids in
stellate cells, although the bleaching is incomplete and a bit slower
than I have seen before. Can anyone confirm this?

Apologies for long post. Any help much appreciated.

David Lockwood
University of Qld Dept of Surgery
PA Hospital Brisbane Australia



From daemon Fri Feb 11 18:29:51 2000



From: Marty Reed :      mmr7001-at-humboldt.edu
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 1980 08:23:24 -0800
Subject: questions for MSA members

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
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A colleague would like your responses to these questions. I believe that I
say something on the first question about a year ago and apologize for
asking again.


} Here's what I/we need to know.
}
} 1) Are Microstar diamond knives equal to Diatome. We have an offer that
} will save us about $1200 on three knives ( one 3mm ultra with 45 degree
} angle, one 3mm ultra with 35 degree angle, one 10 mm histo knife).
}
}
} 2) Is the power controller feature on the Pelco Microwave Tissue processor
} (model #3451) worth it? (costs about $1300 additional compared to the
} Pelco 3450 without the power controller). I plan to do immunolocalization
} work, but am not sure this power controller feature is necessary or worth
} the cost.
}
} Casey
}
}
}
Thanks for your time
}
Marty Reed
Equipment Technician
Biology Department
Humboldt State University
Arcata CA 95521
707-826-3234
707-826-3201 FAX
mmr7001-at-axe.humboldt.edu







From daemon Tue Feb 01 10:56:26 2000



From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2000 10:58:08 -0400
Subject: TEM H600

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Hi!
Could anybody tell me what would be the sale price for a Hitachi
H600?
Thanks
Dorota



From daemon Tue Feb 01 10:56:32 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 11:28:02 -0500
Subject: RE: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I don't use a CM series microscope on a regular basis, but what is important
is that you set it up the same way every time.

You can not make the back focal plane of the objective lens coincident with
the objective aperture. The back focal plane is well above the location of
the objective aperture plane.

There are two ways that I use to set up diffraction patterns reproducibly
depending on whether I am using CBED or SAD. Both are set up after the
sample has been made eucentric and the image focussed.

CBED: This method can be done for both CBED and SAD. The shadow of the
condenser aperture defines the diameter of the diffraction disk. When the
intermediate lens is adjusted properly, the edges of the diffraction disks
will be in focus. You are grabbing the back focal plane for your
diffraction pattern in the projector lens system. You will note that all of
the HOLZ lines (if you can see them) are the sharpest at this condition. If
you have a highly polycrystalline sample with continuous diffraction rings,
this method is difficult to do.

SAD. Spread the beam with the condenser all the way. (clockwise in the
CM-12 will go to more parallel beam faster than CCW -I think.) Then focus
the spot to the smallest that you can. You can take a really long exposure
or cheat a little and put some intensity back into the pattern with the
condenser lens. You will note that the objective aperture is not focused in
this method.

The most important thing to remember is to make the sample eucentric and
focus before during either of these methods and to do the diffraction
focussing consistently from sample to sample.
-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Valerie Leppert [mailto:vjleppert-at-ucdavis.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 31, 2000 6:44 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi there;
}
} We have a new (to us) Philips CM-12 TEM in our lab and are
} wondering how
} to get the intermediate lens focused on the diffraction aperture (for
} making the first image plane and the diffraction aperture coincident
} prior to obtaining a SAED pattern). It doesn't seem to be
} covered in the
} manual.
}
} Any help would be appreciated as this is a completely new
} microscope to
} us.
}
} Thanks,
} Valerie Leppert
}
}



From daemon Tue Feb 01 11:47:12 2000



From: Laurie Wallin :      lwallin-at-ucsd.edu
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 09:02:04 -0800
Subject: Any other fluorescence microscopy classes?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I received Simon Watkins' note about the microscopy class in Maine and
wonder if anyone knows about similar courses closer to California in the
near future? We've got a number of technicians working on fluorescence
microscopy in our lab, and I think it would be great to have some more
formal training for us!

Sincerely,
Laurie Wallin
UCSD Department of Anesthesiology
9500 Gilman Drive, 0629, La Jolla, CA 92093



From daemon Tue Feb 01 13:58:38 2000



From: Robert S Dotson :      rdotson-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 11:55:19 -0600 (CST)
Subject: used Philips EM410

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are disposing of our old Philips 410 transmission
electron microscope. It is in pretty good shape but
is not fully functioning. At minimum it needs its ion
getter reconditioned. Does anyone know of someone who
might want to buy it and fix it up or use it for
parts?
-Robert


____________________________________

Robert S. Dotson, Ph.D.,
Laboratory Supervisor, Microscopy

Coordinated Instrumentation Facility
605 Lindy Boggs Building
Tulane University
6823 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118-5698

504-865-5142| fax 504-865-6768

rdotson-at-mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu
http://www.tulane.edu/~cif
____________________________________



From daemon Tue Feb 01 13:58:42 2000



From: best-at-Juniata.Edu
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 14:09:48 -0500
Subject: RE: weather & Formvar films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am thankful to those who took this weather thread and imparted
some information that I can really use. The retired professor that taught
me how to release forvar films had no idea why sometimes it worked and
sometimes it didn't. Now at least I have a couple of likely variables to
check.

Thanks!
Chris Best
Mol. Biol.
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA 16652


PS - I can't help but be amused that even on a forum for scientists,
the petty &/or silly items get the most responses. Tell the truth, do you
stay up at night watching Jerry Springer? (For heaven sake, don't answer
that!)




From daemon Tue Feb 01 14:23:32 2000



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2000 15:01:57 -0500
Subject: SAD and the back focal plane

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am afraid that I do not agree with Scott Walck about back focal planes.
I do not have a CM 12 in the lab here. So I can not check that I am not
confusing the CM 12 with other Philips/FEI instruments. However, when
Scott says “You can not make the back focal plane of the objective lens
coincident with the objective aperture. The back focal plane is well above
the location of the objective aperture plane.” he is wrong. On all
microscopes except the very few which have very small pole-piece gaps for
high resolution, the objective aperture should coincide with the back focal
plane.

There is an easy and accurate way to find the true back focal plane on a CM
12 (or any other microscope with an immersion lens). Use a crystalline
sample, go to convergent-beam diffraction then use the diffraction focus to
make the Kikuchi lines as sharp as you can. That is the back focal plane.

If the microscope is set up properly, the image of the objective aperture
should be sharply in focus at nearly the same setting of the diffraction
focus. If the diffraction focus to give a sharp image of the objective
aperture is very different from the diffraction focus to make the Kikuchi
lines sharp, get your service engineer to reset the height of the objective
aperture until they agree.

If the sample is at the correct eucentric height, a selected-area
diffraction pattern in the true back focal plane will have sharp spots for
a C2 setting almost but not quite to the maximum (almost fully clockwise).
Again, if it does not, ask the service engineer to fix it.



Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu



From daemon Tue Feb 01 15:14:30 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 15:58:05 -0500
Subject: RE: SAD and the back focal plane

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Alwyn,
We have a CM-12 at our other facility and I will check it out in a day or
so.

I thought that I did and it worked like our JEOL 2000FX. In the 2000FX,
because the lens is highly excited, there are 3 cross overs in the objective
lens after the sample. That means the true back focal plane is inside the
objective lens and it is not possible to put the aperture at that plane. In
the 2000FX, I have focused the CBED pattern and have found the objective
aperture not in focus. I have also found that the two methods that I
outlined do not agree with the camera constants. The 2000FX has a condenser
mini lens to make the beam parallel, but the highly excited lens allows the
small probes. Since the CM-12 can form the small probes, I thought that the
lens system was working in a similar manner.

I will try it out unless someone beats me to it. How about it CM owners?

-Scott


Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 3:02 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: SAD and the back focal plane
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
}
} I am afraid that I do not agree with Scott Walck about back
} focal planes.
} I do not have a CM 12 in the lab here. So I can not check
} that I am not
} confusing the CM 12 with other Philips/FEI instruments.
} However, when
} Scott says "You can not make the back focal plane of the
} objective lens
} coincident with the objective aperture. The back focal plane
} is well above
} the location of the objective aperture plane." he is wrong. On all
} microscopes except the very few which have very small
} pole-piece gaps for
} high resolution, the objective aperture should coincide with
} the back focal
} plane.
}
} There is an easy and accurate way to find the true back focal
} plane on a CM
} 12 (or any other microscope with an immersion lens). Use a
} crystalline
} sample, go to convergent-beam diffraction then use the
} diffraction focus to
} make the Kikuchi lines as sharp as you can. That is the
} back focal plane.
}
} If the microscope is set up properly, the image of the
} objective aperture
} should be sharply in focus at nearly the same setting of the
} diffraction
} focus. If the diffraction focus to give a sharp image of
} the objective
} aperture is very different from the diffraction focus to make
} the Kikuchi
} lines sharp, get your service engineer to reset the height of
} the objective
} aperture until they agree.
}
} If the sample is at the correct eucentric height, a selected-area
} diffraction pattern in the true back focal plane will have
} sharp spots for
} a C2 setting almost but not quite to the maximum (almost
} fully clockwise).
} Again, if it does not, ask the service engineer to fix it.
}
}
}
} Alwyn Eades
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Lehigh University
} 5 East Packer Avenue
} Bethlehem
} Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
} Phone 610 758 4231
} Fax 610 758 4244
} jae5-at-lehigh.edu
}
}



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:01:23 2000



From: Henry Eichelberger :      heichelb-at-binghamton.edu
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2000 16:14:07 -0500
Subject: RE: Reichert Ultracut parts & repair

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-----Original Message-----



Jordi:
For Reichert repair and parts I would suggest Helmut Patzig of MOC
(Microscopical Optical Consulting Inc.), phone (914) 268-6450 or e-mail
MOCLeica-at-Aol.com Helmut is known to carry spare parts for Reichert and LKB
ultramicrotomes.
I have no vested interest in MOC other than as a satisfied customer.
If he cannot help, you could ask him what your Reichert transformer voltage
output should be and using a voltage meter adjust the voltage of a variable
voltage transformer to the correct amount. Make sure to incorporate a
"stop" on the dial so the voltage can't be accidentally moved above the
correct amount.
Henry


Henry Eichelberger, Manager
Electron Microscopy Facility
Department of Biological Sciences
Binghamton University
Binghamton, NY 13902-6000

phone: (607) 777-2682
fax: (607) 777-6521
e-mail: heichelb-at-binghamton.edu


-----Original Message-----
------------------------------------------------------
On Mon, 24 Jan 2000, Marti, Jordi wrote:

} The power supply in our cryo microtome is having problems which might be
} related to the transformer. I was told by the service engineer that the
} transformer is no longer supported by Reichert. Does any one know where I
} can get a replacement ?
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti




From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:00 2000



From: Milo Kral :      m.kral-at-mech.canterbury.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 15:28:32 +1300
Subject: Looking for a turbo pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have an extra turbo pump that they can part with?

the weather is quite wintery considering its summer here in Christchurch
New Zealand. low clouds with southerly prevailing winds (explaining the
COLD)




From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:10 2000



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 02:37:10 -0500
Subject: Silver membranes being discontinued

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Hello,

I apologize in advance if this posting offends anyone. However there are a
good many people who use silver membranes in their work and to have the
supply from the worlds only manufacturer (to my knowledge) come to a halt,
has the potential of being highly disruptive at least to some programs:
=================================================
Osmonics has announced the closing of our Phoenix, AZ manufacturing facility
effective 1 May 2000. Since our silver membranes are manufactured in this
facility, Osmonics has decided to end production of this membrane because of
declining sales and the very expensive costs associated with moving the mfg.
. plant to another location. All orders placed before 1 March, 2000 will be
honored and filled.
==================================================
We plan to make a "last buy" before the cut off date of March 1, 2000. I
would advise anyone depending on these silver membranes for their work to
take stock of their future requirements because after the cut off date,
sales will be possible only from remaining stocks.

For those who do run out, and are in a bind, we are prepared help them find
alternative filtration media, of which there are indeed some alternatives
for some applications.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.spi.cc
########################
============================================



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:13 2000



From: Keith Ryan :      KPR-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 08:35:01 +0000
Subject: LM - Cryostat - marine larvae

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Listers

I have someone here who wants to freeze and cut cryostat sections of
marine larvae (5 microns?) for immuno/light microscopy. The specimens
are 100-200 microns in length.

1. What would be the best way of handling these small items?
2. What would be the best support/medium e.g TissueTek?
3. What about cryoprotection? I am familiar with 2.3 molar sucrose
for EM.
4. Any general tips for immuno (protein/amino peptidases)?

Thanks - Keith
_______________________
Keith Ryan (Dr)
Marine Biological Association
Citadel Hill
Plymouth
Devon PL1 2PB
England

Tel. 0044 (0)1752 633279 (with answer machine)
also 0044 (0)1752 633249
Fax. 0044 (0)1752 633102

e-mail: kpr-at-wpo.nerc.ac.uk



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:11 2000



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 08:38:24 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: re - CM12 SAD focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Valerie,

Like the other respondees I am not a CM12 user
(where are they?), however, as an ex CM12 user of some 10
years ago I think that I remember the alignment that Valerie
is asking about. In the basic alignment of the machine there
was a step during which the SAD aperture was focussed. I
think that it was in the `service calibrations' page. This
may have changed in later software revisions.

The alignment of this microscope was usually
carried out by the engineer when the instrument was
installed. They would set up the objective lens current and
adjust the specimen goniometer height to ensure that when
it was at the eucentric position it was correctly in focus.
Following this a complete column alignment was carried out
including focussing the SAD aperture. The manufacturers
then assumed that the operator would set up the specimen to
the eucentric height, it should focus in the same position
and the aperture should be in focus.

If the aperture is not in focus when in the SA
range (as noted next to the mag readout) then check you are
correctly at the eucentric position, if you are then either
it was not aligned properly after installation or something
has changed.
NOTE: DO NOT ADJUST THE SERVICE ALIGNMENTS UNLESS YOU KNOW
WHAT YOU ARE DOING AS YOU CAN LOSE THE INSTRUMENT
ALIGNMENTS.

Good luck,
Ron


----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:14 2000



From: Jonathan Barnard :      Jonathan.Barnard-at-Angstrom.UU.SE
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 11:20:15 +0100
Subject: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I got a tip for finding the condenser lens settings required for parallel
illumination from Angus Kirkland (Cambridge).

Make sure you are in microprobe mode and set up for SAED and the specimen
is out of the way. Spread the beam, put in the SA Aperture, go to
diffraction and then sweep the SA aperture (SAA) from side to side and
minimise the deflection of the diffraction spot by tweaking the
illumination control (C2 or second condenser lens). A little bit of thought
will convince you that anything other than a parallel beam will give you a
side to side motion (tilt) when the SAA is swept.

I have found it useful to keep a table of C2 condenser lens current
settings for each spot size (C1 excitation) in microprobe mode. Setting the
C2 lens for parallel illumination and adjusting the diffraction focus to
get the sharpest spot will then give you near perfect SAD conditions.

Anyone contemplating electron holography for example, will have to start
from the parallel illumination to get the best spatial coherence for their
holograms.

********************************************************
Dr Jonathan Barnard

Analytical Materials Physics
The Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University
P O Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: +46-(0)18-4716838 Fax: +46-(0)18-500131
http://www.angstrom.uu.se/analytical/home.html

********************************************************



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:20 2000



From: Matt_Plantinga-at-amway.com
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 08:15:48 -0500
Subject: LSCM Need help with non-fluorescing resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am working on fluorescent imaging of thin sections cut from samples
embedded in TEM embedding resin, and am having a significant problem with
resin fluorescence. Does anyone know of an embedding resin that doesn't
autofluoresce?

Matt Plantinga
Amway Corporation
matt_plantinga-at-amway.com



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:03:28 2000



From: Andrew Ochalski :      aochalsk-at-science.uottawa.ca
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 14:05:21 GMT+5
Subject: Heating stage with DvorakStotler Chamber...Recommendations?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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{color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param} {FontFamily} {param} Arial {/param} {smaller} Fellow Microscopists,


We have a Zeiss Axiophot microscope and a
Dvorak-Stotler Chamber that we would like to
assemble into a temperature-controlled environment
for digital live-cell imaging. I have several questions
about the best way to combine these elements:

i) Can anyone recommend a heating stage
compatible with both the microscope and the
chamber?

ii) Would the best position for a temperature sensor
be on the top (near the objective?) or on the bottom
of the chamber, or both (two sensors)?

iii) Is it better to heat the media/fluids in their
containers, or to have an in-line heater ( brand
recommendations?)

iv) Are there any fuid flow or temperature
considerations specific to this chamber that need to
be addressed (gravity vs. pump feed, shear forces,
heating stage redundant, etc.)?

v) Are there any problems related to objective lens
mag/NA that need to be overcome when using this D-
S apparatus?


Any references, anecdotes, or words of wisdom
would be appreciated. Dealers, if you have a product
that you think I could use, please don't hesitate to
contact me. Thank you in advance. {FontFamily} {param} BrushScript BT {/param} {bigger}

{nofill}
Regards,

Andrew Ochalski,
Microscopy Technician,
Dept. of Biology,
University of Ottawa
Room 108, Gendron Bldg.
130 Louis Pasteur,
Ottawa, Ontario
CANADA
K1N 6N5
613-562-5800 x6343
FAX: 613-562 5486

{/x-rich}



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:50 2000



From: Cheri Owen :      cowen-at-cmb.biosci.wayne.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 09:32:01 -0500
Subject: Looking for a new microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would like to get some information from some of the top companies on
microscopes with photographic and possibly fluourescent capabilities.
Please email me or call 313-993-4195
Thank you

Cheri Owen
Wayne State University



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:48 2000



From: BARRY SHAW :      Barry.Shaw-at-nottingham.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 14:36:36 GMT0BST
Subject: Re: Any other fluorescence microscopy classes?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello All,

Not really a reply but another question!!
Anybody know of a similar course a little further east - England
(Great Britain) to be exact !!?
Thanks in Advance,

Baz


Barry Shaw
Senior Imaging Technician
Molecular & Cell Biology
E Floor
School Of Biomedical Sciences
University of Nottingham Medical School
NG7 2UH



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:49 2000



From: Manfred Prantl :      prantl-at-alicona.com
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 15:42:52 +0100
Subject: SEM and 3D?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are a company that has specialized on extracting 3D information
from stereoscopic SEM images. Currently we try to figure out the
potential applications and the future prospects of such techniques for
the microscopy community.

What we do exactly is that we take two images from a sample on the
SEM from slightly different tilt angles and use digital image processing

to compute a 3D elevation model. From there you can then perform
various analysis steps like extraction of 3D profiles, determination
of surface roughness etc.

My questions now are:

1.) How would you judge the importance of obtaining 3D data from a SEM
image?
2.) What would be the major requirements for such a data set to be
useful
(like density, accuracy, number of false alarms, etc.)?
3.) Is it of importance to you that you get the 3D data and the image
data
together and not separated (like it is the case with AFM)?
4.) How would you judge the future prospects and influence of such a
technique on your personal field of work?
5.) Do you generally trust the measurement of 3D data via stereoscopic
images?
6.) Do you already have experience with stereoscopic depth measurments
and what are your conclusions?

Best regards, Manfred Prantl
R&D
Alicona GmbH, Germany
www.alicona.com



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:02:53 2000



From: Russell E. Cook :      cook-at-horus.et.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 09:15:18 -0600
Subject: Back focal plane of CM's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Irene Piscopo of FEI/Philips probably can answer your question. I'm copying
this message to her although if she's in the "field" a response may take a
few days. Also, Max Otten of FEI/Philips is another good source for that
type of information.

We have a CM-120 so we're aware of your problems in deciphering the
operator's manual. Good luck!

Bruce F. Ingber, Biologist
USDA-ARS, SRRC
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124

(504) 286-4270 phone
(504) 286-4419 fax
bingber-at-nola.srrc.usda.gov

-----Original Message-----
} From: Valerie Leppert [mailto:vjleppert-at-ucdavis.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 31, 2000 5:44 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com


I can't speak about Philips CM12's, but the back focal plane of the
objective coincides with the objective aperture in the CM30 here.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Russell E. Cook, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division, Building 212
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439-4838
(630)252-7194
FAX: (630)252-4289
cook-at-horus.msd.anl.gov




From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:03:04 2000



From: Piscopo, Irene :      IPiscopo-at-FEICO.COM
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 07:59:45 -0800
Subject: RE: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello all: Valerie Leppart, you can reach me at 203-853-3256. I cannot call
you since there is no phone number to contact. Irene Piscopo

The CM 12 microscope has four mag ranges: LM, M, SA, Mh

As long as you are eucentric and using the SA range the image plane
and the diffraction aperture plane will be in focus. (It is done
automatically by the instrument.) This will give you accurate SAD down to
1um. The objective mag in the plane of the diffraction aperture is
approxmately 27X. If you wish to obtain diffraction from areas smaller than
one micron, use uD, or uuD. If you call me I will discuss these methods
with you and send you detailed instructions on using these methods.


Irene Piscopo


} -----Original Message-----
} From: Ingber, Bruce F. [SMTP:bingber-at-commserver.srrc.usda.gov]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 10:14 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-MSA. Microscopy. com (E-mail)
} Cc: Piscopo Irene (CS) (E-mail); Max T. Otten (E-mail)
} Subject: FW: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment
}
} Irene Piscopo of FEI/Philips probably can answer your question. I'm
} copying
} this message to her although if she's in the "field" a response may take a
} few days. Also, Max Otten of FEI/Philips is another good source for that
} type of information.
}
} We have a CM-120 so we're aware of your problems in deciphering the
} operator's manual. Good luck!
}
} Bruce F. Ingber, Biologist
} USDA-ARS, SRRC
} 1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
} New Orleans, LA 70124
}
} (504) 286-4270 phone
} (504) 286-4419 fax
} bingber-at-nola.srrc.usda.gov
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Valerie Leppert [mailto:vjleppert-at-ucdavis.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 31, 2000 5:44 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Question on Philips CM-12 SAD Alignment
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer-Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe-Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi there;
} We have a new (to us) Philips CM-12 TEM in our lab and are wondering how
} to
} get the intermediate lens focused on the diffraction aperture (for making
} the first image plane and the diffraction aperture coincident prior to
} obtaining a SAED pattern). It doesn't seem to be covered in the manual.
} Any help would be appreciated as this is a completely new microscope to
} us.
} Thanks,
} Valerie Leppert



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:03:59 2000



From: rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 14:15:55 -0600
Subject: Gray level

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How many gray levels can the human eye distinguish? We've found several
references that disagree.
If anyone knows of a reference - that would be best.


Robin Griffin
UAB



From daemon Wed Feb 02 17:04:02 2000



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 16:07:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Gray level

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Robin,

I don't have the reference right in front of me, but I believe that
Gonzalez and Wintz say that

1. The eye can respond to an intensity range of ~10^10 in light intensity,
but this is the adaptive response. The perceived brightness is a log (some
will argue power law) function of the incident intensity.

2. In any one point in an image, the eye can distinguish at most ~20-30
gray levels... But... in a complex image you need at least 100 gray levels
for the eye to see it as smooth. In other words, the eye seems to adapt as
it scans the image.

Cheers,
Henk


At 02:15 PM 2/2/00 -0600, rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com wrote:

} How many gray levels can the human eye distinguish? We've found several
} references that disagree.
} If anyone knows of a reference - that would be best.
}
}
} Robin Griffin
} UAB

Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://web.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Murphy's Law: "If anything can go wrong, it will."
Commentary: "Murphy was an optimist."



From daemon Wed Feb 02 18:52:13 2000



From: Valerie Leppert :      vjleppert-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 15:04:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: re - CM12 SAD focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thanks for your reply and everyone else's reply regarding the SAD
alignment. There seem to be a lot of different opinions about how this
done!

We did set the sample at the eucentric and did notice that the SAD
aperture is not quite in focus when in image mode. Of course this will
cause the diffraction information to come from an area that is displaced
with respect to the aperture position.

I am accustomed to being able to independently focus the intermediate lens
on the SAD aperture, and then bring the image into focus using the
objective lens - making the image plane and the SAD aperture coincident.
This is on a much older Philips model and a much older Hitachi model.

However, on the CM-12, there doesn't seem to be a way for the user to do
this in normal operation. I've tried a few of the suggestions (haven't
worked my way through them all yet!) with no luck yet.

It does seem that this adjustment has been grouped under the category of
"service alignment" in newer models.

Thank you to everyone who has replied.

Valerie Leppert




From daemon Wed Feb 02 18:52:14 2000



From: Karl Hagglund-KW :      hagglund.kw-at-pg.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 17:06:39 -0600
Subject: LM Sony camera bayonet mount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a sony DXC-760 MD ccd camera that we have mounted to a standard camera
lens with a bayonet adapter. Unfortunately, we have borrowed the adapter and
have to return it. Is there a standard size (i.e. Nikon, Minolta, Canon) lens
adapter that works with this camera mount? We can't find a part number or
description for the adapter, and the book doesn't describe the size. We have
already ordered and returned one that didn't fit.

Thanks in advance.

Karl Hagglund
Proctor and Gamble
Food and Beverage Analytical Microbiology




From daemon Wed Feb 02 18:52:16 2000



From: Dr Eric Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 17:14:03 -0600
Subject: Electron diffraction simulations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fellow Listers,
Does anyone know of a (preferrably free) software package
which simulates ray paths, including the diffraction mode,
in the TEM? We would like to use such a package to teach
physics students a bit of optics.

Thanks,
Eric



----------------------
Dr Eric Lachowski
Department of Chemistry
University of Aberdeen
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 (0)1224 272934 fax 272921
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Feb 02 18:52:20 2000



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 02 Feb 00 16:29:17 -0800
Subject: RE: LSCM Need help with non-fluorescing resin

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Reply to: RE: LSCM Need help with non-fluorescing resin
Dear Matt,

Try any of the immunocytochemical resins (Lowicryl, LR White or Gold, Unicryl etc). When specific antibodies are used on embedded tissue, they produce very beautiful fluorescent patterns that look like line drawings.

Paul Webster

Matt_Plantinga-at-amway.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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}
}
} I am working on fluorescent imaging of thin sections cut from samples
} embedded in TEM embedding resin, and am having a significant problem with
} resin fluorescence. Does anyone know of an embedding resin that doesn't
} autofluoresce?
}
} Matt Plantinga
} Amway Corporation
} matt_plantinga-at-amway.com
}
}
}
}
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Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm



From daemon Wed Feb 02 22:19:11 2000



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 2 Feb 2000 19:56:04 EST
Subject: Re: Gray level

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In a message dated 2/2/00 4:00:26 PM,
rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com writes:

} How many gray levels can the human eye distinguish? We've found several
}
} references that disagree.
}
} If anyone knows of a reference - that would be best.

Most of the books on image processing say the same thing (probably all copied
from each other and other non-prime sources), but I don't know of an original
reference based on real research. You can find the same ideas in books like
Frisby "Seeing: illusion, brain and mind", Oxford, 1980; Marr "Vision",
Freeman, 1982; and Rock "Perception", Freeman, 1984 which deal with the
human visual system not in the context of computer graphics. These are
probably closer to the original research.

The basic idea is that it takes about a 2-2.5% change in absolute brightness
(i.e. a ratio of 1.025) to be just detectable, and only if it is a fairly
sudden change spatially (or temporally for that matter). That is where the
20-30 distinct brightness levels over the full range of brightness that can
be seen at one time (i.e. without accommodations like varying pupil size)
comes from. The requirement that an entire scene have about 100 levels to
avoid banding is more controversial, based on the idea that the eye can
perform some accommodation as it traverses from one part of a scene to
another. This probably doesn't apply when (e.g.) looking through a
microscope, so the 20-30 number would be more applicable. It also ignores
color, which complicates things further.



From daemon Wed Feb 02 22:19:14 2000



From: special123-at-smartportfolio.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 12:17:58 +0900
Subject: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Jonathan,

} From what is my understanding of optics - this will not give you parallel
illumination at the specimen plane (if this what you meant?).
By tweaking C2 you are moving the crossover plane (which is actually the
diffraction plane). You can in the same way make the spot not to move by
changing the diffraction focus. For each setting of C2 you can find the
crossover by changing the diff. focus.
Try this - spread the beam, go to diffraction, focus by diffraction focus
for smallest spot, go back to imaging mode put the SAA, go to diffraction
and try the procedure you described. I think the spot will not move.
Ofcourse if you expand the beam too much you can no longer produce small
diffraction spot (without the use of SAA) because you go out of paraxial
mode.
The diffraction plane is always the crossover plane not the theoretical back
focal plane of the objective. Its z-position changes with the change of the
C2 excitement.
The spatial coherency of the electron waves is very high (actually the
electrons are flying one by one through the microscope). The limiting
factors are the source size, the illumination angle and the energy spread.

