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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 1 Jan 2001 09:37:39 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: December 2000 Archives now on-line

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Colleagues...

The December 2000 Archives are now on-line at :

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

and welcome to the New Millenium...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp




From daemon Mon Jan 1 12:51:47 2001



From: simon watkins :      swatkins+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Jan 2001 09:38:33 -0500
Subject: 3rd annual course in quantitative fluorescence microscopy

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


The answer to this very much depends on what you are charging
for. To find an answer, you need to identify (a) the net costs you
wish to recover: e.g. capital costs (to be recovered over what
period?, at what rate of interest?), running costs, salaries of direct
(em technician) and indirect (clerical, admin.) support staff
including overheads, any charges for space occupancy and
services etc., less any subsidies (b) make a realistic estimate of
the maximum number of hours per year that a charge can be
recovered from. The answer is a/b. Simple, isn't it? Well, no. In
practise you will probably find that b is dependent on a/b since all
categories of users are sensitive to price, but you will have to
model this differently for different categories of users.

Our charges per hour for self-help access to a Philips CM120
Biotwin are as follows: Departmental £15, Other departments £21,
other publicly-funded research organisations £35, industrial £70.
Non-attenders incur full charge for the period booked. These
numbers were not exactly arrived at using rocket science. We
charge extra for all materials consumed (film, processing) and for
direct user-support from a technician. We do not include capital
costs recovery in our charges.

I would strongly advise imposing a special concessionary charge
on users who insist on tipping their specimens and retaining
circlips into the guts of the Compustage! An electronically-operated
trap door beneath the operator's seat is also an attractive option.



Chris




} From: "Ping Li" {pli-at-is.dal.ca}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Folks: A Happy New Year to you all
I thought I should let you all know about the Third annual course in
Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy to be taught between june 17 and 22th
2001 at the Mount Desert Island Marine Biology Laboratories in Arcadia
National Park in Maine. This team taught course led by Dave Piston
(Vanderbilt), Mike Nathanson (Yale), Guillermo Romero (Pittsburgh) and
myself focusses specifically on the development and application of modern
fluorescence microscopic methods. This six day intensive course covers all
aspects of the technology from microscope and dye design, cameras, confocal
microscopy, live cell microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and GFP.
Considerable attention is also given to quantitative analysis in 2 and 3
dimensions and time. The specific focus of the course allows an in depth
treatment of these methods. The goal of the course it to teach students how
to best implement these methods within their labs, using either their own
cells and tissues or using material supplied by the course. An extensive
array instrumentation, provided by all the major microscope and associated
software, hardware and camera manufacturers will be available for students
to use.
For the last two years it has been a very successful event and so we have
decided to give the course again. A full description of the course lectures
together with lecture outlines, registration etc. is available at
http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu/microscopy/ I would encourage you to spread the
word, or sign up if you are interested. The total number of students is
limited to 25, enrollment is decided by the course faculty.
If you have any further questions please feel free to contact me
Thanks
Simon

---------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRC Path
Associate Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
BSTS 225
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
Tel:412-648-3051
Fax:412-648-8330
http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu
-----------------------------------



From daemon Tue Jan 2 08:52:25 2001



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 02 Jan 2001 09:41:03 -0500
Subject: Fwd: Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} There is a position for an EM technician at the Electron
} Microscopy Core lab of the Biotechnology Program at the University of
} Florida in Gainesville. The laboratory is mostly a fee-for-service lab
} serving the needs of biological, biomedical and agricultural scientists
} at the university. Applicants must be skilled in the preparation of
} biological samples for both scanning and transmission electron
} microscopy. Experience with both PC and Mac as well as website
} management is desirable. Experience with digital imaging and
} fluorescence microscopy also a plus.
} This is a full time, permanent position with standard benefits of
} State of Florida employees.
}
} For further details, reply to this message or contact Greg Erdos
} at the number below.
}
}
}

Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Ph. 352-392-1295 Fax: 352-846-0251


From daemon Tue Jan 2 10:48:43 2001



From: Tracy Anderson :      tanderson-at-surmodics.com
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 10:42:43 -0600
Subject: S-TPPS Protocol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have a standard protocol for using Silver Tetraphenylporphin
Sulfonate (S-TPPS) as an SEM stain for collagen?

Tracy E. Anderson
Surface Characterization Specialist
SurModics, Inc.
952.829.2720 Voice
952.829.2743 Fax
tanderson-at-surmodics.com



From daemon Tue Jan 2 12:46:50 2001



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 18:25:54 -0000
Subject: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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As part of the planned makeover of our building, it has been
proposed that the various and somewhat distributed microscopy
facilities in our building - SEM, TEM, Confocal, fluorescence,
luminescence imaging, darkroom etc. etc. might be brought together
to form a biological imaging facility, thereby benefitting from some
improvements in supervision, security and user support. Part of that
proposal was to set up a computing lab with fileserver and work-
stations networked to the instruments and dedicated to image
storage and off-line image and spectral processing and analysis.
However, there is great pressure on space in this building, and it
has been suggested to me that computing for imaging and
spectroscopy does not need to be separated from general purpose
computing these days. What are your opinions about this? Pro or
con?

Happy New Millennium
Chris
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dr Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility
Daniel Rutherford Building
King's Buildings EDINBURGH EH9 3JH
Tel: +44 (0) 131 650 5345
FAX: +44 (0) 131 650 6563

Inveresk Cottage, 26 Carberry Road,
Inveresk, Musselburgh, Midlothian EH21 8PR, UK
Tel: +44 (0) 131 665 6062 / Mobile 07710 585 401
FAX: +44 (0) 131 653 6248
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From daemon Tue Jan 2 13:13:22 2001



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 14:16:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Uranyl Acetate in Acetone

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Hi Tim,
I like your idea of a separate step for the UA*.
Though 1% may be overkill.
We routinely use a cocktail for freeze-sub consisting of:
1) 4% osmium tetroxide in HPLC grade acetone
2) 0.1% uranyl acetate also made with HPLC grade acetone - make this up the
day before the freezing so it has time to go into solution before chilling.
Mix together 1:1 for wonderful contrast.
*We have to use Radiation Safety Services for disposal of this cocktail
because our hazardous waste folks refuse to deal with the combination of
OsO4 and UA.

Another angle - You didn't mention the type of resin you're using.
Freeze-sub tissue is often murky looking (low contrast) when it is embedded
in 100% Spurr's. We use Araldite/Embed 812 (an EMS kit) or a mixture of
equal parts Spurr's and Araldite/Embed 812.

hope this helps,
Beth

} Hello Out There:
}
} I am currently involved with a cryo substitution project with human red
} blood cells. I have replaced the non crystalline ice with 2% Osmium in 100%
} acetone and have OK morphology, but the contrast is a bit low. I am
} thinking about trying to follow the Osmium step with uranyl acetate, before
} embedding in plastic. Does any one out there know if 1%uranly acetate will
} be OK in 100% acetone? Thanks, Tim
}
} Timothy G. Schneider
} Director of Electron Microscopy
} Department of Pathology
} Room 229 Jefferson Hall
} Thomas Jefferson University
} 1020 Locust St.
} Philadelphia Pa. 19107
} 215-503-4798 work
} 610-613-8170 cellular
} timothy.schneider-at-mail.tju.edu

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 2 15:51:00 2001



From: Brownell, Patrick :      patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 13:36:45 -0800
Subject: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all!

I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological samples.
I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing to offer
expertise in this area?

-Patrick Brownell


From daemon Tue Jan 2 20:49:42 2001



From: Edsworth-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 2 Jan 2001 21:44:52 EST
Subject: Chiller

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Within the last couple of days (and, therefore, not in the recently posted
archives) someone posted a note about a used chiller that they had for sale.
I've lost the note. If still available, could you please repeat the note to
my email address: edsworth-at-aol.com Thanks.

Ed Holdsworth
General Mgr.
SEMTEC Laboratories, Inc.


From daemon Wed Jan 3 03:51:27 2001



From: Labar Janos :      labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 12:07:54 +0100
Subject: TEM- electron diffraction: New version of the ProcessDiffraction program

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Colleagues,

I wish you successful and happy new year.

Those of you who need to process electron diffraction ring patterns
(recorded from thin polycrystalline or amorphous samples in a TEM) might be
interested in the FREE program (for IBM PC, Windows op. system) that can be
downloaded from my home page (below). The program produces XRD-like output
from digitized SAED ring-patterns and compares to markers showing the
positions and intensities of known phases.
The newest version (1.2.0) of this ProcessDiffraction program provides
easier operation and new functionality:

* Built-in hints: what to do next (and how). Can be switched off.

* File-name and path can be specified for output. Default paths are
suggested separately for input SAED, input Marker and output. Manually
selected paths can be stored as default (during exit).

* No limit on BMP file-size.

* The automatic peak-list can be manually extended using Cursor.

* Selection of individual points (in the SAED for reading-out of d-value and
establishing correlation between distribution and SAED) is aided with a
Cursor with increased contrast and magnification.


* Units of X-axis can be changed to the physically meaningful scattering
vector [1/A] (in contrast to pixels).

* Several net distributions can be compared

* Individual markers have different colors.

* Renormalized Gross intensity can be calculated by excluding pixels with
zero intensity (i.e. corresponding to beam-blocking pin) from the averaging
process.

* Renormalized Net intensity can be calculated. Here points with intensity
above the average (over a given circle) are only included in the averaging.
Average intensity of bright pixels within a discontinous ring are only
calculated this way, giving more realistic intensity of a diffraction line
for comparison purposes.


* Show menu is included to select which curves to show in the graph.

* Possibility to cancel is introduced at several operations.

* Automatic (fast) refinement of centre is included. In dubious cases manual
selection of peak and valley is asked for.

* Calculation is double precision (basis of later extension of the software
for input files with several bytes/pixel).

* Several error conditions are eliminated (crop, conflicting user requests,
..)

I hope you will like the modifications and find this program useful and easy
to use. Download FREE as before from the same site.

I would appreciate having your comments and/or suggestions. Best regards:



Dr. Janos L. Labar
Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science
H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege u. 29-33
Postal address: H-1525 Budapest-114, Po Box 49
Tel: (36)(1) 392-26-92
Fax: (36)(1) 275-49-96
Fax/phone: (36)(1) 395-92-32
home page: www.mfa.kfki.hu/~labar




From daemon Wed Jan 3 09:13:17 2001



From: Mark Aindow :      m.aindow-at-uconn.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 10:07:03 -0500
Subject: Postdoc Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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University of Connecticut
Institute for Materials Science

Postdoctoral Position in Electron Microscopy

The Institute for Materials Science (IMS) at UConn is an
interdisciplinary center with the threefold mission of fostering
education, research and outreach in all areas of the materials
sciences. The Institute has a vacancy in the EM laboratory
for postdoctoral researcher to work on a DARPA-funded
program on Ni-based superalloys and a variety of smaller
industrial projects. Candidates should hold a PhD in Materials
Science, Physics or a related discipline and must have extensive
hands-on experience in a broad range of electron microscopy
techniques. A candidate with experience in the microstructural
analysis of Ni-based superalloys using SEM and TEM would
be preferred. The appointment is for one year in the first instance
and is available immediately. Screening of the applications will
begin immediately and will continue until the post is filled.
Applications from under-represented groups, including minorities,
women and people with disabilities are encouraged.

Interested candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including
publication list, and the names of at least three referees with
postal addresses, telephone numbers and Email addresses to:
Prof. M. Aindow, Institute for Materials Science, University of
Connecticut, 97 North Eagleville Road, U-3136, Storrs,
CT 06269-3136 USA. Email: m.aindow-at-uconn.edu


From daemon Wed Jan 3 09:29:13 2001



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 11:24:38 -0400
Subject: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are a clinical diagnostic TEM laboratory serving a provincial network of hospitals. We would like to move away from conventional darkroom printing of images and wish to convert negatives to digital files. We are looking for a negative scanner that will:

1. Accept 3 X 4 1/4 inch sheet film negatives (Kodak 4489 film).

2. Comes with software support that is adaptable to a Windows format.

3. Must be priced under $3000.

4. Must provide the best quality resolution for diagnostic results (i.e. 3200 X 3600 pixel; wide linear dynamic range).

I look forward to any information and advice you can provide.

Catherine Powell







From daemon Wed Jan 3 10:10:33 2001



From: Brownell, Patrick :      patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 08:04:10 -0800
Subject: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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My problem is a poor knife edge. The knife looks fine under casual
observation, or with small magnification, but when it comes time to actually
do some sectioning, I get a lot of chattering, or streaking, or both. I
know make as many test blocks as I do sample blocks, so I don't waste
samples with all the bad glass knifes. I've gone through several boxes of
glass over the past two months, and only get a useable knife every 15 to 20
breaks. The same knife breaker has worked fine in the past, and I have
changed the scoring wheel, and checked all that I can.

This knife breaker is also very hard to get parts for. The only obvious
problem is that one of the pressure points has a rubber pad that is unevenly
worn. I don't see how that would cause my problem. Again, the knifes look
good to the naked eye.

The glass I use is from Electron Microscopy Sciences. They are called ultra
glass knife strips 6.5mm x 25mm x 400 mm.

I guess I'm just looking for someone who has had a similar problem, and
fixed it in some manner. Could I have gotten a bad batch of glass? I don't
think it is very likely, I've used several boxes, but they may all be from
the same batch, for all I know. Is there another brand of glass, or breaker
that others have found produce reliable knives?

Thanks for any and all help

-Patrick Brownell
} ----------
} From: Katja M. Wolski[SMTP:kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu]
} Reply To: kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
} Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 4:26 AM
} To: Brownell, Patrick
} Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems
}
} I use a different knife machine, but what's the problem you're having?
} Are you
} not getting a good knife edge or what?
}
} Katja
}
}
}
} "Brownell, Patrick" wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Hi all!
} }
} } I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological
} samples.
} } I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
} } histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing to
} offer
} } expertise in this area?
} }
} } -Patrick Brownell
}


From daemon Wed Jan 3 10:54:47 2001



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 10:49:57 -0600
Subject: Zeiss lamp failure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I recently acquired a Zeiss OPMI with floor stand.
I inspected the bulb superficially before turning
it on and it seemed OK, and I confirmed the voltage
was in range beforehand. However, as soon as I
applied power, the filament left the prongs and
the bulb was dead.

It was a Zeiss 390158 bulb, a 6v 30w triangular
bayonet. It's quite possible the bulb was
mechanically shocked before I got it. Was this
a not unusual failure, or is there some kind of
warm-up procedure that might've saved it?

A hunt through my junk boxes fortunately turned up
a replacement, and it worked straight-away, even though
it looks like one of the spring-like wires worked its
way off the filament prongs, where the filament meets
the prong wire.

For the day that this one dies, though, I'd also like
recommendations for a place to purchase a replacement.

- John



From daemon Wed Jan 3 15:01:29 2001



From: Tracy Anderson :      tanderson-at-surmodics.com
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 14:44:41 -0600
Subject: Suggestions for a good sputtercoater?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings. Can anyone suggest a good all around sputter coater for general
SEM use? I usually use 50 Angstrom Pt, or Carbon for EDS. Thanks in
advance.

Tracy E. Anderson
Microscopy Specialist
Surface Characterization Dept.
SurModics, Inc.
www.surmodics.com
tanderson-at-surmodics.com



From daemon Wed Jan 3 15:38:45 2001



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 14:25:03 -0600
Subject: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Anyone else happen to watch "Mysterious Ways" earlier this week. One
character was chatting with another about the fantastic new TEM they were
using with the "Kevex EDS system with the twin Quantum 10-mm2 detectors". I
had to listen quick to hear it.

Granted, its a bit dated (Thermo-Noran is now the name and they don't list
the Quantum on their web page), and some of their other references to other
techniques were of questionable accuracy. Still, I was tickled to see a
reference to EM on TV. I remember a few references on "Quincy", but not a
lot since.

Disclaimer - I don't have a twin Quantum system, but am still using a
10-mm2 Quantum on our JEOL-840.

Warren S.



From daemon Wed Jan 3 15:58:23 2001



From: greg :      greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 16:57:32 -0500
Subject: ultramicrotomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all:
Can anyone tell me who the current manufactures
of ultra microtomes are?
--
Regards,
Gregory Rudomen
Technical Specialist Electron Microscopy
State University of New York at Stony Brook
University Microscopy Imaging Center
Stony Brook, NY 11794-8088
631-444-7372 Greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
*************************************************
Standard disclaimer: The opinions expressed
in this communication are my own and do
not necessarily reflect those of the University
Microscopy Imaging Center.
*************************************************


From daemon Wed Jan 3 17:18:45 2001



From: Purdy, Sam :      SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 17:12:38 -0600
Subject: RE: Zeiss lamp failure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John:

Bulbs of the most exotic sort can be found at:
1. Bulbtronics;(516)-249-2272
2. Bulb Direct; 1-800-772-5267, or info-at-bulbdrect.com

Good luck,

Sam Purdy
Technical Center,
National Steel Corp.
Trenton MI 48183
Voice; 734-676-2682
FAX 734-676-2030
E-mail spurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
} ----------
} From: John Foust
} Sent: Wednesday, January 2001, 11:49 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Zeiss lamp failure question
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} I recently acquired a Zeiss OPMI with floor stand.
} I inspected the bulb superficially before turning
} it on and it seemed OK, and I confirmed the voltage
} was in range beforehand. However, as soon as I
} applied power, the filament left the prongs and
} the bulb was dead.
}
} It was a Zeiss 390158 bulb, a 6v 30w triangular
} bayonet. It's quite possible the bulb was
} mechanically shocked before I got it. Was this
} a not unusual failure, or is there some kind of
} warm-up procedure that might've saved it?
}
} A hunt through my junk boxes fortunately turned up
} a replacement, and it worked straight-away, even though
} it looks like one of the spring-like wires worked its
} way off the filament prongs, where the filament meets
} the prong wire.
}
} For the day that this one dies, though, I'd also like
} recommendations for a place to purchase a replacement.
}
} - John
}
}




From daemon Wed Jan 3 18:18:39 2001



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 19:20:03 -0500
Subject: "good all around sputter coater"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Tracey E. Anderson wrote:
======================================================
Greetings. Can anyone suggest a good all around sputter coater for general
SEM use? I usually use 50 Angstrom Pt, or Carbon for EDS. Thanks in
advance.
======================================================
SPI Supplies manufactures a modular coater that is robust, requires little
maintenance, and will do all of the precious group metals, including Pt.
Carbon is done via the carbon coater module. A number of other firms
manufacture sputter coaters for SEM applications and they can all be found
on the following two vendor data bases:

Microscopy Vendor's Data Base
http://207.137.96.185/mvd/vendors.html

MicroWorld Resources and News
http://www.mwrn.com/

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies manufactures sputter and carbon coaters for SEM
laboratory applications.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================









From daemon Wed Jan 3 18:20:17 2001



From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Jan 2001 18:03:42 -0600
Subject: MAS Membership Renewal Applications

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MAS membership renewal application forms were mailed late last week.
Enclosed with your application is the 2000 Membership Directory. Please
make any corrections on your form and return it along with your dues in the
envelope provided. My sincere apology for the late mailing.

If you have any questions, do not receive your renewal packet, or are not a
member of MAS and would like to join, please contact me either at work or
at:

MAS Membership Services
PMB 141
2101 W. Broadway
Columbia, MO 65203-1261
1 (800) 4MASMEM
masmembership-at-excite.com

Thanks,
Lou Ross
Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W136 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4777, fax 884=5414
email: rosslm-at-missouri.edu
web: www.missouri.edu/~geosclmr/ebaf.html


From daemon Wed Jan 3 21:35:34 2001



From: Vitaly Feingold :      vitalylazar-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 1:31 PM
Subject: Zeiss lamp failure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi John, check the following places.

http://www.sylvania.com/ http://topbulb.com/
http://www.osram.com/ http://www.spectraservices.com/
http://opto.perkinelmer.com/products/catalog/categories/cat3.asp
http://www1.ushio.co.jp/ http://www.arc-lamps.com/

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax

This message is made of 100% recycled electrons.
-----Original Message-----
} From: John Foust {jfoust-at-threedee.com}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}




From daemon Wed Jan 3 22:02:50 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 03 Jan 2001 19:58:16 -0800
Subject: Re: Suggestions for a good sputtercoater?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What constitutes a "good all around" sputter coater is perhaps
somewhat vague? If you are looking for something that is
easy to use and provides consistent results, that may be
a problem.

New units are in the $4K to $8K price range. This depends
on whether it has a pump included, thickness measuring
unit (not all that usefull, IMO) and type of target, and dual
mode or single plating mode. These units are sputter
coaters, not evaporation units.

I searched for what it sounds like you are doing the same.
I narrowed the search to a Denton Desk II or an Anatech
Hummer VII. I settled on a used Hummer. This is an obsoleted
unit. But after some initial hickups, this coater works really
well. Everything is contained in one unit. It has old metal
gate CMOS digital ICs (still available) and an Edwards or
Alcatel small pump inside. It will do etching and plating.
What I like about this unit is that it will do plating at a specified
rate with a specified end point thickness. These settings
must be validated to be absolutely correct. The rate and
power can be adjusted via pots to hone the correlation of
settings and results.

Newer units cost tons of money and do not do a proportionately
better job. They are basically manual units. Set the time, and
make the run. No idea of thickness. Pump is optional...right.
Thickness measurement options are a waste of money in
my opinion. The results are not repeatable. And the most
common measuring method is a quartz crystal. This is a
consumable item.

You have a tough decision, based on my experience. I would
suggest that you look for a used Hummer VII or a Desk II.
I just don't think that the newer units are all that great of a value.
Nor are they all that user friendly. But YMMV.

gary g.


At 12:44 PM 1/3/01, you wrote:
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jan 3 23:01:39 2001



From: integer-at-www.god-emil.dk
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 05:57:31 +0100
Subject: Microscope recommendation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hallo,

I am participating in an art project that incorporates micro-organisms
(e.g. euglena although larger ones e.g. hydra are feasible) as actors.
The video from the microscopes/cameras will be streamed in realtime via the Internet.

Image quality is important to us, cost less so although there shall
be several stations in different geographical locations.

Should one wish to suggest a particular microscope and camera we would be delighted.
(The software isn't an issue)

Gelukkig Nieuw Jaar
Amicalement, NN





From daemon Thu Jan 4 03:02:41 2001



From: Cameron Hind :      Cameron_Hind-at-baxter.com
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 09:50:39 -0600
Subject: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi Listservers and Catherine Powell,

A European company -Digital Biomedical Imaging Systems AG (DITABIS),
produce a plate scanning system that may suit your future needs, but
I'm not certain whether you can scan negatives with it. It's an
imaging system to replace using negatives; I don't know if they have a
distributor State-side but a while back I made contact with a British
company at the Micro 2000 conference, UK, who are distributors for the
system in the UK and they were willing to let customers have a trial
run with the scanning plates.

A web site http://www.ditabis.de/first.html explains the system

The UK company is

ISS group services
Pellowe House
Francis Rd
Withington
Manchester M20 9XP

Phone:+44 161 445 5442
Fax:+4 161 445 4914

They don't appear to have a web site

Hope this info is of some use + I stress that I have absolutely no
commercial or other interests with the above companies.


Mr. Cameron Hind
Research Scientist
Advanced Technologies group
Baxter R & D Europe S.C.R.L.
Rue du Progrès 7
1400 Nivelles
Belgium

Tel:+32 67 882 511
Fax:+32 67 217 191
e-mail: hindc-at-baxter.com





















From daemon Thu Jan 4 07:24:25 2001



From: Robert_Fowler%TDK-US-at-TDKTCA.COM
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 08:18:59 -0500
Subject: Re: Zeiss lamp failure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi John
In reference to your request for replacement bulb 39-01-58...I currently
use Bulb Direct for all my lighting needs. 1-800-772-5267
WWW.BULBDIRECT.COM This company is very good on delivery (2 days) and have
the best prices I have run across.



I have no affiliation with Bulb Direct just satisfied customer.

Robert



From daemon Thu Jan 4 07:44:56 2001



From: jo verbeeck :      joverbee-at-ruca.ua.ac.be
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 14:32:58 +0000
Subject: Chemical reference sample for EELS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi listers,


Can anyone advise me on what chemical sample I can use to test the
(in)accuracy of EELS quantification for oxygen. Is there an oxide for
which there is abselutely no doubt on the oxygen concentration.
Preferably with a metal which has a good EELS peak (below 1 keV). The
goal is to have a reference with a reliable metal/O ratio.

Thanks,

Jo



From daemon Thu Jan 4 08:13:40 2001



From: Melissa Troost :      m-troost-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 08:06:52 -0600
Subject: job opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Facility Manager Position
Electron Probe Instrumentation Center
Northwestern University

The Electron Probe Instrumentation Center (EPIC) at Northwestern University
has an immediate opening for a full-time facility manager to assume the
responsibility of managing the advanced EM laboratory and
facilitate/initiate advanced TEM research. Responsibilities also include
supervision of two technical staff in SEM and specimen preparation.
The EPIC facility serves over 100 users in all aspects of Scanning and
Transmission electron microscopy. The role of the Facility Manager is to
provide leadership in advanced electron microscopy in materials research,
and assist users with their advanced TEM needs, including the following:
teaching/assistance in: HRTEM, nanodiffraction, EDS, EELS, image processing,
etc. A strong laboratory development component, research initiatives and
commitment to teaching are associated with this position.
All EMs in EPIC are under full service contract. Thus, the duties include
mainly training students/users in their research needs, development of
specialized techniques and applications for materials research, and minor
records and fiscal management.
A PhD in physical sciences/engineering is required. The candidate must have
hands-on experience in all aspects of advanced TEM as well as digital
acquisition, processing and computer assisted techniques. All levels of
experience will be considered. Compensation commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Promotion to research faculty position is possible with
proven research credentials.
Send cover letter, resume and three references to:
Prof. Vinayak P. Dravid, Director EPIC
Materials Science & Engineering
Northwestern University, 3013A MLSB
Evanston, IL 60208
E-mail: v-dravid-at-northwestern.edu
Fax: (847) 491-7820
http://epic.ms.nwu.edu/epic/index.htm

Northwestern University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.






From daemon Thu Jan 4 08:35:30 2001



From: Cavin Mooers :      cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 08:30:23 -0600
Subject: Ultramicrotomy of Glass Subjected to Vapor Hydration Testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopists,

I am a research assistant at Catholic University and have been
attempting for the past few months to thin section alteration layers,
(in cross section,) of simulated nuclear waste glasses subjected to
vapor hydration testing. These altered layers are typically comprised
of multiple phases, frequently composed of various alumino-silicates,
and are brittle and porous. They range from a few microns to hundreds
of microns. When fragmented off the test coupon, usually a few microns
(~1-20um) of glass remain adhered to altered region. We are interested
in this transition region between the glass and altered layers.

Dozens of attempts have been made to section these materials once
embedded. Variations of impregnation protocols have been tried with
recipe variations utilizing Spurr’s resin. Block faces on average have
been ~200x500um with particles sizes anywhere from a few microns to
~200um. Utilizing a Sorvel MT-2, cutting speeds between 0.25 and
2.5mm/second have been attempted, (the full range of the instrument.)
The diamond knife is new. The advance has been altered between 20nm and
250nm – producing the appropriate interference colors, but with voided
regions wherever the particles are situated. I have tried everything I
could think of to
facilitate infiltration/adhesion of these particles within the embedment
medium. After thousands of sections from 80+ blocks and several
protocols, I haven’t had the slightest glimmer of success. I know the
very thing we have been attempting has been successfully done at ANL.
So, I implore anybody that has any specific insight, simple thoughts, or
longshots to let me know.

Sincerely,

Cavin T. F. Mooers
Research Assistant
The Catholic University of America
434 Hannan Hall
Washington, D.C. 20064
(202) 319-5346 phn
(202) 319-4469 fax




From daemon Thu Jan 4 09:55:24 2001



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 11:48:03 -0400
Subject: Leitz TAS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers-

And now, from the Last Hope Department, I was wondering if anyone out
there has an old Leitz Tas Plus Image Analyzer? This would be of mid-'80's
vintage, comprised of a bench with a pop-up monitor with light pen, a nice
microscope with built-in video capability, and a big black electronics box
about four feet tall (containing 2 8-inch floppy drives - like I said, this
thing is old).
Long story short, ours is broken, and we can't even begin to fix it
without schematics (some clever soul -no, not me - tossed them out years
ago).
If anyone happens to have a set of the electronics schematics for one of
these things hanging around, please contact me ....we'll talk....

Frank Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
P.O. Box 1006
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada
B2Y 4A2



From daemon Thu Jan 4 12:16:44 2001



From: C Daniels :      cdaniels-at-gatan.com
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 10:10:47 -0800
Subject: TEM job opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TEM Applications Laboratory Manager - Gatan, Inc.

Gatan, Inc., the technology leader in digital imaging, analytical
spectroscopy and icon beam milling applications for electron microscopy in
Pleasanton, CA., is seeking candidates for a TEM Laboratory Manager. This
person will manage the TEM applications laboratory. Responsibilities
include coordinating all activities related to customer demonstrations and
training, Applications material generation and supporting the R&D department
utilization of the TEM systems. Some travel within and outside the USA is
required. Applicants should have significant TEM and CCD imaging
experience. Biological, materials or semiconductor experience would be
useful. Familiarity with existing vendors, consultants, competitors, etc in
the industry is a plus. Knowledge of Gatan's software and hardware
applications. A proven track record in both planning and managing a
laboratory environment and outstanding computer/PC skills. Must be
comfortable with current development environments and development tools to
work intelligently with engineering. Must have excellent overall PC
computing skills, including a thorough familiarity with market tools in
document composition, database design and presentation management. PhD,
desired; technical background preferred. Salary: Base salary plus bonus
commensurate with experience.

Interested candidates should send, email or fax their resume to:

GATAN, INC
Attn: HR Department
5933 Coronado Lane
Pleasanton, CA. 94588
Fax: (925) 463-0204
Email: hr-at-gatan.com
www.gatan.com
Carlotta Daniels
GATAN, Inc.
Human Resources




From daemon Thu Jan 4 13:46:52 2001



From: phil.swab-at-depsci.com (Phil Swab)
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 11:48:14 -0800
Subject: Ultramicrotomy of Glass Subjected to Vapor Hydration Testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Calvin,
Hard materials such as glass can be readily microtomed with a diamond knife
(even diamond coated silicon in Microscopy Research and Technique, vol. 31,
p. 308, 1995). Any good diamond knife will work with meticulous and careful
technique, but experience has shown that 35 degree knives yield the best
results with hard and ultra-hard materials.

It sounds as though your samples may be large and adhesion to the epoxy is
poor. In order to microtome non-porous materials such as glass, you should
first minimize the cross-sectional area to be sectioned. An easy way is to
do this is to pop concoidal micro-chips from the surface. These tend to be
very thin at the edges and can be further broken to form pointed thin
samples. Another critical element is to improve adhesion of the sample to
the resin (Spurrs) with the use of an adhesion promoter such as Dow Corning
Z-6040. Submerging the sample in a 2% solution of Z-6040 (50/50 ethanol
and H2O) for 30 minutes allows a surface reaction that promotes adhesion of
glass to epoxy. Remove samples from the solution, air dry, and embed in
Spurrs. Then, microtome using standard procedures with sectioning speed
reduced to 0.1 mm/s.

Cheers,


Phil Swab, Sr. Engineer
Engineering Development Group
Deposition Sciences, Inc
386 Tesconi Court
Santa Rosa, CA 95401

phil.swab-at-depsci.com
707-566-3718 (Phone)
707-573-6755 (FAX)

-----Original Message-----
} From: Cavin Mooers [SMTP:cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2001 6:30 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Microscopists,

I am a research assistant at Catholic University and have been
attempting for the past few months to thin section alteration layers,
(in cross section,) of simulated nuclear waste glasses subjected to
vapor hydration testing. These altered layers are typically comprised
of multiple phases, frequently composed of various alumino-silicates,
and are brittle and porous. They range from a few microns to hundreds
of microns. When fragmented off the test coupon, usually a few microns
(~1-20um) of glass remain adhered to altered region. We are interested
in this transition region between the glass and altered layers.

Dozens of attempts have been made to section these materials once
embedded. Variations of impregnation protocols have been tried with
recipe variations utilizing Spurr's resin. Block faces on average have
been ~200x500um with particles sizes anywhere from a few microns to
~200um. Utilizing a Sorvel MT-2, cutting speeds between 0.25 and
2.5mm/second have been attempted, (the full range of the instrument.)
The diamond knife is new. The advance has been altered between 20nm and
250nm - producing the appropriate interference colors, but with voided
regions wherever the particles are situated. I have tried everything I
could think of to
facilitate infiltration/adhesion of these particles within the embedment
medium. After thousands of sections from 80+ blocks and several
protocols, I haven't had the slightest glimmer of success. I know the
very thing we have been attempting has been successfully done at ANL.
So, I implore anybody that has any specific insight, simple thoughts, or
longshots to let me know.

Sincerely,

Cavin T. F. Mooers
Research Assistant
The Catholic University of America
434 Hannan Hall
Washington, D.C. 20064
(202) 319-5346 phn
(202) 319-4469 fax




From daemon Thu Jan 4 14:19:04 2001



From: Ping Li :      pli-at-is.dal.ca
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 16:14:44 -0400
Subject: Help: Confocal micorscope imaging problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, we have some imaging problems with Zeiss LSM 410. Sometimes, when we
collect an image series, one or more of the images had different sized
lighter or darker bands across the images. This happened with both green
and red channels (488 nm and 543 nm). It occurred randomly. In addition,
sometimes, the image suddenly totally whited out during the scanning. In
which case, the up part of the image looks normal, but the lower part is
white. In all cases, there were no indication of any changes in pin hole
size, contrast, brightness, and laser power based on the readings showed
in the LSM program. I am not sure what is wrong. Could be the scanner?
video card? or may be something else? Could any of you please help me
and tell me what do you think the problems are? Any information is
highly appreciated.

Ping



From daemon Thu Jan 4 14:48:26 2001



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 12:47:13 -0800
Subject: Re: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Catherine

I am using regular EPSON Expression 1600 flatbed scanner with "transparency
adapter". It has 1600 optical dpi resolution and pretty fast. To
eliminate the Newton rings, you may use special cassettes to hold the
film. Unfortunately, EPSON does not provide the cassettes for standard EM
film. You have to made them in machine shop (not big deal, actually). I
do use some EPSON cassette, which is bigger than my film in one dimension,
but it works well. This scanner comes with very good software and you may
scan your images directly into Photoshop or any other suitable program. I
am scanning in "positive transparency", 12-bit (Hi-Fi) gray, 1600 dpi mode
and than adjust the levels in the Photoshop (to remove the "empty" levels
of gray), transfer in 8-bit mode and save. Usually, I prefer to keep the
original 12-bit image as well, but it's huge - about 50 Mb each. I am
using 2.6 or 5.2 Gb MO disks for storage.

I hope it will help.

Sergey

P.S. I have no interest in EPSON products, just happy user.

At 11:24 AM 1/3/01 -0400, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Thu Jan 4 14:57:04 2001



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 12:56:57 -0800
Subject: Re: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is another story, Cameron

This equipment specially designed to work with "image plates". Nothing
related to the negatives. Moreover, they claimed that their system is
supposed to substitute the regular photo-process (and in some instances
that works better, linearity and sensitivity, for instance). Only one
disadvantage - very pricey and time consuming.

Sergey.

At 09:50 AM 1/4/01 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Thu Jan 4 15:10:16 2001



From: weiliang EARTH.WGONG.PLANET. gong :      wgong-at-UNM.EDU
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 14:07:13 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy of Glass Subjected to Vapor Hydration Testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Cavin,

I think Phil is right. You better collect really a small smaple which is
like a needdle. At the frond end of your needle, you will have the altered
layer plus a little glass. Crack your corroded glass samples you can
always find out a tiny needle suitable for ultramicrotomy. You may read
our paper in Journal of Nuclear Materials (Vol. 254, pp. 249-265, 1998)
for your reference.

Good luck,

Weiliang Gong
Center for Radioactive Waste Management
University of New Mexico
1001 University Blvd. Se
Albuquerque, NM 87106



From daemon Thu Jan 4 15:10:39 2001



From: Matt Ervin :      mervin-at-arl.army.mil
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 16:07:51 -0500
Subject: SEM scintillators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello-
Does anyone out there know the scintillator sizes for the upper and
lower secondary electron detectors on a Hitachi S-4500? Also, does anyone
have an opinion on whether the single crystal YAP (or YAG) scintillators
are worth 10x the money of a P-47? The catalogues say they last longer and
have better S/N even though they produce less signal than the P-47. If I
switched, would there be adjustments I would need to make to my SEM?
Thanks for your help.

Sincerely,
Matthew Ervin



From daemon Thu Jan 4 15:34:59 2001



From: Demaree, Richard :      RDEMAREE-at-csuchico.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 13:31:26 -0800
Subject: Nikon coolpix at low light levels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues,

We are considering purchasing a Nikon Coolpix digital camera for use on
light microscopes. We would like to know if anyone has experience using
these cameras for fluorescent microscopy. Is the meter accurate at low
light levels? Thanks.

Richard Demaree, Ph.D.
Dept. Biological Sciences
Calif. State Univ., Chico
Chico, CA 95929-0515
530-898-5812
rdemaree-at-csuchico.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 4 15:36:34 2001



From: Kristi Snell :      snell-at-metabolix.com
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 16:30:12 -0500
Subject: LM - immunofluorescence in plant protoplasts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am trying to find a way to perform immunofluorescence
in plant protoplasts for both cytosolic and peroxisomal
proteins.

My problems are as follows:

1) Fixing of the protoplasts prior to immunofluorescence
is difficult;
fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde, 350 mM mannitol, and
50 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7 for 50 min followed
by treatment with 0.1% triton X-100 for 10 minutes
yields protoplasts that appear to be aggragated and
broken.

2) Fixing of protoplasts expressing cytosolic GFP,
as detailed above, loose their GFP-fluorescence.

Does anyone have an established method for plant protoplast
immunofluorescence?

Thanks

Kristi Snell

--
Dr. Kristi D. Snell
Metabolix, Inc.
Cambridge, MA






From daemon Thu Jan 4 15:44:03 2001



From: Tracy Anderson :      tanderson-at-surmodics.com
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 15:29:22 -0600
Subject: TEM sample prep for glass slide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings. I would like to look at a cross section of a standard sized
glass slide under TEM. Does anyone know how I could prepare such a sample?
Will a microtome work? Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Tracy E. Anderson
Surface Characterization Specialist
SurModics, Inc.
952.829.2720 Voice
952.829.2743 Fax
tanderson-at-surmodics.com



From daemon Thu Jan 4 16:34:07 2001



From: Kristi Snell :      snell-at-metabolix.com
Date: Thu, 04 Jan 2001 17:26:15 -0500
Subject: Re: LM - peroxisomal staining in plant protoplasts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





} I am trying to find a way to stain peroxisomes
} in plant protoplasts and visualize the peroxisomes by light
} microscopy.

} Does anyone have an established method for this that doesn't break the
} fragile protoplasts?

} Thanks.
}
} Kristi Snell
}
} --
} Dr. Kristi D. Snell
} Metabolix, Inc.
} Cambridge, MA





From daemon Thu Jan 4 18:51:55 2001



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 19:47:09 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM sample prep for glass slide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There are a number of standard methods that will work.

Microtomy should work. There has been a recent thread about some porous glass. You should see the postings by Phil Swab. He also has a Journal article that you might be able to get a copy from Stacie Kirsch on how to do cross section of glass using microtomy. He recommends a 35 degree knife. Basically, you create small shards from the surface of the glass, mount them and then cut them. If you know how to microtme and do not know any of the other standard cross sectional preparation techniques, I would go with this one.

You could use the small angle cleavage technique. It is relatively inexpensive and easy to learn. It also works well with glass.

You can use the standard cross sectional method of Bravman and Sinclair. You can take two pieces of your glass slides about 5-10 mm x 10-20 mm and epoxy them together. I use Epo-Tek 353ND, but you can also use N-bond 610. I prefer to use a stack of silicon on one side for a number of reasons: 1) I believe that the Si helps reduce the charging effects, 2) I believe that the Si helps prevent the glass from heating under the beam, 3) I can use the Si to gauge the thickness of the sample during dimple grinding, and 4) the Si can help me find the orientation of the sample relative to the beam that puts the surface parallel to the beam. Cut the samples with a thickness of about 400-500 um with a diamond wheel cutoff saw, hand lap them with a hand grinding tool with parallel sides to between 60-90 um thick, dimple grind them to about 5 um (the Si will show a rich red color in transmitted light), and ion mill to perforation and electron transparency.

You can use Tripod polishing with a low angle ion mill clean-up. This takes some learning to do properly and specialized tools.

You can use an FIB. Glass cuts reasonable well without too much charging affects. Protect the surface with a relatively thick sputter coat of gold or Au-Pd before you put it in the FIB, especially if you use a single beam FIB.

With your finished sample, I found that at 125 kV I had to put a light carbon coat on the sample to prevent softening of the glass under the beam. AT higher voltages (200 kV or better), you don't need to coat the sample for charging or for eliminating the heating effects.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
From: Tracy Anderson [mailto:tanderson-at-surmodics.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2001 4:29 PM
To: 'Microscopy ListServer'
Subject: TEM sample prep for glass slide


---------------------------------------------------------------
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of America
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Greetings. I would like to look at a cross section of a standard sized
glass slide under TEM. Does anyone know how I could prepare
such a sample?
Will a microtome work? Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.

Tracy E. Anderson
Surface Characterization Specialist
SurModics, Inc.
952.829.2720 Voice
952.829.2743 Fax
tanderson-at-surmodics.com




From daemon Thu Jan 4 19:39:02 2001



From: Radostin Danev :      rado-at-nips.ac.jp
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 10:35:54 +0900
Subject: Re: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} From: "Sergey Ryazantsev" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu}

} This equipment specially designed to work with "image plates". Nothing
} related to the negatives. Moreover, they claimed that their system is
} supposed to substitute the regular photo-process (and in some instances
} that works better, linearity and sensitivity, for instance). Only one
} disadvantage - very pricey and time consuming.

Yes, they are better for diffraction work (high dynamic range, linearity).
But why time consuming? You just put the plates in the scanner and go do
some other things. When you are back you have all the images scanned. No
development and stuff like with films.

Best regards,

Rado


---------------------------------------------------------------------
Radostin Danev
Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
---------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Thu Jan 4 19:41:36 2001



From: Radostin Danev :      rado-at-nips.ac.jp
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 10:39:34 +0900
Subject: Re: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Sergey,

} I am using regular EPSON Expression 1600 flatbed scanner with
"transparency
} adapter". It has 1600 optical dpi resolution and pretty fast.

Have you tested the MTF of the EPSON? I'm interested what are the actual
resolutions X,Y.

Best regards,

Rado

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Radostin Danev
Laboratory of Ultrastructure Research
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki 444-8585, JAPAN
e-mail: rado-at-nips.ac.jp
---------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Thu Jan 4 21:04:47 2001



From: Winton Cornell :      winton-cornell-at-utulsa.edu
Date: Thu, 4 Jan 2001 20:58:48 -0600
Subject: problems with a Phaser 780 color laser-printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:

We have a Tektronix Phaser 780 color laser-printer which is currently
out of service. We can not find anyone in Oklahoma who can service
it; Xerox, who purchased the Tektronix printer line, is not providing
service for this printer.

I wonder if any of you who have this printer have a service source?
We seek a service center in the
Oklahoma-Texas-Kansas-Arkansas-Misouri area, but are nearly desperate
enough to ship this thing anywhere in the U.S.

Thanks, in advance, for any help you provide.

Winton Cornell


--

Winton C. Cornell, Ph.D.
Department of Geosciences
College of Engineering and Natural Sciences
The University of Tulsa
Tulsa, OK 74104
phone: 918-631-3248
fax: 918-631-2091
e-mail: winton-cornell-at-utulsa.edu




From daemon Fri Jan 5 03:21:25 2001



From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 04:12:33 -0500
Subject: SEM scintillators

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

Sorry I do not know the sizes of the scintillators in the 4500/4700 SEM but
the only change you should see is that you run the "contrast" at a lower
level than you did prior to the change.

Work we have carried out suggests an improvement compared with the
conventional product. Scintilltors start when new with a high signal that
falls off quite quickly to start with then there is a gradual decline over
the life of the scintillator. In my mind people do not change, or in your
future case clean, the scintilltors enough.

Good luck

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For consultancy and training by professionals World Wide
Tel +44 1280 814774 Fax +44 1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


From daemon Fri Jan 5 03:22:50 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 09:17:06 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Here's my favourite EM on TV story.

In an episode of the "X-Files" the EM operator looks up
from the TEM and shows Scully the alien virus. It turns
out to be an SEM of a pollen grain.

After telling the story to visitors I remind them that any
scientist who reveals important information to either
Mulder or Scully must take great care when driving home!

Dave


On Wed, 03 Jan 2001 14:25:03 -0600 Warren E Straszheim
{wesaia-at-iastate.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Anyone else happen to watch "Mysterious Ways" earlier this week. One
} character was chatting with another about the fantastic new TEM they were
} using with the "Kevex EDS system with the twin Quantum 10-mm2 detectors". I
} had to listen quick to hear it.
}
} Granted, its a bit dated (Thermo-Noran is now the name and they don't list
} the Quantum on their web page), and some of their other references to other
} techniques were of questionable accuracy. Still, I was tickled to see a
} reference to EM on TV. I remember a few references on "Quincy", but not a
} lot since.
}
} Disclaimer - I don't have a twin Quantum system, but am still using a
} 10-mm2 Quantum on our JEOL-840.
}
} Warren S.
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 5 03:25:04 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 09:21:24 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Perhaps you could get a lab with no problems to make some
knives with your glass and then test them in their lab and
yours (get them to send some of their glass to you as
well to test your knifemaker). That should show if it is
the glass, the knifemaker or the ultramicrotome that is at
fault.

Dave


On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 08:04:10 -0800 "Brownell, Patrick"
{patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} My problem is a poor knife edge. The knife looks fine under casual
} observation, or with small magnification, but when it comes time to actually
} do some sectioning, I get a lot of chattering, or streaking, or both. I
} know make as many test blocks as I do sample blocks, so I don't waste
} samples with all the bad glass knifes. I've gone through several boxes of
} glass over the past two months, and only get a useable knife every 15 to 20
} breaks. The same knife breaker has worked fine in the past, and I have
} changed the scoring wheel, and checked all that I can.
}
} This knife breaker is also very hard to get parts for. The only obvious
} problem is that one of the pressure points has a rubber pad that is unevenly
} worn. I don't see how that would cause my problem. Again, the knifes look
} good to the naked eye.
}
} The glass I use is from Electron Microscopy Sciences. They are called ultra
} glass knife strips 6.5mm x 25mm x 400 mm.
}
} I guess I'm just looking for someone who has had a similar problem, and
} fixed it in some manner. Could I have gotten a bad batch of glass? I don't
} think it is very likely, I've used several boxes, but they may all be from
} the same batch, for all I know. Is there another brand of glass, or breaker
} that others have found produce reliable knives?
}
} Thanks for any and all help
}
} -Patrick Brownell
} } ----------
} } From: Katja M. Wolski[SMTP:kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu]
} } Reply To: kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
} } Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 4:26 AM
} } To: Brownell, Patrick
} } Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems
} }
} } I use a different knife machine, but what's the problem you're having?
} } Are you
} } not getting a good knife edge or what?
} }
} } Katja
} }
} }
} }
} } "Brownell, Patrick" wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } Hi all!
} } }
} } } I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological
} } samples.
} } } I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
} } } histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing to
} } offer
} } } expertise in this area?
} } }
} } } -Patrick Brownell
} }
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 5 07:33:49 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 05:28:34 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Patrick:

I don't know the machine, but is TAAB no longer in business in the UK? For
the longest time TAAB supplies (altho not generally easily available in the
US) was an excellent source of resins and small items. Regardless, I would
think that the worn rubber pad is your problem. Again, thinking of
experience with other knifemakers, the pads are an essential part of
relieving some of the stress in the glass as it breaks. If this pad is
uneven, it may not be absorbing the pressure/stress as it should. Perhaps
(if TAAB is not around) some other users of the knifemaker might have
accessories (like a spare pad) to help you out. Also check the following:
depth of the score--if it's too deep or too light, that will affect the
break and edge quality; how fast are you breaking after scoring? - a slow
break has always been essential to consistently good knife edges for me;
check the setting of the clamp(s) and pressure points to ensure that there
are no uneven points and that the clamp(s) are providing equal pressure. I
can't find the reference right now, but the original publications on making
the Ralph knives by hand (it was in Stain Technology, I think) might get you
by, and it also might allow you to check the quality of the glass. The
technique wasn't too difficult or tedious, and, as I remember (from the dim
recesses of ancient history) the percentage of good knives was acceptable.
Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Fri, 5 Jan 2001 09:21:24 +0000 (GMT Standard Time), Patton, David wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Perhaps you could get a lab with no problems to make some
} knives with your glass and then test them in their lab and
} yours (get them to send some of their glass to you as
} well to test your knifemaker). That should show if it is
} the glass, the knifemaker or the ultramicrotome that is at
} fault.
}
} Dave
}
}
} On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 08:04:10 -0800 "Brownell, Patrick"
} {patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com} wrote:
}
} }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } My problem is a poor knife edge. The knife looks fine under casual
} } observation, or with small magnification, but when it comes time to
actually
} } do some sectioning, I get a lot of chattering, or streaking, or both.
I
} } know make as many test blocks as I do sample blocks, so I don't waste
} } samples with all the bad glass knifes. I've gone through several boxes
of
} } glass over the past two months, and only get a useable knife every 15
to 20
} } breaks. The same knife breaker has worked fine in the past, and I have
} } changed the scoring wheel, and checked all that I can.
} }
} } This knife breaker is also very hard to get parts for. The only
obvious
} } problem is that one of the pressure points has a rubber pad that is
unevenly
} } worn. I don't see how that would cause my problem. Again, the knifes
look
} } good to the naked eye.
} }
} } The glass I use is from Electron Microscopy Sciences. They are called
ultra
} } glass knife strips 6.5mm x 25mm x 400 mm.
} }
} } I guess I'm just looking for someone who has had a similar problem, and
} } fixed it in some manner. Could I have gotten a bad batch of glass? I
don't
} } think it is very likely, I've used several boxes, but they may all be
from
} } the same batch, for all I know. Is there another brand of glass, or
breaker
} } that others have found produce reliable knives?
} }
} } Thanks for any and all help
} }
} } -Patrick Brownell
} } } ----------
} } } From: Katja M. Wolski[SMTP:kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu]
} } } Reply To: kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
} } } Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 4:26 AM
} } } To: Brownell, Patrick
} } } Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems
} } }
} } } I use a different knife machine, but what's the problem you're
having?
} } } Are you
} } } not getting a good knife edge or what?
} } }
} } } Katja
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } "Brownell, Patrick" wrote:
} } }
} } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } } Hi all!
} } } }
} } } } I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological
} } } samples.
} } } } I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
} } } } histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing
to
} } } offer
} } } } expertise in this area?
} } } }
} } } } -Patrick Brownell
} } }
} }
}
} ----------------------------------------
} Patton, David
} Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
} "University of the West of England"
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Send a cool gift with your E-Card
http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/




From daemon Fri Jan 5 07:58:14 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 13:54:43 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TAAB still exist. Try E-mail sales-at-taab.co.uk

Dave

On Fri, 5 Jan 2001 05:28:34 -0800 (PST) Roger Moretz
{rcmoretz-at-excite.com} wrote:

} Patrick:
}
} I don't know the machine, but is TAAB no longer in business in the UK? For
} the longest time TAAB supplies (altho not generally easily available in the
} US) was an excellent source of resins and small items. Regardless, I would
} think that the worn rubber pad is your problem. Again, thinking of
} experience with other knifemakers, the pads are an essential part of
} relieving some of the stress in the glass as it breaks. If this pad is
} uneven, it may not be absorbing the pressure/stress as it should. Perhaps
} (if TAAB is not around) some other users of the knifemaker might have
} accessories (like a spare pad) to help you out. Also check the following:
} depth of the score--if it's too deep or too light, that will affect the
} break and edge quality; how fast are you breaking after scoring? - a slow
} break has always been essential to consistently good knife edges for me;
} check the setting of the clamp(s) and pressure points to ensure that there
} are no uneven points and that the clamp(s) are providing equal pressure. I
} can't find the reference right now, but the original publications on making
} the Ralph knives by hand (it was in Stain Technology, I think) might get you
} by, and it also might allow you to check the quality of the glass. The
} technique wasn't too difficult or tedious, and, as I remember (from the dim
} recesses of ancient history) the percentage of good knives was acceptable.
} Hope this helps.
}
} Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
} Dept of Toxicology
} Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
}
} On Fri, 5 Jan 2001 09:21:24 +0000 (GMT Standard Time), Patton, David wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Perhaps you could get a lab with no problems to make some
} } knives with your glass and then test them in their lab and
} } yours (get them to send some of their glass to you as
} } well to test your knifemaker). That should show if it is
} } the glass, the knifemaker or the ultramicrotome that is at
} } fault.
} }
} } Dave
} }
} }
} } On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 08:04:10 -0800 "Brownell, Patrick"
} } {patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com} wrote:
} }
} } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
}
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } My problem is a poor knife edge. The knife looks fine under casual
} } } observation, or with small magnification, but when it comes time to
} actually
} } } do some sectioning, I get a lot of chattering, or streaking, or both.
} I
} } } know make as many test blocks as I do sample blocks, so I don't waste
} } } samples with all the bad glass knifes. I've gone through several boxes
} of
} } } glass over the past two months, and only get a useable knife every 15
} to 20
} } } breaks. The same knife breaker has worked fine in the past, and I have
} } } changed the scoring wheel, and checked all that I can.
} } }
} } } This knife breaker is also very hard to get parts for. The only
} obvious
} } } problem is that one of the pressure points has a rubber pad that is
} unevenly
} } } worn. I don't see how that would cause my problem. Again, the knifes
} look
} } } good to the naked eye.
} } }
} } } The glass I use is from Electron Microscopy Sciences. They are called
} ultra
} } } glass knife strips 6.5mm x 25mm x 400 mm.
} } }
} } } I guess I'm just looking for someone who has had a similar problem, and
} } } fixed it in some manner. Could I have gotten a bad batch of glass? I
} don't
} } } think it is very likely, I've used several boxes, but they may all be
} from
} } } the same batch, for all I know. Is there another brand of glass, or
} breaker
} } } that others have found produce reliable knives?
} } }
} } } Thanks for any and all help
} } }
} } } -Patrick Brownell
} } } } ----------
} } } } From: Katja M. Wolski[SMTP:kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu]
} } } } Reply To: kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
} } } } Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 4:26 AM
} } } } To: Brownell, Patrick
} } } } Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems
} } } }
} } } } I use a different knife machine, but what's the problem you're
} having?
} } } } Are you
} } } } not getting a good knife edge or what?
} } } }
} } } } Katja
} } } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } "Brownell, Patrick" wrote:
} } } }
} } } } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } } }
} } } } } Hi all!
} } } } }
} } } } } I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological
} } } } samples.
} } } } } I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
} } } } } histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing
} to
} } } } offer
} } } } } expertise in this area?
} } } } }
} } } } } -Patrick Brownell
} } } }
} } }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------
} } Patton, David
} } Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
} } "University of the West of England"
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________________
} Send a cool gift with your E-Card
} http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 5 08:00:48 2001



From: Ziegler, David SBCCOM(N) :      David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 08:57:43 -0500
Subject: X-TEM of those hydration treated glass

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Calvin,

Are you vacuum embedding the glass and Spurr's resin? That should work to
get a lot of the void space out.

Just pour the resin into the embedding capsule, put the capsule into a
vacuum oven, let pump down for a few minutes (~20 min), bring the sample
back to room pressure to let the air pressure force the resin into the
pores, then pump it down again and bring back to room pressure and let the
sample cure.

dz

David Ziegler
U.S. Army, SBCCOM
AMSSB-RSS-MS(N)
Materials Science Team, SS&T
Natick, MA 01760-5020
TEL: (508) 233-6484
FAX: (508) 233-5521
Email: David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil



From daemon Fri Jan 5 08:03:54 2001



From: epmalab :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 06:25:19 -0800
Subject: RE: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris writes ...}

} As part of the planned makeover of our building, it has been
} proposed ...
} Part of that proposal was to set up a computing lab with
} fileserver and work-stations networked ...
} However, there is great pressure on space in this building, and it
} has been suggested to me that computing for imaging and
} spectroscopy does not need to be separated from general purpose
} computing these days. ...

Somewhat true ... for our EPMA and SEM images, we simply archive to a
"files available" location, and every researcher has their own computer and
software. However, you would need a workstation for the OM, would you not?

shAf :o)



From daemon Fri Jan 5 08:20:54 2001



From: us004118-at-mindspring.com ()
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 08:16:23 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM: Crystal Growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor

---------------------------------------------------

Email: us004118-at-mindspring.com
Name: Leonard Lessin, FBPA

School: (Retired Science & Medical Photographer)

State: NY

Zip: 10012

Question: I am enjoying doing photomicrographs of crystal
preperations in polarized light.However I have insuffient knowledge of
chemistry
to choose solvents without a long series of trial and error efforts.Can you
give me
a rationale and/or a reference to go about this in a more productive
manner?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Fri Jan 5 09:04:09 2001



From: Alexander Solodukhin :      as4j-at-virginia.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 09:58:58 -0500
Subject: Re: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Catherine,

High quality professional film scanners (LeafScan 45, LS-4500 etc.) are very expansive - over $10k.

I use MINOLTA Dimage Scan Multi (Minolta USA -- how2scan.com ) for digitizing of TEM negatives.

Its features:
- Optical resolution: 1128dpi (TEM) 2820dpi (35mm, APS)
- Dynamic range: 3.6
- Price: around $2,000

It has one drawback only: TEM film adapter aperture size is of 2.2x3.15. However only central part of a negative is used for image processing.

There is a choice among the price and convenience.

Best regards,

Alexander

Dr. A.S. Solodukhin
Department of Anesthesiology
University of Virginia Health System
P.O. Box 800710
Charlottesville, VA 22906-0710
FAX : (804) 982-0019
Phone: (804) 924-2494



"Dr. Catherine Powell" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We are a clinical diagnostic TEM laboratory serving a provincial network of hospitals. We would like to move away from conventional darkroom printing of images and wish to convert negatives to digital files. We are looking for a negative scanner that will:
}
} 1. Accept 3 X 4 1/4 inch sheet film negatives (Kodak 4489 film).
}
} 2. Comes with software support that is adaptable to a Windows format.
}
} 3. Must be priced under $3000.
}
} 4. Must provide the best quality resolution for diagnostic results (i.e. 3200 X 3600 pixel; wide linear dynamic range).
}
} I look forward to any information and advice you can provide.
}
} Catherine Powell
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 5 10:15:48 2001



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 10:08:27 -0600
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Since there has been only one other response, I will toss in my 2 cents.

Some time back I would have said that the load of microscopic images would
be more than what the general purpose computing lab would want to take
responsibility for. It might prove a significant network traffic load too.
However, I think any decent network should be able to handle the load from
the microscope labs. On the side, we have a good campus network here at
Iowa State. However an analysis of network traffic shows a disproportionate
amount of traffic coming out of a few dorm rooms (the normal traffic
pattern would be incoming). The university is going to start limiting
traffic to so many gigabytes per month or start charging. So I think the
microscope load is no longer that significant.

The other issue that might work against it is software licensing. I don't
know if you use special programs to work with your images. It might be
difficult to work out a suitable licensing arrangement if that software
needs to be installed on a lab full of computers, but maybe you can.

As far as regular maintenance of the data, I would be all in favor of
letting someone else do the backups providing they have the space (and they
should).

Warren

At 06:25 PM 1/2/2001 +0000, you wrote:

} As part of the planned makeover of our building, it has been
} proposed that the various and somewhat distributed microscopy
} facilities in our building - SEM, TEM, Confocal, fluorescence,
} luminescence imaging, darkroom etc. etc. might be brought together
} to form a biological imaging facility, thereby benefitting from some
} improvements in supervision, security and user support. Part of that
} proposal was to set up a computing lab with fileserver and work-
} stations networked to the instruments and dedicated to image
} storage and off-line image and spectral processing and analysis.
} However, there is great pressure on space in this building, and it
} has been suggested to me that computing for imaging and
} spectroscopy does not need to be separated from general purpose
} computing these days. What are your opinions about this? Pro or
} con?
}
} Happy New Millennium
} Chris
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Dr Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh

----------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From daemon Fri Jan 5 10:30:03 2001



From: E. J. McKenzie :      elizm-at-pdx.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 08:26:31 -0800
Subject: request for carbon coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi everyone,

we're looking to buy a used carbon evaporator and before I
speed through the used equipment websites I thought I'd just check to see if
anyone here is thinking of selling their one.

cheers
Liz McKenzie


*******************************************************
Geomicrobiology and Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Room S9 Cramer Hall
1721 SW Broadway
Portland State University
Portland
OR97201

ph:503 725 3362
fax:503 725 3025

*******************************************************


From daemon Fri Jan 5 12:05:20 2001



From: Platek, Frank :      FPLATEK-at-ora.fda.gov
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 12:57:27 -0500
Subject: Scanning Microscopy in Forensic Science Session - SCANNING 2001

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Applications of Scanning Microscopy in Forensic Science


Dear Fellow Microscopist / Forensic Scientist,


SCANNING 2001, the Thirteenth Annual International Scientific Meeting on
Scanning Microscopies will be held May 5-7, 2001, in New York City at The
Roosevelt Hotel. Please make plans to attend three full days of scientific
papers and six short courses all devoted to the use of scanning microscopy.
Numerous specific application topics including forensics, electron
backscattered diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, nanotechnology,
anthropology, modern optical microscopy, museum applications of SEM, food
microstructure, material science, microwave techniques and pharmaceuticals.
For a completely listing of session topics, short course titles and
registration information, please visit the SCANNING web site at
www.scanning-fams.org.

CALL FOR PAPERS:

As a co-chair of the SCANNING 2001's "Applications of Scanning Microscopy in
Forensic Science" session, I am most pleased with the participation and
interest in the forensic session over the last eight years. This year, Mr.
Dennis Ward of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has graciously agreed to
co-chair the forensic sessions. Together, we are planning to provide an
exciting and informative forensic program. The continued growth of the
forensic session over the last eight years will once again permit two full
days of forensic papers. The "Applications of Scanning Microscopy in
Forensic Science" sessions will be held on Sunday and Monday, May 6-7, 2001.
Combined with the popular one day "Scanning Microscopy in Forensic Science"
short course (Saturday, May 5, 2001), the forensic scientist/student will be
able to attend three consecutive (and full) days of instruction as well as
scientific papers on current forensic science research and unique cases all
devoted to scanning microscopy applications in forensic science. A large
number of microscopy vendors and a full schedule of social activities and
tours in New York are also available for a most enjoyable meeting
experience.

I encourage you to submit an abstract for platform or poster consideration
and be a part of the SCANNING 2001 Forensics Session. Additionally, if you
are involved with or know of forensic science students actively engaged in
forensic research using any type of scanning microscopy, I strongly
encourage you to have your student(s) submit an abstract for consideration
as a student paper or poster. Again, please visit the SCANNING web site at
www.scanning-fams.org.


Should you have any questions about the forensic symposium, short course or
student papers, please feel free to contact me.

See you in New York!


S. Frank Platek, MS
Co-Chair, Forensic Symposium and Short Course
SCANNING 2001
(513) 679-2700
(513) 679-2761 FAX
fplatek-at-ora.fda.gov




From daemon Fri Jan 5 12:23:20 2001



From: OCONNELL-at-ltu.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 13:19:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Job Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Looking for a few good Account Representatives for an electron
and optical microscopy service. Territory is open. Excellent
earning potential. Call Dick O'Connell at 734-668-3309
or e-mail at oconnell-at-ltu.edu for more information.

Thank You

Dick O'Connell


From daemon Fri Jan 5 13:10:16 2001



From: William A. Monroe :      monroe-at-emcenter.msstate.edu
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 14:39:11 -0600
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I believe TAAB is still in business
TAAB Laboratories Equipment Ltd.
3 Minerva House Calleva Park
Aldermaston , Berkshire
RG7 8NA UK Phone: 44-118-9817775 Fax: 44-118-9817881
E-mail: sales-at-taab.co.uk

Chris


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Roger Moretz" {rcmoretz-at-excite.com}
To: "Patton, David" {David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk} ; "Brownell, Patrick"
{patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com}
Cc: "'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 1:28 PM


The earliest mention of EM in TV or movies goes back in time much
further than "Quincy" or the "X-Files".

I thought I would mention my favorite EM TV/Movie memory. Anyone
remember the movie called "The Andromeda Strain" ?? The movie from
the 60's was based on a Michael Crighton book by the same name . A
Transmission Electron Microscope (RCA EMU ???), as well as "live"
images of the ultramicrotomy sectioning process were featured.

Remember?

I would be interested in knowing if there are earlier references than this one.

Best Wishes,

Bill Monroe
--
Bill Monroe
EM Center
Mississippi State University
(601)-325-3019 Lab
Fax 325-0246


From daemon Fri Jan 5 15:21:42 2001



From: Larry Allard :      l2a-at-ornl.gov
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 15:19:10 -0500
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bill:

You're correct about the RCA microscope, except that the one in the
movie was right after RCA discontinued the business, and it was
picked up by "Forgflo", which was the name seen clearly in the movie.

Check it out...

Larry
(Master of all trivia...why don't I get on Who Wants to be a Millionaire?) ;-)




} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} The earliest mention of EM in TV or movies goes back in time much
} further than "Quincy" or the "X-Files".
}
} I thought I would mention my favorite EM TV/Movie memory. Anyone
} remember the movie called "The Andromeda Strain" ?? The movie from
} the 60's was based on a Michael Crighton book by the same name . A
} Transmission Electron Microscope (RCA EMU ???), as well as "live"
} images of the ultramicrotomy sectioning process were featured.
}
} Remember?
}
} I would be interested in knowing if there are earlier references
} than this one.
}
} Best Wishes,
}
} Bill Monroe
} --
} Bill Monroe
} EM Center
} Mississippi State University
} (601)-325-3019 Lab
} Fax 325-0246

Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Senior Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

865-574-4981
865-576-5413 Fax
allardlfjr-at-ornl.gov


From daemon Fri Jan 5 15:45:18 2001



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 16:43:15 -0500
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You might also recall that in the Andromeda Strain movie, the specimen was
inserted through the viewing port and placed on the fluorescent screen. In
this way the were actually able to watch the "virus" replicate right before
their eyes.

At 02:39 PM 01/05/2001 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
PO Box 110580
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

Ph. 352-392-1295 Fax: 352-846-0251


From daemon Fri Jan 5 15:56:46 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 15:53:58 -0600
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Warren E Straszheim" {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
{snip}

}
} As far as regular maintenance of the data, I would be all in favor of
} letting someone else do the backups providing they have the space (and
they
} should).

Warren,

If the backups are of any value to you the only person you can trust to
make them is yourself. The only method I have found that has never failed
me it to compress the files in zip format transfer it to the backup media
and verify it on the back up media. Then store the back up media off site.
The zip format applies to MSDOS computer other archive file types apply to
other OSs.

If the data is really important make two copies.

Unless you can hire a lot better folks then I have seen colleges hire they
will make mistakes on backups sooner or later probably sooner.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00





From daemon Fri Jan 5 17:00:30 2001



From: Robert Mixon :      mixonr-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 14:56:02 -0800
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Of course some of us remember this movie but for heavens sake why did they have green "colored" (interference "color") sections floating in the microtome knife boat when gold surely would have photographed as well and fit the dialogue of that scene. Obviously the technical people just said well cut us some sections to phtograph. A sore point to me at the time.

} } } "William A. Monroe" {monroe-at-emcenter.msstate.edu} 01/05 12:39 PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


The earliest mention of EM in TV or movies goes back in time much
further than "Quincy" or the "X-Files".

I thought I would mention my favorite EM TV/Movie memory. Anyone
remember the movie called "The Andromeda Strain" ?? The movie from
the 60's was based on a Michael Crighton book by the same name . A
Transmission Electron Microscope (RCA EMU ???), as well as "live"
images of the ultramicrotomy sectioning process were featured.

Remember?

I would be interested in knowing if there are earlier references than this one.

Best Wishes,

Bill Monroe
--
Bill Monroe
EM Center
Mississippi State University
(601)-325-3019 Lab
Fax 325-0246




From daemon Fri Jan 5 17:01:23 2001



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 17:58:37 -0500
Subject: RE: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The other fun thing about the crystalline image in that TEM from Andromeda Strain was that it was in color!


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
From: William A. Monroe [mailto:monroe-at-emcenter.msstate.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 3:39 PM
To: Warren E Straszheim
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: Re: TV Trivia


---------------------------------------------------------------
---------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserv er/FAQ.html



---------------------------------------------------------------
--------.


The earliest mention of EM in TV or movies goes back in time much
further than "Quincy" or the "X-Files".

I thought I would mention my favorite EM TV/Movie memory. Anyone
remember the movie called "The Andromeda Strain" ?? The movie from
the 60's was based on a Michael Crighton book by the same name . A
Transmission Electron Microscope (RCA EMU ???), as well as "live"
images of the ultramicrotomy sectioning process were featured.

Remember?

I would be interested in knowing if there are earlier
references than this one.

Best Wishes,

Bill Monroe
--
Bill Monroe
EM Center
Mississippi State University
(601)-325-3019 Lab
Fax 325-0246



From daemon Fri Jan 5 18:31:25 2001



From: Richard Wuhrer :      Richard.Wuhrer-at-uts.edu.au
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 18:26:11 -0600
Subject: AMAS Symposium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


_________________________________________________________________________

"Scanned Probe and Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis: Applications &
Techniques"
_________________________________________________________________________

The University of Sydney

February 14-16, 2001


AMAS and ASPMS invite you to join us for what will probably be the very
first electron and scanned probe microscopy meeting of the 21st Century.

The aim of the Symposium is to provide a forum where participants can
discuss electron and scanned probe microscopy, with emphasis on practical
solutions and applications. A number of overseas invited speakers will be
involved with both the Symposium and the Workshops. We also encourage you
to present your recent work using SPM, SEM/TEM and microanalysis.

Pre-Symposium Workshop
February 12-13, 2001
Practical Digital Imaging Introduction to SPM
Spectral Imaging Materials SPM
Environmental SEM Biological SPM
Low Voltage SEM and microanalysis SPM of Soft Materials
Advances in EBSD in SEM SPM Calibration and Maintenance
Introduction to XEDS and EELS in the EM Functionalising Tips

Information concerning the symposium, workshops, accommodation,
registration, etc. is posted on our website (www.microscopy.org.au then
follow the link to "Upcoming ASPMS, AMAS Symposium". This information will
be revised and expanded as necessary.

General Enquiries:
Clive Nockolds, Tel. (02) 9351 2351, fax (02) 9351 7682, email:
clive-at-emu.usyd.edu.au

SPM Enquiries:
Gordon Thorogood, Tel. (02) 9717 3183, fax (02) 9543 7179, email:
gjt-at-ansto.gov.au

Website:
http://www.microscopy.org.au/symposium/Symposium_HomePage.html




**************************************************
Richard Wuhrer
Microstructural Analysis Unit
Faculty of Science
University of Technology, Sydney
Lower Ground Floor, Bldg 4, Thomas Street, Ultimo
PO Box 123 Broadway NSW 2007
+61 2 9514 1702 (P) +61 2 9514 1703 (fax)
0411 877 476 (M)
Email: Richard.Wuhrer-at-uts.edu.au
**************************************************





From daemon Fri Jan 5 19:20:24 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 17:16:06 -0800
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just a word of caution about Zip disks. They can be very
unreliable. When Iomega first came out with them, their
media was really good. Now it is not the same. Maxell
and Fujifilm also make media. I think that theirs are better.

The other problem with Iomega drives (Zip and Jaz) is the
click of death. This is a precursor to a dead drive or
media and loss of all that is on the media (if bad media).

To check your drives and media, run tip.exe. To find out
more about this, visit http://www.grc.com

gary g.


At 01:53 PM 1/5/01, you wrote:

} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Warren E Straszheim" {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
} {snip}
}
} }
} } As far as regular maintenance of the data, I would be all in favor of
} } letting someone else do the backups providing they have the space (and
} they
} } should).
}
} Warren,
}
} If the backups are of any value to you the only person you can trust to
} make them is yourself. The only method I have found that has never failed
} me it to compress the files in zip format transfer it to the backup media
} and verify it on the back up media. Then store the back up media off site.
} The zip format applies to MSDOS computer other archive file types apply to
} other OSs.
}
} If the data is really important make two copies.
}
} Unless you can hire a lot better folks then I have seen colleges hire they
} will make mistakes on backups sooner or later probably sooner.
}
} Gordon
} Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
} Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
} 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00



From daemon Fri Jan 5 22:07:44 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Fri, 5 Jan 2001 22:07:12 -0600
Subject: Re: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
To: "Gordon Couger" {gcouger-at-couger.com}
Cc: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 7:16 PM


Could someone post the reference for the article for making glass knives
by hand?

Thanks
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Fri Jan 5 22:51:41 2001



From: Rosemary White :      Rosemary.White-at-pi.csiro.au
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 15:52:24 +1000
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


And there were all those Zeiss microscopes in Jurassic Park. Pity the one
they were using in one scene (an Axiophot?) didn't have a condenser....


Rosemary White
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

phone 61-2-6246 5475
fax 61-2-6246 5000
email r.white-at-pi.csiro.au




From daemon Fri Jan 5 23:03:56 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 05 Jan 2001 20:59:44 -0800
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes....different "zip." Winzip is very good for munching
files into a smaller data space. The media problem remains,
however. As you point out, other media keeps coming out.

I tried DVD-RAM and really got whacked by bad sectors.
I don't use that any longer. DVD-R is quite another story.
CD-R is so cheap these days it is a great way to store
600MB of data. The only problem is to ensure that it
remains on the media. Most burner programs do not
verify after write. Toast on the Mac does, but Adaptec's
programs on the PC do not. I have not found any other
programs that will verify after write on the PC. Bummer.

I have not done much at all with CD-RW. I wonder what
the experiences have been with this option? My new Yamaha
drive is 16x/10x/40x and should do nicely for RW. Never tried
it for RW. I guess that I should do that some day. CD-Rs at
12X are iffy....even with certified media. That's why the
verification is such an important missing feature.

For really good backup and restore, consider the removable
IDE drives. Very nice. My one year's work fits on three 45G
drives. Hopefully it remains accessible in the future. Data
overload is an emerging problem.

gg


At 08:03 PM 1/5/01, you wrote:

} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
} To: "Gordon Couger" {gcouger-at-couger.com}
} Cc: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 7:16 PM
} Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging
}
}
} } Just a word of caution about Zip disks. They can be very
} } unreliable. When Iomega first came out with them, their
} } media was really good. Now it is not the same. Maxell
} } and Fujifilm also make media. I think that theirs are better.
} }
} } The other problem with Iomega drives (Zip and Jaz) is the
} } click of death. This is a precursor to a dead drive or
} } media and loss of all that is on the media (if bad media).
} }
} } To check your drives and media, run tip.exe. To find out
} } more about this, visit http://www.grc.com
} }
} } gary g.
}
} Gary,
}
} Zip files not Zip disk. Use Pkzip or some other program to put all the
} files into one zip file, usually a complete directory, copy that file to
} the back up media and verify the zip file on the back up media. Currently
} I use write only CD-ROMs and keep a copy of really important stuff on my
} internet server at my ISP as well. Hard disk space is cheap. I have the
} last 15 years work at my finger tips. If I can find it:) I started using
} this on single sided single density floppies on a Radio Shack Model 1. I
} can only think of two times that I was unable to retrieve a file in 20
} years.
}
} I am a programmer not a photographer so a years work might fit on a floppy
} disk.
}
} I am not satisfied with the life of CD-ROMs but so far something better
} has always come along before the old media went bad and I copied it all
} over. One thing I don't like about CD-ROMs is they are not protected from
} scratching or being broken.
}
} Gordon
} Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
} Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
} 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00



From daemon Sat Jan 6 00:32:59 2001



From: Vr. Richard Bejsak-Colloredo-Mansfeld :      ricardo-at-ans.com.au
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 18:01:59 +1100
Subject: JENA ZEISS Terchnoval 2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
To: "Gordon Couger" {gcouger-at-couger.com}
Cc: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 10:59 PM


I am looking for accessories and parts for binocular microscope Jenna
Technoval 2.
Anyone have some spare unneeded accessories as camera attachment, oculars,
literature, etc?

Keep care and be of good cheer.

Regards

(name) Vratislav Richard Eugene Maria John Baptist
(surname) of Bejsak (Bayshark)-Colloredo-Mansfeld

website: http://www.coleoptera.org
listserver: coleoptera on www.egroup.com/group/coleoptera/info.html
Coleoptera - Australia, Tenebrionidae of World
(incl. Lagriinae, Alleculinae)

University of Sydney
The Wentworth Bldg., Box 62
NSW 2006
AUSTRALIA
phone : +61 414 540 465
email: vratislav-at-bigfoot.com
ricardo-at-ans.com.au
(before Ricardo-at-compuserve.com
and ricardo-at-login.cz )

Only after the last tree has been cut down,
only after the last river has been poisoned,
only after the last fish has been caught,
only then will you find that money can not be eaten.'
CREE INDIAN PROPHECY.

Incoming mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).




From daemon Sat Jan 6 01:21:03 2001



From: Ronald Austin :      rla-at-mindspring.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 01:18:23 -0600
Subject: Re: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In one of the Batman movies where he fights the arch villain Mr. Freeze. In
the part of the move where the police raid Mr. Freezes' lair you will see
off to one side a Philips 400 TEM dressed up as a cheap prop. This is an
insult to the Scientist and Technicians who have developed finely honed
skills to bring to light the world of the very small in a effort to make
life a little better for all of us.
Electron Microscopy has been an important part of Science for the last half
of the 20th century. This finely engineered tool of Science has open up the
world of the very small to eyes that would never have imagined that life
could exist on such a level. It sickens me to see this fine and noble tool
of Science reduced to a carnival side show gimmick. It is my hope that the
men and women of this newsgroup will in their own way and in their own time
bring electron microscopy back to its proper place in the scientific
community, because if we of this newsgroup and others who labor in Science
do not, than this important source of knowledge will be lost to history and
the politicians.
I will now get off my soap box and make no further comment on the subject.

Ronald Austin
Research Associate
LSU Medical Center
Dept of Pathology
Shreveport, LA
rla-at-mindspring.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Rosemary White [mailto:Rosemary.White-at-pi.csiro.au]
Sent: Friday, January 05, 2001 11:52 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


And there were all those Zeiss microscopes in Jurassic Park. Pity the one
they were using in one scene (an Axiophot?) didn't have a condenser....


Rosemary White
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

phone 61-2-6246 5475
fax 61-2-6246 5000
email r.white-at-pi.csiro.au






From daemon Sat Jan 6 05:44:51 2001



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 05:39:49 -0600
Subject: RE: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ah, come on. There were many technical errors in that film, but wasn't it
fun? One of my favorite faux pas was the rapid growth? multiplication? of
the strain. Not to mention it's apparent ability to degrade a variety of
natural and synthetic rubbers while also attacking human blood plasma.

Michael Crichton did a good job of describing a possible protagonist, and
Hollyweird did its usual job of visualizing it. To expect anything
different would be folly.


On Friday, January 05, 2001 4:59 PM, Walck, Scott D. [SMTP:walck-at-ppg.com]
wrote:
}
} The other fun thing about the crystalline image in that TEM from
Andromeda Strain was that it was in color!
}
}
} -Scott
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: William A. Monroe [mailto:monroe-at-emcenter.msstate.edu]

}
} The earliest mention of EM in TV or movies goes back in time much
} further than "Quincy" or the "X-Files".
}
} I thought I would mention my favorite EM TV/Movie memory. Anyone
} remember the movie called "The Andromeda Strain" ?? The movie from
} the 60's was based on a Michael Crighton book by the same name . A
} Transmission Electron Microscope (RCA EMU ???), as well as "live"
} images of the ultramicrotomy sectioning process were featured.
}
} Remember?
}
} I would be interested in knowing if there are earlier
} references than this one.
}
} Best Wishes,
}
} Bill Monroe
} --
} Bill Monroe
} EM Center
} Mississippi State University
} (601)-325-3019 Lab
} Fax 325-0246
}
}
}


Allen R. Sampson, Owner
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174
voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092



From daemon Sat Jan 6 11:20:51 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 06 Jan 2001 09:12:17 -0800
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


At 10:29 PM 1/5/01, you wrote:


} } Yes....different "zip." Winzip is very good for munching
} } files into a smaller data space. The media problem remains,
} } however. As you point out, other media keeps coming out.
} ============================
} I really think the best media out there for long term storage would be
} plain old 35 mm film. I don't know what kind of data density you could get
} on tech pan but I would trust the data to be there when I wanted to get it
} back.

Winzip does a good job on data that is compressible. Non-LZW TIFF
can be compressed as can ASCII and other byte hungry data. But
I don't find much size reduction with compressed TIFF or JPEG. These
are mostly what I have. Even then, my native images are uncompressed
TIFF. Those are what I need to save as backups plus backups of the
backups.

} }
} } I have not done much at all with CD-RW. I wonder what
} } the experiences have been with this option? My new Yamaha
} } drive is 16x/10x/40x and should do nicely for RW. Never tried
} } it for RW. I guess that I should do that some day. CD-Rs at
} } 12X are iffy....even with certified media. That's why the
} } verification is such an important missing feature.
} ===============
} } From the reports I see on RW CDROMs the storage life is a lot shorter than
} a R CDROM. Both of them use some kind of dye process and the RW is
} reversable.

I too have not heard good things about RW. Unless and until the
viability is assured, my precious data isn't going on an RW media.
When its gone, its gone. Not a good situation.


} It takes time and markting didn't like it is my guess. But that is why you
} have to verify each file you copy with verify option of Winzip. It reads
} the file and does the CRC and checks it against the one in the file.
}
} It is slow and cumbersom but it is the only way I have found that works on
} MSDOS or Windos. On Linux or Unix I can write a script to do it all. I
} have been involved in disaster recovereries and most of the times at least
} part of the back ups are bad. Some of the restore system can't recover
} from a bad file. I don't know much about backup systems for contemperary
} systems I just copy every thing to a CDROM uncompressed and put a
} compressed version on the network box and call it good.

Hum. I'm using Winzip 7 and it is very fast on Win98SE. Stuffit on the
Mac also does a nice job.

} }
} } For really good backup and restore, consider the removable
} } IDE drives. Very nice. My one year's work fits on three 45G
} } drives. Hopefully it remains accessible in the future. Data
} } overload is an emerging problem.
} ==================================
} That's what I do on my Linux box on the internet. I have a drive for
} backups. Drives are cheap. High quality digital imagining is going to
} really eat up disk space. We need 10 or 20 gig CDROMs

Yes indeed. Even a 10G CD would be great, if it worked. I've
toyed with the idea of DVD-R which will do 4.7G and 9G. But
the drives are very pricey as is the media. And I suspect they
may have the same reliability issues as CD-RW and even CD-R.
Not all CD-R writes work 100%. Only Toast on the Mac will do
a verify after write. I've not found any burner program for the PC
that will verify after write. Strange.

The IDE drive trays seem like a good approach to backup. The
drives too are obsoleted rather quickly. My "new" IBM 45G Deskstar
ATA-66 drives are now discontinued. IBM makes ATA-100
45G drives for $239 versus the $129 I paid for the ATA-66 ones.

My only other backup option (a redundant one) is a Sony SDT-9000
4mm DAT. Using native hardware compression, it will store 24G
on a DDS-3 120meter tape. But this has some peculiar problems
based on lack of backup software for tape that works in a dual
host adapter environment. Dantz's Retrospect works great on
the Mac but fails on the PC. I have to use old Win95 Adaptec
backup. It works but does not offer user interface to the
drive's features.

It seems that as we rush from film to digital, we may look back
on the thousands of negs or chromes sitting in file cabinets
and wonder what happened. We'd now have file cabinets of
$200 hard drives which may or may not work after sitting for
some amount of time. A rather unsettling feeling.

gary g.



From daemon Sat Jan 6 11:29:44 2001



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 10:25:58 -0700
Subject: RE: TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Holey Microscopy Batman...maybe we should blame that on Alfred. And to
think I didn't tune in the following night...same bat time...same bat
channel...to see if this oversight was corrected.

Harry Ekstrom
Materials Laboratory

(602) 231-2744
e-mail: harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ronald Austin [mailto:rla-at-mindspring.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 06, 2001 12:18 AM
To: Microscopy Society of America


In one of the Batman movies where he fights the arch villain Mr. Freeze. In
the part of the move where the police raid Mr. Freezes' lair you will see
off to one side a Philips 400 TEM dressed up as a cheap prop. This is an
insult to the Scientist and Technicians who have developed finely honed
skills to bring to light the world of the very small in a effort to make
life a little better for all of us.
Electron Microscopy has been an important part of Science for the last half
of the 20th century. This finely engineered tool of Science has open up the
world of the very small to eyes that would never have imagined that life
could exist on such a level. It sickens me to see this fine and noble tool
of Science reduced to a carnival side show gimmick. It is my hope that the
men and women of this newsgroup will in their own way and in their own time
bring electron microscopy back to its proper place in the scientific
community, because if we of this newsgroup and others who labor in Science
do not, than this important source of knowledge will be lost to history and
the politicians.
I will now get off my soap box and make no further comment on the subject.

Ronald Austin
Research Associate
LSU Medical Center
Dept of Pathology
Shreveport, LA
rla-at-mindspring.com







From daemon Sat Jan 6 13:24:40 2001



From: Robert Ruscica :      ruscica-at-etp-usa.com
Date: Sat, 06 Jan 2001 11:19:43 -0800
Subject: Ultimate and perhaps last of TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have enjoyed reading all the TV trivia regarding the Quincy and Andromeda
Strain. What many of you may not know is that for the "Strain" movie the
makers of the film contacted a now defunct Microprobe Company, Materials
Analysis Co. We sent to the studio an Electron Microprobe. The only portion
that made the film was some blinking x-ray scalers and a portion of the
electronics rack. What the impact of microprobe was in the film I can't
guess or remember.
In the Quincy episodes, there were more than one, we sent to the studio an
ISI SEM along with a service engineer, whose name at the moment escapes
me, to install it and our application and Demonstration man, Bill Roth to
run the SEM, Bill has been with Hitachi for many years now and could give
more incite as to what happened at the studio than I can as he was there
for a week doing the one episode. I remember him telling me that Quincy's
technician, Sam was explaining to Quincy what was on the CRT with the
camera going from the control panel with Bill's hands being filmed but the
overall shot of Sam and Quincy looking at the CRT and discussing the
forensic material. I still have some 8x10's around here somewhere of the
filming. Thought you might be interested.

Regards,
Bob Ruscica



From daemon Sat Jan 6 22:03:43 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Sat, 6 Jan 2001 21:57:46 -0600
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}

{snip}
} Winzip does a good job on data that is compressible. Non-LZW TIFF
} can be compressed as can ASCII and other byte hungry data. But
} I don't find much size reduction with compressed TIFF or JPEG. These
} are mostly what I have. Even then, my native images are uncompressed
} TIFF. Those are what I need to save as backups plus backups of the
} backups.
=========
These files are already compressed as much as possible. The only
advantage of zip programs they get them in one file.
{snip}
} } } For really good backup and restore, consider the removable
} } } IDE drives. Very nice. My one year's work fits on three 45G
} } } drives. Hopefully it remains accessible in the future. Data
} } } overload is an emerging problem.
} } ==================================
} } That's what I do on my Linux box on the internet. I have a drive for
} } backups. Drives are cheap. High quality digital imagining is going to
} } really eat up disk space. We need 10 or 20 gig CD-ROMs
}
} Yes indeed. Even a 10G CD would be great, if it worked. I've
} toyed with the idea of DVD-R which will do 4.7G and 9G. But
} the drives are very pricey as is the media. And I suspect they
} may have the same reliability issues as CD-RW and even CD-R.
} Not all CD-R writes work 100%. Only Toast on the Mac will do
} a verify after write. I've not found any burner program for the PC
} that will verify after write. Strange.
}
} The IDE drive trays seem like a good approach to backup. The
} drives too are obsolete rather quickly. My "new" IBM 45G Deskstar
} ATA-66 drives are now discontinued. IBM makes ATA-100
} 45G drives for $239 versus the $129 I paid for the ATA-66 ones.
=============
I just use a regular IDE drive it's about as cheap and not much more
trouble to change if you put it in the bottom bay and don't screw it in.
That works well for me but it would not work well for large images. They
just generate too much data.
}
} My only other backup option (a redundant one) is a Sony SDT-9000
} 4mm DAT. Using native hardware compression, it will store 24G
} on a DDS-3 120meter tape. But this has some peculiar problems
} based on lack of backup software for tape that works in a dual
} host adapter environment. Dantz's Retrospect works great on
} the Mac but fails on the PC. I have to use old Win95 Adaptec
} backup. It works but does not offer user interface to the
} drive's features.
====================
Be careful reusing tapes. They can only be use a few times before they
start getting unreliable. One I was using recommended 5 reuses.

Tape is also slow to get a single file from. The one I want is always on
the end.
}
} It seems that as we rush from film to digital, we may look back
} on the thousands of negs or chromes sitting in file cabinets
} and wonder what happened. We'd now have file cabinets of
} $200 hard drives which may or may not work after sitting for
} some amount of time. A rather unsettling feeling.

I agree that it is unsettling. That why I have said in the past
photographic film is probably still the best archival media we have from
cost, aging and resolution point of view. It's fatal flaw is lack of
instant availability and knowing if you got a good shot or not while you
are
still set up.

An interesting setup would be a beam splitter that would let you take
either plain old film or CCD images. Then you could do your long term
storage on film that we know won't go obsolete with of the next upgrade
and we have no questions about how long it will last. Film is competitive
or
cheaper with digital storage if you include resolution in the equation.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00







From daemon Sun Jan 7 08:24:35 2001



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com
Date: Sun, 07 Jan 2001 09:12:19 -0500
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Gary, Gordon & Microscopists !

What I have been doing, for convenience more than anything,
is to copy my SEM & PM prints with a digital camera at 1024
by 768 resolution. I use a copy stand for its light sources
but I hand-hold the camera (!). After all, the images are
already at their maximum enlargement, so I won't be looking
for more detail than can already be seen in the original
image. They print at 200 dpi, not as good as what the printer
can do (600 dpi) but they look fine in my reports, and then
I can use HTML to write the report because the macro images
are in a digital format, too. Extra copies are no longer a
problem; in the "good old days" we (Amenex's microscopist,
that is) had to spend days at a time making contact prints
in a rube-goldberg photo lab set up in the metallographic
preparation room (only one that's dark enough).

On the other hand, when one starts making digitally
recorded images on the SEM, theoretically one is creating
a super-wide-angle image. Does the resolution hold up ?
If not, we're kidding ourselves like the fly on a raft
who wants the drawbridges raised ...

Best regards,
George Langford, Sc.D.
amenex-at-amenex.com
http://www.amenex.com/


From daemon Sun Jan 7 10:19:46 2001



From: Corneliu Sarbu :      Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Sun, 7 Jan 2001 17:28:57 +0100
Subject: need help on X-EDS k factors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi, everybody !

I would greatly appreciate some hints concerning the kind of materials
(minerals ?) that
could be used in order to determine the k(A,B) (Cliff-Lorimer approx.)
factors for my instrument
(TEM CM-200 Philips microscope with EDAX EDS X-ray spectrometer) concerning
Zr(K-lines),
Y(K-lines), Hf(L-lines) and La(?-lines). Do they exist Si containing minerals
which could be
used to determine the k factors relating Si and the above mentioned elements ?
Are they suppliers of standard materials that could be used for determining
the k factors for the
above mentioned elements ?

Thank you in advance !

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Dept.of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science
Catholic University of Leuven
Belgium


From daemon Sun Jan 7 10:27:51 2001



From: jwahom01-at-tufts.edu ()
Date: Sun, 7 Jan 2001 10:23:30 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM of calcium carbonate crystals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Email: jwahom01-at-tufts.edu
Name: Jane Wahome
School: Tufts University

Question: I need to view calcium carbonate crystals with a transmission
electron microscope for a research project. I also need to record the
images. All I've managed to do so far is order thin carbon grids. I have
been asked to write a plan for my experiment but I have no clue how to
prepare crystals in solution for magnification or what tools to use.
Please give me some direction. My professors say I should figure
everything out myself - "It will be a good learning experience."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Sun Jan 7 11:50:28 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 07 Jan 2001 09:45:09 -0800
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I only do digital images on the SEM. There are several
providers of this capability for retrofitting. Some if not
most all current SEM makers include digital imaging.
When running an active scan system, the digital image
is just as on the TV screen and Polaroid output film.
But it can be made different. Since the voltage points
for limits of the scanned frame are user programmable,
a small region can be scanned at very high resolution
or a larger region at a lower resolution. The limiting
factor is the number of bits in the D/A converter which
drives the scan coils. Most of these are 12-bits, so that
makes 4096 discrete positions across the X range
specified and 4096 discrete positions for the Y range.

My highest recording setting is 4032x2688 pixels which
is 10.8M pixels at 8-bits per pixel or twice that at 16-bits
per pixel. The 4032x2688 values are chosen to make
the aspect ratio 1.5:1, so it fully fits a 35mm frame. The normal
1.33:1 does not. Given that the scan limits are set as for
a Polaroid shot, the equivalent pixel density is between
700 and 800 pixels per inch for the digital capture image.
Not bad at all. And since the pixel dwell time is programmable,
one can optimize it for scan time and minimum noise.

gary g.


At 06:12 AM 1/7/01, you wrote:
} Hello Gary, Gordon & Microscopists !
}
} [snip]
} On the other hand, when one starts making digitally
} recorded images on the SEM, theoretically one is creating
} a super-wide-angle image. Does the resolution hold up ?
} If not, we're kidding ourselves like the fly on a raft
} who wants the drawbridges raised ...
}
} Best regards,
} George Langford, Sc.D.
} amenex-at-amenex.com
} http://www.amenex.com/



From daemon Sun Jan 7 16:30:40 2001



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sun, 07 Jan 2001 20:08:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk}
To: "Gordon Couger" {gcouger-at-couger.com}
Cc: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microsocpy.com}
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2001 8:34 PM


George,
What do you mean by a super-wide-angle picture? The digital scan output
goes through the mag control, so your angle is the same as for Polaroid
at a given mag. The resolution is determined by the pixel density and
won't exceed a Type 55 negative on your ETEC until you capture about 4k
by 4k. 2k by 2k isn't quite as good as you can do with film, the
limiting factor being your record CRT and camera. As Gordon said, film
is still the measure. It lasts, the resolution is great and software
"upgrades" won't make your entire file obsolete.

Besides, don't you have some problems using pure digital imaging for
legal cases? My understanding is that if you use digital, the original
file must be on a WORM drive (now known as CD-R) to give the equivalent
of an original negative on file. This info came from the Virginia
Crime Labs quite a few years ago.

Ken Converse,
owner
Quality Images
Delat, PA


George Langford, Sc.D. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello Gary, Gordon & Microscopists !
}
} What I have been doing, for convenience more than anything,
} is to copy my SEM & PM prints with a digital camera at 1024
} by 768 resolution. I use a copy stand for its light sources
} but I hand-hold the camera (!). After all, the images are
} already at their maximum enlargement, so I won't be looking
} for more detail than can already be seen in the original
} image. They print at 200 dpi, not as good as what the printer
} can do (600 dpi) but they look fine in my reports, and then
} I can use HTML to write the report because the macro images
} are in a digital format, too. Extra copies are no longer a
} problem; in the "good old days" we (Amenex's microscopist,
} that is) had to spend days at a time making contact prints
} in a rube-goldberg photo lab set up in the metallographic
} preparation room (only one that's dark enough).



}
} On the other hand, when one starts making digitally
} recorded images on the SEM, theoretically one is creating
} a super-wide-angle image. Does the resolution hold up ?
} If not, we're kidding ourselves like the fly on a raft
} who wants the drawbridges raised ...
}
} Best regards,
} George Langford, Sc.D.
} amenex-at-amenex.com
} http://www.amenex.com/
}
}
}



From daemon Sun Jan 7 21:05:21 2001



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com
Date: Sun, 07 Jan 2001 21:59:52 -0500
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Ken & Microscopists !

Ken Converse wrote:

} What do you mean by a super-wide-angle picture? The digital scan
} output goes through the mag control, so your angle is the same as
} for Polaroid at a given mag. The resolution is determined by the
} pixel density and won't exceed a Type 55 negative on your ETEC
} until you capture about 4k by 4k. 2k by 2k isn't quite as good as
} you can do with film, the limiting factor being your record CRT and
} camera.

The image I see on the Polaroid film comes nowhere near taxing the
resolution of the film. My 1024 by 768 pixel digicam snapshots of
the original Polaroid prints look pretty close to the originals.
Why enlarge them any more ? Empty magnification and all that. Yes,
I know that the twelve- or sixteen-bit ADC's can capture a much wider
range of exposure than can film, but I don't see where all those
pixels get us any more spatial resolution. A 35 mm camera can cram
a lot of resolution onto a small area of film, but its lens is
reducing the original scene, not enlarging it. All the fancy lenses
on our metallographs can't do any better than covering the 4X5 inch
format of the film at maximum resolution. If we try to use a smaller
eyepiece to get a wide-angle effect, then the edges of the image show
terrible distortion. So there's no point in using an excessive number
of pixels to describe the output of a microscope's imaging system.

} As Gordon said, film is still the measure. It lasts, the
} resolution is great and software "upgrades" won't make your entire
} file obsolete.

Isn't it the hardware that goes South ? Where do I read my eight-inch
floppies; or the 5-1/4 inch ones, for that matter ... ? Once a bit
map, always a bit map, I should think. I do notice that my .JPG
image editor can't make heads or tails of some of the .JPG files
that look fine on Netscape, so there are some software issues, but
it looks as though the old drives are the real problem.

} Besides, don't you have some problems using pure digital imaging
} for legal cases? My understanding is that if you use digital, the
} original file must be on a WORM drive (now known as CD-R) to give
} the equivalent of an original negative on file. This info came from
} the Virginia Crime Labs quite a few years ago.

I lock the original floppy disk and leave the original image files
untouched there. Then I copy 'em to my hard drive for cropping and
adjustment of contrast, etc. Anyone wants to see the report, gets
the whole shebang: originals, thumbnails, edited pix, and text (HTML).
CDROM's are handy for the monster files that result. One report
had almost a thousand individual files in it. Client wasn't too
happy with the task of learning what a browser is. Printing it all
out is a monumental PIA, but then, so is ruffling through a
two-inch-thick pile of prints.

Best regards,
George Langford
Principal Consultant
Amenex Associates, Inc.
http://www.amenex.com/


From daemon Mon Jan 8 03:59:28 2001



From: Alan Bright :      bright-at-dial.pipex.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 09:50:13 -0000
Subject: Re: RE: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

I can assure you all that TAAB is well and truly still in business as we
communicate on a regular basis concerning cryostats and microtomes. Please
contact TAAB on: sales-at-taab.co.uk

Best. Regards

Alan Bright

Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
St Margaret's Way
Huntingdon
Cambridgeshire
PE29 6EU
England

Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Roger Moretz [mailto:rcmoretz-at-excite.com]
Sent: 05 January 2001 13:29
To: Patton, David; Brownell, Patrick
Cc: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Patrick:

I don't know the machine, but is TAAB no longer in business in the UK? For
the longest time TAAB supplies (altho not generally easily available in the
US) was an excellent source of resins and small items. Regardless, I would
think that the worn rubber pad is your problem. Again, thinking of
experience with other knifemakers, the pads are an essential part of
relieving some of the stress in the glass as it breaks. If this pad is
uneven, it may not be absorbing the pressure/stress as it should. Perhaps
(if TAAB is not around) some other users of the knifemaker might have
accessories (like a spare pad) to help you out. Also check the following:
depth of the score--if it's too deep or too light, that will affect the
break and edge quality; how fast are you breaking after scoring? - a slow
break has always been essential to consistently good knife edges for me;
check the setting of the clamp(s) and pressure points to ensure that there
are no uneven points and that the clamp(s) are providing equal pressure. I
can't find the reference right now, but the original publications on making
the Ralph knives by hand (it was in Stain Technology, I think) might get you
by, and it also might allow you to check the quality of the glass. The
technique wasn't too difficult or tedious, and, as I remember (from the dim
recesses of ancient history) the percentage of good knives was acceptable.
Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Fri, 5 Jan 2001 09:21:24 +0000 (GMT Standard Time), Patton, David wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Perhaps you could get a lab with no problems to make some
} knives with your glass and then test them in their lab and
} yours (get them to send some of their glass to you as
} well to test your knifemaker). That should show if it is
} the glass, the knifemaker or the ultramicrotome that is at
} fault.
}
} Dave
}
}
} On Wed, 3 Jan 2001 08:04:10 -0800 "Brownell, Patrick"
} {patrick.brownell-at-weyerhaeuser.com} wrote:
}
} }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } My problem is a poor knife edge. The knife looks fine under casual
} } observation, or with small magnification, but when it comes time to
actually
} } do some sectioning, I get a lot of chattering, or streaking, or both.
I
} } know make as many test blocks as I do sample blocks, so I don't waste
} } samples with all the bad glass knifes. I've gone through several boxes
of
} } glass over the past two months, and only get a useable knife every 15
to 20
} } breaks. The same knife breaker has worked fine in the past, and I have
} } changed the scoring wheel, and checked all that I can.
} }
} } This knife breaker is also very hard to get parts for. The only
obvious
} } problem is that one of the pressure points has a rubber pad that is
unevenly
} } worn. I don't see how that would cause my problem. Again, the knifes
look
} } good to the naked eye.
} }
} } The glass I use is from Electron Microscopy Sciences. They are called
ultra
} } glass knife strips 6.5mm x 25mm x 400 mm.
} }
} } I guess I'm just looking for someone who has had a similar problem, and
} } fixed it in some manner. Could I have gotten a bad batch of glass? I
don't
} } think it is very likely, I've used several boxes, but they may all be
from
} } the same batch, for all I know. Is there another brand of glass, or
breaker
} } that others have found produce reliable knives?
} }
} } Thanks for any and all help
} }
} } -Patrick Brownell
} } } ----------
} } } From: Katja M. Wolski[SMTP:kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu]
} } } Reply To: kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
} } } Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2001 4:26 AM
} } } To: Brownell, Patrick
} } } Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems
} } }
} } } I use a different knife machine, but what's the problem you're
having?
} } } Are you
} } } not getting a good knife edge or what?
} } }
} } } Katja
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } } "Brownell, Patrick" wrote:
} } }
} } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } } Hi all!
} } } }
} } } } I use Ralph type glass knives for plastic sectioning of biological
} } } samples.
} } } } I am experiencing problems in making a proper knife. I have a TAAB
} } } } histoknifemaker (also says Reichart-Jung). Is there anyone willing
to
} } } offer
} } } } expertise in this area?
} } } }
} } } } -Patrick Brownell
} } }
} }
}
} ----------------------------------------
} Patton, David
} Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
} "University of the West of England"
}
}





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From daemon Mon Jan 8 04:55:47 2001



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 03:07:35 -0800
Subject: digital media for EM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

We are using Magneto-Optical Disks, 2.6 or 5.2 Gb to store the data. They
are very reliable (manufacturer claims, that data may be stored up to 50
years) it's not sensitive for magnetic fields and heat (in reasonable
temperature diapason, actually until melted). You may rewrite data many
times (a million, I believe). Because of reliability, US government uses
this media to store all digital data. MO disk needs special drive, which
suppose to be connected to the computer (to the PC in our case,
SCSII). It's connected to the network, so it is accessible from other
computers. We have to insert/remove MO disk by hands of coarse. 2.6 Gb MO
is about $40-80 each. MO drive - about $1000. I am not so happy with this
instrumentation (relatively slow, but faster than CD or Zip-drive, you have
to have special MO-drive connected to the particular computer etc), but
it's only known to me a media, which is reliable: CDR/CDRW - absolutely not
reliable, light-sensitive, etc.; Zip-drive/diskette is not enough for me,
HD- not bad idea, but technically not that easy (you have to have removable
HD, I did have a problem with that setup when WinNT changed the letters to
the logical drives and therefore all my programs suddenly stopped when I
removed the HD, and you have to restart the computer if you want to remove
HD). Currently, I do have approximately 10 Gb data stored on MO
disks. In our Department there are 200 or so disks are in use. To my
knowledge we did have one case when MO disk virtually lost the data but all
100% data has been recovered later. Something like that may happens if you
will try to remove the disk during the writhing (what, probably was
happens). If I am going to work with some block of data, I copied that to
the server and work on it from any computer even from home. The same
happens with fresh portion of data: I temporary store the data on the
server and then (after frequent reminding from SysAdmin), transfer it to
the MO disk. It takes approximately 20 min to transfer 1 Gb of
data. Detailed information about MO disks you may find on the Internet.

Sergey




CEPE} | {A

(310) 453-0748 (home)
(310) 825-1144 (office)
Pager: (310) 845-0248
mailto: sryazant-at-ucla.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 8 06:51:59 2001



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 07:47:55 -0500
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To help improve the reliability of ZIP disk there is a freeware program
available from Gibson Research, TIP.exe . see http://www.grc.com


At 08:16 PM 1/5/01, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Mon Jan 8 07:20:30 2001



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 08:17:59 -0400
Subject: Re: Movie Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} And there were all those Zeiss microscopes in Jurassic Park. Pity the one
} they were using in one scene (an Axiophot?) didn't have a condenser....
}
And let's not forget the Cambodian lady in "Blade Runner" (1982) who
operates an SEM in the street (in the rain!!?). She helps Harrison Ford
identify a scale in evidence as having come from a bioengineered snake, not
a fish (bioengineered animals apparently have serial numbers on even their
smallest parts).
There was another, more recent movie called "Mimic" in which there is a
scene where an insect specialist has a pile of SEM micrographs on her desk,
purportedly representing various insect eggs or larvae. As a former
micropaleontologist, I could tell they were actually illustrations of
planktonic Foraminifera, but I suspect this distinction was lost on much of
the viewing public.

Frank Thomas
Geological Survey of Canada
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Mon Jan 8 08:31:23 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 07:14:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Ultimate and perhaps last of TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jane,

I have done a lot of EM on ZnO and CaCO3 crystals a while ago. I simply made
a suspension of the powder in ethanol or methanol and ultrasonicated them
for 3 to 5 min. I then just dropped one or two drops of the suspension on
the grid positioned on a filter paper and let it dry. You might want to
check with the SEM that you do not change morphologies by the ultrasound
treatment. I suggest that you first take some SEM images anyway to get some
information on sizes, distributions and morphologies. IF you have rather
large crystals. SEM will not work, if the crystals are too small. In that
case you will have to go directly to the TEM. If you are taking the crystals
directly from a reaction solution, just give a drop or two on the grid and
let dry. Of course in that case, you might also have non CaCO3 material on
the grid depending on your reaction. You will have to make sure that you are
looking at the CaCO3 and not some other crap. This can be done by electron
diffraction or HRTEM. Image recording possibilities depend on your
microscope. What microscope are you using ? If you need further information
or want to discuss some things feel free to send an email.

Andreas

*************************************************
Dr. Andreas Taubert
Materials Science and Engineering Dept.
3231 Walnut Street
The University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia PA 19104-6272
tel: +1 215 898 2700
fax: +1 215 573 2128

Physical Chemistry is everything for
which 1/T is linear ...
*************************************************


----- Original Message -----
} From: {jwahom01-at-tufts.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2001 11:23 AM


Or not. I guess I just can't ignore this thread. I have always been vocal
about inconsistencies/stupidities/errors in TV/movies/etc. So, as to
Andromeda Strain: first of all, there was the insertion of the specimen
without use of an airlock (and those of us who suffered with the Forgflo/nee
RCA EMU-4 know that the beast had this horrid airlock that used the external
bellows minipump!!!); then there was the immediate location of the desired
area under the beam....; plus all those already mentioned. On Quincy: the
first episode (or maybe 2) the lab was fully outfitted with Zeiss equipment;
the rest of the series the lab was outfitted with AO (must be nice to have
that kind of equipment budget--but why go that direction??? could it be
politics???); then the SEM/microprobe episode, where, once again, the area
of interest with the decisive inclusion was magically right in the area
being examined immediately; then there was the TEM episode where Sam
received the biopsy about 4am and had a block, stained sections and a
confirmatory diagnosis by 8am (now there's a reality check for you--did your
boss pick up on that and demand that turn-around for you????); I'm sure
there were others but those stuck (mostly in my craw). And a final overall
plaint about the fact that everybody was working (at high mag, no less) in
brightly lit rooms, when we toiled away in near pitch dark!! Even that
Forgflo/RCA with its ma beam current couldn't do that--I know from many
hours in the dark, dark adjusting my eyes.

O well, as someone put it--that's Hollyweird.

Roger Moretz Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Sat, 06 Jan 2001 11:19:43 -0800, Robert Ruscica wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have enjoyed reading all the TV trivia regarding the Quincy and
Andromeda
} Strain. What many of you may not know is that for the "Strain" movie the
} makers of the film contacted a now defunct Microprobe Company, Materials
} Analysis Co. We sent to the studio an Electron Microprobe. The only
portion
} that made the film was some blinking x-ray scalers and a portion of the
} electronics rack. What the impact of microprobe was in the film I can't
} guess or remember.
} In the Quincy episodes, there were more than one, we sent to the studio
an
} ISI SEM along with a service engineer, whose name at the moment escapes
} me, to install it and our application and Demonstration man, Bill Roth
to
} run the SEM, Bill has been with Hitachi for many years now and could give

} more incite as to what happened at the studio than I can as he was there
} for a week doing the one episode. I remember him telling me that Quincy's

} technician, Sam was explaining to Quincy what was on the CRT with the
} camera going from the control panel with Bill's hands being filmed but
the
} overall shot of Sam and Quincy looking at the CRT and discussing the
} forensic material. I still have some 8x10's around here somewhere of the
} filming. Thought you might be interested.
}
} Regards,
} Bob Ruscica
}
}





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From daemon Mon Jan 8 10:03:51 2001



From: Ziegler, David SBCCOM(N) :      David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 10:59:28 -0500
Subject: TEM help making a uranyl acetate stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,

I need some assistance in making up a uranyl acetate stain. I have powdered
uranyl acetate and would like to know what concentration and solvent to use
to make a good stain for looking at meat samples in the TEM. If there are
any procedures (time and temp) that I should adhere too that would also be
much appreciated.

Ps. I'm microtoming the TEM samples first then applying the uranyl acetate
stain with a follow-up stain of RuO4 vapor.

thanks all
dz

David Ziegler
U.S. Army, SBCCOM
AMSSB-RSS-MS(N)
Materials Science Team, SS&T
Natick, MA 01760-5020
TEL: (508) 233-6484
FAX: (508) 233-5521
Email: David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil



From daemon Mon Jan 8 14:11:20 2001



From: C Daniels :      cdaniels-at-gatan.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 12:05:52 -0800
Subject: Job Opening - Analytical Product Manager

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Analytical Product Manager - Gatan, Inc.

Gatan, Inc the technology leader in digital imaging, analytical spectroscopy
and ion beam milling applications for electron microscopy is seeking
candidates for an Analytical Product Manager. This person will manage the
complete product life cycle for this company's product line.
Responsibilities include coordinating all activities necessary to achieve
the strategic revenue and profit objectives for the product. For the
Product manager there are three key product cycle phases: 1) Planning:
includes market research, Marketing plan production and results in a vision
statement to pass to development. This the key stage in the development of
any new product. The vision statement is the marketing vision for the
product and it may include an analysis of competitor's products and a
projection of opportunities in the future. 2) Development: Pricing, product
positioning, product packaging and product promotion.3) Stabilization: Beta
testing, code testing and feedback to developers and product launch. The
applicant must have significant product management experience, preferably in
a product area that is applicable to market: TEM applications, electron
microscopy, biological, materials or semiconductor experience would be
useful. Familiarity with existing vendors, consultants, competitors, etc in
the industry is a plus. Technical knowledge of Gatan software and hardware
applications. A proven track record in both planning and executing
successful product management programs. Must be comfortable with current
development environments and development tools to work intelligently with
engineering. Must have excellent overall PC computing skills, including a
thorough familiarity with market tools in document composition, database
design and presentation management. MBA preferred; PHD desired with a
background in TEM and experience with GIF and PEELS systems. Salary: Base
salary plus bonus commensurate with experience.
Interested candidates should send email or fax their resume to:

GATAN, INC
Attn: HR Department
5933 Coronado Lane
Pleasanton, CA. 94588
Fax: (925) 463-0204
Email: hr-at-gatan.com
www.gatan.com



Carlotta Daniels
GATAN, Inc.
Human Resources
Pleasanton, CA. 94583





From daemon Mon Jan 8 14:38:36 2001



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 13:28:46 -0700
Subject: digital media for EM images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


OK, I think I'll add to the confusion ....

First of all, here are two URLs with what I found interesting data (and
opinions) about CD media.

http://thetechnozone.com/pcbuyersguide/hardware/storage/CD-R_reliability_rep
orts.html

http://www.ctnews3d.com/zzz/art35.html

there are also a number of follow-up links, which I have not explored.

The latter link has the following section:

So, How Long Can CDs Last?
Leaving aside scratches, fires, floods, and peanut butter sandwiches and
concentrating on the slow chemical changes that determine the inherent life
expectancy of a CD, extensive accelerated-aging tests suggest that Kodak
writable CD products, including Photo CD discs, will not reach a BLERmax of
50 for a period of around 200 years when kept in the dark at moderate
storage conditions. This long potential life expectancy is mainly a function
of the greater dark stability of the dye used in Kodak writable CD products.
Considering that BLERmax 50 is still not an unreadable level of error, Kodak
writable CDs have a very long life expectancy indeed. Similar research by
the 3M Company shows that CD-ROM products made by them will not attain a
block error rate of 50 per second for more than 100 years in moderate
storage conditions.

Accelerated aging is subject to uncertainties, but it does rest on firm
scientific footing. Behind the data is the simple assumption that raising
the temperature causes the reactions of decay to happen faster--so fast, in
fact, that they occur within a few months, rather than decades. The science
of reaction rates is called kinetics, and the lifetime predictions are based
on well-established principles of that branch of chemical science. These
same principles are used every day to design the chemical plants and
processes of the modern world. Because there is so much practical experience
with the laws of kinetics, lifetime predictions based on them are
approximately correct. Such test methods soon will be part of a forthcoming
ANSI (American National Standards Institute) standard dealing with tests for
CD permanence.

End of citation.

So, from a scientific standpoint (accelerated aging), a good writeable CD
should have a lifespan of 100-200 years, which is more than tape (several
decades) and on par with film, at least as far as I can tell. Film suffers
from the same problems the CD suffer from (sensitivity to light, scratches,
fire, alien attacks, etc.).

Finally a few words regarding M/O and CD:

We supplied with our systems until a few years ago an M/O drive. At that
time, there were only CD-ROMs. The drives were (are?) fairly expensive,
about $1000 for the drive, and with the advent of cheap CD-Rs it became
harder and harder to find drives and media. The drives are much more common
in Europe. In addition, the drives are pretty slow, and it was always a
hassle to work with the drives under Windows NT. The drives use a laser to
heat the storage medium, then a magnetic head to write the info to the
heated patch. This might result in a more stable storage than CD or
magnetic. The availability, however, seems to be a big problem.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Sergey Ryazantsev [mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 08, 2001 4:08 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello,

We are using Magneto-Optical Disks, 2.6 or 5.2 Gb to store the data. They
are very reliable (manufacturer claims, that data may be stored up to 50
years) it's not sensitive for magnetic fields and heat (in reasonable
temperature diapason, actually until melted). You may rewrite data many
times (a million, I believe). Because of reliability, US government uses
this media to store all digital data. MO disk needs special drive, which
suppose to be connected to the computer (to the PC in our case,
SCSII). It's connected to the network, so it is accessible from other
computers. We have to insert/remove MO disk by hands of coarse. 2.6 Gb MO
is about $40-80 each. MO drive - about $1000. I am not so happy with this
instrumentation (relatively slow, but faster than CD or Zip-drive, you have
to have special MO-drive connected to the particular computer etc), but
it's only known to me a media, which is reliable: CDR/CDRW - absolutely not
reliable, light-sensitive, etc.; Zip-drive/diskette is not enough for me,
HD- not bad idea, but technically not that easy (you have to have removable
HD, I did have a problem with that setup when WinNT changed the letters to
the logical drives and therefore all my programs suddenly stopped when I
removed the HD, and you have to restart the computer if you want to remove
HD). Currently, I do have approximately 10 Gb data stored on MO
disks. In our Department there are 200 or so disks are in use. To my
knowledge we did have one case when MO disk virtually lost the data but all
100% data has been recovered later. Something like that may happens if you
will try to remove the disk during the writhing (what, probably was
happens). If I am going to work with some block of data, I copied that to
the server and work on it from any computer even from home. The same
happens with fresh portion of data: I temporary store the data on the
server and then (after frequent reminding from SysAdmin), transfer it to
the MO disk. It takes approximately 20 min to transfer 1 Gb of
data. Detailed information about MO disks you may find on the Internet.

Sergey




CEPE} | {A

(310) 453-0748 (home)
(310) 825-1144 (office)
Pager: (310) 845-0248
mailto: sryazant-at-ucla.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 8 14:48:55 2001



From: Michael Nesson :      nessonm-at-ucs.orst.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 12:45:29 -0800
Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Gordon Couger wrote:

}
} Could someone post the reference for the article for making glass knives
} by hand?

Here's the original reference, which includes a bit of the history of Ralph
knives (in honor of the late Dr. Paul Ralph):
Stain Technology 51(2): 71-97. [1976]. Bennet et al.
Science and art in preparing tissues embedded in plastic for
light microscopy,
with special reference to glycol methacrylate, glass knives and
simple stains.

Good luck.
Mike Nesson
_______________________________________________________________________
Michael Nesson, Ph.D. Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics
2011 Ag&LS, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7305
(541)737-5245 FAX:(541)737-0481 nessonm-at-ucs.orst.edu




From daemon Mon Jan 8 15:12:08 2001



From: ERIC :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 13:11:31 -0800
Subject: Re: Computing for microscopy and imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Out here in Sunny Southern California we just purchased a AMT 1K digital
camera for use in our EM lab at the UCLA Medical Center.
The storage device or choice for archiving we utilize is to burn CD's of
the images as long term storage.

===========
} } Just a word of caution about Zip disks. They can be very
} } unreliable. When Iomega first came out with them, their
} } media was really good. Now it is not the same. Maxell
} } and Fujifilm also make media. I think that theirs are better.
} }
} } The other problem with Iomega drives (Zip and Jaz) is the
} } click of death. This is a precursor to a dead drive or
} } media and loss of all that is on the media (if bad media).
} }
} } To check your drives and media, run tip.exe. To find out
} } more about this, visit http://www.grc.com
} }
} } gary g.
}
} Gary,
}
} Zip files not Zip disk. Use Pkzip or some other program to put all the
} files into one zip file, usually a complete directory, copy that file to
} the back up media and verify the zip file on the back up media. Currently
} I use write only CD-ROMs and keep a copy of really important stuff on my
} internet server at my ISP as well. Hard disk space is cheap. I have the
} last 15 years work at my finger tips. If I can find it:) I started using
} this on single sided single density floppies on a Radio Shack Model 1. I
} can only think of two times that I was unable to retrieve a file in 20
} years.
}
} I am a programmer not a photographer so a years work might fit on a floppy
} disk.
}
} I am not satisfied with the life of CD-ROMs but so far something better
} has always come along before the old media went bad and I copied it all
} over. One thing I don't like about CD-ROMs is they are not protected from
} scratching or being broken.
}
} Gordon
} Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
} Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
} 405 624-2855 GMT -6:00
}



From daemon Mon Jan 8 15:21:04 2001



From: ERIC :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 13:21:08 -0800
Subject: Archiving Digital Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On the HP CD Writer there are two programs for writing to a CD.. Out here
we use the CD-R one time write to the disc.

There is the HP program for writing a CD which does not have a way to
verify the CD was written. There is also another program that comes with
the CD writer from HP that performs a write speed test on the disc then
writes to the disc and then it verifies the disc... the program is called
MY CD on the HP CD writers....




From daemon Mon Jan 8 15:40:58 2001



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 11:37:48 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Temperture on TEM stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy New Year to you all!

How may I calculate (OK, make an educated guess) the temperture on my grid
in the TEM? I know it depends on the high voltage, the beam current, the
thickness of the specimen, the contact between grid and holder, and the
phase of the moon, and so probably I won't *really* know. All I need is a
ballpark figure, like is it 80C or 200C or 1500C?

I'm watching something presumably melt and fuse/crystallize on my LEO 912
EFTEM at 100-120 kV with a beam current of somewhere in the neighborhood
of 10 uA. This is not necessarily a bad thing - it tells me something
useful about these Si nanoparticles!

Mahalo,
Tina

Sunny, clear, about 74F, South Shore flat, North Shore up.

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 8 16:16:08 2001



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 17:11:35 -0500
Subject: Re: Temperture on TEM stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy New Year to you all!

How may I calculate (OK, make an educated guess) the temperture on my grid
in the TEM? I know it depends on the high voltage, the beam current, the
thickness of the specimen, the contact between grid and holder, and the
phase of the moon, and so probably I won't *really* know. All I need is a
ballpark figure, like is it 80C or 200C or 1500C?

I'm watching something presumably melt and fuse/crystallize on my LEO 912
EFTEM at 100-120 kV with a beam current of somewhere in the neighborhood
of 10 uA. This is not necessarily a bad thing - it tells me something
useful about these Si nanoparticles!

Dear Tina,
I posted something similar to the list a while ago, and wrote up a more
complete version for Microscopy Today. Although the variables are different,
the technique should be the same. A number you'd need would be the stopping
power of Si for 100 kV e-, which is 3.274 Mev cm^2/gm. The radiative stopping
power is much smaller than the collisional stopping power, which is 3.265 MeV
cm^2/gm (since the radiation should escape the particle, use this latter
number). Use this to calculate how much energy is transmitted to the specimen
for each electron by multiplying the stopping power by the density of Si (2.33
gm/cm^3) to get how much energy is deposited per unit path length, figuring out
the path length of each electron, and using the beam current flux (in e-/nm^2 or
the like) to get how many e- strike the particle each second. Next, calculate
the heat losses by conduction and radiation as a function of temperature, and
the steady-state temperature of the specimen--the number you want--will be where
the heat absorbed is equal to the heat lost. I assumed that heat radiated and
that conducted from the immediate vicinity of the particle would be lost in an
essentially infinite heat sink, and that the moon was in third quarter.

Sunny, clear, about 74F, South Shore flat, North Shore up.

Cloudy, about 270 K, Hudson icy.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us







From daemon Mon Jan 8 17:51:53 2001



From: Kenneth Livi :      klivi-at-jhu.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 17:46:55 -0600
Subject: Re: need help on X-EDS k factors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Two minerals are fairly easy to come by Zircon (SiZrO4) and Hafnon
(SiHfO4) or could be synthesized. The rare-earth elements more
commonly form phosphate minerals such as monazite ((Light REE)PO4)
and xenotime ((Heavy REE,Y)PO4). The substitution of Huttonite
(SiThO4) into these structures would allow for the calculation of
REE,Y/Si k-factors. The problem with these minerals is that they are
normally not homogeneous, so special care must be made to correlate
electron microprobe with TEM analyses. Alternatively, you could try
to synthesize your own standards.
Hope this helps,
Ken
}
} Hi, everybody !
}
} I would greatly appreciate some hints concerning the kind of materials
} (minerals ?) that
} could be used in order to determine the k(A,B) (Cliff-Lorimer approx.)
} factors for my instrument
} (TEM CM-200 Philips microscope with EDAX EDS X-ray spectrometer) concerning
} Zr(K-lines),
} Y(K-lines), Hf(L-lines) and La(?-lines). Do they exist Si containing minerals
} which could be
} used to determine the k factors relating Si and the above mentioned elements ?
} Are they suppliers of standard materials that could be used for determining
} the k factors for the
} above mentioned elements ?
}
} Thank you in advance !
}
} Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} Dept.of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science
} Catholic University of Leuven
} Belgium




From daemon Mon Jan 8 17:53:32 2001



From: Pbgrover-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 17:49:33 -0600
Subject: one more TV trivial

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Around 20 years ago, I saw a movie about killer bats in which, after looking
at a slide with what looked like a Tasco microscope, the scientist exclaimed
"It's just as I feared - the rabies bacillus!". To add insult to injury there
followed a view through the microscope where, if I recall correctly, a
paramecium was swimming.

Paul




From daemon Mon Jan 8 17:53:39 2001



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 17:49:51 -0600
Subject: storage media

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Colleagues,

It's my understanding that dye-based CD-ROMs aren't archival, but the
gold-based version is. Anyone know more about this?

Dee



***************************************************************
Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 914/365-8640
F: 914/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
http://www.discovery.com/area/science/micro/micro1.html
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)




From daemon Mon Jan 8 18:58:18 2001



From: Andreas Taubert :      taubert-at-seas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 20:01:30 -0500
Subject: to Philip Oshel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers

sorry for bothering you with that. I wanted to send an email to Phil
Oshel, but deleted the email before writing down his email address.
Phil, please contact me off-list, thanks.

Andreas

*************************************************
Dr. Andreas Taubert
Materials Science and Engineering Dept.
3231 Walnut Street
The University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia PA 19104-6272
tel: +1 215 898 2700
fax: +1 215 573 2128

Physical Chemistry is everything for
which 1/T is linear ...
*************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 8 19:56:51 2001



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 08 Jan 01 18:03:02 -0800
Subject: Re: Ultimate and perhaps last of TV Trivia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: Re: Ultimate and perhaps last of TV Trivia
Dear All,

I too have been enjoying this conversation and thought I would sit back and read. However, I can't resist a few comments. After all we have one of the actual Zeiss microscopes from Jurassic Park in our lab. It works wonderfully, as a Zeiss microscope should. The only madification they made was to paint it pink to look right on film. Being so close to Hollywood, we have a few other pieces of famous furniture around the lab.
I must admit that I too look out for appearances of microscopes, and especially EM's in the media, but I think I must be a little more tolerant of the way we are portrayed. My phylosophy is that as long as we are out there, then it is a good thing. Who cares if the portrayal is accurate or not, we can sort that out in our lectures. At least we are being recognized. After all, it is much better to be talked about (no matter the subject) than to be ignored.

If we systematically went through film portrayals of any subject then I am sure we will find Hollywood had managed to insult just about every scientific disipline, ethnic group and foreign country. Who cares, its only entertainment. Watch out instead for the school science books that show cells with organelles but do not show the Golgi complex, or the histology books that omit the lysosomes. They are there. This is far more harmful to the scientific community.

I enjoyed the comments from Roger Moretz about the speed samples are processed. After all one of the roles of this form of entertainment has become a predictor of the future. Maybe the portrayals are so so inaccurate after all. We already work with microscopes in full daylight (from computer screens), we are close to having 4hr sample processing for resin-embedded samples (cf microwave processing), and we can already section and examine biopsies in less than 2 hr (with cryosectioning methods). Two thumbs up for Hollywood for showing us the way.

Paul Webster.


Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm


Roger Moretz wrote:

} Or not. I guess I just can't ignore this thread. I have always been vocal
} about inconsistencies/stupidities/errors in TV/movies/etc. So, as to
} Andromeda Strain: first of all, there was the insertion of the specimen
} without use of an airlock (and those of us who suffered with the Forgflo/nee
} RCA EMU-4 know that the beast had this horrid airlock that used the external
} bellows minipump!!!); then there was the immediate location of the desired
} area under the beam....; plus all those already mentioned. On Quincy: the
} first episode (or maybe 2) the lab was fully outfitted with Zeiss equipment;
} the rest of the series the lab was outfitted with AO (must be nice to have
} that kind of equipment budget--but why go that direction??? could it be
} politics???); then the SEM/microprobe episode, where, once again, the area
} of interest with the decisive inclusion was magically right in the area
} being examined immediately; then there was the TEM episode where Sam
} received the biopsy about 4am and had a block, stained sections and a
} confirmatory diagnosis by 8am (now there's a reality check for you--did your
} boss pick up on that and demand that turn-around for you????); I'm sure
} there were others but those stuck (mostly in my craw). And a final overall
} plaint about the fact that everybody was working (at high mag, no less) in
} brightly lit rooms, when we toiled away in near pitch dark!! Even that
} Forgflo/RCA with its ma beam current couldn't do that--I know from many
} hours in the dark, dark adjusting my eyes.
}
} O well, as someone put it--that's Hollyweird.
}
} Roger Moretz Ph.D.
} Dept of Toxicology
} Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
} On Sat, 06 Jan 2001 11:19:43 -0800, Robert Ruscica wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } } } } I have enjoyed reading all the TV trivia regarding the Quincy and
} Andromeda } } Strain. What many of you may not know is that for the "Strain" movie the } } makers of the film contacted a now defunct Microprobe Company, Materials } } Analysis Co. We sent to the studio an Electron Microprobe. The only
} portion } } that made the film was some blinking x-ray scalers and a portion of the } } electronics rack. What the impact of microprobe was in the film I can't } } guess or remember.
} } In the Quincy episodes, there were more than one, we sent to the studio
} an } } ISI SEM along with a service engineer, whose name at the moment escapes } } me, to install it and our application and Demonstration man, Bill Roth
} to } } run the SEM, Bill has been with Hitachi for many years now and could give
}
} } more incite as to what happened at the studio than I can as he was there } } for a week doing the one episode. I remember him telling me that Quincy's
}
} } technician, Sam was explaining to Quincy what was on the CRT with the } } camera going from the control panel with Bill's hands being filmed but
} the } } overall shot of Sam and Quincy looking at the CRT and discussing the } } forensic material. I still have some 8x10's around here somewhere of the } } filming. Thought you might be interested.
} } } } Regards,
} } Bob Ruscica
} } } }
}
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________________
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} Subject: Re: Ultimate and perhaps last of TV Trivia
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From daemon Mon Jan 8 21:28:14 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 19:22:56 -0800
Subject: Re: storage media

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They are all dye-based. What is silver or gold is the coating
on the top of the media. It ca readily be flaked off.

With the metal coating removed, the media is generally
transparent. Some have a blue tint while others have
little color. Others might look green. But essentially,
they are all chalgocencide technology. Some are
better than others.

gg


At 03:49 PM 1/8/01, you wrote:

} Colleagues,
}
} It's my understanding that dye-based CD-ROMs aren't archival, but the
} gold-based version is. Anyone know more about this?
}
} Dee
}
}
}
} ***************************************************************
} Dee Breger
} Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
} Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
} 61 Route 9W
} Palisades, NY 10964 USA
} T: 914/365-8640
} F: 914/365-8155
}
} http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
} http://www.discovery.com/area/science/micro/micro1.html
} http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html
} Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)



From daemon Mon Jan 8 21:30:04 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 19:26:38 -0800
Subject: Re: one more TV trivial

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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These are found all of the time in Hollywood. They are stand-ins.
Only a very sharp eye can tell the difference. Notice how well
Antonio Banderas dances in "The Mask of Zorro?" Real,
or a stand-in? duh.

gary



At 03:49 PM 1/8/01, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Jan 9 03:45:24 2001



From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 09:39:37 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Temperture on TEM stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Tina,
I'm sure this question has been asked before, (look in the archives) - but I think the basic answer is 'it depends'(!). I am currently having terrible trouble with plucked FIB sections of Au metallised GaAs on holey carbon films; the metal melts, alloys with and destroys my specimen even at relatively low beam currents in my JEOL 120 CX. I have been told by our theory guys that little heat will escape by radiation below about 500C, so if you have a sample with very poor thermal conductivity it will be easy to get to this temperature. You may be able to avoid the problem somewhat by using higher accelerating voltages (less inelastic interaction with the specimen, I believe) and/or adding a carbon coating to the specimen to increase thermal conductivity.

Good luck!

Richard

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Happy New Year to you all!
}
} How may I calculate (OK, make an educated guess) the temperture on my grid
} in the TEM? I know it depends on the high voltage, the beam current, the
} thickness of the specimen, the contact between grid and holder, and the
} phase of the moon, and so probably I won't *really* know. All I need is a
} ballpark figure, like is it 80C or 200C or 1500C?
}
} I'm watching something presumably melt and fuse/crystallize on my LEO 912
} EFTEM at 100-120 kV with a beam current of somewhere in the neighborhood
} of 10 uA. This is not necessarily a bad thing - it tells me something
} useful about these Si nanoparticles!
}
} Mahalo,
} Tina
}
} Sunny, clear, about 74F, South Shore flat, North Shore up.
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}

==============================================================
Richard Beanland,
Structural Analysis Lab,
Caswell Technology,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ

e-mail richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Tel. +44 1327 356363
Fax. +44 1327 356398
==============================================================
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From daemon Tue Jan 9 04:30:15 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 10:39:24 +0000
Subject: Re: Archiving Digital Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all

It's a bit late but may I wish you a happy new year.

My personal experience is that the biggest problem with CD writing is the
possibility of corrupting the disk and not noticing (e.g. buffer under runs).
This can at the least result in wasted time and frustration and at worst the
actual loss of data if not properly backed up elsewhere. I haven't seen this
mentioned so I thought I would bring up the subject of 'Burn proof' CD writers
which have appeared in the last 6-12 months. They apparently have built in
hardware/software which should mean that you can now use CDs as super floppies
and not have to worry about turning off conflicting software before writing
large chunks of data to CD. The magazine reviews have raved about this stating
that you could play 'Quake' or access the internet and still write to a CD
without error. Has anyone had any experience of these new drives?

Archival quality of CDs, ZIPs and magneto opticals has been discussed many
times before and the usual conclusion is that the technology will be defunct
before good quality discs, stored properly will be significantly corrupted. My
money has to stay with CDs as a cheap, reliable and
'likely-to-be-around-in-a-decade' technology (e.g. all modern DVD drives still
read CDs). CD/DVD technologies still have a long way to go in terms of data
density and so multi-format reading machines would seem more likely than with
magnetic media ... unless you know better. I'm sure that I read of recent
developments in dyes/pigments (maybe it was Kodak - I don't know) that should
greatly reduce writeable CDs deterioration in light. One thing's for certain
if I want to distribute images to students, researchers or other users there
is only one universal technology (some new PCs don't even have a floppy drive
now).

Another thread was discussing e.m. film scanners and I think I should mention
the Epson Perfection 1200P which is a USB scanner that can be used with A4
prints or 5x4 inch negatives. It has a true resolution of 1200dpi and an
optical density range of 3.2 and costs a little over 200 UK pounds. Much of
our work with undergraduates and researchers has been done at 600dpi (which
should easily allow an equivalent of 3x print enlargement) and dare-I-say-it
JPEG formats (set at lowest compression to retain most detail). The film is,
after all, our archive and the digital images are at present for cataloguing,
rapid retrieval and project write ups - the students love it if only because
they don't spend hours in the darkroom. I am not suggesting that this
particular scanner will suit all users because it has a narrower OD range than
some, but is an excellent low cost way of trying the technology out while it
is still maturing. The biggest problem is that there was no film holder for
our format but cardboard and sticky tape have solved that problem,
temporarily. Also if you opt for the USB version then you really need Windows
98 on a PC (95 - including the the second version, NT etc. may all have
problems).

I have no commercial interest in any of the above technologies unless they
make my work or research any easier - in a year or two I may be in a better
position to judge that, objectively.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

ERIC wrote:

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} On the HP CD Writer there are two programs for writing to a CD.. Out here
} we use the CD-R one time write to the disc.
}
} There is the HP program for writing a CD which does not have a way to
} verify the CD was written. There is also another program that comes with
} the CD writer from HP that performs a write speed test on the disc then
} writes to the disc and then it verifies the disc... the program is called
} MY CD on the HP CD writers....



From daemon Tue Jan 9 06:31:47 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 12:39:16 +0000
Subject: Re: one more TV trivial

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Paul

I agree, but I don't blame the film makers. They are part of the majority of the
public who (sometimes proudly) proclaim to have no/little knowledge of science.
It seems to be quite common to use bugs, germs, viruses, bacilli and bacteria as
interchangeable terms. This can be extremely misleading when a national news
reporter warns of the latest outbreak of the meningitis 'virus' when he almost
certainly meant the bacterial form.

There has been more than one occasion where I have seen a TEM instrument with a
superb SEM image portrayed on film or TV (yes I know about TEM/SEM/STEMs - but it
wasn't) presumably because the TEM looks impressive and so do SEM pictures. I
also saw the Bladerunner SEM and another technology it had was a voice activated
TV with high resolution scanner and printer. It seemed well out of reach of the
average household at the time and although I haven't seen this on a TV this month
all of that technology is common on your average home PC now - maybe the next
Intel (QX4) microscope will be a toy SEM connected to your TV.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

"Pbgrover-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} Around 20 years ago, I saw a movie about killer bats in which, after looking
} at a slide with what looked like a Tasco microscope, the scientist exclaimed
} "It's just as I feared - the rabies bacillus!". To add insult to injury there
} followed a view through the microscope where, if I recall correctly, a
} paramecium was swimming.
}
} Paul



From daemon Tue Jan 9 08:26:22 2001



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 08:18:03 -0600
Subject: Re: storage media

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 07:22 PM 1/8/01 -0800, Gary Gaugler wrote:
} They are all dye-based. What is silver or gold is the coating
} on the top of the media. It ca readily be flaked off.

No, supposedly the gold ones are actually made of gold
the metal, and the "silver" ones are aluminum. The Al will
oxidize over time if scratched, the Au won't.

The story says that if you scratch a disc deep enough to
expose the metal, it could degrade the data over time.
I don't put a lot of stock in this worry, though. After
all, it wouldn't take much more of a scratch to wipe out
a section of gold, too, and there's a big difference in
damage between a radial and a concentric scratch on any
media.

- John



From daemon Tue Jan 9 08:37:58 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 06:34:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Ralph Glass Knife problems

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Mike:

Thanks for coming up with the reference. I just KNEW it was it my Reference
Manager database (NOT). So, for several days now I have been trying to
figure out if I ever referenced it in a paper, or in notes or
methods/techniques/procedures.... Now I can sleep at night again :)

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Mon, 08 Jan 2001 12:45:29 -0800, Michael Nesson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Gordon Couger wrote:
}
} }
} } Could someone post the reference for the article for making glass
knives
} } by hand?
}
} Here's the original reference, which includes a bit of the history of
Ralph
} knives (in honor of the late Dr. Paul Ralph):
} Stain Technology 51(2): 71-97. [1976]. Bennet et al.
} Science and art in preparing tissues embedded in plastic for
} light microscopy,
} with special reference to glycol methacrylate, glass knives and
} simple stains.
}
} Good luck.
} Mike Nesson
} _______________________________________________________________________
} Michael Nesson, Ph.D. Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics
} 2011 Ag&LS, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7305
} (541)737-5245 FAX:(541)737-0481 nessonm-at-ucs.orst.edu
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Send a cool gift with your E-Card
http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/




From daemon Tue Jan 9 08:58:05 2001



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 09:51:38 -0800
Subject: RE: EM - Negative Scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Our customers have enjoyed success with the Agfa "Duoscan" line of
scanners.
Fitting in your price range would be the Duoscan Hi-D. The Hi-D has a Dmax
of
3.8 (hence the name Hi-D), 1000x2000 hardware resolution, apochromatic
optics,
excellent software for both Mac and Windows, color management software, and
a SCSI interface. The Hi-D sells for under $2600.
Coming soon will be the Arcus 1200, which also has glassless film scanning,
1200x2400 hardware resolution with a SCSI interface. The Arcus 1200 will be
approximately $800-850 when available.
The Agfa T2500 is a similar design, with 2500x2500 hardware resolution and
3.4 Dmax. The T2500 does not fall in this price range, selling for under
$4300.
It is a phenomenal scanner for TEM. There is currently a $350 rebate on the
T2500.
All of these scanners share the Agfa Fotolook sofware driver for Mac and
Windows.
Unlike most "flatbed" scanners which place films on a glass bed for
scanning,
the Duoscan line utilizes a glassless holder similar to a negative carrier
in an
enlarger. There is no glass between the film and the CCD. This eliminates
Newton
Rings and other issues associated with scanning through glass.