Please correct me if I'm wrong ... I'm still "green" in electron microscopy
.. I'll be happy to learn from experienced users.

Best wishes,

Rado

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Radostin Danev
Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
---------------------------------------------------------------------
----- Original Message -----
} From: Jonathan Barnard {Jonathan.Barnard-at-Angstrom.UU.SE}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 7:20 PM


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From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:56:54 2000



From: Dmitri V. Sokolov :      sokolov-at-ryouko.rciqe.hokudai.ac.jp
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 20:20:06 +0900
Subject: JAMP-7810 manual in English and local chemical analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

We are making preparations for experiments on determination of the chemical
composition of semiconductor oxides, formed locally. The size of the
modified area should be about 1 micron, and we are not sure yet if it is
possible to make mentioned chemical analysis with Auger microprobe at all.

Another problem is that our newly came Auger spectroscope JAMP-7810 has no
English manual with it. And believe me, it is barely possible to read that
in Japanese!

We would be very grateful for your suggestions on both my questions:
- how to measure the best chemical bonding on the spot with 1x1 sq.
micrometer dimensions
- where to get the manual (or copy of it) from.
Remark: Mails to USA and Japanese representatives of JEOL gave no result!

Best regards.
Dmitri


__________________________________________
Dmitri V. Sokolov, Doctor Course student
Research Center for Interface Quantum Electronics,
Hokkaido University, North 13, West 8, Kitaku,
Sapporo 060, Hokkaido, Japan
Phone 81-11-706-7174 Fax 81-11-716-6004
http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Campus/1314
AOL Instant Messenger FalconDot
ICQ 9418072
__________________________________________




From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:57:12 2000



From: bengi :      bengi-at-unimo.it
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 14:54:20 +0100
Subject: Nitrogen determination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Dear listers,
I have started a research project on ammonium -bearing mineral (zeolites),
and now I'm trying to quantify N using electron microprobe analysis. My
problems of dealing with N are:

a) The thickness of the coating (in the literateur = approximately 150 A¡).
Does anyone have information on the model of coater to making these films?
Does anyone have experience with preparation of such
samples?

b) Obtaining appropriate standards. (I have Si3N4, but it contains too much
N (=39.96%) towards my samples (5%). Does anyone known any good nitrogen
standards for such a sample ?

Any other suggestions about quantitative nitrogen analysis would be greatly
appreciated !!
Thanks for your time.

My best regards

Eugenia


Eugenia Marchi
Universitˆ degli Studi di Modena
Dip. Scienze della Terra
P.le S.Eufemia n¡.19
41100 Modena (Italy)
Tel. +39-059-417289
Fax. +39-059-417399
e-mail: bengi-at-unimo.it




From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:57:36 2000



From: Barr, Dennis B :      dennbarr-at-eastman.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 09:30:07 -0500
Subject: RE: Silver membranes being discontinued

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It's unfortunate that this manufacturer is stopping production. Aren't
there other manufacturers?

Dennis B. Barr (dennbarr-at-eastman.com)
Physical Chemistry Research Laboratory
Physical & Analytical Chemistry Research Division
Eastman Chemical Company
Kingsport, TN 37662-5150

B-150B, R-132E, (423) 229-2188


} -----Original Message-----
} From: Garber, Charles A. [SMTP:cgarber-at-2spi.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 2:37 AM
} To: MICROSCOPY BB
} Subject: Silver membranes being discontinued
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Hello,
}
} I apologize in advance if this posting offends anyone. However there are a
} good many people who use silver membranes in their work and to have the
} supply from the worlds only manufacturer (to my knowledge) come to a halt,
} has the potential of being highly disruptive at least to some programs:
} =================================================
} Osmonics has announced the closing of our Phoenix, AZ manufacturing
} facility
} effective 1 May 2000. Since our silver membranes are manufactured in this
} facility, Osmonics has decided to end production of this membrane because
} of
} declining sales and the very expensive costs associated with moving the
} mfg.
} .. plant to another location. All orders placed before 1 March, 2000 will
} be
} honored and filled.
} ==================================================
} We plan to make a "last buy" before the cut off date of March 1, 2000. I
} would advise anyone depending on these silver membranes for their work to
} take stock of their future requirements because after the cut off date,
} sales will be possible only from remaining stocks.
}
} For those who do run out, and are in a bind, we are prepared help them
} find
} alternative filtration media, of which there are indeed some alternatives
} for some applications.
}
} Chuck
}
} ============================================
}
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
} President 1-800-2424-SPI
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
} Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
} Look for us!
} ########################
} WWW: http://www.spi.cc
} ########################
} ============================================



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:57:55 2000



From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 08:11:02 -0700
Subject: RE: Gray level

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, I agree with John. A better question than "how many gray levels can
one see" is probably "how many gray levels can one see under what
circumstances". The answer is probably very different for a static image
and a dynamic image, with edges or without, in low light conditions or
bright light conditions.

The human eye (and brain) has had Millions of years to evolve and
develop some rather sophisticated algorithms to deal with different
conditions and the answer is probably also very complex. For example,
our vision is extremely good at detecting movement. On a completely
static image this tends to depress differences, while on a dynamic image
it tends to enhance differences (we automatically focus on the changes).


Maybe you can test that yourself:

take the same image on a computer at different bit depths (=levels of
gray). Then randomly put them on the screen (without watching the
change) and try to decide, which image it is. Then do the same but watch
the changes and try to decide how many gray levels you need before the
changeover becomes invisible. You could do this with a "noise" image, an
image that shows some object, and a smooth gray wedge. I for one would
be interested to hear about the results.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



} ----------
} From:
"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com[SMTP:"DRJOHNRUSS-at-AOL.COM"-at-SPA
RC5.MICROSCOPY.COM]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 5:56:04 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com; rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu
} Subject: Re: Gray level
} Auto forwarded by a Rule
}
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In a message dated 2/2/00 4:00:26 PM,
rgriffin-at-eng.uab.edu-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com writes:

} How many gray levels can the human eye distinguish? We've found
several
}
} references that disagree.
}
} If anyone knows of a reference - that would be best.

Most of the books on image processing say the same thing (probably all
copied
from each other and other non-prime sources), but I don't know of an
original
reference based on real research. You can find the same ideas in books
like
Frisby "Seeing: illusion, brain and mind", Oxford, 1980; Marr "Vision",

Freeman, 1982; and Rock "Perception", Freeman, 1984 which deal with the

human visual system not in the context of computer graphics. These are
probably closer to the original research.

The basic idea is that it takes about a 2-2.5% change in absolute
brightness
(i.e. a ratio of 1.025) to be just detectable, and only if it is a
fairly
sudden change spatially (or temporally for that matter). That is where
the
20-30 distinct brightness levels over the full range of brightness that
can
be seen at one time (i.e. without accommodations like varying pupil
size)
comes from. The requirement that an entire scene have about 100 levels
to
avoid banding is more controversial, based on the idea that the eye can
perform some accommodation as it traverses from one part of a scene to
another. This probably doesn't apply when (e.g.) looking through a
microscope, so the 20-30 number would be more applicable. It also
ignores
color, which complicates things further.



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:57:56 2000



From: MICHAEL MOHN :      MMOHN-at-mail.monroe.cc.mi.us
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 10:14:13 -0500
Subject: Re: LM Sony camera bayonet mount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Most industrial cameras use C-mounts. C-mount to camera lens adapters are available from Edmund Industrial Optics (http://www.edmundoptics.com phone:800-363-1992) on page 165 of their 2000 catalog. They have mounts for several types of cameras, and list for $62 each. If your connecting the camera to a 'scope, Edmund sells a relay lens for $240 which mounts the camera to a 23mm eyepiece tube. For connecting to trinocular and CCD ports on a scope, Diagnostic Instruments sells relay lenses for many types of 'scopes (http://www.diaginc.com) for $299.


Michael Mohn
Assistant Professor of Materials Technology
Monroe County Community College
Phone: 734-384-4122 Fax: 734-242-9711
http://www.monroe.cc.mi.us/mmohn

} } } "Karl Hagglund-KW" by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec {hagglund.kw-at-pg.com} 02/02 6:06 PM } } }
We have a sony DXC-760 MD ccd camera that we have mounted to a standard camera
lens with a bayonet adapter. Unfortunately, we have borrowed the adapter and
have to return it. Is there a standard size (i.e. Nikon, Minolta, Canon) lens
adapter that works with this camera mount? We can't find a part number or
description for the adapter, and the book doesn't describe the size. We have
already ordered and returned one that didn't fit.

Thanks in advance.

Karl Hagglund
Proctor and Gamble
Food and Beverage Analytical Microbiology






From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:57:57 2000



From: rlvaughn-at-unmc.edu
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 09:39:47 -0600
Subject: Re: Gray level

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Are you equating brightness levels with grey levels here?
I was told something like this years ago when we were buying our first
digital B&W camera, when I asked the vendor about the competitors thousand
plus grey levels vs his 256 grey levels and was told that the eye could not
distinguish greater levels. Now, four or five years later everyone is
pitching 10, 12 and 16? bit cameras, and yet the images from these cameras
do look better. Is it the bits and increased grey levels? I know that if
your doing image analysis at the pixel level that more bits are to your
advantage but what about just photgraphic quality?

Rick Vaughn



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:08 2000



From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 10:06:36 -0600 (CST )
Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry, but I think we are getting a little confused here.

1) The diffraction plane is (by definition) the objective lens
focal length below the sample - it is the focus of parallel
directions coming from the sample. The focal length (and
parameters such as Cs, Cc) change rapidly with the objective lens
current so an eucentric position makes life simple but is not
necessarily the best condition to use. (For HREM you generaly
want to have the objective lens stronger and reduce Cs.)

2) In general C2 does not change the focal length at all. You
can have some effect from coupling of the magnetic fields, but
all C2 is supposed to do is change the convergence angle.

3) The objective aperature is (approximately) in the back-focal
plane, given that it is finite and height adjustments are only
done coarsely (for a specific value of the objective current
only).

4) The selected area aperature is (approximately) in the same
plane as the object for the same reasons as above. Remember that
there are positional errors in SA diffraction due to Cs (see
Hirsch et al for instance).

5) You should focus Kikuchi-lines, not go for the smallest spot,
since these are real object in the diffraction pattern. What you
will see is then representative of you incident beam, sometimes
a Gaussian range of directions.

6) The simplest way to get more parallel illumination in general is
to reduce the condensor aperture size.

7) All bets are off if you have a FEG. Rather than having incoherent
illumination things like the Cs of the prefield (above the sample)
and postfield (below) add coherently making it much more complicated.
For instance, the illumination angle varies across the field of view.
While this is also there with LaB6, it is a weak effect (except for
certain classes of diffracted beams, e.g. those with a screw-axis). With
a FEG you can get a "spot" pattern many ways, and most of these will have
large aberrations (e.g. pincushion).

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:11 2000



From: Dr Eric Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 16:24:08 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Nitrogen determination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eugenia,
the microprobe is not the best tool for the analysis of
ammonia in zeolites because ammonia is very volatile in the
electron beam. If your zeolite is phase pure it would be
far better to dissolve it and do a classical chemical
analysis.

regards,
Eric
On Thu, 3 Feb 2000 14:54:20 +0100 bengi {bengi-at-unimo.it}
wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Dear listers,
} I have started a research project on ammonium -bearing mineral (zeolites),
} and now I'm trying to quantify N using electron microprobe analysis. My
} problems of dealing with N are:
}
} a) The thickness of the coating (in the literateur = approximately 150 A°).
} Does anyone have information on the model of coater to making these films?
} Does anyone have experience with preparation of such
} samples?
}
} b) Obtaining appropriate standards. (I have Si3N4, but it contains too much
} N (=39.96%) towards my samples (5%). Does anyone known any good nitrogen
} standards for such a sample ?
}
} Any other suggestions about quantitative nitrogen analysis would be greatly
} appreciated !!
} Thanks for your time.
}
} My best regards
}
} Eugenia
}
}
} Eugenia Marchi
} Università degli Studi di Modena
} Dip. Scienze della Terra
} P.le S.Eufemia n°.19
} 41100 Modena (Italy)
} Tel. +39-059-417289
} Fax. +39-059-417399
} e-mail: bengi-at-unimo.it
}
}
}

----------------------
Dr Eric Lachowski
Department of Chemistry
University of Aberdeen
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 (0)1224 272934 fax 272921
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk





From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:23 2000



From: L. Paul Bédard :      Paul_Bedard-at-uqac.uquebec.ca
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 12:12:17 -0500
Subject: Need repairman for Hitachi SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I need somebody to repair a Hitachi SEM S-2700.
Please contact me individually not the list.
Thanks for help,
--
L.Paul Bédard, ing. Ph.D.
Resp. Lab. Géochimie | Lab. Manager
Sciences Appliquées ; Université du Québec à Chicoutimi Canada
Tél. : 418/545-5011 x 2276 | Alt. E-mail : pbedard-at-saglac.qc.ca
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
La période humaine, depuis la création d'Adam jusqu'à nos jours, n'est qu'une
moisissure dans l'histoire de notre planète
JCK Laflamme 1886



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:37 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 11:22:46 -0600
Subject: Re: Gray level

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Let me offer my guess that the improved appearance of the images is be due
largely to the improved signal-to-noise ratio in the newer cameras.

Of course there is also something to be gained in the dynamic range by the
extra bits of resolution. They are much more forgiving and allow
substantial changes in contrast and brightness without sacrificing the
information contained in the data.

Warren S.

At 09:39 AM 2/3/2000 -0600, you wrote:

} Are you equating brightness levels with grey levels here?
} I was told something like this years ago when we were buying our first
} digital B&W camera, when I asked the vendor about the competitors thousand
} plus grey levels vs his 256 grey levels and was told that the eye could not
} distinguish greater levels. Now, four or five years later everyone is
} pitching 10, 12 and 16? bit cameras, and yet the images from these cameras
} do look better. Is it the bits and increased grey levels? I know that if
} your doing image analysis at the pixel level that more bits are to your
} advantage but what about just photgraphic quality?
}
} Rick Vaughn



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:28 2000



From: Michael Plociniak :      plocinia-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 12:44:23 -0500
Subject: New Gold Enhancement Reagents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,
Has anyone used gold enhancement reagents from Nanoprobes, Inc.
(Stonybrook, NY - USA) as an alternative to silver enhancement for
enlarging 1 nm immunogold probes?

Advertisements state that gold enhancement has lower background and is
compatible with osmium. Can anyone verify this from personal experience?

In addition to these advantages, I am hoping that milder pH conditions will
be less damaging to ultrastructure in cultured neurons (using a
preembedment protocol).

Thank you,
Michael



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:58:41 2000



From: Sinkler, Wharton :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 12:13:10 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rado,

} The diffraction plane is always the crossover plane not the theoretical back
} focal plane of the objective. Its z-position changes with the change of the
} C2 excitement.

Your statement above is not wrong, but isn't the standard TEM viewpoint (or
terminology). Yes, the plane at which the spot is sharpest (the in focus
plane for the demagnified filament image) is the crossover plane. However
to generally call this the "diffraction plane" is confusing. For example in
the case of CBED, the crossover plane has moved (up or down, depending on
whether C2 was initially under or overfocused) to the specimen plane. This
doesn't make the specimen plane the "diffraction plane". Rather, the
"diffraction plane" is now considered the in-focus plane for the C2
aperture. This is at the objective lens back-focal plane - the plane at
which points on the specimen are magnified to infinity and where the
position variable corresponds to the illumination angle. In collecting an
SADP you can correct for slightly non-parallel illumination by correcting
diffraction focus slightly off of the true back focal plane, but this should
be only slight.

What was proposed in the original mail was a technique of determining how
parallel the incident beam is, and of improving things by tweaking C2. If
the beam isn't very parallel, you'll see the diffraction spots shift when
you move the SA aperture. This is because the incident beam inclination
depends on the position on the sample.

I would think the "tweak" to C2 for obtaining more parallel illumination
would always in the direction of greater beam spread (unless I am
misunderstanding something?).

Regards,
Wharton
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403



} Rado
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} Radostin Danev
} Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
} National Institute for Physiological Sciences
} Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
} e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: Jonathan Barnard {Jonathan.Barnard-at-Angstrom.UU.SE}
} To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 7:20 PM
} Subject: TEM:finding the parallel beam
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I got a tip for finding the condenser lens settings required for parallel
} } illumination from Angus Kirkland (Cambridge).
} }
} } Make sure you are in microprobe mode and set up for SAED and the specimen
} } is out of the way. Spread the beam, put in the SA Aperture, go to
} } diffraction and then sweep the SA aperture (SAA) from side to side and
} } minimise the deflection of the diffraction spot by tweaking the
} } illumination control (C2 or second condenser lens). A little bit of
} thought
} } will convince you that anything other than a parallel beam will give you a
} } side to side motion (tilt) when the SAA is swept.
} }
} } I have found it useful to keep a table of C2 condenser lens current
} } settings for each spot size (C1 excitation) in microprobe mode. Setting
} the
} } C2 lens for parallel illumination and adjusting the diffraction focus to
} } get the sharpest spot will then give you near perfect SAD conditions.
} }
} } Anyone contemplating electron holography for example, will have to start
} } from the parallel illumination to get the best spatial coherence for their
} } holograms.
} }
} } ********************************************************
} } Dr Jonathan Barnard
} }
} } Analytical Materials Physics
} } The Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University
} } P O Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden
} } Phone: +46-(0)18-4716838 Fax: +46-(0)18-500131
} } http://www.angstrom.uu.se/analytical/home.html
} }
} } ********************************************************
} }
} }
}



From daemon Thu Feb 03 15:59:01 2000



From: Carl Henderson :      chender-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 15:11:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Nitrogen determination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eugenia,

You can avoid your concern with C coating by coating your standards
and unknowns at the same time. You should use the minimum coating
thickness--just enough to prevent beam charging.

However, as stated below by Dr. Lachowski, ammonia volatility would
be a big problem, especially since you will need help from high beam
intensities and/or long counting times to get enough N counts to give
decent precision. The expected intensity measured with a 10kV beam
from a zeolite nominally of analcime composition (NaAlSi2O6.H2O) with
5 wt% N would be about 2.5% that of the intensity from Si3N4. High N
intensity is difficult to achieve even with the best spectrometer and
crystal designs. And to add insult to injury, the addition of the C
coating absorbs even more of the N x-rays from the sample. The mass
absorption coefficient for N K-alpha emission with a C absorber is
huge (greater than 23,000).

Plus, you should check for possible N peak shape differences between
Si3N4 (or other standards) and your ammonium-bearing zeolite.

All in all, it is a very difficult analytical problem.

Good luck!

Carl

At 4:24 PM +0000 2/3/00, Dr Eric Lachowski wrote:
} Eugenia,
} the microprobe is not the best tool for the analysis of
} ammonia in zeolites because ammonia is very volatile in the
} electron beam. If your zeolite is phase pure it would be
} far better to dissolve it and do a classical chemical
} analysis.
}
} regards,
} Eric
} On Thu, 3 Feb 2000 14:54:20 +0100 bengi {bengi-at-unimo.it}
} wrote:
}
} }
} } Dear listers,
} } I have started a research project on ammonium -bearing mineral (zeolites),
} } and now I'm trying to quantify N using electron microprobe analysis. My
} } problems of dealing with N are:
} }
} } a) The thickness of the coating (in the literateur =
} approximately 150 A°).
} } Does anyone have information on the model of coater to making these films?
} } Does anyone have experience with preparation of such
} } samples?
} }
} } b) Obtaining appropriate standards. (I have Si3N4, but it contains too much
} } N (=39.96%) towards my samples (5%). Does anyone known any good nitrogen
} } standards for such a sample ?
} }
} } Any other suggestions about quantitative nitrogen analysis would be greatly
} } appreciated !!
} } Thanks for your time.
} }
} } My best regards
} }
} } Eugenia
} }
} }
} } Eugenia Marchi
} } Università degli Studi di Modena
} } Dip. Scienze della Terra
} } P.le S.Eufemia n°.19
} } 41100 Modena (Italy)
} } Tel. +39-059-417289
} } Fax. +39-059-417399
} } e-mail: bengi-at-unimo.it
} }
} }
} }
}
} ----------------------
} Dr Eric Lachowski
} Department of Chemistry
} University of Aberdeen
} Meston Walk
} Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
} Scotland
} +44 (0)1224 272934 fax 272921
} e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk

======================================
Carl Henderson
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2501 C.C. Little Bldg.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA
(734) 936-1550 FAX (734) 763-4690
======================================



From daemon Thu Feb 03 17:53:40 2000



From: Paul.Nolan-at-Alcan.Com
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 16:05:19 -0600
Subject: Technoorg-Linda Ion Beam Thinner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


Does anyone out there have experience with the Technoorg-Linda IV3H ion beam
thinner.
We have their instruction manual but it has been a long time since we had a
training session and are having some problem with the set up.
Does anyone have a revised instruction manual or perhaps some tips on the
alignment procedure of the guns. (please please please please).

Thanks
Paul Nolan

P.S..
It is cold in Canada..everyday...all year. hehe




From daemon Thu Feb 03 17:53:43 2000



From: Thomas, Larry :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 14:10:01 -0800
Subject: RE: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Laurie,

Now I'm really confused. I used to think I understood this somewhat.

1. In the JEOL 2010F FEG (the "all bets are off" case in your item#7),
changing the illumination spread by changing C2 profoundly moves the
"diffraction plane" relative to the objective aperture. [There are actually two
objective apertures at different heights in this microscope, but that's beside
the point]. By diffraction plane, I mean the plane below the objective lens
where the diffraction spots are in sharp focus. In other words (assuming fixed
OL and condenser minilens excitations), in this microscope there is only one C2
value that allows the diffraction spot pattern and OL aperture to be in focus
simultaneously. If you focus on the OL aperture (with the intermediate lens),
the spot pattern can be focused at only this one C2 setting. At any other C2
setting, you can focus the diffraction pattern with the intermediate lens
("diffraction focus") but the OL aperture will then be defocused. Changing the
condenser minilens excitation changes the diffraction plane (relative to the OL
aperture) to a different C2 setting. This is actually quite a useful feature of
the microscope, e.g., for getting very intense focused diffraction patterns, but
a different story.

2. The reason for choosing to focus the diffraction spots rather than
the K-lines is --to put it simply-- that's where the intensity is. In amplitude
contrast imaging (conventional brightfield and darkfield imaging), the intensity
contribution to the image is limited by the OL aperture. It's really important
to have the defining aperture and diffraction spot pattern in focus
simultaneously. In addition, if I aim to measure diffraction spot patterns
there is little incentive to focus the K-lines instead of the spots.

3. Textbooks such as Hirsch et al. often discuss the positional error
in SA diffraction due to Cs. What readers often miss is the consequence of the
fact that the error depends strongly on the diffraction angle. If measurements
are confined to the low-index (low-angle) reflections, the selecting area can be
reduced (to 200 nm or so at 200 kV) without big positional errors. Maybe that's
an example of differences in experimental and theoretical viewpoints.

4. Reducing the condensor aperture size will give less illumination,
but it won't give parallel illumination. It will change the size of the
diffraction spots, but not their focus.

5. I'm not quite sure why the illumination spread has such a strong
effect on the apparent position of the diffraction plane relative to the OL
aperture, but suspect it arises from the action of the strong
condensor-objective in this microscope. I would also question that it has much
to do with coherent/incoherent beams in a FEG or with prefield/postfield Cs
effects.

Larry


Larry Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
MSIN P8-16
P.O. Box 999
Richland, WA 99352
Phone: (509)372-0793 Fax: (509)376-6308
Email: mailto: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov



----------
From: L. D. Marks
Reply To: L-marks-at-nwu.edu
Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2000 8:06 AM
To: Radostin Danev
Cc: MSA listserver
Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Sorry, but I think we are getting a little confused here.

1) The diffraction plane is (by definition) the objective lens
focal length below the sample - it is the focus of parallel
directions coming from the sample. The focal length (and
parameters such as Cs, Cc) change rapidly with the objective lens
current so an eucentric position makes life simple but is not
necessarily the best condition to use. (For HREM you generaly
want to have the objective lens stronger and reduce Cs.)

2) In general C2 does not change the focal length at all. You
can have some effect from coupling of the magnetic fields, but
all C2 is supposed to do is change the convergence angle.

3) The objective aperature is (approximately) in the back-focal
plane, given that it is finite and height adjustments are only
done coarsely (for a specific value of the objective current
only).

4) The selected area aperature is (approximately) in the same
plane as the object for the same reasons as above. Remember that
there are positional errors in SA diffraction due to Cs (see
Hirsch et al for instance).

5) You should focus Kikuchi-lines, not go for the smallest spot,
since these are real object in the diffraction pattern. What you
will see is then representative of you incident beam, sometimes
a Gaussian range of directions.

6) The simplest way to get more parallel illumination in general is
to reduce the condensor aperture size.

7) All bets are off if you have a FEG. Rather than having incoherent
illumination things like the Cs of the prefield (above the sample)
and postfield (below) add coherently making it much more complicated.
For instance, the illumination angle varies across the field of view.
While this is also there with LaB6, it is a weak effect (except for
certain classes of diffracted beams, e.g. those with a screw-axis).
With
a FEG you can get a "spot" pattern many ways, and most of these will
have
large aberrations (e.g. pincushion).

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From daemon Thu Feb 03 17:54:04 2000



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 17:57:35 -0500
Subject: Technoorg-Linda Ion Beam Thinner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Paul:

South Bay Technology does have quite a bit of experience with the TL IV3
Ion Mill and we are happy to offer our assistance. We market the IV3
system throughout the world for Technoorg-Linda and offer technical support
as well. I will send you the most up to date IV3 manual that we have
produced and will include by separate e-mail the section on the gun
alignment.

I will follow up with you to be sure that you have all of the information
you need.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 3:50:09 PM on 02/03/2000

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by
INTERNET:"Paul.Nolan-at-Alcan.Com"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Does anyone out there have experience with the Technoorg-Linda IV3H ion
beam
thinner.
We have their instruction manual but it has been a long time since we had
a
training session and are having some problem with the set up.
Does anyone have a revised instruction manual or perhaps some tips on the
alignment procedure of the guns. (please please please please).

Thanks
Paul Nolan

P.S..
It is cold in Canada..everyday...all year. hehe
{



From daemon Thu Feb 03 17:54:01 2000



From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-risc4.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 17:08:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: RE: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Thu, 3 Feb 2000, Thomas, Larry wrote:

} Laurie,
}
} Now I'm really confused. I used to think I understood this somewhat.
}
} 1. In the JEOL 2010F FEG (the "all bets are off" case in your item#7),
} changing the illumination spread by changing C2 profoundly moves the
} "diffraction plane" relative to the objective aperture. [There are actually two
} objective apertures at different heights in this microscope, but that's beside
} the point]. By diffraction plane, I mean the plane below the objective lens
} where the diffraction spots are in sharp focus. In other words (assuming fixed
} OL and condenser minilens excitations), in this microscope there is only one C2
} value that allows the diffraction spot pattern and OL aperture to be in focus
} simultaneously. If you focus on the OL aperture (with the intermediate lens),
} the spot pattern can be focused at only this one C2 setting. At any other C2
} setting, you can focus the diffraction pattern with the intermediate lens
} ("diffraction focus") but the OL aperture will then be defocused. Changing the
} condenser minilens excitation changes the diffraction plane (relative to the OL
} aperture) to a different C2 setting. This is actually quite a useful feature of
} the microscope, e.g., for getting very intense focused diffraction patterns, but
} a different story.
}
OK, the bets off case. In a FEG you have a somewhat coherent
range of incident directions. The "diffraction pattern" is therefore
something which is effected by the coherent aberrations of the microscope,
unlike the case with incoherent illumination. Consider the case with
focussed illumination, when the diffraction pattern shows an image of
the condensor aperture. In a FEG As a you can "focus" this (coherent)
image to a small spot by going out of focus in a true sense for the
diffraction pattern. This gives you a spot-like pattern, but you will also
see severe distortions at higher angles. With incoherent illumination you
cannot do this and going out of focus (in the diffraction pattern) will
give in general a blurred image of the condensor aperture - life is
simple.
What you need to do is focus "real diffraction" features, e.g.
Kikuchi lines, then not play with the diffraction focus at all. As you
change C2 the size of the spots will grow or shrink, this is fine.