Microtek International shares some hardware specs with the Agfa Duoscan
line
in their Artixscan series. The Artixscan 1100 would be the "sister" model
to the
Duoscan Hi-D with 1000x2000 optical resolution, 3.9 Dmax, SCSI
interface,etc.
Price is under $1750.
The Artixscan 2500 is similar to the Duoscan T2500- 2500x2500 optical res,
SCSI interface, etc. Price under $4000.

See Microtek at http://www.microtekusa.com/list.zhtml?cid=2
Agfa DuoScan HI-D at
http://www.agfahome.com/product/CatProd_DisplayPublic.html?id=4290
Agfa DuoScan T2500 at
http://www.agfahome.com/product/CatProd_DisplayPublic.html?id=3115
Agfa Arcus 1200 at
http://www.agfahome.com/product/CatProd_DisplayPublic.html?id=6130

I will be happy to provide literature, information or answer any questions.
Please contact me directly by phone or email.

Sincerely,

George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
v:(800) 223-7130 X3109
f:(800) 832-2205
email: scisales-at-ngscorp.com




From daemon Tue Jan 9 10:34:49 2001



From: Jonathan Wilson :      wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 16:30:50 -0800
Subject: cryostat tissue mounting stubs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello, I was wondering if any one might know where I could get some cryostat
tissue mounting stubs. I am looking for the 'T' type looking stubs that fit
into a ball joint so the stub position can be adjusted in the cryostat
chuck. The ones I have used were made of copper and the pin diameter was1/8"
with a locking screw in the shaft of the ball joint.
Thanks for any leads.
Sincerely,
Jonathan

Jonathan Wilson (Ph.D.)
Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR)
Universidade do Porto
Rua do Campo Alegre 823
4150-180 Porto, Portugal
tel 351 22 606 0421
fax351 22 606 0423
e-mail: wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
mop01258-at-mail.telepac.pt



From daemon Tue Jan 9 12:19:30 2001



From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 13:13:00 -0500
Subject: Re: Archiving Digital Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Many years ago (at least 6!) when we had an early Pinnacle Micro CD writer
I got into the habit of checking my CD's by copying them back to the hard
drive. If they would copy without generating an error then they were OK (an
even better way was to do the copy on another CD drive). One fairly often
found one that was bad.

Today, using a more modern drive and faster computer I still do the same
thing (my software doesn't have a verify option), but I rarely find a bad
disk. However, it doesn't take much of my time, and I always think better
safe than sorry when it comes to an archive!

Tony.



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* Anthony J. Garratt-Reed M.A., D.Phil.
* MIT, Room 13-1027
* 77 Massachusetts Avenue
* Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
* USA
* Phone: (617) 253-4622
* Fax: (617) 258-6478
*




From daemon Tue Jan 9 12:28:21 2001



From: ERIC :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 10:28:07 -0800
Subject: RMC ultramicrotome Parts needed?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Microscopy List,

I need to get some parts for a RMC MX-600XL ultramicrotome.. I know RMC
was sold to another company from Ventana.. How do I or who do I contact
about some parts??


Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Dept. Pathology and Lab Medicine
Los Angeles, CA 90095





From daemon Tue Jan 9 12:46:57 2001



From: michael shaffer :      mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 10:43:39 -0800
Subject: 4by5 film scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In the context of recent queries, I just thought I'd
post Nikon's most recent announcement ... see:
http://www.klt.co.jp/Nikon/Press_Release/ls-8000.html

cheerios, shAf :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Tue Jan 9 12:48:26 2001



From: michael shaffer :      epmalab-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 10:45:33 -0800
Subject: 4by5 film scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In the context of recent queries, I just thought I'd
post Nikon's most recent announcement ... see:
http://www.klt.co.jp/Nikon/Press_Release/ls-8000.html

cheerios, shAf :o)

{} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ cogito, ergo zZOooOM /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {\/} /\ {}
Michael Shaffer, R.A. - mshaf-at-darkwing.uoregon.edu
Geological Science's Electron Probe Facility - University of Oregon
http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/




From daemon Tue Jan 9 12:59:51 2001



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 13:31:08 -0600
Subject: Re: 4by5 film scanners

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If you check the CD-FAQ:
http://www.landfield.com/faqs/cdrom/cd-recordable/part1/



This looked pretty interesting. Have you heard a ballpark price?


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Tue Jan 9 14:10:21 2001



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 15:06:54 EST
Subject: Re: RMC ultramicrotome Parts needed?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 01/09/2001 11:30:40 AM US Mountain Standard Time,
biology-at-ucla.edu writes:

{ { I need to get some parts for a RMC MX-600XL ultramicrotome.. I know RMC
was sold to another company from Ventana.. How do I or who do I contact
about some parts??


Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Dept. Pathology and Lab Medicine
Los Angeles, CA 90095


} }

Eric,

RMC is now a part of Boeckler Instruments in Tucson, Arizona. You can reach
them at:

Boeckler Instruments, Inc.
4650 South Butterfield Drive
Tucson, AZ 85714
Tel. 800-552-2262
Fax 520-745-0004

Bob Chiovetti
GTI Microsystems


From daemon Tue Jan 9 16:11:14 2001



From: Earl Weltmer :      eweltmer-at-home.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 14:07:46 -0800
Subject: EDS Detector problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,

I have a Kevex EDS detector that was shipped via FEDEX with liquid nitrogen.
FEDEX, in their infinite wisdom, managed to tilt the detector and drain the
LN2 from the dewar.
(Although the packing box and "tilt watch indicators" say "do not tilt',
"this side up", etc.)

Upon inspecting the detector I have found that a plug on the side of the
dewar has been removed and the detector is at atmosphere. I suspect that the
LN2 froze the plug & "O" rings therby allowing air into the detector.

I am considering machining an adapter flange and repumping the detector.
This is, of course, assuming that the detector window is entact.

Does anyone have experience with this? While pumping, I am considering
pouring hot water into the dewar to outgass the system but I don't know if
this is a good idea.

Thank You,

Earl Weltmer



From daemon Tue Jan 9 17:12:24 2001



From: Gwyneth Hill Beagley :      beagleyg-at-alma.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 18:05:18 +0800
Subject: looking for TEM parts - again

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi -
I am looking for a used lens regulator circuit board for a Philips TEM
201. The parts # is Lens Regulator 5322 695 14022 in the 1974 service
manual -also called RB-U13. Is anyone junking a 201? The price from
FEI/Philips is a bit beyond my budget! g





From daemon Tue Jan 9 17:50:06 2001



From: Gwyneth Hill Beagley :      beagleyg-at-alma.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 17:45:37 -0600
Subject: looking for lens regulator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi -
I am looking for a used lens regulator circuit board for a Philips TEM
201. The parts # is Lens Regulator 5322 695 14022 in the 1974 service
manual -also called RB-U13. Is anyone junking a 201? g




From daemon Tue Jan 9 17:51:42 2001



From: Kenneth Livi :      klivi-at-jhu.edu
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 17:47:53 -0600
Subject: TEM: Energy Filtered Diffraction patterns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Colleagues,
Has anyone had any experience with generating energy filtered
diffraction patterns (not CBED) with a Gatan GIF on a Philips CM? I
would like some pointers on intensity issues and summation of images.
Thanks in advance.
Ciao for now,
Ken




From daemon Tue Jan 9 17:52:12 2001



From: jcoleman-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 17:48:24 -0600
Subject: JELCO JSM 6700

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are installing a new JEOLCO JSM 6700F Field Emission Scanning Electron
Microscope. This is a new model and incorporates some novel technology. We
are interested in communicating with others who are or will be working with
this model. Please respond off-line and I will construct a mailing list to
distribute questions, concerns and, of course, suggestions for operation and
improvement.

James R. Coleman, Ph.D.
Supervisor, Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc.




From daemon Tue Jan 9 19:14:49 2001



From: Douglas Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 17:07:30 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Nikon coolpix at low light levels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Richard asked if the exposure meter on the Nikion coolpix
900 digital camera was sensitive enough to control exposure
in low light (immunofluorescent) conditions. We used the
camera to take images of samples labeled with moderate
intensely with FITC. We captured nice images in the "spot"
automatic metering mode. With the camera mounted in one
ocular, the camera chose to expose at F 3.1 and kept the
shutter open one second. However, it was a bit difficult
to use since the image did not appear on the display during
focusing. There was not enough light for real time
imaging. To insure a focused image, we needed focus in
brightfield illumination, then go to EPI to collect the
image. You could also use a monitor, but that would add
significant cost to the system.

It may be useful to realize that the camera has the ability
to be used in several automatic exposure settings
(programmed, aperture priority, shutter priority) (wide
field, narrow field, center spot) and in manual mode, where
you can use a timed exposure from 1/1000 to 8 seconds, or
longer (up to 60 seconds) by pushing the exposure once to
open and again to close.

Feel free to phone with more questions,

Doug

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Research Facilities
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97201
phone: 503-221-3434
FAX: 503-412-6894 (9-5 PST)
e-mail: DRK-at-shcc.org






From daemon Tue Jan 9 22:21:08 2001



From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Tue, 09 Jan 2001 22:37:18 -0500
Subject: Re: EDS Detector problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Earl-

It all depends. If there is no-one else who would pay to fix your
detector, then you have nothing to lose by doing what you suggest (incl.
the hot water). I do it relatively often, (but only to detectors that are
seriously degraded or not functioning at all), and it works, but I've never
had a crystal return to tip-top premium performance after this treatment.
(In fact, only today I deliberately vented a detector and re-pumped it, but
that is a long, and different, story). BTW, you only need to achieve a
quite modest vacuum during the pump - the molecular sieve will take care of
a lot of gas when it cools! Having said that, I have usually rigged up a
piece of vacuum hose from the pumping adapter to a port I had added to an
old evaporater, and pumped down to the 10^-5 - 10^-4 range. I have a
pumping adapter with a US thread for the plug - perhaps it will work on
your Kevex detector (in fact, it came from Kevex 20 years ago). If you
want to borrow it, let me have your FedEx or other shipping account number,
and shipping details, and I'll send it off.

On the other hand, if the shipper, or FEDEX, can be persuaded to pay to
have the detector refurbished, it will probably work better in the end, and
a do-it-yourself attempt beforehand may make your claim more difficult!

Good luck!

Tony

Tony.


At 02:07 PM 1/9/2001 -0800, you wrote:
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From daemon Wed Jan 10 03:08:40 2001



From: Kun Li :      k-li-at-mailcityasia.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 16:57:09 +0800
Subject: staining chemical for low k HSQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,

Does any of you know the staining chemicals for low k HSQ so that HSQ and other kinds of oxides such as SOG and PETEOS can be delineated?

K. Li


Get your FREE Email at http://www.mailcityasia.com


From daemon Wed Jan 10 04:45:54 2001



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 02:43:54 -0800
Subject: Re: Temperture on TEM stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I suppose, if plastic film or plastic sections (biological samples) are
relatively stable under the beam, it may mean (may not) that temperature is
not so high. In my hands, overheating of the plastic film in air over
+150oC will destroy the film. I assume, something like that would happens
in the microscope if the beam generate such amount of heat (plastic film
itself has a low thermal conductivity, I believe). Another scenario:
unelastic scattered electrons may transfer kinetic energy (not necessary it
will immediately transferred into the heat) to the sample/film. This
excess of energy may heat the sample but may force molecules/atoms to
migrate for instance. Heavy atoms should affected more. I do remember, 20
or so years ago people shout films under TEM, how Pt or Au atoms may move
under the beam. They (atoms) tend to form big clusters under the
beam. This is explanation (to me), why the resolution of Pt or Au shadowed
samples is so bad. Pt-C shadowing succeeded because carbon protect Pt from
migration and forming big clusters. In general, I do agree: "it depends"...

Sergey

At 09:39 AM 1/9/01 +0000, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Wed Jan 10 05:11:29 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 21:07:59 +1000
Subject: RE: EDS Detector problem

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I did a few detector treatments and I agree with Tony's comments.
One addition: Obtain a fairly good vacuum before pouring boiling water (couple
of liters) into the dewar. The heat causes a dramatic drop in vacuum due to
outgasing of the molecular sieve. I would terminate pumping a couple of hours
after the hot water was added. Obviously is nice to have a clean vacuum system
available as backstreaming oil vapour would rather defeat the purpose.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Wednesday, January 10, 2001 1:37 PM, Tony Garratt-Reed [SMTP:tonygr-at-mit.edu]
wrote:
}
}
} Earl-
}
} It all depends. If there is no-one else who would pay to fix your
} detector, then you have nothing to lose by doing what you suggest (incl.
} the hot water). I do it relatively often, (but only to detectors that are
} seriously degraded or not functioning at all), and it works, but I've never
} had a crystal return to tip-top premium performance after this treatment.
} (In fact, only today I deliberately vented a detector and re-pumped it, but
} that is a long, and different, story). BTW, you only need to achieve a
} quite modest vacuum during the pump - the molecular sieve will take care of
} a lot of gas when it cools! Having said that, I have usually rigged up a
} piece of vacuum hose from the pumping adapter to a port I had added to an
} old evaporater, and pumped down to the 10^-5 - 10^-4 range. I have a
} pumping adapter with a US thread for the plug - perhaps it will work on
} your Kevex detector (in fact, it came from Kevex 20 years ago). If you
} want to borrow it, let me have your FedEx or other shipping account number,
} and shipping details, and I'll send it off.
}
} On the other hand, if the shipper, or FEDEX, can be persuaded to pay to
} have the detector refurbished, it will probably work better in the end, and
} a do-it-yourself attempt beforehand may make your claim more difficult!
}
} Good luck!
}
} Tony
}
} Tony.
}
}
} At 02:07 PM 1/9/2001 -0800, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hi all,
} }
} } I have a Kevex EDS detector that was shipped via FEDEX with liquid nitrogen.
} } FEDEX, in their infinite wisdom, managed to tilt the detector and drain the
} } LN2 from the dewar.
} } (Although the packing box and "tilt watch indicators" say "do not tilt',
} } "this side up", etc.)
} }
} } Upon inspecting the detector I have found that a plug on the side of the
} } dewar has been removed and the detector is at atmosphere. I suspect that the
} } LN2 froze the plug & "O" rings therby allowing air into the detector.
} }
} } I am considering machining an adapter flange and repumping the detector.
} } This is, of course, assuming that the detector window is entact.
} }
} } Does anyone have experience with this? While pumping, I am considering
} } pouring hot water into the dewar to outgass the system but I don't know if
} } this is a good idea.
} }
} } Thank You,
} }
} } Earl Weltmer
} }
} ***********************************************
} Anthony J. Garratt-Reed, M.A., D.Phil.
} Principal Research Scientist
} Room 13-1027
} Massachusetts Institute of Technology
} 77 Massachusetts Avenue
} Cambridge, MA 02137-4307
}
} Tel: (617) 253-4622
} Fax: (617) 258-6478
} ***********************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 10 06:16:01 2001



From: Alan Bright :      bright-at-dial.pipex.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 12:09:06 -0000
Subject: cryostat tissue mounting stubs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Jonathan,

If you have a problem locating the original suppliers of these object
holders, I should be able to make them for you, please fax me a sketch will
measurement and I will reply with a price.


Best Regards

Alan Bright

Bright Instrument Co.Ltd.
St Margaret's Way
Huntingdon
Cambridgeshire
PE29 6EU
England

Tel No:+44 (0)1480 454528
Fax No:+44 (0)1480 456031
Email: AlanBright-at-brightinstruments.com
Web Site: www.brightinstruments.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Jonathan Wilson [mailto:wilson_jm-at-cimar.org]
Sent: 10 January 2001 00:31
To: Microscopy


Hello, I was wondering if any one might know where I could get some cryostat
tissue mounting stubs. I am looking for the 'T' type looking stubs that fit
into a ball joint so the stub position can be adjusted in the cryostat
chuck. The ones I have used were made of copper and the pin diameter was1/8"
with a locking screw in the shaft of the ball joint.
Thanks for any leads.
Sincerely,
Jonathan

Jonathan Wilson (Ph.D.)
Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental (CIIMAR)
Universidade do Porto
Rua do Campo Alegre 823
4150-180 Porto, Portugal
tel 351 22 606 0421
fax351 22 606 0423
e-mail: wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
mop01258-at-mail.telepac.pt




From daemon Wed Jan 10 07:08:19 2001



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 07:00:04 -0600
Subject: RE: EDS Detector problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Earl,

For about 15 years, I ran a Kevex "extra" detector. This was a windowless
type and over time (I did a lot of light element work) the crystal would ice
over. The Etec was turbo pumped, but between specimen out gassing and the
methane from the WDS, icing over time could not be avoided. I warmed and
pumped a number of times using warm/hot water. A small amount of
degradation occurred, but it did help overall. I later went to a hot air
gun and a tube to direct the air to the bottom of the dewar. By doing this,
I did not have to worry about drying the dewar.

Woody


From daemon Wed Jan 10 08:01:52 2001



From: Brian Gere :      vm89xt-at-zipee.net
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 07:51:30 -0500
Subject: All of us #1ABA

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From daemon Wed Jan 10 08:11:52 2001



From: Tom McKee :      tmckee-at-scilabs.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 09:10:08 -0500
Subject: EM - used Denton DV 515 Evaporator

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Several folks have asked about chillers and evaporators lately.

We have a Denton DV-515 vacuum evaporator which has been replaced by an
automated DV-502A. The DV-515 was originally from a government lab so it
has been well maintained and cared for. We had used it mainly as a back up
for our DV-502A. We use the carbon rod arc to produce TEM support films and
general carbon coating of samples on MCE & PC filters during TEM specimen
prep and to put carbon coatings on SEM samples.

If you are interested, we would like 2500.
reply to:

tmckee-at-scilabs.com




From daemon Wed Jan 10 08:14:59 2001



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 09:08:51 -0800
Subject: RE: 4by5 film scanners

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All,
The preliminary information I have is that the Coolscan 8000 ED
will sell for approximately $4000 US. We will carry it when it becomes
available, currently listed as June. I hope to see it in early February.
Quick specs..
4000dpi optical resolution
IEEE1394 "Firewire" Interface- not SCSI
4.2 dynamic range 48bit images
Multi Sample Scanning

Info is also at
http://64.77.39.20/usa_product/product.jsp?cat=7&grp=703&productNr=9246

I'll pass along more info as it becomes available.

George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
v:(800) 223-7130 X3109
f:(800) 832-2205
email: scisales-at-ngscorp.com
}
} This looked pretty interesting. Have you heard a ballpark price?
}
} }
} } In the context of recent queries, I just thought I'd
} } post Nikon's most recent announcement ... see:
} } http://www.klt.co.jp/Nikon/Press_Release/ls-8000.html
} }

}



From daemon Wed Jan 10 08:47:14 2001



From: Scott Robinson :      sjrobin-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 08:51:14 -0600
Subject: TEM/SEM: Coolscan 8000 ED film scanner

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I called Nikon yesterday (1/9/2001) to ask about the Coolscan 8000 ED. They
told me it would cost $3000 (U.S.) and is scheduled to be released in April.

Scott Robinson





From daemon Wed Jan 10 09:23:03 2001



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 10:02:01 -0500
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM of calcium carbonate crystals

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Question: I need to view calcium carbonate crystals with a transmission
electron microscope for a research project. I also need to record the
images. All I've managed to do so far is order thin carbon grids. I have
been asked to write a plan for my experiment but I have no clue how to
prepare crystals in solution for magnification or what tools to use.
Please give me some direction. My professors say I should figure
everything out myself - "It will be a good learning experience."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Jane,
The most difficult aspect of this is likely to be getting sufficiently
small crystals dispersed over the grid surface so that you can see the
individual crystals. You do not say whether you need detail within the crystals
or whether just seeing silhouettes is sufficient. If the latter, then just
evaporate the solvent rapidly from a dilute CaCO3 solution placed on the grid.
This should leave small crystals dispersed over the grid. If you can't
evaporate on the grid, you will have to prepare the small crystals and transfer
them either by suspending them in a volatile liquid which doesn't dissolve CaCO3
or by wafting them into the air and collecting them on the grid. If you need
detail within the crystals, they must be very thin--no more than ~10 nm
(depending on the EM voltage), so you will have to find a way to get them this
thin, and, if possible, much wider than they are thin--a platy habit. Good
luck.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us







From daemon Wed Jan 10 09:23:05 2001



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 10:01:01 -0500
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM: Crystal Growth

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Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor

---------------------------------------------------

Email: us004118-at-mindspring.com
Name: Leonard Lessin, FBPA

School: (Retired Science & Medical Photographer)

State: NY

Zip: 10012

Question: I am enjoying doing photomicrographs of crystal
preperations in polarized light.However I have insuffient knowledge of
chemistry
to choose solvents without a long series of trial and error efforts.Can you
give me
a rationale and/or a reference to go about this in a more productive
manner?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Leonard,
There are several requirements for a suitable solvent: 1) it must, of
course, disolve the material you want to examine, 2) it must evaporate to
produce crystals in a habit suitable for your work (not too small, transparent,
etc.), and 3) it should not be too toxic even though you may have a fume hood
available. The key to 1) is "like disolves like". If you have an ionic salt or
a polar solute such as sucrose, water would be a good choice, if you have an
aromatic compound, such as naphthalene, an aromatic would work (I hesitate to
reccommend benzene, even though it gives nice crystals, because of its toxicity;
I would try toluene.), and if you have a lipid, like cholesterol, I'd use a
non-polar aliphatic solvent such as hexane. For 2) it is important to have a
suitable rate of evaporation, so in the last case, hexane might evaporate too
fast, so I would go to a longer-chain hydrocarbon, e.g., decane. The Handbook
of Chemistry and Physics lists many compounds, both organic and inorganic, and
some solvents for each; I'd use that as a first reference. I hope this will
reduce the problem from a long series of trial-and-error efforts to a short one,
but you can still expect some problems. The preparation of suitable crystals is
most often the most difficult part of these studies. Good luck.
Yours,

Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us







From daemon Wed Jan 10 09:42:45 2001



From: Brian Gere :      vm89xt-at-zipee.net
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 07:51:30 -0500
Subject: All of us #29E2

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From daemon Wed Jan 10 10:24:11 2001



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 10:19:32 -0600
Subject: xenon bulb problem

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I was forced to dismantle my Opti-quip fluorescence bulb housing the
other day for an unrelated problem. The 75W xenon bulb only has 200
hrs of use so I would have expected it to have another 200 hrs of
life based on what the supplier told me. But I noticed that at one
of the ends, at the junction between the metal cap and the glass
bulb, there was a buildup of a hard, white substance on the outside
of the glass. Does any one know what caused this and if it is safe
to re-install the bulb? TIA, tom

--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Wed Jan 10 10:58:39 2001



From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-uol.com.br
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 14:55:42 -0200
Subject: Lauda Ultra-Kyomat K40D - Technical manual

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Hello all,

I am looking for the technical manual (components and operation) of the the
Lauda Ultra-Kryomat K 40 D. Can anybody help me?
Thank you.

Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
Dep. of Botany
UFRGS
Brazil



From daemon Wed Jan 10 11:53:57 2001



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 11:50:42 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Testing please ignore

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Colleagues:

This is just a test. I've had to make a revision to the JUNK mail
filter (we've been getting alot of hits lately) and I'm testing
the latest modification. To make sure real mail gets through.

Nestor
Your FriendlyNeighborhood SysOp.

===========================================
Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
Materials Science Division
Building 212
Argonne National Lab
9700 S. Cass Ave
Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
===========================================
TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
===========================================

The box said ...
"This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
So I bought a G3 Mac !

===========================================




From daemon Wed Jan 10 12:09:25 2001



From: Temporary Recruiter :      recruiter-at-thermonoran.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 12:12:29 -0600
Subject: Job posting

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Microanalysis Applications Specialist
XRF Applications Specialist


Thermo NORAN, the makers of the finest instrumentation for elemental
analysis is seeking both a Microanalysis and an XRF Applications/Product
Specialist. This position will be responsible for the ensuring the success
of the applications/products targeted at analytical instrument markets,
including materials characterization and materials development markets.
Will perform demonstrations and provide other pre-sale support as required
at major trade shows, technical conferences and other meetings. Will
analyze customer samples and prepare reports for prospective customers.
Worldwide travel may be required to perform demonstrations and
presentations. Travel may include trips greater in duration than one week.
Must be degreed in a physical or life science, have excellent written and
oral communication skills. Knowledge of electron microscope and/or x-ray
microanalysis with experience in materials characterization.
Interested candidates should send, e-mail or fax resumes to:

Thermo NORAN
Attn: Matthew Duffy
2551 W. Beltline Hwy.
Middleton, WI 53562
e-mail: recruiter-at-thermonoran.com {mailto:recruiter-at-thermonoran.com}
fax: 608-836-7224
phone: 608-836-4382
www.thermonoran.com



From daemon Wed Jan 10 13:08:33 2001



From: Stephen Skirius :      Stephen_Skirius-at-bkitech.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 13:00:20 -0600
Subject: TEM: Need help on the mounting/sectioning of cellulosic fibers fo

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Is there a "standard" procedure for the embedding, sectioning and staining
of wood fibers for examination by transmission electron microscopy?

Steve


From daemon Wed Jan 10 13:35:43 2001



From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-uol.com.br
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 17:36:39 -0200
Subject: Lauda Ultra-Kryomat K 40 D - Manuals

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Hello all,

I am looking for the technical manual (components and operation) of the the
Lauda Ultra-Kryomat K 40 D. Can anybody help me?
Thank you.

Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
Dep. of Botany
UFRGS
Brazil




From daemon Wed Jan 10 14:56:10 2001



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 10:51:37 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Choosing a digital camera for LM

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A broad question for the light microscopists-

I'm writing up a wish list for our EM lab, and it includes (gasp) light
microscopes. My question is - how do I go about evaluating and choosing a
digital camera for light microscopes? It would be for both compound and
dissecting microscopes, should be color, decent resolution, not
necessarily low light nor real-time video, but capable of good images for
image analysis on sections. We are getting a confocal, so fluorescence
imaging would be done there rather than with the proposed 'scope and
camera.

What do I need to look for, and what price ranges are we talking about?

Mahalo,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 10 14:57:44 2001



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 12:54:59 -0800
Subject: Mounting large diatoms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi:

Does anyone know how to mount large (100um+) diatoms for LM or SEM? The
little ones are OK, they stick to most any stub, but these big guys like to
fall off.

Anyone know how arranged diatom slides are/were made? I checked WWW but no
specifics on techniques. Something like these methods would work for us.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Wed Jan 10 17:16:50 2001



From: Douglas Keene :      DRK-at-shcc.org
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 15:10:48 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: Nikon coolpix at low light levels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Richard asked if the exposure meter on the Nikion coolpix
900 digital camera was sensitive enough to control exposure
in low light (immunofluorescent) conditions. We used the
camera to take images of samples labeled with moderate
intensely with FITC. We captured nice images in the "spot"
automatic metering mode. With the camera mounted in one
ocular, the camera chose to expose at F 3.1 and kept the
shutter open one second. However, it was a bit difficult
to use since the image did not appear on the display during
focusing. There was not enough light for real time
imaging. To insure a focused image, we needed focus in
brightfield illumination, then go to EPI to collect the
image. You could also use a monitor, but that would add
significant cost to the system.

It may be useful to realize that the camera has the ability
to be used in several automatic exposure settings
(programmed, aperture priority, shutter priority) (wide
field, narrow field, center spot) and in manual mode, where
you can use a timed exposure from 1/1000 to 8 seconds, or
longer (up to 60 seconds) by pushing the exposure once to
open and again to close.

Feel free to phone with more questions,

Doug

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Shriners Hospital Research Facilities
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97201
phone: 503-221-3434
FAX: 503-412-6894 (9-5 PST)
e-mail: DRK-at-shcc.org




From daemon Wed Jan 10 18:13:17 2001



From: Calvert, Dave :      calvert-at-eastman.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 18:03:27 -0600
Subject: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers
My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
My questions:
1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
recommend a glove?
2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)

Thanks!

Dave Calvert
Eastman Chemical Company
Building 150B Lincoln Street (packages)
P.O. Box 1972 (US Mail)
Kingsport, Tennessee 37662-1972
(423) 229-4943
(423) 229-4558 fax




From daemon Wed Jan 10 19:04:00 2001



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 15:00:49 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
} trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
} this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
} My questions:
} 1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
} recommend a glove?
} 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)

When I train people to trim blocks, I always point to the Band-Aids first,
then to the razor blades! This gets a laugh, but drives home the
point. Then I suggest that they put the bandages on FIRST before trimming,
which also gets a laugh, but significant number of people decide to do
so! Therefore, I suggest something like finger cots or other wrap-around
solutions that leave some dexterity while protecting the last joints of
the fingers.

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 10 21:36:22 2001



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 22:31:56 -0500
Subject: SEM Mounting of diatoms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Jonathan Krupp wrote:
==============================================================
Does anyone know how to mount large (100um+) diatoms for LM or SEM? The
little ones are OK, they stick to most any stub, but these big guys like to
fall off.

Anyone know how arranged diatom slides are/were made? I checked WWW but no
specifics on techniques. Something like these methods would work for us.
==============================================================
Consider these two options:

a) Tacky Dot™ Slides, see URL
http://www.2spi.com/new/tacky.html
and
b) Double sided conductive discs, sheets or tape
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/cond_adhes.html

The Tacky Dot Slides have good adhesion and the diatoms should be held in
place without problems. The double sided conductive sheets, discs, and tape
should work as well, but if you are using material that has aged past its
"expiration date", the surface tends to lose its "tac" and indeed might not
hold the "big guys". Of course, only the Tacky Dot Slides will result in
the diatoms being arranged in orthogonal arrays for convenient analysis.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies is the exclusive worldwide licensee for the
manufacturing and distribution of Tacky Dot Slides for applications in
microscopy and microanalysis.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================









From daemon Thu Jan 11 00:09:30 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 00:04:29 -0600
Subject: Re: Mounting large diatoms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Klaus Kemp at http://www.diatoms.co.uk/index.html makes stunning
arrangments of diatoms and seems willing to share his knowledge.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger

} From: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}

}
} Hi:
}
} Does anyone know how to mount large (100um+) diatoms for LM or SEM? The
} little ones are OK, they stick to most any stub, but these big guys like
to
} fall off.
}
} Anyone know how arranged diatom slides are/were made? I checked WWW but
no
} specifics on techniques. Something like these methods would work for us.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}




From daemon Thu Jan 11 04:31:41 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 20:24:40 +1000
Subject: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Never cut myself in over quarter a century of trimming. Any accidental cuts
would be minor since little force is exerted during final trimming. Some force
is required during rough trimming and when cutting PE moulds off blocks -
without a press.
For these operations, just think where a slipped razor blade may go - and that
is were the fingers don't. Surprizingly hardly anybody in my labs ever cut a
finger, because they were taught the obvious.
I think its also obvious, that unless those Kevlar gloves are rather thick (no
analogy to the safety police) they would not prevent cuts. They should have
recommended those stainless steel chain linked butcher's gloves.
That could be a saleable idea!
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 11, 2001 10:03 AM, Calvert, Dave
[SMTP:calvert-at-eastman.com] wrote:
}
}
}
} Listers
} My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
} trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
} this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
} My questions:
} 1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
} recommend a glove?
} 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)
}
} Thanks!
}
} Dave Calvert
} Eastman Chemical Company
} Building 150B Lincoln Street (packages)
} P.O. Box 1972 (US Mail)
} Kingsport, Tennessee 37662-1972
} (423) 229-4943
} (423) 229-4558 fax
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 11 05:01:21 2001



From: Garrison, Becky :      becky.garrison-at-jax.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 05:58:33 -0500
Subject: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have always worn latex gloves more for protection ( abrasion from
tightening chucks, etc.) Using long single edge razors (Weck Extra Long
Blades, EMS #71933-60) seems to give me more control of the blade and
therefore less of a chance to knick one's fingers.

Becky Garrison
Pathology Supervisor
Shand Jacksonville
Jacksonville, FL 32209
904-244-6237
-----Original Message-----
} From: Calvert, Dave [mailto:calvert-at-eastman.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 7:03 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Listers
My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
My questions:
1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
recommend a glove?
2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)

Thanks!

Dave Calvert
Eastman Chemical Company
Building 150B Lincoln Street (packages)
P.O. Box 1972 (US Mail)
Kingsport, Tennessee 37662-1972
(423) 229-4943
(423) 229-4558 fax




From daemon Thu Jan 11 06:05:46 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 10:04:49 +0000
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tina

I have used LKB (now Reichert-Jung or whatever) microtomes and it has always been
possible to trim specimen blocks with glass knives on the microtome, itself. With
a bit of practice you can both trim and cut within about 30 minutes per block so I
don't think that it's particularly time consuming. The added bonuses are that
blocks will always have smooth facets and students get some good hands-on training
with microtome, binoculars and knives before actually cutting thin sections.

Once you get into the technique there are other rewards such as the ability to
'face' or smooth block fronts for best quality sections on difficult specimens,
mesa trimming, combining trimming of blocks and light microscopy surveys etc. The
only requirements are that your specimen must be embedded near to the surface of
the resin for easy trimming and that you don't damage the microtome mechanism.

The basic technique is fairly intuitive you just need practice:
trim the front of the block until you reach the specimen (1-5 um cuts on manual
feed should be OK)
rotate the knife stage by +10 to +40 deg (angle is optional and can be varied for
each side) and trim until you reach the desired edge in your block
rotate knife stage to the other side (i.e. -10 to -40deg) and again trim until you
have a long thin block face
rotate block in specimen holder by 90deg and repeat for the other two edges
Finally I may carefully trim or 'face' the front of the block for best results
If you want to produce mesas then don't rotate the knife - just use it to trim a
few microns around each side of the area to stand 'proud' as a mesa.
If the the block is difficult and blunts the knife you may need to use a second
knife, although this is not common
Smoothest trimming results from thinnest cuts at slowest speeds, so always make
the last couple of cuts on each edge about 1um or less.

If you're uncertain about the ability of your ultramicrotome to trim in this
fashion, I'm sure the manufacturer or someone on the list should be able to help.
If I do ever trim with a blade I use single edged razors and cut away from myself
on an uncluttered work area, but this may only happen once or twice a year often
when I'm demonstrating the method to students.

I'm sure that this has been mentioned on the list quite some time back but please
contact me directly if you have any further questions although there must be lots
of labs that have experience of this technique.

DISCLAIMER I have no commercial interest in LKB or Reichert, they just happen to
be the instruments that I have grown up with.

Good luck

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK


Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} } My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} } razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
} } trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
} } this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
} } My questions:
} } 1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
} } recommend a glove?
} } 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} } safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)
}
} When I train people to trim blocks, I always point to the Band-Aids first,
} then to the razor blades! This gets a laugh, but drives home the
} point. Then I suggest that they put the bandages on FIRST before trimming,
} which also gets a laugh, but significant number of people decide to do
} so! Therefore, I suggest something like finger cots or other wrap-around
} solutions that leave some dexterity while protecting the last joints of
} the fingers.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************



From daemon Thu Jan 11 06:09:20 2001



From: Tiffany Argent :      tiffany.argent-at-abbott.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 06:06:32 -0600
Subject: Cross section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am trying to find a way of looking at a cross section of a printed ink
approx 10um thick on a PVC substrate. I am trying to measure the porosity of
the ink so I guess some image analysis will be used. It is mainly a method
of preparing the samples that has me a bit stumped. I have tried freeze
fracturing and embedding the samples in resin then polising the surface.
Neither are satisfactory. The microscopy techniques I have available are
SEM and LM. Can anyone help?


From daemon Thu Jan 11 06:51:09 2001



From: Michael P. Goheen :      mgoheen-at-iupui.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 07:56:41
Subject: LM Stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jon -

Largish diatoms, like most other microfossils bigger than, say, 50
microns or so in diameter or length, can usually be handled under a
binocular microscope with a very fine (00 or 000) artists' paintbrush. Just
wet the brush with water (distilled, if it's going to matter) and touch the
bug with it. It'll stick to the brush long enough for you to place it on a
stub. When I'm looking at microfossils in the SEM, I can usually get them to
stick to double-sided tape on a stub just by "dabbing" them on with the
point of the brush. Orienting them can be a bit tricky, but you'll improve
with practice. One problem with double-sided tape, though, is that once
stuck on, a lot of the more delicate microfossils such as diatoms will break
before they'll come loose. So you don't want to handle type specimens this
way....
Another good way to stick such bugs down includes a little bit of Gum
Tragacanth. An old micropaleontologists' standby, this stuff is available as
a powder, which you mix with a little water to make a paste. You can glue
individual bugs down with this, using your fine paint brush. It dries in a
few seconds - and if you want to move/remove the bug later, just wet your
brush and touch the bug. The gum redissolves and the specimen comes free.
Unsightly gum residues on the bug will come off with a bit more application
of your wet brush. Once mixed up and kept in a sealed little vial, the gum
mixture should keep for months or years. A drop or two of clove oil in it
will inhibit any possible mould growth, if you're going to keep it around
for a while.
One guy I used to work with liked to use bits of old undeveloped 35mm
film. Apparently you can get small items to stick to such film really well
if the specimen is wet. I've never tried this myself, though.
And, of course, there's lots of micropaleontology texts out there with
chapters on handling techniques.
After reading all this, you're probably sorry you got me started.
Anyway, good luck with the diatoms - they're among nature's most photogenic
micro-organisms.

Frank Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 4:54 PM


Hi Folks,

Does anyone know of a stain to differentiate PMN's from Macrophages for
light microscopy?

Thanks,

Mike Goheen



From daemon Thu Jan 11 07:59:49 2001



From: Judy Murphy :      jmurphy-at-sjdccd.cc.ca.us
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 07:54:21 -0600
Subject: Delta Microscopy Society, & Northern California Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are honored to host

Dr. Patrick Echlin of Cambridge University, UK

for a 7 Hr Minicourse in Cryomicroscopy and Microanalysis

at the Microscopy Technology Center of San Joaquin Delta College in
Stockton, CA

Everyone is welcome. Come, enjoy, and RSVP.
Happy New Year

Delta Microscopy Society, & Northern California Microscopy Society
Joint Meeting



WHEN: Jan 17, 18, 2001; Wed. and Thur.

WHERE: San Joaquin Delta College, Microscopy Technology Center, Stockton, CA

Please email or fax RSVP. See form below.

7 Hr Minicourse in Low Temperature Microscopy and Microanalysis
by Dr. Patrick Echlin, Director of Cambridge Analytical Microscopy and
member of Multi-Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, UK

Image Database (Asset Management System) for Multi-Platform, Multi-Instrument
Microscopy Laboratory, Dr Judy A. Murphy, San Joaquin Delta College,
Microscopy Technology Center

January 17, 2001: Wednesday
12:00 - 1:00 pm Registration, Holt 121
1:15 - 1:30 pm Welcome and Introduction, South Forum Building
1:30 - 2:30 pm Minicourse Lecture 1 : Chemical-physics of water and ice
2:45 - 3:30 pm Minicourse Lecture 2: Sample cooling
3:30 - 4:30 pm Tour of Microscopy Technology Center, Holt 121
including Demo of Image Database
4:30 - 5:30 pm Minicourse Lecture 3; Sectioning and Fracturing
Discussion
Social 5:30 - 6:30 pm, Budd Lounge
Light Buffet 6;30 - 8pm, Budd Lounge
8:00 - 9:00 Image Database Lecture

January 18, 2001: Thursday
8:00 - 8:45 am Registration, 121 Holt
9:00 - 10:00 am Minicourse Lecture 4: Freeze drying, freeze substitution
and low temperature embedding
10:15 - 11 am Minicourse Lecture 5: Low temperature microscopy
Discussion
11:15 - 1:00 Lunch
1:15 - 2:15 pm Minicourse Lecture 6: Low temperature microanalysis
2:30 - 3:30 pm Minicourse Lecture 7 : Imaging, artefacts and beam damage.
Discussion

Any building or room changes will be posted in Holt 121.

Activities are being sponsored by: Gatan Inc., Oxford Instruments, Hitachi,
JEOL, FEI, Ted Pella Inc., EMS/Diatome, Anatech, Cressington, LEO, Advanced
Computers and Networking, Delicato Winery, Paul De Georgio and others to be
identified later.

Please RSVP so we know what room sizes we will need, # of handouts, and
how much food.


Cost to Students: $0
Cost to Other Registrants $15 (to defray cost of activities, handouts, etc.)

Please PRINT or TYPE

Name:

Company:

Address:

City, State, ZIP

Phone:

FAX:

email:

Activities you will attend: Please indicate which you will attend:

Wed. afternoon lectures: yes no maybe

Wed. Social/Buffet yes no maybe

Wed. pm Lecture yes no maybe

Thur. am Lectures yes no maybe

Thur pm Lectures yes no maybe

Please email or fax RSVP

email to:
murphyjudy-at-mediaone.net

FAX to: 209/954-5600
This is a central fax, so put Judy Murphy, Microscopy on top of fax.

Any questions, call
Judy Murphy (209/954-5284) or Pat Kysar (209/954-5246)

Checks can be made out to Delta Microscopy Society and sent to:
Judy Murphy, San Joaquin Delta College, Microscopy Technology Center, 5151
Pacific Ave, Stockton, CA 95207

Directions to Microscopy Technology Center & Lodging
Holt Center
San Joaquin Delta College
5151 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95207

1. Find Interstate 5 (I-5) on California map. It is a main North/South
Interstate in California.
2. From I-5, exit on March Lane going East. Continue on March Lane 1.6
miles until you reach the traffic light at Pacific Ave.
3. At Pacific Ave.turn LEFT, and go 0.3 miles until you reach the traffic
light for Delta College.
4. Turn LEFT at Delta College Entrance. The street is labeled Yoguts going
East and Delta College going West.
5. As soon you turn into Delta College Entrance, bear LEFT on the Campus
Drive (called Burke-Bradley in some places).
6. Continue around on Campus Drive until you reach Holt 1 Parking Lot.
Turn RIGHT into Holt 1 Parking Lot.
7. As soon as you turn into Holt 1 Parking Lot, take a sharp RIGHT turn to
enter Holt 2 Parking Lot.
8. Park as close to the front of the parking lot as possible, closest to
the buildings.
9. Since this is the first week of Spring semester classes, no tickets are
issued, so you do NOT need a parking permit.
10. As you walk towards the buildings, you should first enter Holt
building. Go to Holt 121 which is the Microscopy Center.
11. Any questions, call Judy Murphy (209/954-5284) or Pat Kysar
(209/954-5246)

Lodging Within 1.5 miles of San Joaquin Delta College
Prices were quoted Dec. 20, 2000, but check when you make reservations.
All listed lodging is close to March Lane exit off Interstate 5

Red Roof Inn, 2654 March Lane, Stockton, CA, Phone: 209/478-4300
Fax: 209/478-1872; Rates: Single - $59.99; Queen or 2 Double - $65.99;
King - $71.99; Suite - $87 and up depending on number of people.

LaQuinta, 2710 W. March Lane, Stockton, CA, Phone: 209/952-7800, Fax:
209/472-0732; Rates: King-$75; 2 Double Beds-$69, Complimentary Breakfast
AAA, AARP,Senior Citizen Discount Rates: King-$71.25; 2 Double beds-$65.55

Radisson Hotel, 2323 Grand Canal Blvd., Stockton, CA, Phone 209/957-9090
Fax: 209/473-0739; Rates: $79 - $99. Canal Blvd is one block off March Lane.

Courtyard by Marriott, 3252 W. March Lane, Stockton, CA, Phone
209/472-9700, Fax:
209/472-9722; Rate: $89-104
.
Marriott Residence Inn, 3240 W. March Lane, Stockton, CA, Phone: 209/472-9800
Fax: 209/472-9888; Rates: Studio - $119; 1 Bedroom - $124. Complimentary
Breakfast every day. Rooms have Kitchens equipped with Stove,
refrigerators, pots & pans etc




From daemon Thu Jan 11 10:05:46 2001



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 10:00:58 -0600
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It sounds like the safety folks may be overzealous in their attempts
to protect you from embedding resins.
Once polymerized, the resins are considerably safer than the
monomers. Since the plastic is no longer liquid, latex gloves would
be more appropriate (if the individual is not allergic to latex).

A bigger concern, I would think, when working with polymerized
plastic is the possible allergic reaction due to inhalation of the
plastic chips. I strongly recommend the use of a dust mask if you are
using a grinder or other mechanical device to shape the blocks.




} My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
} trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
} this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
} My questions:
} 1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
} recommend a glove?
} 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)
--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Thu Jan 11 10:30:55 2001



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:27:45 +0100
Subject: EDS detector pumping

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Hello

I have no experience in EDS detector pumping, but a little bit in vacuum
technology.

What do you think about heating the Dewar before pumping ?

That's what I do with sorbtion (zeolite) pumps used to prepump UHV vessel
(to have a dry pumping before starting turbo or ion pump). I put a heater
around the pump -in our case it would be hot water (hot air ? hot oil ?
which temperture can support the Dewar assembly ?)- let it warm over the
night, and close the venting valve.

You could do something similar with the detector : warm it at air
pressure for a few hours (it schould dry too the zeolite) and than pump
down with turbo, but pre-pump with dry backing pump to prevent oil
contamination,
as Jim mentioned. Than pump down until the Dewar is cold, with a base
pressure of something like 10E-5 Torr. And after that, cool it with
nitrogen.

What do you think about that ?

Bye


J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



From daemon Thu Jan 11 10:34:00 2001



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 10:30:17 -0600
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
}
} } My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} } razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy
} } 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} } safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)


We routinely use a Dremel moto-tool (available at your local hardware
store) with thin cutting wheels (i prefer the ones from Small Parts,
Inc that have an abrasive on one side and a very thin metal backing
on the other side). Working in the hood to avoid the dust, we can
trim dozens of blocks rapidly. I advise holding the block in a
pliers in case you slip with the dremel but it really is very easy
once you get used to it.
--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Thu Jan 11 10:57:14 2001



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:51:52 +0100
Subject: Thikness measurment

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Hello Jondo

If someone in your lab has a Perrot Fabry spectrometer, you can use it to
mesure film thickness between 2 and 100 nm. You évaporate your film on a
glass slide (LM slide), than you put a fine scratch on the film, than you
evaporate a opticaly opaque film of silver or aluminum. Than on the Perrot
Fabry, with a monochromatic light, you can see and mesure the hights of
the siver setp, which covers the the film to bee mesured. You must know
the wavelength of your light. You schould find the way to calculate this
in any optics book. You must do a serie of different thickness to draw a
calibration curve. Its very sensitiv and cheep,... if you have the Perrot
Fabry of course

An other way, opticaly too, is on a LM with a Nomarski Prism. I used it 15
years ago, but I do know the way to make the optical montage. I remember
that there is a monochromatique light, the Nomarski prism, the polariser
and analyser, but what kind of objectif ? The sample must be scratched and
silver covered as with the Perrot Fabry...

Can someone tell me something about that ?

Thanks


J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



From daemon Thu Jan 11 11:18:39 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:14:30 +0000
Subject: Re: 4by5 film scanners

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George

I had a quick look at the specification of the Coolscan 8000ED and it seems
to be aimed at TEM users with about 6x9cm films - I quote the largest areas
from the web page:
(6 x 9) 63.5 x 88.0mm (10,000x13,176 pixels);
(Elect Micro) 56.9 x 83.7mm (8,964x13,176 pixels);
My e.m. film is 4 x 3 5/16 inches or 83 x 102 mm with an absolute minimum
picture area (without data) of 69 x 92mm so it may be a problem for some e.m.

users.

I must admit it's a great specification though.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

George Laing wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} All,
} The preliminary information I have is that the Coolscan 8000 ED
} will sell for approximately $4000 US. We will carry it when it becomes
} available, currently listed as June. I hope to see it in early February.
} Quick specs..
} 4000dpi optical resolution
} IEEE1394 "Firewire" Interface- not SCSI
} 4.2 dynamic range 48bit images
} Multi Sample Scanning
}
} Info is also at
} http://64.77.39.20/usa_product/product.jsp?cat=7&grp=703&productNr=9246
}
} I'll pass along more info as it becomes available.
}
} George
}
} George Laing
} National Graphic Supply
} v:(800) 223-7130 X3109
} f:(800) 832-2205
} email: scisales-at-ngscorp.com
} }
} } This looked pretty interesting. Have you heard a ballpark price?
} }
} } }
} } } In the context of recent queries, I just thought I'd
} } } post Nikon's most recent announcement ... see:
} } } http://www.klt.co.jp/Nikon/Press_Release/ls-8000.html
} } }
}
} }



From daemon Thu Jan 11 11:30:12 2001



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 11 Jan 01 09:36:22 -0800
Subject: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

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From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 11 Jan 01 09:36:22 -0800
Subject: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

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Reply to: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues
It is possible to perform all the trimming steps needed to get a good block by using glass knives. Not only is it safer for the operator it also produces blocks with smooth, regular edges which are great for serial sectioning. More details provided on command.

Paul Webster.




Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm


Calvert, Dave wrote:
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers
} My company's safety folks are bent on making us wear Kevlar gloves while
} razor trimming samples for ultramicrotomy - I'm talking about the final
} trimming done using a trimming stand on the microtome. As you might know,
} this is fine work - wearing gloves is a handicap.
} My questions:
} 1. Does anyone out there actually wear gloves? - if so then can you
} recommend a glove?
} 2. Are there other ways to make this task look less dangerous to the
} safety police? (short of purchasing a trimming machine)
}
} Thanks!
}
} Dave Calvert
} Eastman Chemical Company
} Building 150B Lincoln Street (packages)
} P.O. Box 1972 (US Mail)
} Kingsport, Tennessee 37662-1972
} (423) 229-4943
} (423) 229-4558 fax
}
}
}
}
}
} RFC822 header
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From daemon Thu Jan 11 11:47:09 2001



From: Thearith H. Ung :      tung-at-qdots.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 09:25:51 -0800
Subject: STEM

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Dear Colleagues,

Does anyone know any place that has a TEM with a dedicated STEM unit
attached. The reason for the question is that I have particles composed of
cores and shells (coated particles), both of which are different materials.
By TEM I am not able to discern the shells from the cores because the
contrast is extremely low. However, I am told that a dedicated STEM unit
might allow me distinguish the shells from the cores based on the fact that
they both have very different z-contrast.

Regards,
Thearith

_________________________

Thearith Ung, Ph.D.
Quantum Dot Corporation
26136 Research Road
Hayward CA 94545
Tel: (510)-887-8775 (x4125)
Fax:(510)-783-9729
www.qdots.com



From daemon Thu Jan 11 11:57:08 2001



From: Lewis McCrigler :      lmm7001-at-Humboldt.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 09:56:34 -0800
Subject: Help on an Orthomat E Photo System

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,
I'm looking for technical assistance or a service
manual for a
Leitz
Orthomat E (7916) Photo System.The problem we are
having is
the unit will
not allow a picture to be taken unless there is very
little light.
Once the
system thinks it is in range, there is not enough
light present to
get the
photograph. An adjustment of the light detector? Any
assistance
is
appreciated.
Lewis McCrigler
Humboldt State University



From daemon Thu Jan 11 12:16:53 2001



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 12:13:16 -0600
Subject: RE: Cross section sample preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've never worked with ink samples, but nevertheless I am
trying to give some advice (be cautious!).

I think that techniques like freeze fracturing are not suitable for
your purposes. Cracks could prefer to propagate through pores, so
fracture surface will exaggerate porosity. Polished cross sections are
much better for quantification. Maybe you could find suitable media for
embedding. And what about mounting 2-3 substrates in a clip and cutting
them with a sharp blade (hm... I really do not know ink's properties...)?

Vladimir



Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Tiffany Argent [mailto:tiffany.argent-at-abbott.com]
} Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 6:07 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Cross section sample preparation
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} I am trying to find a way of looking at a cross section of a
} printed ink
} approx 10um thick on a PVC substrate. I am trying to measure
} the porosity of
} the ink so I guess some image analysis will be used. It is
} mainly a method
} of preparing the samples that has me a bit stumped. I have
} tried freeze
} fracturing and embedding the samples in resin then polising
} the surface.
} Neither are satisfactory. The microscopy techniques I have
} available are
} SEM and LM. Can anyone help?
}


From daemon Thu Jan 11 13:15:53 2001



From: Corazon D. Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 12:58:33 -0500
Subject: fluorescence intensity ratios

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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One of our investigators is studying the ratio of total and phosphorylated
transcription factor in the cell. We are able to do multiple fluorescence
labeling but I need help in determining the fluorescence intensity ratios.
We are using the Alexa dyes 350, 488 and 630 just to make sure there is no
bleed through with the filters that we use. I would like to know if anyone
has done this type of experiment and what are the potential problems that
one could run into. I would appreciate comments or suggestions.

Thank you,

Cora Bucana
Corazon D. Bucana, Ph.D.
Dept. Cancer Biology
UT M.D.Anderson Cancer Center
1515 Holcombe Blvd, Box 173
Houston, Texas 77030
Phone: 713-792-8106
FAX 713-792-8747


From daemon Thu Jan 11 13:20:06 2001



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 13:18:56 -0600
Subject: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We've only lost about 4 technologists due to them accidentally cutting open
their jugulars with a razor blade whilst trimming blocks and bleeding to
death on the spot. So with that good safety record, we've chosen to
dispense with the gloves thus far. Should we lose a few more though, the
issue might come up again.

Garry

Charge Technologist - Electron Microscopy
Department of Pathology
Health Sciences Centre
Winnipeg, Canada



From daemon Thu Jan 11 14:34:36 2001



From: Louise_Harner-at-albint.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:28:51 -0500
Subject: Re: Mounting large diatoms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Jon -

I've never done any serious particle arranging, but perhaps one of the people
mentioned below can help you.

You might try asking Klaus Kemp via the website at http://www.diatoms.co.uk
since he creates arranged slides as a profession. He has been referred to as a
master of the art at several microscopy seminars I've attended.

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artapr00/machslide.html will take you to an
article titled "A microscopical view of an old diatom circle pattern slide with
250+ diatom shells" by Martin Mach (there is a link to his e-mail). He provides
a "Modern Microscopy" reference for preparation of such slides, but unless you
have a GOOD library, you might ask him if he could send you a copy of the
article - it is dated 1895.

Anna Teetsov at McCrone Associates (http://www.mccrone.com/ma/staff.html) is
also expert at positioning particles on slides. While she is famous for
manipulating the tiniest of particles, I've seen some beautiful arranged
butterfly scale slides she's made for viewing under the light microscope. She
might be willing to provide some suggestions.


Louise Harner
Research Microscopist
Albany International Research Co.
777 West Street, P.O. Box 9114
Mansfield, MA 02048
508-339-7300 phone
508-339-4996 fax
Louise_Harner-at-albint.com





jmkrupp-at-cats.
ucsc.edu (Jon To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Krupp) cc:
Subject: Mounting large diatoms?
2001/01/10
03:54 PM






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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi:

Does anyone know how to mount large (100um+) diatoms for LM or SEM? The
little ones are OK, they stick to most any stub, but these big guys like to
fall off.

Anyone know how arranged diatom slides are/were made? I checked WWW but no
specifics on techniques. Something like these methods would work for us.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu








From daemon Thu Jan 11 14:50:19 2001



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:46:26 -0600
Subject: Microtome for semi-thins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A colleague (visiting from Brazil) is looking for a microtome for
cutting semi-thin (0.25 to 2 micrometer) sections of plastic (epoxy)
embedded specimens (mammalian tissues). He is considering a new Leica
RM2165 ($18K).

I am soliciting testimonials (good and bad) for this or ANY other
microtomes for cutting semi-thins.

Thank you on his behalf.

JB

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Thu Jan 11 15:00:44 2001



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:54:31 -0600
Subject: RE: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Garry,

We've solved that problem with Kevlar collars. We found that gloves just
made it MORE likely that jugulars would be severed, so we don't use them
either.

Randy

-----Original Message-----
} From: Garry Burgess [mailto:GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca]
Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 1:19 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


We've only lost about 4 technologists due to them accidentally cutting open
their jugulars with a razor blade whilst trimming blocks and bleeding to
death on the spot. So with that good safety record, we've chosen to
dispense with the gloves thus far. Should we lose a few more though, the
issue might come up again.

Garry

Charge Technologist - Electron Microscopy
Department of Pathology
Health Sciences Centre
Winnipeg, Canada



From daemon Thu Jan 11 15:28:26 2001



From: Timothy Schneider :      Timothy.Schneider-at-Mail.TJU.EDU
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:50:36 -0500
Subject: SAFETY POLICE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dave:

In my 21 years of thin sectioning I have from time to time cut my fingers,
but a band aid is all that was needed. Kevlar gloves sound to me like
ridiculous over kill. However for those of us working in really big and not
always friendly cities, there might be an argument for Kevlar vests. Happy
sectioning, Tim

Timothy G. Schneider
Director of Electron Microscopy
Department of Pathology
Room 229 Jefferson Hall
Thomas Jefferson University
1020 Locust St.
Philadelphia Pa. 19107
215-503-4798 work
610-613-8170 cellular
timothy.schneider-at-mail.tju.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 11 15:33:16 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:29:53 -0600
Subject: Re: Ultramicrotomy safety issues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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----- Original Message -----
} From: "Garrison, Becky" {becky.garrison-at-jax.ufl.edu}
} I have always worn latex gloves more for protection ( abrasion from
} tightening chucks, etc.) Using long single edge razors (Weck Extra Long
} Blades, EMS #71933-60) seems to give me more control of the blade and
} therefore less of a chance to knick one's fingers.
}
I have at times shaved with a straight razor and that is little different
that what a long single edge razor. Some people that have beards still do
although a old Gillette safety razor with the guard removed is easier to
use since sharpening a straight razor is a pain. Explaining that some
folks still use them to shave should at least catch the safely Nazi off
guard if not convince him of the absurdity of his request.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Thu Jan 11 15:56:17 2001



From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.org
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 14:29:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Using a microscope as a "flatbed" scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi! I am interested in using a light
microscope to digitize photographic film, i.e.
to use my light microscope as a film scanner
to scan negatives.

Since our lab does a fair amount of investigation
into telepathology applications, we have scopes
that are set up for the automatic scanning of
multiple fields, merging of fields, etc. That
problem is (relatively) solved.

What I am getting stumped on here is how to
mount my 35mm photographic negatives. If I
just slap one on a slide and set a coverslip
on top, I get (not surprisingly) nontrivial
refractive problems with irregularities in the
surface of the film.

Unfortunately, these are photographic negatives
which might have forensic/evidentiary value, so
I can't dribble on any of the mounting media I
can think of -- since I can't permanently mount
the negative. I have to be able to take that
negative at a later time and make an "original"
photograph.

Anybody have experience with this? Any lore
would be appreciated.


billo




From daemon Thu Jan 11 16:49:14 2001



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 17:44:52 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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A one day TEM course sponsored by the AVS will given during the upcoming
February Santa Clara meeting. For more information please see
www.vacuum.org


At 9:04 AM -0800 12/13/00, Thearith H. Ung wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From daemon Thu Jan 11 18:59:10 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 10:52:58 +1000
Subject: RE: Using a microscope as a "flatbed" scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Glycerin has about the right refractive index and is easily washed out with
water, after which the negatives can be air dried. Certainly glycerin works as
a temporary mountant for microscope slides and the negative's gelatin emulsion
is not affected by it.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Friday, January 12, 2001 5:30 AM, William R. Oliver
[SMTP:oliver-at-cpt.afip.org] wrote:
}
}
}
} Hi! I am interested in using a light
} microscope to digitize photographic film, i.e.
} to use my light microscope as a film scanner
} to scan negatives.
}
} Since our lab does a fair amount of investigation
} into telepathology applications, we have scopes
} that are set up for the automatic scanning of
} multiple fields, merging of fields, etc. That
} problem is (relatively) solved.
}
} What I am getting stumped on here is how to
} mount my 35mm photographic negatives. If I
} just slap one on a slide and set a coverslip
} on top, I get (not surprisingly) nontrivial
} refractive problems with irregularities in the
} surface of the film.
}
} Unfortunately, these are photographic negatives
} which might have forensic/evidentiary value, so
} I can't dribble on any of the mounting media I
} can think of -- since I can't permanently mount
} the negative. I have to be able to take that
} negative at a later time and make an "original"
} photograph.
}
} Anybody have experience with this? Any lore
} would be appreciated.
}
}
} billo
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 11 19:07:35 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 11:05:55 +1000
Subject: RE: EDS detector pumping

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Don't do it. The reason for pumping detectors first without heat is to avoid
further contamination of the crystal. When the dewar is heated material is
released from the walls of the contained space and especially the molecular
sieve.
Pump first and then heat, that way the pump can cope and quickly eliminate the
additional contaminants.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Friday, January 12, 2001 2:28 AM, Faerber Jacques
[SMTP:Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr] wrote:
}
} Hello
}
} I have no experience in EDS detector pumping, but a little bit in vacuum
} technology.
}
} What do you think about heating the Dewar before pumping ?
}
} That's what I do with sorbtion (zeolite) pumps used to prepump UHV vessel
} (to have a dry pumping before starting turbo or ion pump). I put a heater
} around the pump -in our case it would be hot water (hot air ? hot oil ?
} which temperture can support the Dewar assembly ?)- let it warm over the
} night, and close the venting valve.
}
} You could do something similar with the detector : warm it at air
} pressure for a few hours (it schould dry too the zeolite) and than pump
} down with turbo, but pre-pump with dry backing pump to prevent oil
} contamination,
} as Jim mentioned. Than pump down until the Dewar is cold, with a base
} pressure of something like 10E-5 Torr. And after that, cool it with
} nitrogen.
}
} What do you think about that ?
}
} Bye
}
}
} J. Faerber
} IPCMS-GSI
} (Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg
} Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
} 23, rue de Loess
} 67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
} France
}
} Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
} Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
} E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



From daemon Thu Jan 11 23:01:08 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2001 22:56:13 -0600
Subject: Re: Using a microscope as a "flatbed" scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is also a film cleaning fluid I found several at Porters Camera
http://www.porters.com/ and search for "film cleaner" in their on line
store. These usually don't require washing and would be easier to clean
off than Glycerin. There is a scratch remover that might also work. I
couldn't find it so it may have had something in it that the EPA didn't
like. Your darkroom or local camera store may have these.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00
} From: "Jim at ProSciTech" {jim-at-proscitech.com}
}
} Glycerin has about the right refractive index and is easily washed out
with
} water, after which the negatives can be air dried. Certainly glycerin
works as
} a temporary mountant for microscope slides and the negative's gelatin
emulsion
} is not affected by it.
} Cheers
} Jim Darley
} ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
} PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
} Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
} Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
} ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com
}
} On Friday, January 12, 2001 5:30 AM, William R. Oliver
} [SMTP:oliver-at-cpt.afip.org] wrote:
} }
} }
} }
} } Hi! I am interested in using a light
} } microscope to digitize photographic film, i.e.
} } to use my light microscope as a film scanner
} } to scan negatives.
} }
} } Since our lab does a fair amount of investigation
} } into telepathology applications, we have scopes
} } that are set up for the automatic scanning of
} } multiple fields, merging of fields, etc. That
} } problem is (relatively) solved.
} }
} } What I am getting stumped on here is how to
} } mount my 35mm photographic negatives. If I
} } just slap one on a slide and set a coverslip
} } on top, I get (not surprisingly) nontrivial
} } refractive problems with irregularities in the
} } surface of the film.
} }
} } Unfortunately, these are photographic negatives
} } which might have forensic/evidentiary value, so
} } I can't dribble on any of the mounting media I
} } can think of -- since I can't permanently mount
} } the negative. I have to be able to take that
} } negative at a later time and make an "original"
} } photograph.
} }
} } Anybody have experience with this? Any lore
} } would be appreciated.
} }
} }
} } billo
} }
} }
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 12 01:44:31 2001



From: Nuria Cortadellas :      nuriac-at-giga.sct.ub.es
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 08:39:23 +0100 (CET)
Subject: callose

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, microscopists

does anybody knows the telephone number from Biosupplies (Melbourne,
Australia), I bought a callose ((1-3)beta-glucan-specific) monoclonal
antibody two years ago and I can't contact with them at the telephone that
I have.
Thanks a lot
Nuria

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nuria Cortadellas
Unitat de Microscopia de Transmissio
Serveis Cientifico-Tecnics
Universitat de Barcelona
C/ Sole i Sabaris, 1-3 08028 Barcelona
Tel: +34 3 402 13 52
Fax: +34 3 402 13 98
E-mail: nuriac-at-giga.sct.ub.es



From daemon Fri Jan 12 02:16:19 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 08:13:20 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: SAFETY POLICE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We put up with the minor wounds. I do however tell
students not to cut themselves as I will be obliged to fill
in an accident form and the safety officer will invite me
to think of alterative methods. We thought of blunting the
blade corners or making little corner guards but never got
round to it.

Dave

On Thu, 11 Jan 2001 15:50:36 -0500 Timothy Schneider
{Timothy.Schneider-at-Mail.TJU.EDU} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dave:
}
} In my 21 years of thin sectioning I have from time to time cut my fingers,
} but a band aid is all that was needed. Kevlar gloves sound to me like
} ridiculous over kill. However for those of us working in really big and not
} always friendly cities, there might be an argument for Kevlar vests. Happy
} sectioning, Tim
}
} Timothy G. Schneider
} Director of Electron Microscopy
} Department of Pathology
} Room 229 Jefferson Hall
} Thomas Jefferson University
} 1020 Locust St.
} Philadelphia Pa. 19107
} 215-503-4798 work
} 610-613-8170 cellular
} timothy.schneider-at-mail.tju.edu
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 12 04:22:27 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 10:18:45 +0000
Subject: Re: STEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thearith

we use a Hitachi H7000 with STEM attachment although I'm sure there will be
someone much closer to you, but I would like to make a couple of comments:
you mention a dedicated STEM unit which to me is a free-standing high
resolution STEM and not a STEM attachment to a TEM. There should be lots of
TEMs with STEM attachments on instruments bought in the last 10 or 15 years but
only a few high resolution STEMs because they are expensive and specialized
(try Brookhaven National Laboratory website
http://bnlstb.bio.bnl.gov/biodocs/stem/stem.htmlx).

You may also want to consider that certain TEMs have built in energy filtering
or electron energy spectrometers which can actually be tuned for different
atomic masses in the specimen - Zeiss EM902s can do this but I'm not sure if
any other machines are available.

I have no connection with Brookhaven or Zeiss, although of course I do use
Hitachi.

Good luck

Malcolm


Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

"Thearith H. Ung" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} Does anyone know any place that has a TEM with a dedicated STEM unit
} attached. The reason for the question is that I have particles composed of
} cores and shells (coated particles), both of which are different materials.
} By TEM I am not able to discern the shells from the cores because the
} contrast is extremely low. However, I am told that a dedicated STEM unit
} might allow me distinguish the shells from the cores based on the fact that
} they both have very different z-contrast.
}
} Regards,
} Thearith
}
} _________________________
}
} Thearith Ung, Ph.D.
} Quantum Dot Corporation
} 26136 Research Road
} Hayward CA 94545
} Tel: (510)-887-8775 (x4125)
} Fax:(510)-783-9729
} www.qdots.com



From daemon Fri Jan 12 04:51:15 2001



From: Peter Bond :      P.Bond-at-plymouth.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 08:17:03 -0600
Subject: Microtome injury

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Glycerin, and also ethylene glycol, can be dried under vacuum
making it possible to avoid rehydrating the negative
Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jim at ProSciTech" {jim-at-proscitech.com}
To: "'William R. Oliver'" {oliver-at-cpt.afip.org} ;
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 12, 2001 12:52 AM


Before this subject is banned from the list -

Our only serious injuries to date are blinded students falling asleep
while sectioning and poking their eyes out on the binocular eyepieces!

Perhaps the kevlar collars would keep their heads up a little longer?!

Pete

--
Peter Bond
Plymouth Electron Microscopy Unit
University of Plymouth
Drake Circus
Plymouth
Devon
UK PL4 8AA
Tel/Fax: 01752 233092
email: pbond-at-plymouth.ac.uk




From daemon Fri Jan 12 09:55:42 2001



From: ed_bachmann-at-unc.edu (Ed Bachmann)
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 11:01:48 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)
Subject: Nikon SMZ800 vs Leica MZ7 Stereozooms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am trying to judge the optical quality of two similar stereoscopic zoom
scopes: the Nikon SMZ800 and the Leica MZ7, both equipped with a 1x
Planapochromatic objective.

Leica publishes resolution figures for the MZ7, claiming 309 line pairs per mm.
Nikon does not, and I haven't been able to persuade the Nikon representative to
"characterize" the resolution of the SMZ800, although he says he can. I do not
have the necessary test slide, nor do I know where I can get one with a scale
graduated from say 200-400 lp/mm. I do know though that such a slide would cost
probably $300-$500.

Interestingly, Nikon publishes a resolution number for its next higher quality
scope, the SMZ1000. It claims the SMZ1000 can resolve 300 lp/mm with a 1x
Planapo. Because Nikon product literature doesn't publish a resolution for the
SMZ800, I suspect that its resolution is substantially lower than 300 lp/mm, and
therefore inferior to the Leica MZ7.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might judge the relative quality of
these two scopes, or does anyone have experience with either scope that might
shed light on this problem? Is my only alternative to find and buy a suitable
test slide? If so, can anyone point me to a source?

Thanks very much,
Ed

Ed Bachmann
Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
Manning Hall CB 3355
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3355
(919) 962-0512



From daemon Fri Jan 12 10:39:34 2001



From: DMoravits-at-swri.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 10:37:47 CST
Subject: LM--need operator's manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for some sort of operator's manual for a Zeiss Axioskop (am unsure
of the date of production, but assuming the '90's).

Thank you,

Don Moravits
Senior Technician
Southwest Research Institute
6220 Culebra Road
San Antonio, Texas 78238

Voice-210-522-2891
Fax-210-522-6220
E-Mail-dmoravits-at-swri.edu


From daemon Fri Jan 12 10:50:48 2001



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 16:47:47 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: STEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thearith,

Here are a couple of references you might find useful, from a specialist
on this kind of electron microscopy. I'll send the abstracts as
attachments separately.

Srnova-Sloufova I, Lednicky F, Gemperle A, et al.
Core-shell (Ag)Au bimetallic nanoparticles: Analysis of transmission
electron microscopy images
LANGMUIR 16: (25) 9928-9935 DEC 12 2000

Lednicky F, Coufalova E, Hromadkova J, et al.
Low-voltage TEM imaging of polymer blends
POLYMER

} "Thearith H. Ung" wrote:
} }
} } Dear Colleagues,
} }
} } Does anyone know any place that has a TEM with a dedicated STEM unit
} } attached. The reason for the question is that I have particles composed of
} } cores and shells (coated particles), both of which are different materials.
} } By TEM I am not able to discern the shells from the cores because the
} } contrast is extremely low. However, I am told that a dedicated STEM unit
} } might allow me distinguish the shells from the cores based on the fact that
} } they both have very different z-contrast.
} }
} } Regards,
} } Thearith
} }
} } _________________________
} }
} } Thearith Ung, Ph.D.
} } Quantum Dot Corporation
} } 26136 Research Road
} } Hayward CA 94545
} } Tel: (510)-887-8775 (x4125)
} } Fax:(510)-783-9729
} } www.qdots.com

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+



From daemon Fri Jan 12 10:56:24 2001



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 16:53:10 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Microscopy of core-shell: abstracts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thearith,

(I accidentally deleted the original message with your e-mail address)

Abstracts after the signature.

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Record 1 of 2

Author(s): Srnova-Sloufova I; Lednicky F; Gemperle A; Gemperlova J
Title: Core-shell (Ag)Au bimetallic nanoparticles: Analysis of
transmission electron microscopy images
Source: LANGMUIR 2000, Vol 16, Iss 25, pp 9928-9935
Addresses: Srnova-Sloufova I, Charles Univ, Dept Phys & Macromol Chem,
Hlavova 2030, Prague 12840 2, Czech Republic.
Charles Univ, Dept Phys & Macromol Chem, Prague 12840 2, Czech Republic.
Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Macromol Chem, CR-16206 Prague 6, Czech
Republic.
Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Phys, Prague 18221 8, Czech Republic.

Abstract: Layered core-shell bimetallic silver-gold colloids in the size
range of 10-16 nm have been prepared by the seed-growth method. Silver
nuclei were covered by gold shells of various thicknesses without any
stabilization agent. Interfacial (Ag)Au colloid-2,2'-bipyridine films were
prepared from these bimetallic colloids and used for the purpose of
analysis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and electron
diffraction. Both observed and calculated TEM images were used to
characterize the prepared nanoparticles. On the basis of the analysis of
TEM images, the calculated TEM image contrast, and results obtained by
electron diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and other
experiments, the core-shell structure of the prepared (Ag)Au nanoparticles
was revealed. Particles were found to consist of a silver core and a gold
shell enriched with silver.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Record 2 of 2

Author(s): Lednicky F; Coufalova E; Hromadkova J; Delong A; Kolarik V
Title: Low-voltage TEM imaging of polymer blends
Source: POLYMER 2000, Vol 41, Iss 13, pp 4909-4914
Addresses: Lednicky F, Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Macromol Chem,
Heyrovsky Sq 2, CR-16206 Prague 6, Czech Republic.
Acad Sci Czech Republ, Inst Macromol Chem, CR-16206 Prague 6, Czech
Republic.
Delong Instruments, Brno 61200, Czech Republic.

Abstract: Low-voltage transmission electron microscopy (LV-TEM) was
applied to obtain images of the phase structure of selected polymer blends
without any prior staining. The instrument used (LVTEM-5, working at 5 kV)
is of a novel construction combining visual-light and
electronmicroscopical techniques, resulting in an enhanced efficiency of
light transport to the eye and facilitating CCD imaging. Results were
compared wi th LV-STEM at 25 kV. Phase structure of polycarbonate/poly(
styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PC/SAN), polystyrene/polypropylene (PS/PP), and
polyethylene/polypropylene blends (PE/PP, ADFLEX) were selected to
demonstrate the above techniques. The difference in density between the
individual components of polymer blends was found to be the reason for the
obtained image contrast. Differences less than 0.04 g/cm(3) can be traced
with this technique.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





From daemon Fri Jan 12 11:05:21 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 09:00:28 -0800
Subject: Re: Using a microscope as a "flatbed" scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


First off, I can't understand the rationale for using an
LM to do neg scanning. Why not just use a scanner?
Easy, fast, reproducable.

If you do want to use an LM, it seems to me that a low
power objective is required in order to avoid imaging
mostly the grain structure. With a typical field of view
for the camera, you will likely be taking about 100
individual shots and then stitching them together.
A 2.5X objective works on low NA condensers. A
1X objective requires an ultra low condenser. But
even this would result in a 10X FOV on each image
frame.

Notwithstanding the above, if you do want to temporarily
mount 35mm frames, get Bair mounts from the Stock
Solution, Salt Lake City.

http://www.tssphoto.com/sp/index.html

These are self-adhesive cardboard mounts which stick
to themselves but not to the film. When you are done,
just peel the mount apart and your neg will fall out.

gary g.

http://photoweb.net



At 11:29 AM 1/11/01, you wrote:

} Hi! I am interested in using a light
} microscope to digitize photographic film, i.e.
} to use my light microscope as a film scanner
} to scan negatives.
}
} Since our lab does a fair amount of investigation
} into telepathology applications, we have scopes
} that are set up for the automatic scanning of
} multiple fields, merging of fields, etc. That
} problem is (relatively) solved.
}
} What I am getting stumped on here is how to
} mount my 35mm photographic negatives. If I
} just slap one on a slide and set a coverslip
} on top, I get (not surprisingly) nontrivial
} refractive problems with irregularities in the
} surface of the film.
}
} Unfortunately, these are photographic negatives
} which might have forensic/evidentiary value, so
} I can't dribble on any of the mounting media I
} can think of -- since I can't permanently mount
} the negative. I have to be able to take that
} negative at a later time and make an "original"
} photograph.
}
} Anybody have experience with this? Any lore
} would be appreciated.
}
}
} billo



From daemon Fri Jan 12 11:07:47 2001



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 17:05:00 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM: Crystal Growth

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Leonard,

Some things don't need solvents. For example, citric acid can be melted
on a hotplate at about 100^C, and if cooled slowly will give chunky
crystals in all sorts of birefringence colours.

If you have a hot enough plate, it's good to look at sodium nitrate (mp
about 305^C. This will form large slabs of crystals. These don't look so
good in themselves, but if you have a Bertrand lens or else simply pull
out the eyepiece and look at down the tube, many of them will display
concentric rings on a Maltese cross, the interference pattern resulting
from different path lengths of the two polarized rays through the crystal.
Try this with different magnification objectives. The citric acid will
also give wonderful interference patterns, but they're much more
complicated.

Other organic compounds can simply be melted, and when cooled between
cover slip and hot plate will form spherulites.

If you melt a thin film of polypropylene between slide and cover slip, and
cool slowly, you will get fantastic spherulites. Spherulites are found in
many plastics, but polypropylene is the star performer. (Further details
on request).

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

On Fri, 5 Jan 2001 us004118-at-mindspring.com wrote:

} Question: I am enjoying doing photomicrographs of crystal preparations
} in polarized light. However I have insuffient knowledge of chemistry to
} choose solvents without a long series of trial and error efforts.Can you
} give me a rationale and/or a reference to go about this in a more
} productive manner?

Email: us004118-at-mindspring.com
Name: Leonard Lessin, FBPA

School: (Retired Science & Medical Photographer)

State: NY

Zip: 10012







From daemon Fri Jan 12 11:22:10 2001



From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 12:18:44 -0500
Subject: [LM - Stereo] AO Questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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What is the difference in AO Stereo eyepieces between the 10X WF number 134 and the 10x WF
number 148?

Who (after market or used) has part for AO boom stand's number 562?

I am looking for rack and pinion set for the 562 stand?

Any one have a copy of service manual, instruction manual or catalog for a AO Stereo Zoom
model 580 pod?

Thank You

Best Regards

Joseph Passero

mailto:jp-at-spacelab.net

Shop online without a credit card
http://www.rocketcash.com
RocketCash, a NetZero subsidiary


From daemon Fri Jan 12 11:37:17 2001



From: E.M.M. Manders :      e.manders-at-chem.uva.nl
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 18:28:28 +0100
Subject: FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 2001, Amsterdam, April 1-4

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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***************************************************
Last call for papers: FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 2001
***************************************************

FOM 2001 , Amsterdam The Netherlands, April 1-4, 2001


FOM 2001 is a world leading international conference on advanced
microscopy. It is the joint meeting of the 13th International Conference on
Confocal Microscopy and the 13th International Conference on 3D Image
Processing in Microscopy.

FOM 2001 will be held at the Academic Medical Centre (AMC) of the
University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

For more information visit: http://www.focusonmicroscopy.org

Call for abstracts
------------------
Deadline for abstract submission: february 1st, 2001.


Core conference subjects:
"INSTRUMENTATION" and "IMAGE PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS"

SPEAKERS: S. Hell (Gottingen, Germany), T. Wilson (Oxford, UK), S. Kawata
(Osaka, Japan) C.J.R. Sheppard (Sydney, Astralia), C. Coggswell (Sydney,
Astralia) E. Stelzer (Heidelberg, Germany) C. Cremer (Heidelberg, Germany),
P.A. Benedetti (Pisa, Italy), A. Kriete (Giessen, Germany), H. van der
Voort (Hilversum, The Netherlands), P.C. Cheng (Buffalo, USA), G.J.
Brakenhoff (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)


Special conference subjects this year:
MULTI-PHOTON MICROSCOPY" and "MICROSCOPY OF LIVING CELLS AND TISSUE".

SPEAKERS: A. Zumbusch (Muenchen, Germany), L. Moreaux (Paris, France) A.
Diaspro (Genova, Italy), M. Muller (Amsterdam, The Netherlands), K.
Sullivan (La Jolla, USA, to be confirmed), R. van Driel (Amsterdam, The
Netherlands), R. Eils (Heidelberg, Germany), T. Mistelli (Bethesda, USA; to
be confirmed), D. Gadella (Wageningen, The Netherlands), J. Dobrucki
(Krakov, Poland), A. Houtsmuller (Rotterdam, The Netherlands), E. Manders
(Amsterdam, The Netherlands)


Conference Office:
------------------
Mrs M.P.A. Beunk-Timmers
Nicolaes Tulp Institute
PO-Box 23213
1100 DS Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Fax: +31-(0)20-6963228
Phone +31-(0)20-5668585
Web: http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org
E-mail: info-at-FocusOnMicroscopy.org


Local Organising Committee:
---------------------------
Prof. G.J. Brakenhoff and Dr. E.M.M. Manders






---------------
Erik M.M. Manders, PhD
Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences
Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam

Visit: Kruislaan 316, Building III, room 2.07, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Plantage Muidergracht 12, 4th floor, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Mail: Kruislaan 316
1098 SM AMSTERDAM
The Netherlands
E-mail: e.manders-at-chem.uva.nl
Tel: +31-(0)20-5256225 (5257702)(5255136)
Fax: +31-(0)20-5256271
Web: http://wwwmc.bio.uva.nl/
http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org/
---------------



From daemon Fri Jan 12 12:07:45 2001



From: William R. Oliver :      oliver-at-cpt.afip.org
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 10:40:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Using a microscope as a "flatbed" scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2001, Gary Gaugler wrote:

} First off, I can't understand the rationale for using an
} LM to do neg scanning. Why not just use a scanner?
} Easy, fast, reproducable.

There are a couple. The driving reason for me is that this gives me a
*lot* more control in exploiting the lighting of the negative.

I do forensic image processing as well as "regular" pathology stuff.
Consider the following scenario:

A bad guy is sitting in a shadowed room aiming a rifle through a
window. Joe Snuffy tourist takes a photo of the street which
incidentally captures the window (let's assume that Joe Snuffy
is a purist and isn't using a Mavica, in which this is all moot
and useless). The window is largely a dark blob.

The task, then is to get as much information of that dark blobby window
as possible. If you look at most film scanners on the market,
particularly in any reasonable price range, you don't have the option
of cranking your illumination up or down, of sticking filters in the
light pathway, of doing all the stuff we take for granted as
microscopists.

There's a lot of tools in them thar microscopy hills. It ain't so, it
seems, with the film scanners I have available.

Instead, almost always, the only thing you can play with is the gamma.
That means you are going to spend a lot of your representation space on
stuff you don't want to see. The scanner is going to get two bits of
data out of that blob, whatever knob you twiddle.

Playing games resetting the gamma as an option in a TWAIN driver won't
fix this, and I haven't seen a "burn the bejezus out of this little
area here and ignore the rest of the slide" button. Oh, sure, you can
take those two bits the scanner gives you and display it as 0 and 1 or
0 and 255, but it ain't going to fill up the space in between. Not
even with noise. The bottom line is that my impression is that film
has dynamic range that is not accessible to most film scanners.

As a secondary issue, I have a few ideas for for playing with grain and
restoration that might benefit from data aquisition at a higher
resolution.


}
} If you do want to use an LM, it seems to me that a low
} power objective is required in order to avoid imaging
} mostly the grain structure.

Sorta, but I am actually interested in seeing about characterizing the
grain structure and seeing if that characterization can be useful in
restoration.

Finally, I have a good characterization of the mtf of my microscope. I
don't have a good characterization of the mtf of my flatbed scanner.
While that doesn't help me with blind deconvolution for the camera mtf,
it does help me for at least that part of the restoration of the
image. I may be goofy, but I'd like to play with it a little.

If you have some experience with this, I'd love to learn from you. I
figure that *somebody* must have played with this, but I haven't been
able to find much literature on it. Do you have some lore you would
like to share (nudge, nudge)?


} With a typical field of view
} for the camera, you will likely be taking about 100
} individual shots and then stitching them together.

Something like that. But that stitching and data handling
is something we do on a daily basis.

}
} Notwithstanding the above, if you do want to temporarily
} mount 35mm frames, get Bair mounts from the Stock
} Solution, Salt Lake City.
}
} http://www.tssphoto.com/sp/index.html


Thanks!


billo



From daemon Fri Jan 12 12:52:38 2001



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 08:49:15 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: STEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Does anyone know any place that has a TEM with a dedicated STEM unit
} attached. The reason for the question is that I have particles composed
} of cores and shells (coated particles), both of which are different
} materials.
} By TEM I am not able to discern the shells from the cores because the
} contrast is extremely low. However, I am told that a dedicated STEM unit
} might allow me distinguish the shells from the cores based on the fact
} that they both have very different z-contrast.

I agree with the person who suggested an energy-filtering TEM, such as the
Zeiss 902. We have the newer version, the LEO 912, and I have also been
doing some work with coated nanoparticles. Yes, it is possible to see the
difference between the cores and coating with this type of instrument.

Aloha,
Tina

http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf/microangela

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Fri Jan 12 13:06:30 2001



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 11:03:17 -0800
Subject: Gold staining heparin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi:

Its me again.

Someone here would like to probe for heparin on some amyloid fibrils they
have made. Fibril formation is different in the presence of heparin and
they are curious to know if the heparin is binding to the fibrils or not.

They prepare the fibrils in their lab, don't ask me how, and apply liquid
suspensions to a formvar coated grid. We negative stain with UA and then go
to the TEM to look for fibrils.

The results of the neg stain search can be variable, sometimes the fibrils
look like fibers, other times it seems to be just a bunch of junk, so the
fibril formation is not always we defined. These folks are trying to figure
out whether to probe the fibrils on the grid, or before while still
suspended. But they tell me that often the fibrils do not survive too many
washings in suspension, so maybe probing in solution before applying to
grids could be a problem.

Any ideas, this is not my area of expertise.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Fri Jan 12 14:28:17 2001



From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      AllanWojtasP-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 15:22:27 -0500
Subject: Food Structure and Functionality Symposium 2001

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Food Structure & Functionality Symposium 2001
An international symposium leading food structure & Functionality studies through the 21st century
*webaddress at the AOCS site http://www.aocs.org/member/division/fsff/index.htm*

Being held in conjunction with the , May 13-16, 2001, Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. For information, e-mail us at: meetings-at-aocs.org

The symposium has two themes:
* New and novel approaches (including microscopy, rheology and spectroscopy) to the study of structure-function relationships in foods;
* Food system studies covering any part of the processing chain - from the raw material to the final product, and including trouble shooting.

Tentative Program (confirmed as of January 12th, 2001)

May 13th - Short Courses (short courses will run for a full day, and will run concurrently)

1) Food Contaminants. Contact person - Mark Auty
2) Specific Labeling in Foods. Contact person - Marcel Paques

May 14th-16th inclusive - Technical sessions
6 sessions will run over 3 days

Morning
Symposium opening
Plenary lecture - Food Quality andwhy the Structure matters. P. Lillford, Unilever Research, Colworth House UK

Session 1: Dairy Products and Fat Based Foods Session - chairs M. Auty and M. Paques

Milk protein polysaccharide interactions in aqueous solutions and oil-in-water emulsions.
H. Singh*, Y. Hemar & P. Munro, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health
Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Structural functions of dairy ingredients in products formulated with taro flour.
C. Onwulata, USDA/ARS,Eastern Regional Research Center,Wyndmoor, PA 19038

Confocal imaging of galactomannan mode of action in recrystallisation of ice in model ice cream
D. Ferdinando, Unilever Research Colworth House, UK

Heating of Food Proteins in a Closed System at High Temperature
N. Kitabatake, Kyoto University, Japan

Milk Protein - molecular components and functional properties. N. C. Ganguli, Indian Dairy Association

Afternoon
Session 2: Food Safety - chairs J. W. Arnold and R. Droleskey
Prevention of Foodborne Illness Through Sanitation and Processing Technology
J.W. Arnold; USDA/ARS, Russell Research Center; Athens, GA 30604

PreHarvest Intervention Strategies to Control Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry
J. A. Byrd; USDA/ARS/SPARC; College Station, TX 77845

Interactions of Competitive Exclusion Cultures with the Intestinal Mucosa of Newly Hatched Chicks
R. Droleskey; USDA/ARS/SPARC; College Station, TX 77845

Adhesion of Salmonella on Alfalfa Sprouts
A. Chartowski; USDA/ARS, Western Regional Research Center; Albany, CA 94710

Growth of Fusarium moniliforme Dependent upon Corn Tissue Type
I. E. Yates; USDA/ARS, Russell Research Center; Athens, GA 30604

Dedicated poster viewing 4:00-6:00PM

Evening: Round Table Discussion - topic to be announced


Tuesday, May 15th, 2001
Morning
Session 3: New Methods and Techniques for Food Structure and Functionality Analysis -chair K.Groves

Diffusing wave spectroscopy - a new and non-invasive method for the investigation of the structure, dynamics and interactions in complex food systems
M. Alexander* and P. Schurtenberger

Food: How complex can it be?
E. Esselink ,Unilever Research Vlaardingen, The Netherlands

Immunolocalization of Transgenic Protein in Wheat Endosperm
M. L. Parker *, E. Stoger, R. Casey and P. Christou, Institute of Food Research, Norwich, England.

Structure/Function relationships through microrheology.
M. Paques, Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences/Unilever Research Vlaardingen

Specific labeling techniques for foods
J. Leunissen, Aurion: Immuno-Gold Reagents & Accessories, The Netherlands


Food Structure and Functionality Division Luncheon. Dr. Brian Brooker (Institute of Food Research, England * retired) will be presented with the Food Structure and Functionality Division award and will give a presentation entitled: Fat crystals - the importance of
being small.

Afternoon
Session 4: Agricultural Applications of Microscopy and Imaging Session- chairs D.F.Wood and P. Allan-Wojtas

The Utility of Sorting in Agriculture.
H. J. Arnott, Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, Texas

The Potential for Automatic X-ray Sorting of Insect Infested Grain
R. Haff . USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Automated Sorting of Almonds with Embedded Shell by Laser Transmittance Imaging
T. Pearson* R. Young, USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Use of a GFP-transformed strain of Fusarium graminearum to study ear rot development in corn
S. S. Miller. , AAFC - ECORC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Popping modifies endosperm structure and improves digestibility in maize and sorghum.
M.L. Parker, Institute of Food Research, Norwich, England.

Microstructural Changes in Rice During Cooking
D. Wood* and P.C. Yu . USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Evening: Food Structure and Functionality Division Member meeting

Wednesday, May 16th, 2001
Morning
Session 5: Ingredients and Food Processing - chairs D. Kittleson and J. Charbonneau

Water continuous fat crystal networks in ice cream induced by unsaturated monoglycerides
N. M. Barfod , Danisco Cultor, Brabrand, Denmark

High pressure application fo food systems and its impact on functional ingredients
B. Tauscher*, P. Butz,and A.F. Garcia, Federal Research Center for Nutrition, Karlsruhe, Germany

Specificity and application of lipolytic enzymes in bread making processes
T.B. Frandsen, T. Spendler, G. Budolfsen, L. Christiansen and J. B. Neilsen, Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark

Afternoon
Session 6: Colloidal and Interfacial Sciences - chairs D. Pechak and M. Paques

Rheology and Structure of Particulate Protein Gels
T. van Vliet, Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences,Wageningen, The Netherlands

Posters:

1. In situ study of the effect of heating on dough components using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR)

O. Sevenou, S.E. Hill, I.A. Farhat and J.R. Mitchell. Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK

2. Antioxidative activity of the crude extract of lignan glycosides from sesame meal

Y-S Shue and L.S. Hwang, Graduate Institute of Food Science and Technology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan, R.O.C.

3. Near Field Microscopy of phase separation in a mixed interfacial protein/surfactant film

A. P. Gunning, A.R. Mackie, A.R. Kirby and V.J. Morris, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK

Contact information for the chairs is shown below, in alphabetical order:

Paula Allan-Wojtas
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Centre, Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada
B4N 1J5
Tel: (902) 679-5566
FAX: (902) 679-2311
email: allanwojtasp-at-em.agr.ca

Judy Arnold
USDA -ARS - RRC
950 College Station Rd.
P.O. Box 5677
Athens, GA 30604-5677
USA
Tel: (706) 546-3515
FAX: (706) 546-3068
email: jarnold-at-ars.usda.gov

Mark Auty
Dairy Products Research Centre
TEAGASC
Moorepark, Femoy, Co. Cork
Ireland
Tel: 011-353-25-42447
FAX: 011-353-25-42340
email: mauty-at-moorepark.teagasc.ie

James E. Charbonneau
National Food Processors Association
Food Chemistry and Packaging Department
1401 New York Ave, NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
USA
Tel: (202) 639-5972
FAX: (202) 639-5991
email: jcharbo-at-nfpa-food.org

Kathy Groves
Leatherhead Food Research Association
Randalls Road, Leatherhead
Surrey KT22 7RY
England
Tel: 44 0132 822330
FAX: 44 0132 386228
email: kgroves-at-lfra.co.uk

Diana Kittleson
Pillsbury TPC Labs
737 Pelham Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55114
USA
Tel: (651) 917-5859
FAX: (651) 917 5850
email: dkittleson-at-pillsbury.com

Tony McKenna
New Zealand Dairy Institute
Private Bag 11 029
Palmerston North,
New Zealand
Tel: 011 64 6 350 4649
FAX: 011 64 6 356 1476
email: tony.mckenna-at-nzdri.org.nz

Marcel Paques
Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences/Unilever Research Vlaardingen
P.O. Box 20, 6710 BA Ede
The Netherlands
Tel: 011 31 318 659690
FAX: 011-31-318 650400
email: paques-at-nizo.nl

David Pechak
Kraft Technology Centre
801 Waukegan Road
Glenview, IL 60025
USA
Tel: (847) 646-4808
FAX: (847) 646-3864
email: dpechak-at-kraft.com

Delilah Wood
USDA - ARS - WWRC
800 Buchanan Street
Albany, CA 94710
USA
Tel: (510) 559-5653
FAX: (510) 559-5777
email: wood-at-pw.usda.gov



From daemon Fri Jan 12 15:12:21 2001



From: Linda Fox :      LFOX1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 14:47:28 -0600
Subject: single cell, Lanthanum and Ruthenium

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Greetings,
Does anyone have experience with lanthanum and/or ruthenium HT staining specifically for isolated cells??
I prepared two samples of single atrial cells, using protocols from the 60's and 70's. The ultrastructure was great, in part because I believe that the lanthanum as well as the ruthenium enhanced the UA and LC staining. I was hoping for a much more dense cell margin that would help to delineate vesicles that might be open to the surface.
I know that Ruthenium HT is supposed to bind to the glycocalyx and stain well....but the lanthanum protocols I could find were all intact tissue where the spaces between cells were filled with dense material. I am not sure that lanthanum works for single cells, but gave it a try. Ruth. HT was added to both the GA and OsO4, but lanthamun was used, per protocol, only in the OsO4. Etoh dehydration and Embed 812 resin.
Any sage wisdom on how to improve staining on a single cell prep would be helpful.
Linda Fox
lfox1-at-lumc.edu


From daemon Fri Jan 12 15:31:19 2001



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 12 Jan 2001 16:27:35 -0500
Subject: Facility management topics

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Fellow Microscopists:
As many of you know, the Facility Management session held at M&M2000 was very well received and there was a unanimous request for it to be continued. Therefore a similar session will be held at M&M 2001. I must finalize the topics within the next week or two. Since the purpose of this session is to discuss topics of interest to facility managers, I would like your input before the session is finalized.

The topics covered in the M&M 2000 session with transcripts published in Microscopy Today were:
1) Multi-user Facilities...managing users
2) Justification of Costs, cost recovery, electronic bookkeeping and billing
3) Equipment Maintenance: Vender service contracts vs. Independent providers vs. Insurance company/self-insure options.

The following are some suggestions that were gleaned from the evaluation forms and discussion during the session.

1) Training Users…courses, workshops, …what works for whom?
2) Scientific Ethics…What are our responsibilities as lab Managers?
3) Mission statements/lab organization/lab business plans/future planning issues
4) Staffing issues including training, part-time student help, Training course T.A’s
5) Daily issues…prioritizing use, prioritizing service projects, dealing with difficult users/customers
6) Legal issues involving data ownership, confidentiality of data, handling of potential evidence.
7) Justification for new equipment
8) Commercial use of university facilities
9) Microscopy as a research tool…integration of industry or campus facilities in coordination with other core facilities.
10) Issues unique to Multi-user and/or Service facilities and how such facilities can coexist.


The first 2 received the greatest number of requests. However there may be more relevant topics now. Please rank the 3 of highest priority to you or suggest additional topics of interest. I will sift through all replies at the end of next week and narrow them down to 3. Also please feel free to supply the names of individuals to lead specific discussion topics.
The format will be the same as the last session. A presenter will give a 10-15 min. introduction of the topic followed by ~30 min. open discussion.

Thanks,
Debby


Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-099e Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Fri Jan 12 15:32:48 2001



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 16:33:54 -0500
Subject: Re: Microtome injury

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Hi All,
On the "serious" side of this, and to make the safety police happy,
EMS sells a plastic guard that holds razor blades, exposing just a
small expanse for trimming. I had bought some years ago, on the
"that sound good" premise. Personally, I found them awkward to use,
but they are cheap, and having them in the lab (even if not used) may
be enough to satisfy your safety wizards.

Disclaimer: I have no financial interests in EMS.

Lee
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Fri Jan 12 17:24:00 2001



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 17:18:04 -0600
Subject: mounting diatoms for SEM

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Mounting of particles on the order of 50-100um onto double stick tape is
easily done as previously noted by using a very fine artist's brush and
distilled water. But this should be done moist, rather than wet. After
dipping the brush into DW, twirling the length of the brush end on a lab
tissue both removes excess water and creates a finer point at the tip. The
moist, fine-tipped brush can then not only pick up the diatom, foram or
other particle, but can also be used to orient it and position it on the
tape with good control. This method also prevents glue from bleeding up the
particle. Particles of this size range can also be set down on a thin
layer of silver conducting paint that's still wet, if you can chase the
drying horizon fast enough, or on a thin layer of still-wet collodion (the
same adhesive used by belly dancers to secure the navel jewel, but that's
another story).


***************************************************************
Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 914/365-8640
F: 914/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
http://www.discovery.com/area/science/micro/micro1.html
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)




From daemon Fri Jan 12 17:24:01 2001



From: Purdy, Sam :      SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2001 17:20:03 -0600
Subject: RE: Nikon SMZ800 vs Leica MZ7 Stereozooms

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Ed:
Edmund Scientific sells test slides for microscopes. Perhaps you can
find an adequate one there. Some test slides run up $300, though. Or, what
about using diatoms to compare one scope with another?

Sam Purdy
Technical Center/National Steel Corp
Trenton MI
} ----------
} From: ed_bachmann-at-unc.edu
} Sent: Friday, January 2001, 11:01 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Nikon SMZ800 vs Leica MZ7 Stereozooms
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
}
} I am trying to judge the optical quality of two similar stereoscopic zoom
} scopes: the Nikon SMZ800 and the Leica MZ7, both equipped with a 1x
} Planapochromatic objective.
}
} Leica publishes resolution figures for the MZ7, claiming 309 line pairs
} per mm.
} Nikon does not, and I haven't been able to persuade the Nikon
} representative to
} "characterize" the resolution of the SMZ800, although he says he can. I
} do not
} have the necessary test slide, nor do I know where I can get one with a
} scale
} graduated from say 200-400 lp/mm. I do know though that such a slide
} would cost
} probably $300-$500.
}
} Interestingly, Nikon publishes a resolution number for its next higher
} quality
} scope, the SMZ1000. It claims the SMZ1000 can resolve 300 lp/mm with a 1x
} Planapo. Because Nikon product literature doesn't publish a resolution
} for the
} SMZ800, I suspect that its resolution is substantially lower than 300
} lp/mm, and
} therefore inferior to the Leica MZ7.
}
} Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might judge the relative quality
} of
} these two scopes, or does anyone have experience with either scope that
} might
} shed light on this problem? Is my only alternative to find and buy a
} suitable
} test slide? If so, can anyone point me to a source?
}
} Thanks very much,
} Ed
}
} Ed Bachmann
} Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
} Manning Hall CB 3355
} University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
} Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3355
} (919) 962-0512
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 12 20:58:08 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2001 12:49:33 +1000
Subject: RE: mounting diatoms for SEM

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I believe that the time-honoured method of manipulating small particles with a
fine brush can be improved on. A customer thought that certain specimen should
not be wetted, because they were to be weighed. Presumably they could be left
to dry, but that was inconvenient.
I suggested one of those vacuum pick-up devices; these pick up specimens using
a square tipped syringe needle. Obviously those needles are too large for
foramifera but they can be tipped with thin plastic tubing. On the first try I
pulled some 0.3mm internal tubing using a PE transfer pipette. With practice
smaller tubes could be produced. I suggest that manipulating specimens with a
vacuum pick-up is faster and more precise than using a brush.
I have used a vacuum pick-up for placing (and turning over) TEM grids when
making support films. Its a rather more elegant and faster method than using
tweezers.
Disclaimer: ProSciTech is a supplier of vacuum pick-ups.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:18 AM, Dee Breger
[SMTP:micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu] wrote:
}
}
} Mounting of particles on the order of 50-100um onto double stick tape is
} easily done as previously noted by using a very fine artist's brush and
} distilled water. But this should be done moist, rather than wet. After
} dipping the brush into DW, twirling the length of the brush end on a lab
} tissue both removes excess water and creates a finer point at the tip. The
} moist, fine-tipped brush can then not only pick up the diatom, foram or
} other particle, but can also be used to orient it and position it on the
} tape with good control. This method also prevents glue from bleeding up the
} particle. Particles of this size range can also be set down on a thin
} layer of silver conducting paint that's still wet, if you can chase the
} drying horizon fast enough, or on a thin layer of still-wet collodion (the
} same adhesive used by belly dancers to secure the navel jewel, but that's
} another story).
}
}
} ***************************************************************
} Dee Breger
} Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
} Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
} 61 Route 9W
} Palisades, NY 10964 USA
} T: 914/365-8640
} F: 914/365-8155
}
} http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
} http://www.discovery.com/area/science/micro/micro1.html
} http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html
} Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)
}
}



From daemon Sat Jan 13 06:30:15 2001



From: chris smith (IACR-RES) :      chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2001 12:24:08 -0000
Subject: Retirement

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Hi Listers,
I've been thrown on the scrapheap at 60. So I'll be unsubscribing soon but
will keep an eye on the list over a colleague's shoulder. Many thanks for
all the help and interesting items, especially the forensic stuff - a
fascinating and useful insight into the problems of others.
Byeeee, Chris, Plant Path., IACR-Rothamsted, UK. chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk


From daemon Sat Jan 13 12:10:35 2001



From: Chris Jeffree :      c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2001 18:06:22 -0000
Subject: Microtome safety

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Most injuries while trimming blocks with hand-held razor blades result
either from the free
hand not knowing where the razor hand is, or from sudden uncontrolled
movement of the blade when force is released at end of cut, or due to
slippage, etc.
when the razor hand / arm movement is unlimited.
A couple of simple rules will prevent these situations from arising.
1) Look before you move
2) when cutting, use both hands - hold one end of the blade in each
hand at all times. That way you know where both hands are in relation
to the blade all the time
and there is also improved control over blade movement
3) Never cut with the blade at the end of an unsupported arm. Arms
and
hands should be supported as close to the specimen as possible, so
that
blade movement is strictly limited to the range that can be driven by
deliberate finger movements, and free, involuntary movements cannot
occur.

I recommend you not to wear gloves because they interfere with touch
perception and interfere with your grip on the blade. Has your safety
officer seen you in action? Does he really know what the risks are, or
is his imagination running riot? Show him your procedures.
(Any gender-specificity in the above is wholly unintentional)

Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility

Inveresk Cottage
26, Carberry Road
Inveresk
Musselburgh
Midlothian
EH21 8PR
Tel: +44 131 665 6062
FAX +44 131 653 6248
Mobile 07710 585 401



From daemon Sat Jan 13 15:05:22 2001



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2001 13:00:06 -0800
Subject: Re: Retirement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Hi Listers,
} I've been thrown on the scrapheap at 60. So I'll be unsubscribing soon but
} will keep an eye on the list over a colleague's shoulder. Many thanks for
} all the help and interesting items, especially the forensic stuff - a
} fascinating and useful insight into the problems of others.
} Byeeee, Chris, Plant Path., IACR-Rothamsted, UK. chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk

Chris -

WRONG attitude! I retired at the same age, and started Project MICRO so
that I could continue to share my love of the microworld. I suggest that
you contact the RMS equivalent, AMFES, and have some fun yourself!

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Mon Jan 15 08:48:34 2001



From: chris smith (IACR-RES) :      chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 14:25:12 -0000
Subject: Resurrection

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Dear Listers,
Many thanks indeed for the unanticipated response to my 'for info' note.
Attitude adjustment assimilated. The world will hear from me again! ttfn,
Chris


From daemon Mon Jan 15 11:44:55 2001



From: TEDPELLA-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 12:37:52 EST
Subject: unsubscribe

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Ted Pella


From daemon Mon Jan 15 11:52:52 2001



From: OCONNELL-at-ltu.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 12:50:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Job posting--revisited

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Still looking...for a few good account representatives for an
electron and optical microscopy service. territory is open.,
excellent earning potential. Please call Dick O'Connellat
734-668-3309 or e-mail Oconnell-at-ltu.edu. for more information.
(I was unable to reach some of you who responded because of
one reason or another--you know who you are. Please contact
me again with a phone number or some other means to reach you.)

Thanks
Dick O'Connell


From daemon Mon Jan 15 18:24:41 2001



From: RangeTS-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 19:18:08 EST
Subject: Job opening

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We are looking for someone with EDS/SEM experience to work out of our Florida
office. Responsible for setting up procedures and repairing systems in house
as well as customer sites. Working without supervision is a must. if you
are interested to know more about the position, please send your
qualification and salary history to our Email address. rangets-at-aol.com



From daemon Mon Jan 15 20:41:55 2001



From: Boron nitride :      boronnitride-at-hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 20:35:27 -0600
Subject: SOFTWARE FOR CREATE ATOMIC STRUCTURES OF INTERFACE OR DEFECT

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Dear Colleage,
Does anybody know if there is a software that can create
the atomic structure for an interface or a dislocation, so that an image
simulation (by using EMS or Mac Tempas) can be carried out directly for such
structures? I know crystal Kit can create an interface structure,however,
its atomic cordinations can not be exported directly to MacTempas or EMS
directly for image simulations.

I would be greatly appreciate if you could provide such kind of
information!

Sincerely,


James

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com




From daemon Mon Jan 15 22:07:37 2001



From: Rosalie Daniel :      rosalie-at-deakin.edu.au
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 14:59:03 +1100
Subject: Staining Spurr's and LR sections for LM

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Hello,
I a trying to stain sections of plant root that has been infected with a
fungus to highlight certain features including lignin, callose, suberin and
the fungal tissue itself. However, my samples have been embedded in LR
White and Spurr's Resins. I am having difficulty finding protocols for
staining of these resins. Most protocols refer to paraffin sections and it
is not possible to use ethanol based stains for these resin sections. Does
anyone know of any good references, books etc where I can find protocols
for staining of these resins for LM?
Thanks for your help.
Rose




From daemon Tue Jan 16 05:38:39 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 21:34:39 +1000
Subject: RE: Staining Spurr's and LR sections for LM

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Several stains are used with resin embedded sections. The favorite seems to be
Toluidine blue. This topic was discussed last March and several postings will
be in the Archives. The differentiation method I contributed then, but to make
this posting useful, I'll give here "my" complete method. There are many
variants, most recently contributors to the histoserver were "frothing" how
wonderful the results of staining with a combination of urea and Toluidine blue
are - I have no experience with that.

Make up 0.5% Toluidine blue and 1% Borax in water. This will keep "forever" in
a stoppered bottle on the bench. Keep with it a small funnel and a double layer
filter paper.

Sections should be well adhering to a slide after heating on a 60-80 degree
hotplate for some minutes after the sections had dried. Run a thick felt-tip
pen around the section - on the underside. This will help locating sections and
will not wash off.


Poor about 5ml of stain into the filter and apply a couple of drops to the
sections. Sit the funnel back on the bottle recovering the stain.

Place the section on a hotplate and leave until the edge of the stain has dried
up.

Now a few drops of water could be added to gently remove the remaining stain.
This would result in a fairly intense, but blue-only staining.

Its better to differentiate.
This is one of the most attractive features of the Toluidine stain as it can
give a two
colour, pink and blue rendition. This shows cell features similar to a double
staining with Haematoxylin & Eosin.

After staining on a hotplate add a drop of acid alcohol and then rinse the
slide with distilled water. The acid alcohol can destain partially or even
completely, but a brief application brings forth the two colours.

Make acid alcohol by adding to 25ml of 50% Ethanol a couple of drops of 1N HCl.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Tuesday, January 16, 2001 1:59 PM, Rosalie Daniel
[SMTP:rosalie-at-deakin.edu.au] wrote:
}
} Hello,
} I a trying to stain sections of plant root that has been infected with a
} fungus to highlight certain features including lignin, callose, suberin and
} the fungal tissue itself. However, my samples have been embedded in LR
} White and Spurr's Resins. I am having difficulty finding protocols for
} staining of these resins. Most protocols refer to paraffin sections and it
} is not possible to use ethanol based stains for these resin sections. Does
} anyone know of any good references, books etc where I can find protocols
} for staining of these resins for LM?
} Thanks for your help.
} Rose
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 16 06:34:45 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 04:31:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Staining Spurr's and LR sections for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Rose:

LR White is a methacrylate, and most routine paraffin stains can be used
directly with minor time modifications (the methacrylate can give some
background staining, but usually umimportant). Spurr's (and other epoxies)
can also be stained with differential methods--primarily using Toluidine
Blue or methylene blue. Check out Hayat's book on staining (MA Hayat,
"Stains and Cytochemical Methods", Plenum Press, 1993). He includes a broad
range of stains, including PAS, basic fuchsin-toluidine blue (similar to
H&E), Azure II-methylene blue-safranin O, H&E, and a thionin-acridine orange
(specifically for plant tissues). Another good source of references would
be to go to PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed) and do a search for
stains, then for resins or methacrylate, combine your searches, and use the
original papers (I know there are a lot out there). BTW, most suppliers of
stains (e.g. EM Sciences, Polysciences, Ted Pella, EB Sciences, Fullam,
Ladd, ProSciTech,SPI, etc) will have protocols for using their stains on LR
White and Spurr's--another good source for you. Hope this helps.

Roger C. Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

I have no financial interest in any of the mentioned vendors/suppliers (and
if I missed anyone--I apologize, it was purely a senior moment).

(On Tue, 16 Jan 2001 14:59:03 +1100, Rosalie Daniel wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello,
} I a trying to stain sections of plant root that has been infected with a
} fungus to highlight certain features including lignin, callose, suberin
and
} the fungal tissue itself. However, my samples have been embedded in LR
} White and Spurr's Resins. I am having difficulty finding protocols for
} staining of these resins. Most protocols refer to paraffin sections and
it
} is not possible to use ethanol based stains for these resin sections.
Does
} anyone know of any good references, books etc where I can find protocols
} for staining of these resins for LM?
} Thanks for your help.
} Rose
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Send a cool gift with your E-Card
http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/




From daemon Tue Jan 16 07:39:16 2001



From: Carmen =?iso-8859-1?Q?Mart=EDn?= :      cmartal-at-terra.es (by way of Nestor J.
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 07:33:53 -0600
Subject: Light Microscopy for vegetal tissues

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Hello,
I work with radicle tips and I'm looking for an effective stain in order
to reveal different cellular types such as xylem and/ or phloem, but I'm
havin some problemsa in finding protocols. Can anybody help me? Thanks
Carmen Martín




From daemon Tue Jan 16 07:56:46 2001



From: jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 08:58:47 -0500
Subject: more microtome safety

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One of our students was worried and put labeling tape (sometimes
referred to as "time tape") along the edge to be held (we normally
break a double edge in half).
We also have a very graphic cartoon drawn by our grad student
depicting a severed finger complete with blood (he was getting
frustrated with the EM students...)

Regarding the safety officers - teach *them* to section...


John P. Shields, PhD
Center for Ultrastructural Research
151 Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-4080
FAX 706-542-4271
jshields-at-cb.uga.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 16 09:14:26 2001



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 10:08:25 -0500
Subject: Re: single cell, Lanthanum and Ruthenium

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Hi Linda,
I worked with isolated ventricular cells many years ago, and as I
remember, there was always some variablilty of staining intensities
between cells that were processed in the same sample. We used cell
that were isolated using enzymatic treatment in conjunction with
shaking ( I believe that was pretty standard. This was in the early
1980's, work with Beatrice Wittenberg and Thomas Robinson). Cells
that ended up in the same dish for study, and were fixed & processed
together, took the stains differently. We also used Ruthenium Red to
stain the glycocalyx as well as Alcian Blue, Safraninin O, phenylene
diamine and a few other stains. You can look up the papers by
Simionescu & Simionescu from the 1970's for examples.
Caveoli can also be visualized with careful staining of silver-grey
sections. You can also try bismuth instead of lead, but use it at
1/10 the recipe's strength and for a shorter time.

good luck,
Lee
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jan 16 12:00:43 2001



From: Joyce Craig :      j-craig-at-csu.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 11:47:46 -0600
Subject: job posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Department of Biological Sciences at Chicago State University is
looking for an experienced electron microscopy technologist.
We teach a course in TEM in the fall and SEM in the spring. In the
summer we have students from several programs who learn about EM and
complete a simple research project.
We work on research projects with undergraduates, graduate students, and

faculty.
We have a really nice facility with JEOL 1200 STEM, JEOL 2100 SEM, and
RMC ultramicrotomes with cryo.
We have a beautiful campus that is very easy to get to as it is right at

several major freeways.
Our website will give you more information:
WWW.CSU.EDU/jbrown/EM



From daemon Tue Jan 16 14:39:10 2001



From: Michael D. Standing :      Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 13:37:55 -0700
Subject: Metal for sputter coating targets

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Dear Listers:

In our lab we have been sputter coating with gold since the dawn of time.
This has essentially been the "traditional" metal we have used for coating
our non-conductive samples. We have found that in some of our applications
that the gold grain is to large and is causing us problems in visualizing
some of the smaller structures (primarily in engineering samples) that we
are interested in. We currently sputter our samples for 1 to 4 minutes with
a current reading of 18 to 20 mA using an argon atmosphere in the coater.
We are aware that chromium and/or osmium coating are preferential to gold
sputtering, but those technologies are not available to us at this time.
What I would like to know is:
1) What are the advantages of using something other than gold as the target
material (eg. Gold palladium, platinum palladium, or just platinum)?
2) Are there other materials that will work besides these metals that would
give us equal service for small grain and a stable coating?
3) Are there operating conditions we could try that would still give us good
coating but reduce the grain size of the film material?
Thanks for your help,

Mike

======================================
Michael D. Standing
BYU Microscopy Lab
401 WIDB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602

e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
phone: (801) 378-4011
fax: (801) 378-3937
======================================




From daemon Tue Jan 16 14:50:16 2001



From: Sarah Lundberg :      lundberg-at-nevada.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 12:41:07 -0800
Subject: mounting supplies - bakelite ring forms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello listers-
I am looking for a supplier of bakelite ring forms 1 inch in diameter
(outside). Would someone contact me with that information. I can't
find anything on the web.
I appreciate your help!
Many Thanks,
Sarah
--
Sarah A.W. Lundberg
Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory
Department of Geoscience, UNLV
4505 S. Maryland Parkway Box 454010
Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010

EPMA Lab (702) 895-2660
SEM Lab (702) 895-2462
Office (702) 895-1134
Fax (702) 895-4064
Dept. Office (702) 895-3262

lundberg-at-nevada.edu
http://www.unlv.edu/Colleges/Sciences/Geoscience/EMIL.htm

Home:
8025 W. Russell Rd. Apt. #1117
Las Vegas, NV 89113
(702) 871-9635




From daemon Tue Jan 16 15:11:25 2001



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 08:07:46 +1100
Subject: Re: Metal for sputter coating targets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Michael,
you dont say what resolution you need, but if you cut the current on your
existing gold system down to 4-5mA for 3 min or so, you may see a
considerable improvement in the 10-50,000X range.

Sally Stowe


Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU EMU
Box 475 Canberra ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218 or 6125 8525
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU


} } } "Michael D. Standing" {Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu} 01/17/01 07:37am } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear Listers:

In our lab we have been sputter coating with gold since the dawn of time.
This has essentially been the "traditional" metal we have used for coating
our non-conductive samples. We have found that in some of our
applications
that the gold grain is to large and is causing us problems in visualizing
some of the smaller structures (primarily in engineering samples) that we
are interested in. We currently sputter our samples for 1 to 4 minutes
with
a current reading of 18 to 20 mA using an argon atmosphere in the coater.
We are aware that chromium and/or osmium coating are preferential to gold
sputtering, but those technologies are not available to us at this time.
What I would like to know is:
1) What are the advantages of using something other than gold as the
target
material (eg. Gold palladium, platinum palladium, or just platinum)?
2) Are there other materials that will work besides these metals that
would
give us equal service for small grain and a stable coating?
3) Are there operating conditions we could try that would still give us
good
coating but reduce the grain size of the film material?
Thanks for your help,

Mike

======================================
Michael D. Standing
BYU Microscopy Lab
401 WIDB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602

e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
phone: (801) 378-4011
fax: (801) 378-3937
======================================





From daemon Tue Jan 16 15:56:08 2001



From: Sarah Lundberg :      lundberg-at-nevada.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 13:45:33 -0800
Subject: Bakelite Rings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ah, once again invaluable information, Thank you John, Fred and Nestor
too!!
I tried all the suppliers I could think of, except Buehler of course!

--
Sarah A.W. Lundberg
Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory
Department of Geoscience, UNLV
4505 S. Maryland Parkway Box 454010
Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010

EPMA Lab (702) 895-2660
SEM Lab (702) 895-2462
Office (702) 895-1134
Fax (702) 895-4064
Dept. Office (702) 895-3262

lundberg-at-nevada.edu
http://www.unlv.edu/Colleges/Sciences/Geoscience/EMIL.htm

Home:
8025 W. Russell Rd. Apt. #1117
Las Vegas, NV 89113
(702) 871-9635




From daemon Tue Jan 16 15:59:16 2001



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 17:00:34 -0500
Subject: polarizing microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All,
Here's an LM-related question:
A group here needs to look at samples stained with picrosirius red
using polarizing optics. I have a microscope equipped with DIC, and
realize that if we pull the Wollaston prisms, we might be able to see
something, but I don't have a rotatable stage which would make it
easier to align their samples relative to the polarized light. Do
any of you out there in the New York City area have an appropriate
microscope? Or any ideas?
TIA,
Lee
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jan 16 16:19:05 2001



From: David Henriks :      Henriks-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 17:15:35 -0500
Subject: mounting supplies - bakelite ring forms

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Sarah:

We at South Bay Technology offer such a product. They are available as our
Part Number RFP100-10 and cost $5.25 for a package of 10. We have them in
stock and can ship them out the same day you order them. I hope this
helps.

Best regards-

David
Writing at 3:03:09 PM on 01/16/2001

***************************************************************************
************************

David Henriks
Vice President TEL: 800-728-2233
(toll free in the USA)
South Bay Technology, Inc. +1-949-492-2600
1120 Via Callejon FAX: +1-949-492-1499
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

***************************************************************************
************************

} } } } } Please visit us at http://www.southbaytech.com { { { { {

Manufacturers of precision sample preparation equipment and supplies for
metallography, crystallography and electron microscopy.

Message text written by Sarah Lundberg
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello listers-
I am looking for a supplier of bakelite ring forms 1 inch in diameter
(outside). Would someone contact me with that information. I can't
find anything on the web.
I appreciate your help!
Many Thanks,
Sarah
--
Sarah A.W. Lundberg
Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory
Department of Geoscience, UNLV
4505 S. Maryland Parkway Box 454010
Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010

EPMA Lab (702) 895-2660
SEM Lab (702) 895-2462
Office (702) 895-1134
Fax (702) 895-4064
Dept. Office (702) 895-3262

lundberg-at-nevada.edu
http://www.unlv.edu/Colleges/Sciences/Geoscience/EMIL.htm

Home:
8025 W. Russell Rd. Apt. #1117
Las Vegas, NV 89113
(702) 871-9635


{


From daemon Tue Jan 16 16:30:38 2001



From: Pier, Julie (LNA) :      Julie.Pier-at-america.luzenac.com
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 15:32:35 -0700
Subject: Electron diffraction pattern simulation software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Does anyone know of free software to simulate electron diffraction patterns
(space group info not necessary)?


From daemon Tue Jan 16 21:04:00 2001



From: Rinaldo Pires dos Santos :      rinaldop-at-uol.com.br
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 00:58:45 -0200 (UOL)
Subject: TEM: problems with Spurr embedding of seeds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,
I am working with seeds of Ilex paraguariensis (the maté). The aim of my research is to describe the ultrastructure (TEM) of the endosperm and the imature embryo. The samples (small dissected pieces) were fixed in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde solution in phosphate buffer, washed, transferred for osmium (2% in 0,8% K3FeCN6, 1:1), dehydrated in acetone (10, 30, 50, 70, 90, 90 ,100, 100, 30 min in each step) and included in 1:3, 1:1, 3:1 and two changes of pure Spurr resin (24 hour in each step with continuous agitation). However, the tissues are very poorly infiltrated (endosperm and embryo with holes and soft parts). The endosperm cells have a lot of proteins and lipids as storage substances. I think that I should use a special protocol for this plant tissues, but I want to maintain the osmium fixation (lipid preservation). I tried the LR White and Unicryl resins with worst results. Does anybody suggest some thing?
Thank's.

Dr. Rinaldo Pires dos Santos
Lab. of Plant Anatomy
Dept. of Botany - UFRGS
Brazil
e-mail: rinaldop-at-uol.com.br


From daemon Wed Jan 17 00:45:26 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 07:40:08 +0100
Subject: Re: Staining Spurr's and LR sections for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Rosalie,

you will find a lot of information in "Histochemistry" by R.W. Horobin,
Stuttgart, G. Fischer 1982.

A few years ago I did some staining of plant cuticles (lets assume cutin is
similar to suberin for your purpose) with Sudan Black B in Epon sections.
SBB needs to be dissolved in hot alcohol but it worked quiet well on my
Epon semis. I even managed to dissolve the resin in KOH before staining and
got good results ... A recipe for SBB staining you will find in Bronner,
R., 1975: Simultanous Staining of Lipid and Starch in Plant Tissues. Stain
Technology 50(1):1-4.

I do not know if you want to use Toluidin Blue O, but TBO is a water based
stain for acid polyanions like pectins, DNA/RNA and stains cytoplasm too.
It will stain paraffin and resin sections and is easy and relatively safe
to use. A very basic paper describing it is: Sakai, S.W, 1973: Simple
method for differential staining of paraffin embedded plant material using
Toluidin Blue O. Stain Tech 48(5):247-249.

Hope that helps you,

Joachim

Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350



From daemon Wed Jan 17 02:04:04 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 10:01:26 +0100
Subject: Antwort: TEM: problems with Spurr embedding of seeds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------- Forwarded message follows -------
} From: Alexander Tikhonovski {tikhonov-at-mpi-halle.mpg.de}
To: "Pier, Julie (LNA)" {Julie.Pier-at-america.luzenac.com}



Hi Rinaldo,

I have been working on the ultrastructure of orchid stigmas for a few
years, this tissue contains a large amount of lipids and intercellular
cutin, debris from plasmolysed "nutritive cells", slimy pectins etc ...
very difficult to embed - at least that was what everbody told me when I
started.
As in the orchid column the pollen (pollinia in this case) is still there,
in most cases I embedded even the pollen with its sporopollenin, a lipidic
substance usually extremely bad to embed (sections may break out at the
interface to the resin).

In the beginning I tried Spurr and had very poor results. Then I switched
to Epon although everybody told me that this would work even worse because
of the high viscosity of Epon (= bad infiltration).

But I could achieve godd embedding with Epon for my tissue. Here is how I
did it:

Specimen: Orchid buds, columns and stigmas, preferably smaller then 2x2x2
mm
Fixation: 3% GAD in cacodylate buffer pH7.2 for at least 24 h
Wash a few times in buffer and then in a.d.
Stepwise dehydration in acetone: 30, 50, 70, 90, 100, 100% for 20 min each
Intermedium acetontril 3 x 100% for 10 min each
Embedding in Epon (Agar 100 Resin Kit): No movement of the specimens
needed, just use Eppendorf tubes or something similar
acetonitril:Epon 3:1 overnight
acetonitril:Epon 1:1 4 h
acetonitril:Epon 1:3 4 h
pure Epon overnight
change to Epon + accelerator
Polymerisation in flat embedding form 48 h at 60°C

I used the acetonitril as a substitute for propylene oxide simply because
it is said to be less poisonous. Maybe its the acetonitril step that is
responsible for the good infiltration - I really do not know, but it worked
well, so "never change a winning team".

Hope that helps you,

Joachim

Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350




From daemon Wed Jan 17 03:49:44 2001



From: R. Cross :      r.cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 11:44:52 +0200
Subject: ICEM-15

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




{bold} *** ICEM-15 *** {/bold}


"World Focus on Microscopy"


15th International Congress on Electron Microscopy

Durban, South Africa


1 - 6 September 2002


www.icem15.com


{center} A conference and trade exhibition on the technology, techniques
and applications of all forms of microscopy to be held under the
auspices of the International Federation of Societies for Electron
Microscopy and the Microscopy Society of Southern Africa. {/center}


The Organisers of ICEM-15 are pleased to extend an invitation to

anyone involved in microscopy in any of its various forms to use

this opportunity to hear from world authorities about the latest

developments in your areas of interest, meet with colleagues,

make new friends, present results, see and test the latest

technology, and last but not least, enjoy the best of South Africa's

warmth and hospitality.


Look at the web site (www.icem15.com) for more information about
this exciting event.


If you wish to be included on the mailing list please click your reply

button and complete your contact details in the space below.

Alternatively you may register your information online when you
visit the congress web site (www.icem15.com).


Best regards


Robin Cross

Chairman : ICEM-15



Please include me on the mailing list for ICEM-15.


Name:

Postal address:

Email address:

Tel:

Fax: {color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param}



From daemon Wed Jan 17 05:37:16 2001



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 06:31:33 -0500
Subject: Re: Metal for sputter coating targets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,
The obvious grains of Au are the reason that the Au/Pd alloy is used.
It should be less apparent with a Au/Pd target.
Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
Delta, PA

Michael D. Standing wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Listers:
}
} In our lab we have been sputter coating with gold since the dawn of time.
} This has essentially been the "traditional" metal we have used for coating
} our non-conductive samples. We have found that in some of our applications
} that the gold grain is to large and is causing us problems in visualizing
} some of the smaller structures (primarily in engineering samples) that we
} are interested in. We currently sputter our samples for 1 to 4 minutes with
} a current reading of 18 to 20 mA using an argon atmosphere in the coater.
} We are aware that chromium and/or osmium coating are preferential to gold
} sputtering, but those technologies are not available to us at this time.
} What I would like to know is:
} 1) What are the advantages of using something other than gold as the target
} material (eg. Gold palladium, platinum palladium, or just platinum)?
} 2) Are there other materials that will work besides these metals that would
} give us equal service for small grain and a stable coating?
} 3) Are there operating conditions we could try that would still give us good
} coating but reduce the grain size of the film material?
} Thanks for your help,
}
} Mike
}
} ======================================
} Michael D. Standing
} BYU Microscopy Lab
} 401 WIDB
} Brigham Young University
} Provo, UT 84602
}
} e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
} phone: (801) 378-4011
} fax: (801) 378-3937
} ======================================
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 17 08:02:27 2001



From: Ladd Research :      sales-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 08:58:04 -0500
Subject: Re: Metal for sputter coating targets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Michael,

I would suggest you try gold/palladium. It has a smaller grain size and
the same reflectivity.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research sell targets for most types of sputter
coaters.
--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

web site http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955


Michael D. Standing wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.}
} Dear Listers:
}
} In our lab we have been sputter coating with gold since the dawn of time.
} This has essentially been the "traditional" metal we have used for coating
} our non-conductive samples. We have found that in some of our applications
} that the gold grain is to large and is causing us problems in visualizing
} some of the smaller structures (primarily in engineering samples) that we
} are interested in. We currently sputter our samples for 1 to 4 minutes with
} a current reading of 18 to 20 mA using an argon atmosphere in the coater.
} We are aware that chromium and/or osmium coating are preferential to gold
} sputtering, but those technologies are not available to us at this time.
} What I would like to know is:
} 1) What are the advantages of using something other than gold as the target
} material (eg. Gold palladium, platinum palladium, or just platinum)?
} 2) Are there other materials that will work besides these metals that would
} give us equal service for small grain and a stable coating?
} 3) Are there operating conditions we could try that would still give us good
} coating but reduce the grain size of the film material?
} Thanks for your help,
}
} Mike
}
} ======================================
} Michael D. Standing
} BYU Microscopy Lab
} 401 WIDB
} Brigham Young University
} Provo, UT 84602
}
} e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
} phone: (801) 378-4011
} fax: (801) 378-3937
} ======================================


From daemon Wed Jan 17 09:36:45 2001



From: Leslie Cummins :      gunther-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 10:26:23 -0500
Subject: CryoEM sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers

I have been doing cryoultramicrotomy for the last year or so with varying
levels of success. I finally got some pretty pictures, so I know I can get
it right. Now I want to make it consistent.

So, my biggest problem appears to be with freezing. I am fixing my cells
with 4% para, 0.1% glut, 0.25M Hepes, rinsing with Hepes, embedding in 10%
gelatin and then infiltrating with 2.3M sucrose in a stepwise manner. I am
cutting the sample into *very* small blocks (less than 0.5mm) hoping to
infiltrate better. I then place the sample onto pins and drop into liquid
nitrogen to freeze. However, it always seems that only the very outer
layer of tissue/cells are well frozen. If I take a 1 micron section to see
how the tissue looks, I can't take another b/c it would bring me into a
freeze damaged area. I have tried using liquid proprane and liquid freon,
but the samples cracked when I attempted to section them.

I have now been given a very precious human sample that they want to
immunolabel on cryo thin sections, and I don't have enough tissue to make
lots of blocks to section just the outside.

If anyone has any suggestions to help me get good freezing deeper in the
tissue, I'd appreciate it.
TIA
Leslie


These are my pretty pictures:
http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/gallery/TEM/shields_immuno/tem_cryo.htm
Analytical Imaging Facility visit our web site: www.aecom.yu.edu/aif
Albert Einstein C. of M
1300 Morris Park Ave
Forchheimer 639
Bronx, NY 10461
718-430-3547


From daemon Wed Jan 17 10:15:40 2001



From: Cindy Kleier :      j-kleier-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 10:10:19 -0800
Subject: Negatives-Need help find clear plastic sleeves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The sleeves need to be 3 1/4 x 4 in. I don't know where they were bought
previously and need help finding out where.

Thanks

Cindy K.

Joyce L. Kleier
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. USA
j-kleier-at-northwestern.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 17 11:02:48 2001



From: Peggy Sherwood :      sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 11:55:27 -0500
Subject: Microtome Safety

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all:

It always amazes me how much discussion can be generated on some topics!

I very rarely offer my 'two cents', but love reading through the comments.
On the issue of microtome safety: I have been an electron microscopist for
over 25 years (I started as a child prodigy!) and other than one incident early
on when I (stupidly) tried trimming a block by bringing the razor blade toward
me, I have NEVER had a problem with severed fingers, major lacerations, etc.

The aforementioned incident did result in stitches and I bear the scar proudly.

I do my trimming on a special holder on the Reichert Ultracut looking
through the binoculars and "map" out the block face by marking the
edges with the blade. Then I proceed very carefully (away from me
and the block) to trim the epon. I then do the rough sectioning on
the microtome itself. At times, we have used a jeweler's saw and
vise to trim away excess epon and get down to the tissue, etc.

I agree that gloves or other enhancements only add to the problem.

I believe the main thing to consider is: "Think before you cut!"

Peggy Sherwood
--
Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu


From daemon Wed Jan 17 11:22:56 2001



From: Joseph Passero :      jp-at-spacelab.net
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 12:20:01 -0500
Subject: [LM - Stereo] Wanted AO Stereo Microscope Part

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Would any one know who or have a AO coaxial illuminator (available for sale) for a AO model 580
stereo zoom pod?

Thank You

Best Regards

Joseph Passero

mailto:jp-at-spacelab.net

Shop online without a credit card
http://www.rocketcash.com
RocketCash, a NetZero subsidiary


From daemon Wed Jan 17 13:49:20 2001



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 14:45:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Negatives-Need help find clear plastic sleeves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Cindy Kleier wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} The sleeves need to be 3 1/4 x 4 in. I don't know where they were bought
} previously and need help finding out where.
}
} Thanks
}
} Cindy K.
}
} Joyce L. Kleier
} Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. USA
} j-kleier-at-northwestern.edu

Polysciences in Warrington, PA 800-523-2575
Electron Microscopy Sciences in Ft. Washington, PA 800-523-5874


Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 17 14:14:25 2001



From: Frida.Maiers-at-co.hennepin.mn.us
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 13:42:33 -0600
Subject: SEM, used model available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN has a used ISI-60A SEM
available to anyone interested. Supporting equipment also available
include: Eiko Multicoater, model VX-10A and an OMAR critical point dryer,
model SPC 900/EX.



From daemon Wed Jan 17 14:31:37 2001



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 15:28:02 -0500
Subject: TEM specimen prep short course (there is no snow in Florida in

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


TEM Specimen Preparation Short Course!!!!

With emphasis on Tripod Polishing and Focused Ion Beam Specimen Preparation

.will be offered in conjunction with Surface Analysis 2001 and the Joint
Annual Meetings of the
Florida Society for Microscopy and the Florida American Vacuum Society in
Orlando at the University of Central Florida March 14-16, 2001.

Instructors:

Ron Anderson, IBM
Fred Stevie, Lucent Technologies
Lucille Giannuzzi, UCF

Vendor Sponsors will be participating!

To register, please go to www.dce.ucf.edu

For technical information please contact Lucille Giannuzzi at lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone (407) 275-4354,5,6
fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 17 14:41:12 2001



From: Don Grimes :      microtoday-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 15:23:23 -0600
Subject: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Group,
One of my readers has asked the following question. If you can help, kindly
contact her direct.
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today

Do you know or can you ask your readers about the possibility of
Electrostatic Discharge damage caused by an SEM? Is this a problem? My
company is reluctant to have me examine flight-ready devices in the SEM
because of this possibility. I can't find any information on the
subject. Thanks for any help you can give me.

Virginia Harper
vbharper-at-west.raytheon.com



From daemon Wed Jan 17 15:38:38 2001



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 15:31:22 -0600
Subject: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Well, one of the (supposedly true)legends in our facility is that a student
was knocked out of a chair one day long ago by a major spark from an old
JSM35 SEM. But maybe that's not what you meant.... ;-)

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO  65211
(573) 882-8304
(573) 884-5414 (fax)
email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu {mailto:tindallr-at-missouri.edu}  
          http://biotech.missouri.edu/emc



-----Original Message-----
} From: Don Grimes [mailto:microtoday-at-mindspring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2001 3:23 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Group,
One of my readers has asked the following question. If you can help, kindly
contact her direct.
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today

Do you know or can you ask your readers about the possibility of
Electrostatic Discharge damage caused by an SEM? Is this a problem? My
company is reluctant to have me examine flight-ready devices in the SEM
because of this possibility. I can't find any information on the
subject. Thanks for any help you can give me.

Virginia Harper
vbharper-at-west.raytheon.com



From daemon Wed Jan 17 15:47:32 2001



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 15:41:22 -0600
Subject: Teflon stirring paddle

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,

Does anyone know where to find a Teflon stirrer/mixer attachment in the
shape of a corkscrew. We used to use one at the New Mexico State EM lab
(yup, that's you, Soumitra) for mixing resins, attached to a variable speed
drill-type mixer on a stand. I have never been able to locate another and
my stirring arm is about worn out.

Thanks

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/





From daemon Wed Jan 17 18:00:52 2001



From: Boron nitride :      boronnitride-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 16:55:08 -0700
Subject: Software for generating atom arrangment in one specific atomic palne

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Colleage,
Does anybody know if there is a software that can draw the atom arrangments
in a specific crystalline plane? I know several software, such as
Crystalkit, Mactempas and Crystal Maker, can draw the atomic
projection, in which many layers are overlapped, however they can not
display the
atomic arrangments in one specific plane.

I would greatly appreciate if you could provide such kind of
information!

Sincerely,


James



_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com



From daemon Wed Jan 17 19:14:12 2001



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 17 Jan 01 17:19:47 -0800
Subject: RE: Microtome Safety

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From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 17 Jan 01 17:19:47 -0800
Subject: RE: Microtome Safety

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Reply to: RE: Microtome Safety
I too have been surprized by the response to this subject.
I wonder if everyone who uses Lowicryl resin also hand trims the blocks with a blade?


Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm


}
} To all:
}
} It always amazes me how much discussion can be generated on some topics!
}
} I very rarely offer my 'two cents', but love reading through the comments.
} On the issue of microtome safety: I have been an electron microscopist for
} over 25 years (I started as a child prodigy!) and other than one incident early
} on when I (stupidly) tried trimming a block by bringing the razor blade toward
} me, I have NEVER had a problem with severed fingers, major lacerations, etc.
}
} The aforementioned incident did result in stitches and I bear the scar proudly.
}
} I do my trimming on a special holder on the Reichert Ultracut looking } through the binoculars and "map" out the block face by marking the } edges with the blade. Then I proceed very carefully (away from me } and the block) to trim the epon. I then do the rough sectioning on } the microtome itself. At times, we have used a jeweler's saw and } vise to trim away excess epon and get down to the tissue, etc.
}
} I agree that gloves or other enhancements only add to the problem.
}
} I believe the main thing to consider is: "Think before you cut!"
}
} Peggy Sherwood
} -- } Peggy Sherwood
} Lab Associate, Photopathology
} Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
} Massachusetts General Hospital
} 50 Blossom Street
} Boston, MA 02114
} 617-724-4839 (voice mail)
} 617-726-6983 (lab)
} 617-726-3192 (fax)
} sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
}
}
}
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From daemon Wed Jan 17 19:54:18 2001



From: Gordon Nord :      gnord-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2001 20:52:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Software for generating atom arrangment in one specific atomic palne

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Message-ID: {3A664C2C.8E2581AB-at-mindspring.com}


James,

Perhaps you are familiar with an older version but CrystalMaker can limit the
size of your structure to one atomic plane and draw an opaque or translucent
plane in any color parallel or coincident ot the plane of interest. Check it
out.

{http://www.crystalmaker.co.uk}



Boron nitride wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Colleage,
} Does anybody know if there is a software that can draw the atom arrangments
} in a specific crystalline plane? I know several software, such as
} Crystalkit, Mactempas and Crystal Maker, can draw the atomic
} projection, in which many layers are overlapped, however they can not
} display the
} atomic arrangments in one specific plane.
}
} I would greatly appreciate if you could provide such kind of
} information!
}
} Sincerely,
}
} James
}
} _________________________________________________________________
} Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com

--
Gordon Nord
Scientist Emeritus
US Geological Survey
Email gnord-at-mindspring.com




From daemon Thu Jan 18 04:09:39 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 10:24:30 +0100
Subject: Antwort: CryoEM sectioning

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Hi Leslie,

I think you are doing everything right (fixation, rinsing, 10% gelatin,
0.5mm size, drop into LN2), but maybe it is the STEPWISE infiltration with
2.3 M sucrose that does not work well for your cells. How long do you do
the infiltration? At what temperature?

You probably get a gradient of sucrose concentration from the edges to the
center of your blocks because the lower suc concentrations enter the block
rapidly while the higher concentrations need more time?! The different
concentrations probably do not have time enough at low temperatures (i.e.
+4°C) to mix/substitute properly.