} 2. The reason for choosing to focus the diffraction spots rather than
} the K-lines is --to put it simply-- that's where the intensity is. In amplitude
} contrast imaging (conventional brightfield and darkfield imaging), the intensity
} contribution to the image is limited by the OL aperture. It's really important
} to have the defining aperture and diffraction spot pattern in focus
} simultaneously. In addition, if I aim to measure diffraction spot patterns
} there is little incentive to focus the K-lines instead of the spots.
}
Yes, you can always get a "spot" pattern with a FEG, and it may
be prettier. However, beware the distortions which make doing
measurements from it very dangerous.

} 3. Textbooks such as Hirsch et al. often discuss the positional error
} in SA diffraction due to Cs. What readers often miss is the consequence of the
} fact that the error depends strongly on the diffraction angle. If measurements
} are confined to the low-index (low-angle) reflections, the selecting area can be
} reduced (to 200 nm or so at 200 kV) without big positional errors. Maybe that's
} an example of differences in experimental and theoretical viewpoints.
}
Hirsch et al is just a good reference to read, about this as well
as many other things!

} 4. Reducing the condensor aperture size will give less illumination,
} but it won't give parallel illumination. It will change the size of the
} diffraction spots, but not their focus.
}
It makes it closer to parallel. Of course, with really parallel
illumination there is no intensity!

} 5. I'm not quite sure why the illumination spread has such a strong
} effect on the apparent position of the diffraction plane relative to the OL
} aperture, but suspect it arises from the action of the strong
} condensor-objective in this microscope. I would also question that it has much
} to do with coherent/incoherent beams in a FEG or with prefield/postfield Cs
} effects.
}
Sorry, I don't think that is correct. I would suggested that
people look at the distortions with a standard sample and see how bad they
can be.

} Larry
}
}
} Larry Thomas
} Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
} MSIN P8-16
} P.O. Box 999
} Richland, WA 99352
} Phone: (509)372-0793 Fax: (509)376-6308
} Email: mailto: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
}
}
}
} ----------
} From: L. D. Marks
} Reply To: L-marks-at-nwu.edu
} Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2000 8:06 AM
} To: Radostin Danev
} Cc: MSA listserver
} Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Sorry, but I think we are getting a little confused here.
}
} 1) The diffraction plane is (by definition) the objective lens
} focal length below the sample - it is the focus of parallel
} directions coming from the sample. The focal length (and
} parameters such as Cs, Cc) change rapidly with the objective lens
} current so an eucentric position makes life simple but is not
} necessarily the best condition to use. (For HREM you generaly
} want to have the objective lens stronger and reduce Cs.)
}
} 2) In general C2 does not change the focal length at all. You
} can have some effect from coupling of the magnetic fields, but
} all C2 is supposed to do is change the convergence angle.
}
} 3) The objective aperature is (approximately) in the back-focal
} plane, given that it is finite and height adjustments are only
} done coarsely (for a specific value of the objective current
} only).
}
} 4) The selected area aperature is (approximately) in the same
} plane as the object for the same reasons as above. Remember that
} there are positional errors in SA diffraction due to Cs (see
} Hirsch et al for instance).
}
} 5) You should focus Kikuchi-lines, not go for the smallest spot,
} since these are real object in the diffraction pattern. What you
} will see is then representative of you incident beam, sometimes
} a Gaussian range of directions.
}
} 6) The simplest way to get more parallel illumination in general is
} to reduce the condensor aperture size.
}
} 7) All bets are off if you have a FEG. Rather than having incoherent
} illumination things like the Cs of the prefield (above the sample)
} and postfield (below) add coherently making it much more complicated.
} For instance, the illumination angle varies across the field of view.
} While this is also there with LaB6, it is a weak effect (except for
} certain classes of diffracted beams, e.g. those with a screw-axis).
} With
} a FEG you can get a "spot" pattern many ways, and most of these will
} have
} large aberrations (e.g. pincushion).
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Laurence Marks
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Northwestern University
} fax: (847) 491-7820
} mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
} http://www.numis.nwu.edu
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
}
}

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:L-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From daemon Thu Feb 03 20:37:06 2000



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 12:30:27 +1100
Subject: Re: LSCM Need help with non-fluorescing resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
Butyl methyl methacrylate is in our hands non fluorescent
totally. You can use it for TEM, although it is not as good as epoxies.
Hope this helps.
Tobias
}
}
} I am working on fluorescent imaging of thin sections cut from samples
} embedded in TEM embedding resin, and am having a significant problem with
} resin fluorescence. Does anyone know of an embedding resin that doesn't
} autofluoresce?
}
} Matt Plantinga
} Amway Corporation
} matt_plantinga-at-amway.com



From daemon Thu Feb 03 20:36:55 2000



From: ancq3f1nkrz5xza-at-lancenet.or.jp
Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 19:34:55
Subject: Special Report: Reach Thousands of Prospects Monthly

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


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I understand that I am purchasing the Millions Vol. 7 e-mail
address CD, the addresses are not rented, but are mine to use for
my own mailing, over-and-over. Free bonuses are included, but
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"CD-Marketing"





























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From daemon Thu Feb 03 17:54:05 2000



From: ctschristopher :      ctschristopher-at-samiot.uct.ac.za (by way of Carol
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 17:56:46 -0800
Subject: a question about 2-hydroxyhexane-dial, AKA hydroxyadipaldehyde

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


LIst,

Does anyone know of a current source for this chemical? It's an ingredient
of an embedding medium made up by our group. We have a supply on hand but
have to reserve it if it's no longer commercially available.


} } We are very excited about the possibilities of HACH as a solution for a
} } problem
} } that has troubled us for a couple of years with our PU grafts. We have,
} } unfortunately, one serious problem in that we cannot find a source for HA.
} } We have tried Sigma Aldrich and they informed us that they withdrew
} } 2-Hydroxyhexane-dial from their range in 1990. We have tried a web search
} } and are contacting our local suppliers, so far without success. Do you have
} } any ideas where we can find it? We are very anxious to try HACH on our PU
} } samples and will gratefully appreciate any additional help that you can give
} } us.

} } Thanks again

} } Phil




From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:26 2000



From: Dr Malcolm Roberts :      malc-at-rock.ru.ac.za
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 09:04:34 +0200
Subject: Silence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have I been cut off, or is nobody talking anymore?

--
Dr MP Roberts Phone: [+27](0)46 603 8313
Dept of Geology Fax: [+27](0)46 622 9715
Rhodes University e-mail: malc-at-rock.ru.ac.za
6140 Grahamstown
SOUTH AFRICA




From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:27 2000



From: Alexander Mironov Jr. :      amironov-at-cmns.mnegri.it
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 08:51:22 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: New Gold Enhancement Reagents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Michael,

I have tried GoldEnhance for preembedding protocol to label intracellular
structures. It is marvelous. Buy it and use it - you will not be
unsatisfied. I have no any interest in Nanoprobes, I just like these dense
gold particles.
Practically all they claim is true:
- light insensitive
- no self-nucleation
- do not react with buffer ions
- is not dissolved by uranil and osmium (I have treat for 1 h)

Sincerely,
Dr. Alexander A. Mironov Jr., MD, PhD
Unit of Morphology
Dept. of Cell Biology and Oncology
Consorzio Mario Negri Sud
Via Nazionale, S.Maria Imbaro (Ch)
66030 Italy

Tel. 0039-0872-570-332
Fax 0039-0872-570-412
E-mail: amironov-at-cmns.mnegri.it


On Thu, 3 Feb 2000, Michael Plociniak wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
} Has anyone used gold enhancement reagents from Nanoprobes, Inc.
} (Stonybrook, NY - USA) as an alternative to silver enhancement for
} enlarging 1 nm immunogold probes?
}
} Advertisements state that gold enhancement has lower background and is
} compatible with osmium. Can anyone verify this from personal experience?
}
} In addition to these advantages, I am hoping that milder pH conditions will
} be less damaging to ultrastructure in cultured neurons (using a
} preembedment protocol).
}
} Thank you,
} Michael
}
}



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:31 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 00:13:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Steve and interested parties:

The comparison between Zeiss and Olympus '100x' objective lenses is
impossible unless one knows the type of lens be compared.

Catagories used to determine the quality of such a lens include:
aberration correction (spherical and chromatic), correction of flatness of
field, numerical aperture, the presence of an iris diaphram, whether the
system is based on a 160mm tube length or infinity correction, and if the
lens is used for brightfield or phase contrast for instance.

(PLAN APO, PH3, 100x, iris diaphram, 1.32 numerical aperture? 160mm tube
length)

Resolution is still basically related to half the wavelength utilized.
Hey, let's look at the advantages of oblique illumination for contrast
enhancement and a differerent formula for resolution!!

Is your client looking at a system or an indivdual lens? Do they have a
Zeiss or an Olympus system? One does not mixed and match objectives from
different systems merely for the convenience of pricing.

An additional consideration is the type and correction of the condenser
lens. Check the numerical aperture of not only the objective, but the
condenser lens as well.

More questions than answers...Let me know if I can further complicate the
answers!

Cheers!
Ken

------------
Ken Tiekotter
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000 N Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97303


On Thu, 3 Feb 2000, Steve Niemela wrote:

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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} Subject: A comparison of optics
} Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 10:57:19 -0600
} MIME-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
} boundary="----=_NextPart_000_001F_01BF6E35.70E8F2E0"
} X-Priority: 3
} X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
} X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 5.00.2615.200
} X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V5.00.2615.200
}
} A client of ours wonders about a comparison between Zeiss and Olympus
} optics. The Zeiss 100X lense cost $10,000, and the Olympus about $4,000:
} does that mean the Olympus is inferior?  That's what our client's
} colleagues imply. What measure of lense function is relevant? Does Olympus
} (or Zeiss) have a specification, like 'resolves particles to 0.1 micron'
} or something like that?  Is there a measure of distortion? Best
} regards, Steve NiemelaVayTek, Inc.305 West Lowe AvenueFairfield, IA
} 52556email: sniemela-at-vaytek.com Phone: 515.472.2227Fax: 515.472.8131web:
} www.vaytek.comgeneral email: vaytek-at-vaytek.com
}
}
}
}



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:33 2000



From: Janko Otto :      otto-at-quantifoil.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 09:47:44 +0100
Subject: Re: JAMP-7810 manual in English and local chemical analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dmitri,

} We are making preparations for experiments on determination of the chemical
} composition of semiconductor oxides, formed locally. The size of the
} modified area should be about 1 micron, and we are not sure yet if it is
} possible to make mentioned chemical analysis with Auger microprobe at all.

I can recommend you some former colleagues of mine performing auger
spectroscopy and many other semiconductor surface analytics.
Please contact Prof. Wolfgang Richter: richter-at-pinet.uni-jena.de.
The URL is: http://www.physik.uni-jena.de/~layer/

Regards,
Kay Pfennighaus


--
_____________________________________________________________

Janko Otto/Kay Pfennighaus email otto-at-quantifoil.com
Quantifoil Micro Tools GmbH Tel +49 (0) 3641 - 206 470
Winzerlaer Strasse 10 Fax +49 (0) 3641 - 206 471
D-07745 Jena Web http://www.quantifoil.com
Germany
_____________________________________________________________



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:35 2000



From: Tony Bruton :      bruton-at-EMU.UNP.AC.ZA
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 11:38:49 +0200
Subject: Re: Silence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


W'ere all waiting to hear news of MSSA Conference 2000 { :-)

Tony

} } } Dr Malcolm Roberts {malc-at-rock.ru.ac.za} 02/04/00 09:04AM } } }
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Have I been cut off, or is nobody talking anymore?

--
Dr MP Roberts Phone: [+27](0)46 603 8313
Dept of Geology Fax: [+27](0)46 622 9715
Rhodes University e-mail: malc-at-rock.ru.ac.za
6140 Grahamstown
SOUTH AFRICA






From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:38 2000



From: A.Walker :      Alan.Walker-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 10:10:23 +0000
Subject: Re: Technoorg-Linda Ion Beam Thinner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Paul,

} Does anyone out there have experience with the Technoorg-Linda IV3H ion beam
} thinner.
} We have their instruction manual but it has been a long time since we had a
} training session and are having some problem with the set up.
} Does anyone have a revised instruction manual or perhaps some tips on the
} alignment procedure of the guns. (please please please please).

We have the IV3 here in Sheffield - I'll try and help you if I can.
You need to be able to actually see the beams (cover your head and
the viewing glass with a black sheet if you cannot darken the room).
Get one gun to fire through the center of the sample holder (tilt it
at right angles to the beam) and to hit the opposite gun where it's
beam would exit. Do the same for the other gun. Now keep this gun
orientation, load the specimen and tilt the holder to the desired milling angle.

Hope this helps,

Alan Walker

*********************************************
Alan Walker
Dept of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
University of Sheffield
Mappin Street
Sheffield S1 3JD
United Kingdom

Tel:+44-(0)114-2225365
Fax:+44-(0)114-2726391
alan.walker-at-shef.ac.uk
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/academic/D-H/eee/
*********************************************



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:48:59 2000



From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 09:17:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Is KEVEX 8000 worth installing?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A Kevex 8000 (with huge 8 or 10" disk drives), attached to an old Amray
1000, has been donated to us. All components were fully functional when
they were crated up a year ago. (They are sitting in our basement until we
move into our new building this June).

A colleague in Physics (I'm a biologist) wishes to use the system to
quantify elemental composition (beryllium, gallium, etc) in semi-conductor
ceramics. We already have (up and running) an Hitachi HS-510 (SEM) and an
Hitachi H-7100 (STEM).

1) Is this (Kevex 8000) an appropriate instrument for her to do the
analyses?

2) Which would be wiser: Trying to get the Amray installed and running
or getting an adapter to use the Kevex in one of the Hitachi's? (Space is
a consideration, so I'd prefer not to have to install (and keep in running
condition) another scope.)

3) The Kevex is pretty old. Are we wasting money trying to get or keep
running something that is this old? I realize that we may need to replace
the detector, since it has been at room temp for about a year. Is there
anything else we should automatically consider replacing or upgrading as
part of the installation?

4) She also has been sending her samples out to do x-ray analysis of the
material to determine it's crystalline structure. The place she sends it
to has a special x-ray diffraction instrument. Could the x-ray
diffraction on the H-7100 be used to get equal results, or does this other
instrument have capabilities that the TEM doesn't.

Thanks for any advice.

Don
______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718








From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:36 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 10:20:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Steve,

The cost of an objective depends on a number of issues, not the least of
which are the corrections for chromatic and spherical aberration as well as
the size of the numerical aperture. I'd need more information to really
compare. "Optimizing Light Microscopy" has a detailed discussion of all of
this which might be helpful. Ordering information is available on our
website.

The best test is to try each system with your applications. Since much of
Vaytek's work centers on deconvolution of fluorescence images, fluorescent
beads of varying sizes would be a good test object for you and high
throughput and crisp imaging would probably be two key benchmarks. Since
fluorescence detects objects beyond the resolution limits, the normal
resolution tests are meaningless. By the way, the numerical aperture of
the objective is the major deciding factor on a microscope's ability to
resolve fine detail (as well as providing good edge information).

If you'd like to write or call me directly, I may be able to give you
further guidance.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}


Caveat: MME does have a commercial interest in the sale of "Optimizing
Light MIcroscopy:"

At 04:04 PM 2/3/00 -0600, Steve Niemela wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:47 2000



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 09:52:32 -0600
Subject: Re: Is KEVEX 8000 worth installing?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If your Kevex has a Quantum thin window detector you should be able to see
about half of a Boron peak, but there is no commercially available detector
(that I know of) that reliably sees all of the beryllium peak. And if you
have a standard window, you will only be able to see sodium and above.

I suppose the detector may still be functional even after storage. I recall
that it is not a trivial thing to switch detectors between scope models.
The adapters can be quite different and can get pricey. But I have not
priced one in over 10 years.

I suppose with rigorous use of standards, you might be able to analyze Be
by difference, but it would be a trick.

I think the Kevex 8000 may be worth installing if you are primarily
interested in x-ray analysis. We used a Kevex Delta for many years and
found it quite adequate. I might be able to talk you through some of the
technical issues.

However, if you are interested in digital imaging or x-ray mapping, the
improvements in the new equipment is fantastic compared to the old systems.
We run an IXRF Systems EDS on a JEOL 840A (having replaced our Kevex) and a
Link ISIS on a Hitachi 2460N. I could hardly imagine giving up their
capabilities and going back to the Delta or an 8000. Disk storage, the
operating environment, digital imaging can hardly be compared between the
old and the new.

FWIW,
Warren

At 09:17 AM 2/4/2000 -0500, Donald L. Lovett wrote:
} A Kevex 8000 (with huge 8 or 10" disk drives), attached to an old Amray
} 1000, has been donated to us. All components were fully functional when
} they were crated up a year ago. (They are sitting in our basement until we
} move into our new building this June).
}
} A colleague in Physics (I'm a biologist) wishes to use the system to
} quantify elemental composition (beryllium, gallium, etc) in semi-conductor
} ceramics. We already have (up and running) an Hitachi HS-510 (SEM) and an
} Hitachi H-7100 (STEM).
}
} 1) Is this (Kevex 8000) an appropriate instrument for her to do the
} analyses?
}
} 2) Which would be wiser: Trying to get the Amray installed and running
} or getting an adapter to use the Kevex in one of the Hitachi's? (Space is
} a consideration, so I'd prefer not to have to install (and keep in running
} condition) another scope.)
}
} 3) The Kevex is pretty old. Are we wasting money trying to get or keep
} running something that is this old? I realize that we may need to replace
} the detector, since it has been at room temp for about a year. Is there
} anything else we should automatically consider replacing or upgrading as
} part of the installation?
}
} 4) She also has been sending her samples out to do x-ray analysis of the
} material to determine it's crystalline structure. The place she sends it
} to has a special x-ray diffraction instrument. Could the x-ray
} diffraction on the H-7100 be used to get equal results, or does this other
} instrument have capabilities that the TEM doesn't.
}
} Thanks for any advice.
}
} Don



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:48 2000



From: Jim McGee :      mcgee-at-geol.sc.edu
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 10:55:56 -0500
Subject: Re: Nitrogen determination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Carl et al.,

I responded to Eugenia's query on another listserver (MAS microprobe listserver),
but since it is also discussed here, I will add a couple things.

I did some work on ammonium-bearing minerals (with ~ 3 - 5 wt%N), using BN and later
synthetic buddingtonite (ammonium feldspar) as the N standard (see Microbeam
Analysis 1994, New Orleans meeting). I avoided using any epoxy for the sample prep
as a precaution against N artifacts from the mounting medium. The synthetic
buddingtonite can be made ala Voncken et al., 1988 (Phys. Chem of Minerals, v. 15,
p. 323).

We did "normal" carbon coating, using brass color as a guide to obtain 150-200A
coating (standards and unknowns). I used a synthetic crystal, 2d 60A, and ran at
10kV, 25 nA probe current. I agree that a light C coat, done at same time/conditions
as the standards is important. I don't recall a substantial problem with mobility
at thnese operating conditions, although the N intensity yields were low and
detection limits were on the order of 0.5wt% N. The minerals are feldpar and
perhaps the ammonium ion stayed put better than it woud in zeolites. I agree
though, it is a difficult analytical problem. But that makes it interesting.

Jim
--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208

Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777-6610




Carl Henderson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Eugenia,
}
} You can avoid your concern with C coating by coating your standards
} and unknowns at the same time. You should use the minimum coating
} thickness--just enough to prevent beam charging.
}
} However, as stated below by Dr. Lachowski, ammonia volatility would
} be a big problem, especially since you will need help from high beam
} intensities and/or long counting times to get enough N counts to give
} decent precision. The expected intensity measured with a 10kV beam
} from a zeolite nominally of analcime composition (NaAlSi2O6.H2O) with
} 5 wt% N would be about 2.5% that of the intensity from Si3N4. High N
} intensity is difficult to achieve even with the best spectrometer and
} crystal designs. And to add insult to injury, the addition of the C
} coating absorbs even more of the N x-rays from the sample. The mass
} absorption coefficient for N K-alpha emission with a C absorber is
} huge (greater than 23,000).
}
} Plus, you should check for possible N peak shape differences between
} Si3N4 (or other standards) and your ammonium-bearing zeolite.
}
} All in all, it is a very difficult analytical problem.
}
} Good luck!
}
} Carl
}
} At 4:24 PM +0000 2/3/00, Dr Eric Lachowski wrote:
} } Eugenia,
} } the microprobe is not the best tool for the analysis of
} } ammonia in zeolites because ammonia is very volatile in the
} } electron beam. If your zeolite is phase pure it would be
} } far better to dissolve it and do a classical chemical
} } analysis.
} }
} } regards,
} } Eric
} } On Thu, 3 Feb 2000 14:54:20 +0100 bengi {bengi-at-unimo.it}
} } wrote:
} }
} } }
} } } Dear listers,
} } } I have started a research project on ammonium -bearing mineral (zeolites),
} } } and now I'm trying to quantify N using electron microprobe analysis. My
} } } problems of dealing with N are:
} } }
} } } a) The thickness of the coating (in the literateur =
} } approximately 150 A°).
} } } Does anyone have information on the model of coater to making these films?
} } } Does anyone have experience with preparation of such
} } } samples?
} } }
} } } b) Obtaining appropriate standards. (I have Si3N4, but it contains too much
} } } N (=39.96%) towards my samples (5%). Does anyone known any good nitrogen
} } } standards for such a sample ?
} } }
} } } Any other suggestions about quantitative nitrogen analysis would be greatly
} } } appreciated !!
} } } Thanks for your time.
} } }
} } } My best regards
} } }
} } } Eugenia
} } }
} } }
} } } Eugenia Marchi
} } } Università degli Studi di Modena
} } } Dip. Scienze della Terra
} } } P.le S.Eufemia n°.19
} } } 41100 Modena (Italy)
} } } Tel. +39-059-417289
} } } Fax. +39-059-417399
} } } e-mail: bengi-at-unimo.it
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} } ----------------------
} } Dr Eric Lachowski
} } Department of Chemistry
} } University of Aberdeen
} } Meston Walk
} } Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
} } Scotland
} } +44 (0)1224 272934 fax 272921
} } e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk
}
} ======================================
} Carl Henderson
} Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
} University of Michigan
} 2501 C.C. Little Bldg.
} Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063 USA
} (734) 936-1550 FAX (734) 763-4690
} ======================================



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:50 2000



From: Augusto_A_Morrone-at-notes.seagate.com
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 09:58:13 -0600
Subject: JEOL 2010 question/C2, diffraction and OA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Since the discussion on CM12 alignment shifted to several other problems, and
eventually got some JEOL 2010 users involved (Larry Thomas), I thought of
throwing in this alignment question regarding the OA in a 2010 with a LaB6 gun:

To keep the camera length at a consistent value when I am not using an internal
standard, I record SA diffraction patterns with C2 fully defocused cw (this is
by conventional jargon, although actually using the Brightness knob I am
changing C3). This is supposed to make the illumination as parallel as possible
and is easily reproducible. Then I focus the direct beam with the intermediate
lens (diffraction focus). CBD and NBD are another problem.

The problem is to align the Objective Aperture under this condition. If the OA
is centered around the direct beam in diffraction, when switching to image mode
and increasing the illumination (Brightness) for imaging conditions, the
aperture will be apparently out of center. This gives the impression that the
voltage center changes between a fully defocused C2 and a moderately focused
(still cw from crossover, converging the illumination on the sample) condenser.
That shift is obvious in DIFF mode, the direct beam can be seen to shift as C2
is turned ccw from the fully cw position.

As was noted in the on-going discussion, the crossover planes move along the
optic axis as the strength of C2 changes. The helicoidal path of the beam is
straight down the optic axis of the lenses only piecewise, and at the level of
the OA plane it stays centered only for a limited range of C2 settings--or
convergence angles. In my case, the convergence changes considerably when I
record images digitally in a 1kx1k CCD camera, which screams for brightness.

My two ways around this are to (1) recenter the OA in image mode, or (2) in DIFF
mode, but keeping C2 at the setting I will use in MAG mode. Both methods are a
pain, mostly when doing BF/DF work, and probably incorrect.

Is there an alignment procedure for the 2010 that will prevent this " OA shift "
from DIFF to MAG modes?

Augusto Morrone
Seagate Technology
NRW-115
7801 Computer Ave S.
(612) 844-5838
Fax: (612) 844-7301




From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:54 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 08:42:59 -0800
Subject: Re: Need repairman for Hitachi SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Paul,
Why don't you use the Hitachi service from NSC? They are the best and the
cheapest.
At 12:12 PM 2/3/00 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:49:59 2000



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 10:12:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Aqueous mounting medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Can anyone recommend an aqueous mounting medium that polymerises (or
whatever) to form a permanent hard mount, and that does not
autofluoresce? Thanks.

Lesley Weston.





From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:50:02 2000



From: Douglas Keene :      DRK-at-SHCC.ORG
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 10:36:37 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: New Gold Enhancement Reagents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Michael,

We had been using silver enhancement kits from Amersham and
Nanoprobe. Of these, we found the Nanoprobe kit to be very
difficult to work with given it's high viscosity. We also
use a pre-embed protocol, and found that both silver
enhancement kits caused collagen fibrils to denature
(unravel). However, during our protocol the tissue is
incubated for fairly long duration in the enhancement
medium (15 minutes on ice, then warmed to 25 C in a water
bath for an additional 5 minutes, all in the dark).

Our more recent experience is with the Nanoprobe gold
enhancement kit. It has HUGE advantages over the silver
system.

First, you can Osmicate the tissue. Second, the viscosity
of the components is comparatively very low, easing the use
of the product. It is not so sensitive to light, and it
does not cause denaturation of collagen fibrils. We do see
some variability in particulate size, but this is probably
a problem associated with diffusion of the media through
the tissue. We have found no disadvantages of the Gold
enhancement v.s. Silver and now use the Gold method
exclusively.

I hope this helps,

Doug

On Thu, 03 Feb 2000 12:44:23 -0500 Michael Plociniak
{plocinia-at-aecom.yu.edu} wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email
} to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
} Has anyone used gold enhancement reagents from Nanoprobes,
} Inc. (Stonybrook, NY - USA) as an alternative to silver
} enhancement for enlarging 1 nm immunogold probes?
}
} Advertisements state that gold enhancement has lower
} background and is compatible with osmium. Can anyone
} verify this from personal experience?
}
} In addition to these advantages, I am hoping that milder pH
} conditions will be less damaging to ultrastructure in
} cultured neurons (using a preembedment protocol).
}
} Thank you,
} Michael

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Research Facilities
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97201
phone: 503-221-3434
FAX: 503-412-6894 (9-5 PST)
e-mail: DRK-at-shcc.org






From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:50:14 2000



From: Dan Freidus :      freidus-at-wwnet.com
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 14:38:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ken Tiekotter {tiekotte-at-up.edu}
..One does not mixed and match objectives from different systems merely for
the convenience of pricing....
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Of course, I've heard this sort of statement many times before. But has
anyone ever done any comparisons of mixed systems to see if there are
certain brands that are particularly incompatible or particularly
compatible?

I ask this both as a general question and because I use a Wild M7 for which
I need a pair of high eyepoint oculars. I don't need the adjusting collar
built into current models and haven't been able to find an older pair used.
But before I buy a Nikon/Olympus/ etc. pair I'd love to know how different
the complete system will be from what I've got now.

I know many people who have used third party photo eyepieces, in just the
situation where you'd think quality would be of the utmost concern. Dealers
are often not the best source of info since they tend to represent one brand
and, even when they are completely honest, rarely have experienc ewith a
wide range of brands (especially mixed up.

Dan Freidus
freidus-at-wwnet.com

P.S. Of course, if anyone has a pair of Wild 10x high eyepoint oculars for
sale, that would also solve my problem (I'd also consider other
magnifications). (I'm also looking for accessory objective lenses and
various other accessories. Please contact me off-list if you've got anything
for sale or trade.)