I would recommend to do the infiltration in an Eppendorf vial (app. 1ml)
DIRECTLY in 2.3M sucrose at +4°C (your gelatin is not fixed I assume, so
you need the low temperature for the gelatin to stay solid). Infiltrate for
AT LEAST 2 HOURS on a rotating table.

Jan Slots group in Utrecht, The Netherlands achieves very good results with
that method. They are giving a highly recommendable CRYOCOURSE from 3rd -
12th July 2001 in cooperation with Leica (I am doing a tiny little bit of
it). If you are interested I can send you detailed information.

Hope that helps you,

Joachim



Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350



From daemon Thu Jan 18 04:09:56 2001



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 04:10:09 -0600
Subject: RE: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Your question is quite frankly hard to fathom. In an SEM, the sample is
subjected to up to 50 KV electron bombardment intentionally at up to
several hundred nanoamps in an area as small as a few tenths of a square
millimeter. Exactly what measure are you considering as electrostatic
discharge? Voltage, current or radiation flux density? And what specs are
you holding your electronics to? If lightning strikes or EMP effects are
considered, the SEM's effects are probably minimal.

50 KV can certainly be considered an electrostatic potential. 50 KV at 100
nanoamps sample current translates to only 5 milliwatts. However, that
amount of power translated to the sub-millimeter scales of an electron
microscope can add up, as can the effects mentioned when considering such
small structures.

A rough estimate shows that a 30 KV beam at 100 nA sample current and an
excitation surface on the sample of 100 micrometers diameter yields a huge
energy density at the surface. Assuming a subsurface absorption sphere of
around 200 micrometers diameter, obviously the radiation flux densities are
quite high. I leave it to you to calculate the actual figures based on the
materials you are sampling.

However, given your internet domain and the specific question asked, I have
to wonder what reservations your company has. If there are electrostatic
weaknesses in the circuitry you want to examine, is it better to have these
brought out in R&D SEM examination or in field exposure to lightning, EMP
and ECM? If I were in the left seat, I would want some assurance that
those envelope edges had been explored. My intuitive side would tend to
believe that the potential lightning, EMP and ECM effects would likely be
as concentrated, if not more so, that the SEM beam energies in the
nanoscale structures of the circuitry you are probably using. In fact, the
electron beam energies may be the best method you have of simulating the
localized energy density effects of these sources.


} Group,
} One of my readers has asked the following question. If you can help,
kindly
} contact her direct.
} Don Grimes, Microscopy Today
}
} Do you know or can you ask your readers about the possibility of
} Electrostatic Discharge damage caused by an SEM? Is this a problem? My
} company is reluctant to have me examine flight-ready devices in the SEM
} because of this possibility. I can't find any information on the
} subject. Thanks for any help you can give me.
}
} Virginia Harper
} vbharper-at-west.raytheon.com
}
}
}


Allen R. Sampson, Owner
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174
voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092



From daemon Thu Jan 18 07:22:28 2001



From: jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 08:21:23 -0500
Subject: Re: Negatives-Need help find clear plastic sleeves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We get them from Better Containers Mfg. Co.
530 Hyde Park
Hillside, Ill 60162
708-547-7272

There is also other companies (e.g. Consolidate Plastics Co., Inc.
330-425-3900) out there.

Good Luck

On 17 Jan 2001, at 10:10, Cindy Kleier wrote:

} The sleeves need to be 3 1/4 x 4 in. I don't know where they were
} bought previously and need help finding out where.
}
} Thanks
}
} Cindy K.
}
} Joyce L. Kleier
} Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. USA
} j-kleier-at-northwestern.edu
}


John P. Shields, PhD
Center for Ultrastructural Research
151 Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-4080
FAX 706-542-4271
jshields-at-cb.uga.edu


From daemon Thu Jan 18 07:39:56 2001



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 08:32:25 -0800
Subject: Re: Negatives-Need help find clear plastic sleeves

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



}
} The sleeves need to be 3 1/4 x 4 in. I don't know where they were bought
} previously and need help finding out where.

We carry Plastine sleeves for 3 1/4 x 4 negatives.
These sleeves are archival quality polyethylene and come in
a box of 1000.
We also carry Kodak Sleeves which come in boxes of 100,
and the Print File EM-6 page which will hold 6 negatives in a
page that fits a 3 ring binder.

George


George Laing
National Graphic Supply
v:(800) 223-7130 X3109
f:(800) 832-2205
email: scisales-at-ngscorp.com


From daemon Thu Jan 18 07:41:35 2001



From: John Heckman :      heckman-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 05:46:14 -0800
Subject: Re: Software for generating atom arrangment in one specific atomic palne

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"Boron",

I think EMS will also do what you want. There is a web site where you
can
preview some of the possibilities of this package.

http://cimesg1.epfl.ch/CIOL/ems.html

cheers,
John

John Heckman
MSM Department
Michigan State University

No affiliation with CIME; just an end user of EMS.





From daemon Thu Jan 18 08:15:26 2001



From: Majid :      majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 08:10:33 -0600
Subject: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning

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Hello all

We are preparing Pt-C and C replicas from different biological material. For
cleaning the obtained replica we either use bleach (5.2%) or chromic acid
(10, 20 followed by 40%) with washes in between. The protocol usually works
well for most stuff but when it comes to oocytes from Xenopus we are usually
left with a lot of organic material still attached to the replica. If we
leave the replica in cleaning agent for a long time we end up with a very
brittle replica which can easily break.

Oocytes have got a reputation for being very sticky and difficult to clean.
We are considering to use plasma cleaning instead but I don't know what to
expect from that. I would appreciate it if you could share your 'tips and
tricks' with us.

Majid Ghoddusi



................................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, PhD
Protein Dynamics Unit
Department of Chemistry
Australian National University
ACTON 0200
Canberra
Tel: (02) 6125 4190
Fax: (02) 6125 0760
e.mail: majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au
web site: http://langevin.anu.edu.au/
...........................................................................
..........




From daemon Thu Jan 18 08:25:58 2001



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 09:25:44 -0500
Subject: Re: CryoEM sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Leslie,
One thing I can think of, is that you shouldn't drop your samples
into the liq. Nit. LN2 is a poor cryogen in that it boils when warm
things are placed into it, creating a pocket of nitrogen gas around
the sample, that acts as an insulating layer. Most of us do use
nitrogen to freeze our samples. I always hold the pin end of the
stub in a hemostat-type clamp and wiggle it as it freezes to try to
ensure an exchange of the cryogen and avoid too much of a gas bubble
around the sample. I'm sure you will get many other suggestions,
since there are so many of us out there doing this with varying
degrees of success.
Good luck,
Lee
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Thu Jan 18 08:25:58 2001



From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 11:21:25 -0500
Subject: Metal for sputter coating targets

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All,

ESD damage on semiconductor samples is quite real & has been documented for
years.
When CMOS circuits first came out this was a real concern.
Motorola & a number of other semiconductor companies has reams of papers on
this subject.

Contact me offline & I can see if I can dig up the info.

Regards,

Earl

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Allen R. Sampson" {ars-at-sem.com}
To: "'Don Grimes'" {microtoday-at-mindspring.com} ;
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 2:10 AM


Hi

Just a few points which may help in your quest for better sputter coatings.

Sputter coaters fall into a number of categories based upon age. Each
category requires a slightly different set up procedure.

Class 1 - Coaters with a variac voltage control of up to 1500volts
Class 2 - Coaters with a variac voltage control of up to 2500volts
Class 3 - Cool coaters with a fixed voltage but a variable "deposition"
control

General - All coaters need approximately a 5cm target to specimen
distance. Coat a piece of paper the 2-3 minutes the paper should cover
the specimen bed, you will then see the distribution pattern of low and
high depostion areas. Make sure you put your specimen in a high deposition
area. Coating many specimens in one run may lead to uneven coatings as
each specimen has an affect on those near by, outgassing, partial shadowing
etc.

Class 1 need an operating voltage which you would guess is about 700 volts
on the voltage dial, Class 2 around 800 volts (i.e. as low as possible
whilst still striking a plasma). These coaters probably need a 1 minute
coating at 20mA for gold.

Class 3 coaters need a deposition rate set at 10mA and a 30 second coating
for gold.

With any coater increase the coating time and you increase thickness and
the possibility of visualizing the structure.

Multi coats increase the visibility of the metal structure.

Platinum deposits at half the rate but at less than half the grain size;
increase coating times but do not exceed the 20mA and 10mA settings as
described above.

Hope this helps

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For consultancy and training by professionals World Wide
Tel +44 1280 814774 Fax +44 1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


From daemon Thu Jan 18 10:30:41 2001



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-mail.med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 11:29:22 -0500
Subject: Re: polarizing microscopes

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Hi Listers,

Thanks to all of you who have responded to my query about polarizing
microscopes. Among the responses was the name of someone nearby who
has a fully equipped instrument, and if all the "poor man's"
adaptations I've received don't pan out, I'll give that fellow a
call. Below are highlights of the responses I received. We can put
this topic to rest now.

Lee

***********************
Hello re: rotating stage.

Put some vaseline on top of your stage after removing the mechanical
stage, and invert an AOL CD on it. Makes an elegant rotating stage
for a scope.
************************
Alternatively, you can make a mini "Theta" stage by mounting any sort
of small turntable on your existing stage. Take off all the normal
slide holding/mechanical stage equipment and mount the turntable in
place. Parameters:
a. You need to open a hole in the center so that you can get light
through the slide.
b. You need some mechanism (as simple as a rubber band or an old
stage clip) which will allow you to slide the slide for XY; the
special stage will supply the rotation
c. Depending on the thickness of the turntable, you may need a long
working distance condenser; simple Abbe condensers are good, but for
true pol work, you need high NA

There are limits to this approach, especially in terms of centration,
but if they are just doing qualitative Pol, it's a good way to go.
***********************
Yes, as you wrote, if you remove the wallaston's from the
light path, you will indeed have a set up with crossed polarizers.
This is a good start, but as you suggested that still leaves a few
problems. You mentioned the rotating stage. As DIC is fairly popular,
you might well find someone around with a DIC stand that has a
rotatable stage. Really, for DIC work, the stage ought to rotate too,
because contrast in the specimen does change as a function of the
orientation of the sample. But there are two other very useful things
that you should look for in the stand.

1) Be sure that you can rotate either the polarizer or the analyser.
For DIC, it doesn't matter all that much if the analyser and
polarizer are not exactly crossed. But for polarized light they need
to be crossed as exactly as possible. You can look through the
eyepieces at a blank slide and rotate either the analyser or the
polarizer until the field gets maximally dark. Then stop.

2) A compensator of some kind is handy. That is because often the
sample has weak retardation and the compensator enhances that. If you
are lucky enough to find a real polarized light scope, it will have
several of these available. But if you use a DIC scope, then what you
can do is to experiment with various kinds of plastic that you find
lying around. Petri dish lids are a good bet, or clear tape or
plastic wrap stretched on a slide. Put this in the beam, somewhere
after the polarizer in a way that you can rotate to some extent.
You'll know you have got the right thing when you find something that
makes the nice dark field (from step 1) get bright as your rotate it.
***********************
I have made a 'poor-man's' polarizing microscope by putting one sheet of
polaroid material (glass or plastic) over the light source of an ordinary LM
and another sheet between the slide and the objective lens. I rotate the
sheet over the light source until I get the desired effect. Works great as
long as you do not need a high magnification lens that works close to the
specimen.

Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Thu Jan 18 10:48:35 2001



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 18 Jan 2001 11:45:14 -0500
Subject: Facility management topics

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Okey, one last time. Please, if you haven't weighed in on your preference for topis (see below) by tomorrow, I will pick them based on response to date. There is a wide range of responses and I would love to have more to see if a few topics end up standing above the rest as to interest level. Also, don't forget to recommend presenters for specific topics.
And thanks to all who have already responded. Please don't stuff the ballot box by voting again.
Thanks,
Debby

=================


Fellow Microscopists:
As many of you know, the Facility Management session held at M&M2000 was very well received and there was a unanimous request for it to be continued. Therefore a similar session will be held at M&M 2001. I must finalize the topics within the next week or two. Since the purpose of this session is to discuss topics of interest to facility managers, I would like your input before the session is finalized.

The topics covered in the M&M 2000 session with transcripts published in Microscopy Today were:
1) Multi-user Facilities...managing users
2) Justification of Costs, cost recovery, electronic bookkeeping and billing
3) Equipment Maintenance: Vender service contracts vs. Independent providers vs. Insurance company/self-insure options.

The following are some suggestions that were gleaned from the evaluation forms and discussion during the session.

1) Training Users…courses, workshops, …what works for whom?
2) Scientific Ethics…What are our responsibilities as lab Managers?
3) Mission statements/lab organization/lab business plans/future planning issues
4) Staffing issues including training, part-time student help, Training course T.A’s
5) Daily issues…prioritizing use, prioritizing service projects, dealing with difficult users/customers
6) Legal issues involving data ownership, confidentiality of data, handling of potential evidence.
7) Justification for new equipment
8) Commercial use of university facilities
9) Microscopy as a research tool…integration of industry or campus facilities in coordination with other core facilities.
10) Issues unique to Multi-user and/or Service facilities and how such facilities can coexist.


The first 2 received the greatest number of requests. However there may be more relevant topics now. Please rank the 3 of highest priority to you or suggest additional topics of interest. I will sift through all replies at the end of next week and narrow them down to 3. Also please feel free to supply the names of individuals to lead specific discussion topics.
The format will be the same as the last session. A presenter will give a 10-15 min. introduction of the topic followed by ~30 min. open discussion.

Thanks,
Debby


Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-099e Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Thu Jan 18 11:37:47 2001



From: chris smith (IACR-RES) :      chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 17:31:50 -0000
Subject: Sputtering targets

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Hi Mike,
Just a thought. When we tried to change to other metals we found that our
sputterer would handle Au, Au/Pd but not Pt. Might be worth checking yours
before spending serious money.
ttfn, Chris


From daemon Thu Jan 18 11:52:27 2001



From: Rehorek, Susan S. :      susan.rehorek-at-sru.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 12:50:21 -0800
Subject: Looking for TEM

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I am searching for a new TEM (hoping to write a grant to get funding for
one anyway - since I am not independantly wealthy). The one we currently
have is a JOEL 100S (and a crabby one, too boot).

I would like to know what is available. I would also like to know some
approximate prices.

Please reply off-list!

Thank you.
Susan J Rehorek, Ph.D.
Department of Biology
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
PA, 16057-1326

ph: 724 738 2485
fax: 724 738 4782
email: susan.rehorek-at-sru.edu


From daemon Thu Jan 18 12:55:43 2001



From: Karen Pawlowski :      Karen.Pawlowski-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 12:47:08 -0600
Subject: Basal bodies

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Hi all,

I was wondering if there are any stains/methods that would allow the
identification of basal bodies or centromeres in a non-dividing cell.
I would like to determine the basal body position in a cell without
resorting to serial TEM. My thinking is that I might be able to do
it in whole cells with the right marker. Any comments?

Karen Pawlowski


From daemon Thu Jan 18 12:55:43 2001



From: Frank Macaluso :      macaluso-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 13:47:43 -0500
Subject: Re: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning

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Majid,
Try 50% sulfuric acid for 2 hours to overnight. I used this successfully
some years ago on replicas from Xenopus oocytes.
Frank


At 08:10 AM 1/18/01 -0600, Majid wrote:
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From daemon Thu Jan 18 14:33:39 2001



From: Sue Hendricks :      sjh2e-at-virginia.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 16:15:54 -0500
Subject: LM: tongue paraffin embedding help

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Yes, EDS is very real and chip manufacturers go to great length (end
expense) to avoid them. However, I think the mechanism is different:

EDS means, that something collects static electricity (by walking on a
carpet, for example), then touches something that is at a very different
potential. That's what happens if you touch a metal after walking on that
carpet. The enormous potential difference create strong electric field that
finally ionize the air and you get "zapped". The strong fields can destroy
the electronics.

In an SEM the sample is usually grounded and does not see strong fields.
True, the electrons are accelerated to 30 KV or more, but the sample does
not see that, as the anode usually sits at ground level with the Cathode
being at - 30 kV. What you need to be concerned about here is the kinetic
energy that is transferred to the sample and can heat it up considerable. On
the other hand, if the sample is not grounded, there will be fields
developing. There are also other effects, such as residual organics getting
"cracked" and forming a residue on the sample, but that's a different story.

Michael

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Earl Weltmer [mailto:eweltmer-at-home.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 7:24 AM
To: ars-at-sem.com; 'Don Grimes'; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi All,

ESD damage on semiconductor samples is quite real & has been documented for
years.
When CMOS circuits first came out this was a real concern.
Motorola & a number of other semiconductor companies has reams of papers on
this subject.

Contact me offline & I can see if I can dig up the info.

Regards,

Earl

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Allen R. Sampson" {ars-at-sem.com}
To: "'Don Grimes'" {microtoday-at-mindspring.com} ;
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 2:10 AM


Can anyone offer any tips for embedding rat tongue tissue in paraffin? I
am having difficulty with complete infiltration (?) of the tissue. The
tongue has a dense muscle core that becomes hard during the process causing
shredding during sectioning. Any help would be much appreciated.

On a second note: This tissue has been injected with tritiated thymidine.
Has anyone ever heard of loss of radioactive label during tissue post-fix or
embedding?

thanks so much,

Susan Hendricks
University of Virginia
Department of Psychology
PO Box 400400
Gilmer Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22904

804.982.4755
802.982.4785 [fax]
sjh2e-at-virginia.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 18 15:26:28 2001



From: Michael D. Standing :      Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 14:29:09 -0700
Subject: Metal for Sputter Coating Targets -- Thanks and a summary

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Dear Listers:

Thank you for the numerous responses to my query about which metals and
operating conditions to consider for improving the grain size of the
coatings we have been getting from our sputter coater. Below is a brief
summary of the recommendations we have received. I will be experimenting
with several of these items to see where we ultimately want to end up with
this. I suspect that we will develop several protocols based on the
requirements of the experiment. Again thank you.

1) Gold/Palladium definitely has a smaller grain and we should see a
definite improvement by using it.

2) Platinum will have the finest grain size but it takes longer to deposit,
potentially causing damage to sensitive samples.

3) Platinum/Palladium is sometimes used as an alternative to Chromium
coating

4) Reduce the coating thickness as much as possible

5) Coat using higher vacuum / lower currents / lower voltage to reduce grain
size

6) Pulse the deposition

7) Decrease sample surface temperature

8) Gold may be the best alternative for samples where resolution is not as
much a factor as is sample integrity as the other metals require more energy
/ longer exposure to get an adequate coating.
======================================
Michael D. Standing
BYU Microscopy Lab
401 WIDB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602

e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
phone: (801) 378-4011
fax: (801) 378-3937
======================================




From daemon Thu Jan 18 16:02:48 2001



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 13:55:00 -0800
Subject: Re: Sputtering targets

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Interesting. What was it about the unit that precluded Pt?
Did the maker supply Pt targets or did you just try your own?
It would seem that if Pt target are factory supplied, they should
work with the system. My Hummer does Au, Au/Pd and Pt
very well. No problems.

gary g.



At 09:31 AM 1/18/01, you wrote:
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From daemon Thu Jan 18 16:59:05 2001



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 15:08:50 -0800
Subject: Re: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning

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Hello Majid

What I did many years ago, I treated the replica with enzymes to degradate
the most of the sample and then I did clean the replica in 20-40%
H2SO4. The enzymes you could use depends from nature of your contamination
on the replica. I did use proteinase-K. It's very active enzyme if you
need to have deal with proteins. I assume that, because your
containerizations are survived even in chromic-mixture (difficult to
impress to me) it may be some poly-sugars or something like that. So, you
may try the particular enzymes. There are plenty of them in the Sigma Catalog.

You may also use full-strength chromic-mixture. In theory it may not
affect the Pt-C replica. I don't like the bleach at all,
personally. Plasma cleaning will affect the integrity of the carbon layer,
I believe.

Good luck.

Sergey.

At 08:10 AM 1/18/01 -0600, you wrote:
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------------------------------------------------------

Sergey Ryazantsev, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy
Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

(310) 825-1144 (office)
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX: (310) 206-5272 (departmental)
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 18 17:05:47 2001



From: Maria Ericsson :      maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 17:58:27 -0500
Subject: Re: CryoEM sectioning

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Hi Leslie,

I've never had a problem with freeze damage and I've done this a lot...I
can't see anything obviously wrong in what you're doing..The few things I
can think of are:

- wash your cell pellet in PBS with 0.12% glycine before putting them in
the gelatin. This will quench free aldehyde groups from the fix and avoid
crosslinking the gelatin (I'm not sure this would affect the sucrose
infiltration..?? but..maybe..I never tried not quenching)

- avoid putting the cells in gelatin (if you can). If you have tissue
there's certainly no need for gelatin. Cut the fixed tissue in to small
cubes, wash in PBS/glycine for 15 minutes then infiltrate in 3 drops of 2.3
M sucrose at RT for a total of 15 minutes (30 minutes for tissue pieces),
put a piece of the pellet/tissue on the pin and put into LN2.

( I only do gelatin embedding if I have cells that have been fixed in
suspension for some reason - they will never stay together as a pellet in
the sucrose! If you spin the cells down in a microfuge tube in the fixative
and let them fix as a pellet, they will stay together really well without
the gelatin (you can get the pellet out of the microfuge tube with a
toothpick)

- If you need to do gelatin, try putting the gelatin embedded cells in 2.3M
Sucrose (not step-wise) and incubate over night in the fridge.

good luck!
don't hesitate to contact me if you have more problems.

Maria

At 10:26 AM 1/17/01 -0500, Leslie Cummins wrote:
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____________________________

Maria Ericsson
Harvard Medical School EM Facility
220 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 432 1698
maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
http://www.hms.harvard.edu/core/em.html


From daemon Thu Jan 18 17:44:13 2001



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 18:40:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Question

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Virginia,

The kinetic energy referred to by Michael can be a very real problem
for your sample in the SEM.

As far as the concern over Electrostatic Discharge damage goes, it may
not look the same as that caused by somebody's finger discharging
through the part, but it will be real. I have analyzed samples with both
types
of damage. In the SEM, floating nodes of circuitry may charge up from the
beam. When they exceed the breakdown voltage of the dielectric, such
as a CMOS gate oxide, a very large, very short in duration, current spike
will occur and cause extreme localized heating. This causes a hole in
the oxide, filled with alloyed silicon, causing a short circuit. Another
way
for this to happen, is for the interlevel dielectric to build up a charge
of
electrons, and then suddenly discharge through a part of the circuitry.
Both
of these mechanisms have given me problems while trying to localize
resistive via contacts with Resistive Contrast Imaging in the SEM, where
the specimen absorbed current is imaged. The defect "heals" when it is
blown through.

Another problem with looking at circuits that you hope to operate after
SEM observation, is the electron beam can "implant" electrons in the
chips structures and affect the proper operation of the circuitry. This is
especially true at the higher accelerating voltages.

I hope this helps.

Darrell Miles
Failure Analyst
IBM Microelectronics Analytical Services
Fishkill, New York



From daemon Thu Jan 18 17:44:13 2001



From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 18:38:39 -0500
Subject: RE: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Yes, EDS is very real and chip manufacturers go to great length (end
} expense) to avoid them. However, I think the mechanism is different:
}
} EDS means, that something collects static electricity (by walking on a
} carpet, for example), then touches something that is at a very different
} potential. That's what happens if you touch a metal after walking on that
} carpet. The enormous potential difference create strong electric field that
} finally ionize the air and you get "zapped". The strong fields can destroy
} the electronics.
}
} In an SEM the sample is usually grounded and does not see strong fields.
} True, the electrons are accelerated to 30 KV or more, but the sample does
} not see that, as the anode usually sits at ground level with the Cathode
} being at - 30 kV. What you need to be concerned about here is the kinetic
} energy that is transferred to the sample and can heat it up considerable. On
} the other hand, if the sample is not grounded, there will be fields
} developing. There are also other effects, such as residual organics getting
} "cracked" and forming a residue on the sample, but that's a different story.
}
} Michael
}
} Michael Bode, Ph.D.

Not really true as backscattered electrons as well as x-rays generated from
the sample can have an energy upto the acceleration voltage. The anode is
grounded to create the 30KeV field which accelerates the electrons. The
electrons shoot through the hole in the anode, through lenses (and other
things) all the way to the sample, at 30KeV. Check any source on how the
SEM works or for that matter how a basic electron accelerator works.

As for the EDS (static discharge that is) question, why would a chip maker
use SEM to analysis the effect of static discharge if the SEM could cause
the effect in the first place. Check out the older chip makers data books,
plenty of SEM photos of EDS effects. An SEM would be pretty useless for IC
failure analysis if it caused EDS damage.

EDS is destructive from the current density, not the field density. Too
much current through a sub-micron conductor blows up the conductor in the
same way electrical wires vaporize under too much current. EDS protection
is handled through shunting the current before it gets to the sensitive
areas. Most modern ICs are EDS protected, some (like IO drivers) more than
others. Old hat to chip makers and not much expense compared to the rest of
the design.

I would suggest this, try it. If you have EDS problems you will see the
results. If you see the results, send the design back to R&D for further
development. If you are nervious about 30KeV, use a lower voltage, that's
what it is there for.

Scott
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 ext 13 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com



From daemon Thu Jan 18 18:37:01 2001



From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 19:30:56 -0500
Subject: RE: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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One more comment,

The orignal question was

} } } Do you know or can you ask your readers about the possibility of
} } } Electrostatic Discharge damage caused by an SEM? Is this a problem? My
} } } company is reluctant to have me examine flight-ready devices in the SEM
} } } because of this possibility. I can't find any information on the
} } } subject. Thanks for any help you can give me.

Virginia , if you are suggesting to examine these devices and then install.
Very bad idea for any sort of testing besides operational on shipping
product. This is never done for production that goes out the door. That's
what product testing is all about. You take samples from production, then
subject them to things that they will see over their life. If they fail, a
statistical analysis will tell you their failure rate. Or if they cannot
fail (because of were they are used), tells you to try again.

Flight-ready devices have very specific rules and regulations, I can
understand their reluctance. Keeps things in the air, in the air. Why do
you need to examine by SEM? Do you need to examine every one or will a
statistical sample of production devices work as well. IC makers don't EDS
test every chip they ship yet they are EDS rated. They test samples from
pre-production and then test production samples every now and then. The
tested devices are not returned to production.

If these devices are expensive (most flight-ready devices are) and your
need for examination is important, then the company should have no problem
pulling some production devices for you to use. Once used, they do not ship
but are stored or destroyed. If you company says it's too expensive, then
you have a managment problem because product testing costs should have been
built into the selling price of the devices. It's part of NRE,
non-returnable expenses.

For a flight-ready device example, say you have a box of electronic that
must survive 100Gs. You don't subject every box to 100Gs and say ship the
ones that survived. You design for 100Gs. You test for 100Gs. You start
production and pull samples for testing at 100Gs. Over life of the
production and whenever the production process changes, you test for 100Gs.
Everytime you test, survive or fail, you open the box to check if there is
an unseen problem that will cause a future failure because you performed
the test. Product testing 101.

Scott
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 ext 13 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com



From daemon Thu Jan 18 22:02:32 2001



From: Harry Walsh :      h_walsh-at-acs.org
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 21:56:26 -0600
Subject: ACS LM Short Course at PittCon

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"Applied Optical Microscopy" - an ACS Short Course, offered in conjunction
with PITTCON 2001 in New Orleans.

A three-day, hands-on course in light microscopy, including units on
contrast techniques, becoming a better consumer, digital imaging, and
quantitative polarized light.

March 2-4, 2001, Hyatt Regency Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana
Tuition: $995 for non-ACS members, $895 for ACS members. (Note: Tuition does
not include housing or meals.)


For more information about the course or to register, contact the American
Chemical Society at shortcourses-at-acs.org or 800-227-5558, extension 4508.
Or, visit the website at www.acs.org/shortcourses.



**********************************************************
Harold G. Walsh
Department of Continuing Education
American Chemical Society
1155 Sixteenth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036

Phone: 800-227-5558, ext. 4507, or 202-872-4507
Fax: 202-872-6336

Visit our Web site at: www.acs.org/shortcourses
**********************************************************




From daemon Thu Jan 18 22:40:44 2001



From: Al Coritz :      al-at-boeckeler.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 21:57:52 -0700
Subject: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Quite Correct.

Usually 5% of the lot is pulled for testing.
The evaluation for the entire lot is based upon the test results of the
representative 5%.

Sometimes examining a part under the SEM will cause damage depending upon
the construction of the part.
The damage is artifact and has nothing to do with the part integrity.
I think it is this damage that Raytheon is most concerned.

The emphasis for SEM examination of semiconductor has shifted from 15KV to
20KV, to lower (up to 2KV)
accelerating voltages. Resolution at low KV suffers and hence the
untilization of field emission guns.


Regards All,


Earl

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Scott D. Davilla" {davilla-at-4pi.com}
To: "'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 4:30 PM


Majid:

The common cleaning methods for FF replicas include: Conc. Bleach, 70%
Sulfuric acid, or 50%Chromic acid. These work for almost everything I have
encountered. For the others I recommend Fisher Scientific Glass Cleaning
Solution*. Start with 10% increasing to 50% overnight in a humidified
chamber with a cover.

If you don't take care to slowly increase the conc. of ANY of the cleaning
solutions you take the chance of "cooking" the remaining biological material
to the replica. This maybe what is happening. Several labs I work with are
using Xenopis oocytes and don't encounter problems with the replicas and
they use only Bleach. Plasma cleaning replicas may also "cook" the replica
too but I don't know for certain.

I think the brittleness you are encountering is related strictly to the
replication process and not the cleaning. I would need more information on
your protocol to comment on what might be causing it. Pt/C replicas are
stabile in all of the solutions mentioned above for extended cleaning times.

* I have no financial interest in Fisher Chemicals or Products.


Al Coritz
Sales & Service Manager
RMC-Boeckeler Instruments
4650 S. Butterfield Dr.
Tucson, AZ 85714
Voice: 520-745-0001
Cell: 520-465-3598
Fax: 520-745-0004
Email:Al-at-Boeckeler.com
Website:RMCProducts.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Majid [mailto:majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 7:11 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




Hello all

We are preparing Pt-C and C replicas from different biological material. For
cleaning the obtained replica we either use bleach (5.2%) or chromic acid
(10, 20 followed by 40%) with washes in between. The protocol usually works
well for most stuff but when it comes to oocytes from Xenopus we are usually
left with a lot of organic material still attached to the replica. If we
leave the replica in cleaning agent for a long time we end up with a very
brittle replica which can easily break.

Oocytes have got a reputation for being very sticky and difficult to clean.
We are considering to use plasma cleaning instead but I don't know what to
expect from that. I would appreciate it if you could share your 'tips and
tricks' with us.

Majid Ghoddusi



...............................................................
Majid Ghoddusi, PhD
Protein Dynamics Unit
Department of Chemistry
Australian National University
ACTON 0200
Canberra
Tel: (02) 6125 4190
Fax: (02) 6125 0760
e.mail: majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au
web site: http://langevin.anu.edu.au/
..........................................................................
.........





From daemon Thu Jan 18 23:51:03 2001



From: Nelson Conti :      NelsonC51-at-excite.com
Date: Thu, 18 Jan 2001 21:47:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Basal bodies

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Hi Karen -
I've worked with ciliates (i.e., eukaryotic microorganisms -- one common
example is Paramecium), and there are several silver stains that, when
properly executed, allow the user to clearly visualize basal bodies under LM
brightfield. They are: Klein silver stain (using silver nitrate);
Chatton-Lwoff silver stain (using a salinated gel in combo with silver
nitrate); Rio Hortega ammoniacal silver stain (using a combo of ammonium
hydroxide and silver nitrate), and Protargol stain (using proteinaceous
silver nitrate). There are protocols for these stains in a protozoology book
by Kirby (I forget the title offhand). Any of these stains may help you.
Good luck with the basal body visualization!
Nelson Conti



On Thu, 18 Jan 2001 12:47:08 -0600, Karen.Pawlowski-at-worldnet.att.net wrote:

| ------------------------------------------------------------------------
| The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
| To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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| -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
|
|
| Hi all,
|
| I was wondering if there are any stains/methods that would allow the
| identification of basal bodies or centromeres in a non-dividing cell.
| I would like to determine the basal body position in a cell without
| resorting to serial TEM. My thinking is that I might be able to do
| it in whole cells with the right marker. Any comments?
|
| Karen Pawlowski
|


164 Ferne Court
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650) 494-0472
[NelsonC51-at-excite.com]





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From daemon Fri Jan 19 05:02:01 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 10:56:44 +0000
Subject: Re: CryoEM sectioning

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Leslie

one way that you could improve the cooling properties of your liquid
nitrogen is by 'slushing' it. This simply involves supercooling liquid
nitrogen by using latent heat of evaporation. A simple rotary pump and
vacuum chamber is used to evaporate gas off the liquid until a slush of
solid nitrogen is produced. If air is leaked into the chamber the solid
nitrogen melts and the process should be repeated 2 or 3 times to thoroughly
cool the nitrogen. The resulting liquid/slush should be handled with great
care because it does not boil when warm objects are plunged into it (i.e. it
will freeze specimens and you more quickly). It can be used for a few
minutes after production and can be tested simply by dropping small metal
objects in (if they 'fizz' it's no longer cool enough).

If you intend to try this you will need to experiment with quantities and
containers (about 100-200ml in a 200-400ml PTFE or metal beaker) and take
care that the nitrogen doesn't all spurt out when the solid forms on its
surface. You will need a vacuum chamber design where chilling and nitrogen
spillage will not cause damage, you can view the process through a window
and bleed air in quickly. I have used freeze drying units and a
home/lab-made chamber made out of an old film desiccator and they both
worked well. If you're careful and have some form of insulated drip tray you
might try an ordinary vacuum coater with just the roughing/rotary pump.

I'm sure there is plenty of published information on this technique (perhaps
in a Hayat book or other cryo technique texts) and I apologise if you were
already aware of it. If my memory serves me well, the last paper I looked at
stated that pentane etc. were better cryogens but that slush was a lot
better than liquid nitrogen.

Good luck

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK


Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi Leslie,
} One thing I can think of, is that you shouldn't drop your samples
} into the liq. Nit. LN2 is a poor cryogen in that it boils when warm
} things are placed into it, creating a pocket of nitrogen gas around
} the sample, that acts as an insulating layer. Most of us do use
} nitrogen to freeze our samples. I always hold the pin end of the
} stub in a hemostat-type clamp and wiggle it as it freezes to try to
} ensure an exchange of the cryogen and avoid too much of a gas bubble
} around the sample. I'm sure you will get many other suggestions,
} since there are so many of us out there doing this with varying
} degrees of success.
} Good luck,
} Lee
} Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
} Sr. Staff Associate
} Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
} Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
} of Cornell University
} voice (212)746-6146
} fax (212)746-8175



From daemon Fri Jan 19 05:09:16 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 05:06:19 -0600
Subject: Re: Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} }
} } The orignal question was
} }
} } } } } Do you know or can you ask your readers about the possibility of
} } } } } Electrostatic Discharge damage caused by an SEM? Is this a
problem?
} My
} } } } } company is reluctant to have me examine flight-ready devices in
the
} SEM
} } } } } because of this possibility. I can't find any information on the
} } } } } subject. Thanks for any help you can give me.
} }

Having worked on aircraft parts you will never get to test a flight ready
part and get it declared flight ready again. I expect an inspector will
destroy it in some way when you are finished with it. If you think about
it a little you wouldn't want it any other way. The device was not
designed to be run through a SEM so even if it was totaly safe it would be
out of the queston.

If you need to look at one look at one that has been used in other testing
or has failed inspection and can not be reworked. These happen on occasion
just have them hold one for you.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger





From daemon Fri Jan 19 06:07:19 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 13:02:28 +0100
Subject: Antwort: LR White protocol for plant tissues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Rinaldo,

sorry that I answer your question a bit late! Some weeks ago you asked
about recipes for LR White embedding of plant tissue.

Well, here are some references:

Lonsdale J.E., McDonald K.L., Jones R.L. (1999): High pressure freezing and
freeze substitution reveal new aspects of fine structure and maintain
protein antigenicity in barley aleurone cells. Plant Journal 17(2):
221-229.

Takahashi, H., Kuroiwa, H., Miyagishima, S., Toda K., Itoh R., Kuroiwa T.
(1997): Improved procedure for immunogold electron microscopy: Rapid-freeze
substitution with absolute acetone. Cytologia (Tokyo) 62(3): 303 ? 308

This one is with LR Gold:
Staff, I.A., Schappi, G., Taylor P.E. (1999): Localisation of allergens in
ryegrass pollen and in airborne micronic particles. Protoplasma 208(1-4):
47 ? 57.

Hope that helps,

Joachim


Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350



From daemon Fri Jan 19 08:15:02 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 08:09:12 -0600
Subject: Problems with blue staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello
} My problem is: after revealing the semithin slices (10 um), I can see
} eye-naked the blue staining, but then it fades away in 10 to 30
} minutes. Can it be possible that the glycerol-PBS that I use as
} mounting media has something to do, or it is maybe the PBS in which I
} rinse the slides after revealing, to clean the excess and toxic DAB ?
}
} We suspect the PBS may have some contaminating elements which may
} reduce the DAB so it re-dissolves, or the glycerol is too old (it was
} bought in 1997) and has turned acid so it gives protons to the media
so
} DAB re-dissolves.
} Has it ever happened to anyone? Thank you.
}
} Albert Cardona.
} University of Barcelona. Spain.


__________________________________________________
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From daemon Fri Jan 19 08:20:25 2001



From: ldb2-at-ix.netcom.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 08:16:27 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Student Science Fair Project on DNA

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Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ldb2-at-ix.netcom.com
Name: Larry Bell
School: Westfields High School
State: VA

Question:
My son built a polarized light microscope and has been trying to observe
the liquid crystal properies of DNA for his 10th grade science fair
project. We've been all over looking for books and materials on the
subject and haven't had much luck. We've seen great pictures of the 3
liquid crystal phases exhibited by DNA, but can't find information on
preparing the sample and the slides. His science teacher gave him a simple
procedure to extract DNA from peas (or bananas) using a blender, meat
tenderizer and alcohol. The DNA rises to the top after the alcohol is
added. He tried allowing a drop of DNA/Alcohol mixture evaporate under the
crossed polarizer, but no changes have been observed. I'm told he needs to
"dissolve the DNA in a buffered saline solution prior to evaporation". Can
you advise him on a simple process to prepare the sample, and offer advice
on how to obtain or make the buffered saline solution?

Can you help us with a simple process to prepare a DNA sample for analysis
by evaporation?

Any advice you can offer would be appreciated.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Fri Jan 19 09:35:41 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 07:30:44 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have used all of the aforementioned replica cleaning reagents. One that
hasn't been mentioned yet, and that is very good for cleaning Pt/C replicas
is HF. The method is like all the rest, except that the HF has to be in
plastic containers (small petri dish, usually). Cleaning time can be up to
overnight, wash by transferring across several water washes, and pick up on
the grid. This is the method of choice for high resolution
shadowed/replicas protein preps. I have used it on other specimens as well,
and think that if necessary you could try it on yours. Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Thu, 18 Jan 2001 21:57:52 -0700, Al Coritz wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Majid:
}
} The common cleaning methods for FF replicas include: Conc. Bleach, 70%
} Sulfuric acid, or 50%Chromic acid. These work for almost everything I
have
} encountered. For the others I recommend Fisher Scientific Glass Cleaning
} Solution*. Start with 10% increasing to 50% overnight in a humidified
} chamber with a cover.
}
} If you don't take care to slowly increase the conc. of ANY of the
cleaning
} solutions you take the chance of "cooking" the remaining biological
material
} to the replica. This maybe what is happening. Several labs I work with
are
} using Xenopis oocytes and don't encounter problems with the replicas and
} they use only Bleach. Plasma cleaning replicas may also "cook" the
replica
} too but I don't know for certain.
}
} I think the brittleness you are encountering is related strictly to the
} replication process and not the cleaning. I would need more information
on
} your protocol to comment on what might be causing it. Pt/C replicas are
} stabile in all of the solutions mentioned above for extended cleaning
times.
}
} * I have no financial interest in Fisher Chemicals or Products.
}
}
} Al Coritz
} Sales & Service Manager
} RMC-Boeckeler Instruments
} 4650 S. Butterfield Dr.
} Tucson, AZ 85714
} Voice: 520-745-0001
} Cell: 520-465-3598
} Fax: 520-745-0004
} Email:Al-at-Boeckeler.com
} Website:RMCProducts.com
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Majid [mailto:majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au]
} Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2001 7:11 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Freeze-Fracture replica cleaning
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Hello all
}
} We are preparing Pt-C and C replicas from different biological material.
For
} cleaning the obtained replica we either use bleach (5.2%) or chromic acid
} (10, 20 followed by 40%) with washes in between. The protocol usually
works
} well for most stuff but when it comes to oocytes from Xenopus we are
usually
} left with a lot of organic material still attached to the replica. If we
} leave the replica in cleaning agent for a long time we end up with a
very
} brittle replica which can easily break.
}
} Oocytes have got a reputation for being very sticky and difficult to
clean.
} We are considering to use plasma cleaning instead but I don't know what
to
} expect from that. I would appreciate it if you could share your 'tips and
} tricks' with us.
}
} Majid Ghoddusi
}
}
}
} ...............................................................
} Majid Ghoddusi, PhD
} Protein Dynamics Unit
} Department of Chemistry
} Australian National University
} ACTON 0200
} Canberra
} Tel: (02) 6125 4190
} Fax: (02) 6125 0760
} e.mail: majid.ghoddusi-at-anu.edu.au
} web site: http://langevin.anu.edu.au/
}
.........................................................................
} .........
}
}
}
}





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From daemon Fri Jan 19 09:53:38 2001



From: Stephen Skirius :      Stephen_Skirius-at-bkitech.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 09:47:01 -0600
Subject: The preparation and examination of wood fibers by TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Is there a "standard" procedure for the embedding, sectioning and staining
of wood fibers for examination by transmission electron microscopy?

Steve


From daemon Fri Jan 19 09:57:27 2001



From: Tom Pella :      tom_pella-at-tedpella.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 07:53:35 -0800
Subject: Re: Negatives-Need help find clear plastic sleeves

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We sell clear polypropylene sleeves, 3 1/4 x 4, product number 35341-P.

Ted Pella, Inc.
800-237-3526

Tom Pella




From daemon Fri Jan 19 10:16:43 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 08:13:00 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM: tongue paraffin embedding help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Sue:

First, a question: are you embedding the whole tongue or a cross section (or
cross sections)? We routinely process rat tongue as part of the tissue
workup on whole animal collections. We collect a cross section
approximately 7mm long and embed to view the cross section. Processing is
done with the same schedule that we use for all the rest of our rat tissue.
Dehydration/clearing are at 45 min steps except for the last 100% alcohol
and clearant (those are 60 min each). We use either two 1 hour 30 min steps
in paraffin (Shandon Hypercenter XP) or two 45 min and two 60 min steps (VIP
E300). The only differences I can see between the two processors is that
the skins and cns tissues tend to be less well embedded through the Shandon
two-stage paraffin vs the VIP four-stage paraffin. Tongue embeds equally
well in either (as does other dense tissues)--the problem with skin
(especially from female rats or very old animals--either sex) and cns is the
high lipid/fat content and the ability to remove/replace that more
effectively with the additional paraffin infiltration steps. The other
thing I do is to make sure that my paraffins are not contaminated with
clearant (even the first stage). If the paraffin feels "slippery" when
rubbed between finger and thumb, dump it and replace with fresh paraffin.
Hope this helps.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Thu, 18 Jan 2001 16:15:54 -0500, Sue Hendricks wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Can anyone offer any tips for embedding rat tongue tissue in paraffin?
I
} am having difficulty with complete infiltration (?) of the tissue. The
} tongue has a dense muscle core that becomes hard during the process
causing
} shredding during sectioning. Any help would be much appreciated.
}
} On a second note: This tissue has been injected with tritiated
thymidine.
} Has anyone ever heard of loss of radioactive label during tissue post-fix
or
} embedding?
}
} thanks so much,
}
} Susan Hendricks
} University of Virginia
} Department of Psychology
} PO Box 400400
} Gilmer Hall
} Charlottesville, VA 22904
}
} 804.982.4755
} 802.982.4785 [fax]
} sjh2e-at-virginia.edu
}
}





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From daemon Fri Jan 19 10:55:17 2001



From: chris smith (IACR-RES) :      chris.smith-at-bbsrc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 17:33:08 -0000
Subject: Sputter coater

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thanks, Allen, for pointing out some of the issues here. By the way, It's
"Wehnelt", not "Wienault".

You are probably right about the ESD vs. EDS name. However, it was clear to
me what the original question was about.

Someone pointed out, that the cause of ESD (!) failure in electronic devices
is, that the fields increase to beyond the breakdown strength of the
devices, which causes a high and sudden current to flow through the parts
where the fields are highest, which in turn heats and destroys the sample. I
think, that is right. It's the fields that reach critical strength, which
then causes the current flow and destruction of the device. That's what I
meant when I said you get "zapped".

Now, about the electron microscope. Obviously I don't want to pronounce,
that electron microscopy is impossible. That would be stupid, wouldn't it?
However, as you said yourself, the sample is at ground potential, or very
near it, and so is the anode. In other words, there is not electric
potential (or very little) between the anode and the sample and thus no
electric field. Since the sample is grounded, as is the rest of the
microscope, there is no electric field between those, either. The energy of
an electron in an electric field is proportional to the electric field
(actually proportional to the square of the field, if my memory serves me).
No field - no electric energy. Of course that does not mean that the
electrons don't have energy. They have quite a lot of energy, on the order
of 20keV, by "falling" through the electric field between cathode and anode
and not being stopped by the anode. Since the sample is grounded (or should
be), the electric effects of the electron beam on the grounded sample will
be cancelled. What you have to contend with is the kinetic energy (20
keV/electron), which is transferred to the sample.

Now, I have always talked about grounded samples. That does not mean that
electric fields cannot be generated by the electron beam within the sample.
Obviously, you put electrons in the sample and they have to move out of the
sample. If there is any kind of resistance (an oxide layer, etc.), that will
result in charging and an electric potential.

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 2:44 AM
To: 'Mike Bode'


Hi,
Many thanks for the suggestions.
We have an Oxford Instruments 1500 attached to an SEM. Oxford themselves
say that this model will only sputter Au or Au/Pd, although they supply all
types of target. It can be upgraded to a 1500HF at £11,000 plus tax which
will do Pt but they say we would also need to swap the rotary vacuum pump
for a turbo. We compromised and bought an Au/Pd target. We find cracking
open the valve to the SEM chamber to get a sniff of the higher vacuum helps
deposition.
ttfn, Chris


From daemon Fri Jan 19 11:38:18 2001



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 19 Jan 2001 12:35:49 -0500
Subject: Embedding samples after GUS staining

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Microscopists,
We have some students doing projects where GAS staining is used as a genetic marker in arabadopsis roots. These roots are very small and must then be fixed embedded and thick-sectioned so that the distribution of the blue GUS staining can be observed with the light microscope.

The staining tends to fade badly with most embedding procedures. We have found that if samples are only run up to 95% ETOH and then embedded, the staining intensity is preserved. Thus only resins which tolerate 5% water can be used. We have successfully used technovit but this resin is very difficult to cut. Has anyone had experience with this stain and other resins that might preserve the stain intensity but is easier to handle (and hopefully not as expensive!).
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-099e Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907





From daemon Fri Jan 19 15:58:35 2001



From: Kim DeRuyter :      fnksd1-at-uaf.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 12:51:43 -0900
Subject: Used fiber optic panel for Zeiss 109

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X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Version 4.3.2


Fellow Listers,
Our Zeiss 109 recently developed a large vacuum leak in the fiber optic
panel (Between the column and the camera). I am told a new one runs
approximately $6000.00. We are no longer on service contract, but my old
service technician at LEO may already have a line on a used one. Above and
beyond the call of duty, if you ask me. In case that falls through I
thought I'd see If anyone out there might know of a likely source.
Thanks in advance
You are all so amazingly resourceful

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy Technician
900 Yukon Dr.
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-0180
907-474-5452





From daemon Fri Jan 19 16:36:16 2001



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 09:32:13 +1100
Subject: Re: Used fiber optic panel for Zeiss 109

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Kim,
I think there is a 35mm camera port on that microscope? You might be able
to blank off the bottom plate and pick up a second hand 35mm camera.
Good luck
Sally




Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU EMU
Box 475 Canberra ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218 or 6125 8525
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU


} } } Kim DeRuyter {fnksd1-at-uaf.edu} 01/20/01 08:51am } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Fellow Listers,
Our Zeiss 109 recently developed a large vacuum leak in the fiber optic
panel (Between the column and the camera). I am told a new one runs
approximately $6000.00. We are no longer on service contract, but my old
service technician at LEO may already have a line on a used one. Above and

beyond the call of duty, if you ask me. In case that falls through I
thought I'd see If anyone out there might know of a likely source.
Thanks in advance
You are all so amazingly resourceful

Kim DeRuyter
Histology and Electron Microscopy Technician
900 Yukon Dr.
Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-0180
907-474-5452






From daemon Fri Jan 19 18:18:18 2001



From: Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 18:14:00 -0600
Subject: Carbon in Steel Standards for WDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All:

I need to obtain some certified standards for
carbon in steel matrix to do quantitative work using WDX.
The problem is finding material that is homogeneous
on a micro-scale. I am trying to cover a range of 0.1 to
2.0 Wt. % carbon. No luck thus far with NIST or Brammer.

Does anyone know of a supplier who can produce
and sell such material?

Thanks in advance.

Jim Koncki
Senior Project Chemist
Torrington Co./Ingersoll-Rand

860-626-2774
fax 496-3636




From daemon Fri Jan 19 18:18:18 2001



From: Garone, Lynne C :      GARONEL-at-polaroid.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 18:12:16 -0600
Subject: Alden printer drivers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone use an Alden model 9315 CTP direct thermal printer to print
images? We have obtained this printer without drivers and the company
appears to be out of business.
Thanks,
Lynne C. Garone
Polaroid Corp.
W4-1D
1265 Main St.
Waltham, MA 02451-1714
(781) 386 -1446
(781) 386 -0378
GaroneL-at-Polaroid.com




From daemon Fri Jan 19 19:14:02 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Fri, 19 Jan 2001 19:10:58 -0600
Subject: Re: Used fiber optic panel for Zeiss 109

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: "Kim DeRuyter" {fnksd1-at-uaf.edu}
} Fellow Listers,
} Our Zeiss 109 recently developed a large vacuum leak in the fiber optic
} panel (Between the column and the camera). I am told a new one runs
} approximately $6000.00. We are no longer on service contract, but my
old
} service technician at LEO may already have a line on a used one. Above
and
} beyond the call of duty, if you ask me. In case that falls through I
} thought I'd see If anyone out there might know of a likely source.
} Thanks in advance
} You are all so amazingly resourceful
}
A free wanted add on www.labx.com turns up a lot of hard to find stuff and
the price it right.

I have no connection with labx except using their service to find some
really hard to find stuff.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger





From daemon Fri Jan 19 19:54:53 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 11:51:50 +1000
Subject: RE: Metal for Sputter Coating Targets -- Thanks and a summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I think that the emphasis is not quiet right. If you have resolution problems
due to the coating in the common SEM magnification range at say up to x60k,
chances are, its the thickness of the coating and not the grain-size.
The analogy with a blanket of snow should be clear to all of you in frigid
climates: A dusting of snow contours every pebble, whereas a 300mm layer would
hide all small features. You cannot expect to see much detail using a thick
coating.
A thin coating may not be continuos because of grain size and a thin coating
may lead to charging effects and these have to be addressed by various means.
Finer grain size gives a more continuous coating, but if the coating is thick
the grain-size scarcely matters in terms of resolution.
The difference in grain size between Au and Au/Pd is marginal and was first
given as a theoretical advantage when SEM specimens were coated by evaporation.
Sputtering gives lower grain sizes than evaporation for any given metal, but I
guess that the relative grain-size remains.
I rather doubt that you will find any real advantage after switching from Au to
Au/Pd targets. Pt would give an advantage at high SEM mags, but even then, part
of the effect may be the thinner coating that Pt gives when compared with Au.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Friday, January 19, 2001 7:29 AM, Michael D. Standing
[SMTP:Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu] wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Listers:
}
} Thank you for the numerous responses to my query about which metals and
} operating conditions to consider for improving the grain size of the
} coatings we have been getting from our sputter coater. Below is a brief
} summary of the recommendations we have received. I will be experimenting
} with several of these items to see where we ultimately want to end up with
} this. I suspect that we will develop several protocols based on the
} requirements of the experiment. Again thank you.
}
} 1) Gold/Palladium definitely has a smaller grain and we should see a
} definite improvement by using it.
}
} 2) Platinum will have the finest grain size but it takes longer to deposit,
} potentially causing damage to sensitive samples.
}
} 3) Platinum/Palladium is sometimes used as an alternative to Chromium
} coating
}
} 4) Reduce the coating thickness as much as possible
}
} 5) Coat using higher vacuum / lower currents / lower voltage to reduce grain
} size
}
} 6) Pulse the deposition
}
} 7) Decrease sample surface temperature
}
} 8) Gold may be the best alternative for samples where resolution is not as
} much a factor as is sample integrity as the other metals require more energy
} / longer exposure to get an adequate coating.
} ======================================
} Michael D. Standing
} BYU Microscopy Lab
} 401 WIDB
} Brigham Young University
} Provo, UT 84602
}
} e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
} phone: (801) 378-4011
} fax: (801) 378-3937
} ======================================
}
}



From daemon Sat Jan 20 07:29:03 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 05:22:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE:RE:Problems with Blue staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you Grace
It was my first question here and it amazes me how fast answers came
from everywhere.
Yes, I'm using niquel amonium sulfate as DAB enhancer, and then I mount
the slides with glycerol-PBS 50%, since the slides are 8-well ones
-pretty expensive- and we re-use them hundreds of times. It would not
be possible to do so with permanent mounting media as DPX or permount.
Anyway, there is no point in keeping the screening results ... these
immunostainings are used screen monoclonal antibodies produced by
myself.
But, the issue is, it has always been possible to mount the slides in
glycerol-PBS with no loss-of-stain problems -at least, the blue stain
lasted 2 days. But now we are losing the staining in 30 minutes, even
less, sometimes even 10 minutes. That is why I was asking if the
glycerol aged more acid had something to do, or the PBS.
Thank you.
Oh, by the way, I accidentaly deleted the last 10 mails, one of them
also including an answer to my request. If anybody could be so kind as
to resend it to me to planaria2000-at-yahoo.com I would really appreciate
it.

Albert Cardona
University of Barcelona. Spain.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices.
http://auctions.yahoo.com/


From daemon Sat Jan 20 07:56:55 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 05:53:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE: RE: Problems with blue staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you Grace
It was my first question here and it amazes me how fast answers came
from everywhere.
Yes, I'm using niquel amonium sulfate as DAB enhancer, and then I mount
the slides with glycerol-PBS 50%, since the slides are 8-well ones
-pretty expensive- and we re-use them hundreds of times. It would not
be possible to do so with permanent mounting media as DPX or permount.
Anyway, there is no point in keeping the screening results ... these
immunostainings are used screen monoclonal antibodies produced by
myself.
But, the issue is, it has always been possible to mount the slides in
glycerol-PBS with no loss-of-stain problems -at least, the blue stain
lasted 2 days. But now we are losing the staining in 30 minutes, even
less, sometimes even 10 minutes. That is why I was asking if the
glycerol aged more acid had something to do, or the PBS.
Thank you.
Oh, by the way, I accidentaly deleted the last 10 mails, one of them
also including an answer to my request. If anybody could be so kind as
to resend it to me to planaria2000-at-yahoo.com I would really appreciate
it.

Albert Cardona
University of Barcelona. Spain.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Auctions - Buy the things you want at great prices.
http://auctions.yahoo.com/


From daemon Sat Jan 20 08:35:36 2001



From: Markus F. Meyenhofer :      micro-at-mail.superlink.net
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 08:30:24 -0600
Subject: Help for LKB Ultrotome V

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all.
I would like to get a circuit diagram for an LKB Ultrotome V (2088)
Ultra Microtome. Please contact me direct.
Thanks for any help.
Markus




From daemon Sat Jan 20 20:53:40 2001



From: Tim Richardson :      mirlyn-at-attglobal.net
Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2001 21:31:52 -0500
Subject: Food Structure and Functionality Symposium 2001

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For your information, thought you all might be interested to know what is
happening in microscopy in this sector. The sender is the head of plant /
food em microscopy at AG Canada in Dartmouth NS I think.

Tim

=========

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Food Structure & Functionality Symposium 2001
An international symposium leading food structure & Functionality studies
through the 21st century
*webaddress at the AOCS site
http://www.aocs.org/member/division/fsff/index.htm*

Being held in conjunction with the , May 13-16, 2001, Minneapolis
Convention Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. For information, e-mail us
at: meetings-at-aocs.org

The symposium has two themes:
* New and novel approaches (including microscopy, rheology and
spectroscopy) to the study of structure-function relationships in foods;
* Food system studies covering any part of the processing chain - from the
raw material to the final product, and including trouble shooting.

Tentative Program (confirmed as of January 12th, 2001)

May 13th - Short Courses (short courses will run for a full day, and will
run concurrently)

1) Food Contaminants. Contact person - Mark Auty
2) Specific Labeling in Foods. Contact person - Marcel Paques

May 14th-16th inclusive - Technical sessions
6 sessions will run over 3 days

Morning
Symposium opening
Plenary lecture - Food Quality andwhy the Structure matters. P. Lillford,
Unilever Research, Colworth House UK

Session 1: Dairy Products and Fat Based Foods Session - chairs M. Auty and
M. Paques

Milk protein polysaccharide interactions in aqueous solutions and
oil-in-water emulsions.
H. Singh*, Y. Hemar & P. Munro, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health
Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Structural functions of dairy ingredients in products formulated with
taro flour.
C. Onwulata, USDA/ARS,Eastern Regional Research Center,Wyndmoor, PA 19038

Confocal imaging of galactomannan mode of action in recrystallisation of
ice in model ice cream
D. Ferdinando, Unilever Research Colworth House, UK

Heating of Food Proteins in a Closed System at High Temperature
N. Kitabatake, Kyoto University, Japan

Milk Protein - molecular components and functional properties. N. C.
Ganguli, Indian Dairy Association

Afternoon
Session 2: Food Safety - chairs J. W. Arnold and R. Droleskey
Prevention of Foodborne Illness Through Sanitation and Processing Technology
J.W. Arnold; USDA/ARS, Russell Research Center; Athens, GA 30604

PreHarvest Intervention Strategies to Control Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry
J. A. Byrd; USDA/ARS/SPARC; College Station, TX 77845

Interactions of Competitive Exclusion Cultures with the Intestinal Mucosa
of Newly Hatched Chicks
R. Droleskey; USDA/ARS/SPARC; College Station, TX 77845

Adhesion of Salmonella on Alfalfa Sprouts
A. Chartowski; USDA/ARS, Western Regional Research Center; Albany, CA 94710

Growth of Fusarium moniliforme Dependent upon Corn Tissue Type
I. E. Yates; USDA/ARS, Russell Research Center; Athens, GA 30604

Dedicated poster viewing 4:00-6:00PM

Evening: Round Table Discussion - topic to be announced


Tuesday, May 15th, 2001
Morning
Session 3: New Methods and Techniques for Food Structure and Functionality
Analysis -chair K.Groves

Diffusing wave spectroscopy - a new and non-invasive method for the
investigation of the structure, dynamics and interactions in complex food
systems
M. Alexander* and P. Schurtenberger

Food: How complex can it be?
E. Esselink ,Unilever Research Vlaardingen, The Netherlands

Immunolocalization of Transgenic Protein in Wheat Endosperm
M. L. Parker *, E. Stoger, R. Casey and P. Christou, Institute of Food
Research, Norwich, England.

Structure/Function relationships through microrheology.
M. Paques, Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences/Unilever Research Vlaardingen

Specific labeling techniques for foods
J. Leunissen, Aurion: Immuno-Gold Reagents & Accessories, The Netherlands


Food Structure and Functionality Division Luncheon. Dr. Brian Brooker
(Institute of Food Research, England * retired) will be presented with the
Food Structure and Functionality Division award and will give a
presentation entitled: Fat crystals - the importance of
being small.

Afternoon
Session 4: Agricultural Applications of Microscopy and Imaging Session-
chairs D.F.Wood and P. Allan-Wojtas

The Utility of Sorting in Agriculture.
H. J. Arnott, Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, Texas

The Potential for Automatic X-ray Sorting of Insect Infested Grain
R. Haff . USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Automated Sorting of Almonds with Embedded Shell by Laser Transmittance
Imaging
T. Pearson* R. Young, USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Use of a GFP-transformed strain of Fusarium graminearum to study ear rot
development in corn
S. S. Miller. , AAFC - ECORC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Popping modifies endosperm structure and improves digestibility in maize
and sorghum.
M.L. Parker, Institute of Food Research, Norwich, England.

Microstructural Changes in Rice During Cooking
D. Wood* and P.C. Yu . USDA - ARS - WRRC, Albany, California.

Evening: Food Structure and Functionality Division Member meeting

Wednesday, May 16th, 2001
Morning
Session 5: Ingredients and Food Processing - chairs D. Kittleson and J.
Charbonneau

Water continuous fat crystal networks in ice cream induced by unsaturated
monoglycerides
N. M. Barfod , Danisco Cultor, Brabrand, Denmark

High pressure application fo food systems and its impact on functional
ingredients
B. Tauscher*, P. Butz,and A.F. Garcia, Federal Research Center for
Nutrition, Karlsruhe, Germany

Specificity and application of lipolytic enzymes in bread making processes
T.B. Frandsen, T. Spendler, G. Budolfsen, L. Christiansen and J. B.
Neilsen, Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark

Afternoon
Session 6: Colloidal and Interfacial Sciences - chairs D. Pechak and M. Paques

Rheology and Structure of Particulate Protein Gels
T. van Vliet, Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences,Wageningen, The Netherlands

Posters:

1. In situ study of the effect of heating on dough components using
Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR)

O. Sevenou, S.E. Hill, I.A. Farhat and J.R. Mitchell. Division of Food
Sciences, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK

2. Antioxidative activity of the crude extract of lignan glycosides from
sesame meal

Y-S Shue and L.S. Hwang, Graduate Institute of Food Science and Technology,
National Taiwan University, Taiwan, R.O.C.

3. Near Field Microscopy of phase separation in a mixed interfacial
protein/surfactant film

A. P. Gunning, A.R. Mackie, A.R. Kirby and V.J. Morris, Institute of Food
Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK

Contact information for the chairs is shown below, in alphabetical order:

Paula Allan-Wojtas
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Centre, Kentville, Nova Scotia,
Canada
B4N 1J5
Tel: (902) 679-5566
FAX: (902) 679-2311
email: allanwojtasp-at-em.agr.ca

Judy Arnold
USDA -ARS - RRC
950 College Station Rd.
P.O. Box 5677
Athens, GA 30604-5677
USA
Tel: (706) 546-3515
FAX: (706) 546-3068
email: jarnold-at-ars.usda.gov

Mark Auty
Dairy Products Research Centre
TEAGASC
Moorepark, Femoy, Co. Cork
Ireland
Tel: 011-353-25-42447
FAX: 011-353-25-42340
email: mauty-at-moorepark.teagasc.ie

James E. Charbonneau
National Food Processors Association
Food Chemistry and Packaging Department
1401 New York Ave, NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
USA
Tel: (202) 639-5972
FAX: (202) 639-5991
email: jcharbo-at-nfpa-food.org

Kathy Groves
Leatherhead Food Research Association
Randalls Road, Leatherhead
Surrey KT22 7RY
England
Tel: 44 0132 822330
FAX: 44 0132 386228
email: kgroves-at-lfra.co.uk

Diana Kittleson
Pillsbury TPC Labs
737 Pelham Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55114
USA
Tel: (651) 917-5859
FAX: (651) 917 5850
email: dkittleson-at-pillsbury.com

Tony McKenna
New Zealand Dairy Institute
Private Bag 11 029
Palmerston North,
New Zealand
Tel: 011 64 6 350 4649
FAX: 011 64 6 356 1476
email: tony.mckenna-at-nzdri.org.nz

Marcel Paques
Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences/Unilever Research Vlaardingen
P.O. Box 20, 6710 BA Ede
The Netherlands
Tel: 011 31 318 659690
FAX: 011-31-318 650400
email: paques-at-nizo.nl

David Pechak
Kraft Technology Centre
801 Waukegan Road
Glenview, IL 60025
USA
Tel: (847) 646-4808
FAX: (847) 646-3864
email: dpechak-at-kraft.com

Delilah Wood
USDA - ARS - WWRC
800 Buchanan Street
Albany, CA 94710
USA
Tel: (510) 559-5653
FAX: (510) 559-5777
email: wood-at-pw.usda.gov



===============================================================
Tim Richardson, R&D, Bio-Microtech Inc. & Bolton Bio-Research
email: mirlyn-at-attglobal.net, web: www.bio-microtech.com
ph: 905-951-7058 fax: 905-951-7052
4-670 Hardwick Road, P.O. Box 23, Bolton, Ontario, L7E 5T1, Canada





From daemon Sun Jan 21 11:31:33 2001



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 10:21:06 -0700
Subject: Carbon in Steel Standards for WDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You might try Geller Microanalytical Lab in Peabody, Mass. The last phone
number I had for him was 508-535-5595. If he doesn't have it, he would know
where to direct you.

Good Luck.

Harry Ekstrom
Materials Laboratory

(602) 231-2744
e-mail: harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 5:14 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi All:

I need to obtain some certified standards for
carbon in steel matrix to do quantitative work using WDX.
The problem is finding material that is homogeneous
on a micro-scale. I am trying to cover a range of 0.1 to
2.0 Wt. % carbon. No luck thus far with NIST or Brammer.

Does anyone know of a supplier who can produce
and sell such material?

Thanks in advance.

Jim Koncki
Senior Project Chemist
Torrington Co./Ingersoll-Rand

860-626-2774
fax 496-3636




From daemon Mon Jan 22 00:48:06 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 07:35:39 +0100
Subject: Antwort: The preparation and examination of wood fibers by TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Stephen,

there is (probably not a "routine method") a really good paper on embedding
Cornus wood in Spurr:

Ristic, Z., Ashworth E.N. (1995): Response of xylem ray parenchyma cells of
supercooling wood tissues to freezing stress: Microscopic study.
International Journal of Plant Sciences. 156(6): 784-792.


The preparation there was done by plunge freezing followed by Freeze
Substitution.

Hope that helps,

Joachim


Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350



From daemon Mon Jan 22 02:21:05 2001



From: Labar Janos :      labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 10:41:58 +0100
Subject: TEM of Mg-based alloys

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

A friend wants to examine Mg-based alloys in TEM and warned us that in a
previous lab this alloy was expelled from the microscope because it caused
contamination by sublimation. I have no experience with these materials. Can
anyone give me more detailed info if this is a real danger?

Thanks in advance:

János


Dr. habil, Janos L. Labar
Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science
H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege u. 29-33
Postal address: H-1525 Budapest-114, Po Box 49
Tel: (36)(1) 392-26-92
Fax: (36)(1) 275-49-96
Fax/phone: (36)(1) 395-92-32
home page: www.mfa.kfki.hu/~labar




From daemon Mon Jan 22 05:21:35 2001



From: Giles Sanders :      g.sanders-at-ic.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 12:09:09 -0000
Subject: Interfacing digital camera to microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, please forgive me. My spelling is not very accurate when I am
responding so early in the morning. Your correction on Wehnelt is correct.
Please forgive any such errors in this response, as it is similar in
timing.

The electric field of interest is not between any parts of the column, but
rather between the electrons and the sample. I really don't want to try to
attempt any quantum exercises here, but the energy impressed on the
electrons results in their increased EM field effects. The acceleration of
the electrons controlled by the electron gun configuration controls the
energy afforded the electrons. What happens after the anode does not
affect the energy of the electrons in the beam.

The electrons are the field. The acceleration given to them by the gun
determine their acceleration, and thus their field and relativistic
effects. Their energy is determined by the fields in the gun structure
alone. Once they are given that energy, their travel through the column is
determined by the momentum they have been given. The fields they generate
as they travel through the sample surface are the direct result of the
energy they were provided with in the electron gun.

Here's a simple challenge - define the 'kinetic' energy of a fast moving
electron. As the kinetic energy is generally defined as the mass vs. the
velocity of that mass, you may have a problem. The best high energy
experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to the electron.
Apparently, the only mass associated with the electron is the Einsteinium
energy-mass equivalent of its charge. If there is any increase in an
electron's mass/energy by acceleration in an applied electric field, it is
to the electrons energy. Check with SLAC's experiments.

A fine point, but one with merit. It doesn't matter whether the distance
from anode to sample is 10 cm or 1000 cm, if the electron can travel the
distance without interference and external force. Thus the electro-magn
etic interaction of the electron with the sample is simply dependant on the
force originally impressed on the electron by the gun.

The field present at the sample surface will thus be determined by the
acceleration given the electrons by the gun and their current density. The
higher the beam current, the greater the field flux. The smaller the area
of the electron impingement on the surface, the higher the field flux. As
we work towards smaller circuit dimensions, these electron interactions
produce higher field flux densities as the circuit dimensions come closer
to the electron beam diameters.

You seem to want to separate the mass related kinetic effects from the
energy of the particle, but that can not be done. As the electron is
accelerated, its energy is apparently increased, rather than its mass. The
result is that the classical and relativistic effects normally related to
mass are instead seen in an increase in the energy, and thus, the field
effects of the electron with the sample.

On Friday, January 19, 2001 10:43 AM, Mike Bode [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
wrote:
} { { File: ATT00000.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }

Thanks, Allen, for pointing out some of the issues here. By the way, It's
"Wehnelt", not "Wienault".

You are probably right about the ESD vs. EDS name. However, it was clear to
me what the original question was about.

Someone pointed out, that the cause of ESD (!) failure in electronic
devices
is, that the fields increase to beyond the breakdown strength of the
devices, which causes a high and sudden current to flow through the parts
where the fields are highest, which in turn heats and destroys the sample.
I
think, that is right. It's the fields that reach critical strength, which
then causes the current flow and destruction of the device. That's what I
meant when I said you get "zapped".