From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:51:06 2000



From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 15:02:28 -0600
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 09:20 AM 2/4/00 , you wrote:
} } A client of ours wonders about a comparison between Zeiss and Olympus
} } optics. The Zeiss 100X lense cost $10,000, and the Olympus about $4,000:
} } does that mean the Olympus is inferior?  That's what our client's
} } colleagues imply. What measure of lense function is relevant? Does Olympus
} } (or Zeiss) have a specification, like 'resolves particles to 0.1 micron'
} } or something like that?  Is there a measure of distortion? Best
} } regards, Steve NiemelaVayTek, Inc.305 West Lowe AvenueFairfield, IA
} } 52556email: sniemela-at-vaytek.com Phone: 515.472.2227Fax: 515.472.8131web:
} } www.vaytek.comgeneral email: vaytek-at-vaytek.com
} }

The NA is very important in achieving high resolution. The other factor is
the NA of the condenser. An Abbe condenser is easily out gunned by
the aplanatic condenser (NA=1.4). Olympus makes two PlanAPO 100X oil
objectives. One has an NA of 1.3 while the other is 1.4. The 1.4 lens
costs today new about $6000. The lower NA lens is about $4500. So this
is probably the one you are comparing. I had a Zeiss PlanAPO and recall
that it had an NA of 1.3. It was terrible. I replaced it with the Olympus 1.4
and got major improvements. Of the Zeiss objectives, their 63X PlanAPO
is probably the best one they have made. The rest are so so. Some are
easily beaten by Olympus flourites. Zeiss is more expensive because it
is Zeiss, not necessarily because it is better. The cost of manufacturing
in Germany is very high compared to Japan and other places that
Olympus uses. The emerging problem I see is that Olympus is moving much
of its scope production to China. I have purchased all of the Olympus
items I need and that were made in Japan before being stuck with Chinese
Olympus. It may reach a point where Zeiss is a better product despite the
higher cost.

BTW, the 1.4NA lens at $6000 reflects the recent 10% across the board
price increase by Olympus.

gary g.



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:50:38 2000



From: Sinkler, Wharton :      wharton.sinkler-at-anlw.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 14:14:10 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Listers,

There are important differences between older and more recent TEMs, which go
to the heart of this discussion.

On older dedicated HREM's (LaB6) imaging is done with the beam at or close
to crossover on the specimen, and beam convergence is determined by the user
using the C2 aperture. On newer TEM's such as the JEOL 2010 (FEG or not),
you need to set C2 so crossover is pretty far from the specimen plane in
order to get decent coherence for imaging. Whenever this is the case, the
C2 aperture isn't incoherently filled, and some of the older theory won't
apply (regardless of whether the machine is or isn't a FEG).

For example, the standard method of determining convergence in an image is
by switching to diffraction under the same conditions used to image, and
measuring the disc diameter. (see e.g. O'Keefe and Sanders, Acta Cryst A31,
p.307). This assumes the beam being near or at crossover on the specimen
aperture. It won't work if the beam is far from crossover on the specimen,
because now the incident angle depends on position on the specimen. The
disc diameters in diffraction only indicate what the total range of incident
angles is over the entire illuminated area. But the area visible in the
HREM image is much smaller than this, and over this latter area the range of
illuminating angles is smaller. This is just another way of saying that the
C2 aperture isn't incoherently filled. If it were, would be impossible to
form a shadow image of the C2 aperture at the specimen plane, as one does by
spreading the beam.

Think of the illumination on the specimen as a convolution of the source
image with the circular C2 aperture: When the beam is at crossover, the
aperture part is approximating a delta function - we see the source in the
image. When the beam is spread very far, the illumination is a nice shadow
image of the C2 aperture, with a little blurriness at the edge because of
convolution with a source which is not quite point-like.

In the latter case, the angular spread locally is given by the source size
(demagnification) in the diffraction pattern. This can be imaged by
switching to diffraction and focusing with the intermediate lens to obtain
sharp source images.

This doesn't depend on whether the machine is FEG or not, though the source
will be very much smaller if it is. I have posted an example in which a
tungsten filament is imaged sharply by defocusing with the intermediate lens
with the illumination just slightly defocused. This should be a square
pattern, so note that the optics introduce significant distortions in this
extreme case.

http://www.numis.nwu.edu/internet/Staff/wharton/sources.jpg


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Wharton Sinkler
Argonne National Laboratory West
P. O. Box 2528
Idaho Falls, ID 83403

}
}
} On Thu, 3 Feb 2000, Thomas, Larry wrote:
}
} } Laurie,
} }
} } Now I'm really confused. I used to think I understood this somewhat.
} }
} } 1. In the JEOL 2010F FEG (the "all bets are off" case in your item#7),
} } changing the illumination spread by changing C2 profoundly moves the
} } "diffraction plane" relative to the objective aperture. [There are actually
} } two
} } objective apertures at different heights in this microscope, but that's
} } beside
} } the point]. By diffraction plane, I mean the plane below the objective lens
} } where the diffraction spots are in sharp focus. In other words (assuming
} } fixed
} } OL and condenser minilens excitations), in this microscope there is only one
} } C2
} } value that allows the diffraction spot pattern and OL aperture to be in focus
} } simultaneously. If you focus on the OL aperture (with the intermediate
} } lens),
} } the spot pattern can be focused at only this one C2 setting. At any other C2
} } setting, you can focus the diffraction pattern with the intermediate lens
} } ("diffraction focus") but the OL aperture will then be defocused. Changing
} } the
} } condenser minilens excitation changes the diffraction plane (relative to the
} } OL
} } aperture) to a different C2 setting. This is actually quite a useful feature
} } of
} } the microscope, e.g., for getting very intense focused diffraction patterns,
} } but
} } a different story.
} }
} OK, the bets off case. In a FEG you have a somewhat coherent
} range of incident directions. The "diffraction pattern" is therefore
} something which is effected by the coherent aberrations of the microscope,
} unlike the case with incoherent illumination. Consider the case with
} focussed illumination, when the diffraction pattern shows an image of
} the condensor aperture. In a FEG As a you can "focus" this (coherent)
} image to a small spot by going out of focus in a true sense for the
} diffraction pattern. This gives you a spot-like pattern, but you will also
} see severe distortions at higher angles. With incoherent illumination you
} cannot do this and going out of focus (in the diffraction pattern) will
} give in general a blurred image of the condensor aperture - life is
} simple.
} What you need to do is focus "real diffraction" features, e.g.
} Kikuchi lines, then not play with the diffraction focus at all. As you
} change C2 the size of the spots will grow or shrink, this is fine.
}
} } 2. The reason for choosing to focus the diffraction spots rather than
} } the K-lines is --to put it simply-- that's where the intensity is. In
} } amplitude
} } contrast imaging (conventional brightfield and darkfield imaging), the
} } intensity
} } contribution to the image is limited by the OL aperture. It's really
} } important
} } to have the defining aperture and diffraction spot pattern in focus
} } simultaneously. In addition, if I aim to measure diffraction spot patterns
} } there is little incentive to focus the K-lines instead of the spots.
} }
} Yes, you can always get a "spot" pattern with a FEG, and it may
} be prettier. However, beware the distortions which make doing
} measurements from it very dangerous.
}
} } 3. Textbooks such as Hirsch et al. often discuss the positional error
} } in SA diffraction due to Cs. What readers often miss is the consequence of
} } the
} } fact that the error depends strongly on the diffraction angle. If
} } measurements
} } are confined to the low-index (low-angle) reflections, the selecting area can
} } be
} } reduced (to 200 nm or so at 200 kV) without big positional errors. Maybe
} } that's
} } an example of differences in experimental and theoretical viewpoints.
} }
} Hirsch et al is just a good reference to read, about this as well
} as many other things!
}
} } 4. Reducing the condensor aperture size will give less illumination,
} } but it won't give parallel illumination. It will change the size of the
} } diffraction spots, but not their focus.
} }
} It makes it closer to parallel. Of course, with really parallel
} illumination there is no intensity!
}
} } 5. I'm not quite sure why the illumination spread has such a strong
} } effect on the apparent position of the diffraction plane relative to the OL
} } aperture, but suspect it arises from the action of the strong
} } condensor-objective in this microscope. I would also question that it has
} } much
} } to do with coherent/incoherent beams in a FEG or with prefield/postfield Cs
} } effects.
} }
} Sorry, I don't think that is correct. I would suggested that
} people look at the distortions with a standard sample and see how bad they
} can be.
}
} } Larry
} }
} }
} } Larry Thomas
} } Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
} } MSIN P8-16
} } P.O. Box 999
} } Richland, WA 99352
} } Phone: (509)372-0793 Fax: (509)376-6308
} } Email: mailto: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
} }
} }
} }
} } ----------
} } From: L. D. Marks
} } Reply To: L-marks-at-nwu.edu
} } Sent: Thursday, February 3, 2000 8:06 AM
} } To: Radostin Danev
} } Cc: MSA listserver
} } Subject: Re: TEM:finding the parallel beam
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Sorry, but I think we are getting a little confused here.
} }
} } 1) The diffraction plane is (by definition) the objective lens
} } focal length below the sample - it is the focus of parallel
} } directions coming from the sample. The focal length (and
} } parameters such as Cs, Cc) change rapidly with the objective lens
} } current so an eucentric position makes life simple but is not
} } necessarily the best condition to use. (For HREM you generaly
} } want to have the objective lens stronger and reduce Cs.)
} }
} } 2) In general C2 does not change the focal length at all. You
} } can have some effect from coupling of the magnetic fields, but
} } all C2 is supposed to do is change the convergence angle.
} }
} } 3) The objective aperature is (approximately) in the back-focal
} } plane, given that it is finite and height adjustments are only
} } done coarsely (for a specific value of the objective current
} } only).
} }
} } 4) The selected area aperature is (approximately) in the same
} } plane as the object for the same reasons as above. Remember that
} } there are positional errors in SA diffraction due to Cs (see
} } Hirsch et al for instance).
} }
} } 5) You should focus Kikuchi-lines, not go for the smallest spot,
} } since these are real object in the diffraction pattern. What you
} } will see is then representative of you incident beam, sometimes
} } a Gaussian range of directions.
} }
} } 6) The simplest way to get more parallel illumination in general is
} } to reduce the condensor aperture size.
} }
} } 7) All bets are off if you have a FEG. Rather than having incoherent
} } illumination things like the Cs of the prefield (above the sample)
} } and postfield (below) add coherently making it much more complicated.
} } For instance, the illumination angle varies across the field of view.
} } While this is also there with LaB6, it is a weak effect (except for
} } certain classes of diffracted beams, e.g. those with a screw-axis).
} } With
} } a FEG you can get a "spot" pattern many ways, and most of these will
} } have
} } large aberrations (e.g. pincushion).
} }
} } ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} } Laurence Marks
} } Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} } Northwestern University
} } fax: (847) 491-7820
} } mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
} } http://www.numis.nwu.edu
} } ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} }
} }
} }
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Laurence Marks
} Department of Materials Science and Engineering
} Northwestern University
} fax: (847) 491-7820
} mailto:L-marks-at-nwu.edu
} http://www.numis.nwu.edu
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
}



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:51:05 2000



From: Jaci Lett :      jmlett-at-cid.wustl.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 16:01:45 -0600
Subject: TEM: B-glucuronidase localization

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are looking to localize B-glucuronidase in the mouse cochlea. We'd like
to stain for the enzyme and still be able to decalcify the cochleas and
process them into Epon-Araldite for LM and TEM without losing the reaction
product. Does anyone have any suggestions for staining or localization
protocols for this enzyme? I'm not certain whether the tissue will be taken
all the way to TEM, but I do know we'll be looking at LM (1 to 4 microns).
I found a method by Hayashi and Hayashi ("Electron Microscopic Cytochemistry
and Immunocytochemistry in Biomedicine", CRC Press, 1993) using hexazonium
pararosanilin (red in LM and electron dense for EM) on 40 micron non-frozen
sections (and then processed for EM) that sounds appropriate, but I'm
concerned that it may not work en bloc (the cochlea is a twisty, windy
beasty).

I posted this request a few months ago and received no assistance (just
individuals also interested in similar protocols and a company promoting
their antibody).

Thanks so much for any direction I can get,

Jaclynn M. Lett, Research Assistant jmlett-at-cid.wustl.edu

Fay and Carl Simons Center for Biology of Hearing and Deafness
Central Institute for the Deaf
818 S. Euclid Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63110

voice: 314-977-0257 fax: 314-977-0030



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:51:15 2000



From: Jonathan Barnard :      Jonathan.Barnard-at-Angstrom.UU.SE
Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2000 00:45:21 +0100
Subject: TEM: Jeol 2010 question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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So the problem as I have understood it is:

===} changing C3 (brightness) leads to a shift of the bright field (BF)
beam in the back focal plane (BFP) causing the objective aperture to appear
off centre after converging the beam?

If you have aligned the gun properly then I suspect that the (shift) wobble
alignment has not been done properly.
When this button is pressed the microscope goes over to diffraction and you
should see a pair of discs or spots (which represent the two extremes in
tilt when the beam is shifted to its own extremes). The beam tilts are
adjusted to bring the two discs/spots into coincidence. This is done for
both the X and Y shift coils separately.
The X wobble button shifts the beam back and forth (X shift coils), but in
the back focal plane the spot or disc should remain stationary. This is
what you are trying to achieve with this alignment procedure. Afterwards
this should give you a beam that expands about the same point in the back
focal plane. You should find that the objective aperture remains centred in
both diff and image modes after doing this alignment.

As for the crossovers, yes you are right, they do move up and down when
changing the brightness. The back focal plane remains stationary (by
definition as L.Marks said). Anything other than a parallel beam should
give you a disc in the BFP (which represents the angular distribution of
rays incident on the objective lens).

What did you mean by a voltage centre? My interpretation of this is that
the source high tension is wobbled and any shift in the (previously
focussed) image is minimised by tuning the beam tilts. This alignment would
be used for energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) when doing elemental mapping on a
Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) for example.



********************************************************
Dr Jonathan Barnard

Analytical Materials Physics
The Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University
P O Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: +46-(0)18-4716838 Fax: +46-(0)18-500131
http://www.angstrom.uu.se/analytical/home.html

********************************************************



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:51:14 2000



From: Stephen A. Shaffer :      sshaffer-at-microdataware.com
Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2000 15:47:58 -0800
Subject: LM Meeting Announcement, San Francisco Microscopical Society

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The San Francisco Microscopical Society Announces its next regular
meeting:

Wednesday, February 9, 2000

Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114-1429
(415) 554-9600

7:00 pm

Topic: Introduction to Phase Contrast Microscopy
by Robert D. Griffin, President, SFMS
And: Annual Business Meeting and Election of Officers

Further information, including an important Letter to the Members from
President Griffin, is available at http://www.microdataware.com/sfms .

The San Francisco Microscopical Society (SFMS) is a small, informal
group of light microscopists who meet on a monthly basis to discuss
topics of common interest. All are invited and welcome, regardless of
knowledge level or professional field.



From daemon Fri Feb 04 21:51:19 2000



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2000 14:39:24 +1100
Subject: 5th Live-cell Course at UBC: June 19-29

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Steve,
Because of the nomenclature and the way manufacturers determine their
specifications, it is really difficult to compare optics on paper. When I
find myself in these types of discussions, I find it more useful to compare
optics of similar list price rather than specifications because generally
speaking, in our industry, the more things cost, the more care is taken in
their manufacture. Olympus has a new 100X objective with an NA of 1.65 that
sells for $10k. That would be the optic I would compare to the $10k Zeiss.

Shane Collins
Scientific Instruments

-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Niemela [mailto:sniemela-at-vaytek.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2000 2:05 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}


SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT: UBC LIVE-CELL COURSE: Please register by March!!

Hello all,

The faculty for the 2000 UBC 3D Live-cell Microscopy Course is now set and
we welcome several new faces, including Stephan Hell, Andreas Kriete and
Steve Potter. The whole list is below.

o Stephen Adams University of California-SD
o Ping Chin Cheng SUNY, Buffalo
o Elaine Humphrey Univ. of British Columbia
o Stephan Hell Max Planck, Goettingen
o Ted InouŽ Universal Imaging, PA
o Iain Johnson Molecular Probes, OR
o Larry Keenan Cell Robotics, NM
o Ernst Keller Carl Zeiss, Thornwood, NY
o Andreas Kriete University of Geissen
o Felix Margadant University of Sydney
o Tim Murphy University of British Columbia
o Jim Pawley University of Wisconsin-Madison
o Steve Potter California Institute of Tech
o Jason Swedlow University of Aberdeen
o Michael Weis Agriculture Canada


Basic info is below but you can get the entire brochure, including links to
faculty home pages, at

http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/brochure.htm

Cheers,

Jim P.

Fifth Annual INTERNATIONAL 10-Day Short Course on

3D Microscopy of Living Cells
June 19 - 29, 2000



Fourth, Post-course Workshop on

3D Image Processing,
July 1 - 3, 2000



Organized by Prof. James Pawley,
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
(SEE SABBATICAL ADDRESS AT END OF MESSAGE)


in association with Dr. Elaine Humphrey
UBC BioSciences Microscopy Facility:
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada



DATES

Applications must be received by March 1, 2000
Deposit due April 15, 2000
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 PM Sunday, June 18, 2000
First Lecture 7:30 PM Sunday, June 18, 2000
Live-cell Course ends, noon Thursday, June 29, 2000


APPLICATIONS DUE BY MARCH 1, 2000


More information at :
http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html

or

REGARDING COURSE ORGANIZATION:


Prof. James B. Pawley, (on Sabbatical)
Room LG 10, Madsen Building, F-09,
University of Sydney, NSW, 2006
Australia

Ph. 61-2-9351-7548/2351
FAX 61-2-9351-7682
JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU

REGARDING APPLICATIONS

Dr. Elaine Humphrey,
Biosciences EM Facility
Biosciences Building
Univ. of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, BC, V6T-1Z4




THE PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

Modern methods of 3D light microscopy promise a revolutionary improvement
in our ability to view living cells. To help convert this promise to
reality for a wider selection of biological scientists, an intensive
eleven-day residential course concentrating on all aspects of 3D Microscopy
of Living Cells will be held at the University of British Columbia, in June
of 2000. The course includes 4 days on 2D techniques, 6 days of 3D
techniques and a summary presentation. It covers basic microscopy to the
highest level confocal microscopy. (A half-day Pre-course is offered for
any who may need to brush up on basic optics!).

Topics include:
o Quantitative 2D light microscopy
o How to keep your cells alive
o 3D imaging in confocal microscopy
o Widefield/deconvolution techniques
o Two-photon excitation microscopy
o Fluorescent and backscattered light signals
o Dye design, characteristics and use
o Pixelation: The Nyquist Criterion
o Lasers and laser tweezers
o Objectives and aberrations
o Scanning-systems: AODs and mirrors
o Optimal pinhole size/photon efficiency
o Detectors: operation and performance
o Video-rate confocal imaging
o Measuring ion concentrations
o Display and measurement of 3D data

Morning lecture/demonstrations lead to hands-on laboratory exercises each
afternoon that will utilize most of the commercial instruments currently
available for 3D microscopic imaging. Students will work in groups of 3 or
4 throughout the discussion and laboratory sessions, and may complete a
live-cell 3D study on their own specimens. In the first four years, over
100 students from 22 countries have attended. Last year, 11 separate, 3D
microscopical workstations were available for student use under the
supervision of a 17-member international faculty. We expect to have even
more workstations in 2000. Including manufacturers representatives, the
teacher/ student ratio will be almost 2:1.

INTERNATIONAL FACULTY

o Stephen Adams University of California-SD
o Ping Chin Cheng SUNY, Buffalo
o Elaine Humphrey Univ. of British Columbia
o Stephan Hell Max Planck, Goettingen
o Ted InouŽ Universal Imaging, PA
o Iain Johnson Molecular Probes, OR
o Larry Keenan Cell Robotics, NM
o Ernst Keller Carl Zeiss, Thornwood, NY
o Andreas Kriete University of Geissen
o Felix Margadant University of Sydney
o Tim Murphy University of British Columbia
o Jim Pawley University of Wisconsin-Madison
o Steve Potter California Institute of Tech
o Jason Swedlow University of Aberdeen
o Michael Weis Agriculture Canada

TUITION

Course tuition is $2,150 US and includes lunches. On receipt of 50%
deposit, students will receive preliminary group assignments and the
textbook, Handbook of Biological Confocal Microscopy, (Plenum, 1995). The
tuition fee includes the textbook, a binder of handouts, and tickets for
the Opening Reception, the Manufacturer's Reception and the Beach Party.
Accommodations and meals other than lunch are not included in the tuition
fee. The Pre-course is $100 US.

APPLICATIONS

Applicants will complete a questionnaire to assess knowledge level and
field of interest. Enrollment is limited to about 24 participants.
Selection will be made on the basis of background and perceived need.
Those without previous LM experience will be provided with basic texts on
request to read before the course begins and are encouraged to take the
Pre-course on the afternoon of June 18.


Application forms, and other course information from this and past years,
can be downloaded from the WWW site at:

http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html

or obtained from:

Dr. Elaine Humphrey,
Biosciences EM Facility
Biosciences Building
Univ. of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver, BC, V6T-1Z4
Phone: 1-604.822-3354
FAX: 1-604.265-5315
Email: ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca.


Application deadlines:

Application forms are due by March 1, 2000!
Deadlines are early to facilitate setting up groups. Successful applicants
will be notified by April 1, and a deposit of 50% must be received by April
15, 2000 to reserve your position. In general, deposit refunds are only be
possible if your position can be filled from the waiting list. The
remainder of the fees is due at registration.

DATES

Applications must be received by March 1, 2000
Deposit due April 15 2000
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 PM Sunday, June 18, 2000
First Lecture 7:30 PM Sunday, June 18, 2000
Live-cell Course ends, noon Thursday, June 29, 2000


TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

As befits teaching in an area at the boundary of "what is now known,"
lecturers have been chosen based on their expertise as scientists working
in the field rather than because they all agree. They are encouraged more
to be provocative than to be prosaic. Students should expect discussion in
areas where differences of opinion exist.

Prior to the course, students will be organized into groups and encouraged
to communicate by email/phone, about the "Living-cell" group projects that
they will pursue during the course and that will be presented to the class
on the last day of the course. It has been found that group interactions
make best use of students' prior experience and can be very effective in
teaching the practical skills covered in a hands-on course of this type.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR LIVE SAMPLES

Students must contact Dr. Elaine Humphrey to make necessary arrangements
for the transport and maintenance of cell lines etc. needed for their
projects. Organisms linked in any way with human disease are not permitted
because of safety considerations. Transport and customs arrangements for
living specimens are entirely the responsibility of the student.
Students also attending the 3D Image Processing Course, may be able to
analyze, process and display some of the 3D data collected from their
specimens


********************************************************************************

Fourth Annual

3D MAGE PROCESSING WORKSHOP

The workshop will cover 3D image processing for measurement and display.
Enrollment is limited to those attending the 3D Microscopy course.
Tuition : $850 US (lunches and snacks incl.)

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

The course is designed for biologists working with multidimensional and
possibly multicolor microscopical data sets. Getting the data is only half
of the battle. Image data in 3, 4 or even 5 dimensions may be difficult to
store let alone analyze or display. This course is to help students
understand the hardware and software aspects of this problem and give them
the techniques they need to make the best use of their data.

The course is designed for biologists who need to make measurements on 3D
microscopical data sets and then display the results in an effective
manner. The course will be taught on SGI, Macintosh and IBM-compatible
computers. A wide variety of software designed for the 3D microscopy market
will be described, demonstrated and available for use.

Workshop Organizers

o Andreas Kriete Giessen University, DE
o Felix Margadant University of Sydney, Au

Faculty

o Ping Chin Cheng State U. of New York, Buffalo
o Chris MacLean Vaytek Inc., IA

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION
Classes will meet from 8:30-12:00 and 1:00-6:00 with lecture-demonstrations
followed immediately by hands-on laboratory sessions using a variety of
workstations. Students will "learn-by-doing" with two to a machine. Lab
handouts will describe some specific exercises to be performed on "canned"
data sets. Facilities and supervision will be available until 11:00 PM, for
students to work on their own data.
****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, (on Sabbatical) Ph. 61-2-9351-7548/2351
Room LG 10, Madsen Building, F-09, FAX 61-2-9351-7682
University of Sydney, NSW, 2006 Australia JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
Come to the 5th 3D Live-cell Microscopy Course, June 19-29, 2000, UBC, Canada.
Info and forms at: http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/course/bulletin.html
"A scientist is not one who can answer questions but one who can question
answers." Theodore Schick Jr., Skeptical Enquirer, 21-2:39



From daemon Fri Feb 04 22:50:55 2000



From: Stan Rice :      srice-at-alpha.utampa.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 21:55:32 -0600
Subject: LKB Nova ultramicrotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I recently inherited a used LKB Nova ultramicrotome from a medical
facility in town. The previous owner could not locate the operating
instructions and I am at a loss to figure out its proper operation. Does

anyone on the list have instructions for operation of this instrument??
I would be willing to reimburse anyone for a copy of the instruction
manual.

Dr. Stanley A. Rice
University of Tampa
srice-at-alpha.utampa.edu
(813) 253-3333 Ext. 3340

Content-Type: text/x-vcard; charset=us-ascii; name="vcard.vcf"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: Card for Stan Rice
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="vcard.vcf"





From daemon Fri Feb 04 22:50:57 2000



From: Patricia A. Glazebrook :      PGlazebr-at-Research.metrohealth.org
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 21:57:44 -0600
Subject: Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I tried a Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope equiped
with a Diagnostics Instrument Spot Camera. My tissue had been
immunolabelled with Cy5 and I did not expect to see thru the microscope. So
we took pictures with the Spot Camera and the immunolabeling seemed to
work. The problem was that there was uneven illumination in the pictures,
half moon of brightness and the rest of the field dark. The salesperson did
check that the mercury bulb was aligned correctly. Also there was no
ambient light from the room causing the shadow.

Anyone with an idea  of what is causing this problem?

Thank-you, Pat Glazebrook





From daemon Fri Feb 04 22:50:56 2000



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 21:59:21 -0600
Subject: TEM Specimen Prep short course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TEM Specimen Preparation Short Course!!!!

With emphasis on Tripod Polishing and Focused Ion Beam Specimen Preparation
....

..will be offered in conjunction with the Joint Annual Meeting of the
Florida Society for Microscopy and the Florida American Vacuum Society in
Orlando at the University of Central Florida March 15-17, 2000.

Instructors:

Ron Anderson, IBM
Fred Stevie, Lucent Technologies
Lucille Giannuzzi, UCF

Vendor Sponsors:

FEI Company
Micro Optics
South Bay Technology

For registration material please contact Lucille Giannuzzi at lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dept. of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Eng.,
University of Central Florida,
PO Box 162450, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA
phone (407) 823-5770 fax (407) 823-0208 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, 12443 Research
Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 phone (407) 275-4354,5,6 fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:27:19 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2000 20:52:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The responses to this thread have been outstanding. Yet from my perspective
the unasked and thus unanswerable question is: what is the purpose for the
lens? A couple of the responses have brushed the issue, but it still hasn't
been specifically stated. Assuming that resolution is the main issue, the
concerns of flatness of field, NA, color correction, working distance, etc,
all have to be factored into the evaluation of the different lenses. It
should be possible to demo both (or any of a set of) lenses under the lab
and experimental conditions of real life. Only then can one truly determine
which lens is the "best" (or more correctly, the appropriate) lens. All of
the theory and specifications in the world don't matter if the lens doesn't
aid the microscopist in obtaining the data necessary to carry out the work.
One thing that is unalterable is that even if one is considering a number of
"infinity-corrected" lenses from different manufacturers, they may not be
truly interchangeable. Make sure the lens works on the microscope body.
Then make sure it provides the performance needed. That's the right lens.

Roger Moretz


On Thu, 3 Feb 2000 16:04:55 -0600, Steve Niemela wrote:

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}
} To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} Subject: A comparison of optics
} Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2000 10:57:19 -0600
} MIME-Version: 1.0
} Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
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} X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 5.00.2615.200
} X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V5.00.2615.200
}
} A client of ours wonders about a comparison between Zeiss and
Olympus
} optics. The Zeiss 100X lense cost $10,000, and the Olympus about
$4,000:
} does that mean the Olympus is inferior?  That's what our client's
} colleagues imply. What measure of lense function is relevant? Does
Olympus
} (or Zeiss) have a specification, like 'resolves particles to 0.1 micron'
} or something like that?  Is there a measure of distortion? Best
} regards, Steve NiemelaVayTek, Inc.305 West Lowe AvenueFairfield, IA
} 52556email: sniemela-at-vaytek.com Phone: 515.472.2227Fax: 515.472.8131web:
} www.vaytek.comgeneral email: vaytek-at-vaytek.com
}
}
}


Roger C Moretz, Ph.D.





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com



From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:27:43 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2000 00:36:00 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Aqueous mounting medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Lesley,
How about CMC (Refractive Index=1.37). CMC10 (R.I.=1.39), CMCP-9
(R.I.=1.40) and CMCP-10 (R.I. 1.41)? This is a mixture of Polyvinyl
alcohol (5%), phenol(25%), lactic acid (25%), and water (45%).

I believe you can get this from Polysciences Inc. This mountant causes
problems with most stained specimens, but may work for you. Is glycerine
jelly auto-fluorescening?