Now, about the electron microscope. Obviously I don't want to pronounce,
that electron microscopy is impossible. That would be stupid, wouldn't it?
However, as you said yourself, the sample is at ground potential, or very
near it, and so is the anode. In other words, there is not electric
potential (or very little) between the anode and the sample and thus no
electric field. Since the sample is grounded, as is the rest of the
microscope, there is no electric field between those, either. The energy of
an electron in an electric field is proportional to the electric field
(actually proportional to the square of the field, if my memory serves me).
No field - no electric energy. Of course that does not mean that the
electrons don't have energy. They have quite a lot of energy, on the order
of 20keV, by "falling" through the electric field between cathode and anode
and not being stopped by the anode. Since the sample is grounded (or should
be), the electric effects of the electron beam on the grounded sample will
be cancelled. What you have to contend with is the kinetic energy (20
keV/electron), which is transferred to the sample.

Now, I have always talked about grounded samples. That does not mean that
electric fields cannot be generated by the electron beam within the sample.
Obviously, you put electrons in the sample and they have to move out of the
sample. If there is any kind of resistance (an oxide layer, etc.), that
will
result in charging and an electric potential.

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 2:44 AM
To: 'Mike Bode'


Apologies in advance if this has been asked before ..

Has anyone had an success in interfacing an Epson PhotoPC 3000 digital
camera to an optical microscope?

Thanks

Giles Sanders
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------
Dr. Giles Sanders
Zeneca / SmithKline Beecham Centre for Analytical Sciences
Chemistry Department
Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine
London
SW7 2AY

Web: http://www.achem.ic.ac.uk/gsanders/web/giles.htm

Tel: (44) - 020-7594-5749
Fax: (44) -020-7594-5833



Never express yourself more clearly than you think.
-- Niels Bohr (1885-1962) Danish physicist

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------



From daemon Mon Jan 22 06:41:10 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 04:37:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: LM - problems with paraffin, xylene and AA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everybody
My questions are:
1- Is it very important to use an extremly pure ethanol (AA) to remove
the xylene from the semithin sections placed on slides?
2- Can the tissue burst and the cells disrupt if it is not 100% pure?
3- Can the xylene stay within the tissue if the AA is not 100% pure,
as little yellow bubbles?
4- What happens if the paraffin has been stored at 56 degrees for too
long? Can it turn into longer polymers and then be harder or impossible
to remove from the sections? How may I detect so in the sections, is it
visible?

Albert Cardona
University of Barcelona, Spain.

__________________________________________________
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From daemon Mon Jan 22 09:06:09 2001



From: Louise_Harner-at-albint.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 10:01:00 -0500
Subject: Carbon in Steel Standards for WDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Just thought I'd provide a corrected phone number & address (having been to
their lab). These were pulled off their website, but I didn't check to see if
they have what you're looking for.

Joseph D. Geller
Email: jg-at-gellermicro.com
www.gellermicro.com

Geller MicroAnalytical Laboratory
426e Boston St.
Topsfield, MA 01983-1212

Phone:(978) 887-7000
Fax:(978) 887-6671

Hope this helps. Disclaimer - I have no connection with Geller MicroAnalytical
Laboratory except as a satisfied customer. - Louise

Louise Harner
Research Microscopist
Albany International Research Co.
777 West Street, P.O. Box 9114
Mansfield, MA 02048
508-339-7300 phone
508-339-4996 fax
Louise_Harner-at-albint.com


----- Forwarded by Louise Harner/AlbInt on 2001/01/22 09:32 AM -----

"Ekstrom, Harry"
{harry.ekstrom-at-hone To: '\"Jim_Koncki {"'\"Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com\"
ywell.com} -at-sparc5.microscopy.com'" {"Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com"
-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} , Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
2001/01/21 12:21 PM cc:
Subject: RE: Carbon in Steel Standards for WDX





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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


You might try Geller Microanalytical Lab in Peabody, Mass. The last phone
number I had for him was 508-535-5595. If he doesn't have it, he would know
where to direct you.

Good Luck.

Harry Ekstrom
Materials Laboratory

(602) 231-2744
e-mail: harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Jim_Koncki-at-Ingersoll-Rand.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 5:14 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi All:

I need to obtain some certified standards for
carbon in steel matrix to do quantitative work using WDX.
The problem is finding material that is homogeneous
on a micro-scale. I am trying to cover a range of 0.1 to
2.0 Wt. % carbon. No luck thus far with NIST or Brammer.

Does anyone know of a supplier who can produce
and sell such material?

Thanks in advance.

Jim Koncki
Senior Project Chemist
Torrington Co./Ingersoll-Rand

860-626-2774
fax 496-3636







From daemon Mon Jan 22 09:56:11 2001



From: Zhiping LUO :      luo-at-msd.anl.gov
Date: 22 Jan 01 09:46:33 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM of Mg-based alloys

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Dear János,
I did a lot of TEM work of Mg-based alloys and I never experienced any
danger of these alloys in the microscope. The Mg matrix is definitely stable
in the microscope under the beam. The only concern may arise from the
stability of the compounds in your samples (usually I don't think it's a big
deal, since once a particle decomposes under the beam, the amount is quite
tiny). Anyway you may test your sample out of the microscope first.
Best regards,
Z.P. Luo

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Zhiping LUO
Materials Science Division, Building 223
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439
Phone: (630) 252-8762
Fax: (630) 252-7777
E-mail: luo-at-msd.anl.gov
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


} From: "Labar Janos" {labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu}
} To: "Microscopy ListServer" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Subject: TEM of Mg-based alloys
} Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 10:41:58 +0100
}
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} A friend wants to examine Mg-based alloys in TEM and warned us that in a
} previous lab this alloy was expelled from the microscope because it
caused
} contamination by sublimation. I have no experience with these materials.
Can
} anyone give me more detailed info if this is a real danger?
}
} Thanks in advance:
}
} János
}
}
} Dr. habil, Janos L. Labar
} Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science
} H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege u. 29-33
} Postal address: H-1525 Budapest-114, Po Box 49
} Tel: (36)(1) 392-26-92
} Fax: (36)(1) 275-49-96
} Fax/phone: (36)(1) 395-92-32
} home page: www.mfa.kfki.hu/~labar
}



From daemon Mon Jan 22 10:16:29 2001



From: Colleen Genadry :      cgenadry-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 11:12:12 -0500
Subject: CLEAR PLASTIC SLEEVES

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Importance: Normal


Dear Cindy,

The following is our supplier for clear "glassine " envelopes:

National Graphic Supply
226 N. Allen Street
Albany, NY 12206
Phone: (800)-223-7130

The manufacturer is Savage Universal Corporation in Arizona. We
have purchased, in the past, the following sizes:

2 3/4" X 3 3/4" Part No. SA 64 OPEN END (1000 per carton) - $
63.00 per carton*
4 1/4" X 5 1/4" Part No. SA 66 OPEN END (1000 per carton) - $
49.40 per carton**
5 1/4" X 7 3/8" Part No. SA 67 OPEN END (1000 per carton) -
$111.45 per carton*
8 1/4" X 10 1/4" Part No. SA 68 OPEN END (500 per carton) -
$102.90 per carton*

(Please NOTE: *last price - September, 1999; **last price - March, 2000.)

If I can be of any further help, please let me know.

Regards,

Colleen Marie Genadry, Administrative Assistant, Manpower
IBM Corporation
2070 State Route 52, Mail Stop E40, Dept. 13WA
Hopewell Jct., NY 12533-6531
T/L 532-2664
} From Outside call (845)-892-2664
FAX #: (845)-892-2003
E-Mail: cgenadry-at-us.ibm.com



From daemon Mon Jan 22 10:21:35 2001



From: ERIC :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:22:14 -0800
Subject: Cleaning Knife Boats?

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To my fellow Microscopists,

Here we use the LKB plastic knife boats for our glass knives on cutting 1
micron sections. To attach the knife boat to the glass I use clear nail
polish. The problem is how can I safely remove the nail polish and use the
knife boats again.

I have tried a low concentration of acetone which melts the boats. I have
tried a diluted nail polish remover which also melts the plastic boats and
deforms them.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Electron Microscopy Lab
Department of Pathology
Email: biology-at-ucla.edu or erosen-at-mednet.ucla.edu




From daemon Mon Jan 22 10:57:00 2001



From: J. A. Kiernan :      jkiernan-at-julian.uwo.ca
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 11:53:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Basal bodies

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On Thu, 18 Jan 2001, Karen Pawlowski wrote:

} I was wondering if there are any stains/methods that would allow the
} identification of basal bodies or centromeres in a non-dividing cell.
} I would like to determine the basal body position in a cell without
} resorting to serial TEM. My thinking is that I might be able to do
} it in whole cells with the right marker. Any comments?

This is classical cytology, so you need a classical method! Here
are a few suggestions.

1. Osmium tetroxide is a must, either in the primary fixative
or as a post-fix. A glutaraldehyde-osmium sequence, as for EM,
is excellent.

2. Plastic embedding followed by staining 1um sections with a
basic dye may be all you need. Otherwise, cut paraffin sections
as thinly as possible (The 19th century methods for centrosomes
were, according to McClung's Handbook, done this way, after
chrome-osmic fixatives.)

3. Try treating paraffin sections of postosmicated tissue with
ethyl gallate, which makes a more darkly coloured product at
sites of osmium binding. This method was used with great elegance
in a study of the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis by
D. G. Montemurro - J. Endocrinol. 35: 271-279 (1966).

4. Try Heidenhain's iron-haematoxylin method. With careful
differentiation this can make almost anything visible.

5. When you have found a good method let us all know about
it, by way of Histonet.

John A. Kiernan,
Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology,
The University of Western Ontario,
LONDON, Canada N6A 5C1
E-mail: kiernan-at-uwo.ca
http://publish.uwo.ca/~jkiernan/index.htm




From daemon Mon Jan 22 11:52:59 2001



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 11:37:39 -0600
Subject: Re: Carbon in Steel Standards for WDX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I didn't think that you could get a single-phase microstructure for carbon
in steel at a very high level of carbon. But I couldn't remember with
certainty, so I asked my friendly neighborhood materials scientist. Here is
his reply.
-------------
} At what levels can carbon be held in the matrix by solid solution? When
} does it force a second phase to appear?

About 0.02% C.

That's a huge range of carbon levels to expect homogenous
microstructure. Only thing I can think of would be to look for standards
with nickel to keep the steel austenitic, like an austenitic stainless
steel. Might be able to get quenched steel standards having a somewhat
uniform structure of martensite, though not purely homogenous.

So it begs the question, if the guy needs standards to analyze samples that
are homogenous, how are the samples being prepared?
-------------
I would be curious to know what sort of samples will be the subject of the
investigation. I suppose it might be possible to get some estimate by
probing a larger area, but the results would be subject to dis-similarities
in the microstructure and whatever errors result from dealing with a
two-phase structure.

C in iron is problematic, and I don't have a probe to get enough signal.
Besides, my friend gets good, cheap, fast results from a spectrographic lab
so that I haven't bothered to even try.

Warren S.

At 06:14 PM 1/19/2001 -0600, you wrote:
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From daemon Mon Jan 22 12:16:21 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 10:13:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE: Problems with blue staining

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Ok, here I go again :-)
We've checked the PBS pH and turned out to be just fine, about 7
(suposedly is 7.2). The glycerol was more acid though, down to 4.5. So
maybe it was the glycerol. But we performed a dot-blot test and it was
negative for that batch of glycerol: we fixed HRPeroxidase on
nitrocelulose paper and we tested 2 batches of DAB (an old and a new
one)to reveal it, and both performed equally up to the same
HRP-dilution. Then we added the supposedly bad glycerol:PBS and nothing
happened, the stain didn't fade, not even in 2 hours. So that is why
it's running us crazy. Maybe the DAB performs differently on semithin
tissue sections than over nitrocellulose paper.
The semithin sections, well they are 7 or 10 micrometers wide,in 53ª
paraffin, and a few months ago the immunostaining didn't work at all
(though the protocol has been working fine for 5 years), and then small
yellowish bubbles could be seen inside the tissue. And we never cleared
if they were residual paraffin or xylene -though we found out both
paraffin and xylene were doing wrong, since the paraffin had been at
56º for months -supposedly the polymers grew longer-, the xylene was
too polluted with paraffin and the AA was not pure at all. I'll never
forget again that EVERY single step on that protocol is killingly
important.
That is why I was asking if anyone had ever had any problems with
immunostainings ...
So, what do you think? Right now the protocol works fine some days, and
some others doesn't.

Albert Cardona
University of Barcelona

__________________________________________________
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From daemon Mon Jan 22 13:43:34 2001



From: Tony Owens :      towens-at-camscan-usa.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 14:38:44 -0500
Subject: Re[2]: Question

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Just thought I would throw my two cents worth in regarding the
issue of fields. It seems that one of the problems is defining
exactly what we mean by an electric field. Faraday introduced the
concept of a field (or more precisely a "force field") simply as
model or construct used to describe the existence - i.e. the
observation - of electric forces. An electric field is
characterized or explored by "measuring" the magnitude and
direction of electric force experienced by a test charge (the
force vector). A collection of infinitely many force vectors
"defines" the electric field. At any point in the field, the
direction of the field is DEFINED as the direction of force on
the test charge, and the strength of the field is DEFINED as the
magnitude of the force experienced by the test charge. There are
different models for the mechanism of electric force - the
"original" Faraday-Maxwell theory, in which lines or tubes of
force represent a strain in the "ether" - to the more modern
theory of exchange of particles (photon-field theory). But the
important point here is that "field" is simply a concept used to
characterize the electric forces experienced by our imaginary
test charge (we'll say an electron, even though physicists use a
positive test charge by convention).

So maybe the question to ask is what electric force will an
imaginary, stationary electron experience in the "vicinity" of
the sample (either above the sample surface or within the
sample). Assuming that the sample is a perfect conductor, my
sense is that this stationary electron would not experience any
significant electric forces, indicating that (by definition) no
significant electric field exists.

However, real samples such as what we're discussing in this
thread will contain regions of varying electrical conductivity.
The best example is perhaps that of a charging dust particle,
around which a strong electrical "field" is generated - I believe
a stationary test charge will experience strong electrical forces
in this region. The reason the field is produced is the existence
of a buildup of charges on/in the dust particle, and the
close proximity of the surface of the sample which does not build
up this electric charge (perhaps semantics, but I would NOT say
the electrons ARE the field - they may be partly responsible for the
field, but the "field" itself is just a concept which
characterizes our observation that a test charge in this region
will experience a force which has magnitude and direction.

Therefore, it seems to me that any electrostatic discharge (ESD)
damage caused within a sample will be initiated by the generation
of such an electric field, which in turn can only be generated
when there are differences in electrical conductivity (otherwise,
how can a differential buildup of charges - which produces the
field - occur?)

Best regards,


Tony mailto:towens-at-camscan-usa.com

Tony Owens
CamScan USA Inc.
508 Thomson Park Dr.
Cranberry Twp., PA 16066
Tel: 724-772-7433
Fax: 724-772-7434
URL: www.camscan-usa.com

____________________________________________


Monday, January 22, 2001, 1:44:53 PM, You wrote:

ARS} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARS} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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ARS} Yes, please forgive me. My spelling is not very accurate when I am
ARS} responding so early in the morning. Your correction on Wehnelt is correct.
ARS} Please forgive any such errors in this response, as it is similar in
ARS} timing.

ARS} The electric field of interest is not between any parts of the column, but
ARS} rather between the electrons and the sample. I really don't want to try to
ARS} attempt any quantum exercises here, but the energy impressed on the
ARS} electrons results in their increased EM field effects. The acceleration of
ARS} the electrons controlled by the electron gun configuration controls the
ARS} energy afforded the electrons. What happens after the anode does not
ARS} affect the energy of the electrons in the beam.

ARS} The electrons are the field. The acceleration given to them by the gun
ARS} determine their acceleration, and thus their field and relativistic
ARS} effects. Their energy is determined by the fields in the gun structure
ARS} alone. Once they are given that energy, their travel through the column is
ARS} determined by the momentum they have been given. The fields they generate
ARS} as they travel through the sample surface are the direct result of the
ARS} energy they were provided with in the electron gun.

ARS} Here's a simple challenge - define the 'kinetic' energy of a fast moving
ARS} electron. As the kinetic energy is generally defined as the mass vs. the
ARS} velocity of that mass, you may have a problem. The best high energy
ARS} experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to the electron.
ARS} Apparently, the only mass associated with the electron is the Einsteinium
ARS} energy-mass equivalent of its charge. If there is any increase in an
ARS} electron's mass/energy by acceleration in an applied electric field, it is
ARS} to the electrons energy. Check with SLAC's experiments.

ARS} A fine point, but one with merit. It doesn't matter whether the distance
ARS} from anode to sample is 10 cm or 1000 cm, if the electron can travel the
ARS} distance without interference and external force. Thus the electro-magn
ARS} etic interaction of the electron with the sample is simply dependant on the
ARS} force originally impressed on the electron by the gun.

ARS} The field present at the sample surface will thus be determined by the
ARS} acceleration given the electrons by the gun and their current density. The
ARS} higher the beam current, the greater the field flux. The smaller the area
ARS} of the electron impingement on the surface, the higher the field flux. As
ARS} we work towards smaller circuit dimensions, these electron interactions
ARS} produce higher field flux densities as the circuit dimensions come closer
ARS} to the electron beam diameters.

ARS} You seem to want to separate the mass related kinetic effects from the
ARS} energy of the particle, but that can not be done. As the electron is
ARS} accelerated, its energy is apparently increased, rather than its mass. The
ARS} result is that the classical and relativistic effects normally related to
ARS} mass are instead seen in an increase in the energy, and thus, the field
ARS} effects of the electron with the sample.

ARS} On Friday, January 19, 2001 10:43 AM, Mike Bode [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
ARS} wrote:
} } { { File: ATT00000.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }

ARS} Thanks, Allen, for pointing out some of the issues here. By the way, It's
ARS} "Wehnelt", not "Wienault".

ARS} You are probably right about the ESD vs. EDS name. However, it was clear to
ARS} me what the original question was about.

ARS} Someone pointed out, that the cause of ESD (!) failure in electronic
ARS} devices
ARS} is, that the fields increase to beyond the breakdown strength of the
ARS} devices, which causes a high and sudden current to flow through the parts
ARS} where the fields are highest, which in turn heats and destroys the sample.
ARS} I
ARS} think, that is right. It's the fields that reach critical strength, which
ARS} then causes the current flow and destruction of the device. That's what I
ARS} meant when I said you get "zapped".

ARS} Now, about the electron microscope. Obviously I don't want to pronounce,
ARS} that electron microscopy is impossible. That would be stupid, wouldn't it?
ARS} However, as you said yourself, the sample is at ground potential, or very
ARS} near it, and so is the anode. In other words, there is not electric
ARS} potential (or very little) between the anode and the sample and thus no
ARS} electric field. Since the sample is grounded, as is the rest of the
ARS} microscope, there is no electric field between those, either. The energy of
ARS} an electron in an electric field is proportional to the electric field
ARS} (actually proportional to the square of the field, if my memory serves me).
ARS} No field - no electric energy. Of course that does not mean that the
ARS} electrons don't have energy. They have quite a lot of energy, on the order
ARS} of 20keV, by "falling" through the electric field between cathode and anode
ARS} and not being stopped by the anode. Since the sample is grounded (or should
ARS} be), the electric effects of the electron beam on the grounded sample will
ARS} be cancelled. What you have to contend with is the kinetic energy (20
ARS} keV/electron), which is transferred to the sample.

ARS} Now, I have always talked about grounded samples. That does not mean that
ARS} electric fields cannot be generated by the electron beam within the sample.
ARS} Obviously, you put electrons in the sample and they have to move out of the
ARS} sample. If there is any kind of resistance (an oxide layer, etc.), that
ARS} will
ARS} result in charging and an electric potential.

ARS} Michael Bode, Ph.D.
ARS} Soft Imaging System Corp.
ARS} 1675 Carr St., #105N
ARS} Lakewood, CO 80215
ARS} ===================================
ARS} phone: (888) FIND SIS
ARS} (303) 234-9270
ARS} fax: (303) 234-9271
ARS} email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
ARS} web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
ARS} ===================================



ARS} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
ARS} Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 2:44 AM
ARS} To: 'Mike Bode'
ARS} Subject: RE: Question


ARS} Ok, apparently a simple physics lesson needed here.

ARS} First of all we are talking about ESD, or Electro-Static Discharge effects
ARS} here. Not EDS, or what in this field is known as Electron Dispersive
ARS} Spectroscopy.

ARS} Secondly, the electrons arriving at the sample surface in an SEM are
ARS} getting there with an acceleration that is roughly equivalent to the the
ARS} acceleration voltage impressed at the cathode. The sample is at, or very
ARS} near, ground potential. But the electrons in the beam are reaching the
ARS} sample at close to the accelerating voltage impressed. The grid or
ARS} "Wienault" of the electron gun is at a potential roughly +500V from the
ARS} accelerating voltage and is used to induce the electrons from the cathode
ARS} through the aperture in the anode, preventing the 'space charge' effects
ARS} around the cathode and providing the first electrostatic lens in the gun.

ARS} The potential of the anode of an electron microscope may be at ground
ARS} potential, but the electron beam is passing through the opening in the
ARS} anode. The anode is used as the second electrostatic lens, and has little
ARS} effect on the energy of the electrons passing through it. By its charge
ARS} opposite that of the electron beam, it encourages the first crossover of
ARS} the beam, but since the beam does not directly interact with it, there is
ARS} no direct energy exchange.

ARS} Precisely what kinetic energy can be transferred to the sample if there is
ARS} no energy differential between the electron potential at the anode and the
ARS} sample? Given your understanding of the processes involved, there can be
ARS} no discernable energy changes in the sample since the electrons have no
ARS} energy, and thus, there can be no discernable energy release from the
ARS} sample. In other words, in your view, electron microscopy is impossible.



ARS} On Thursday, January 18, 2001 2:24 PM, Mike Bode [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
ARS} wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Yes, EDS is very real and chip manufacturers go to great length (end
} } expense) to avoid them. However, I think the mechanism is different:
} }
} } EDS means, that something collects static electricity (by walking on a
} } carpet, for example), then touches something that is at a very different
} } potential. That's what happens if you touch a metal after walking on that
} } carpet. The enormous potential difference create strong electric field
ARS} that
} } finally ionize the air and you get "zapped". The strong fields can
ARS} destroy
} } the electronics.
} }
} } In an SEM the sample is usually grounded and does not see strong fields.
} } True, the electrons are accelerated to 30 KV or more, but the sample does
} } not see that, as the anode usually sits at ground level with the Cathode
} } being at - 30 kV. What you need to be concerned about here is the kinetic
} } energy that is transferred to the sample and can heat it up considerable.
ARS} On
} } the other hand, if the sample is not grounded, there will be fields
} } developing. There are also other effects, such as residual organics
ARS} getting
} } "cracked" and forming a residue on the sample, but that's a different
ARS} story.
} }
} } Michael
} }
} } Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} } Soft Imaging System Corp.
} } 1675 Carr St., #105N
} } Lakewood, CO 80215
} } ===================================
} } phone: (888) FIND SIS
} } (303) 234-9270
} } fax: (303) 234-9271
} } email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
} } web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} } ===================================
} }
ARS} Allen R. Sampson, Owner
ARS} Advanced Research Systems
ARS} 317 North 4th. Street
ARS} St. Charles, Illinois 60174
ARS} voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092


ARS} Allen R. Sampson, Owner
ARS} Advanced Research Systems
ARS} 317 North 4th. Street
ARS} St. Charles, Illinois 60174
ARS} voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092




From daemon Mon Jan 22 15:44:07 2001



From: Wright, John D. :      jwright-at-dugway-emh3.army.mil
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 14:48:18 -0700
Subject: unsubscribe

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unsubscribe


From daemon Mon Jan 22 16:52:26 2001



From: Sarah Lundberg :      lundberg-at-nevada.edu
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 14:47:15 -0800
Subject: SEM: Imaging irradiated samples

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Hiyo Listers,
What are the problems associated with imaging (SE and BSE) low level
radioactive samples (rocks)? They were irradiated for isotopic dating
~2 years ago and are now only a couple of times background? Does anyone
have experience with this low level radioactivity and SEM analysis? I
would appreciate any advice.
Many thanks,
Sarah

--
Sarah A.W. Lundberg
Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory
Department of Geoscience, UNLV
4505 S. Maryland Parkway Box 454010
Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010

EPMA Lab (702) 895-2660
SEM Lab (702) 895-2462
Office (702) 895-1134
Fax (702) 895-4064
Dept. Office (702) 895-3262

lundberg-at-nevada.edu
http://www.unlv.edu/Colleges/Sciences/Geoscience/EMIL.htm

Home:
8025 W. Russell Rd. Apt. #1117
Las Vegas, NV 89113
(702) 871-9635




From daemon Mon Jan 22 17:50:46 2001



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 15:47:30 -0800
Subject: Summer Internship in Transmission Electron Microscopy at Intel Co

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} We are pleased to announce the availability of a Summer Internship
} in Transmission Electron Microscopy at Intel Corporation, in Santa Clara,
} California. The period of employment will be summer, 2001, approximately
} from June through August, depending on availability. The goals of the
} internship will be to develop techniques using Electron Tomography to
} characterize the three-dimensional structure of elements of
} microelectronic devices. The ideal candidate should be a graduate student
} in materials science, physics, biophysics, or equivalent. In addition, the
} ideal candidate should be familiar with Transmission Electron Microscopy
} theory and practice, and should be very facile with computers. Prior
} experience with Electron Tomography techniques, FIB specimen preparation
} and Silicon Graphics would be especially beneficial. US citizenship, a
} Green Card, or an unrestricted work permit are required. For candidates
} geographically distant from California, relocation assistance may be
} available. Intel is an equal opportunity employer. Interested candidates
} are invited to contact John Mardinly by replying to this e-mail, or
} directly John.Mardinly-at-Intel.Com, 408-765-2346. Resumes must be submitted
} as text in an e-mail, not an attachment, or can be submitted through
} postal mail at: John Mardinly, Intel Corporation, Mail Stop SC2-24, 2200
} Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara, CA 95052-8119
}
}



From daemon Mon Jan 22 19:41:39 2001



From: Arthur Day :      ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 12:36:39 +1100
Subject: Re: SEM: Imaging irradiated samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Hiyo Listers,
} What are the problems associated with imaging (SE and BSE) low level
} radioactive samples (rocks)? They were irradiated for isotopic dating
} ~2 years ago and are now only a couple of times background? Does anyone
} have experience with this low level radioactivity and SEM analysis? I
} would appreciate any advice.
} Many thanks,
} Sarah
}
} --
} Sarah A.W. Lundberg

Sarah,

From your description there should not be any problem with SE and BSE
imaging if the levels are only a few times "background".

If your samples have been irradiated (neutrons?) at some point in the
past then you might pick up some spontaneous signals from them in
your EDS detector, but that's probably about the extent of any
interference you'll get.

Cheers,
Arthur.





Arthur Day, Electron Microscope Unit Phone: 61-2-9717-3457
Ansto Materials Division Fax: 61-2-9543-7179
PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Email: ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Australia www: http://www.ansto.gov.au/


From daemon Tue Jan 23 03:52:33 2001



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 03:37:17 -0600
Subject: RE: Re[2]: Question

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The concept of fields are not, I think, as arbitrary as you seem to
believe. Their introduction was not as an expedient to describe electric
forces, but rather DEFINED as their influence over distance, which could
not be explained by any other means. A fine point, perhaps, but one worth
making. Newton had given some explanation of the gravitational field, and
thus the underpinning of field theory. When it was discovered that
electricity and magnetism were related, it was obvious that the same
theories that explained the mass-gravity duality might be extended to
charge-magnetism . In each case, it was supposed that distant interactions
could be related to localized observations.

In our specific field, we are privy to the roots of quantum theory that
currently pervade our understanding of this world. The characteristic
x-ray spectrums that we rely on were a catalyst for the basic quantum
theories such as Pauli's, not to mention the photo-electric effects of PMTs
that were the foundation of Einstein's theory of Special Relativity. These
theories also support the concept of fields, although they couch them in
the exchange of discrete particles. This is used to explain the
empirically observed discrete, rather than continuous, exchanges of energy
between sub-atomic particles.

You digress to interactions of a sample with 'stationary' electrons. I
have written about electrons that have been given energy by acceleration in
electric fields. Apples and oranges. An electron that has been
accelerated by the typical electron beam instrument has far more energy
than a 'stationary' electron, and that energy is primarily available
through its interaction with matter. Can a 'stationary' electron produce
an inner shell electron vacancy? I can prove that an accelerated electron
can produce far greater yields than those produced by simple kinetic
theories. Producing an inner shell electron vacancy requires a defined
amount of energy and energy transfer at a distance that is simply not
available in a 'stationary' electron. As the electron has no measurable
dimension, the 'billiard ball' idea of kinetics can simply not explain such
an energy exchange or the spectral yield in a typical x-ray instrument.

A simple demonstration. Within your SEM or TEM is a circuit that provides
compensation for various accelerating voltages used. When you increase the
accelerating voltage, this circuit will increase the currents applied to
the condenser and objective lenses. Why? Because the electrons have more
energy at the increased accelerating voltages and require more force to be
applied to alter their trajectories to produce a similar demagnification
and focussing. The rest energy of these electrons has not changed, but
their total energy has. What repercussions does this have? Very simply,
their ability to interact with external fields and thus other charged
particles has increased while their susceptibility to those influences has
decreased.

In terms of fields, the accelerated electron produces an increased electric
field gradient in its immediate vicinity as its energy is increased. For a
single electron, this is a very localized effect. But in an electron beam
instrument, this effect can be spread over a much larger area as there is
considerable uncertainty in the location of individual electrons. In a
macro gradient produced by ESD, they are larger still. While the field
gradients are substantially different from those produced by electro-static
discharge, the effect and cause can be basically the same.

In ESD, two macro materials are brought in close contact that have greatly
differing electric potentials. Those electric differentials eventually
find a path through ionization of the interstitial gases to equalize the
electrical difference. The intervening gases provide a randomizing effect
that spreads the effect over a relatively large area. However, the energy
transfer behind the effect is the acceleration of electrons by the
differing electric potentials of the materials. Those accelerated
electrons hit the secondary material with the same enhanced energy as those
accelerated by artificial means.

Whether you use particle energy and fields or wave functions, the math is
similar. The electron has a rest mass, that is indistinguishable from its
charge. When accelerated through electric fields, the electron gains
energy that is then available externally, through interactions with the
fields it generates, or the extension of its wave function. In either
case, as the energy of the electron is increased, the gradient of its field
or wave function increases. That creates an increasing EM field that on a
small scale can create large electric and magnetic fields gradients that
can emulate larger scale effects within reason.

On Monday, January 22, 2001 1:39 PM, Tony Owens
[SMTP:towens-at-camscan-usa.com] wrote:
} Just thought I would throw my two cents worth in regarding the
} issue of fields. It seems that one of the problems is defining
} exactly what we mean by an electric field. Faraday introduced the
} concept of a field (or more precisely a "force field") simply as
} model or construct used to describe the existence - i.e. the
} observation - of electric forces. An electric field is
} characterized or explored by "measuring" the magnitude and
} direction of electric force experienced by a test charge (the
} force vector). A collection of infinitely many force vectors
} "defines" the electric field. At any point in the field, the
} direction of the field is DEFINED as the direction of force on
} the test charge, and the strength of the field is DEFINED as the
} magnitude of the force experienced by the test charge. There are
} different models for the mechanism of electric force - the
} "original" Faraday-Maxwell theory, in which lines or tubes of
} force represent a strain in the "ether" - to the more modern
} theory of exchange of particles (photon-field theory). But the
} important point here is that "field" is simply a concept used to
} characterize the electric forces experienced by our imaginary
} test charge (we'll say an electron, even though physicists use a
} positive test charge by convention).
}
} So maybe the question to ask is what electric force will an
} imaginary, stationary electron experience in the "vicinity" of
} the sample (either above the sample surface or within the
} sample). Assuming that the sample is a perfect conductor, my
} sense is that this stationary electron would not experience any
} significant electric forces, indicating that (by definition) no
} significant electric field exists.
}
} However, real samples such as what we're discussing in this
} thread will contain regions of varying electrical conductivity.
} The best example is perhaps that of a charging dust particle,
} around which a strong electrical "field" is generated - I believe
} a stationary test charge will experience strong electrical forces
} in this region. The reason the field is produced is the existence
} of a buildup of charges on/in the dust particle, and the
} close proximity of the surface of the sample which does not build
} up this electric charge (perhaps semantics, but I would NOT say
} the electrons ARE the field - they may be partly responsible for the
} field, but the "field" itself is just a concept which
} characterizes our observation that a test charge in this region
} will experience a force which has magnitude and direction.
}
} Therefore, it seems to me that any electrostatic discharge (ESD)
} damage caused within a sample will be initiated by the generation
} of such an electric field, which in turn can only be generated
} when there are differences in electrical conductivity (otherwise,
} how can a differential buildup of charges - which produces the
} field - occur?)
}
} Best regards,
}
}
} Tony mailto:towens-at-camscan-usa.com
}
}
} Monday, January 22, 2001, 1:44:53 PM, You wrote:
}
} ARS} Yes, please forgive me. My spelling is not very accurate when I am
} ARS} responding so early in the morning. Your correction on Wehnelt is
correct.
} ARS} Please forgive any such errors in this response, as it is similar
in
} ARS} timing.
}
} ARS} The electric field of interest is not between any parts of the
column, but
} ARS} rather between the electrons and the sample. I really don't want to
try to
} ARS} attempt any quantum exercises here, but the energy impressed on the
} ARS} electrons results in their increased EM field effects. The
acceleration of
} ARS} the electrons controlled by the electron gun configuration controls
the
} ARS} energy afforded the electrons. What happens after the anode does
not
} ARS} affect the energy of the electrons in the beam.
}
} ARS} The electrons are the field. The acceleration given to them by the
gun
} ARS} determine their acceleration, and thus their field and relativistic
} ARS} effects. Their energy is determined by the fields in the gun
structure
} ARS} alone. Once they are given that energy, their travel through the
column is
} ARS} determined by the momentum they have been given. The fields they
generate
} ARS} as they travel through the sample surface are the direct result of
the
} ARS} energy they were provided with in the electron gun.
}
} ARS} Here's a simple challenge - define the 'kinetic' energy of a fast
moving
} ARS} electron. As the kinetic energy is generally defined as the mass
vs. the
} ARS} velocity of that mass, you may have a problem. The best high energy
} ARS} experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to the electron.
} ARS} Apparently, the only mass associated with the electron is the
Einsteinium
} ARS} energy-mass equivalent of its charge. If there is any increase in
an
} ARS} electron's mass/energy by acceleration in an applied electric
field, it is
} ARS} to the electrons energy. Check with SLAC's experiments.
}
} ARS} A fine point, but one with merit. It doesn't matter whether the
distance
} ARS} from anode to sample is 10 cm or 1000 cm, if the electron can travel
the
} ARS} distance without interference and external force. Thus the
electro-magn
} ARS} etic interaction of the electron with the sample is simply dependant
on the
} ARS} force originally impressed on the electron by the gun.
}
} ARS} The field present at the sample surface will thus be determined by
the
} ARS} acceleration given the electrons by the gun and their current
density. The
} ARS} higher the beam current, the greater the field flux. The smaller
the area
} ARS} of the electron impingement on the surface, the higher the field
flux. As
} ARS} we work towards smaller circuit dimensions, these electron
interactions
} ARS} produce higher field flux densities as the circuit dimensions come
closer
} ARS} to the electron beam diameters.
}
} ARS} You seem to want to separate the mass related kinetic effects from
the
} ARS} energy of the particle, but that can not be done. As the electron
is
} ARS} accelerated, its energy is apparently increased, rather than its
mass. The
} ARS} result is that the classical and relativistic effects normally
related to
} ARS} mass are instead seen in an increase in the energy, and thus, the
field
} ARS} effects of the electron with the sample.
}
} ARS} On Friday, January 19, 2001 10:43 AM, Mike Bode
[SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
} ARS} wrote:
} } } { { File: ATT00000.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }
}
} ARS} Thanks, Allen, for pointing out some of the issues here. By the way,
It's
} ARS} "Wehnelt", not "Wienault".
}
} ARS} You are probably right about the ESD vs. EDS name. However, it was
clear to
} ARS} me what the original question was about.
}
} ARS} Someone pointed out, that the cause of ESD (!) failure in electronic
} ARS} devices
} ARS} is, that the fields increase to beyond the breakdown strength of the
} ARS} devices, which causes a high and sudden current to flow through the
parts
} ARS} where the fields are highest, which in turn heats and destroys the
sample.
} ARS} I
} ARS} think, that is right. It's the fields that reach critical strength,
which
} ARS} then causes the current flow and destruction of the device. That's
what I
} ARS} meant when I said you get "zapped".
}
} ARS} Now, about the electron microscope. Obviously I don't want to
pronounce,
} ARS} that electron microscopy is impossible. That would be stupid,
wouldn't it?
} ARS} However, as you said yourself, the sample is at ground potential, or
very
} ARS} near it, and so is the anode. In other words, there is not electric
} ARS} potential (or very little) between the anode and the sample and thus
no
} ARS} electric field. Since the sample is grounded, as is the rest of the
} ARS} microscope, there is no electric field between those, either. The
energy of
} ARS} an electron in an electric field is proportional to the electric
field
} ARS} (actually proportional to the square of the field, if my memory
serves me).
} ARS} No field - no electric energy. Of course that does not mean that the
} ARS} electrons don't have energy. They have quite a lot of energy, on the
order
} ARS} of 20keV, by "falling" through the electric field between cathode
and anode
} ARS} and not being stopped by the anode. Since the sample is grounded (or
should
} ARS} be), the electric effects of the electron beam on the grounded
sample will
} ARS} be cancelled. What you have to contend with is the kinetic energy
(20
} ARS} keV/electron), which is transferred to the sample.
}
} ARS} Now, I have always talked about grounded samples. That does not mean
that
} ARS} electric fields cannot be generated by the electron beam within the
sample.
} ARS} Obviously, you put electrons in the sample and they have to move out
of the
} ARS} sample. If there is any kind of resistance (an oxide layer, etc.),
that
} ARS} will
} ARS} result in charging and an electric potential.
}
}
} ARS} -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
} ARS} Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 2:44 AM
} ARS} To: 'Mike Bode'
} ARS} Subject: RE: Question
}
}
} ARS} Ok, apparently a simple physics lesson needed here.
}
} ARS} First of all we are talking about ESD, or Electro-Static Discharge
effects
} ARS} here. Not EDS, or what in this field is known as Electron
Dispersive
} ARS} Spectroscopy.
}
} ARS} Secondly, the electrons arriving at the sample surface in an SEM are
} ARS} getting there with an acceleration that is roughly equivalent to the
the
} ARS} acceleration voltage impressed at the cathode. The sample is at, or
very
} ARS} near, ground potential. But the electrons in the beam are reaching
the
} ARS} sample at close to the accelerating voltage impressed. The grid or
} ARS} "Wienault" of the electron gun is at a potential roughly +500V from
the
} ARS} accelerating voltage and is used to induce the electrons from the
cathode
} ARS} through the aperture in the anode, preventing the 'space charge'
effects
} ARS} around the cathode and providing the first electrostatic lens in the
gun.
}
} ARS} The potential of the anode of an electron microscope may be at
ground
} ARS} potential, but the electron beam is passing through the opening in
the
} ARS} anode. The anode is used as the second electrostatic lens, and has
little
} ARS} effect on the energy of the electrons passing through it. By its
charge
} ARS} opposite that of the electron beam, it encourages the first
crossover of
} ARS} the beam, but since the beam does not directly interact with it,
there is
} ARS} no direct energy exchange.
}
} ARS} Precisely what kinetic energy can be transferred to the sample if
there is
} ARS} no energy differential between the electron potential at the anode
and the
} ARS} sample? Given your understanding of the processes involved, there
can be
} ARS} no discernable energy changes in the sample since the electrons have
no
} ARS} energy, and thus, there can be no discernable energy release from
the
} ARS} sample. In other words, in your view, electron microscopy is
impossible.
}
}
}
} ARS} On Thursday, January 18, 2001 2:24 PM, Mike Bode
[SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
} ARS} wrote:
} } }
} } }
} } } Yes, EDS is very real and chip manufacturers go to great length (end
} } } expense) to avoid them. However, I think the mechanism is different:
} } }
} } } EDS means, that something collects static electricity (by walking on a
} } } carpet, for example), then touches something that is at a very
different
} } } potential. That's what happens if you touch a metal after walking on
that
} } } carpet. The enormous potential difference create strong electric field
} ARS} that
} } } finally ionize the air and you get "zapped". The strong fields can
} ARS} destroy
} } } the electronics.
} } }
} } } In an SEM the sample is usually grounded and does not see strong
fields.
} } } True, the electrons are accelerated to 30 KV or more, but the sample
does
} } } not see that, as the anode usually sits at ground level with the
Cathode
} } } being at - 30 kV. What you need to be concerned about here is the
kinetic
} } } energy that is transferred to the sample and can heat it up
considerable.
} ARS} On
} } } the other hand, if the sample is not grounded, there will be fields
} } } developing. There are also other effects, such as residual organics
} ARS} getting
} } } "cracked" and forming a residue on the sample, but that's a different
} ARS} story.
} } }
} } } Michael
} } }
} } } Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} } } Soft Imaging System Corp.
} } } 1675 Carr St., #105N
} } } Lakewood, CO 80215
} } } ===================================
} } } phone: (888) FIND SIS
} } } (303) 234-9270
} } } fax: (303) 234-9271
} } } email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
} } } web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} } } ===================================

Allen R. Sampson, Owner
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174
voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092



From daemon Tue Jan 23 03:56:04 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 09:53:11 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Cleaning Knife Boats?

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You could attach the boats with wax. They can then be
reused.

Dave


On Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:22:14 -0800 ERIC {biology-at-ucla.edu}
wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} To my fellow Microscopists,
}
} Here we use the LKB plastic knife boats for our glass knives on cutting 1
} micron sections. To attach the knife boat to the glass I use clear nail
} polish. The problem is how can I safely remove the nail polish and use the
} knife boats again.
}
} I have tried a low concentration of acetone which melts the boats. I have
} tried a diluted nail polish remover which also melts the plastic boats and
} deforms them.
}
} Any suggestions?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Eric A. Rosen
} UCLA Medical Center
} Electron Microscopy Lab
} Department of Pathology
} Email: biology-at-ucla.edu or erosen-at-mednet.ucla.edu
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Tue Jan 23 04:24:25 2001



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 10:21:30 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Alcohol, Xylene and Paraffin

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Albert,

Solvents and polymers are my business, rather than clearing sections (I last
did that sort of thing many years ago, in my schooldays), but here's some
chemical background. But those with more direct experience in this field
might know better.

On Mon, 22 Jan 2001, Grup Epigenetica wrote:

} Hello everybody
} My questions are:

} 1- Is it very important to use an extremly pure ethanol (AA) to remove
} the xylene from the semithin sections placed on slides?

I doubt it very much. DRY is important, for if water is present one might
end up with xylene-water emulsion. But I seem to remember that denatured
ethanol (i.e. with some methanol but not all the other things which are put
into ordinary "methylated spirit) was OK.

} 2- Can the tissue burst and the cells disrupt if it is not 100% pure?

If you are finding trouble with ethanol, I would think that isopropanol
(propan-2-ol) MIGHT be even better, since it has greater molar volume. But
because of its greater molar volume it would work more slowly. Paint
strippers, which work by swelling and bursting, rely on SMALL molar volume
for their effect. Small traces of water AND of xylene tend to evaporate
out of propan-2-ol, since in this environment their partial vapour
pressure is greater with an azeotropic effect.

} 3- Can the xylene stay within the tissue if the AA is not 100% pure,
} as little yellow bubbles?

Very unlikely, unless there is water there.

} 4- What happens if the paraffin has been stored at 56 degrees for too
} long? Can it turn into longer polymers and then be harder or impossible
} to remove from the sections? How may I detect so in the sections, is it
} visible?

The oxidation products of paraffins are unlikely to be polymeric.
Generally oxidation reduces the molecular weight of polythene, which after
all is a super-long paraffin. Yellow sticky polymeric nasties only form
from unsaturated oils such as linseed oil and overheated cooking oil: they
can cross-link because of their double bonds. But if the paraffin is not
properly washed out by the xylene it could be re-precipitated by the
alcohol, whether clean or degraded.

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Robert H.Olley Phone: |
| J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory {direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572 |
| University of Reading {University internal extension 7867 |
| Whiteknights Fax +44 (0) 118 9750203 |
| Reading RG6 6AF Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk |
| England URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+




From daemon Tue Jan 23 04:30:44 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 22:51:38 +1000
Subject: RE: Cleaning Knife Boats?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It is unlikely that there is a solvent that will dissolve nail polish
without also attacking the boats, since the solvents in nail polish
dissolve the boats. Your only option here is to use another "glue".
Good old dental wax is probably the simplest.

Chris

Date sent: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:22:14 -0800
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} From: ERIC {biology-at-ucla.edu}


Agreed. Wax is the way to fasten boats. However, I much prefer dental wax over
common paraffin wax which is more prone to cause leaky boats.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Tuesday, January 23, 2001 7:53 PM, Patton, David
[SMTP:David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk] wrote:
}
}
} You could attach the boats with wax. They can then be
} reused.
}
} Dave
}
}
} On Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:22:14 -0800 ERIC {biology-at-ucla.edu}
} wrote:
}
}
} }
} } To my fellow Microscopists,
} }
} } Here we use the LKB plastic knife boats for our glass knives on cutting 1
} } micron sections. To attach the knife boat to the glass I use clear nail
} } polish. The problem is how can I safely remove the nail polish and use the
} } knife boats again.
} }
} } I have tried a low concentration of acetone which melts the boats. I have
} } tried a diluted nail polish remover which also melts the plastic boats and
} } deforms them.
} }
} } Any suggestions?
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } Eric A. Rosen
} } UCLA Medical Center
} } Electron Microscopy Lab
} } Department of Pathology
} } Email: biology-at-ucla.edu or erosen-at-mednet.ucla.edu
} }
} }
} }
}
} ----------------------------------------
} Patton, David
} Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
} "University of the West of England"
}



From daemon Tue Jan 23 07:08:22 2001



From: Lena Falk :      lklfalk-at-fy.chalmers.se
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:57:51 +0100
Subject: TEM post-doc position at Chalmers, Sweden

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



POST-DOCTORAL POSITION
"Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotubes"

A post-doctoral position in the field of carbon nanotube science is
available in the Division for Microscopy and Microanalysis at Chalmers
University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. Qualified candidates
should have a Ph.D. in physics, materials science or chemistry, and a
documented background in transmission electron microscopy. It will be
considered an advantage if the candidate has some experimental
experience of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and / or high
resolution lattice imaging. The position is immediately available, and
the appointment may last up to 24 months.

The position is part of a consortium of seven research groups at
Universities in Gothenburg and Uppsala in Sweden. The consortium, which
is funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), will
focus on the experimental and theoretical investigation of structure and
electronic properties of carbon nanotubes with the ultimate goal of
implementation of prototype electronic devices based on carbon
nanotubes. An interdisciplinary approach, provided by the diversity of
the research groups in the consortium and strong interaction between the
groups is intended to facilitate this aim.

The microscopy work will be carried out on a Philips CM200 Supertwin
transmission electron microscope (TEM) with a field emission gun (FEG)
and surrounding interactive instrumentation. The FEG TEM is equipped
with the Gatan imaging filter (GIF), which produces energy filtered
electron images and diffraction patterns as well as electron energy loss
spectra, a Gatan off-axis CCD camera and a Link Isis energy dispersive
X-ray (EDX) system. There are also other electron microscopes in the
laboratory, e.g. a Jeol 2000-FX TEM/STEM/SEM and a CamScan SEM.

Interested candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including
publication list, and the names of at least three referees with postal
and e-mail addresses to:

Associate Professor Lena Falk, Department of Experimental Physics,
Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden
e-mail: lklfalk-at-fy.chalmers.se; fax: +46 31 772 3224; phone: +46 31
772 3321

Information about the Division for Microscopy and Microanalysis can be
found at
http://fy.chalmers.se/microscopy


____________________________

Associate Professor Lena Falk
Department of Experimental Physics,
Chalmers University of Technology,
SE-412 96 Göteborg, SWEDEN

tel: +46 31 772 3321
fax: +46 31 772 3224
e-mail: lklfalk-at-fy.chalmers.se


From daemon Tue Jan 23 07:17:04 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:14:08 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: RE: Cleaning Knife Boats?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks Jim. I should have said it was dental wax. You can
get it from an EM supply company. We have a little LKB
multiplate which allows you to, warm the knife, melt the
dental wax and apply it with a sort of warmed metal spatula.

Dave


On Tue, 23 Jan 2001 22:51:38 +1000 Jim at ProSciTech
{jim-at-proscitech.com} wrote:

} Agreed. Wax is the way to fasten boats. However, I much prefer dental wax over
} common paraffin wax which is more prone to cause leaky boats.
} Cheers
} Jim Darley
} ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
} PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
} Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
} Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
} ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com
}
} On Tuesday, January 23, 2001 7:53 PM, Patton, David
} [SMTP:David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk] wrote:
} }
} }
} } You could attach the boats with wax. They can then be
} } reused.
} }
} } Dave
} }
} }
} } On Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:22:14 -0800 ERIC {biology-at-ucla.edu}
} } wrote:
} }
} }
} } }
} } } To my fellow Microscopists,
} } }
} } } Here we use the LKB plastic knife boats for our glass knives on cutting 1
} } } micron sections. To attach the knife boat to the glass I use clear nail
} } } polish. The problem is how can I safely remove the nail polish and use the
} } } knife boats again.
} } }
} } } I have tried a low concentration of acetone which melts the boats. I have
} } } tried a diluted nail polish remover which also melts the plastic boats and
} } } deforms them.
} } }
} } } Any suggestions?
} } }
} } } Thanks,
} } }
} } } Eric A. Rosen
} } } UCLA Medical Center
} } } Electron Microscopy Lab
} } } Department of Pathology
} } } Email: biology-at-ucla.edu or erosen-at-mednet.ucla.edu
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------
} } Patton, David
} } Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
} } "University of the West of England"
} }
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Tue Jan 23 07:36:23 2001



From: Linda Fox :      LFOX1-at-wpo.it.luc.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 07:36:51 -0600
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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unsubscribe


From daemon Tue Jan 23 07:53:51 2001



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 07:46:27 -0600
Subject: RE: Imaging irradiated samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Sarah,

At the rad levels you describe, the effects will be difficult to notice. I
have examined specimens ranging up to 10s of R at a foot. Not many that hot
lately, thankfully. Emissions from my specimens have included alpha, beta,
and gamma. Gamma was my least favorite. Highly active alpha/beta would
significantly impair imaging and EDS by adding noise to the system. The
signal to noise of the SE/BSE system was degraded and EDS peaks broadened.
Have you ever seen 80% dead time *before* you turn on the beam? On one
occasion, the EDS was totally locked out at 100% DT. Dead time...Hummmm...
OTOH those high energy gammas would escape the chamber and take aim at me.
I was hiding behind two - four inches of temporary lead wall in front of the
chamber.

Woody

}
} -------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hiyo Listers,
} What are the problems associated with imaging (SE and BSE) low level
} radioactive samples (rocks)? They were irradiated for isotopic dating
} ~2 years ago and are now only a couple of times background?
} Does anyone
} have experience with this low level radioactivity and SEM analysis? I
} would appreciate any advice.
} Many thanks,
} Sarah
}
} --
} Sarah A.W. Lundberg
} Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory
} Department of Geoscience, UNLV
} 4505 S. Maryland Parkway Box 454010
} Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010
}
} EPMA Lab (702) 895-2660
} SEM Lab (702) 895-2462
} Office (702) 895-1134
} Fax (702) 895-4064
} Dept. Office (702) 895-3262
}
} lundberg-at-nevada.edu
} http://www.unlv.edu/Colleges/Sciences/Geoscience/EMIL.htm
}
} Home:
} 8025 W. Russell Rd. Apt. #1117
} Las Vegas, NV 89113
} (702) 871-9635
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 23 08:16:50 2001



From: klaus neumann :      bikneu-at-krzsun.med-rz.uni-saarland.de
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 15:15:43 +0100
Subject: RE: cleaning plastic knife boats

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,
sorry but I have already deleted the original question, but I suggest
"physical" cleaning by liquid nitrogen. This should also remove the nail
polish.

Hope this helps

Klaus Neumann
Dr. Klaus Neumann
2.5 Med. Biologie
Universität des Saarlandes
D-66421 Homburg
Tel: ++49-6841-16-62 55
Fax: ++49-6841-16-62 56
http://www.med-rz.uni-sb.de/med_fak/biologie



From daemon Tue Jan 23 17:35:17 2001



From: Grup Epigenetica :      planaria2000-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 15:19:13 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM - problems with paraffin, xylene and AA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you Carmen Martin
Yes, we do also use our dehydratation series a lot, up to 60 slides
-which roughly means 2 weeks- and for sure the clearest sign is they
don't get stained. But it has it all puzzling us since anything seemed
to be wrong but everything failed -or so it looks.

Albert Cardona
University of Barcelona. Spain.


__________________________________________________
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From daemon Wed Jan 24 01:49:20 2001



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Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 17:15:21 -0800
Subject: Detective Software to Find Anything

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From daemon Wed Jan 24 04:13:09 2001



From: Terry Cooper :      terry.cooper-at-btinternet.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 09:54:46 -0000
Subject: Histoknifemaker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

I have been filtered out of posting responses by a quirk of my e-mail
address so this info is a little out of date but unavoidably so.

For those people with TAAB or the branded Reichert-Jung Histoknifemakers we
are still able to supply many of the spare parts for instruments up to 20
years old, but don't all rush at once!

This also confirms that we are still here live and well in Blighty,

Regards

Terry Cooper
TAAB Laboratories Equipment Ltd
3 Minerva House, Calleva Park
Aldermaston, Berks, RG7 8NA, England

Tel ++44 118 981 7775
Fax ++44 118 981 7881


From daemon Wed Jan 24 05:57:34 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 12:51:47 +0100
Subject: Antwort: Cleaning Knife Boats?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi list,

may I just add to the discussion about the knife boats:

yes, if you use dental wax to glue the Truf to the knife (with the Leica
Multiplate, especially designed for that purpose its really easy) the boat
can be reused a few times.

HOWEVER:
1. breaking off the Truf from the knife and scratching away the old
hardened wax may damage the Truf - leaking may result from this! Can be
frustrating if you have perfect sections of a precious sample and see them
dive away ...
2. Esp. with ultrathins (but also with semithins) you must be aware of
possible cross contamination of old sections to the new set (I have no idea
if there is a GLP rule on that but in a hospital mixing up different
samples might cause serious problems)!

BTW the "LKB"Trufs are "Leica"Trufs now, but call them as you like it :-)

Best regards,

Joachim

Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350




From daemon Wed Jan 24 08:42:43 2001



From: Ryan Mitchell :      gtma-rdm-at-texas.net
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 08:42:59 -0800
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From daemon Wed Jan 24 08:47:58 2001



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 24 Jan 2001 09:45:08 -0500
Subject: TEM calibration

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi all,
I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you. We are working with some small particles and have to have reasonable size calibrations at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20 years old). Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice spacing give us values somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag. readout on the panel. This is fine. The important thing is that we know what the true mags are.
One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly slightly lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at first but I am assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of the electrons at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons would be influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point, which could result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this through the software programming and will be doing the calibration at different kV values on our CM-10 to verify this.
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-099e Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Wed Jan 24 09:22:17 2001



From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      AllanWojtasP-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 10:58:10 -0500
Subject: Printers - opinions, please

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Allen,

I am not sure I am following you. You say

"The best high energy experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to the
electron."

To my knowledge and from a list of "fundamental constants" in my "Solid
State Physics" book by Ashcroft and Mermin, the rest mass of an electron is
9.1095 x 10^(-31) kg. Just multiply that wit 1/2 v*v and you have the
kinetic Energy of the electron. Of course you have to take into account
relativistic effects. Or just multiply it with v and you have the momentum.

I think, you mistake the mass of the electron with that of the neutrino,
which indeed they have not been able to determine, although there are
indications from recent high energy physics measurements. But that's
irrelevant here.



Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2001 4:21 AM
To: 'Mike Bode'; 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Hi, all,

I'm back to ask for more help. Thanks in advance, before I forget to My colleague is gathering some information on Tektronix Phaser 950 color printers. Specifically she would like to know:

- the quality of b/w prints (are they publication quality?) Some color printers make wonderful color prints and awful b/w prints.

- what sort of paper we would need for the best b/w prints.

Any comments, pros and cons from users, or people who have tried this product would be very welcome.

Please contact me offline and I'll forward the replies to her.

Thanks again.

Paula.

Paula Allan-Wojtas
Research Scientist - Food Microstructure
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Atlantic Food and Horticulture Research Centre
Kentville, Nova Scotia Canada B4N 1J5

Tel: (902) 679-5566
FAX: (902) 679-2311

email: allanwojtasp-at-em.agr.ca



From daemon Wed Jan 24 10:06:30 2001



From: William F. Tivol :      wft03-at-health.state.ny.us
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 11:42:56 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Debby,

Yes, the focussing action of the lens, as given by d2z/dr2, is proportional
to (field) squared over voltage. [Check, e.g. Joy, Romig & Goldstein,
Principles of Analytical Electron Microscopy, pages 44-45.] I'l be
interested to hear whether newer TEMs do compensate for this or not.

Gill
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Debby Sherman" {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
To: "message to: MSA list" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 7:45 AM







Hi all,
I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you. We are
working with some small particles and have to have reasonable size calibrations
at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20 years old).
Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice spacing give us values
somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag. readout on the panel.
This is fine. The important thing is that we know what the true mags are.
One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly slightly
lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at first but I am
assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of the electrons
at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons would be
influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point, which could
result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this through the
software programming and will be doing the calibration at different kV values on
our CM-10 to verify this.
Debby


Dear Debby,

It is true that the lens currents will be higher at 100 kV than at 80 kV;
however, even a 20-year-old microscope takes this into account and sets
the lens currents to match the accelerating voltage. It seems that in
your case this correction is slightly off resulting in the systematically
lower mags. The newer microscopes will also set the lens currents to
match the voltage, but whether this is done through software or
electromechanically I don't know.

Yours,


Bill Tivol
Wadsworth Center
Albany NY
(518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us




From daemon Wed Jan 24 10:56:56 2001



From: Peggy Sherwood :      sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 11:55:49 -0500
Subject: 2 Month Leave

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all:

I will be out of the lab for two months. Please do not include me in
messages to the ListServer for the period 1/26/01-4/1/01.

Thanks!
Peggy Sherwood
--
Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
50 Blossom Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
sherwood-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu


From daemon Wed Jan 24 11:37:32 2001



From: Nancy Robertson :      pfnlr-at-UAA.ALASKA.EDU
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 08:37:22 -0900
Subject: Microtome room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To all:

I have a small inner room within my office that is 6.2 5X 3.8 ft. with a
high ceiling. The building was built about 1950 with some of the same
electrical features. I would like to purchase a microtome (basic for
cutting thin sections of plant tissue for TEM) for the little room, and
the electrician asked if there were special requirements before the
purchase is made. Could someone help me?

Thanks,

Nancy Robertson
Research Plant Pathologist
USDA/ARS
533 E. Fireweed Ave.
Palmer AK 99645


From daemon Wed Jan 24 13:27:20 2001



From: Andreas Taubert :      taubert-at-seas.upenn.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 14:23:54 -0500
Subject: EFTEM of 2 nm features

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

I have been trying for a while to obtain EFTEM images on a series of polymers, but they wouldn't
cooperate. Our group is investigating ionomers (i.e polymers with a hydrophobic backbone and approx.
5 mol % of either sulfonic acid or carboxylic acid groups that are neutralized with different metal
ions). We know from STEM that these metal ion neutralized acid groups form aggregates in the 2 nm
range within a hydrophobic matrix and we would like to know the elemental distribution of metal ions
and O (and S in the case of SO3H). I use a JEOL210F FEG with GIF at 200kV. Has anybody ever tried to
resolve such small structures by EFTEM ? I'd appreciate tips and tricks as well as some useful
references.

Thanks for your help,

Andreas

*************************************************
Dr. Andreas Taubert
Materials Science and Engineering Dept.
3231 Walnut Street
The University of Pennsylvania=20
Philadelphia PA 19104-6272
tel: +1 215 898 2700
fax: +1 215 573 2128

Physical Chemistry is everything for
which 1/T is linear ...
*************************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 24 14:00:17 2001



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 15:51:14 -0400
Subject: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers -

I've just run into a problem (and, I think, partially solved it) that
may affect a lot of beam instruments with water-cooled diffusion pumps.
We'd been having some problems lately with at least one of the diff
pumps on our ESEM shutting itself off because it thought it wasn't being
cooled enough. I checked our little Neslab chiller unit; it seemed OK, and
since I'd just replaced the pump in it last year, I figured that there
really couldn't be a problem with that....
So I was starting to worry that maybe we had a diff pump or at least a
sensor starting to fail, but then this morning, the other diff pump also
shut itself down. Hello, thinks I, then this has to be a cooling problem. So
I disconnect the outflow from the chiller, and check the flow. Damn, lots of
water coming out....must be something else. But then I get a bright
idea....let's check the inline filter. Turns out, the filter is getting a
bit full of crud. Green crud. Ok, so I put a new one in. Then I get a second
bright idea (my personal daily limit). Let's check the water pressure/flow
returning from the ESEM. ....Oh oh, very low. So I disconnect both inlet and
outlet lines from the ESEM, stick the nozzle of a can of compressed air in
one, and let fly. Wish I hadn't had the other line aimed at myself just
then, but that's beside the point. About a half a litre of pretty dirty
water came shooting out, including a surprising number of little solid bits
of stuff. Judging by their blue-green colour, they're copper oxides,
presumably from the water lines in my slowly-decomposing ESEM.
Anyway, after that system flush, the flow seems a lot better, and now
the diff pumps seem to be staying on.
I don't believe it says anywhere in the manual that one should regularly
do this kind of procedure on one's beam instrument, but I wonder if this is
a common problem. Maybe some of you do a flush like this on a regular
(annual?) basis?
The water in our system is RO, and I don't put anything in to treat for
algae, since that doesn't seem to be a problem. Yet there's obviously some
corrosion going on. Is there a way to buffer the water to ensure a neutral
pH that will certainly not bother the instrument? I'm assuming our water is
a bit on the acid side, for this corrosion to be happening (?).


F. C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Wed Jan 24 14:13:14 2001



From: tflore-at-lsuhsc.edu (Flores, Teresa)
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 13:16:58 -0500
Subject: HT/Spanish/NJ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow colleagues, I am posting this for Carlos Saenz, a veteran histotec
and licenced HT, in San Jose, Costa Rica, English is limited, but knowledge
of histotecnology is excellent and commitment is there. He may be reached
at 732-748-069 in New Jersey. I had one reply for Carlos to try and
increase his English skills, and he is trying, but will someone give him an
opportunity.
I have been invited to lecture about Histotecnology in Mexico, Guatemala
and Central America; And, the only countries I have not been in South
America are Venezuela, Colombia, Guyanas, Brazil and Uruguay. And the only
diffrence between the histotecnologist there and in the USA are
opportunities and language barriers, othere than that, knowledge of our
field is excellent.
Thanks again, Teresa




From daemon Wed Jan 24 14:21:36 2001



From: Krzysztof Herman :      kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 21:20:48 +0100
Subject: PD: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi
all till now answered people are right - the lens currents are adjusted
according to selected HT by means of sets of analog resistors and reference
voltages adjustable inside the EM400. If this adjustment is not 100%
according to theory (what is allmost 100% true after so many years) than the
image size projected on the screen differs from expected size and mag values
can be different for each HT, non linear thru HT etc.
It is a fine tuning required by service..... but is this mag accuracy worth
this service work ?? maybe just do in series with shots with importance of
mag value the one with same condition and calibration sample inserted for
corrections as reference ??

regards
Krzysztof Herman

EMISJA S.c.
02-892 Warszawa, ul.Bazancia 45 A, Poland
tel/fax: (+48 22)6449753, 6449750
tel: (+48 601)307456
kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
www.emission.com.pl


----- Wiadomooæ oryginalna -----
Od: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
Do: message to: MSA list {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Wys³ano: 24 stycznia 2001 15:45
Temat: TEM calibration


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi all,
} I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you. We are
working with some small particles and have to have reasonable size
calibrations at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20 years
old). Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice spacing give
us values somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag. readout on
the panel. This is fine. The important thing is that we know what the true
mags are.
} One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly
slightly lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at first
but I am assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of
the electrons at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons
would be influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point,
which could result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
} I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this through the
software programming and will be doing the calibration at different kV
values on our CM-10 to verify this.
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-099e Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
}



From daemon Wed Jan 24 15:07:48 2001



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 15:03:00 -0600
Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hey, deja-vu all over again......

I encountered a similar (green sludge and corrosion) problem on the
DP's and recirculating water system of our TEM several years ago. I
assumed that it was a reaction between the iron and copper tubing
used in the system. Old time plumbers, for example, always warned
about directly connecting iron and copper tubing because of the
corrosion that would occur. I KNOW that on our DP's the iron fittings
have copper connections. Oh well....

JB

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Wed Jan 24 15:09:22 2001



From: Krzysztof Herman :      kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 22:08:57 +0100
Subject: Odp: PD: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Wiadomooæ oryginalna -----
Od: Peggy Bisher {peggy-at-research.nj.nec.com}
Do: Krzysztof Herman {kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl}
Wys³ano: 24 stycznia 2001 21:44
Temat: Re: PD: TEM calibration


} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } Hi
} } all till now answered people are right - the lens currents are adjusted
} } according to selected HT by means of sets of analog resistors and
reference
} } voltages adjustable inside the EM400. If this adjustment is not 100%
} } according to theory (what is allmost 100% true after so many years) than
the
} } image size projected on the screen differs from expected size and mag
values
} } can be different for each HT, non linear thru HT etc.
} } It is a fine tuning required by service..... but is this mag accuracy
worth
} } this service work ?? maybe just do in series with shots with importance
of
} } mag value the one with same condition and calibration sample inserted for
} } corrections as reference ??
} }
} } regards
} } Krzysztof Herman
} }
} } EMISJA S.c.
} } 02-892 Warszawa, ul.Bazancia 45 A, Poland
} } tel/fax: (+48 22)6449753, 6449750
} } tel: (+48 601)307456
} } kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
} } www.emission.com.pl
}
}
} I do remember at one time that Philips would guarantee that the
} "nominal mag" be +/- 5% of the actual mag no matter what kV you were
} using. What I am saying is that if you calibrate your microscope and
} you found it to be more or less than 5% of what is actually displayed
} on the panel then they should come in and make an adjustment for
} you, providing you have a maintenance contract.
} Many years ago I found one of my EM400's to be in some instances
} 10-15% out so they fixed it. Otherwise it is your responsibility to
} calibrate your microscope.

I am the service specialist grown from CM series onwards. I was maintening
not only Philips microscopes. But each time I touch the EM-xxx machine I
feel the smell of nobel time of Philips name. Now all this become a
business, very commercial and without soul. Software makes it like this. It
is similar difference like the old mechanical swiss clock 100 years old and
modern Taiwan made electronic one. Do You feel the difference ?
From otehr side the people from the times You mentioned (times of "customer
first" slogan) "they should come and adjust it..." so "they" are allmost all
retired or gone.
I think - be happy that this EM-XXX still works. Ofcourse - pure customers
point of view and feeling can differ from mine.
All the best
Krzysztof Herman
EMISJA S.c.
02-892 Warszawa, ul.Bazancia 45 A,
tel/fax: (+48 22)6449753, 6449750
tel: (+48 601)307456
kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
www.emission.com.pl



From daemon Wed Jan 24 16:28:30 2001



From: Matthew Lynn :      mlynn-at-miami.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 17:25:28 -0500
Subject: FW: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Debby and Bill,

I suspect (but have not worked out), another possibility could be that the lens
currents are set properly for 100kV but your HT tank is actually providing
somewhat less..or more? Without thinking too hard, it seems like } 100kV could
result in lower than expected mags. Is this error consistent over weeks,
months? My EM300 calibrates consistently higher than published values, but I
haven't seen a systematic difference with kV. In any case, if you have service
on the instrument, ask the engineer to check currents, reference resistors,
etc. The correct values should be easy to find.

Matt

Matthew J. Lynn, Ph.D.
Center for Advanced Microscopy
University of Miami
(305)284-4736
mlynn-at-miami.edu



}
}
} Dear Debby,
}
} It is true that the lens currents will be higher at 100 kV than at 80
} kV;
} however, even a 20-year-old microscope takes this into account and sets
} the lens currents to match the accelerating voltage. It seems that in
} your case this correction is slightly off resulting in the
} systematically
} lower mags. The newer microscopes will also set the lens currents to
} match the voltage, but whether this is done through software or
} electromechanically I don't know.
}
} Yours,
}
}
} Bill Tivol
} Wadsworth Center
} Albany NY
} (518) 473-7399 WFT02-at-health.state.ny.us
}



From daemon Wed Jan 24 17:19:57 2001



From: tamara a howard :      thoward-at-UNM.EDU
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 16:16:05 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Image Pro Express evaluation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Is anyone using/used in the past Image Pro Express software (or Image Pro
Plus)? I'm unfamiliar with the package, and would like to hear any
comments (+ or -).

Thanks!