-Ken

--------------
Ken Tiekotter
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000N. Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97303





From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:27:45 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2000 00:45:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dan,
Mixing and matching objectives is one thing, while doing the same for
oculars is probably not visually as big an issue. However, in highly
corrected systems, compensating eyepieces are a critical consideration if
one wishes to maintain image quality, i.e., plan apo objectives require
compensating oculars to maintain the correction of the apochromatic
objective. This is especially true for color reproduction in color
photomicrograph. This is not as important in black and white
photomicrography.

-Ken

----------------
Ken Tiekotter
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000 N Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97303


On Fri, 4 Feb 2000, Dan Freidus wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Ken Tiekotter {tiekotte-at-up.edu}
} ..One does not mixed and match objectives from different systems merely for
} the convenience of pricing....
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Of course, I've heard this sort of statement many times before. But has
} anyone ever done any comparisons of mixed systems to see if there are
} certain brands that are particularly incompatible or particularly
} compatible?
}
} I ask this both as a general question and because I use a Wild M7 for which
} I need a pair of high eyepoint oculars. I don't need the adjusting collar
} built into current models and haven't been able to find an older pair used.
} But before I buy a Nikon/Olympus/ etc. pair I'd love to know how different
} the complete system will be from what I've got now.
}
} I know many people who have used third party photo eyepieces, in just the
} situation where you'd think quality would be of the utmost concern. Dealers
} are often not the best source of info since they tend to represent one brand
} and, even when they are completely honest, rarely have experienc ewith a
} wide range of brands (especially mixed up.
}
} Dan Freidus
} freidus-at-wwnet.com
}
} P.S. Of course, if anyone has a pair of Wild 10x high eyepoint oculars for
} sale, that would also solve my problem (I'd also consider other
} magnifications). (I'm also looking for accessory objective lenses and
} various other accessories. Please contact me off-list if you've got anything
} for sale or trade.)
}
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:28:48 2000



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-hei.org
Date: 05 Feb 00 12:50:25 -0800
Subject: RE: Aqueous mounting medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Lesley Weston {lesley-at-interchange.ubc.ca}
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From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-hei.org
Date: 05 Feb 00 12:50:25 -0800
Subject: RE: Aqueous mounting medium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: RE: Aqueous mounting medium
Dear Lesley,

You can make a very useful mounting medium from inexpensive ingredients.
The main ingredient is poly(vinyl) alcohol which is soluble in water but will dry without shrinking too much. The water solubility means you can take previously mounted slides, rehydrate them and use them again.

Fading of fluorescent dyes can be retarded by including anti-fade compounds.

You can find the recipe at {http://www.hei.org/htm/moviol.htm} .

Details of anti-fade compounds can be found here (at the bottom of the page) {http://www.hei.org/htm/ifse.htm} .
Ths site is getting a little outdated so if you feel there are details missing then please contact me with your questions.

Many thanks to Heinz Schwarz of Tuebingen for writing these protocols.

Regards,

Paul Webster

Paul Webster, Ph.D.
Associate Scientist & Director
Ahmanson Advanced Electron Microscopy & Imaging Center
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third St.
Los Angeles, CA 90057

Phone: (213) 273-8026
Fax: (213) 413-6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm



From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:29:32 2000



From: donald j marshall :      dmrelion-at-world.std.com
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 07:21:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: solid state emitters

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I would call this a typical PARTIAL judgment.
What you see is what you get. Thee only way, to the best of my experience,
is to get both objectives, side by side if possible, and to do your own
evaluation. I have honestly doubts concerning those values set on
objectives.
Things change and optic too and sometimes faster that we could expect.
Norm
----- Original Message -----
} From: Dr. Gary Gaugler {gary-at-gaugler.com}
To: MSA listserver {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ; {sniemela-at-vaytek.com}
Sent: Friday, February 04, 2000 5:02 PM


I am interested to know what the present state of the art is re: solid state
electon emitters, total electron beam currents available and also beam
current densities. If anyone could point out a recent review article, I
would appreciate it. Thanks,

Don Marshall

Donald J. Marshall
Relion Industries
P.O. Box 12
Bedford, MA 01730
Ph: 781-275-4695
FAX: 781-271-0252
email dmrelion-at-world.std.com

Cathodoluminescence, mass spectroscopy, electron beam technology


"A weed is a flower out of place."

(Please note: Do not send email with attachments to this address. Instead, send it to donbarlen-at-aol.com. Thank you.)



From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:29:52 2000



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Sun, 06 Feb 2000 08:43:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In fact, if you're really interested in getting the BEST lens, try at
least three examples of the ones you are interested in . All high NA lenses
must meet some minimal standard but some are significantly better than that
minimum and the only way to find one that is is to try THE lens you are
going to buy - not just an example.

Bill Miller

At 10:04 PM 2/5/00 -0400, Norm wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sun Feb 06 18:31:08 2000



From: VALLARAY-at-aol.com
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 16:10:45 EST
Subject: Re: Electron diffraction simulations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Erik,

Do not have difraction sofrware, but here are some URLs where you can
download free simulation software I use for e-beam to solid interactions,
hope it may be useful for you.

Casino is a freeware for monte carlo simulations:
http://www.gme.usherb.ca/casino/

Monte carlo resources:
http://dsa.dimes.tudelft.nl/pattern_definition/monte/monte.html

My FAVORITE monte carlo software:
http://web.utk.edu/~srcutk/htm/simulati.htm

Valery Ray, MSEE,
SEM engineer
Applied Materials
001-208-8413744



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:07:17 2000



From: Richard Hey :      richardh-at-jeoleuro.com
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 18:32:21 -0600
Subject: Re: Parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi everybody
While this has been an interesting discussion we seem to have got away from
the original question.

This is the method I use - after of course ensuring normal alignments and
adjustments have been carried out

Insert the objective aperture with a specimen in the beam. Focus the image
of this aperture in Selected Area Diffraction using the first intermediate
lens focus.

Focus the diffraction pattern (i.e. the smallest zero order spot) with the
final condenser lens, this will give a parallel beam incident upon the
specimen.

To test this, remove the objective aperture and insert the largest selected
area aperture. If the beam is parallel moving this aperture will not move
the diffraction spot.


------------------------------------------------------------

Tilt and Shift alignment wobblers in the 2010

Tilt - The purpose of this alignment is to ensure that when the beam is
tilted it doesn't move on the specimen. This is double tilt correction and
depends on using double deflector coils.

Shift - Double shift correction is meant to ensure that when the beam is
shifted it doesn't tilt. The operation of this alignment is dependent upon
the value of the first intermediate lens. The best value for this alignment
is a parallel beam condition as described above. By the very nature of the
beast it will be found to be impossible to perform this alignment correctly
at some CBD conditions. This is meant to be a convergent beam mode after all
not a parallel beam mode.

I understand that this is also referred to as tilt and shift purity.

Richard Hey

The views expressed herein are purely my own and do not reflect those of my
employer

Richard Hey
Technical Support Engineer
Jeol (UK) Ltd
Phone: (44) 1707 377117




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:07:20 2000



From: Qiaoling Jin :      jinq-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2000 20:37:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Immnogoldlabeling on TEM

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Dear colleagues,
I am now currently using TEM to observe a filamentous structure
so-called hrp pilus produced by plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae which is
grown on planta mimic medium agar plates. Even though I could easily find this
structure through directly put the nickel-grid on the bacteria plate for a
certain time,followed by the negative staining, I can't convince other people
to believe it's the structure we are looking for as its size is around
7-10 nm, which is indistinguishable from that of bacterial flagellum.
So we want to label this structure by using the specific antibody against
its major structural protein followed by the 10 nm gold-conjugated second
antibody. The difficulty I am encountering now is most pili are washed away
after the whole immnuogoldlabeling process. Since I am a beginnner on TEM work,
I don't know whether it's a very commonly encountered problem in
immnogoldlabeling experiment or just a very special case happened to me, such
as the pilus i'm interested in is too vulnerable to survive the exclusive wash,
or I didn't master the whole immunogoldlabeling techinique. If it's a common
problem, I hope someone could kindly provide me with your valuable experience
on how to resolve this problem, how we can prevent them to be washed away. If
it's due to my techinical problem, could you please send me a very detailed
immunogoldlabeling protocol.
Any kind of help will be highly appreciated
have a nice week
yours
qiaoling jin
jinq-at-msu.edu






From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:08:36 2000



From: Augusto_A_Morrone-at-notes.seagate.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 08:17:13 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM: Jeol 2010 question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Jonathan, Andrew, Richard, Larry:

Thank you for your responses. Please note that I do perform the TILT and SHIFT
alignments (aka "pivot point alignment" in other instruments) on a regular
basis, but this doesn't solve the problem.

Regarding: "...What did you mean by a voltage centre? My interpretation of this
is that
the source high tension is wobbled and any shift in the (previously
focussed) image is minimised by tuning the beam tilts. This alignment would
be used for energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) when doing elemental mapping on a
Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF) for example".

This is a (standard) routine alignment for imaging as well. The voltage center
alignment is done by first focusing the specimen at the optimum OL current
(adjusting Z), then adjusting the Tilt (in image mode) and Shift (in diffraction
mode), and finally adjusting the beam tilts to minimize the image shift at the
center of the screen. The problem arises when the Brightness is changed, as is
typically adjusted when optimizing the illumination on the sample to record an
image (intense illumination) versus an SA diffraction pattern (fully overfocused
condenser). Apparently this brightness change affects the voltage center as
evidenced by a shift of the direct beam as that brightness change is effected in
the SAD mode. This shift in the direct beam is equivalent to a beam tilt.

Augusto




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:08:38 2000



From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 08:30:10 -0600 (CST )
Subject: Re: Parallel beam

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I regret to say that there are some important points which perhaps are
being missed. Classic optics, i.e. most TEM textbooks and introductory
optics texts are for one of two cases:
a) Every point in the condensor aperture (CA) is incoherent (i.e is not
related in phase in a statistical sense) with respect to any other point.
b) Every point in the CA is coherent (i.e. has a fixed phase) with
respect to any other point.

Approximation a) is used in most computer codes for HREM, approximation
b) for STEM.

Alas, both a) and b) are only approximations! Current microscopes,
particularly FEGs (but perhaps others as well) operate under conditions
when neither of the two approximations are valid. While the analytic
theory is well established (see the Chapter in Born and Wolff on
partial coherence), it is not easy and there are no clean solutions
that you can write down. (It can be solved numerically, but this
would require big 4-D FFT's which are beyond most current computers.)

The simplest test is to fully focus the illumination. If the spot
size is A nm, the coherence in the CA is about 1/A nm-1 (which you can
convert to an angle as appropriate). If this is small relative to the
CA radius you are working with case a) above. If it is about the same as the
CA radius you have b). If it is 2-3 times less, neither approximation
is correct!

The moral of the story:
1) If you have a), you can simulate an HREM image with confidence
using any of the available programs. They are WRONG quantitatively
otherwise.
2) If you have a), you can use simple "ray-diagram" optics,
but not otherwise.
3) If you have b) the simple equations for STEM operation are
valid, but not otherwise.

Sorry, but as microscopes improve the theory we need to understand them
can change.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:l-marks-at-nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:08:40 2000



From: Michael Herron :      herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 09:20:44 -0600
Subject: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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All,

I am trying to get a handle on the scale of some old pictures. There
are human RBC in theses pictures. Can anyone tell me the diameter of
your average human RBC?

Thanks
Mike

--
_________________________________________________
/ Michael J. Herron /
/ U of MN,Medicine/Infectious Diseases /
/ herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu /
/ http://128.101.243.213 /
/_____________________________________________/



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:09:09 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 10:52:29 -0500
Subject: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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When a characteristic X-ray is given off from an atom, it carries 1 h-bar
(Planck's constant divided by 2 pi) of angular momentum. The electronic
transition that occurred for the X-ray to come off must conserve angular
momentum of the system. Therefore, a transition from a 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2
state is forbidden by selection rules. You can't produce a Be X-ray.
-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:09:24 2000



From: A. K. Christensen :      akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 11:38:52 -0500
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike: According to Fawcett's CONCISE HISTOLOGY (page 32), "In the blood,
erythrocytes are 8.5 micrometers in diameter, but in the dehydrated state,
in dried blood smears, they measure 7.6 micrometers." --Kent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
Office: 2703A Medical Science II Building
Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
E-mail: akc-at-umich.edu
http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
--On Mon, Feb 7, 2000 9:20 AM -0600 Michael Herron
{herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu} wrote:

} All,
}
} I am trying to get a handle on the scale of some old pictures. There
} are human RBC in theses pictures. Can anyone tell me the diameter of
} your average human RBC?
}
} Thanks
} Mike
}
} --
} _________________________________________________
} / Michael J. Herron /
} / U of MN,Medicine/Infectious Diseases /
} / herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu /
} / http://128.101.243.213 /
} /_____________________________________________/






From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:09:45 2000



From: donald j marshall :      dmrelion-at-world.std.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:06:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Computer lock-ups from static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John, If they do, I hope that they will respond to the whole list because we
have clients who have experienced similar problems, especially re: computers
that are controlling VIS spectrometers collecting CL spectra. I know that
there are in line RF filters available (e.g., Steward Co.) and there may be
others but the final word is not in on how well these work yet.

Don Marshall


} From microprobe-at-microanalysis.org Mon Feb 7 11:43:28 2000
} }
} From: John Hunt {hunt-at-ccmr.cornell.edu}
} Subject: Computer lock-ups from static
} To: microprobe-at-microanalysis.org
}
}
} Dear Probe community,
} It is winter in Central NY, and the room humidity is 33%. Static
} electricity (I believe) has been causing frustrating computer lockups
} requiring rebooting our microprobe workstation.
} I am wondering if anyone has found the best solution for preventing
these
} problems.
}
}
}
}
} John Hunt
} Cornell Center for Materials Research
} 607-255-0108 microprobe
} -3789 SEM/TEM
} -2365 fax
}

Donald J. Marshall
Relion Industries
P.O. Box 12
Bedford, MA 01730
Ph: 781-275-4695
FAX: 781-271-0252
email dmrelion-at-world.std.com

Cathodoluminescence, mass spectroscopy, electron beam technology


"A weed is a flower out of place."

(Please note: Do not send email with attachments to this address. Instead, send it to donbarlen-at-aol.com. Thank you.)



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:09:49 2000



From: Marisa Ahmad :      mahmad-at-semiconductor.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:33:38 -0500
Subject: tungsten filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I would like to tap the wealth of information out there.

We are experiencing a lot of problems with the tungsten filaments that we
are currently using on our JEOL 5800 SEM. During long acquisitions (many
hours) there is a lot of brightness drift and shifting, even when lengthy
stabilization periods are given prior to the acquisitions. JEOL has
checked out the SEM itself, and can't find the source for the drifting. I
was thinking that it might be the filament. I was wondering if there are
different types of tungsten filaments out there, and which is the most
stable over long periods of time. I would like to try out all of them
(considering trying to switch our entire system to a LaB6 filament is a bit
much for now). Any recommendations or experiences you have would help us
out a lot.

Thanks in advance!


Marisa Ahmad
R&D Specialist
Semiconductor Insights
mahmad-at-semiconductor.com


weather report (for those interested):
It's unusually sunny and warm for here in Ottawa.....only -10 degrees C (but
it feels like -25 with the wind). It's such a nice day that I washed my
car this morning since it's not really supposed to be brown - now all the
doors and windows are frozen shut. {sigh}



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:07 2000



From: Marie E. Cantino :      cantino-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:45:54 -0500
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In my experience, RBCs prepared for SEM by critical point drying or HMDS
shrink even more and may be only 4 or 5 microns across.

Marie
}
} Mike: According to Fawcett's CONCISE HISTOLOGY (page 32), "In the blood,
} erythrocytes are 8.5 micrometers in diameter, but in the dehydrated state,
} in dried blood smears, they measure 7.6 micrometers." --Kent
}

Dr. Marie E. Cantino
Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology, U-2131
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT 06269-2131
Phone: 860-486-3588
Fax: 860-486-1936




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:10 2000



From: Karl E. Garsha :      keg-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:03:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Immnogoldlabeling on TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------- Begin Forwarded Message -------------



------------- End Forwarded Message -------------




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:12 2000



From: Karl E. Garsha :      keg-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:10:39 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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It depends on the fixation/dehydration parameters. Somewhere in the
nieghborhood of 4 microns, dependant on the angle of measurement and the angle
of the sample with respect to the camera.
} Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 09:20:44 -0600
} From: Michael Herron {herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu}
} X-Accept-Language: en
} MIME-Version: 1.0
} To: Microscopy listserv {Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
} Subject: Diameter of human RBC?
} Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:18 2000



From: Margaret Brannigan :      brannign-at-asrr.arsusda.gov
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 13:25:52 -0500
Subject: TEM: What is Brandes dip?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

Can anyone tell me what a Brandes dip is and how it is done? The only thing
I know is that it can be used to detect virus particles from plant sap but
I can't find any references on it.

Thank You!

Margaret

Margaret Dienelt

Plant Pathologist
Electron Microscopy Lab

Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit
U.S. National Arboretum/Agricultural Research Service/USDA

B. 010A, Rm. 238, BARC-W
10300 Baltimore Avenue
Beltsville MD. 20705 USA

(301) 504-6097
Fax: (301) 504-5096




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:30 2000



From: Hao Li :      haoli-at-eng.umd.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 13:56:57 -0500
Subject: Simulation of dislocation network

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Does anybody know any program capable of doing TEM simulation of
dislocation network, e.g., misfit dislocations in plane view TEM? I know
some programs can do one or two dislocations, but what I need is the
simulation for a set of dislocations.
Thanks a lot.

Hao Li



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:10:31 2000



From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 13:59:53 -0500
Subject: Automatic Microscope and Coherence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi

It has been very interesting reading about diffraction and electron beams
but it is quite clear that we often give the instrument credit, "the
instrument does it automatically", when credit is not due. Almost every
"automatic" is a designers estimate or better still a calculation, it is a
setting!

After 36 years with TEM I have to say that the only area that the
instrument could set in the SA mode could be the approximate position of
the first image plane. We normally move to the SA mode to free up the
diffraction lens (1st intermediate) to enable it to be focussed on the
diffraction (intermediate) aperture independent of the magnification
system. We would then focus the image inside the aperture with the
objective lens to ensure that the selected area IS the area in the
diffraction pattern. Without this procedure electron rotation and
misalignments could give you a diffraction pattern from an area not in the
centre of the screen! Users are correct in that if they set the eucentric
point or better still, adjust the specimen height to focus at the same
objective lens current value, that done the first image plane will be at
the same point within the diffraction (intermediate) lens.

So how could the Philips work? I would guess they set the diffraction lens
at approximately the first image plane. Then as they do not use it within
their lens scheme for the SA magnifications it is fixed at this focus, good
enough I think?

A second point, parallel beams are very important if you are chasing the
best image quality, biology or materials, most times we need high
coherence. There are misunderstandings on how to obtain a parallel beam or
high coherence, setting the final condenser underfocus is incorrect. The
procedure for high coherence would be to use the smallest spot size you can
tolerate (this probably means you must up the emission current). Once in
this condition overfocus the final condenser (clockwise from crossover) the
spot, what ever size it is now, becomes your virtual source. The further
overfocus you go the greater the beam coherence and that is what we are
after. You will deduce the smaller the condenser aperture the sharper the
spot and the smaller the spot the greater the coherence for a given degree
of overfocus.

Work with a design team and they expect everyone to overfocus, they expect
everyone to use small condenser apertures and they expect everyone to use
small spot sizes. They do not expect everyone to use too low an emission
current (almost everyone does, we have talked before about filament life
being the most important feature of many laboratories) because this makes
the task too difficult!
There must be people more knowledgeable than I who will cut out all the
guesswork?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant
Protrain
Electron microscopy courses world wide
http://www.emcourses.com
Tel & Fax 44 (0) 1280 814774



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:11:18 2000



From: Kalman Rubinson :      kr4-at-is2.nyu.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 14:27:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Mon, 7 Feb 2000, Michael Herron wrote:

} I am trying to get a handle on the scale of some old pictures. There
} are human RBC in theses pictures. Can anyone tell me the diameter of
} your average human RBC?

When I was a lad...... in grad school, we were told it was
a useful reference at 7um diameter.

Kal



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:11:30 2000



From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 15:15:13 -0500
Subject: ANNOUNCEMENT Course on Polarized Light Microscopy

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New York Microscopical Society

Bernard Friedman Memorial Workshop

Polarized Light Microscopy

Two consecutive weekends

Saturday, April 21, Sunday, April 22, 2000
Saturday, April 28, Sunday, April 29, 2000

An advanced course on polarized light microscopy which will cover the following topics:
The nature of polarized light
The origin and interpretation of interference colors
Birefringence and crystal orientation
The Indicatrix
Compensation and variable compensators
Interference figures and their interpretation

The workshop will consist of two consecutive weekends of lectures and hands on labs to cover
the theoretical and practical aspects of polarized light microscopy.

The course instructors include;

Jan Hinsch of Leica, Inc.,

John Reffner of Trace Consulting,

N.Y.M.S. Instructor Donald O'Leary.

WHEN: April 22, 23, 28 & 29, 2000 from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.

WHERE: Location To be Announced.

COST: $275 for N.Y.M.S. members, $295 for non-members (includes membership)
Lunch and course materials are included. Checks made out to N.Y.M.S.

WHO: advanced course for those who have completed "The Use of the Microscope" or
are experienced in microscopy and familiar with the theory of its use.

HOW: Register using the form below. Limited to the first 12 registrants.


FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact Donald O'Leary

eMail: mailto:donoleary-at-worldnet.att.net

(201) 797-8849 Voice Phone Number

PLEASE POST
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Return form to Donald O'Leary, 6 Chittenden Road, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.

Registration Form

Polarized Light Microscopy, April 22, 23, 28 & 29, 2000

N.Y.M.S. Member _________________ ($275.00) Non-Member __________($295.00)

Name ___________________________________________________________________________

Address _________________________________________________________________________

City _________________________________ State __________________ Zip Code _______________

Phone (W) ____________________________ (H) ___________________________

eMail Address: ______________________________________




________________________________________________________
1stUp.com - Free the Web®
Get your free Internet access at http://www.1stUp.com



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:08 2000



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 13:23:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Patricia,

I'm just taking a guess. Is it possible, depending on the type of filters
used in the cube, that infrared is passing through as flare if your first
excitation filter is not blocking the IR? Or there may be a coating
problem on your filter? We have an IR blocking filter right after the
mercury lamp. The CCD cameras are extremely sensitive to IR and this has
caused problems on our system. But in your situation I don't know why it
would pass through. So it is probably something else.

Bob
Morphology core
U of Washington

On Fri, 4 Feb 2000, Patricia A. Glazebrook wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} I tried a Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope equiped
} with a Diagnostics Instrument Spot Camera. My tissue had been
} immunolabelled with Cy5 and I did not expect to see thru the microscope. So
} we took pictures with the Spot Camera and the immunolabeling seemed to
} work. The problem was that there was uneven illumination in the pictures,
} half moon of brightness and the rest of the field dark. The salesperson did
} check that the mercury bulb was aligned correctly. Also there was no
} ambient light from the room causing the shadow.
}
} Anyone with an idea  of what is causing this problem?
}
} Thank-you, Pat Glazebrook
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:10 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 16:26:47 -0500
Subject: Re: Help:A comparison of optics

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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One more thought to support Gary's observation about the importance of the
NA of the condenser: The full equation for the limit of resolution is R =
(1.22)(wavelength)/(NAobjective + NAcondenser). However, if you don't oil
it to the back of the slide, you might as well use a lower NA condenser.
Reminds me of the hematology scope built by an otherwise sensible company,
meant to be used in ultra high resolution applications. The manufacturer
was very good about providing a quality, high NA, oil immersion objective
as well as a high NA condenser. The only problem was that you could never
raise the condenser high enough to oil it to the back of the slide and,
therefore, use it at the NA inscribed... only at about .95! What a waste
of time and money!

Also, a reminder that the NAs engraved are the maximum working limit.
Closing down an aperture iris or an iris in the back focal plane of the
objective reduces the NA accordingly.

One last fact: the NA affects both resolution AND edge information, so,
for the crispest, highest resolution images, go for high NA in both
objective and condenser.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}


At 03:02 PM 2/4/00 -0600, Dr. Gary Gaugler wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:14 2000



From: William Tivol :      tivol-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 16:35:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: tungsten filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Marisa Ahmad:
} I would like to tap the wealth of information out there.
}
} We are experiencing a lot of problems with the tungsten filaments that we
} are currently using on our JEOL 5800 SEM. During long acquisitions (many
} hours) there is a lot of brightness drift and shifting, even when lengthy
} stabilization periods are given prior to the acquisitions. JEOL has
} checked out the SEM itself, and can't find the source for the drifting. I
} was thinking that it might be the filament. I was wondering if there are
} different types of tungsten filaments out there, and which is the most
} stable over long periods of time. I would like to try out all of them
} (considering trying to switch our entire system to a LaB6 filament is a bit
} much for now). Any recommendations or experiences you have would help us
} out a lot.
}
Dear Marisa,
Do you have control over the filament voltage? If so, set the
voltage just a hair over that necessary to saturate the filament. If
the voltage is too low, parts of the filament will not emit electrons
which get through the wehnelt and into the beam; if too high, there may
be significant evaporation of the filament; either may cause drifting
and/or shifting. I have had very good luck with the stabilities of
both Agar and Ebtec (now Energy Beam Sciences) filaments; not that
others may not be as good, I haven't tried them. Ebtec makes several
shapes of filament, and one may be best for long-term stability. I
have no interest in Agar or Ebtec except as a satisfied customer.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:17 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 17:07:29 -0500
Subject: Re: Computer lock-ups from static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John,

Have you considered a "local" remedy, like putting up a humidifier? I know
that static can be an issue, but I have never heard of it being this bad
before.
In more humid environments, we often put a small enclosure around a light
microscope then put out a dish of Drierite. Perhaps some simple plastic
sheeting, like they sell for exterior storm windows/wind breaks, can be
hung from the ceiling around your microprobe plus the humidifier will keep
the humidity immediately around your microprobe more balanced.

Best of luck on a tough problem.

Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}


At 12:06 PM 2/7/00 -0500, donald j marshall wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:25 2000



From: BLADE1691-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 17:33:41 EST
Subject: pictures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




---------- Forwarded message ----------


how can i get a picture of you seal



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:19:22 2000



From: G. Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 14:52:34 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Is this a Spot Jr. or a SpotII? The IR filter in the Jr. cuts off at 650
nm, the SpotII puts it on a slider. Is it all the way out or [partially
occluding the image? Bob Fern
caught a lot of the possible issues, but is your lamp properly focussed
and aligned? Are you picking up light through the eyepieces? We have a
Nikon that will show a semi-circle of light in from a
recessed ceiling light
that projects to the scope at an angle.

Regards,
Glen


Glen MacDonald
Research Scientist
Hearing Research Laboratories of the
Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center
Box 35-7923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu


On Fri, 4 Feb 2000, Patricia A. Glazebrook wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} I tried a Cy5 filtercube today on a upright flourescent microscope equiped
} with a Diagnostics Instrument Spot Camera. My tissue had been
} immunolabelled with Cy5 and I did not expect to see thru the microscope. So
} we took pictures with the Spot Camera and the immunolabeling seemed to
} work. The problem was that there was uneven illumination in the pictures,
} half moon of brightness and the rest of the field dark. The salesperson did
} check that the mercury bulb was aligned correctly. Also there was no
} ambient light from the room causing the shadow.
}
} Anyone with an idea  of what is causing this problem?
}
} Thank-you, Pat Glazebrook
}
}
}
}
}




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:19:50 2000



From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 16:06:21 -0700
Subject: RE: Computer lock-ups from static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Out here in the dry West (here we have Summer humidity around the 33%
value you mention, in Winter we go a lot further down) we have the same
problem. There are a few methods to help:

1) increase humidity. Perhaps you can use a humidifier in your equipment
room?
2) prevent charging. There are shoes available that prevent charging.
3) get rid of charging. There are several options here:

a) The easiest way and what I usually do if no other method is
available, is to touch some metal part NOT of the PC but a chair or
table before touching the PC. This requires a) that a suitable object is
near the PC, b) that you're not afraid of "shocking" yourself, and c)
that you don't move around a lot while working on the PC.

b) Purchase a grounding mat to place in front of the equipment. these
mats are connected to the AC ground (use the same as the PC ground). If
the mat is big enough so that everybody has to step on the mat first AND
is wearing the conductive shoes, everything should be OK.

c) wear grounded wrist straps. These require of course that you put them
on.