Tamara

(note new home bench!)
|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|



From daemon Wed Jan 24 17:37:19 2001



From: John Nailon :      J.Nailon-at-mailbox.uq.edu.au
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:34:06 +1000
Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


G'day Frank,
Early last year we had a similar problem on our E3 ESEM, the water lines
were blocking up with gelatinous material. After many attempts to
reverse flush the lines we decided to pull all the water lines off and
replace them. Our problem was in the water cooled alloy heatsink board,
the alloy was slowly dissolving. We reamed out the alloy and fitted
copper tube through the cooling channel. This solved the problem.
Regards
JVN

Frank Thomas wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Listers -
}
} I've just run into a problem (and, I think, partially solved it) that
} may affect a lot of beam instruments with water-cooled diffusion pumps.
} We'd been having some problems lately with at least one of the diff
} pumps on our ESEM shutting itself off because it thought it wasn't being
} cooled enough. I checked our little Neslab chiller unit; it seemed OK, and
} since I'd just replaced the pump in it last year, I figured that there
} really couldn't be a problem with that....
} So I was starting to worry that maybe we had a diff pump or at least a
} sensor starting to fail, but then this morning, the other diff pump also
} shut itself down. Hello, thinks I, then this has to be a cooling problem. So
} I disconnect the outflow from the chiller, and check the flow. Damn, lots of
} water coming out....must be something else. But then I get a bright
} idea....let's check the inline filter. Turns out, the filter is getting a
} bit full of crud. Green crud. Ok, so I put a new one in. Then I get a second
} bright idea (my personal daily limit). Let's check the water pressure/flow
} returning from the ESEM. ....Oh oh, very low. So I disconnect both inlet and
} outlet lines from the ESEM, stick the nozzle of a can of compressed air in
} one, and let fly. Wish I hadn't had the other line aimed at myself just
} then, but that's beside the point. About a half a litre of pretty dirty
} water came shooting out, including a surprising number of little solid bits
} of stuff. Judging by their blue-green colour, they're copper oxides,
} presumably from the water lines in my slowly-decomposing ESEM.
} Anyway, after that system flush, the flow seems a lot better, and now
} the diff pumps seem to be staying on.
} I don't believe it says anywhere in the manual that one should regularly
} do this kind of procedure on one's beam instrument, but I wonder if this is
} a common problem. Maybe some of you do a flush like this on a regular
} (annual?) basis?
} The water in our system is RO, and I don't put anything in to treat for
} algae, since that doesn't seem to be a problem. Yet there's obviously some
} corrosion going on. Is there a way to buffer the water to ensure a neutral
} pH that will certainly not bother the instrument? I'm assuming our water is
} a bit on the acid side, for this corrosion to be happening (?).
}
} F. C. Thomas
} MicroAnalysis Facility
} Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
} Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
} Canada

--
John Nailon
Operations Manager
The Centre for Microscopy and Microanlaysis
The University of Queensland
St Lucia QLD 4072
Tel: +61-7-33654214
Fax: +61-7-33654422
WWW: http://www.uq.edu.au/nanoworld


From daemon Wed Jan 24 18:06:21 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 10:03:53 +1000
Subject: RE: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A law of nature: Small diameter tubes in a heated system crud up.
Filters must be cleaned and anti-corrosion fluids renewed.
Check the flow rate (litres per minute) of the return line every couple of
weeks.
A thermometer measuring the temperature of the returned water is useful.
Return lines from each instrument are best hooked into a 50mm gravity drain,
which obviously must be higher than the cooling water reservoir.
Such an open drain avoids back-pressure and makes monitoring of different
instruments easier.

After some years EMs will need to be reversed flushed with water. If the flow
is still not good enough, than pumping of a weak acid (10% acetic/vinegar)
through the instrument in a loop may be required .
There was a long discussion on anti corrosion items a couple of years ago. The
Tips and Ticks site (one of the first on our Links page) may have that
information more easily accessible than wading through the archives.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 25, 2001 5:51 AM, Frank Thomas
[SMTP:thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA] wrote:
}
} Listers -
}
} I've just run into a problem (and, I think, partially solved it) that
} may affect a lot of beam instruments with water-cooled diffusion pumps.
} We'd been having some problems lately with at least one of the diff
} pumps on our ESEM shutting itself off because it thought it wasn't being
} cooled enough. I checked our little Neslab chiller unit; it seemed OK, and
} since I'd just replaced the pump in it last year, I figured that there
} really couldn't be a problem with that....
} So I was starting to worry that maybe we had a diff pump or at least a
} sensor starting to fail, but then this morning, the other diff pump also
} shut itself down. Hello, thinks I, then this has to be a cooling problem. So
} I disconnect the outflow from the chiller, and check the flow. Damn, lots of
} water coming out....must be something else. But then I get a bright
} idea....let's check the inline filter. Turns out, the filter is getting a
} bit full of crud. Green crud. Ok, so I put a new one in. Then I get a second
} bright idea (my personal daily limit). Let's check the water pressure/flow
} returning from the ESEM. ....Oh oh, very low. So I disconnect both inlet and
} outlet lines from the ESEM, stick the nozzle of a can of compressed air in
} one, and let fly. Wish I hadn't had the other line aimed at myself just
} then, but that's beside the point. About a half a litre of pretty dirty
} water came shooting out, including a surprising number of little solid bits
} of stuff. Judging by their blue-green colour, they're copper oxides,
} presumably from the water lines in my slowly-decomposing ESEM.
} Anyway, after that system flush, the flow seems a lot better, and now
} the diff pumps seem to be staying on.
} I don't believe it says anywhere in the manual that one should regularly
} do this kind of procedure on one's beam instrument, but I wonder if this is
} a common problem. Maybe some of you do a flush like this on a regular
} (annual?) basis?
} The water in our system is RO, and I don't put anything in to treat for
} algae, since that doesn't seem to be a problem. Yet there's obviously some
} corrosion going on. Is there a way to buffer the water to ensure a neutral
} pH that will certainly not bother the instrument? I'm assuming our water is
} a bit on the acid side, for this corrosion to be happening (?).
}
}
} F. C. Thomas
} MicroAnalysis Facility
} Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
} Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
} Canada
}



From daemon Wed Jan 24 18:49:31 2001



From: Steve Barlow :      sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 16:51:17 -0800
Subject: teaching microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am assembling platform and poster presentations for a symposium on
"Teaching Microscopy" to be given at the upcoming MSA meeting in Long Beach
from August 5-9, 2001. I encourage anyone with an interest or experience
with this topic to submit a presentation. Please contact me directly for
more information or to answer any questions. See you in Long Beach!

Teaching Microscopy

Remote links to various light and electron microscopes, virtual
microscopes, and CD-ROMS of images are all being used to teach colleagues
and/or students about microscope theory, operation, and utilization. These
are the new hardware and software tools for instruction. Are they
effective? How are these tools being integrated into training programs and
school curricula? What should be included in a training course? What is the
best way to teach these concepts? This symposium will highlight examples of
the hardware and software tools, as well as discuss different approaches,
from formal classes and image collections to intensive workshops, to be
used to teach microscopy theory and operation.

Steve Barlow



___________________________________________________
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676

email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility

Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
promoting microscopy instruction and increased access to microscopes
Microscopy Society of America
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/





From daemon Wed Jan 24 19:12:14 2001



From: Ekstrom, Harry :      harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 18:07:47 -0700
Subject: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We use DI water and ethylene glycol or some good old fashioned anti-freeze.
However, I can't remember the concentration right now. I think our
"corrosion" problems promptly disappeared.

Harry Ekstrom
Materials Laboratory

(602) 231-2744
e-mail: harry.ekstrom-at-honeywell.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank Thomas [mailto:thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA]
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 12:51 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Listers -

I've just run into a problem (and, I think, partially solved it) that
may affect a lot of beam instruments with water-cooled diffusion pumps.
We'd been having some problems lately with at least one of the diff
pumps on our ESEM shutting itself off because it thought it wasn't being
cooled enough. I checked our little Neslab chiller unit; it seemed OK, and
since I'd just replaced the pump in it last year, I figured that there
really couldn't be a problem with that....
So I was starting to worry that maybe we had a diff pump or at least a
sensor starting to fail, but then this morning, the other diff pump also
shut itself down. Hello, thinks I, then this has to be a cooling problem. So
I disconnect the outflow from the chiller, and check the flow. Damn, lots of
water coming out....must be something else. But then I get a bright
idea....let's check the inline filter. Turns out, the filter is getting a
bit full of crud. Green crud. Ok, so I put a new one in. Then I get a second
bright idea (my personal daily limit). Let's check the water pressure/flow
returning from the ESEM. ....Oh oh, very low. So I disconnect both inlet and
outlet lines from the ESEM, stick the nozzle of a can of compressed air in
one, and let fly. Wish I hadn't had the other line aimed at myself just
then, but that's beside the point. About a half a litre of pretty dirty
water came shooting out, including a surprising number of little solid bits
of stuff. Judging by their blue-green colour, they're copper oxides,
presumably from the water lines in my slowly-decomposing ESEM.
Anyway, after that system flush, the flow seems a lot better, and now
the diff pumps seem to be staying on.
I don't believe it says anywhere in the manual that one should regularly
do this kind of procedure on one's beam instrument, but I wonder if this is
a common problem. Maybe some of you do a flush like this on a regular
(annual?) basis?
The water in our system is RO, and I don't put anything in to treat for
algae, since that doesn't seem to be a problem. Yet there's obviously some
corrosion going on. Is there a way to buffer the water to ensure a neutral
pH that will certainly not bother the instrument? I'm assuming our water is
a bit on the acid side, for this corrosion to be happening (?).


F. C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Wed Jan 24 19:18:39 2001



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 13:04:39 +1100
Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Good question.

I used to put antifreeze in the chillers but in the later models there is a
warning stating not to use antifreeze as it damages the seals.

I would like to know what everyone now uses to prevent organic growth.

By the way the DP's must have been fairly warm to trip the sensors.
If I have any questions at all about the temperture Is usually feel the DP
cooling coils.
All the coils should be cool except for the last two or three turns. Typical
temperature is 20 deg C.

Earl Weltmer
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Frank Thomas" {thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 11:51 AM


Earl said:
I used to put antifreeze in the chillers but in the later models there is
a
warning stating not to use antifreeze as it damages the seals.

I would like to know what everyone now uses to prevent organic growth.


We dont put anything in the water these days, but check filters, flush and
reverse flush once a year or whenever convenient or when the temperature or
flow meters look ominous. Our recirculating system has a 500 litre buffer
tank which is cleaned about every five years.

We have had certainly no more trouble, probably less, than when we put
various chemicals into the water

Sally




Dr Sally Stowe
Facility Coordinator, ANU EMU
Box 475 Canberra ACT 2601
AUSTRALIA
stowe-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au fax 61 (0)2 6125 3218 or 6125 8525
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU



From daemon Wed Jan 24 21:04:55 2001



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 2001 22:05:51 -0500
Subject: Sectioning non-decalcified bone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,
I'm trying to obtain 8 um thick sections of non-decalcified bone which
has been embedded in methacrylate using a R-J autocut. Thanks in advance
for any tips to minimize compression and adhere sections to a glass slide.
Rosemary Walsh
EMF for the Life Sciences
Penn State University


From daemon Thu Jan 25 00:50:15 2001



From: joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 07:44:29 +0100
Subject: Antwort: Microtome room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Nancy,

all ultramicrotomes I know run either with a standard electrical supply (eg
110 V in the USA, 220 V in many other countries eg here in Austria) or
with a "full range power supply". Our Leica EM UCT and UCR are equipped
with a full range power supply for a voltage input range from "90 - 260
VAC, 50-60 Hz" (as the engineers call it). Some older model you will have
to switch between voltages depending on the voltage you use...

You may want to run additionally a few desktop lights, a LM for looking at
semis before trimming down to a blockface for ultrathins, etc. but this
should be no problem even with electrical features from the 1950`s.

Important when deciding for a UM room: Are you having vibrations in this
room? In which floor is your room? Are you having a concrete floor? and
what is the floor covering made of? These factors all may affect the
stability of your room!

I strongly recommend the use of an antivibration instrument table or AT
LEAST an antivibration base plate for the UM. Do not use a desk or smthg
similar! You can test for vibrations easily by putting a petridish filled
with water (slightly "overfilled" with a convex meniscus) on a table in
your room under a light - you should see NO waves! Slam the door and watch
what happens :-)

And just one more thought REALLY important: Should you ever decide to work
with a cryosectioning equipment: DANGER OF SUFFOCATION!!! Make sure that
you have a good ventilation of your room! 1 litre of liquid nitrogen (LN2)
will produce 700 litres of gaseous nitrogen (GN2). It is odourless and
tasteless and an operator in a small room may suffocate and not even
recognize that he/she is in danger!!!
You may use an oxygen analyzer (range 0 - 25%) for testing ...

Hope that helps you,

Joachim

Dr. Joachim Prutsch
Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation

Leica Microsystems GmbH
Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350






From daemon Thu Jan 25 04:40:57 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:54:27 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Maybe US plumbers are better trained, but UK heating systems are
almost always iron (pressed steel steel) radiators with copper
connecting pipes. Other metals involved are brass valves and
connectors, and lead/tin solder at soldered joints. Systems like that
corrode unless inhibitors are used. The sludge that collects in my
copper/iron central heating system is deep black, like indian ink, not
green.
Is it possible that your green sludge is not copper but algae??
Transparent plastic tubing in the system may allow alagal growth,
provided there is some source of carbon. Bacterial/fungal
decomposition of glycol could provide that.
Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:03 PM


Debby

there are several things that you should consider when checking magnification on a TEM:
First of all most manufacturers will aim for a consistency of about +/-5% accuracy because of the laws of diminishing returns. Also they may have an optimum voltage
Second there will be variations up and down the magnification scale because a balance has been struck between several lenses and when they are excited differently this will be expressed differently.
Third remember that there is a very short working distance between lens polepiece and specimen (just a few millimetres) so if the specimen height varies by +/- 0.2 mm this will greatly affect the magnification. For instance if the grid is slightly bent or kinked, if you don't check magnifications at a standard Z position (eucentric if that's available) then you will get inconsistencies of easily 5%. When I calibrated at eucentric I noticed that all of my
magnifications at 75kv were near or better than +/- 4% whereas one or two previous sets were mostly worse than +/- 5%
Fourth all of the above will change with time as the electronics changes so calibrations, if you're fussy, should be done perhaps every 6 months or year if you're fussy or notice great changes. I'm sure that Steve Chapman would agree that it's an excellent way of monitoring part of the performance of your microscope anyway.
Fifth consider how you measure your calibrations you should always measure the negative never the print (use a calibrated graticule eyepiece or travelling microscope). Prints can vary by 1 or 2% so easily.
Sixth the calibration standards for TEM will be at best +/- 2% accurate unless you've got a certificate that says otherwise. They will often differ e.g. catalase and diffraction grating will give you a slightly different answer.
Seventh don't forget the hysteresis factor. On most microscopes you get best calibration by calibrating at the highest magnification then working down the range because of inherent hysteresis in the electromagnetic lenses. Some manufacturers even used to supply a special button to overcome this on our old AEI 801 it was called standardise magnification.
Eighth I'm slipping I can usually come up with about ten problems.

Never quote magnifications to 3 significant figures it's meaningless. It may sound insurmountable but if you are aware of the problems you can reduce or avoid them. If you have calibrated and see little change between sets then you can put confidence limits on your accuracy. If it's critical that a user needs accuracy then photograph a consecutive shot of a calibration sample under exactly the same conditions.

good luck in your quest for the perfect magnification.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland


Debby Sherman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi all,
} I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you. We are working with some small particles and have to have reasonable size calibrations at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20 years old). Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice spacing give us values somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag. readout on the panel. This is fine. The important thing is that we know what the true mags are.
} One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly slightly lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at first but I am assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of the electrons at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons would be influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point, which could result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
} I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this through the software programming and will be doing the calibration at different kV values on our CM-10 to verify this.
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-099e Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Thu Jan 25 06:15:15 2001



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 12:11:01 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Antwort: Cleaning Knife Boats?

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There is no need to scrape off the old wax when reusing
Trufs - just put them on the multiplate and it melts and
gets recycled. I used to to re-use them then I hit a
problem where I had difficulty wetting the knife edge. I
got so desperate I decided to use a new boat each time.

Dave


On Wed, 24 Jan 2001 12:51:47 +0100
"joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} Hi list,
}
} may I just add to the discussion about the knife boats:
}
} yes, if you use dental wax to glue the Truf to the knife (with the Leica
} Multiplate, especially designed for that purpose its really easy) the boat
} can be reused a few times.
}
} HOWEVER:
} 1. breaking off the Truf from the knife and scratching away the old
} hardened wax may damage the Truf - leaking may result from this! Can be
} frustrating if you have perfect sections of a precious sample and see them
} dive away ...
} 2. Esp. with ultrathins (but also with semithins) you must be aware of
} possible cross contamination of old sections to the new set (I have no idea
} if there is a GLP rule on that but in a hospital mixing up different
} samples might cause serious problems)!
}
} BTW the "LKB"Trufs are "Leica"Trufs now, but call them as you like it :-)
}
} Best regards,
}
} Joachim
}
} Dr. Joachim Prutsch
} Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation
}
} Leica Microsystems GmbH
} Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
} Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
} A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
} AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Thu Jan 25 07:12:56 2001



From: Steven Celotto :      s.celotto-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 13:07:59 +0000
Subject: TEM magnification calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


One point about magnification calibration that I have not read here yet
is that for a particular nominal setting, the actual mag differs when
the mag has been stepped up compared to stepping down the mag. I have
been told this is due to hysteresis in the lenses (predominantly the
objective probably). I have measured up to 10% difference.

I have not kept a close eye on this discussion, but the dependence of
the electron voltage was mentioned. If this is so, that means that the
electron accelerating voltage would need to be checked. I remember in
the book by Forwood and Clarebrough (Electron Microscopy of Interfaces
in Metals and Alloys, published by Adam Hilger) where they found the
accelerating voltage of their instrument was 220 keV as opposed to 200
keV. I take it that could make a difference.


--
Dr. Steven Celotto
Department of Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
University of Liverpool
Brownlow Hill
Liverpool L69 3BX
UNITED KINGDOM

Telephone (UK) 0151-794-4692 (Int.) +44-151-794-4692
Fax. (UK) 0151-794-4675 (Int.) +44-151-794-4675
email: s.celotto-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Thu Jan 25 07:57:14 2001



From: Leslie Eibest :      leibest-at-duke.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:01:43 -0500
Subject: Re: fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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At 5:16 PM -0800 1/24/01, Earl Weltmer wrote:
} I would like to know what everyone now uses to prevent organic growth.


We sprinkle dichlorophene on the surface of the water in our Haskris
chiller to prevent fungal/bacterial growth, and buffer the water to
about pH 7.0 with sodium bicarbonate. So far (for the last 21
years), these procedures have worked fine.

Leslie Eibest


From daemon Thu Jan 25 08:04:20 2001



From: Ziegler, David SBCCOM(N) :      David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:02:07 -0500
Subject: Image Pro Express evaluation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes Tamara,

I used the working demo version of Image Pro Plus during the summer to help
analyze my SEM photos for my masters thesis. I found the program to be very
easy to use and very functional. I was really pleased with how well you
could set, save, and recall image calibrations for doing measurement work.
I had SEM micrographs from two different machines (one acquired digitally,
the other Polaroid film) and each had a different screen calibration.

dz

-----Original Message-----
} From: tamara a howard [mailto:thoward-at-UNM.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 6:16 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu


Is anyone using/used in the past Image Pro Express software (or Image Pro
Plus)? I'm unfamiliar with the package, and would like to hear any
comments (+ or -).

Thanks!

Tamara

(note new home bench!)
|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|



From daemon Thu Jan 25 08:18:02 2001



From: Matthew Lynn :      mlynn-at-miami.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:16:06 -0500
Subject: RE: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Earl,

I heard the same about the antifreeze...checked with Haskris and they
recommended (a year or two ago) Dichlorophene to prevent biological growth.
Seems to work but I still need to clean filters 2-3 times a year and monitor
flow. Haskris actually faxed me an info sheet, there's a chance I could find
it so email me if you would like it.

Matt

Matthew J. Lynn, Ph.D.
Center for Advanced Microscopy
University of Miami
(305)284-4736
mlynn-at-miami.edu


On Wednesday, January 24, 2001 8:16 PM, Earl Weltmer [SMTP:eweltmer-at-home.com]
wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Good question.
}
} I used to put antifreeze in the chillers but in the later models there is a
} warning stating not to use antifreeze as it damages the seals.
}
} I would like to know what everyone now uses to prevent organic growth.
}
} By the way the DP's must have been fairly warm to trip the sensors.
} If I have any questions at all about the temperture Is usually feel the DP
} cooling coils.
} All the coils should be cool except for the last two or three turns. Typical
} temperature is 20 deg C.
}
} Earl Weltmer
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Frank Thomas" {thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 11:51 AM
} Subject: Fun with vacuum systems
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Listers -
} }
} } I've just run into a problem (and, I think, partially solved it) that
} } may affect a lot of beam instruments with water-cooled diffusion pumps.
} } We'd been having some problems lately with at least one of the diff
} } pumps on our ESEM shutting itself off because it thought it wasn't being
} } cooled enough. I checked our little Neslab chiller unit; it seemed OK, and
} } since I'd just replaced the pump in it last year, I figured that there
} } really couldn't be a problem with that....
} } So I was starting to worry that maybe we had a diff pump or at least a
} } sensor starting to fail, but then this morning, the other diff pump also
} } shut itself down. Hello, thinks I, then this has to be a cooling problem.
} So
} } I disconnect the outflow from the chiller, and check the flow. Damn, lots
} of
} } water coming out....must be something else. But then I get a bright
} } idea....let's check the inline filter. Turns out, the filter is getting a
} } bit full of crud. Green crud. Ok, so I put a new one in. Then I get a
} second
} } bright idea (my personal daily limit). Let's check the water pressure/flow
} } returning from the ESEM. ....Oh oh, very low. So I disconnect both inlet
} and
} } outlet lines from the ESEM, stick the nozzle of a can of compressed air in
} } one, and let fly. Wish I hadn't had the other line aimed at myself just
} } then, but that's beside the point. About a half a litre of pretty dirty
} } water came shooting out, including a surprising number of little solid
} bits
} } of stuff. Judging by their blue-green colour, they're copper oxides,
} } presumably from the water lines in my slowly-decomposing ESEM.
} } Anyway, after that system flush, the flow seems a lot better, and now
} } the diff pumps seem to be staying on.
} } I don't believe it says anywhere in the manual that one should
} regularly
} } do this kind of procedure on one's beam instrument, but I wonder if this
} is
} } a common problem. Maybe some of you do a flush like this on a regular
} } (annual?) basis?
} } The water in our system is RO, and I don't put anything in to treat
} for
} } algae, since that doesn't seem to be a problem. Yet there's obviously some
} } corrosion going on. Is there a way to buffer the water to ensure a neutral
} } pH that will certainly not bother the instrument? I'm assuming our water
} is
} } a bit on the acid side, for this corrosion to be happening (?).
} }
} }
} } F. C. Thomas
} } MicroAnalysis Facility
} } Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
} } Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
} } Canada
} }
} }



From daemon Thu Jan 25 08:45:16 2001



From: Mary Gail Engle :      mgengle-at-pop.uky.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 09:41:55 -0500
Subject: black & white print processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear listers,
Our 10 year old Ilford print processor is breaking down piece by
piece. We've about reached the point of diminishing returns and so are
considering replacing it. Not everyone has switched to digital so we
use quite a lot of film. Can any of you recommend a good black and white
print processor?

Thank you,

Mary Gail Engle
Manager
Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
University of Kentucky


From daemon Thu Jan 25 10:45:43 2001



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 10:40:30 -0600
Subject: Salary Range for Microscopist at University

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We need to determine a reasonable salary (at a research university)
for someone with the following skills:

PhD degree in biological sciences
11 yr experience (practial & theory) in LM, SEM, TEM
microscope maintenance (basic and advanced-mechanical)
basic and advanced scope operator (STEM, EDS)
excellent training skills (personable)
excellent communication skills (verbal, written)
specimen prep, ultramicrotomy, immunocytochemistry, vacuum
techniques, digital imaging, statistics
1 yr exerience in atomic force microscopy
8 yr supervisory experience

This is a 12 month, continuing, non-tenured, hard-money position.
The person provides research support to faculty & researchers on campus.

What are other academic institutuions paying such (or similar) individuals?

Thank you.
--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Thu Jan 25 12:32:50 2001



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 13:27:53 EST
Subject: Ann: Image Processing and Measurement Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The three-day intensive hands-on workshop on Image Processing and Measurement
presented by John Russ through the North Carolina State University Department
of Continuing and Professional Education is now in its 19th year. The course
will be presented May 9 - 11, 2001, in Raleigh, NC, and June 6-8, 2001, at
the Danish Technological Institute in Taastrup, Denmark (near Copenhagen).
This course has generated highly favorable reviews from the thousands of
previous students. The primary focus is on images from various types of
microscopy, with practical guidance in correcting imaging defects, enhancing
the images for presentation and measurement, and performing stereological
meaningful measurements on them. Textbooks and computer software are provided
to attendees. Lab sessions with an opportunity to bring your own images makes
this course immediately useful and highly productive.

For full information on the course, including outlines, faculty information,
a downloadable brochure, and on-line registration, go to

http://members.AOL.com/IPCourse/




From daemon Thu Jan 25 12:38:28 2001



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 13:42:45 -0500
Subject: SEM of stomata

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all,
Is it possible to fix plant tissue and have the stoma (guard cells and the
pore between them) remain in their original position (opened or closed)?
Does anyone have a reference?
thanks for the help,
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Thu Jan 25 13:37:12 2001



From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 13:34:04 -0600
Subject: Re: Salary Range for Microscopist at University

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello John
Surely you will hear of people making less or more but between the survey
done by Don Grimes of Microscopy Today (457 microscopist) & the salary survey
of optically educated individuals published annually in Photonics Spectra, I
think your window is 50-70K$. Can you get someone for less, probably. Would you
like continuity in the years to come? (the answer is yes) One more thing, I
don't think the range of skills & experience you are asking for are typical of
microscopist in education e.g. ignore the educational discount usually applied
to most of us.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.

"John J. Bozzola" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We need to determine a reasonable salary (at a research university)
} for someone with the following skills:
}
} PhD degree in biological sciences
} 11 yr experience (practial & theory) in LM, SEM, TEM
} microscope maintenance (basic and advanced-mechanical)
} basic and advanced scope operator (STEM, EDS)
} excellent training skills (personable)
} excellent communication skills (verbal, written)
} specimen prep, ultramicrotomy, immunocytochemistry, vacuum
} techniques, digital imaging, statistics
} 1 yr exerience in atomic force microscopy
} 8 yr supervisory experience
}
} This is a 12 month, continuing, non-tenured, hard-money position.
} The person provides research support to faculty & researchers on campus.
}
} What are other academic institutuions paying such (or similar) individuals?
}
} Thank you.
} --
} ##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
} ##############################################################



From daemon Thu Jan 25 14:45:55 2001



From: Steve Barlow :      sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 12:47:03 -0800
Subject: teaching microscopy CD-ROMS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Barry

I'm sure there are more microscopy CD-ROMS out there than I know about. A
very nice one that comes to mind is one produced by Oxford Instruments as
part of its X-Ray microanalysis tutorial. That one concentrates mainly on
SEM and microanalysis. It was on desplay at recent MSA meetings.
Instructors are best served by going to the Project Micro website and
checking that bibliography, so ably maintained by the tireless Caroline
Schooley. If anyone knows about microscopy materials not on that list,
please send me and Caroline the title and source (even better a review of
the material and what level it is appropriate for).

While the major emphasis of Project Micro is for pre-college, Caroline has
tried to include useful materials for all levels.

Steve

} From: "Barry Searle" {B.Searle-at-unsw.edu.au}
} To: "Steve Barlow" {sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu}
} Subject: Re: teaching microscopy
} Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 12:13:46 +1100
} MIME-Version: 1.0
} X-Priority: 3} Steve,
}
} Would you have a web address for CD-ROMS on electron Microscopy and
} teaching?
}
} Thanks
}
} Barry
} EMU
} UNSW
}
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: Steve Barlow {sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu}
} To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 11:51 AM
} Subject: teaching microscopy
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I am assembling platform and poster presentations for a symposium on
} } "Teaching Microscopy" to be given at the upcoming MSA meeting in Long
} Beach
} } from August 5-9, 2001. I encourage anyone with an interest or experience
} } with this topic to submit a presentation. Please contact me directly for
} } more information or to answer any questions. See you in Long Beach!
} }
} } Teaching Microscopy
} }
} } Remote links to various light and electron microscopes, virtual
} } microscopes, and CD-ROMS of images are all being used to teach colleagues
} } and/or students about microscope theory, operation, and utilization. These
} } are the new hardware and software tools for instruction. Are they
} } effective? How are these tools being integrated into training programs and
} } school curricula? What should be included in a training course? What is
} the
} } best way to teach these concepts? This symposium will highlight examples
} of
} } the hardware and software tools, as well as discuss different approaches,
} } from formal classes and image collections to intensive workshops, to be
} } used to teach microscopy theory and operation.
} }
} } Steve Barlow
} }
} }
} }
} } ___________________________________________________
} } Dr. Steven Barlow
} } EM Facility/Biology Dept.
} } San Diego State University
} } 5500 Campanile Drive
} } San Diego CA 92182-4614
} } phone: (619) 594-4523
} } fax: (619) 594-5676
} }
} } email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
} } http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility
} }
} } Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
} } promoting microscopy instruction and increased access to microscopes
} } Microscopy Society of America
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }



___________________________________________________
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676

email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility

Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
promoting microscopy instruction and increased access to microscopes
Microscopy Society of America
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/





From daemon Thu Jan 25 15:47:33 2001



From: Bill Chissoe :      wchiss-at-ou.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 15:40:20 -0800
Subject: ETEC module

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have an ETEC Autoscan whose main use is as a teaching scope and for
doing demos for the various groups that tour our facility. It has TV
capability which is really helpful for the above mentioned activities,
but is also nice when you're searching for small particulates scattered
all over the plug. Our TV Scan module is currently in for repair so we
are without this useful accessory (and the class has started and the
tours keep coming). We have two other ETECs that we use as spare parts,
but neither of them had TV capability. Is there anybody out there
having one of these (working) modules that would be willing to part with
it? We might even be able to work out a trade if I have a module that
you need. TIA.
Bill

--
=============================================================
Bill Chissoe III
Electron Microscopist
University of Oklahoma
770 Van Vleet Oval
Norman, Ok. 73019
E-mail: wchiss-at-ou.edu Ph. (405)325-4391
=============================================================




From daemon Thu Jan 25 16:30:44 2001



From: Julaine Roffers :      roffers-at-uwm.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 16:29:05 -0600
Subject: problems using tannic acid for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have been following a protocol that involves using tannic acid (1% in
50mM Na cacodylate buffer) to prevent shrinkage of cells in Xenopus. I
am looking at cilia on the surface of the embryos and when I incubate in
tannic acid I see a deposition of crystals on the surface of the
embryos. I have made sure that the embryos as well as the solution is
at room temperature before and during incubation but this problem
persists. I am also washing subsequently in cacodylate buffer three
times. Has anyone seen this before or have any suggestions about
preventing it? The tannic acid does appear to reduce cell shrinkage but
makes it difficult to observe the cilia.
Julaine Roffers
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


From daemon Thu Jan 25 16:35:27 2001



From: Yali Tang :      ytang-at-anl.gov
Date: 25 Jan 01 16:32:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Image Pro Express evaluation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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"David SBCCOM(N)\"" {David.Ziegler-at-Natick.Army.Mil} ,
Yali Tang {ytang-at-anl.gov}
X-Mailer: QuickMail Pro 1.5.4 (Mac)
X-Priority: 3
Reply-To: Yali Tang {ytang-at-anl.gov}
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-Ascii"



From: Yali Tang :      ytang-at-anl.gov
Date: 25 Jan 01 16:32:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Image Pro Express evaluation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



I used to use Image Pro for image analysis and diffraction pattern
measurements. It is pretty good. Sometime you have to make calibration in order
to measure diffraction patterns. i hope there will be a version for Mac. (
i am now using NIH on Mac)

Yali Tang

Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Bldg. 223, A109
Argonne, IL 60439
Ph: 630-252-6219
Fax:630-252-7777
Email:ytang-at-anl.gov



From daemon Thu Jan 25 16:42:50 2001



From: Matthew Lynn :      mlynn-at-miami.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 17:41:30 -0500
Subject: RE: Fun with vacuum systems - Dichlorophene

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Listmembers,

For those interested in what Haskris recommended to me: I scanned in their
sheet and OCR'd it so I might have missed some "typos". Other standard
disclaimers: this info is two years old so you may want to check again with
Haskris, or whichever manufacturer applies in your case.

Matt

WATER TREATMENT FOR BIOLOGICAL GROWTH
In reference to our recent phone conversation, following are some suggestions
regarding water treatment for biological growth. Please keep in mind that any
additive must have the prior approval of the manufacturer of the equipment
being cooled.

It is important that you fill the system with clean, potable distilled water.

Check the system after one week of operation, if algae is starting to form,
flush the system in accordance with one of the following alternatives:

ALTERNATIVE 1:
Add one cup of chlorine bleach per 15 gallons of water, circulate 20-30
minutes. Drain the system and refill with clean water.

ATLERNATIVE 2:
Add one pint of hydrogen peroxide per 15 gallons of water. Circulate 20-30
minutes. Drain the system and refill with clean water.

Once the system has been flushed we recommend that you proceed with one of the
following water additives:

ALTERNATIVE 1:
A 10% solution of lab grade (no additives) ethylene glycol is recommended.

ALTERNATIVE 2:
Dichlorophene. This is a non-soluble white powder. It is a
fungicide/bactericide and should be sprinkled evenly across the entire tank's
water surface.

Haskris Co. does not sell this product, but we have the following source for
you to call:

ICN Biomedicals, Inc,. P.O. Box 5023, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 Phone:
800-854-0530

Dichlorophene Catalog # 05201981

ALTERNATIVE 3:
Chlorine, 8 parts per million.


NOTE: A 5 micron filter is very helpful in keeping the system clean, especially
if used in conjunction with one of the additives described above.

If you have any questions, please give us a call.





From daemon Thu Jan 25 16:45:16 2001



From: Tracey M. Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 16:41:56 -0600
Subject: Immuno gold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have a researcher who needs an unusual type of gold-conj. secondary
antibody. Her primary is made in goat and the only known available
anti-goat is made in rabbit. Her tissue has cross-reactivity with
rabbit. Is there any other species (donkey, dog, Brazilian opossum...)
that anyone knows of as an anti-goat gold conjugate secondary? Do we have
to make a home-made version?
Thanks!

Tracey Pepper
Supervisor
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa State University
ph: 515-294-3872
fax: 515.294.1337



From daemon Thu Jan 25 16:49:11 2001



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 16:46:54 -0600
Subject: Re: teaching microscopy CD-ROMS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is also a very good set of teaching tools for SEM, ESEM, and SEM/EDS done
by Brendan Griffin (UWestern Australia - Perth), Clive Nockolds (UofSydney)
it is University level. Contact Brendan for details at {bjg-at-cyllene.uwa.edu.au}


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

===========================================
Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec
Materials Science Division
Building 212
Argonne National Lab
9700 S. Cass Ave
Argonne, Illinois 60439 USA
Tel: 630-252-7901, Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
===========================================
TPMLab: http://tpm.amc.anl.gov
MMSite: http://www.amc.anl.gov
===========================================

The box said ...
"This program requires Win 95/98/NT or better..."
So I bought a G3 Mac !

===========================================




From daemon Thu Jan 25 18:53:45 2001



From: Jaclynn Lett :      jlett-at-cid.wustl.edu
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 18:46:10 -0600
Subject: AO 923 knife sharpener

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anyone have a manual for a AO 923 knife sharpener that they would be
willing to copy and mail or fax to me? This is the model that
automatically sets the plate heights for the coarse and fine blade facets.


Thank you,


Jaclynn Lett, Research Assistant jlett-at-cid.wustl.edu


Central Institute for the Deaf
Faye and Carl Simons Center for Biology of Hearing and Deafness
4560 Clayton Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63110


voice: 314-977-0257
fax: 314-977-0030







From daemon Thu Jan 25 18:53:47 2001



From: jekstrom-at-mediaone.net
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 18:49:00 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Zeiss Jena microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Colleagues...

Can anyone help this person . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jekstrom-at-mediaone.net
Name: jim Ekstrom

School: Phillips Exeter Academy

State: NH

Zip: 03833

Question: I have a Zeiss Jena microscope drawing set (Nr.6454) Stamped
Zeichenapparat on the box. I am looking for directions for this particular
instrument or a similar type.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Thu Jan 25 19:28:16 2001



From: Purdy, Sam :      SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
Date: Thu, 25 Jan 2001 19:24:03 -0600
Subject: FW: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fellow Microscopists:
As some one on the metallurgical side of things, I may be able to
help. Chris Jeffry is on the right track. The corrosion product from Cu/Fe
couples. such Cu pipe and Fe fittings, may be magnetite, a black, magnetic
residue or, maybe, red rust but not green Cu compounds. In such a couple, Fe
corrodes and the Cu does not. I'd bet on algae as the green material. You
biologists ought to be able to tell if it's algae.

regards,

Sam Purdy
Technical Center
National Steel Corp.

} ----------
} From: Chris Jeffree
} Sent: Thursday, January 2001, 4:49 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Maybe US plumbers are better trained, but UK heating systems are
} almost always iron (pressed steel steel) radiators with copper
} connecting pipes. Other metals involved are brass valves and
} connectors, and lead/tin solder at soldered joints. Systems like that
} corrode unless inhibitors are used. The sludge that collects in my
} copper/iron central heating system is deep black, like indian ink, not
} green.
} Is it possible that your green sludge is not copper but algae??
} Transparent plastic tubing in the system may allow alagal growth,
} provided there is some source of carbon. Bacterial/fungal
} decomposition of glycol could provide that.
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
} To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:03 PM
} Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems
}
}
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } --------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
} }
} }
} } Hey, deja-vu all over again......
} }
} } I encountered a similar (green sludge and corrosion) problem on the
} } DP's and recirculating water system of our TEM several years ago. I
} } assumed that it was a reaction between the iron and copper tubing
} } used in the system. Old time plumbers, for example, always warned
} } about directly connecting iron and copper tubing because of the
} } corrosion that would occur. I KNOW that on our DP's the iron
} fittings
} } have copper connections. Oh well....
} }
} } JB
} }
} } --
} } ##############################################################
} } John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} } I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} } 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} } Southern Illinois University
} } Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} } Phone: 618-453-3730
} } Fax: 618-453-2665
} } Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} } Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
} } ##############################################################
} }
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 26 01:07:30 2001



From: Nazlia Samodien :      ctssamodien-at-samiot.uct.ac.za
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 09:00:23 +0200
Subject: CPD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All
Is there anybody out there who may have a spare Critical Point Drier to
sell. We urgently need one, and our existing budget does not allow the
purchase of a new one right now. Any offers???? We're hoping that someone
in South Africa would respond to this offer. Makes life a bit easier.
Thanks


_____________________________________________________

Nazlia Samodien

Cardiovascular Research Unit
Dept. of Cardiothoracic Surgery
University of Cape Town Medical School
Anzio Rd, Observatory, 7925, South Africa

Tel. +27 21 406 6398 (office)
+27 21 406 6476 (Secretary)
Fax + 27 21 448 5935


Email: ctssamodien-at-samiot.uct.ac.za










From daemon Fri Jan 26 03:37:41 2001



From: Richard Beanland +44 1327 356363 :      richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 09:32:19 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Malcolm,
just thought I'd raise a few points. I should say I'm using a 20 year old JEOL 120CX and things may be different for more modern instruments!

1) I find that magnification is changed only slightly by variations in sample position (maybe 3% top to bottom of my 1 mm z-range). However diffraction pattern magnification (camera length) is changed enormously (+/- 50%). It's easy to see why if you draw a ray diagram.
2) I agree the standards are no better than +/- 2%. I'm lucky to be working in a field where I can generate my own standards which are an order of magnitude better (III-V superlattices which can be measured by high resolution X-ray diffraction very accurately).
3) If I turn all the knobs to the end and back I find magnification reproducibility is better than I can measure (about 0.5%). Unless, of course the reference batteries start going flat, but then the position of the knobs in the standard setting changes. I am happy to quote mags to 3 significant figures (but not 4!).

Richard

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Debby
}
} there are several things that you should consider when checking magnification on a TEM:
} First of all most manufacturers will aim for a consistency of about +/-5% accuracy because of the laws of diminishing returns. Also they may have an optimum voltage
} Second there will be variations up and down the magnification scale because a balance has been struck between several lenses and when they are excited differently this will be expressed differently.
} Third remember that there is a very short working distance between lens polepiece and specimen (just a few millimetres) so if the specimen height varies by +/- 0.2 mm this will greatly affect the magnification. For instance if the grid is slightly bent or kinked, if you don't check magnifications at a standard Z position (eucentric if that's available) then you will get inconsistencies of easily 5%. When I calibrated at eucentric I noticed that all of my
} magnifications at 75kv were near or better than +/- 4% whereas one or two previous sets were mostly worse than +/- 5%
} Fourth all of the above will change with time as the electronics changes so calibrations, if you're fussy, should be done perhaps every 6 months or year if you're fussy or notice great changes. I'm sure that Steve Chapman would agree that it's an excellent way of monitoring part of the performance of your microscope anyway.
} Fifth consider how you measure your calibrations you should always measure the negative never the print (use a calibrated graticule eyepiece or travelling microscope). Prints can vary by 1 or 2% so easily.
} Sixth the calibration standards for TEM will be at best +/- 2% accurate unless you've got a certificate that says otherwise. They will often differ e.g. catalase and diffraction grating will give you a slightly different answer.
} Seventh don't forget the hysteresis factor. On most microscopes you get best calibration by calibrating at the highest magnification then working down the range because of inherent hysteresis in the electromagnetic lenses. Some manufacturers even used to supply a special button to overcome this on our old AEI 801 it was called standardise magnification.
} Eighth I'm slipping I can usually come up with about ten problems.
}
} Never quote magnifications to 3 significant figures it's meaningless. It may sound insurmountable but if you are aware of the problems you can reduce or avoid them. If you have calibrated and see little change between sets then you can put confidence limits on your accuracy. If it's critical that a user needs accuracy then photograph a consecutive shot of a calibration sample under exactly the same conditions.
}
} good luck in your quest for the perfect magnification.
}
} Malcolm
}
} Malcolm Haswell
} e.m. unit
} University of Sunderland
}
}
} Debby Sherman wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Hi all,
} } I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you. We are working with some small particles and have to have reasonable size calibrations at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20 years old). Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice spacing give us values somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag. readout on the panel. This is fine. The important thing is that we know what the true mags are.
} } One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly slightly lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at first but I am assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of the electrons at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons would be influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point, which could result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
} } I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this through the software programming and will be doing the calibration at different kV values on our CM-10 to verify this.
} } Debby
} }
} } Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} } Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} } Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} } S-099e Whistler Building
} } West Lafayette, IN 47907
}

==============================================================
Richard Beanland,
Structural Analysis Lab,
Caswell Technology,
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northants NN12 8EQ

e-mail richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Tel. +44 1327 356363
Fax. +44 1327 356398
==============================================================
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From daemon Fri Jan 26 04:13:17 2001



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 10:10:33 +0000
Subject: Re: TEM calibration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all

I wrote a throw away comment at the end of my last mailing to the list
about NEVER quoting magnifications to 3 significant figures. I think I
should qualify that
because 3 significant figures at 10k is different from 3 significant
figures at 98k. It might be reasonable to quote 10.5k (this would depend
on what % error your
calibration gave) but pointless to quote 98.5k.

Malcolm


Malcolm Haswell wrote:

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}
} Debby
}
} there are several things that you should consider when checking
magnification on a TEM:

} {SNIP}
}
} Never quote magnifications to 3 significant figures it's meaningless.
It may sound insurmountable but if you are aware of the problems you can
reduce
or avoid them. If you have calibrated and see little change between sets
then you can put confidence limits on your accuracy. If it's critical
that a user
needs accuracy then photograph a consecutive shot of a calibration
sample under exactly the same conditions.
}
} good luck in your quest for the perfect magnification.
}
} Malcolm
}
} Malcolm Haswell
} e.m. unit
} University of Sunderland
}
} Debby Sherman wrote:
}
} }
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} }
} } Hi all,
} } I just wanted to run some interesting calibration data by you.
We are working with some small particles and have to have reasonable
size
calibrations at both 80 and 100kV on a Philips EM-400 microscope (~20
years old). Calibration using replica gratings and catalase lattice
spacing give
us values somewhat below the magnifications indicated by the mag.
readout on the panel. This is fine. The important thing is that we
know what the
true mags are.
} } One thing we did find is that the magnifications are consistantly
slightly lower in value at 100kV than at 80kV. This surprised me at
first but I am
assuming that the difference is due to the higher acceleration of the
electrons at 100kV. Am I correct to assume that higher energy electrons
would be
influenced less by the lenses, resulting in lower x-over point, which
could result in a slight decrease in the magnification?
} } I suspect that newer microscopes could compensate for this
through the software programming and will be doing the calibration at
different kV
values on our CM-10 to verify this.
} } Debby
} }
} } Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} } Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} } Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} } S-099e Whistler Building
} } West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Fri Jan 26 07:08:40 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 04:57:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: problems using tannic acid for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Julaine:
A question: how are you using the tannic acid? Is this in one of the OTOTO
methods, or just part of the glut mixture? An answer to these would allow
me to give you some advice/experience, as I have used both, but they are
really different issues. I'll check back later today, and try to help then.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Thu, 25 Jan 2001 16:29:05 -0600, Julaine Roffers wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have been following a protocol that involves using tannic acid (1% in
} 50mM Na cacodylate buffer) to prevent shrinkage of cells in Xenopus. I
} am looking at cilia on the surface of the embryos and when I incubate in
} tannic acid I see a deposition of crystals on the surface of the
} embryos. I have made sure that the embryos as well as the solution is
} at room temperature before and during incubation but this problem
} persists. I am also washing subsequently in cacodylate buffer three
} times. Has anyone seen this before or have any suggestions about
} preventing it? The tannic acid does appear to reduce cell shrinkage but
} makes it difficult to observe the cilia.
} Julaine Roffers
} University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
}





_______________________________________________________
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From daemon Fri Jan 26 07:28:32 2001



From: Jim at ProSciTech :      jim-at-proscitech.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 23:26:45 +1000
Subject: RE: Antwort: Microtome room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I used nine ultramicrotomes (including a cryo) over the years. All except for
one Reichert, which had its own desk, were placed on a common office desk and
we never had a hint of vibration problems.
(Who remembers the hand-driven Porter-Blum, the Siroflex and the Huxley, great
stuff - 35 years ago) However, my labs were either on the ground floor or in a
basement. I suggest that you buy an expensive table only when needed.

Suffocation: sure its possible, but why scare the population. Our body does not
require the nominal 16% of O2. The partial pressure of gases dictates that only
about half the nominal is available at 10,000 ft altitude, which is equivalent
to the cabin pressure of aircraft at high altitude.
A small microtome room of 4x3x2.5m contains 30,000 liters of air and over 80%
of that is nitrogen. I don't know how nitrogen hungry your equipment is, but I
suggest that leaving the door open is good advice. If you have air-conditioning
with return vents, you can even shut that door.
I rather have a Canary than an oxygen analyser in the cryolab.
Cheers
Jim Darley
ProSciTech Microscopy PLUS
PO Box 111, Thuringowa QLD 4817 Australia
Ph +61 7 4774 0370 Fax:+61 7 4789 2313 service-at-proscitech.com
Great microscopy catalogue, 500 Links, MSDS, User Notes
ABN: 99 724 136 560 www.proscitech.com

On Thursday, January 25, 2001 4:44 PM, "joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com"
-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[SMTP:"joachim.prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com] wrote:
}
} Hi Nancy,
}

snip}
} Important when deciding for a UM room: Are you having vibrations in this
} room? In which floor is your room? Are you having a concrete floor? and
} what is the floor covering made of? These factors all may affect the
} stability of your room!
}
} I strongly recommend the use of an antivibration instrument table or AT
} LEAST an antivibration base plate for the UM. Do not use a desk or smthg
} similar! You can test for vibrations easily by putting a petridish filled
} with water (slightly "overfilled" with a convex meniscus) on a table in
} your room under a light - you should see NO waves! Slam the door and watch
} what happens :-)
}
} And just one more thought REALLY important: Should you ever decide to work
} with a cryosectioning equipment: DANGER OF SUFFOCATION!!! Make sure that
} you have a good ventilation of your room! 1 litre of liquid nitrogen (LN2)
} will produce 700 litres of gaseous nitrogen (GN2). It is odourless and
} tasteless and an operator in a small room may suffocate and not even
} recognize that he/she is in danger!!!
} You may use an oxygen analyzer (range 0 - 25%) for testing ...
}
} Hope that helps you,
}
} Joachim
}
} Dr. Joachim Prutsch
} Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation
}
} Leica Microsystems GmbH
} Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
} Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
} A 1170 Vienna Tel.: +43 1 4 88 99 - 235
} AUSTRIA Fax: +43 1 4 88 99 - 350
}
}
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 26 07:35:56 2001



From: jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 08:37:28 -0500
Subject: Re: Immuno gold sources

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have found that Accurate (don't have the address handy,
somewhere in NY state if I remember) has a wide variety of oddball
antibody, sera, and toxin inventory.
Also the website http://www.antibodygateway.com/
is sort of a clearing house for several companies.
john

On 25 Jan 2001, at 16:41, Tracey M. Pepper wrote:

} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
} I have a researcher who needs an unusual type of gold-conj. secondary
} antibody. Her primary is made in goat and the only known available
} anti-goat is made in rabbit. Her tissue has cross-reactivity with
} rabbit. Is there any other species (donkey, dog, Brazilian
} opossum...) that anyone knows of as an anti-goat gold conjugate
} secondary? Do we have to make a home-made version? Thanks!
}
} Tracey Pepper
} Supervisor
} Bessey Microscopy Facility
} Iowa State University
} ph: 515-294-3872
} fax: 515.294.1337
}




From daemon Fri Jan 26 08:21:12 2001



From: Frank Thomas :      thomasf-at-AGC.BIO.NS.CA
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 10:26:13 -0400
Subject: Fun with....revisited

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Bill,

I can get you several.

Earl Weltmer


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Bill Chissoe" {wchiss-at-ou.edu}
To: "MSA listserver" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 3:40 PM


Thanks to all those who responded privately with good ideas about the
chiller/circulation problem, and to those who pitched in for the good of the
whole List.
I've made some further investigations into my own plumbing problem (....that
doesn't sound right....) and found out a couple additional facts.

1. The water currently in my system is pH 5.3.
2. The green crud all over my water filter was, indeed, copper.

So, I am having some corrosion problems, presumably because of the acid
water. As somebody said, iron will be attacked first where it's available,
but I found only very small traces of Fe on the filter. Perhaps there's very
little iron/steel available in my particular system.
Checking the acidity of fresh RO water from our source showed its pH to be
5.8-6.0, which is probably good enough. I guess I'll just institute a policy
of monitoring and changing the water in the system on some kind of regular
basis (semiannually?). Found no trace of biologicals on the filter so at
least that doesn't seem to be an issue.
Since it took at least five years (maybe 6 or 7) for the lines in the
ESEM to become occluded the first time, I'll assume a modest amount of care
and attention will prevent further occurrences.
It could well be that much of this copper is actually coming from the
cooling coils in the chiller itself - unfortunately this unit (a Neslab) has
a closed-up tank that you can't see inside - to add water there's just a
little neck and cap like a gas tank on a car. I think I prefer the old
Haskris unit we used to have. It just had a big open tank that you could
easily inspect.

F.C. Thomas
MicroAnalysis Facility
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Canada



From daemon Fri Jan 26 10:38:08 2001



From: Maria Ericsson :      maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 10:07:43 -0500
Subject: Re: black & white print processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Re: black and white print processors:

I can recommend the MohrPro print processor. We've had it for a year and a
half and it's been great. It's dry-dry, compact, fast and fairly easy to
clean. I believe I bought it from EMS for around 4000$.

Maria

At 09:41 AM 1/25/01 -0500, Mary Gail Engle wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

____________________________

Maria Ericsson
Harvard Medical School EM Facility
220 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 432 1698
maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
http://www.hms.harvard.edu/core/em.html


From daemon Fri Jan 26 10:39:13 2001



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 08:34:53 -0800
Subject: Re: FW: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sam,
I have a similar system and I definitly get green copper oxide flakes
accumulating in my reservoir. Some of the brass fittings in my microscope
water system have almost completely lost their inside flanges to corrosion.
I haven't seen any iron oxide residue, but I don't know all the metals in
the water system.
At 07:24 PM 1/25/01 -0600, you wrote:
} Fellow Microscopists:
} As some one on the metallurgical side of things, I may be able to
} help. Chris Jeffry is on the right track. The corrosion product from Cu/Fe
} couples. such Cu pipe and Fe fittings, may be magnetite, a black, magnetic
} residue or, maybe, red rust but not green Cu compounds. In such a couple, Fe
} corrodes and the Cu does not. I'd bet on algae as the green material. You
} biologists ought to be able to tell if it's algae.
}
} regards,
}
} Sam Purdy
} Technical Center
} National Steel Corp.
}
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Fri Jan 26 10:50:55 2001



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 10:47:23 -0600
Subject: Texas Society for Microscopy Spring Meeting announcement and call for

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


**CALL FOR PAPERS**

The 2001 Spring Meeting of

THE TEXAS SOCIETY FOR MICROSCOPY
“Embracing All Forms of Microscopy”


April 5-7, 2001

Houston Marriott, Medical Center
6580 Fannin Street
Houston, TX 77030

(713) 770-8100
www.marriotthotels.com

Mention that you are with TSM when making your reservations.
RATES: $79/single, double, triple or quad
HOTEL RESERVATION DEADLINE: March 12, 2001
After this date reservations will be accepted on a space available
basis only with convention rates not guaranteed.

The meeting will open with a Thursday evening social (7:00 pm).

THURSDAY WORKSHOP
“Atomic Force Microscopy”
Coordinated by Steve Zeigler
FRIDAY GUEST SPEAKER
Cell cycle, sperm dimorphism and sperm cell biology in flowering
plants
Presented by Scott D. Russell
SATURDAY WORKSHOP
“Cryo-Microtomy”
Coordinated by Al Coritz

If you need fore information on the meeting, please contact Pam
Neill, Pamela.Neill-at-AlconLabs.com, or phone her at 817-568-6497.
(TSM members: you will receive this information by surface mail and
e-mail.)

ABSTRACTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY: March 12, 2001
Mail abstracts to: Camelia G.-A. Maier, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Texas Woman's University
Department of Biology, GRB 328
Denton, TX 76204
Tel.: 940-898-2358 (office)
E-mail: f_maier-at-twu.edu

If you need format documents and are not a member of TSM, please
contact Dr. Maier as listed above.
(TSM members will receive these documents by surface mail and e-mail.)







From daemon Fri Jan 26 11:16:18 2001



From: David T. Hoelzer :      hoelzerd-at-ornl.gov
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 12:13:54 -0500
Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

After following this thread dealing with corrosion occurring in the cooling
system, I've decided to add my experience. In my former position at NYSCC,
I had a similar problem of corrosion products clogging the cooling system
on the ion mill, which was a closed loop system combined with a Neslab
chiller. Although there were two cast iron fittings used (not including
the chiller unit), the tubing and most of the fittings were Cu or brass.
However, the corrosion products were definitely Cu-based. Why? I examined
at times the elbow and tube size reduction fittings and determined that
these were mostly the problem. I surmised that both cause turbulence in
the water flow which promotes erosion corrosion. This would especially be
more of a problem in regions of the tubing and fittings that became hot,
such as near the bottom of the diffusion pump heater as well as on the
trailing side of the flow direction from the diffusion pump. I learned to
first check the elbow fitting on the trailing side of the pump since it
almost always got clogged by corrosion products. Thus, be aware of these
transitions points in the water flow path and on the proximity to the heat
load as potential areas for this problem.

David
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
David T. Hoelzer, Ph.D.
Metals and Ceramics Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Bldg. 4500S, Mail Stop 6151
P. O. Box 2008
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830
* (865) 574-5096 {Work}
* (865) 574-0641 {Fax}


From daemon Fri Jan 26 11:56:01 2001



From: Dr. Edgar Voelkl :      vog-at-ornl.gov
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 12:50:57 -0500
Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

I found an interesting page at:

http://www.moenv.go.kr/english/tit12/eco49.htm

on Demetalization (the selective corrosion caused by the difference
in ionization tendencies among the components of alloy). Maybe that
explains why the copper pieces are floating around ... would be
interested in more details though,

Best regards,

Edgar



--


________________
Dr. Edgar Voelkl
Senior Development Staff Member
ORNL
Bldg 4515, MS 6064
1 Bethel Valley Road
P.O. Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

Tel.: (865) 574-8181
Fax: (865) 574-4913
email: vog-at-ornl.gov


From daemon Fri Jan 26 12:04:22 2001



From: Pauline C. Yu :      splene-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 10:17:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: IHC classes in N. California?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Yes, you can do this with Low-temperature SEM. I wrote a paper on this
in 1989
vanGardingen, PR, Jeffree, CE and Grace, J (1989) Variation in
stomatal aperture in leaves of Avena fatua L. observed by
low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Plant Cell and
Environment 12, 887-897.

I have to say that the method is not applicable to all species - just
those which offer an unobstructed view of the aperture.
If you need any more info on this just ask.
Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Beth Richardson" {beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 6:42 PM


Dear List folks

I have a colleague who would like to take some workshops or classes in
Immunohistochemistry-Microscopy techniques. She's just a beginner, so
something that starts with the basics would be ideal. Does anyone have
recommendations on offerings of either in the greater bay area to greater
Sacramento area? I can think of a few local schools that may teach such
courses, but I don't know about their policies about non-students taking
such classes, especially when it involves hands-on labwork.

Thanks,
Pauline Yu
Microscopist Technician
USDA-ARS-WRRC
splene-at-pw.usda.gov



From daemon Fri Jan 26 14:24:38 2001



From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 26 Jan 01 12:28:54 -0800
Subject: RE: Immuno gold

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From: Paul Webster :      pwebster-at-mailhouse.hei.org
Date: 26 Jan 01 12:28:54 -0800
Subject: RE: Immuno gold

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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Reply to: RE: Immuno gold
Although I didn't really understand the problem with your antibody (rabbit and goat-gold, how could it react with the sample?), there may be a solution to not using rabbit antibodies.

If you purchase an unconjugated goat antibody that binds protein A, you could then use the protein A to visualize antibody binding. Examples of antibodies that bind protein A include those from pig, dog, guinea pig, rat IgG2c and IgG1, and any IgG2a, IgG2b immunoglobulins from mouse. I think human antibodies are also good for binding protein A but have not yet found any volunteers willing to be subjected to the repeated injections required.

Paul Webster.



Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
phone:213 273 8026
fax: 213 413 6739
e-mail: pwebster-at-hei.org
http://www.hei.org/htm/aemi.htm



Tracey M. Pepper wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I have a researcher who needs an unusual type of gold-conj. secondary } antibody. Her primary is made in goat and the only known available } anti-goat is made in rabbit. Her tissue has cross-reactivity with } rabbit. Is there any other species (donkey, dog, Brazilian opossum...) } that anyone knows of as an anti-goat gold conjugate secondary? Do we have } to make a home-made version?
} Thanks!
}
} Tracey Pepper
} Supervisor
} Bessey Microscopy Facility
} Iowa State University
} ph: 515-294-3872
} fax: 515.294.1337
}
}
}
}
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From daemon Fri Jan 26 14:36:58 2001



From: Thomas, Larry (PNNL) :      Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 12:33:19 -0800
Subject: RE: black & white print processors

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We still use a lot of film too, but gave up on darkroom printing in favor of
scanning and digital image processing some time ago. Film recording still
offers significant advantages over the in-microscope CCD cameras for certain
applications (we use both). Compared to darkroom printing, the scanning/digital
processing/dye-sub printing route is a big cost saver and reduces generation of
chemical wastes. Also, digital processing with programs like PhotoShop or
CorelPaint is much faster and gives better control of the process. All the time
spent and print paper wasted dodging and getting tones right certainly won't be
missed. Also, digital images avoid the extra step of dealing with prints in
presentations and publications.

Larry

Larry Thomas
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
MSIN P8-16
P.O. Box 999
Richland, WA 99352
Phone: (509)372-0793 Fax: (509)376-6308
Email: mailto: Larry.Thomas-at-pnl.gov


----------
From: Maria Ericsson
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2001 7:07 AM
To: Mary Gail Engle; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: Re: black & white print processors

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Re: black and white print processors:

I can recommend the MohrPro print processor. We've had it for a year and
a
half and it's been great. It's dry-dry, compact, fast and fairly easy to

clean. I believe I bought it from EMS for around 4000$.

Maria

At 09:41 AM 1/25/01 -0500, Mary Gail Engle wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear listers,
} Our 10 year old Ilford print processor is breaking down piece by
} piece. We've about reached the point of diminishing returns and so are

} considering replacing it. Not everyone has switched to digital so we
} use quite a lot of film. Can any of you recommend a good black and
white
} print processor?
}
} Thank you,
}
} Mary Gail Engle
} Manager
} Electron Microscopy & Imaging Facility
} University of Kentucky

____________________________

Maria Ericsson
Harvard Medical School EM Facility
220 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 432 1698
maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
http://www.hms.harvard.edu/core/em.html



From daemon Fri Jan 26 15:34:20 2001



From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2001 15:33:26 -0600
Subject: 3mm glass,tem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Ya'll,
if there is a kind sole out there with a tem sample prep hole saw, that
is willing into cut ~20 TEM disk from microscope slide covers, I am
willing to pay for the service.
Please contact me off line.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.



From daemon Sat Jan 27 09:32:25 2001



From: m.delcerro-at-worldnet.att.net ()
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 09:18:24 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM/EM of mosses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

Can anyone answer this question . Remember
Ask-A-Microscopist is a forum that is used by NON-MICROSCOPISTS
looking for help so keep try to your technical details at the right level.

Nestor
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: m.delcerro-at-worldnet.att.net
Name: Manuel del Cerro
State: New York


Question: I would very much like to see light and electron microscopy
(TEM/SEM) of leaves of mosses. Could you please give me the name of a book
or web site that will have these?
Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From daemon Sat Jan 27 09:44:45 2001



From: Stefan.Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-uni-koeln.de
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:40:42 +0100
Subject: embedding (human) spermatozoa for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I´am looking for a reference giving a protocol how to embedd (human)
spermatozoa for TEM. What I need also to know is if and how I have to
isolate the spermatozoa out of the ejaculate. It would be advantageous
for me to have a relatively dense pellet of spermatozoa and I have no
idea how much percent of the ejaculate are spermatozoa and how much is
`junk`.

Tanks

Stefan


****************************
Dr. Stefan Geimer
University of Cologne
Botanical Institute
Gyrhofstr. 15
D-50931 Cologne
Germany

phone:
office: +49-(0)221-470-7022
lab: +49-(0)221-470-3795

fax: +49-(0)221-470-5181
****************************




From daemon Sat Jan 27 20:48:13 2001



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 21:28:12 -0500
Subject: RE: 3mm glass,tem ----I got it covered.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have a stash of about 50 cut from coverslips that I don't need. I don't know what thickness they are, but they are probably #1 or #2. Send me your address.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce Brinson [mailto:brinson-at-rice.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2001 4:33 PM
To: MSA Listserver
Subject: 3mm glass,tem


---------------------------------------------------------------
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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
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Hi Ya'll,
if there is a kind sole out there with a tem sample prep hole saw, that
is willing into cut ~20 TEM disk from microscope slide covers, I am
willing to pay for the service.
Please contact me off line.

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.




From daemon Sat Jan 27 20:48:13 2001



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 21:40:41 -0500
Subject: RE: Fun with vacuum systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Careful.
Galvanic corrosion is dependent on the relatvie electronegativities of the alloys involved in the corrosion cell. Not all Fe alloys will corrode in contact with copper. I know for instance, that 304SS is about the same as copper, but a little more noble and therefore it is the copper that will corrode.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8161 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
From: Purdy, Sam [mailto:SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 8:24 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: FW: Fun with vacuum systems


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Fellow Microscopists:
As some one on the metallurgical side of things, I may
be able to
help. Chris Jeffry is on the right track. The corrosion
product from Cu/Fe
couples. such Cu pipe and Fe fittings, may be magnetite, a
black, magnetic
residue or, maybe, red rust but not green Cu compounds. In
such a couple, Fe
corrodes and the Cu does not. I'd bet on algae as the green
material. You
biologists ought to be able to tell if it's algae.

regards,

Sam Purdy
Technical Center
National Steel Corp.

} ----------
} From: Chris Jeffree
} Sent: Thursday, January 2001, 4:49 AM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems
}
}
---------------------------------------------------------------
---------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
---------------------------------------------------------------
--------.
}
}
} Maybe US plumbers are better trained, but UK heating systems are
} almost always iron (pressed steel steel) radiators with copper
} connecting pipes. Other metals involved are brass valves and
} connectors, and lead/tin solder at soldered joints. Systems like that
} corrode unless inhibitors are used. The sludge that collects in my
} copper/iron central heating system is deep black, like
indian ink, not
} green.
} Is it possible that your green sludge is not copper but algae??
} Transparent plastic tubing in the system may allow alagal growth,
} provided there is some source of carbon. Bacterial/fungal
} decomposition of glycol could provide that.
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "John J. Bozzola" {bozzola-at-siu.edu}
} To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:03 PM
} Subject: Re: Fun with vacuum systems
}
}
} }
--------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
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} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
--------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---.
} }
} }
} } Hey, deja-vu all over again......
} }
} } I encountered a similar (green sludge and corrosion) problem on the
} } DP's and recirculating water system of our TEM several years ago. I
} } assumed that it was a reaction between the iron and copper tubing
} } used in the system. Old time plumbers, for example, always warned
} } about directly connecting iron and copper tubing because of the
} } corrosion that would occur. I KNOW that on our DP's the iron
} fittings
} } have copper connections. Oh well....
} }
} } JB
} }
} } --
} } ##############################################################
} } John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} } I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} } 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} } Southern Illinois University
} } Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} } Phone: 618-453-3730
} } Fax: 618-453-2665
} } Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} } Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
} } ##############################################################
} }
}
}





From daemon Sun Jan 28 11:12:24 2001



From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      ALLANWOJTASP-at-em.agr.ca
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2001 11:54:08 -0500
Subject: What is Food Structure and Functionality?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

I'd like to thank Tim Richardson for his comments and interest in our upcoming Food Structure and Functionality Symposium in May 2001, which was recently publicized on this list. I wanted to take advantage of this opportunity to explain a little about this fascinating area of study.

Food Structure and Functionality is the epitome of applied microscopy and imaging. It is not merely imaging but the integrating of this information with other food quality attributes especially texture. One of our fundamental beliefs is that every change in the behaviour of a food is accompanied by a structural change at a heirarchy of levels - from the macroscopic to the molecular. In other words, this is a structure/function relationship.

If you think about this a little, you can see how the quality of food can be assessed and controlled using these methods. Processed foods with certain properties can be designed by following the evolution of structure using these methods. Food Structure and Functionality covers all aspects of foods, from their plant and animal origins, from breeding, growth and management, harvest and post-harvest (plants), and finally to the processing stage.

At present, Food Structure and Functionality researchers are scattered all over the world. There are many labs which do this type of work and don't use this name. I know that there are a number of labs in Canada's Federal Department of Agriculture (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) which do this type of work, but there is only 1 in our department, at our Research Centre in Kentville, Nova Scotia (1 hour drive from Halifax/Dartmouth) which actually calls itself a Food Structure lab (our lab). USDA has many labs which do this research. Many of the large food companies in the world routinely use these techniques as a valuable tool - some are able to talk about what they do while others cannot. In Europe, labs using these techniques are numerous and are well supported.

Those of us who come to this field of study are either classically trained microscopists from the bio/medical sciences, or food scientists/technologists who have discovered the power of imaging techniques in their daily work. To my knowledge, there is no university which specifically offers courses in Food Structure and Functionality, but it is the basis of many challenging PhD theses.

Hopefully this explains a little about us for the curious. You can find out more about our group at the AOCS website (www.aocs.org, on the the Food Structure and Functionality Division webpage). Also, Milos Kalab, a pioneer in Food Structure research has a website called Food under the Microscope which is really worthwhile to visit at:

http://www.magma.ca/~scimat

Thanks for the opportunity of telling you all of this.

Paula.





From daemon Sun Jan 28 12:52:56 2001



From: Bruce Brinson :      brinson-at-rice.edu
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2001 12:16:59 -0600
Subject: thx,3mm glass, tem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Yall,
I tried to send this with "thanks, 3mm glass, tem" in the subject
line...guess ''thanks" got cought in the spam filter.
} Wow! My thanks to the MSA list server & those of you that reponed. My
need
} for 3mm disk has been met faster than I got a copy of my own messsage
{:o{)}

Bruce Brinson
Rice U.
}



From daemon Mon Jan 29 03:59:22 2001



From: Steve Chapman :      PROTRAIN-at-CompuServe.COM
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 05:41:26 -0500
Subject: Re: teaching microscopy CD-ROMS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Sorry for not getting around to this before now.

First, I am neither an expert in physics or mathematics. Unfortunately, I
shot from the hip and included my own personal terminology. My
understanding of the world is based in what I would call 'intuitive
modeling'. In terms of modern physics, the electron does have a definable
mass. However, with my aversion to the mathematics of quantum physics, I
struggle to find a more intuitive understanding. The fitting of
statistical descriptions to empirical data holds far less interest to me
than the discovery of theoretical considerations that explain empirical
data.

In doing so, I consider the electron as having no gravitational mass, but
rather a mass defined at this point based solely on its energy. This I
base on the simple minded concept of classical physics of particles as
'billiard balls'. In that concept, two features are required for 'mass'-
spatial dimension and gravitational effects. At this point in time, I am
unaware of any experiments that can demonstrate that either property can be
attributed to the electron.

Instead, I consider the electron as a dimensionless bundle of energy that
affects matter solely through contactless energy interactions. While
Einstein managed to equate energy with matter, the matter portion of his
equations gained considerable weight from the c-squared portion. That
should have shown up by now in the case of the electron.