We use a combination of these techniques to protect our equipment both
in the office and the production floor (believe me, it IS necessary
here). As bad as it is for electronic equipment, though, it is just
great for comfort levels outside. 90 degrees (F) feel just right for
bicycling, climbing, rafting...

One company where you can buy this stuff is called "-at-once". Their web
site is www.4atonce.com. I just happened to find their catalog first.
There are many other companies out there that sell static control
equipment. We have no financial interest in this company whatsoever.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



} ----------
} From: donald j marshall[SMTP:DMRELION-at-WORLD.STD.COM]
} Sent: Monday, February 07, 2000 10:06:10 AM
} To: hunt-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
} Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Re: Computer lock-ups from static
} Auto forwarded by a Rule
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



John, If they do, I hope that they will respond to the whole list
because we
have clients who have experienced similar problems, especially re:
computers
that are controlling VIS spectrometers collecting CL spectra. I know
that
there are in line RF filters available (e.g., Steward Co.) and there may
be
others but the final word is not in on how well these work yet.

Don Marshall


} From microprobe-at-microanalysis.org Mon Feb 7 11:43:28 2000
} }
} From: John Hunt {hunt-at-ccmr.cornell.edu}
} Subject: Computer lock-ups from static
} To: microprobe-at-microanalysis.org
}
}
} Dear Probe community,
} It is winter in Central NY, and the room humidity is 33%.
Static
} electricity (I believe) has been causing frustrating computer lockups
} requiring rebooting our microprobe workstation.
} I am wondering if anyone has found the best solution for
preventing
these
} problems.
}
}
}
}
} John Hunt
} Cornell Center for Materials Research
} 607-255-0108 microprobe
} -3789 SEM/TEM
} -2365 fax
}

Donald J. Marshall
Relion Industries
P.O. Box 12
Bedford, MA 01730
Ph: 781-275-4695
FAX: 781-271-0252
email dmrelion-at-world.std.com

Cathodoluminescence, mass spectroscopy, electron beam technology


"A weed is a flower out of place."

(Please note: Do not send email with attachments to this address.
Instead, send it to donbarlen-at-aol.com. Thank you.)



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:19:40 2000



From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-leland.Stanford.EDU
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 17:24:50 -0600
Subject: GFP antibodies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am planning to try EM immunolabelling with GFP antibodies. Does anyone
out there know of the best source for GFP antibodies and had any luck with
using them for TEM. I would like to try pre-embedding with a nanogold
labelled secondary. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you.

JoAnn Buchanan
Molecular and Cellular Physiology
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305
650-723-5856




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:19:42 2000



From: Frederick Schamber :      fhscham-at-sgi.net
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 19:04:05 -0500
Subject: Re: tungsten filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Marisa,

Just a quick comment for whatever it's worth. Your posting suggests that you
are concerned about mechanical drifts of the filament -- the subject of a
certain body of folklore in the microscopy community. It's been my experience
that the principal drift in a tungsten filament is not the filament itself, but
rather it is the mechanism supporting the filament which drifts.

The actual issue with drifting filaments is that mechanical stresses in the wire
will gradually relieve under heat, causing the filament to distort slightly.
This is a first-time-used issue. However, I believe most manufacturers include
an annealing step in their process to remove these stresses before the filament
is shipped to a customer (at least, that's what we used to do in another company
when we manufactured our own filaments). In any case, the filament is operated
at a very high temperature and it doesn't take long to anneal out these stresses
under normal use, so long-term drift effects shouldn't be an issue.

My experience is that long-term mechanical drifts originate elsewhere in the gun
mechanism. When you think about it, this makes sense. The filament itself has
very little mass and quickly reaches its ultimate operating temperature
distribution. However, the rest of the gun assembly is much more massive and,
depending on various design considerations, may take hours to reach thermal
equilibrium. Meanwhile, all of those intricate parts are expanding -- and many
at different rates. Principal suspects, in my opinion, are lateral adjusting
and clamping screws -- for example, a set of radial set screws is commonly used
to center the ceramic base of the filament within a ring of some type. I used
to work with a rather complex assembly which positioned the filament via lateral
screws and sometimes had episodes of "filament drift". Subsequently, I have had
nearly a decade of experience with a very simple design which supports the
filament solely via axial pressure and find that "filament drift" isn't an
issue. My conclusion is that a lot of what I used to call "filament drift" was
actually mechanism drift. So if you are experiencing mechanical instabilities
of the filament, I would suspect the way the filament is being supported more
than the filament itself.

This opinion is based on my own experiences, however, and I will be very
interested to hear if others have had different experience.

Fred Schamber
RJ Lee Instruments Limited

Marisa Ahmad wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I would like to tap the wealth of information out there.
}
} We are experiencing a lot of problems with the tungsten filaments that we
} are currently using on our JEOL 5800 SEM. During long acquisitions (many
} hours) there is a lot of brightness drift and shifting, even when lengthy
} stabilization periods are given prior to the acquisitions. JEOL has
} checked out the SEM itself, and can't find the source for the drifting. I
} was thinking that it might be the filament. I was wondering if there are
} different types of tungsten filaments out there, and which is the most
} stable over long periods of time. I would like to try out all of them
} (considering trying to switch our entire system to a LaB6 filament is a bit
} much for now). Any recommendations or experiences you have would help us
} out a lot.
}
} Thanks in advance!
}
} Marisa Ahmad
} R&D Specialist
} Semiconductor Insights
} mahmad-at-semiconductor.com
}
} weather report (for those interested):
} It's unusually sunny and warm for here in Ottawa.....only -10 degrees C (but
} it feels like -25 with the wind). It's such a nice day that I washed my
} car this morning since it's not really supposed to be brown - now all the
} doors and windows are frozen shut. {sigh}



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:20:58 2000



From: schmutzm-at-lear.u-strasbg.fr (Schmutz Marc)
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 09:27:07 +0900
Subject: Hematology Slide Stainer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Colleagues around the world,



We're interested in knowing a little bit more about the Hematology Slide
Stainer RSG 61 commercialized by EMS. So if you have one can you please
share your experience with us. Give the plus and also all the minus. If you
have another equivalent brand in which you're fully satisfied of course say
it. Naturally salesman can contact me (offline only please, so the whole
community will not be annoided...)

Thank you for your help


Marc


PS hi Keith how is weather in Plymouth ? Here it's raining and we're singing...





------------------------------
SCHMUTZ Marc
IGBMC
1 rue Laurent FRIES
BP 163
F 67404 Illkirch Cedex
FRANCE

Tel: +33 (0)388 653 330 direct
Fax: +33 (0)388 653 201
email:schmutzm-at-lear.u-strasbg.fr

------------------------------




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:23 2000



From: Bart Cannon :      cannonmp-at-accessone.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 16:39:50 -0800
Subject: Solid State Electron Emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donald,

Nasa has been working on micro-machined solid state electron emitters
and Thomas George of that agency has published a design utilizing an
array of them as the source for a "palm top" SEM in the August, 1998
issue of Nasa Tech Briefs. The proposed SEM relies upon the speculated
use of an electon transparent membrane at the bottom of the lens column
in this sealed, vacuum pumpless system. Resolution is anticipate in the
micron range.

Nasa has also published designs for miniature x-ray tubes in an October
1995 issue of Nasa Tech Briefs.

As far as I know a solid state high energy electron gun exists only as a
Star Wars project.

Bart Cannon
Cannon Microprobe
Seattle
206 522 9233



From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:03 2000



From: Bart Cannon :      cannonmp-at-accessone.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 16:39:50 -0800
Subject: Solid State Electron Emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donald,

Nasa has been working on micro-machined solid state electron emitters
and Thomas George of that agency has published a design utilizing an
array of them as the source for a "palm top" SEM in the August, 1998
issue of Nasa Tech Briefs. The proposed SEM relies upon the speculated
use of an electon transparent membrane at the bottom of the lens column
in this sealed, vacuum pumpless system. Resolution is anticipate in the
micron range.

Nasa has also published designs for miniature x-ray tubes in an October
1995 issue of Nasa Tech Briefs.

As far as I know a solid state high energy electron gun exists only as a
Star Wars project.

Bart Cannon
Cannon Microprobe
Seattle
206 522 9233



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:00 2000



From: Bart Cannon :      cannonmp-at-accessone.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 16:39:50 -0800
Subject: Solid State Electron Emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Donald,

Nasa has been working on micro-machined solid state electron emitters
and Thomas George of that agency has published a design utilizing an
array of them as the source for a "palm top" SEM in the August, 1998
issue of Nasa Tech Briefs. The proposed SEM relies upon the speculated
use of an electon transparent membrane at the bottom of the lens column
in this sealed, vacuum pumpless system. Resolution is anticipate in the
micron range.

Nasa has also published designs for miniature x-ray tubes in an October
1995 issue of Nasa Tech Briefs.

As far as I know a solid state high energy electron gun exists only as a
Star Wars project.

Bart Cannon
Cannon Microprobe
Seattle
206 522 9233



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:22 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Mon, 07 Feb 2000 19:57:13 -0500
Subject: LM: Course reminder

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just a friendly reminder about the upcoming American Chemical Society
Course, "Applied Optical Microscopy". This course is not just for chemists!

If you need a refresher on a basic technique, need to know more about
interpreting images gathered by a variety of contrast systems (including
Hoffman Modulation Contrast and Polarized light), or are moving more into
digital imaging, this is a great course for you!

Hands-on, 3 days of total immersion, basic principles through advanced
techniques, quantitative polarized light.... and New Orleans, thrown in for
good measure! $895 for ACS members; $995 for non-members (tuition and
materials only).

Visit the MME website for details: {http://MME-Microscopy.com/education}

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
ACS Course Coordinator

Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}
******************************************************



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:20:32 2000



From: Hay, Karen :      KHay-at-ahs.llumc.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 19:13:42 -0800
Subject: RE: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




---------- Forwarded message ----------



-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Herron [SMTP:herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu]

I am trying to get a handle on the scale of some old pictures.
There
are human RBC in theses pictures. Can anyone tell me the diameter
of
your average human RBC?


Mike-

I have recently subscribed to this list in the hopes of picking up some SEM
pointers as I am beginning to dip my toes into the field. I certainly
can't answer any SEM questions, but I CAN answer your question regarding the
size of human RBCs. On a dried film, normal RBC's have a diameter of
between 7.2-7.9 um. In certain disease states, they can deviate markedly
from this. Microcytic RBC's can be well under 6 um, while macrocytes will
have diameters greater than 9 um.

Good luck in your sizing!

{ {...} }
Karen Hay, MS, MT(ASCP)
Hematology Research, MC 2522
Loma Linda University Medical Center
Loma Linda, CA 92354
Tel: (909) 558-4000 x45350
Fax: (909) 558-4189
Khay-at-ahs.llumc.edu {mailto:Khay-at-ahs.llumc.edu}




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:20:51 2000



From: COURYHOUSE-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 23:24:15 EST
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


what is a rbc?
in machining we had a theoretical size referred to by the Dimension of a RCH
thanks Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:20:57 2000



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 22:45:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Michael,
How about ~7.5 to 8.5um in diameter (depending on fixation/preparation)
and ~2um in greatest thickness.
-Ken

On Mon, 7 Feb 2000, Michael Herron wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} All,
}
} I am trying to get a handle on the scale of some old pictures. There
} are human RBC in theses pictures. Can anyone tell me the diameter of
} your average human RBC?
}
} Thanks
} Mike
}
} --
} _________________________________________________
} / Michael J. Herron /
} / U of MN,Medicine/Infectious Diseases /
} / herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu /
} / http://128.101.243.213 /
} /_____________________________________________/
}
}



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:01 2000



From: Bright, Alan :      ABright-at-brightinstruments.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 08:59:57 -0000
Subject: SEM: automotive paints

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Jorgelina,

We have supplied a number of Cryostats & Microtomes to the automotive
industry for sectioning paint finishes on steel body parts & plastic
components e.g. bumper (fenders) door handles, door handle surrounds
etc. Please view our Website to see our range of instruments.

If I can be of further assistance please come back to me.

Best Regards

Alan Bright

Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
St Margaret's Way
Huntingdon
PE18 6EB
England

Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: "csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
[mailto:"csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com]
Sent: 08 February 2000 17:35
To: MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi!
My name is Jorgelina C. Altamirano. I'm an undegrated student of
the
licenciate in chemical sciences.
I'm currently preparing my thesis, being its subjet: The
morphological
characterization and the chemical analysis of automotive paints with
forensic
purposes.
I'm undergoing my work using SEM and EPMA techniques with a
JEOL,
JSM 35C and a microprobe EDAX PV9500.
I've chosen some papers as references:
- Beam et al, Analysis Protocol for discrimination for
automotive
paints by SEM-EDAX, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 35, 5, 1990
- Zieba-Palus et al, Mikrochim. Acta, 14, 1997.

I've taken same samples of automotive paints (such as Fiat,
Peugeot,
Renault, Ford, Chevrolet, Volkswagen) corresponding to the years
1994-99.
I've found many difficulties while preparing them in:
- separating the paint from the body work of the car;
- cutting the specimen;
- to stick specimen to the graphite specimen pedestal;

Though I've made the primary morphological and chemical analysis
and I
haven't observed great differences between the diferent automotive
paints
trades (while polyuretane paints and belayer metalizer paints already
tested),
but I'd found great differences between layers and layers of the paints
specimen.
As I'm not quite satisfied with the results obtained to be used
for
forensic purposes, I would greatly appreciate making contacts with
specialist
fo this subject, so as to receive any comments on this subject.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Jorgelina Altamirano
CERIDE,
Guemes 3450
(3000) Santa Fe, Argentina
e-mail: csedax-at-arcride.edu.ar



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:10 2000



From: mauty-at-MOOREPARK.TEAGASC.IE
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 11:22:33 +0000
Subject: HeNe laser

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jorgelina
SEM/EDS//EPMA is only one class of analytical methods that the Forensic
community applies to paint analysis for comparison and association with
original source. Although used routinely, probe methods are not used
exclusively. The organic components in paints are generally more
discriminating.
Sample preparation usually entails some form of embedment and either
microtomy or polishing in order to reveal internal structure.
Removal of paint from an auto body is tricky, and requires practice.The
manufacturers have designed their paint systems to prevent removal!
I would be glad to provide you with additional resources.

Dennis

_________________________________________________________________________
Dennis C . Ward voice: 202-324-2982
FBI Laboratory fax: 202-324-4018
Microanalysis Laboratory email:
DCWard-at-concentric.net


----- Original Message -----
} From: {"csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
To: {MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 9:35 AM


Jorgelina
SEM/EDS//EPMA is only one class of analytical methods that the Forensic
community applies to paint analysis for comparison and association with
original source. Although used routinely, probe methods are not used
exclusively. The organic components in paints are generally more
discriminating.
Sample preparation usually entails some form of embedment and either
microtomy or polishing in order to reveal internal structure.
Removal of paint from an auto body is tricky, and requires practice.The
manufacturers have designed their paint systems to prevent removal!
I would be glad to provide you with additional resources.

Dennis

_________________________________________________________________________
Dennis C . Ward voice: 202-324-2982
FBI Laboratory fax: 202-324-4018
Microanalysis Laboratory email:
DCWard-at-concentric.net




----- Original Message -----
} From: "Bright, Alan" {ABright-at-brightinstruments.com}
To: {"csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com} ;
{MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 12:59 AM


Jorgelina
SEM/EDS//EPMA is only one class of analytical methods that the Forensic
community applies to paint for characterization and association with
original source. Although used routinely, probe methods are not used
exclusively. The organic components in paints are generally more
discriminating.
Sample preparation usually entails some form of embedment and either
microtomy or polishing in order to reveal layer structure.
Removal of paint from an auto body is tricky, and requires practice.The
manufacturers have designed their paint systems to prevent removal!
I would be glad to provide you with additional resources.

Dennis

_________________________________________________________________________
Dennis C . Ward voice: 202-324-2982
FBI Laboratory fax: 202-324-4018
Microanalysis Laboratory email:
DCWard-at-concentric.net




----- Original Message -----
} From: {"csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar"-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
To: {MICROSCOPY-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 9:35 AM


Dear all

I am planning to replace my Kr/Ar laser on a Zeiss 310 CSLM with two
separate lasers: 488nm Ar ion and HeNe 543nm. Does anyone have
experience of using a HeNe 543? I need this or something similar to
excite Rhodamine for food structure applications. I'd appreciate any
advice.

The reason I'm replacing the mixed gas laser is that has
averaged 25% downtime over the past three years.

Mark

Mark Auty
Dairy Products Research Centre
Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland.
mauty-at-moorepark.teagasc.ie
tel 00353 2542447
fax 00353 2542340




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:36 2000



From: Stan Rice :      srice-at-alpha.utampa.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 09:04:43 -0400
Subject: LKB Nova

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

Thank you for the many responses to my inquery about operation
instructions for the LKB Nova ultramicrotome. For future reference, I
have the instrument and the original instructions for the LKB Reichert
ultramicrotome if anyone has acquired one of these without instructions.
Thanks again for all of your responses.

Stan Rice
University of Tampa



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:25 2000



From: Cap'n Peachfuzz :      bsteffen-at-arches.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 08:42:57 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Re: tungsten filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Mon, 7 Feb 2000 12:33:38 -0500 Marisa Ahmad
{mahmad-at-semiconductor.com} wrote:

} We are experiencing a lot of problems with the tungsten filaments that
} we are currently using on our JEOL 5800 SEM. During long acquisitions
} (many hours) there is a lot of brightness drift and shifting, even when
} lengthy stabilization periods are given prior to the acquisitions.
} JEOL has checked out the SEM itself, and can't find the source for the
} drifting

Marisa,

You can easily enough to see if it is filament drift. First, start the
filament alignment program to ensure alignment. Then with the beam on,
wait a few minutes for the filament to drift, then switch off the
autobeam function, and manually check the alignment using the 2
filament alignment knobs. If you can make the image brighter, then
there is filament drift. With my experiences with the 5800 though, I
suspect this is not the case.


W. L. (Buddy) Steffens, Ph.D
Dept. of Pathology
University of Georgia




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:28 2000



From: Cap'n Peachfuzz :      bsteffen-at-arches.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 09:02:01 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Re: tungsten filaments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Mon, 7 Feb 2000 16:35:56 -0500 (EST) William Tivol
{tivol-at-wadsworth.org} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}

} Dear Marisa, Do you have control over the filament voltage? If so,
} set the voltage just a hair over that necessary to saturate the
} filament. If the voltage is too low, parts of the filament will not
} emit electrons which get through the wehnelt and into the beam; if too
} high, there may be significant evaporation of the filament; either may
} cause drifting and/or shifting. I have had very good luck with the
} stabilities of both Agar and Ebtec (now Energy Beam Sciences)
} filaments; not that others may not be as good, I haven't tried them.
} Ebtec makes several shapes of filament, and one may be best for
} long-term stability. I have no interest in Agar or Ebtec except as a
} satisfied customer. Yours,
} Bill Tivol


Marisa,

This is a good point that Bill makes...if you are slightly
undersaturated, there will be fluctuations in the rate of electron
emission from the filament. The 5800 automatically aligns and
saturates the filament when the Autobeam mode is selected...and on our
5800, saturation in this mode is a bit low. If you turn off the
autobeam switch and use the filament emission knob to slightly increase
the emission current, this might solve the problem at a cost of only a
small decrease in filament life.



W. L. (Buddy) Steffens, Ph.D
Dept. of Pathology
University of Georgia



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:46 2000



From: Huggins, Bradley J :      HUGGINBJ-at-BP.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 09:11:56 -0500
Subject: Re: Computer lock-ups from static

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



John Hunt wrote:
}
} Dear Probe community,
} It is winter in Central NY, and the room humidity is 33%. Static
} electricity (I believe) has been causing frustrating computer lockups
} requiring rebooting our microprobe workstation.
} I am wondering if anyone has found the best solution for preventing
these
} problems.
}
John we had this same problem for many years while we were using the old
RT-11 based Tracor Northern and Kevex x-ray analyzers. The problem was
especially bad with the TN-5500. This was due to the keyboard with built in
scroll knob. The motion of turning that knob on the keyboard was perfect
for generating a little static. (This is pre- GUI and mouse days, except
for the Mac users!) Because of the low humidity conditions and severe
static accumulation, in winter months we were forced to set the entire
keyboard on a grounded pad. We also attached an antistatic strip to the
front of the keyboard. Because of the nature of the job, and the movement
to and from the computer and the microscope controls, we could not wear the
wrist straps. But with the conductive grounding strip across the entire
front of the keyboard we found that we could very easily get into the habit
of grounding our wrist or thumb on the strip before touching the rest of the
computer or keyboard. Then as we used the keyboard we would make some
effort to touch the grounding strip from time to time. This virtually
eliminated the problem. By the way I believe it was such a problem that
Tracor engineered a static discharge switch into the keyboard connection.


Brad Huggins
BPAmoco,
Naperville, Microscopy and Microanalysis



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:58 2000



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 12:44:34 -0400
Subject: Re: Diameter of human RBC?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 9:20 AM -0600 2/7/0, Michael Herron wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175




From daemon Mon Feb 07 17:12:19 2000



From: csedax-at-alpha.arcride.edu.ar
Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2000 17:36:17 -2359
Subject: SEM: automotive paints

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi!
My name is Jorgelina C. Altamirano. I'm an undegrated student of the
licenciate in chemical sciences.
I'm currently preparing my thesis, being its subjet: The morphological
characterization and the chemical analysis of automotive paints with forensic
purposes.
I'm undergoing my work using SEM and EPMA techniques with a JEOL,
JSM 35C and a microprobe EDAX PV9500.
I've chosen some papers as references:
- Beam et al, Analysis Protocol for discrimination for automotive
paints by SEM-EDAX, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 35, 5, 1990
- Zieba-Palus et al, Mikrochim. Acta, 14, 1997.

I've taken same samples of automotive paints (such as Fiat, Peugeot,
Renault, Ford, Chevrolet, Volkswagen) corresponding to the years 1994-99.
I've found many difficulties while preparing them in:
- separating the paint from the body work of the car;
- cutting the specimen;
- to stick specimen to the graphite specimen pedestal;

Though I've made the primary morphological and chemical analysis and I
haven't observed great differences between the diferent automotive paints
trades (while polyuretane paints and belayer metalizer paints already tested),
but I'd found great differences between layers and layers of the paints
specimen.
As I'm not quite satisfied with the results obtained to be used for
forensic purposes, I would greatly appreciate making contacts with specialist
fo this subject, so as to receive any comments on this subject.
Thank you in advance for your help.
Jorgelina Altamirano
CERIDE,
Guemes 3450
(3000) Santa Fe, Argentina
e-mail: csedax-at-arcride.edu.ar



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:08 2000



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 09:49:38 -0800
Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Scott,
I've seen a Be Ka x-ray peak in a Link advertisement and we have generated
one in the Quartz XOne applications lab with a really good light element
deteector. You will find the Be Ka1 peak listed at 0.110 keV in most x-ray
tables.
At 10:52 AM 2/7/00 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:21:53 2000



From: Christoph Bauer :      cbauer-at-midway.uchicago.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 09:56:35 -0800
Subject: Desmosomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


we are looking at desmosomes in mouse epidermis. My question: From
looking at sections we got the impression that demosomes are rather
uniform, round knob-like structures. As we did not do any serial
sections, we are not sure if this is true. Does anybody know of a
publication dealing with this?

Thanks for your help,

Christoph



Christoph Bauer Ph.D.
University of Chicago
Molecular Genentics and Cell Biology
5841 S. Maryland Ave/MC 1028
Chicago, Il 60637



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:09 2000



From: Ingber, Bruce F. :      bingber-at-commserver.srrc.usda.gov
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 11:56:46 -0600
Subject: Re: FEI/Philips CM12 SAD focus

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I received the following fax from Ms. Irene Piscopo, EM Consultant,
regarding electron diffraction procedures for the CM-12 or CM-120 TEM's from
FEI/Philips. I'll copy the information for those interested.

ELECTRON DIFFRACTION PROCEDURES

There are three methods for doing electron diffraction in the CM-12
involving two different techniques: Method I is an aperture limiting method
while Methods II and III are probe limiting. In all cases, the sample must
be in the eucentric position and focused.

METHOD I: (area } 1 µm) SAD

1. Select the SA mode (the diffraction aperture and image are focused in the
same plane).
2. Insert and center the SA aperture around the area of interest.*
3. Select D.
4. Remove the objective aperture.
5. Overfocus the second condenser to sharpen the pattern (i.e. parallel
illumination conditions).
6. Focus the pattern with the focus control which is now changing the
diffraction lens).
7. Change the size of the pattern (i.e. camera length) by changing the
magnification.

Size of the SA aperture
* Size of area selected =
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
Objective lens magnification in D aperture
plane (~ 30x**)

** Actual magnification is focal length dependent.

METHOD II: (areas down to 40 nm with w filament; 20 nm with LaB6)

1. Locate an area of interest.
2. Remove the objective aperture.
3. Using Condensers 1 and 2, bring the beam down to a size slightly smaller
than the area of the area from which the diffraction pattern is to be
obtained.
4. Go to D and select the desired CL with the magnification control.
5. Focus the pattern with the focus control. Note: While it's sometimes
difficult to determine exact focus, it's often easier to insert an objective
aperture and focus the edge of the aperture to determine diffraction focus.
6. The size of the discs within the pattern can be decreased by decreasing
the size of the condenser aperture. Be sure the aperture is well-centered.

METHOD III: NANOPROBE and/or STEM (to 2 nm)

For diffraction and/or chemical information in the TEM mode from
regions of the sample less than 40 nm in diameter requires operating the
instrument in either the NANOPROBE or STEM modes.

NANOPROBE:

1. Depress NANOPROBE.
2. Follow instructions in Method II.

STEM:

1. Obtain a focused STEM image using the smallest C2 aperture.
2. Stop the scan.
3. Lower the main screen (CBED pattern)
4. Slightly larger probes and more parallel beam conditions can be obtained
using UUD and focusing with INTENSITY (C2 lens).

NOTES ON ELECTRON DIFFRACTION

1. The sample must always be eucentric and focused.
2. In METHOD I, the area from which the diffraction pattern is obtained is
determined by the selected area - (diffraction) aperture, when in SA mode.
To sharpen the ED pattern, one overfocuses the second condenser (C2)
3. In METHODS II and III, the area from which the diffraction pattern is
selected depends on the size of the beam. The size of the beam can be
altered by changing condenser lenses C1 and C2 (i.e. spot size and
intensity. To sharpen the ED pattern , one reduces the size of the C2
aperture.
4. Spherical aberration limits METHOD I to ~1 µm.
5. In METHODS II and III, spherical aberration of the objective lens is not
the limiting factor, the minimum probe size is.
6. For identifying an ED pattern, at least three rings are required.
7. Be sure the sample and the standard are in the eucentric position.
Changes in the objective current will cause variations in CL.


Bruce F. Ingber, Biologist
USDA-ARS, SRRC
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124

(504) 286-4270 phone
(504) 286-4419 fax
bingber-at-nola.srrc.usda.gov




From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:11 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 12:57:15 -0500
Subject: RE: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm wrong. I guess I should have looked up at the X-ray periodic table
above my head and saw the 0.108 keV value for Be. The reason that I was
wrong was that I did not consider the solid state aspects. I am still right
about not having a 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2 transition and that an X-ray carries
away 1h-bar of angular momentum. What I didn't do was think about the band
structure of a solid. If you have the solid, the 2p bands of Be most be
spilling into or be the conduction band for the electrons. That must be the
source for the electronic transition. I guess I should have engaged brain
before typing.
My most humble apologies.
-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--

} -----Original Message-----
} From: microprobe [mailto:chris.salter-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk]
} Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 7:10 AM
} To: Walck. Scott D.
} Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so
}
}
} Dear Walck,
}
} You may not, in theory, be able to produce Be X-rays, but we
} can detect them on our JEOL JXA 8800, they correspond to the position
} in the tables for Be Ka!, and the target is pure Be.
}
} On Mon, 7 Feb 2000 10:52:29 -0500 "Walck. Scott D." {walck-at-ppg.com}
} wrote:
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Ekstrom, Harry [mailto:harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com]
} Sent: Monday, February 07, 2000 7:40 PM
} To: 'Walck. Scott D.'
} Subject: RE: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so
}
}
} I don't agree Scott. An L or M line for any element would
} not be located in
} the area
} of Be Ka. And the peak I normally get there with an ultra thin window
} is a well defined peak with great resolution.
} Please re evaluate your theory.
}
} Harry Ekstrom
} } }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
} }
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} }
} }
} } When a characteristic X-ray is given off from an atom, it
} carries 1 h-bar
} } (Planck's constant divided by 2 pi) of angular momentum.
} The electronic
} } transition that occurred for the X-ray to come off must
} conserve angular
} } momentum of the system. Therefore, a transition from a
} 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2
} } state is forbidden by selection rules. You can't produce a
} Be X-ray.
} } -Scott
} }
} } Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} } PPG Industries, Inc.
} } Glass Technology Center
} } Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} } P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} } Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
} }
} } Walck-at-PPG.com
} }
} } (412) 820-8651 (office)
} } (412) 820-8161 (fax)
} }
} }
} }
}
} -------------------
} microprobe
} chris.salter-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
}
} * This e-mail message was sent with Execmail V5.0.x *
}



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:18 2000



From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 15:31:08 -0500
Subject: Diffraction & Coherence

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

It has been very interesting reading about diffraction and electron beams
but it is quite clear that we often give the instrument credit, "the
instrument does it automatically", when credit is not due. Almost every
"automatic" is a designers estimate or better still a calculation, it is a
setting!

After 36 years with TEM I have to say that the only area that the
instrument could set in the SA mode could be the approximate position of
the first image plane. We normally move to the SA mode to free up the
diffraction lens (1st intermediate) to enable it to be focussed on thefirst
image plane and the diffraction (intermediate) aperture, independent of the
magnification system. We would then focus the image inside the aperture
with the objective lens to ensure that the selected area IS the area in the
diffraction pattern. Without this procedure electron rotation and
misalignments could give you a diffraction pattern from an area not in the
centre of the screen! Users are correct in that if they set the eucentric
point or better still, adjust the specimen height to focus at the same
objective lens current value, that done the first image plane will be at
the same point within the diffraction (intermediate) lens.

So how could the Philips work? I would guess they set the diffraction lens
at approximately the first image plane. Then as they do not use it within
their lens scheme for the SA magnifications it is fixed at this focus, good
enough I think?

A second point, parallel beams are very important if you are chasing the
best image quality, biology or materials, most times we need high
coherence. There are misunderstandings on how to obtain a parallel beam or
high coherence, setting the final condenser underfocus is incorrect. The
procedure for high coherence would be to use the smallest spot size you can
tolerate (this probably means you must up the emission current). Once in
this condition overfocus the final condenser (clockwise from crossover) the
spot, what ever size it is now, becomes your virtual source. The further
overfocus you go the greater the beam coherence . You will deduce the
smaller the condenser aperture the sharper the spot and the smaller the
spot the greater the coherence for a given degree of overfocus.

Work with a design team and they expect everyone to overfocus, they expect
everyone to use small condenser apertures and they expect everyone to use
small spot sizes. They do not expect everyone to use too low an emission
current (almost everyone does, we have talked before about filament life
being the most important feature of many laboratories) because this makes
the task too difficult!


Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant
Protrain
Electron microscopy courses world wide
http://www.emcourses.com
Tel & Fax 44 (0) 1280 814774



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:19 2000



From: Schibler, Matthew :      MSchibler-at-mednet.ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 12:42:13 -0800
Subject: RE: HeNe laser

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Dear all

} I am planning to replace my Kr/Ar laser on a Zeiss 310 CSLM with two
} separate lasers: 488nm Ar ion and HeNe 543nm. Does anyone have
} experience of using a HeNe 543? I need this or something similar to
} excite Rhodamine for food structure applications. I'd appreciate any
} advice.

} The reason I'm replacing the mixed gas laser is that has
} averaged 25% downtime over the past three years.

} Mark

} Mark Auty
} Dairy Products Research Centre
} Moorepark, Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland.
} mauty-at-moorepark.teagasc.ie
} tel 00353 2542447
} fax 00353 2542340


I have been using the Argon ion (488nm) and HeNe 543nm combination on
different Zeiss LSM310's and 410's for the past 9 years. The HeNe 543nm is
fairly low power, but it has been perfectly adequate for scanning the
fluorochromes I have needed to see including TRITC, Texas Red, Cy3,
propidium iodide, and Sirius Red. I have never had a problem with the laser
going down either, but one would expect that with a HeNe laser.

Slàinte,

Matthew J. Schibler Ph.D.
UCLA Brain Research Institute
1524A Gonda (Goldschmied) Center
for Neuroscience and Genetics
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1761

(310) 825-9783
FAX (310) 206-5855
E-mail: mschibler-at-mednet.ucla.edu



From daemon Tue Feb 08 16:22:25 2000



From: Kristen Lennon :      kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 14:06:58 -0800
Subject: cryo chamber for LRWhite UV

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
Does anyone have experience with the Pelco UVC2 or UVC1 Cryo Chamber for UV
curing of resins (especially LR White) or with something similar? We're
contemplating buying something like that for UV polymerization of LR White
at -20 C.
Thanks for your help,
Kristen
Kristen A. Lennon
Cell, Molecular & Developmental Biology Group
Department of Botany & Plant Sciences
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521
kalen-at-citrus.ucr.edu



From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:26:51 2000



From: Jim McGee :      mcgee-at-geol.sc.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2000 17:09:09 -0500
Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scott,
I'm not sure what brought this up, but my reaction is "thems fightin'
words". I do not currently have a wavelength reflecting crystal to measure
that low in the periodic table, but I did on another instrument. I distinctly

recall seeing a pretty hefty peak at the Be K-alpha position when I focused
the beam down on a piece of pure Be metal. I guess rules are made to be
broken. Are your calculations correct? Or am I misunderstanding something
here?

Jim
--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208

Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777

"Walck. Scott D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} When a characteristic X-ray is given off from an atom, it carries 1 h-bar
} (Planck's constant divided by 2 pi) of angular momentum. The electronic
} transition that occurred for the X-ray to come off must conserve angular
} momentum of the system. Therefore, a transition from a 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2
} state is forbidden by selection rules. You can't produce a Be X-ray.
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8161 (fax)



From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:26:57 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:04 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:07 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:08 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:10 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:17 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:39 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:49 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:51 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:57 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:13 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:17 2000



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:35 -0600
Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:26:55 2000



From: Dr Eric Lachowski :      che136-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:24:58 -0600
Subject: Be X-ray and filament drift

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,
I have responses to two of today's postings, but they are
quite unrelated.
1. I did not see the original question about Be x-rays,
only Scott Walk's reply, so I don't know what info was
being sought. We used a Be-containing mineral to evaluate
microprobes before buying. I won't embarrass those who
failed, but only one manufacturer succeeded. The reason
the others failed is probably that in compounds the x-ray
energy is subject to largish chemical shifts relative to
pure Be because there is no shielding by outer electrons
and you need to search on either side of the tabulated
value of about 0.1keV. So there IS a Be x-ray and a
reasonable WDS spectrometer should detect it.

2. Filament drift. Fred Schamber's reply is right most of
the time, but I did once have a batch of 6 JEOL-type
filaments made by an EM supply house where 2 of them
drifted until the tips were right at the edge of the hole
and stayed there even when the filament was cooled down
again. This was the only time in about 15 years of using
JEOL microscopes.

Eric
----------------------
Dr Eric Lachowski
Department of Chemistry
University of Aberdeen
Meston Walk
Old Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland
+44 (0)1224 272934 fax 272921
e.lachowski-at-abdn.ac.uk




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:26:54 2000



From: Dean Armytage :      hillstream-at-hypermax.net.au
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 16:27:01 -0600
Subject: Live Blood Staining

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Hi List I am using live blood staining light microscopy, is there
anyone who has tried or is using this technique. I would like to swap
notes. Dean Armytage PhD Hillstream Health Centre Australia




From daemon Tue Feb 08 21:27:20 2000



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 18:55:31 -0700
Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm getting more curious as I read on here. Speaking strictly energy now
and leaving out wavelength, the characteristic energy of Be Ka is about .11
KeV like Mary stated. I've had an occasional peak show up there before and
thought it may have been Be. Now I understand that it may have been "noise"
all along. Would "noise" be a pretty defined and relatively well resolved
peak at that energy level using an ultra thin window? Depending on the low
energy cutoff setting, one might truly have Be and never detect it. Would
lowering the KV reduce the noise artifact?

I guess I'll get out my Be planchet and try a few things.

Harry

-----Original Message-----
} From: Jim McGee [mailto:mcgee-at-geol.sc.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 3:09 PM
To: 'Microscopy'


Scott,
I'm not sure what brought this up, but my reaction is "thems fightin'
words". I do not currently have a wavelength reflecting crystal to measure
that low in the periodic table, but I did on another instrument. I
distinctly

recall seeing a pretty hefty peak at the Be K-alpha position when I focused
the beam down on a piece of pure Be metal. I guess rules are made to be
broken. Are your calculations correct? Or am I misunderstanding something
here?

Jim
--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208

Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777

"Walck. Scott D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} When a characteristic X-ray is given off from an atom, it carries 1 h-bar
} (Planck's constant divided by 2 pi) of angular momentum. The electronic
} transition that occurred for the X-ray to come off must conserve angular
} momentum of the system. Therefore, a transition from a 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2
} state is forbidden by selection rules. You can't produce a Be X-ray.
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} PPG Industries, Inc.
} Glass Technology Center
} Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
}
} Walck-at-PPG.com
}
} (412) 820-8651 (office)
} (412) 820-8161 (fax)



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:21 2000



From: Hong Yi :      hyi-at-emory.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 21:26:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: New Gold Enhancement Reagents

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Dear Michael:

My personal experience with silver enhancement dates back to when Janssen
Life Sciences first introduced the IntenSE M silver enhancement kit in
late 80's (this product was later taken over by Amersham). At the time, I
felt the IntenSE M was easy to use, but its fast reaction made it hard to
control the particle growth. Just like you, the desire for a better
results has kept me searching and testing whenever a new protocol or
product became available.

Danscher's method gives wonderful intensification, but its low pH
sometimes damages the ultrastructure when used for the pre-embedding
immunogold labeling. Burry's method and the Nanoprobes HQ silver made
progress with pH, however they inherited Danscher's high viscosity and
light sensitivity, which limit their penetration in pre-embedding silver
enhancement and render it more difficult to handle from a practical
standpoint. I have also tested the Nanoprobes GoldEnhance kit for
pre-embedding immunogold labeling recently. At the LM level the results
were decent. I have not spent a lot of time evaluating its performance
at the EM-level. So far, the particle size homogeneity is not as good as
what I've found with Danscher's method. But I will refrain from further
judgment until more work has been done.

In my opinion, the first breakthrough in intensifying gold particles since
Danscher's method was realized when Aurion, a Dutch company, first
introduced the R-gent SE-EM silver enhancement kit last June. As you
wished for in your post, it has a near-neutral pH, low viscosity, and it
is light insensitive. Moreover, it gives a great enhancement efficiency
and even particle size and shape. Background remains minimal even after
two hours enhancement on the bench. Morphology preservation after
enhancement is superior to any other enhancement reagent I have used. I
have been testing this kit profusely for both post- and pre-embedding
immunogold labeling on various types of samples (including cell cultures
and vibratome sections), with many different primary and secondary
antibodies, and am very pleased with its performance. I use 0.5% OsO4 for
20 min and have never had any problem with silver disappearing. If you
like, I would be very happy to e-mail some images to you so you can
evaluate them yourself.

Hong
=================
Hong Yi
Emory University
Department of Neurology
6215 Woodruff Memorial Research Building
1639 Pierce Dr.
Atlanta, GA 30341
Phone: (404) 727-8692
Fax: (404) 727-3157
Email: hyi-at-emory.edu

On Thu, 3 Feb 2000, Michael Plociniak wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
} Has anyone used gold enhancement reagents from Nanoprobes, Inc.
} (Stonybrook, NY - USA) as an alternative to silver enhancement for
} enlarging 1 nm immunogold probes?
}
} Advertisements state that gold enhancement has lower background and is
} compatible with osmium. Can anyone verify this from personal experience?
}
} In addition to these advantages, I am hoping that milder pH conditions will
} be less damaging to ultrastructure in cultured neurons (using a
} preembedment protocol).
}
} Thank you,
} Michael
}





From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:29 2000



From: Radostin Danev :      rado-at-nips.ac.jp
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 12:01:47 +0900
Subject: Finding the diffraction plane

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi everybody,

Here is the way I found yesterday for finding the diffraction plane. By
diffraction plane I mean the plane at which diffraction pattern is formed
(crossover, Fourier of the object wave) not the theoretical BFP of the
objective.

First perform standard alignment for brightfield mode. Then go to 10 000X.
There are several ways to perform:

1. Fixed illumination and specimen position (i.e. OL current)

a) Adjust the desired brightness with C2. Adjust the desired OL current and
specimen position.
b) Insert OL aperture and move it so that the edge of the aperture to cross
through the middle of the screen. If the aperture is exactly at the diff.
plane then you'll not be able to see its edge - just the whole beam will
fade uniformly ... so you have the diff. plane.
c) If you see aperture edge then it is not at diff. plane. Now two ways:
- change the aperture z-position (not recommended ... but if it is very far
..)
- If your microscope has condenser minilens you can try tweaking both C2 and
CML in order to keep the intensity same and just make the aperture edge
disappear (i.e. the whole screen uniformly darkened).

2. Fixed specimen (i.e. OL current).

a) Focus the specimen
b) same as 1b
c) Change C2 excitement in order to make the edge disappear

3. Fixed illumination

a) Set desired C2 excitement
b) same as 1b
c) Change the objective lens current until the aperture edge disappears.
Then move specimen in z-direction until it is focused.


In all these methods after adjusting the aperture at diff. plane you can try
tweaking C2 or OL ... you will see that the aperture is not at diff. plane
anymore, The edge will appear on one or the other side (i.e. mirrored)
depending on the direction of the lens current change.
Another thing - after adjusting the aperture at diff. plane you can check if
beam shift tilts the beam (by tilting here I mean - if the specimen is
illuminated with plane wave then shifting the beam should not tilt the wave
front). Shift the beam and if the brightness changes (when the aperture edge
partially covers the zero diff. spot) then the beam is tilting.
I wish there was a IL1 tweaking knob allowing for change of the IL1 current
while in brightfield mode. This wold make the things much more easier.

About the methods for making the illumination at the specimen parallel. They
will work only if:
- The OL aperture is positioned by the manufacturer exactly at the
theoretical BFP (I think that in most of the TEMs it is not)
- The OL current should be set to zero deviation (i.e. at the value for
which the BFP position was calculated)
- The intermediate lens system should be properly calibrated by the
manufacturer so that if both of the above conditions are satisfied and the
specimen is at front focal plane of the OL then it to be in focus. In other
words the theoretical BFP of the objective to coincide with the theoretical
front focal plane of the IL1.

I don't think parallel illumination is so very important ... using spherical
wave will give the same results but just the diff. planes will be shifted.

All of the above is just my opinion. I could be mistaking somewhere ...

Best wishes,

Rado

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Radostin Danev
Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
---------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:37 2000



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 21:31:38 -0600
Subject: Re: automotive paints

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dennis Ward" {DCWard-at-concentric.net}
}
} Jorgelina
} SEM/EDS//EPMA is only one class of analytical methods that the
Forensic
} community applies to paint analysis for comparison and association with
} original source. Although used routinely, probe methods are not used
} exclusively. The organic components in paints are generally more
} discriminating.
} Sample preparation usually entails some form of embedment and either
} microtomy or polishing in order to reveal internal structure.
} Removal of paint from an auto body is tricky, and requires
practice.The
} manufacturers have designed their paint systems to prevent removal!
} I would be glad to provide you with additional resources.

I have never do this but this is what i would try first.

One thing I would try on would be removing the metal from the paint. A
weak elecrolite solution and a low DC voltage connected to reverse
electoplate the metal away sould get rid of almost all of it and the last
bit could be removed with acid or evaporated as the cathode in a vacum
chamber.

Once you get the metal down to a bunch of small islands you might be able
to let it rust free of the paint.

I have no idea what this would do to the paint but most paint films I have
delt with are pretty tough.

Gordon

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com

Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:48:56 2000



From: Massimo Catalano :      massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 09:43:03 +0100
Subject: PIPS and milling damage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listservers,

we are massively working on analytical and structural TEM characterization
of semiconductors, mainly InGaAs/GaAs, quantum well, wires and dots.

Specimen preparation is of course a crucial point of our work.

We have just switched to PIPS (we used to make our samples using the Gatan
Duo Mill), and we are getting controversial results about the damage
introduced by the milling procedure.

We are perfectly aware of all the differences between the two instruments,
especially the absence of cooling stage and the higher beam current.

Has anyone performed a systematic and careful analysis to try to evaluate
the milling damage on similar materials systems. We are willing to start a
systematic work to assess this issue, but would like to know if anyone has
already done anything on this topic. Also, any collaboration will be more
than welcome.

Thanks.

Massimo




Dr. Massimo Catalano
CNR-IME
Campus Universitario
Via Arnesano
73100 Lecce - ITALY
tel: + 39 0832 322362
fax: + 39 0832 325299
email: massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it/sime/sime.htm




From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:27 2000



From: flaitz-at-us.ibm.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 07:48:09 -0500
Subject: PIPS and milling damage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear Massimo,

in our lab we have prepared a number of GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs devices.
Mechanical thinning is by the tripod wedge technique, but typically we end
up with more damage than we find for Si samples so there is a need to leave
samples thicker and use more extensive ion milling for final thinning.

We also have a PIPS and I have found its capabilities essential for
achieving good thin samples in these materials. I found more success by
using low angles and low KeV for long times. Typically I would be using
5-6 degrees and 4-4.5 KeV initially, with 3-4 degrees and 3-3.5 KeV for the
final ion polishing. On samples 2-3 microns thick, this would amount to
2-3 hours total milling time. I did not observe any artefacts introduced
with milling under these conditions, and the junction structures and
inherent defects were clearly observed.

The conditions above should work with any ion miller capable of low angle
milling, but our experience is only with the PIPS. If you use the wedge
technique for mechanical thinning, I would recommend that you use Mo grids
to mount your specimens as the extended milling times at low angles will
really chew up a Cu grid. Also, Mo grids are considerably thinner,
allowing angles as low as 3-4 degrees on the grid hole side for a sample
positioned in the middle of a 1 mm grid hole.

If you would like, I can send you some typical images of devices we have
prepared, including images showing the removal of the mechanical polishing
damage.


Philip L. Flaitz
IBM Analytical Services, Hopewell Junction, NY
http://www.chips.ibm.com/services/asg
Ph.......(914) 892-3094, FAX -2003
flaitz-at-us.ibm.com



Massimo Catalano {massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it} on 02/09/2000 03:43:03 AM

To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
cc:


Dear Listservers,

we are massively working on analytical and structural TEM characterization
of semiconductors, mainly InGaAs/GaAs, quantum well, wires and dots.

Specimen preparation is of course a crucial point of our work.

We have just switched to PIPS (we used to make our samples using the Gatan
Duo Mill), and we are getting controversial results about the damage
introduced by the milling procedure.

We are perfectly aware of all the differences between the two instruments,
especially the absence of cooling stage and the higher beam current.

Has anyone performed a systematic and careful analysis to try to evaluate
the milling damage on similar materials systems. We are willing to start a
systematic work to assess this issue, but would like to know if anyone has
already done anything on this topic. Also, any collaboration will be more
than welcome.

Thanks.

Massimo




Dr. Massimo Catalano
CNR-IME
Campus Universitario
Via Arnesano
73100 Lecce - ITALY
tel: + 39 0832 322362
fax: + 39 0832 325299
email: massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it/sime/sime.htm








From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:23 2000



From: LAB. DE MICROSCOPIA ELECTRONICA - FI - UNER :      microsc-at-fi.uner.edu.ar
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 13:10:00 +0000
Subject: looking for ETEC Company

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello .....
we have an old ETEC Omniscan SEM, and we are searching for ETEC company or any
people that can supply manuals ....

any help is welcome

best regards


===================================================
Fernando D. Balducci
Laboratorio de Microscopia Electr—nica
Facultad de Ingenier’a - Bioingenieria
Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios
Argentina
e-mail: microsc-at-fi.uner.edu.ar
tel: 54 43 975100
fax: 54 43 975077


===================================================



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:27 2000



From: Corazon Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 08:11:32 -0600
Subject: autofluorescence quenching

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am working with archival specimens of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded
tissues and I am getting tremendous autofluorescence. I looked at tissue
sections after the sections have been de-waxed using either FITC or
rhodamine filter sets and red cells and connective tissues are brightly
fluorescent. Is there a way of suppressing the autofluorescence and still
retain reactivity of tissue to antibodies? I would appreciate any comments
or suggestions.

*******************************************************
Corazon D. Bucana, Ph.D.
Department of Cancer Biology
U.T. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Blvd. Box 173
Houston, Texas 77030
Phone: (713) 792-8106
FAX: (713) 792-8747
Email:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
FAX: (713) 792-8747



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:25 2000



From: Jim McGee :      mcgee-at-geol.sc.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 10:26:27 -0500
Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Harry,

I don't have a UTW detector here, so I'll leave this to the EDS experts. But,
on the JEOL 8800/8900 I used to run we had a thin window detector that could see
B (not Be) if the low end noise peak (which is huge) was properly
discriminated. Get out your C planchett while you are getting the Be one, and
see if you get the noise peak at Be. Far better to use wavelength than EDS down
at that end.

Jim McGee
--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208

Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777-6610

"Ekstrom, Harry" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm getting more curious as I read on here. Speaking strictly energy now
} and leaving out wavelength, the characteristic energy of Be Ka is about .11
} KeV like Mary stated. I've had an occasional peak show up there before and
} thought it may have been Be. Now I understand that it may have been "noise"
} all along. Would "noise" be a pretty defined and relatively well resolved
} peak at that energy level using an ultra thin window? Depending on the low
} energy cutoff setting, one might truly have Be and never detect it. Would
} lowering the KV reduce the noise artifact?
}
} I guess I'll get out my Be planchet and try a few things.
}
} Harry
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Jim McGee [mailto:mcgee-at-geol.sc.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 3:09 PM
} To: 'Microscopy'
} Subject: Re: Be X-ray peaks -I don't think so
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Scott,
} I'm not sure what brought this up, but my reaction is "thems fightin'
} words". I do not currently have a wavelength reflecting crystal to measure
} that low in the periodic table, but I did on another instrument. I
} distinctly
}
} recall seeing a pretty hefty peak at the Be K-alpha position when I focused
} the beam down on a piece of pure Be metal. I guess rules are made to be
} broken. Are your calculations correct? Or am I misunderstanding something
} here?
}
} Jim
} --
} ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
} James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
} Department of Geological Sciences
} University of South Carolina
} Columbia, SC 29208
}
} Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777
}
} "Walck. Scott D." wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } When a characteristic X-ray is given off from an atom, it carries 1 h-bar
} } (Planck's constant divided by 2 pi) of angular momentum. The electronic
} } transition that occurred for the X-ray to come off must conserve angular
} } momentum of the system. Therefore, a transition from a 2s1/2 to a 1s1/2
} } state is forbidden by selection rules. You can't produce a Be X-ray.
} } -Scott
} }
} } Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} } PPG Industries, Inc.
} } Glass Technology Center
} } Guys Run Rd. (packages)
} } P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
} } Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
} }
} } Walck-at-PPG.com
} }
} } (412) 820-8651 (office)
} } (412) 820-8161 (fax)

--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
James J. McGee (email: jmcgee-at-sc.edu)
Department of Geological Sciences
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208

Tel: 803-777-6300 Fax: 803-777-6610




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:30 2000



From: ipaul-at-MtRoyal.AB.CA
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 09:26:15 -0700
Subject: Sarcomere cross-sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for TEM images that show cross-sectional views of skeletal muscle
sarcomeres during the *contracted state*. In particular, I am interested in
seeing the spacing of the thin filaments when they **overlap each other** (i.e.,
when those from one side of the sarcomere overlap those from the other side of
the sarcomere in the contracted state). In addition, I am interested in seeing
the distribution of the thin filaments as they pass through the M line. It
would be greatly appreciated if anyone could tell me if they know of any
research papers or review articles that contain such TEM images.

Thank you!

Izak Paul
Biological Sciences
Mount Royal College




From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:51:48 2000



From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconn.edu
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 13:03:36 -0500
Subject: Paultek camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone know if Paultek Imaging still exists and a phone number for
them (or Email)? Thanks-Dave


************************************************************

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
75 N. Eagleville Rd. U-125
Storrs, CT 06269
Knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html
************************************************************




From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:32 2000



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 10:06:34 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Desmosomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Christoph:
I don't have any references at hand, but there is a whole literature on
desmosomes. A search on Medline (or PubMed on the internet) should provide
you with a good list of EM related publications on desmosomes--probably more
than you ever wanted to know! As an aside, I think there may be some books
that cover this as well, but since it is not an area of personal expertise
or current research interest, I am afraid they have all gone from my memory
banks.

Roger


On Tue, 08 Feb 2000 09:56:35 -0800, Christoph Bauer wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} we are looking at desmosomes in mouse epidermis. My question: From
} looking at sections we got the impression that demosomes are rather
} uniform, round knob-like structures. As we did not do any serial
} sections, we are not sure if this is true. Does anybody know of a
} publication dealing with this?
}
} Thanks for your help,
}
} Christoph
}
}
}
} Christoph Bauer Ph.D.
} University of Chicago
} Molecular Genentics and Cell Biology
} 5841 S. Maryland Ave/MC 1028
} Chicago, Il 60637
}


Roger C Moretz, Ph.D.





_______________________________________________________
Get 100% FREE Internet Access powered by Excite
Visit http://freeworld.excite.com



From daemon Wed Feb 09 16:49:20 2000



From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 10:06:35 -0800
Subject: Re: Desmosomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Christoph,
I have examined alot of mouse and pig skin at the TEM level and the
desmosomes and hemidesmosomes appear rather typical, that is, small, long
bridge-like structures between the cells.

Mary Gail Engle
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky

At 09:56 AM 2/8/00 -0800, Christoph Bauer wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:51:42 2000



From: Fagerland,Jane :      jane.a.fagerland-at-abbott.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 16:45:16 -0600
Subject: Summer internships

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Department of Microscopy and Microanalysis at Abbott Laboratories has two
summer internships available for 8-12 weeks this summer. One position is in
Biological Microscopy, and one is in Materials Analysis and Microscopy.
We're looking for students who are considering a career in microscopy,
especially students interested in the pharmaceutical industry.

Abbott Laboratories is a diversified healthcare company that produces
pharmaceuticals, diagnostic devices, and hospital products. The Microscopy
department analyzes samples related to all these functions. We use polarized
light, fluorescence, TEM, SEM, EDXS, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry
to solve problems related to products, as well as to provide support for
pharmaceutical Discovery and Development basic research and drug safety.

Housing and a stipend are provided for the summer. We're located near Lake
Michigan and the Wisconsin state border, about an hour's drive or train-ride
north of Chicago. There's lots to see and do in the area, and there are
planned activities with other interns, as well. The Abbott Summer Internship
Program has been nationally recognized as one of the best in the country.

If you're interested, please send a resume to:

Jane A. Fagerland, Ph.D.
Abbott Laboratories
D-45M/AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park IL 60064-6202

You may also fax a resume to me at (847) 938-5027 or e-mail it to me at
jane.a.fagerland-at-abbott.com.

If you'd like further information, I can be reached by telephone at (847)
935-0104, or by e-mail. I prefer e-mail, but will be more than happy to talk
to discuss our projects and laboratory by telephone.



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:01 2000



From: Walck. Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 20:31:58 -0500
Subject: RE: PIPS and milling damage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is an easy way to determine the milling damage between the two
machines and the amount of ion milling damage (subjectively); compare them
with samples prepared using the small angle cleavage technique. Look at
John McCaffrey's paper on using the small angle cleavage technique in
Ultramicrotomy 38, (149) 1991. He shows the difference between high angle
milling, low angle milling and the small angle cleavage technique. Of
course, the small angle cleavage technique showed no ion milling damage. It
is perfect for these types of materials. If you don't need a site specific
technique, it is the way to go for semiconductors.

You should also look at his paper in the MRS TEM Sample Prep series III (vol
254) that also shows a comparison for a SiGe/Si layer structure. We have a
detailed pictorial outline with tips and tricks on how to do it in the MRS
TEM Sample Prep series IV (vol 480).

I know that you invested a lot in your ion mill, but you can do these
samples very cheaply. SouthBay Technology sells a Microcleave kit that gets
you started with the technique.



Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)


"The opinions expressed are those of Scott D. Walck and not of PPG
Industries, Inc. nor of any PPG-associated companies."
--




} -----Original Message-----
} From: Massimo Catalano [mailto:massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 3:43 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: PIPS and milling damage
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.} html
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Dear Listservers,
}
} we are massively working on analytical and structural TEM
} characterization
} of semiconductors, mainly InGaAs/GaAs, quantum well, wires and dots.
}
} Specimen preparation is of course a crucial point of our work.
}
} We have just switched to PIPS (we used to make our samples
} using the Gatan
} Duo Mill), and we are getting controversial results about the damage
} introduced by the milling procedure.
}
} We are perfectly aware of all the differences between the two
} instruments,
} especially the absence of cooling stage and the higher beam current.
}
} Has anyone performed a systematic and careful analysis to try
} to evaluate
} the milling damage on similar materials systems. We are
} willing to start a
} systematic work to assess this issue, but would like to know
} if anyone has
} already done anything on this topic. Also, any collaboration
} will be more
} than welcome.
}
} Thanks.
}
} Massimo
}
}
}
}
} Dr. Massimo Catalano
} CNR-IME
} Campus Universitario
} Via Arnesano
} 73100 Lecce - ITALY
} tel: + 39 0832 322362
} fax: + 39 0832 325299
} email: massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
} http://www.ime.le.cnr.it
} http://www.ime.le.cnr.it/sime/sime.htm
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:03 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 20:34:34 -0500
Subject: Re: LM: Course reminder - DATES...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi again,

It has been brought to my attention that no dates were attached to this
course reminder:

March 10-12, 2000
Hyatt Regency
New Orleans, LA.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Consortium President
Microscopy/Microscopy Education ...Educating microscopists for greater
productivity.

125 Paridon Street Suite 102 Springfield, MA 01118
PH: (413)746-6931 FX: (413)746-9311 email: mme-at-map.com
Visit our web site {http://www.MME-Microscopy.com/education}



At 07:57 PM 2/7/00 -0500, Barbara Foster wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:05 2000



From: Barbara Foster :      mme-at-map.com
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 20:39:10 -0500
Subject: Re: tacky wax

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Linda,

Suggest you contact Chuck Garber at Structure Probe: www.2spi.com
I'm sure that he has some sort of derivative of his tacky dots which would
be helpful


At 08:48 PM 8/27/70 +0000, Linda Chicoine wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Feb 09 23:52:23 2000



From: Christina bennett :      chbennet-at-nmsu.edu
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 21:58:18 -0700
Subject: FYI: Congress to allow email charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I know this is off topic however a change like this could make this type of
forum impossible.





} Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 08:13:53 -0700
} X-Sender: liperez-at-cnmailsvr.nmsu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} To: all-at-biology.nmsu.edu
} From: liperez-at-NMSU.Edu (LSPSaldana)
} Subject: Congress to allow email charges
} Sender: owner-all-at-biology.nmsu.edu
} Precedence: bulk
} X-Keywords:
} X-UID: 43
} Status: O
}
}
} } } Congress to allow email charges
} } }
} } } Please pass this on to all you know since many of us use e-mail for
} } } business and to keep up with friends and family, I thought you'd like
} } } to know the following.
} } }
} } } Please jump on it right away and forward this to others.
} } }
} } } CNN has reported that within the next two weeks Congress is going to
} } } vote on allowing telephone companies to CHARGE A TOLL FEE for
} } } internet access.
} } } Translation: Every time we send long distance e-mail we will receive a
} } } long distance charge. This will get costly. Please visit the following web
} } } site and file a complaint. Complain to your Congressperson. We can't
} } } allow this to pass. The following address will allow you to send an
} } } e-mail on this subject DIRECTLY to your Congressperson.
} } }
} } } http://www.house.gov/writerep {http://www.house.gov/writerep}
} } }
} } } Pass this on to your friends. It is urgent! I hope all of you will pass
} } } this on to all your friends and family. We should ALL have
} } } an interest in this one.
} } }
} } } WAIT, THERE'S MORE. IN ADDITION, The last few months have revealed an
} } } alarming trend in the Government of the United States attempting to
} } } quietly push through legislation that will affect your use of the
} } Internet.
} } } Under
} } } proposed legislation the U.S. Postal Service will be attempting to bill
} } } email users out of "alternate postage fees". Bill 602P will permit the
} } } Federal Govt. to charge a 5 cent surcharge on every email delivered, by
} } } billing Internet Service Providers at source. The consumer would then be
} } } billed in turn by the ISP. Washington D.C. lawyer Richard Stepp is
} } } working without pay to prevent this legislation from becoming law. The
} } U.S.
} } } Postal Service is claiming that lost revenue due to the proliferation of
} } } email
} } } is costing nearly $230,000,000 in revenue per year. You may have noticed
} } } their recent ad campaign "There is nothing like a letter".
} } } Since the average citizen received about 10 pieces of email per day in
} } } 1998,
} } } the cost to the typical individual would be an additional 50 cents per
} } } day, or over $180 dollars Per year, above and beyond there regular
} } Internet
} } } costs.
} } } Note that this would be money paid directly to the U.S. Postal Service
} } } for a service they do not even provide. The whole point of the Internet is
} } } democracy and non-interference. If the federal government is permitted
} } } to tamper with our liberties by adding a surcharge to email, who knows
} } Where
} } } it will end. You are already paying an exorbitant price for snail mail
} } } because of bureaucratic inefficiency. It currently takes up to 6 days for
} } a
} } } letter to be delivered from New York to Buffalo. If The U.S. Postal
} } Service
} } } is
} } } allowed to tinker with email; it will mark the end of the "free"
} } } Internet in the United States.
} } } One congressman, Tony Schnell has even suggested a "twenty to forty
} } } dollar per month surcharge on all internet service" above and beyond the
} } } government's proposed email Charges. Note that most of the major
} } } newspapers have ignored the story, the only exception being the
} } } Washingtonian
} } } which called the idea of email surcharge "a useful concept who's time has
} } } come"
} } } (March 6, 1999) Editorial.
} } }
} } } Don't sit by and watch your freedoms erode away! Send this e-mail to
} } } EVERYONE on your list, and tell all your friends and relatives to write
} } } to their congressman and say "No!" to Bill 602P.
} } }
} } }
} } } It will only take a few moments of your time, and could very well be
} } } instrumental in killing a bill we don't want.
} } }
} } } PASS THIS ON TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW WHO USES EMAIL REMEMBER THESE ARE TWO
} } } SEPARATE ISSUES THAT EFFECT ALL OF US ONLINE. LET YOU VOICE BE HEARD
} } } NOW, NOT AFTER
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
}




From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:06 2000



From: S.A.Gusev :      gusev-at-ipm.sci-nnov.ru
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 10:51:57 +0300
Subject: Solid State Electron Emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Donald,
the Institute of Applied Physics
(http://www.sandy.ru/science/science/appl.new/frames.html)
constructs, produces and uses solid state high energy electron gun for
the High-power electronics and plasma physics researches.
May be they will help you.

Best regards,
Dr. S.A.Gusev


********************************************
* Institute for Physics of Microstrutures *
* Russian Academy of Science *
* ( IPM RAS ) *
* *
* Niznii Novgorod, GSP-105 *
* 603600 *
* RUSSIA *
* *
********************************************

tel: (+7)-8312-675313
fax: (+7)-8312-675553
e-mail: gusev-at-ipm.sci-nnov.ru




From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:12 2000



From: Erdem Yasar :      yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 11:29:38 +0200 (EET)
Subject: about my water cooling system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
We have got a JEM3010 Transmission electron microscopy.I have got a
one problem about water cooling system.I dont
know,Which kind of water to used?I think so, We should use pure water for
water cooling?Besides My city water is not clean.What do you think about
this problem?
Thanks for your interest

**********************************
**********************************
** Research.Asst.ERDEM YASAR **
** University of Kirikkale **
** Department of Physics **
** TEM LABORATORY **
** 71450 KIRIKKALE/TURKEY **
** erdem.yasar-at-physics.org **
** yasar-at-science.ankara.edu.tr **
** yasar-at-turkuaz.kku.edu.tr **
**********************************
**********************************








From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:14 2000



From: Matt L Walker :      bmsmlw-at-bms.leeds.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 10:08:40 -0000
Subject: TEM: Re Sarcomere cross-sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I am looking for TEM images that show cross-sectional views of skeletal
muscle
sarcomeres during the *contracted state*. In particular, I am
interested in
seeing the spacing of the thin filaments when they **overlap each
other** (i.e.,
when those from one side of the sarcomere overlap those from the other
side of
the sarcomere in the contracted state). In addition, I am interested in
seeing
the distribution of the thin filaments as they pass through the M line.
It
would be greatly appreciated if anyone could tell me if they know of any
research papers or review articles that contain such TEM images.

Thank you!

Izak Paul
Biological Sciences
Mount Royal College

The following papers are classics and would make good starting point.
Huxley, H.E. & Hanson, J. (1954). Nature, 173, 973-976.
Huxley, A.F. & Niedergerke, R.M. (1954). Nature, 173, 971.
Huxley, H.E. (1957). Biophys. & Biochem. Cytol. 3, 631-648.

Thin filaments 'pass through' the Z-line. Try John Squire and Pradeep
Luther
(3D reconstruction of fish Z-disc) and Mike Reedy (insect) or Bellinda
Bullard.

Matt Walker
School of Biomedical Sciences
Leeds University, UK





From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:25 2000



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 11:26:59 +0000
Subject: Film scanners - that old chestnut

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm sorry to bring this topic up yet again, but I have just come across
the specification for a flat-bed scanner which looks as if it would be
suitable for scanning e.m. cut-film. It is the Epson Perfection 1200
Photo which includes a 5x4inch film adapter.

The UK web site address is:
http://www.epson.co.uk/sohoprod/imaging/scanner/perf1200/perf1200photo/spec.htm

and the specification is:
A4 Colour flatbed with 5"x4" film image scanner Single pass scanning
Optical resolution: 1200 x 2400 (30600 pixels/line)
Maximum output resolution of 9600x9600 dpi
36 bits per pixel in colour (24 bit output)
12 bits per pixel in black (8 bit output)
Optical Density 3.2D
USB (Type B)

Does anyone have any experience of this machine because it is about a
fifth of the price of the Umax flatbed film scanners? My only
reservation is that it is a SOHO product rather than professional.


Thanks in advance

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (0191) 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:04 2000



From: Dr. Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 05:34:15 -0600
Subject: Re: FYI: Congress to allow email charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a recurring post about nothing more than a hoax.

Search for internet hoaxes and so forth and you will find
this one and many other interesting yet equally invalid assertions.

gary g.


At 10:58 PM 2/9/00 , you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:44 2000



From: Jonathan Barnard :      Jonathan.Barnard-at-Angstrom.UU.SE
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 13:38:12 +0100
Subject: coherence and spot size

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The statement that the smallest spot size gives the best coherence can be a
misleading. The full statement should be the spot size with the smallest
angular distribution should be used. Anyone who has tried to do off-axis
holography in nanoprobe mode will testify to this.
The spatial coherence envelope, roughly the distance over which the beam is
considered 'coherent', is the Fourier transform of the angular distribution
of intensity at the source (Van Cittert Vernike theorem).

Born & Wolf (section 10.4.2)
"Hence if the linear dimensions of the source and the distance between P1
and P2 (points in the imaging plane) are small compared to the distance of
these points from the source, the degree of coherence, |mu_12| is equal to
the absolute value of the normalized Fourier transform of the intensity
function of the source"

The reason holography and high resolution work is done with te most
parallel beam possible becomes clear, the angular distribution of a
converged (or diverged beam) is wide enough to reduce the spatial coherence
envelope. In off-axis holography this is even more stringent since two
interfering points (reference wave & object wave) can be hundreds of
nanometers, microns even, apart. Elliptical illumination is used to
preserve coherence in the one important direction (minimum angular width)
and converged in the other to improve the intensity.


********************************************************
Dr Jonathan Barnard

Analytical Materials Physics
The Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University
P O Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: +46-(0)18-4716838 Fax: +46-(0)18-500131
http://www.angstrom.uu.se/analytical/home.html

********************************************************



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:46 2000



From: EvexAnalyt-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 07:49:14 EST
Subject: Re: FYI: Congress to allow email charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Christine,

I read the following just the other day, from the US Postal Service

http://www.usps.gov/news/press/99/99045new.htm


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 21, 1999
Release No. 45

E-MAIL RUMOR COMPLETELY UNTRUE

WASHINGTON – A completely false rumor concerning the U.S. Postal Service is
being circulated on Internet e-mail. As a matter of fact, the Postal Service
has learned that a similar hoax occurred recently in Canada concerning Canada
Post.

The e-mail message claims that a "Congressman Schnell" has introduced "Bill
602P" to allow the federal government to impose a 5-cent surcharge on each
e-mail message delivered over the Internet. The money would be collected by
Internet Service Providers and then turned over to the Postal Service.

No such proposed legislation exists. In fact, no "Congressman Schnell" exists.

The U.S. Postal Service has no authority to surcharge e-mail messages sent
over the Internet, nor would it support such legislation.

-30-


Evex Analytical
X-ray Analyzers and Digital Imaging Systems
857 StateRoad
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-252-9192 T
609-252-9091 F
www.evex.com
info-at-evex.com




In a message dated 2/10/00 12:26:56 AM Eastern Standard Time,
chbennet-at-nmsu.edu writes:

{ { Subj: FYI: Congress to allow email charges
Date: 2/10/00 12:26:56 AM Eastern Standard Time
From: chbennet-at-nmsu.edu (Christina bennett)
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


I know this is off topic however a change like this could make this type of
forum impossible.





} Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2000 08:13:53 -0700
} X-Sender: liperez-at-cnmailsvr.nmsu.edu
} Mime-Version: 1.0
} To: all-at-biology.nmsu.edu
} From: liperez-at-NMSU.Edu (LSPSaldana)
} Subject: Congress to allow email charges
} Sender: owner-all-at-biology.nmsu.edu
} Precedence: bulk
} X-Keywords:
} X-UID: 43
} Status: O
}
}
} } } Congress to allow email charges
} } }
} } } Please pass this on to all you know since many of us use e-mail for
} } } business and to keep up with friends and family, I thought you'd like
} } } to know the following.
} } }
} } } Please jump on it right away and forward this to others.
} } }
} } } CNN has reported that within the next two weeks Congress is going to
} } } vote on allowing telephone companies to CHARGE A TOLL FEE for
} } } internet access.
} } } Translation: Every time we send long distance e-mail we will receive a
} } } long distance charge. This will get costly. Please visit the following
web
} } } site and file a complaint. Complain to your Congressperson. We can't
} } } allow this to pass. The following address will allow you to send an
} } } e-mail on this subject DIRECTLY to your Congressperson.
} } }
} } } http://www.house.gov/writerep {http://www.house.gov/writerep}
} } }
} } } Pass this on to your friends. It is urgent! I hope all of you will pass
} } } this on to all your friends and family. We should ALL have
} } } an interest in this one.
} } }
} } } WAIT, THERE'S MORE. IN ADDITION, The last few months have revealed an
} } } alarming trend in the Government of the United States attempting to
} } } quietly push through legislation that will affect your use of the
} } Internet.
} } } Under
} } } proposed legislation the U.S. Postal Service will be attempting to bill
} } } email users out of "alternate postage fees". Bill 602P will permit the
} } } Federal Govt. to charge a 5 cent surcharge on every email delivered, by
} } } billing Internet Service Providers at source. The consumer would then be
} } } billed in turn by the ISP. Washington D.C. lawyer Richard Stepp is
} } } working without pay to prevent this legislation from becoming law. The
} } U.S.
} } } Postal Service is claiming that lost revenue due to the proliferation of
} } } email
} } } is costing nearly $230,000,000 in revenue per year. You may have noticed
} } } their recent ad campaign "There is nothing like a letter".
} } } Since the average citizen received about 10 pieces of email per day in
} } } 1998,
} } } the cost to the typical individual would be an additional 50 cents per
} } } day, or over $180 dollars Per year, above and beyond there regular
} } Internet
} } } costs.
} } } Note that this would be money paid directly to the U.S. Postal Service
} } } for a service they do not even provide. The whole point of the Internet
is
} } } democracy and non-interference. If the federal government is permitted
} } } to tamper with our liberties by adding a surcharge to email, who knows
} } Where
} } } it will end. You are already paying an exorbitant price for snail mail
} } } because of bureaucratic inefficiency. It currently takes up to 6 days for
} } a
} } } letter to be delivered from New York to Buffalo. If The U.S. Postal
} } Service
} } } is
} } } allowed to tinker with email; it will mark the end of the "free"
} } } Internet in the United States.
} } } One congressman, Tony Schnell has even suggested a "twenty to forty
} } } dollar per month surcharge on all internet service" above and beyond the
} } } government's proposed email Charges. Note that most of the major
} } } newspapers have ignored the story, the only exception being the
} } } Washingtonian
} } } which called the idea of email surcharge "a useful concept who's time has
} } } come"
} } } (March 6, 1999) Editorial.
} } }
} } } Don't sit by and watch your freedoms erode away! Send this e-mail to
} } } EVERYONE on your list, and tell all your friends and relatives to write
} } } to their congressman and say "No!" to Bill 602P.
} } }
} } }
} } } It will only take a few moments of your time, and could very well be
} } } instrumental in killing a bill we don't want.
} } }
} } } PASS THIS ON TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW WHO USES EMAIL REMEMBER THESE ARE TWO
} } } SEPARATE ISSUES THAT EFFECT ALL OF US ONLINE. LET YOU VOICE BE HEARD
} } } NOW, NOT AFTER
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
}





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To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
From: Christina bennett {chbennet-at-nmsu.edu}
Subject: FYI: Congress to allow email charges
Errors-to: Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com

} }



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:37 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 07:14:00 -0600
Subject: Re:FYI: Congress to allow email charges -Hoax?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Is this yet another hoax eating time & bandwidth by being posted without
confirmation (like the last 3-4 times I saw this message in the pas year or
two), or is it real?

I could find no reference to it at the FCC site.... Those people who are
REALLY
in charge of telecommunication regulations....

Woody

New format, more pix:
http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3722



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:38 2000



From: White, Woody N :      Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 07:29:00 -0600
Subject: Noise vs. Be

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Harry,

Weelll... For most systems, if the low end noise is not inhibited (most
are),
the noise generated, apparent x-ray intensity, tends to increase with lower
ev.
This would not produce a gaussian-like peak, but a monotonic rise in
intensity
with lower ev. OTOH, pulse processor circuitry *could* be designed/setup to
produce such an effect. Seeing Be x-rays from 100% element is difficult to
impossible with most EDS systems. If compounded, the odds get worse.

Woody



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:53 2000



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:29:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Solid State Electron Emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the early 1980's Philips believed that their research labs had
successfully developed a new electron source suitable for electron
microscopes. Indeed there was a time when they were planning to sell
microscopes with the new sources. I never heard what went wrong. There
were rumors that the lifetime was not good enough.

Anyone who wants details can find them in their library:
"An Efficient Silicon Cold Cathode for High Current Densities"
Van Gorkom and Hoeberechts
Philips Journal of Research 39 (1984) 51-60


Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvannia 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:03:49 2000



From: David_Bell-at-Millipore.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:29:28 -0500
Subject: Re: FYI: Congress to allow email charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi all,

This, of course, is a classic internet hoax. I refer you to the following
website:


http://ciac.llnl.gov/ciac/CIACHoaxes.html#internetcharge

This hoax is designed, like many of the others, to eat up bandwidth and get
people involved in a general uproar.

Hopefully, no one panicked here! It may be worth the time to bookmark this hoax
site, or a similar one, so that when
we get messages such as this in our email, we can check their validity, before
contributing to its spread.
No insult intended towards anyone who falls victim to these emails, as I'm sure
most of us have at one time
or another.

Sincerely,

David Bell
Scientist
Electron Microscopy Lab
Millipore Corporation
80 Ashby Road
Bedford, MA 01730
(781) 533-2108




From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:09 2000



From: Scott Wight :      scott.wight-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:54:18 -0500
Subject: Re: FYI: Congress to allow email charges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is one of those internet hoaxes. It is not true, do not send it to
your friends, do not write your congressperson. Mining Co has a great web
page that debunks these hoaxes and myths
{http://urbanlegends.miningco.com/culture/urbanlegends/library/blhoax.htm?pid=27
33&cob=home} and is a good place to check before sending on any email that
urges you to send it to everyone you know. This message is a combination
of two old and popular hoaxes, see
{http://urbanlegends.miningco.com/culture/urbanlegends/library/blemtax2.htm}
and
{http://urbanlegends.about.com/culture/urbanlegends/library/weekly/aa012099.htm}
Hopefully this will die here.
Scott


} } } } Congress to allow email charges
} } } }
} } } } Please pass this on to all you know since many of us use e-mail for
} } } } business and to keep up with friends and family, I thought you'd like
} } } } to know the following.
} } } }
} } } } Please jump on it right away and forward this to others.
} } } }
} } } } CNN has reported that within the next two weeks Congress is going to
} } } } vote on allowing telephone companies to CHARGE A TOLL FEE for
} } } } internet access.
} } } } Translation: Every time we send long distance e-mail we will receive a
} } } } long distance charge. This will get costly. Please visit the following web
} } } } site and file a complaint. Complain to your Congressperson. We can't
} } } } allow this to pass. The following address will allow you to send an
} } } } e-mail on this subject DIRECTLY to your Congressperson.
} } } }
} } } } http://www.house.gov/writerep {http://www.house.gov/writerep}

..sniped...
} } } }
} } } } PASS THIS ON TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW WHO USES EMAIL REMEMBER THESE ARE TWO
} } } } SEPARATE ISSUES THAT EFFECT ALL OF US ONLINE. LET YOU VOICE BE HEARD
} } } } NOW, NOT AFTER


-------------------note: new mailing address----------------------
Scott Wight e-mail: scott.wight-at-nist.gov
NIST 222/A113 W voice: 301-975-3949
100 Bureau Dr STOP 8371 | fax: 301-417-1321
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371 \|/ disclaimer: Any opinion expressed
is my own and does not represent those of my employer.




From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:50 2000



From: William Janssen :      bjanssen-at-neuro.mssm.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 10:31:03 -0400
Subject: position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A technical position is available in the Neurobiology of Aging program at the
Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. We are seeking an experienced
Electron Microscopist with a BS/BA or MS in Biology/Life Sciences. Applicants
should have excellent communication and organizational skills, an understanding
of basic laboratory procedures, and the ability to manage a large and varied
workload. The successful candidate will participate in ultrastructural studies
focusing on the effects of: estrogen and aging on hippocampal circuitry
which is implicated in learning and memory, quantitative excitatory amino
acid receptor (NMDA and AMPA) distribution within the central nervous
system of transgenic models, as well as manipulated primate and rodent
models. Qualifications include at least 2 years of experience in routine
transmission electron microscopy procedures,
ultramicrotomy, immunogold labelling, specimen preparation, digital
photography, and routine maintenance of equipment. Experience with
immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy is an asset.

We offer a salary commensurate with experience and excellent benefits. For
consideration, please mail/email your resume to:

Bill Janssen
Neurobiology of Aging
Box 867, EB9-02
Mount Sinai School of Medicine,
One Gustave L. Levy Place,
New York, NY 10029-6574

We are an equal opportunity employer fostering diversity in the workplace.
Bill Janssen
Neurobiology of Aging Laboratories
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Box 1639
One Gustave L. Levy Place
New York, NY 10029

Phone 212-824-8789
Fax 212-849-2510



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:37 2000



From: A.Walker :      Alan.Walker-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 14:55:24 +0000
Subject: Re: about my water cooling system

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

I think the best solution would be to use a water recirculatory
system. Fill it with clean water and it should stay clean for a
long time. We use a 'Neslab'

Hope this helps

Alan Walker.

*********************************************
Alan Walker
Dept of Electronic and Electrical Engineering
University of Sheffield
Mappin Street
Sheffield S1 3JD
United Kingdom

Tel:+44-(0)114-2225365
Fax:+44-(0)114-2726391
alan.walker-at-shef.ac.uk
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/academic/D-H/eee/
*********************************************



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:48 2000



From: Michael Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 07:59:28 -0700
Subject: Re: Size determination of overlapping particles

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Rosemary,

this is of course a recurring theme in image analysis. There really is
no easy answer to this. Counting particles is easier as you can perhaps
separate the particles and arrive at the correct count, but if you don't
know what is occluded, you cannot measure it. However, if you can use
some information that is available to make some guesses or
extrapolations what the shape is, it can be done. A simple example: If
you look at a heap of coins, they may overlap. It is nevertheless
possible to measure the individual coins because I know that they are
all round. So I can take the "protruding" part of a coin and simply fit
a circle and that should give me the size pretty accurately.

Are ice crystals like snowflakes? Snowflakes, if I remember correctly,
have a six-fold symmetry. Can't you just measure one "branch" of a
snowflake (the one that you can see), and multiply that by 6? I am not
an expert on ice crystals (although I love to ski), so this may be
oversimplified. You may have to think about all the information you have
about ice crystals and can then perhaps make some guesses about the
occluded part.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



} ----------
} From: Rosemary Walsh[SMTP:RW9-at-PSU.EDU]
} Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2000 3:24:35 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: Size determination of overlapping particles
} Auto forwarded by a Rule
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear Listers,
I have a student interested in sizing ice crystals
which overlap. Any suggestions?
Rosemary




From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:13 2000



From: spatel-at-goodyear.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 09:59:36 -0500
Subject: Liquid Nitrogen

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Fellow Subscribers;

We have a tedious task of liquid nitrogen transfer and fill-up on our
instruments such as SEMs, TEM and for cryo-ultramicrotomes. Is there any
compact unit on market which would condense nitrogen from air into liquid
form? I know that Liquid oxygen would be a problem. TIA;

Siddharth Patel



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:51 2000



From: Eric Windsor :      Eric.Windsor-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 10:10:27 -0500
Subject: Re: PIPS and milling damage

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Dear Massimo,

I just read the two excellent replies from Scott and Phillip and fully agree
with them. Small angle cleavage technique (SACT) and the tripod polisher are
two very useful TEM prep techniques. In my experience, SACT is easier to learn
than tripod polishing but tripodding is applicable to more materials and yields
larger thin areas than does SACT.

As Phillip mentions, low energy milling in the final step of the process is
extremely important for reducing artifacts. I would finish using the lowest
possible energy that still yields effective milling.

Another approach is to use reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) or chemically
assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE). In both these techniques a reactive gas
(usually Iodine) is used. In RIBE, iodine is actually ionized and is used as
the milling gas. In CAIBE, iodine gas is introduced into the milling chamber
directly adjacent to the sample during argon ion milling. Both these
techniques have been shown to eliminate the ion beam damage for binary type
III-V compound semiconductors containing InP. Chew and Cullis (Ultramicroscopy
23/1987/175-198) also report improvements of ion milled surfaces for ternary
type III-V semiconductors containing InGaAs (materials you mentioned) using
RIBE.

I believe that Gatan offers an optional CAIBE attachment for the PIPS. This
may be the easiest thing to try first. Remember that iodine is very corrosive
and can damage ion milling parts if not used properly. Check with Gatan for
their recommendations.

Hope this helps,

Eric W.

Eric S. Windsor
Physical Scientist
NIST
100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371
(301) 975-3930
Fax: (301) 417-1321
Eric.Windsor-at-NIST.Gov


On Feb 9 -at- 09:43 Massimo Catalano wrote:

Dear Listservers,
we are massively working on analytical and structural TEM characterization
of semiconductors, mainly InGaAs/GaAs, quantum well, wires and dots.
Specimen preparation is of course a crucial point of our work.
We have just switched to PIPS (we used to make our samples using the Gatan
Duo Mill), and we are getting controversial results about the damage
introduced by the milling procedure.
We are perfectly aware of all the differences between the two instruments,
especially the absence of cooling stage and the higher beam current.
Has anyone performed a systematic and careful analysis to try to evaluate
the milling damage on similar materials systems. We are willing to start a
systematic work to assess this issue, but would like to know if anyone has
already done anything on this topic. Also, any collaboration will be more
than welcome.
Thanks.
Massimo



Dr. Massimo Catalano
CNR-IME
Campus Universitario
Via Arnesano
73100 Lecce - ITALY
tel: + 39 0832 322362
fax: + 39 0832 325299
email: massimo.catalano-at-ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it
http://www.ime.le.cnr.it/sime/sime.htm



Eric S. Windsor
Physical Scientist
NIST
100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371
(301) 975-3930
Fax: (301) 417-1321
Eric.Windsor-at-NIST.Gov



From daemon Thu Feb 10 19:04:42 2000



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 15:12:21 +0000
Subject: Re: Film scanners - that old chestnut

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