In regards to the matter at hand (no pun intended), it can not be denied
that the accelerated electron carries a field. As even relativistically
accelerated electrons have, of yet, not been shown to have an increased
gravitational or spatial mass, I assume, probably incorrectly, that the
apparent increase in mass is due to an increase in their energy. At least
a portion of that increase should be in their electro-magnetic effects, and
thus their field strength and their effect on nearby charges. Consider
quantum explanations of the Bremstralung radiation, which is dependent on
the acceleration of the electron yet relies on the action at a distance of
a field effect.

On the level of flux densities involved in electron microscopes, I also
assume that the field densities brought on the microscopic level by
accelerated and focussed electron beams can easily approximate those on a
macro level by an electrostatically charged body brought within millimeters
of a surface. The matter of scale in a focussed electron beam can not be
underestimated.

While Einstein was clearly successful in uniting our concepts of energy and
mass, he also left clear distinctions. If one assumes that there is a
gravitational mass associated with the electron, then one would have to
assume an infinite gravitational field gradient if the electron is truly
dimensionless. Such a gradient would essentially extend beyond the
Swartzchild radius and make the electron a small 'black hole' - essentially
undefinable in our current understanding. I honestly have not done the
math myself, but I think that the difference in energy attributable to the
electron's charge and its mass is sufficient that modern experiments should
have been able to detect them.

That mass effect should become apparent when the particle is brought near
the speed of light, as the gravitational mass would then be greatly
amplified. But no such effect has been measured, as far as I know.

Frankly, I think we have a long way to go to explain the electron. In the
mean time, I reserve the right to define my own understanding of it,
although I may regret making those views public.

On Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:11 AM, Mike Bode
[SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com] wrote:
} { { File: ATT00005.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }

Allen,

I am not sure I am following you. You say

"The best high energy experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to
the
electron."

To my knowledge and from a list of "fundamental constants" in my "Solid
State Physics" book by Ashcroft and Mermin, the rest mass of an electron is
9.1095 x 10^(-31) kg. Just multiply that wit 1/2 v*v and you have the
kinetic Energy of the electron. Of course you have to take into account
relativistic effects. Or just multiply it with v and you have the momentum.

I think, you mistake the mass of the electron with that of the neutrino,
which indeed they have not been able to determine, although there are
indications from recent high energy physics measurements. But that's
irrelevant here.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2001 4:21 AM
To: 'Mike Bode'; 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Hi

Am I permitted to say that we at Protrain do a range of training CD for
SEM, TEM and EDX? Ready in a week or two will be a CD on Monitoring &
Maintaining an Electron Microscope that will tidy up a number of the MSA
mailings on SEM and TEM performance as well as instrument calibration.

As an ex service engineer, and now with our training courses, I find the
magnification "problems" mentioned by your mailings to be absolutely
NORMAL. If you have checked as many instruments as I have you will have
seen all the "errors" mentioned.

Surely the important point in the discussions is not where the
magnification is, high or low, but how consistant it is? For example if you
have an old instrument that was calibrated by the manufacturer just the
differences in glass plate to film thickness must make a difference but
does it matter once you know? Specimen position, therefore objective lens
current, is always very critical as is the high voltage level. If you
monitor high voltage over a period of several hours you will detect a
change so during the working day I know that instruments do change in
relation to their calibration.

Try this experiment? When you switch on the high voltage in the morning
insert a test specimen (holey carbon film) find true focus (no fringe) and
immediately take a test picture at say 50,000kX. Leave the microscope on
and take further pictures every hour BUT most important count the focus
clicks (their value will be found in your instruction book), that is the
correction that you make from one test picture to the next. After a few
hours one would expect the high voltage to be stable and very little focus
change to take place.

Now insert a grating replica and take a picture at the exact same focus you
had for your last test picture. Now turn the focus back to the position
that you had for your first test picture and adjust the eucentric Z to
bring the sample back in focus. Measure the two pictures and see how your
microscope performs. Plus or minus 5% is very good, but what answers will
you get?

If you have a gas filled high voltage tank the system will settle far
quicker than an oil filled tank. You are waiting for heat gained by the
tank to equal the heat lost; then the system will become stable!

Have fun

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For consultancy and training by professionals World Wide
Tel +44 1280 814774 Fax +44 1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


From daemon Mon Jan 29 09:00:50 2001



From: Brian Wajdyk :      Brian.Wajdyk-at-onsemi.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 08:03:23 -0700
Subject: SEM and LM image capture on PC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow Microscopists,

I would like suggestions for any frame grabber cards, for image capture,
for both light microscope (S-video) and SEM (NTSC) applications. All of
our microscopes are connected to PC based Windows NT systems. We have
tried several cards with varying success. I am hoping that some of you
have found cards that you are happy with. Any suggestions would be
appreciated.

Regards,

Brian Wajdyk
Senior Electron Microscopist
On Semiconductor
Product Analysis Laboratory
Brian.Wajdyk-at-onsemi.com


From daemon Mon Jan 29 09:15:27 2001



From: Jennifer Palmer :      jpalmer-at-cvmbs.colostate.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 08:11:29 -0700 (Mountain Standard Time)
Subject: Re: embedding (human) spermatozoa for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:40:42 +0100 "Stefan.Geimer"
{stefan.geimer-at-uni-koeln.de} wrote:

} I´am looking for a reference giving a protocol how to embedd (human)
} spermatozoa for TEM. What I need also to know is if and how I have to
} isolate the spermatozoa out of the ejaculate. It would be advantageous
} for me to have a relatively dense pellet of spermatozoa and I have no
} idea how much percent of the ejaculate are spermatozoa and how much is
} `junk`.
}
} Tanks
}
} Stefan
}
}
} ****************************
} Dr. Stefan Geimer
} University of Cologne
} Botanical Institute
} Gyrhofstr. 15
} D-50931 Cologne
} Germany
}
} phone:
} office: +49-(0)221-470-7022
} lab: +49-(0)221-470-3795
}
} fax: +49-(0)221-470-5181
} ****************************
} Hope this helps.
Our lab routinely embeds rabbit and horse spermatozoa. You really
will need to centrifuge the ejaculate into a reasonably dense pellet.
I wouldn't worry about excess "junk".
We fix the ejaculate in 4% glutaraldehyde, 5% sucrose in 1M
cacodylate for 24hr. Wash with buffer.
Osmicate in 1% OsO4 for 1.5hr. Wash in buffer, centrifuge then
embed in 2% low melting point agarose(Sigma A5030), 2% sucrose in
buffer. This does very well in 1cc syringes that have been cut off at
both ends and the plunger cut even with the bottom so that you can
fill them to about 0.5cc and they will fit in a centrifuge tube. You
can warm and mix the sperm and agarose in the syringe, keep warm and
centrifuge, then push out a perfect pellet. We then use a standard
dehydration and epon protocol for TEM.
Sorry I don't have published reference for this. I have it as a
hand-me down protocol.
Jennifer
}
}

====================================
Jennifer Palmer
ARBL
Colorado State Univ
Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1683 , USA
voice:(970)491-1770
fax:(970)491-3557

jpalmer-at-cvmbs.colostate.edu
====================================



From daemon Mon Jan 29 10:11:08 2001



From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 10:57:45 -0500
Subject: Cartoon Depictions of EM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To All,
I am hoping someone can help me locate, i.e. send me a copy of, a Gary
Larson Far Side cartoon which I saw several years ago. I would like to
include this cartoon in an upcoming presentation I will be giving at a local
university.

The cartoon showed a janitor who had entered an electron microscope lab,
propped his mop up against the wall and was shown peering into the
microscope to glimpse a view of an apple he had placed in the 'viewing'
area. I hope this description sounds familiar to someone. Can anyone help?
Although it is not my intention, this note may well start an exchange of all
cartoons illustrating the amusing side of work in the microscopy lab or any
lab for that matter.

So, can one of you Larson fans help me out? Thanks.

Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com



From daemon Mon Jan 29 10:34:19 2001



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 09:43:55 -0600
Subject: Re: SEM and LM image capture on PC

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In what way were you not satisfied with the boards you have already tried?

Resolution - NTSC is only good for about 640 pixels across. That is too low
for my use. I prefer 1024. Many prefer even higher numbers. The NTSC signal
just doesn't have it there to be captured.

Noise - I would think most NTSC signals would be noisy and that would show
up in a single frame capture. You should be able to do some frame averaging
or integration to improve that. That depends on the system.

Usability - This will be a function of software. Because of the resolution
issue, I don't even have such a system anymore. Well maybe I do, sort of.
We still have a couple of units from Dazzle that we use very infrequently.
When we do use them, it is for the purpose of recording a video.

At 08:03 AM 1/29/2001 -0700, you wrote:

} Fellow Microscopists,
}
} I would like suggestions for any frame grabber cards, for image capture,
} for both light microscope (S-video) and SEM (NTSC) applications. All of
} our microscopes are connected to PC based Windows NT systems. We have
} tried several cards with varying success. I am hoping that some of you
} have found cards that you are happy with. Any suggestions would be
} appreciated.

----------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From daemon Mon Jan 29 13:37:32 2001



From: Katja M. Wolski :      kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 14:21:02 -0500
Subject: Re: embedding (human) spermatozoa for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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{!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"}
{html}
{font size=-1} Here are some references you might find useful for isolate
and embed spermatazoa. {/font}
{p}
{hr WIDTH="100%"}
{br}  
{p} Aleman V. Trejo R. Morales E. Hernandez-Jauregui P. Delhumeau-Ongay
G.  A simple and rapid technique to
{br} isolate enriched populations of spermatocytes and spermatids from the
immature rat testis.  {b} {i} Journal of Reproduction & Fertility {/i} . {/b}

{i} 54(1):67-75, 1978 Sep. {/i}
{p} Baccetti B. Burrini AG.  An improved method for the scanning electron
microscopy of spermatozoa.  {b} {i} Journal of {/i} {/b}
{br} {b} {i} Microscopy {/i} . {/b}   {i} 99(1):101-7, 1973 Sep. {/i}
{p} Basrur PK. Ackerley CA. Reyes ER. Doig PA.  Surface morphology
of the spermatozoa in infertile Welsh ponies.  {b} {i} Scanning Electron
Microscopy {/i} . {/b}   {i} (3):511-6, 1979. {/i}
{br}  
{p}
{hr WIDTH="100%"}
{br}  
{br}  
{p} {font size=-1} -- {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Katja M. Wolski {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Ph.D. Student {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} University of South Florida College of Medicine {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Department of Anatomy {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Andrology Laboratory {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., MDC 6 {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Tampa, FL 33612-4799 {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Office:  813.974.6102 {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Lab:  813.974.9434 {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} Fax:  813.974.2058 {/font}
{br} {font size=-1} E-mail:  kwolski-at-hsc.usf.edu {/font} {/html}



From daemon Mon Jan 29 13:44:51 2001



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-UNM.EDU
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 12:39:25 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Image Pro wrap-up

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If anyone is interested, the general response to my question about Image
Pro software(s) was that the package is nice, easy to learn and use (big
plus!), and reasonably priced. There is a demo version available from
Media Cybernetics (http://www.mediacy.com/). The "Express" package is
pretty basic, but can collect images, do some "rudimentary"
processing/measuring, and store. "Plus" is more advanced in its analysis
capabilities, and "Pro" is the suped-up version.

I also heard that the Russ plug-in for Adobe Photoshop is similar to Image
Pro; I've heard wonderful things about it, but haven't had a chance to
play with it, yet. And I don't know how close it is to the Media Cyb.
stuff.

Thanks again to everyone who responded!

Tamara


|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|





From daemon Mon Jan 29 14:31:28 2001



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 15:41:41 EST
Subject: Re: Image Pro wrap-up

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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With all due respect (long pause): Isn't this thread getting a bit old?

The person who asked this question has long since had her question answered.

Doesn't this remind one of two dogs and only one tree?

Thank You,

Earl


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Allen R. Sampson" {ars-at-sem.com}
To: "'Mike Bode'" {mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com} ; "'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'"
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 1:55 AM


I've just faxed it to you. I enlarged it first so shrinking it should make
the fax look better. If it doesn't look OK, I can either scan and e-mail or
snail mail it to you.

Ron L
----- Original Message -----
} From: Gerroir, Paul J {Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com}
To: Microscopy-at-MSA. Microscopy. com (E-mail)
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 29, 2001 10:57 AM



In a message dated 1/29/01 3:55:20 PM, thoward-at-UNM.EDU writes:

} I also heard that the Russ plug-in for Adobe Photoshop is similar to Image
} Pro; I've heard wonderful things about it, but haven't had a chance to
} play with it, yet. And I don't know how close it is to the Media Cyb.
} stuff.

I wouldn't say they are "similar" and in fact many people use the tool kit or
fovea pro plug-ins with Image Pro Plus (in which they work just as well as in
Photoshop). The plug-ins implement a very wide range of algorithms for
processing and measurement, which no single commercial program provides.
IPPlus is quite strong in image measurement and some areas of image
processing, but has areas such as FFT processing and morphological processing
of binary images in which it is less complete. The tool kit fills in those
gaps nicely. On the other hand, the plug-ins when used with Photoshop provide
only a very limited amount of automation. You can create actions that provide
efficient batch processing of images, but you cannot automate stage control,
acquisition, and report creation as you can with an IP+ Macro. I don't see
them as competitive products, and I don't think Media Cybernetics does
either. They address different needs and in some respects are complementary.
To go beyond what I've tried to say here probably verges into the area of
commercialism that would be inappropriate for this forum, but I did think it
important to put my 2 cents worth in since the specific question was raised.

John C. Russ



From daemon Mon Jan 29 15:15:40 2001



From: Susanne Stemmer :      stemmer-at-rice.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 15:10:39 -0600
Subject: Postdoctoral Position in TEM (resent 1/29/01)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Postdoctoral Position in Transmission Electron Microscopy - Rice University

Rice University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science,
located in Houston, TX, is seeking candidates for a postdoctoral position in
transmission electron microscopy of multicomponent oxide thin films.
Applicants should have extensive and demonstrated experience in several areas
of TEM and a strong background and interest in materials problem solving.
Preference will be given to candidates with experience in high-resolution
imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as conventional
diffraction contrast imaging.
Facilities at Rice include a JEOL 2010, field-emission SEM and high-resolution
X-ray diffractometers, as well as sample preparation. The
project will be carried out in close collaboration with the University of
Houston using a state-of-the-art field-emission TEM (JEOL 2010F), with annular
dark-field detector, EDS and EELS capabilities. The position is available
immediately. Duration about 1-2 years, salary is commensurate with
qualifications. Candidates with a Ph.D. in Materials Science or Physics will
be given preferred consideration.
Interested candidates should send a curriculum vitae, publication list and the
names and email addresses of at least three references to:

Prof. Susanne Stemmer
Rice University
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
MS 321
6100 Main Street
Houston, TX 77005-1892
stemmer-at-rice.edu

Applicants must have proof of legal authorization to work in the United
States.
Rice University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.


From daemon Mon Jan 29 17:45:48 2001



From: beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu (Beth Richardson)
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 17:26:28 -0500
Subject: thanks - stomata replies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,
I just want to thank all the people who wrote to me about SEM of stomata. I
regret that I do not have the time to reply individually.
I appreciate all the advice and references. I will try both chemical and
cryo SEM (just as soon as our central facility gets a cold stage).
This is such a great list!
thanks again,
Beth

**************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone - (706) 542-1790
FAX - (706) 542-1805
Email - beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**************************************




From daemon Mon Jan 29 17:47:51 2001



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 15:11:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Batson's No 17 Plastic Replica and Corrosion Kit

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Hello,
I have someone wanting to do some corrosion casts from parts of a rat. I
was wondering if anyone has any experience with Batson's No 17 Plastic
Replica and Corrosion Kit. I believe it is a methyl methacrylate monomer.

We had trouble in the past in working with resins in the SEM. They tended
to melt under the beam, even after sufficient coating. So I was hoping,
to get any comments about this or other resins.
Gordon.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793



From daemon Mon Jan 29 20:25:51 2001



From: Eric :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 18:19:16 -0800
Subject: Question about NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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To my Fellow Microscopists,

First of all thanks for all the info on cleaning the LKB Knife boats
we are using here and I will try and get them to switch to dental
wax.

Secondly, I need to know where I can find NIH Image if it is still
available and is it availabe for the PC now??

Thanks

Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Electron Microscopy Lab


{ { {This message is made of 100% recycled electrons} } }
|"|
-`^'- {_*_} ` _ , ' _|_|_
(o o) (o o) - (o)o) - (o o)
ooO--(_)--Ooo--8--(_)--Ooo-ooO'(_)--Ooo-ooO--(_)--Ooo
**Everyone has a photographic memory. Some just don't have film!
Eric {Los Angeles, California}
Go Check out my new and alomst finished webpage at:
http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Rapids/4855/
_ /| \\\|///
\'o.O' ( o o )
==========oOO==(_._)==OOo==============oOO==(_)==OOo========



From daemon Mon Jan 29 20:37:19 2001



From: Frederick Schamber :      fhscham-at-stargate.net
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2001 21:44:31 -0500
Subject: Re: Question

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Allen:

Since you are admittedly creating your own interpretation of realitiy in these
postings, it is a bit hard to understand when you depart from accepted physics
whether you are doing that by intent or otherwise, but a few comments do seem
to be in order:

(1) First of all, there is absolutely no need to drag either quantum mechanics
or relativity into the discussion. The discussion of an electron microscope
can be accomplished very nicely by assuming that an electron is a classical
particle -- the only exception is when we deal with diffraction of the electron
by a small aperture or other feature. We also do not generally need to invoke
quantum mechanics to discuss the interaction of free electrons with matter
through electromagnetic fields -- this is due to the fact that the
electromagnetic forces are very long range and it matters not a bit whether the
electron is a point or an extended distribution. Unless you are operating a
VERY high energy electron microscope, relativistic effects are also
inconsequential. In short, a late nineteenth century physicist would not have
had any trouble understanding how an electron microscope operates (except for
the aforementioned matter of diffraction) nor would he have had any problem
with understanding how the field of the incident electron interacted with
conduction electrons in the specimen (ionization would be a different story due
to the atomic shells involved). So it seems to me that you are struggling to
create a great deal of complexity where none needs to exist.

(2) Your remarks about the ambiguity of the mass of the electron are
"remarkable". Does an electron have mass? Of course! The rest mass of an
electron is well-known (9.1x10^-31kg) and confirmed in many experiments. One
of the most direct ways of observing it is via the positron "annihilation"
gamma rays emitted in many nuclear decay schemes. The mechanism is as
follows: a positron (anti-matter version of the electron with a positive
charge) is emitted in the nuclear decay. The positron quickly encounters a
normal electron and they annihilate in a flash of pure energy, giving off a
pair of oppositely directed gamma rays (as required by the conservation of
momentum), each gamma ray carrying 511,000 eV energy, which, using E=mc^2, is
just the rest mass of the electron! But you don't have to get this exotic to
know that electrons have mass -- there are countless devices (such as scanning
electron microscopes and TV picture tubes) which routinely manipulate their
trajectories -- and they obey F=ma with the aforesaid mass. Since the behavior
of electrons in the classical, quantum mechanical, and relativistic domains are
all beautifully predicted by their representation as having mass (and I
personally know of no experiment or theory to the contrary), why on earth would
one want to invent an alternate theory?

Fred Schamber


"Allen R. Sampson" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Sorry for not getting around to this before now.
}
} First, I am neither an expert in physics or mathematics. Unfortunately, I
} shot from the hip and included my own personal terminology. My
} understanding of the world is based in what I would call 'intuitive
} modeling'. In terms of modern physics, the electron does have a definable
} mass. However, with my aversion to the mathematics of quantum physics, I
} struggle to find a more intuitive understanding. The fitting of
} statistical descriptions to empirical data holds far less interest to me
} than the discovery of theoretical considerations that explain empirical
} data.
}
} In doing so, I consider the electron as having no gravitational mass, but
} rather a mass defined at this point based solely on its energy. This I
} base on the simple minded concept of classical physics of particles as
} 'billiard balls'. In that concept, two features are required for 'mass'-
} spatial dimension and gravitational effects. At this point in time, I am
} unaware of any experiments that can demonstrate that either property can be
} attributed to the electron.
}
} Instead, I consider the electron as a dimensionless bundle of energy that
} affects matter solely through contactless energy interactions. While
} Einstein managed to equate energy with matter, the matter portion of his
} equations gained considerable weight from the c-squared portion. That
} should have shown up by now in the case of the electron.
}
} In regards to the matter at hand (no pun intended), it can not be denied
} that the accelerated electron carries a field. As even relativistically
} accelerated electrons have, of yet, not been shown to have an increased
} gravitational or spatial mass, I assume, probably incorrectly, that the
} apparent increase in mass is due to an increase in their energy. At least
} a portion of that increase should be in their electro-magnetic effects, and
} thus their field strength and their effect on nearby charges. Consider
} quantum explanations of the Bremstralung radiation, which is dependent on
} the acceleration of the electron yet relies on the action at a distance of
} a field effect.
}
} On the level of flux densities involved in electron microscopes, I also
} assume that the field densities brought on the microscopic level by
} accelerated and focussed electron beams can easily approximate those on a
} macro level by an electrostatically charged body brought within millimeters
} of a surface. The matter of scale in a focussed electron beam can not be
} underestimated.
}
} While Einstein was clearly successful in uniting our concepts of energy and
} mass, he also left clear distinctions. If one assumes that there is a
} gravitational mass associated with the electron, then one would have to
} assume an infinite gravitational field gradient if the electron is truly
} dimensionless. Such a gradient would essentially extend beyond the
} Swartzchild radius and make the electron a small 'black hole' - essentially
} undefinable in our current understanding. I honestly have not done the
} math myself, but I think that the difference in energy attributable to the
} electron's charge and its mass is sufficient that modern experiments should
} have been able to detect them.
}
} That mass effect should become apparent when the particle is brought near
} the speed of light, as the gravitational mass would then be greatly
} amplified. But no such effect has been measured, as far as I know.
}
} Frankly, I think we have a long way to go to explain the electron. In the
} mean time, I reserve the right to define my own understanding of it,
} although I may regret making those views public.
}
} On Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:11 AM, Mike Bode
} [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com] wrote:
} } { { File: ATT00005.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }
}
} Allen,
}
} I am not sure I am following you. You say
}
} "The best high energy experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to
} the
} electron."
}
} To my knowledge and from a list of "fundamental constants" in my "Solid
} State Physics" book by Ashcroft and Mermin, the rest mass of an electron is
} 9.1095 x 10^(-31) kg. Just multiply that wit 1/2 v*v and you have the
} kinetic Energy of the electron. Of course you have to take into account
} relativistic effects. Or just multiply it with v and you have the momentum.
}
} I think, you mistake the mass of the electron with that of the neutrino,
} which indeed they have not been able to determine, although there are
} indications from recent high energy physics measurements. But that's
} irrelevant here.
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
} Sent: Monday, January 22, 2001 4:21 AM
} To: 'Mike Bode'; 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'
} Subject: RE: Question
}
} Yes, please forgive me. My spelling is not very accurate when I am
} responding so early in the morning. Your correction on Wehnelt is correct.
} Please forgive any such errors in this response, as it is similar in
} timing.
}
} The electric field of interest is not between any parts of the column, but
} rather between the electrons and the sample. I really don't want to try to
} attempt any quantum exercises here, but the energy impressed on the
} electrons results in their increased EM field effects. The acceleration of
} the electrons controlled by the electron gun configuration controls the
} energy afforded the electrons. What happens after the anode does not
} affect the energy of the electrons in the beam.
}
} The electrons are the field. The acceleration given to them by the gun
} determine their acceleration, and thus their field and relativistic
} effects. Their energy is determined by the fields in the gun structure
} alone. Once they are given that energy, their travel through the column is
} determined by the momentum they have been given. The fields they generate
} as they travel through the sample surface are the direct result of the
} energy they were provided with in the electron gun.
}
} Here's a simple challenge - define the 'kinetic' energy of a fast moving
} electron. As the kinetic energy is generally defined as the mass vs. the
} velocity of that mass, you may have a problem. The best high energy
} experiments have been unable to assign a 'mass' to the electron.
} Apparently, the only mass associated with the electron is the Einsteinium
} energy-mass equivalent of its charge. If there is any increase in an
} electron's mass/energy by acceleration in an applied electric field, it is
} to the electrons energy. Check with SLAC's experiments.
}
} A fine point, but one with merit. It doesn't matter whether the distance
} from anode to sample is 10 cm or 1000 cm, if the electron can travel the
} distance without interference and external force. Thus the electro-magn
} etic interaction of the electron with the sample is simply dependant on the
} force originally impressed on the electron by the gun.
}
} The field present at the sample surface will thus be determined by the
} acceleration given the electrons by the gun and their current density. The
} higher the beam current, the greater the field flux. The smaller the area
} of the electron impingement on the surface, the higher the field flux. As
} we work towards smaller circuit dimensions, these electron interactions
} produce higher field flux densities as the circuit dimensions come closer
} to the electron beam diameters.
}
} You seem to want to separate the mass related kinetic effects from the
} energy of the particle, but that can not be done. As the electron is
} accelerated, its energy is apparently increased, rather than its mass. The
} result is that the classical and relativistic effects normally related to
} mass are instead seen in an increase in the energy, and thus, the field
} effects of the electron with the sample.
}
} On Friday, January 19, 2001 10:43 AM, Mike Bode [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
} wrote:
} } { { File: ATT00000.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }
}
} Thanks, Allen, for pointing out some of the issues here. By the way, It's
} "Wehnelt", not "Wienault".
}
} You are probably right about the ESD vs. EDS name. However, it was clear to
} me what the original question was about.
}
} Someone pointed out, that the cause of ESD (!) failure in electronic
} devices
} is, that the fields increase to beyond the breakdown strength of the
} devices, which causes a high and sudden current to flow through the parts
} where the fields are highest, which in turn heats and destroys the sample.
} I
} think, that is right. It's the fields that reach critical strength, which
} then causes the current flow and destruction of the device. That's what I
} meant when I said you get "zapped".
}
} Now, about the electron microscope. Obviously I don't want to pronounce,
} that electron microscopy is impossible. That would be stupid, wouldn't it?
} However, as you said yourself, the sample is at ground potential, or very
} near it, and so is the anode. In other words, there is not electric
} potential (or very little) between the anode and the sample and thus no
} electric field. Since the sample is grounded, as is the rest of the
} microscope, there is no electric field between those, either. The energy of
} an electron in an electric field is proportional to the electric field
} (actually proportional to the square of the field, if my memory serves me).
} No field - no electric energy. Of course that does not mean that the
} electrons don't have energy. They have quite a lot of energy, on the order
} of 20keV, by "falling" through the electric field between cathode and anode
} and not being stopped by the anode. Since the sample is grounded (or should
} be), the electric effects of the electron beam on the grounded sample will
} be cancelled. What you have to contend with is the kinetic energy (20
} keV/electron), which is transferred to the sample.
}
} Now, I have always talked about grounded samples. That does not mean that
} electric fields cannot be generated by the electron beam within the sample.
} Obviously, you put electrons in the sample and they have to move out of the
} sample. If there is any kind of resistance (an oxide layer, etc.), that
} will
} result in charging and an electric potential.
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Allen R. Sampson [mailto:ars-at-sem.com]
} Sent: Friday, January 19, 2001 2:44 AM
} To: 'Mike Bode'
} Subject: RE: Question
}
} Ok, apparently a simple physics lesson needed here.
}
} First of all we are talking about ESD, or Electro-Static Discharge effects
} here. Not EDS, or what in this field is known as Electron Dispersive
} Spectroscopy.
}
} Secondly, the electrons arriving at the sample surface in an SEM are
} getting there with an acceleration that is roughly equivalent to the the
} acceleration voltage impressed at the cathode. The sample is at, or very
} near, ground potential. But the electrons in the beam are reaching the
} sample at close to the accelerating voltage impressed. The grid or
} "Wienault" of the electron gun is at a potential roughly +500V from the
} accelerating voltage and is used to induce the electrons from the cathode
} through the aperture in the anode, preventing the 'space charge' effects
} around the cathode and providing the first electrostatic lens in the gun.
}
} The potential of the anode of an electron microscope may be at ground
} potential, but the electron beam is passing through the opening in the
} anode. The anode is used as the second electrostatic lens, and has little
} effect on the energy of the electrons passing through it. By its charge
} opposite that of the electron beam, it encourages the first crossover of
} the beam, but since the beam does not directly interact with it, there is
} no direct energy exchange.
}
} Precisely what kinetic energy can be transferred to the sample if there is
} no energy differential between the electron potential at the anode and the
} sample? Given your understanding of the processes involved, there can be
} no discernable energy changes in the sample since the electrons have no
} energy, and thus, there can be no discernable energy release from the
} sample. In other words, in your view, electron microscopy is impossible.
}
} On Thursday, January 18, 2001 2:24 PM, Mike Bode [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com]
} wrote:
} }
} } Yes, EDS is very real and chip manufacturers go to great length (end
} } expense) to avoid them. However, I think the mechanism is different:
} }
} } EDS means, that something collects static electricity (by walking on a
} } carpet, for example), then touches something that is at a very different
} } potential. That's what happens if you touch a metal after walking on that
} } carpet. The enormous potential difference create strong electric field
} that
} } finally ionize the air and you get "zapped". The strong fields can
} destroy
} } the electronics.
} }
} } In an SEM the sample is usually grounded and does not see strong fields.
} } True, the electrons are accelerated to 30 KV or more, but the sample does
} } not see that, as the anode usually sits at ground level with the Cathode
} } being at - 30 kV. What you need to be concerned about here is the kinetic
} } energy that is transferred to the sample and can heat it up considerable.
} On
} } the other hand, if the sample is not grounded, there will be fields
} } developing. There are also other effects, such as residual organics
} getting
} } "cracked" and forming a residue on the sample, but that's a different
} story.
} }
} } Michael
} }
} } Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} } Soft Imaging System Corp.
} } 1675 Carr St., #105N
} } Lakewood, CO 80215
} } ===================================
} } phone: (888) FIND SIS
} } (303) 234-9270
} } fax: (303) 234-9271
} } email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
} } web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} } ===================================
}
} On Wednesday, January 24, 2001 9:11 AM, Mike Bode
} [SMTP:mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com] wrote:
} } { { File: ATT00005.txt; charset = windows-1252 } }
}
} Allen R. Sampson, Owner
} Advanced Research Systems
} 317 North 4th. Street
} St. Charles, Illinois 60174
} voice 630.513.7093 fax 630.513.7092



From daemon Tue Jan 30 05:44:23 2001



From: David Vowles :      djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 11:36:44 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: Question about NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric,

You can find the NIH Image home page on:
http://rsb.info.nih.gov/nih-image/
The PC version is available from Scion Corporation on:
http://www.scioncorp.com

Cheers,

David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 1223 334325
Fax: +44 1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk

On Mon, 29 Jan 2001, Eric wrote:

} Secondly, I need to know where I can find NIH Image if it is still
} available and is it availabe for the PC now??



From daemon Tue Jan 30 07:06:00 2001



From: MSimko-at-uss.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 07:32:35 -0500
Subject: dusty Polaroid DMC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Our laboratory owns a Polaroid DMC digital camera for acquiring digital
images from a Nikon Optiphot upright optical microscope. We have the need
to determine the cleanliness of polished steel samples and capture clean,
accurate digital images. This is a very demanding application and the
presence of any dust creates unacceptable spots on the final images.

The optics in the microscope and camera mounts have been checked multiple
times and are spotless. When critical images are needed, Polaroid film is
used which works wonderfully. Obviously we would prefer to capture the
images electronically. On visual inspection, the camera chip itself
appears to have dust on the surface. We have been told that we should not
attempt to service the unit ourselves and for about five hundred dollars we
could have factory service. However, we are also told that with the
mechanical shutter action, the problem will recur in short order.
Unfortunately, we cannot tolerate the loss of productivity taken by sending
the camera in for this kind of service at frequent intervals.

Does anyone have a similar problem with this camera? Can anyone suggest a
possible solution to this dilemma? I speculate that electrostatic forces
may be keeping the dust in place. Bursts of canned air will not remove the
dust but I would be willing to try something else. I am afraid that the
camera may not be adequate for these most delicate applications and we may
need to find another unit to meet our needs. Any assistance would be
greatly appreciated. Please contact me with any suggestions and I will
respond with the results. Thank you in advance for your help.

Michael Simko
Research Manager ? Metallography
U. S. Steel Research and Technology Center
msimko-at-uss.com




From daemon Tue Jan 30 07:20:22 2001



From: jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 08:21:40 -0500
Subject: NIH image source

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To my Fellow Microscopists,

First of all thanks for all the info on cleaning the LKB Knife boats
we are using here and I will try and get them to switch to dental
wax.
NIH Image is now Scion image and available for the PC.
You can find it here.
http://www.meyerinst.com/html/scion/scion_image_windows.htm



Secondly, I need to know where I can find NIH Image if it is still
available and is it availabe for the PC now??

Thanks

Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Electron Microscopy Lab
John P. Shields, PhD
Center for Ultrastructural Research
151 Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-4080
FAX 706-542-4271
jshields-at-cb.uga.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 30 08:50:55 2001



From: Zhaojie Zhang :      Zhaojie-Zhang-at-mail.omrf.ouhsc.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 08:43:10 -0600
Subject: Question about NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric:

NIH Image is still available and you can download the program at
http://www.scioncorp.com/

Zhaojie Zhang
Cell and Molecular Biology
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
OKC, OK 73104



-----Original Message-----
} From: Eric
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'
Sent: 1/29/01 8:19 PM


To my Fellow Microscopists,

First of all thanks for all the info on cleaning the LKB Knife boats
we are using here and I will try and get them to switch to dental
wax.

Secondly, I need to know where I can find NIH Image if it is still
available and is it availabe for the PC now??

Thanks

Eric A. Rosen
UCLA Medical Center
Electron Microscopy Lab


{ { {This message is made of 100% recycled electrons} } }
|"|
-`^'- {_*_} ` _ , ' _|_|_
(o o) (o o) - (o)o) - (o o)
ooO--(_)--Ooo--8--(_)--Ooo-ooO'(_)--Ooo-ooO--(_)--Ooo
**Everyone has a photographic memory. Some just don't have film!
Eric {Los Angeles, California}
Go Check out my new and alomst finished webpage at:
http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Rapids/4855/
_ /|
\\\|///
\'o.O'
( o o )
==========oOO==(_._)==OOo==============oOO==(_)==OOo========



From daemon Tue Jan 30 13:51:13 2001



From: Tom Januszewski :      tom.januszewski-at-email.swmed.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 09:26:03 -0600
Subject: Polaroid 55 film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

Although we have a digital camera
for our SEM, some people still
prefer Polaroids over digital
images. We've been using Polaroid
55 pos/neg film. We routinely wash
the negatives in running water for
at least 30 minutes to remove
residual traces of chemicals.
According to the literature
supplied with the film, the
negatives should cleared with 18%
sodium sulfite as soon as possible
after exposure, then briefly rinsed
in water. I assume that this is to
stop development and clear the
negative. My question is: Is sodium
sulfite a necessary step or can we
continue to clear with a long rinse
of running water? Note: we've never
seen any adverse effects from
washing in water alone.

Thanks in advance for your responses.

Tom Januszewski
Senior Electron Microscopist
Molecular and Cellular Imaging Facility
UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
Dallas, TX 75390-9039
214-648-7291
Email: tom.januszewski-at-UTSouthwestern.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 30 13:51:17 2001



From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 14:28:59 -0500
Subject: Thanks for all the Cartoon Submissions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all who responded so generously with their emails, faxes and phone calls
- Thanks!

Cheers!
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com



From daemon Tue Jan 30 13:51:17 2001



From: Ladd Research :      sales-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 10:38:20 -0500
Subject: Re: Batson's No 17 Plastic Replica and Corrosion Kit

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gordon,

Since we do Mercox it would be unfair for Ladd to report our comparison of
Mercox with other corrosion casting materials.
But having said that, the work of our internal personnel and outside
researchers leads us to believe the problems incurred with other corrosion
casting materials in use have not been experienced with Mercox.
You may find the following links of interest,

http://laddresearch.com/Key_Products/Mercox/HosslerPaper/hosslerpaper.html

and

http://laddresearch.com/Key_Products/Mercox/mercox.html

Hope this was of use,

John Arnott
--

LADD RESEARCH
131 Dorset Lane
Williston, VT 05495 USA

web site http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-878-6711 (anywhere)
FAX 1-802-878-8074
e-mail sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955



Gordon Vrololjak wrote:
}

} Hello,
} I have someone wanting to do some corrosion casts from parts of a rat. I
} was wondering if anyone has any experience with Batson's No 17 Plastic
} Replica and Corrosion Kit. I believe it is a methyl methacrylate monomer.
}
} We had trouble in the past in working with resins in the SEM. They tended
} to melt under the beam, even after sufficient coating. So I was hoping,
} to get any comments about this or other resins.
} Gordon.
}
} \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
} Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
} ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
} gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
} phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
} fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793


From daemon Tue Jan 30 15:46:59 2001



From: Pradyumna Prabhumirashi :      p-prabhumirashi-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 15:08:43 -0600
Subject: ZnO on Si (111)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I need to prepare a plan-view sample of a ZnO thin film (~200 nm) on Si
(111). I would like to etch away the Si and float the thin film on a grid.
Can someone please suggest me a way of doing this? I can etch the Si away by
HF/HNO3 but am afraid that in doing so, it would affect my ZnO too!. Please
advice.

Many thanks
Prad

Pradyumna Prabhumirashi
Department of Materials Science
Northwestern University
Phone: (847)-491-7798
Fax: (847)-491-7820
http://vpd.ms.northwestern.edu/prad.htm



From daemon Tue Jan 30 15:57:05 2001



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 13:53:02 -0800
Subject: Removable epoxy resist?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Could you brainiacs please put on your thinking caps and see what you can
come up with for this problem?

A guy came to the lab asking if I knew of anything he could use as an
'epoxy resist'.

Now, here's the rest of the story:

He is making CCD's for telescopes. He wants to glue a piece of material to
the face of the CCD using a very low viscosity epoxy. He puts the two
together dry with thin strips of tape down two sides as spacers, then by
capillary action fills the space between with epoxy and lets it cure.

Sometimes excess epoxy runs out at the ends and covers some of the bonding
pads on the CCD. He wanted to know if there is something he could put on
the bonding pads that would shield them from the epoxy, either repel it or
protect the pads and let the epoxy separate easily from the pads after it
has cured.

It struck me that this is similar to the kinds of problems some material
scientists might run into when preparing TEM samples via tripod polishing,
ie. how to hold a sample, but then release it later.

Some more details. The bonding pads are 100 x 300 um made of 1 um thick Al.
After the gluing part, 1 mil gold wires are ultrasonically bonded to the
pads. He says the pads are too small to paint anything on, thinks a spray
might work. Pads can't be touched or the bonding won't work right.

I thought of super glue and acetone, ala tripod polishing. He wants to
avoid acetone and things like petroleum distallates. He thinks ethanol
and/or water would be OK, not sure about other solvents. I thought of wax
and xylene, but he wasn't sure about that one either. He took some sucrose
to try as a separation layer, he will try anything.

I suggested more careful measuring of the epoxy used so it wouldn't
overflow, but there are some technical problems that limit the usefulness
of this technique. He might try some physical barriers to hold back the
overflow, but he would still like a way to protect the pads from the epoxy
in case these fail.

So, is there anything that can be put on these pads to protect them from
epoxy and be removed later to open them up for bonding? If anybody knows,
one of you will.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Tue Jan 30 16:36:50 2001



From: Angela Klaus :      avklaus-at-amnh.org
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 12:40:06 -0500
Subject: Museum Session at Scanning 2001

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues...

This note is to announce the session entitled "Museum Applications of SEM"
at Scanning 2001. Anyone involved in the application of scanning electron
microscopy and/or x-ray microanalysis in a museum setting (natural history,
art, geology, etc) is encouraged to submit an abstract.

Scanning 2001 will be held in New York City, May 5-7. Details for abstract
submission can be found at:

http://www.scanning.org/

Invited speakers are:

Frankie Jackson, Museum of the Rockies - "Dinosaur Eggshell Microstructure
Visualized by Scanning Electron Microscopy"

and

Mark Wypyski, Metropolitan Museum of Art - "SEM and X-ray Microanalysis
Applications for Art Materials"

All the best,

Angela

---------------------------------------------
Angela V. Klaus

Director, Core Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192 USA

Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
Voice: (212)769-5977
Fax: (212)496-3480
---------------------------------------------


From daemon Tue Jan 30 16:37:43 2001



From: Bob Bagnell :      rml-at-grayhawk.med.unc.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 17:33:41 -0400
Subject: black & white print processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For years we have used a Kodak Dektomatic print processor (not to
be confused with the stabalization technology Ektomatic processor) for both
our EM negatives and prints. Polymax chemistry is fine for both. Kodak no
longer makes the Dektomatic, but a suitable replacement might be the Colex
Colette Pro B&W processor. We are working with Colex to determine if this
processor can handle EM film material. These processors are for relatively
high volume work (we process about 1500 film images per month) and are more
expensive than the MorePro machine.

Bob

_____________________________________________________________
C. Robert Bagnell Jr., Ph.D., Res.Assoc.Prof.
Microscopy Services Laboratory
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
CB #7525 UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599
ph 919-966-2413 fx 919-966-6718
http://www.pathology.med.unc.edu/path/microscopy/welcome.htm




From daemon Tue Jan 30 16:47:50 2001



From: Peter Engelhardt :      Peter.Engelhardt-at-helsinki.fi
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 00:05:53 +0200
Subject: Cryo-TEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

I wonder if someone could tell me rough approximate costs of:

- He-Cryo 300 kV, and Cryo 400, 200, or 120kV TEM,
- with FEG and equipments for automatic collection of tilt series,
CCD cameras etc.

I thank you in advance

Cheers

Peter





--
___________________________________________________________
Peter Engelhardt, PhD, docent
Assistant Professor in Molecular Genetics
Unit of Electron Tomography
Department of Virology
Haartman Institute
P.O.Box 21 (Haartmaninkatu 3)
FIN-00014 University of Helsinki,
Finland

Email: Peter.Engelhardt-at-Helsinki.FI
URL: http://www.csc.fi/jpr/emt/engelhar/
Mobil phone: 040 811 9180

Dept. Virology, Tel: (+358-9)-19126487,19126507
EM-laboratory: (+358-9)-19126885 (direct)
Fax: (+358-9)-19126491 (Dept of Virology)

CSC (Center for Scientific Computing):
Tekniikantie 15a D, Otaniemi, Espoo
CSC-facilities, Tel: (+358-9)-4573229 (direct)

Home address:
Lindstedstvägen 1 B 7
FIN-02700 Grankulla,
Finland
Home Tel: (+358-9)-5091381



From daemon Tue Jan 30 17:28:49 2001



From: Yan Xin :      xin-at-magnet.fsu.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 18:29:11 -0500
Subject: cartoons for TEM illustration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I am looking for some cartoons to illustrate what is a TEM. I would like
to make a poster to show the general public what is TEM.

I would appreciate very much if anyone could send me or tell me where to
get these cartoons (like a sketch of a microscope), anything related to TEM
would do.

Regards

Yan Xin
=======================================
Yan Xin (Ph.D)
Magnet Science & Technology
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
Florida State University
1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310
Tel: (850) 644 1529
Fax: (850) 644 0867
========================================





From daemon Tue Jan 30 17:30:40 2001



From: Glenn Larkin :      gmlarkin-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 17:26:25 -0500
Subject: Boron Microanalysis (Biological Specimens)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,

I am working on the analysis of boron in lignocellulosic materials,
employing an electron microprobe and synthetic WDS crystal (OV-145H).
Does anyone know what the lowest reported detection limit for boron in
biological matrix is? Any helpful suggestions?

Thank you.

Regards,


Glenn


Glenn M. Larkin
Research Scientist
School of Forestry & Wood Products
Michigan Technological University
Houghton, MI 49931-1295
Ph: (906) 487-3316
Fax: (906) 487-2915
e-mail: gmlarkin-at-mtu.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 30 19:32:56 2001



From: colin.veitch-at-tft.csiro.au
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 10:38:46 +1000
Subject: NIH Image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric,

The PC version of Image is available from Scion Corp BUT there is platform
independent, Java version available from NIH at http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/
I have used both and personally, I prefer the Java version.

Cheers

Colin Veitch

Instrumentation Scientist
Late Stage Innovation Group
CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology
PO Box 21, BELMONT, Vic. 3216. Australia.

E-mail: colin.veitch-at-tft.csiro.au
Web: http://www.tft.csiro.au

Tel: +61 (0) 3 5246 4000
Fax: +61 (0) 3 5246 4811


The information contained in this e-mail message may be privileged or
confidential information. If you are not an intended recipient, you may not
copy, distribute or take any action in reliance on it. If you have received
this message in error, please telephone CSIRO Textile and Fibre Technology
on +61 3 5246 4000.



From daemon Tue Jan 30 21:46:48 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 20:57:22 -0600
Subject: Re: Removable epoxy resist?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Shellac and alcohol?

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00

} From: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}
} Could you brainiacs please put on your thinking caps and see what you
can
} come up with for this problem?
}
} A guy came to the lab asking if I knew of anything he could use as an
} 'epoxy resist'.
}
} Now, here's the rest of the story:
}
} He is making CCD's for telescopes. He wants to glue a piece of material
to
} the face of the CCD using a very low viscosity epoxy. He puts the two
} together dry with thin strips of tape down two sides as spacers, then by
} capillary action fills the space between with epoxy and lets it cure.
}
} Sometimes excess epoxy runs out at the ends and covers some of the
bonding
} pads on the CCD. He wanted to know if there is something he could put on
} the bonding pads that would shield them from the epoxy, either repel it
or
} protect the pads and let the epoxy separate easily from the pads after
it
} has cured.
}
} It struck me that this is similar to the kinds of problems some material
} scientists might run into when preparing TEM samples via tripod
polishing,
} ie. how to hold a sample, but then release it later.
}
} Some more details. The bonding pads are 100 x 300 um made of 1 um thick
Al.
} After the gluing part, 1 mil gold wires are ultrasonically bonded to the
} pads. He says the pads are too small to paint anything on, thinks a
spray
} might work. Pads can't be touched or the bonding won't work right.
}
} I thought of super glue and acetone, ala tripod polishing. He wants to
} avoid acetone and things like petroleum distallates. He thinks ethanol
} and/or water would be OK, not sure about other solvents. I thought of
wax
} and xylene, but he wasn't sure about that one either. He took some
sucrose
} to try as a separation layer, he will try anything.
}
} I suggested more careful measuring of the epoxy used so it wouldn't
} overflow, but there are some technical problems that limit the
usefulness
} of this technique. He might try some physical barriers to hold back the
} overflow, but he would still like a way to protect the pads from the
epoxy
} in case these fail.
}
} So, is there anything that can be put on these pads to protect them from
} epoxy and be removed later to open them up for bonding? If anybody
knows,
} one of you will.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}




From daemon Tue Jan 30 22:27:31 2001



From: mary mckee :      mckee-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2001 22:21:57 -0600
Subject: Reichert accesories

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, Listers,

I need a couple of things for a Reichert ultracut E and wondered if anyone
knows a supplier. I need a couple of chuck holders (locks chuck in place
for trimming the block). Also, I need a rubber 'belt' to operate the
specimen arm - one broke. Thanks in advance.

Mary Mckee
Renal Unit
MGH
Charlestown, MA

(617)726-3696 phone
(617)726-5669 fax




From daemon Wed Jan 31 00:30:12 2001



From: Tony Bruton :      Bruton-at-nu.ac.za
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 08:24:01 +0200
Subject: Re: Thanks for all the Cartoon Submissions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings Paul

I trust that all of these EM cartoons are going to find their way onto some public access site where we can all see them - and perhaps use them to liven up our lectures !

Tony


Tony Bruton
Head, Centre for Electron Microscopy
University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg
Tel +27 (0) 33 260 5155
Fax +27 (0) 33 260 5776
website via:http:www.nu.ac.za
Email:bruton-at-nu.unp.ac.za
postal address;
Private Bag X01,
Scottsville, 3209
KwaZulu-Natal
South Africa

} } } "Gerroir, Paul J" {Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com} 01/30/01 09:28PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


To all who responded so generously with their emails, faxes and phone calls
- Thanks!

Cheers!
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com





From daemon Wed Jan 31 02:52:19 2001



From: jesper.v.carstensen-at-risoe.dk
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 09:32:37 +0100
Subject: cartoons for TEM illustration

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Yan Xin,

Here are a few suggestions:

Sketch of the first two-step electron microscope with magnetic lenses
(1931), designed and realized by M. Knoll and E. Ruska:
http://www.scandem.lu.se/

Learn how transmission electron microscopes work:
http://www.unl.edu/CMRAcfem/temoptic.htm

Study common uses of the TEM: http://www.mri.psu.edu/mcl/tem.htm

Modes of transmission electron microscope operation:
http://em-outreach.sdsc.edu/web-course/Sec-I.F/Sec-I.F.html

I hope that you can use some of it.

Kind regards,
Jesper

_ _
(. .)
---------------------000--(_)--000----------
Jesper Vejlø Carstensen
Research Scientist, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
P.O.Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde
DENMARK
Phone: +45 4677 5776
Fax: +45 4677 5758
E-mail: jesper.v.carstensen-at-risoe.dk
Web: http://www.risoe.dk/afm
--------------------------------------------





-----Original Message-----
} From: Yan Xin [mailto:xin-at-magnet.fsu.edu]
Sent: 31. januar 2001 00:29
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello,

I am looking for some cartoons to illustrate what is a TEM. I would like
to make a poster to show the general public what is TEM.

I would appreciate very much if anyone could send me or tell me where to
get these cartoons (like a sketch of a microscope), anything related to TEM
would do.

Regards

Yan Xin
=======================================
Yan Xin (Ph.D)
Magnet Science & Technology
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
Florida State University
1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310
Tel: (850) 644 1529
Fax: (850) 644 0867
========================================





From daemon Wed Jan 31 07:04:53 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 04:58:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Polaroid 55 film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tom:
It has been awhile since I used the 55p/n film, but IF memory serves me
correctly, the sodium sulfite was used to both stop the development process
and to harden the emulsion. We used this for years (as did many
microscopists) and finally switched over to positive only polaroid (when not
grabbing digital images).

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

On Tue, 30 Jan 2001 09:26:03 -0600, tom.januszewski-at-email.swmed.edu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Although we have a digital camera
} for our SEM, some people still
} prefer Polaroids over digital
} images. We've been using Polaroid
} 55 pos/neg film. We routinely wash
} the negatives in running water for
} at least 30 minutes to remove
} residual traces of chemicals.
} According to the literature
} supplied with the film, the
} negatives should cleared with 18%
} sodium sulfite as soon as possible
} after exposure, then briefly rinsed
} in water. I assume that this is to
} stop development and clear the
} negative. My question is: Is sodium
} sulfite a necessary step or can we
} continue to clear with a long rinse
} of running water? Note: we've never
} seen any adverse effects from
} washing in water alone.
}
} Thanks in advance for your responses.
}
} Tom Januszewski
} Senior Electron Microscopist
} Molecular and Cellular Imaging Facility
} UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
} Dallas, TX 75390-9039
} 214-648-7291
} Email: tom.januszewski-at-UTSouthwestern.edu
}





_______________________________________________________
Send a cool gift with your E-Card
http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/




From daemon Wed Jan 31 07:06:26 2001



From: Roger Moretz :      rcmoretz-at-excite.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 05:02:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Reichert accesories

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mary:
Leica took over the Reichert line of products several years ago, so getting
in touch with the local Leica rep (I just saw that Energy Beam Sciences is
the rep here in New England) is your best bet. If that doesn't work try the
links at the MSA web site or at the Microworld Resource page
http://www.mwrn.com.

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
On Tue, 30 Jan 2001 22:21:57 -0600, mary mckee wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi, Listers,
}
} I need a couple of things for a Reichert ultracut E and wondered if
anyone
} knows a supplier. I need a couple of chuck holders (locks chuck in place
} for trimming the block). Also, I need a rubber 'belt' to operate the
} specimen arm - one broke. Thanks in advance.
}
} Mary Mckee
} Renal Unit
} MGH
} Charlestown, MA
}
} (617)726-3696 phone
} (617)726-5669 fax
}
}
}





_______________________________________________________
Send a cool gift with your E-Card
http://www.bluemountain.com/giftcenter/




From daemon Wed Jan 31 10:04:20 2001



From: dino-at-peterbosch.com
Date: 31 Jan 2001 07:58:04 -0800
Subject: Microscopist looking for a new position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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31 Jan 2001 07:58:04 PST
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


L.S.

Microscopist (34) (Msc) is looking for a new challenging working environment.
In total 10 years of research experience in materialscience/(fracture)mechanics.
3 years experience in SEM/EPMA/EBSD/AFM/Image-processing as well as confocal microscopy.
Currently working at University.

Interested?: mail dino-at-peterbosch.com


-------------------------------------
Register for your free domain name!
Plus free email and a personal portal
http://www.namedemo.com


From daemon Wed Jan 31 10:35:47 2001



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 08:30:24 -0800
Subject: Re: Removable epoxy resist?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Jon,
I would suggest the "Mold release spray" that I use to stop the epoxy
mounting material from sticking to to the molds. Mine is by Crown, number
63223 and is called "Ready Release", "Gerneral Purpose Silicone". Hope this
helps.
At 01:53 PM 1/30/01 -0800, you wrote:

} Could you brainiacs please put on your thinking caps and see what you can
} come up with for this problem?
}
} A guy came to the lab asking if I knew of anything he could use as an
} 'epoxy resist'.
}
} Now, here's the rest of the story:
}
} He is making CCD's for telescopes. He wants to glue a piece of material to
} the face of the CCD using a very low viscosity epoxy. He puts the two
} together dry with thin strips of tape down two sides as spacers, then by
} capillary action fills the space between with epoxy and lets it cure.
}
} Sometimes excess epoxy runs out at the ends and covers some of the bonding
} pads on the CCD. He wanted to know if there is something he could put on
} the bonding pads that would shield them from the epoxy, either repel it or
} protect the pads and let the epoxy separate easily from the pads after it
} has cured.
}
} It struck me that this is similar to the kinds of problems some material
} scientists might run into when preparing TEM samples via tripod polishing,
} ie. how to hold a sample, but then release it later.
}
} Some more details. The bonding pads are 100 x 300 um made of 1 um thick Al.
} After the gluing part, 1 mil gold wires are ultrasonically bonded to the
} pads. He says the pads are too small to paint anything on, thinks a spray
} might work. Pads can't be touched or the bonding won't work right.
}
} I thought of super glue and acetone, ala tripod polishing. He wants to
} avoid acetone and things like petroleum distallates. He thinks ethanol
} and/or water would be OK, not sure about other solvents. I thought of wax
} and xylene, but he wasn't sure about that one either. He took some sucrose
} to try as a separation layer, he will try anything.
}
} I suggested more careful measuring of the epoxy used so it wouldn't
} overflow, but there are some technical problems that limit the usefulness
} of this technique. He might try some physical barriers to hold back the
} overflow, but he would still like a way to protect the pads from the epoxy
} in case these fail.
}
} So, is there anything that can be put on these pads to protect them from
} epoxy and be removed later to open them up for bonding? If anybody knows,
} one of you will.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Jan 31 10:58:14 2001



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 08:52:11 -0800
Subject: Re: Polaroid 55 film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Tom,
I have used PN 55 for many years and always used the 18% sodium sulfite
bath. When you slip the negative into the sodium sulfite bath and gently
swish it around, the negative clears and the brown developing jelly lifts
off the negative and floats in the bath. It can then be fished out and
disposed of like your other film developers. I then rinse the negative for
10 to 15 minutes in running water to remove the remaining caustic. My
concern would be that if you only rinse in water, the developer goes down
the drain and many jurisdictions do not allow this.
At 09:26 AM 1/30/01 -0600, you wrote:
} Hi,
}
} Although we have a digital camera
} for our SEM, some people still
} prefer Polaroids over digital
} images. We've been using Polaroid
} 55 pos/neg film. We routinely wash
} the negatives in running water for
} at least 30 minutes to remove
} residual traces of chemicals.
} According to the literature
} supplied with the film, the
} negatives should cleared with 18%
} sodium sulfite as soon as possible
} after exposure, then briefly rinsed
} in water. I assume that this is to
} stop development and clear the
} negative. My question is: Is sodium
} sulfite a necessary step or can we
} continue to clear with a long rinse
} of running water? Note: we've never
} seen any adverse effects from
} washing in water alone.
}
} Thanks in advance for your responses.
}
} Tom Januszewski
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchg.ubc.ca



From daemon Wed Jan 31 12:29:05 2001



From: greg :      greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 13:25:12 -0500
Subject: Job Listings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
Is there a site that has a listing of jobs for
E.M. Please respond off the list server. I don't
wish to clutter up the listserver with non
techinical request.
--
Best Regards,
Gregory Rudomen
Technical Specialist Electron Microscopy
631-444-7372 Greg-at-umic.sunysb.edu
*************************************************
Standard disclaimer: The opinions expressed
in this communication are my own and do
not necessarily reflect those of the University
Microscopy Imaging Center.
*************************************************


From daemon Wed Jan 31 13:58:52 2001



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 13:50:42 -0600
Subject: Re: Reichert accesories

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} Another person to try would be Dave Paschke, The Dawson Co.,
} (617)484-7900. He had some parts for our Reichert MeF2 when I spoke to
} him a year ago...you never know.
}
} Diane Ciaburri
} General Dynamics
} Pittsfield, MA 01235
} (413)494-2847

} your freind could try to contact Mr. Rasche in Germany:
} email: mikrovid-at-gmx.de
} homepage: www.mikrovid.com
}
} best wishes, Joachim
}
}
} Dr. Joachim Prutsch
} Product Manager EM Specimen Preparation
}
} Leica Microsystems
} Hernalser Hauptstr. 219 email:
} Joachim.Prutsch-at-leica-microsystems.com
} A-1170 Vienna Tel. +43 1 48899 - 235
} Austria Fax +43 1 48899 - 350
} ---------------------- Weitergeleitet von Joachim

These are my only source for Reichart parts.

Good luck
Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00




From daemon Wed Jan 31 14:40:45 2001



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 15:31:15 -0800
Subject: RE: Polaroid 55 film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tom,
Here is verbiage from a Polaroid Tech Sheet on Type 55 film:


Processing the reusable negative:
In order to remove the reagent layer and the anti-halation dyes,
the processed negative needs to be washed in an 18% sodium sulfite
solution.
The salts within the solution minimize the swelling in the negative's
gelatin layer that would be caused by washing in water only. Swelling can
cause reticulation which would remain after the negative dries.

To prevent scratches:
Negative scratch resistance can be improved by treating the
processed negative(after clearing in water and sodium sulfite) in a
solution of Kodak Rapid Fix with Hardener (parts A&B) for two minutes.
This solution should be made up and used in accordance with Kodak's
recommended mix procedures, chemical caution statements, wash times
and temperatures.

Warm Water 2 liters 70oz.
Soduim Sulfite anhydrous 440 grams 16oz(avdp)


George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
v:(800) 223-7130 X3109
f:(800) 832-2205
email: scisales-at-ngscorp.com





From daemon Wed Jan 31 16:10:32 2001



From: William P. Sharp :      wsharp-at-asu.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 15:03:51 -0700
Subject: TEM Cryo Stages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello again, list -

Seems I only communicate when I need something. Our Life Science EM lab is
considering writing a proposal for a cryo stage for our Philips CM12S. We
have a range of support instrumentation such as a high pressure freezer,
cryo ultramicrotomy atttachment for one of our ultramicrotomes, plus other
bits and bobs. We do a lot of freeze substitution, but there are times when
it would be useful in the extreme to see material that has been frozen only
- not subjected to immersion in solvents, chemical fixatives, etc.

To that end, we have had discussions with one or more companies who build
and/or sell cryo transfer and cryo stages or specimen holders for our
research microscope. Some offer what are characterized as "additional" or
"ancillary" anti contamination blades or devices that are permanently
installed in the objective lens gap ( if there's room) and are used to keep
contaminants from settling on the specimen (which is the coldest spot in
the immediate area) . We are told that these devices necessarily cost a
great deal and may not even be useable if there is too much "stuff" - like
detectors, etc. in the gap or if the gap is too small.

Our 'scope has a short focal length lens called a "twin lens" (as opposed
to a super twin or an ultra twin or a bio twin) and we have an EDS
detector, a secondary electron detector and its bias plate, a stock
anticontamination horseshoe, and the specimen holder plus the objective
aperture all in the vicinity.

My questions. Finally. First, is it folly to expect excellent results using
a cryo holder without the extra anticontamination blades installed? I am
thinking in terms of long exposure periods such as one would experience if
one were trying to learn TEM Tomography - tilt series micrographs through
short intervals over the full range of the holder. Second, if the blades
are installed, do they limit the use of other detectors or the movement
range of the specimen or any other function that I haven't thought of. I'm
hoping there are those of you out there who have the blades and can comment
and those of you who only have the transfer device and holder who can relay
their experiences and some hint as to the quality of image achieved and the
difficulty encountered either with the system or because of it.

Ours is a multi-user facility and we are trying to add to the functionality
of our instruments, not to make them less useful.

Thanks very much for any comment or observation, whether on or off list.

Bill Sharp
William P. Sharp
Arizona State University
Dept. Plant Biology, box 871601
Tempe, AZ 85287-1601
Phone - (480)-965-3210
Fax - (480)-965-6899



From daemon Wed Jan 31 16:10:33 2001



From: Bob Price :      price-at-dcsmserver.med.sc.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 17:04:19 -0500
Subject: Microscopy and Microanalysis 2001 meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List Members,

The program for the Microscopy and Microanalysis 2001 meeting that
will be held in Long Beach, California from August 4-9 promises to be
an exciting one and covers many aspects of light, confocal, atomic
force and electron microscopy. Highlights of the scientific meeting will
include a 2-day Pre-meeting Congress chaired by Dr. Dave Piston of
Vanderbilt University entitled "Imaging Life: From Cells to Whole
Animals", a number of pre-meeting workshops, and a variety of
symposia in the Biological and Material sciences covering specific
topics on the development and applications of a full range of
microscopes and microscopy techniques.

Contributed presentations and posters are welcome for all scientific
sessions. Deadline for submission of abstracts (2 page extended format)
is February 15, 2001.

In addition to the scientific program the Local Arrangements Committee,
chaired by Bob Koch and Zed Mason, have arranged several activities
around the Long Beach area. These include the Sunday Golf
Tournament, a Sunday evening reception on the Queen Mary, and a
Wednesday Evening cruise around the Long Beach and Los Angeles
breakwater on the motor yacht "Spirit".

Full information concerning the meeting including the instructions for
submitting abstracts, registration forms and lodging, can be found by
following the Microscopy and Microanalysis '01 link on the right side of
the Microscopy Society of America web page
(www.msa.microscopy.com). If there are any questions please contact
me (Price-at-med.sc.edu) or the meeting managers (877-MSA-MAS-1).

I hope to see as many of you as possible in Long Beach.

Bob Price


Bob Price
M&M 2001 Program Chair
803-733-3393 (T)
803-733-1533 (F)


From daemon Wed Jan 31 16:30:32 2001



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 14:25:11 -0800
Subject: Re: Thanks for all the Cartoon Submissions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I'm familiar with the cartoon that Paul wanted; we tried to get permission
to use it for a t-shirt for the international EM meeting in Seattle a few
years ago. But even though the artist lived there (and was even a neighbor
of the then-current MSA president), the answer was a firm NO. Professional
cartoonists make a living from their drawings and they won't like "public
access". But MSA has a few talented amateurs, including its current
president (hi, Ron!), who could contribute; the job will get done if
someone (like you, for example) volunteers to do it!

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Wed Jan 31 17:04:34 2001



From: Heinrich Matthies :      hjmatthies-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 16:59:45 -0600
Subject: rotary shadowing, platinum coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hello,

I'm plan to attempt to rotary shadow a motor protein using platinum on a
carbon rod and then coat with carbon. At the moment, I am trying to
evaporate the platinum from the carbon electrode and am having difficulties.

We have a denton vacuum LLC with a bench top turbo III high vacuum
evaporator. We wind one inch of platinum (Pt) wire on a nail (0.045) and
then we load this 1 inch of 0.008 Pt wire onto a 0.04 tip of a 1.5mm carbon
rod. The wire is pushed toward the solid carbon rod coming from the other
side and all of the loops are tight (touch each other). The "spring" of Pt
wire is tightly wound around the carbon wire. We pull a vacuum to about 5
x 10-5 torr and bring the amperage to 10 amps (filament 2) wait and then
increase the amperage. Then I've tried 20,22.24, 26 and 30 amps but
usually somewhere between 26-30, the carbon appears to evaporate. At lower
amps, less than 24, I don't see any Pt on the test paper. So at the higher
amps, both carbon and pt evaporate and this means we are getting too much
carbon rather than an initial Pt coating. Under these conditions, the Pt
wire only covers a short distance of the narrow tip of the carbon
electrode. Does anyone have any advice or experienced this problem?

Thank you,

Heiner Matthies
UC Davis
MCB
530-754-9051




From daemon Wed Jan 31 17:04:37 2001



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 16:57:57 -0600
Subject: autoradiography for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,

Is anyone out there working with autoradiography at the TEM level? We are
considering a project of radiolabelling plant cells and looking at the sites
of incorporation as per Pickett-Heaps, 1968 Protoplasma 65: 181-205.

I would be interested in any feedback regarding techniques, pitfalls,
references (current) etc. especially with regard to plants.

Thank you in advance,

Kim
---
Dr. Kim Rensing
Dept. of Botany, UBC
6270 University Blvd
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T 1Z4

phone: 604-822-5223
fax: 604-822-6089




From daemon Wed Jan 31 17:10:47 2001



From: Smartech :      smartech-at-javanet.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 17:05:24 -0600
Subject: Nikon 990, what is the best set-up , focus method and monitor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have played w/ my Nikon 990 a while. I am very impressed with the camera.

I have a metallurgical and a stereo microscope and I connect the Nikon using
an eyepiece adaptor.

My question is: what is the best focus method and what is a suitable
external monitor.

I would assume a manual focus set at some reasonable focal length, perhaps
the distance the eye would perceive an object when viewed in the eye piece.
They fine focus could be done with the LM?

An external monitor seems to be required. The manual indicates NTSC or PAL
as video output. I assume that means only low resolution output, so no need
to spend extra for a high resolution monitor? Also, the LCD monitor
indicates 110,000 dots. Which I guess would be in the ball park of 300
lines and 400 pixels, so it is hard to image Nikon would put much technology
to produce extra resolution for the video output since only a small fraction
of users would ever connect to a monitor.

Has anyone out picked a monitor they are happy with?

Ric

SMARTech
860-491-3299
www.semguy.com
19 Cornwall Drive
Goshen CT 06756

SMARTech
860-491-3299
www.semguy.com
19 Cornwall Drive
Goshen CT 06756





From daemon Wed Jan 31 17:10:47 2001



From: Smartech :      smartech-at-javanet.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 17:05:43 -0600
Subject: used stereo microscpe pricing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What is a fair price range for a used ( {10 years old and in good condition)
German or Swiss stereo microscope that can provide good resolution images up
to 100X. I am looking to buy such a scope. Please contact me directly if
you are selling a scope that fits this description.

Ric

SMARTech
860-491-3299
www.semguy.com
19 Cornwall Drive
Goshen CT 06756

SMARTech
860-491-3299
www.semguy.com
19 Cornwall Drive
Goshen CT 06756




From daemon Wed Jan 31 19:04:53 2001



From: Purdy, Sam :      SPurdy-at-nationalsteel.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 18:26:51 -0600
Subject: FW: Polaroid 55 film

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Tom:

For years and years, at least 20, we have been doing what you
do-rinsing in 20C water. 20 year old negatives are just as clear as new ones
with no signs of degradation.

Sam Purdy
Tech Center
National Steel Corp.
Trenton, MI

} From: Tom Januszewski
} Sent: Tuesday, January 2001, 10:26 AM
} To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: Polaroid 55 film
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
}
} Although we have a digital camera
} for our SEM, some people still
} prefer Polaroids over digital
} images. We've been using Polaroid
} 55 pos/neg film. We routinely wash
} the negatives in running water for
} at least 30 minutes to remove
} residual traces of chemicals.
} According to the literature
} supplied with the film, the
} negatives should cleared with 18%
} sodium sulfite as soon as possible
} after exposure, then briefly rinsed
} in water. I assume that this is to
} stop development and clear the
} negative. My question is: Is sodium
} sulfite a necessary step or can we
} continue to clear with a long rinse
} of running water? Note: we've never
} seen any adverse effects from
} washing in water alone.
}
} Thanks in advance for your responses.
}
} Tom Januszewski
} Senior Electron Microscopist
} Molecular and Cellular Imaging Facility
} UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
} Dallas, TX 75390-9039
} 214-648-7291
} Email: tom.januszewski-at-UTSouthwestern.edu
}




From daemon Wed Jan 31 19:20:58 2001



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 14:33:13 -0800
Subject: HV tank oil disposal

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Hi:

You all did so well with the last question (epoxy resist) that I couldn't
resist trying a new one on you.

My EH&S guy wants to know about the current knowledge regarding the
disposal of HV tank oil that may be contaminated with PCB's. He has an HV
tank from a Philips x-ray machine, circa 1970's, rated at 100KV. He asked
me what is usually done to dispose of these tanks. The information he finds
is ambiguous. In some cases if the oil is drained, it can be disposed of
one way that may be cheaper than getting rid of the whole thing intact. On
the other hand, if he can just get rid of the whole thing as one piece it
would be a lot less mess.

Its the PCB's in the oil that complicates things. They were put in most HV
oils of that vintage, primarily to reduce the flamability of the simple
mineral oil used in the tank (I think). He would like to avoid an assay for
PCB's just to tell him something we already know. Also, if there is really
solid evidence and reasons for special care and caution with th oil, it
would help him chart the best course for responsible disposal.

Thanks,

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Wed Jan 31 19:29:17 2001



From: Jane LaGoy :      jlagoy-at-bodycote-imt.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 13:38:54 -0500
Subject: Re: EM cartoons

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To second Paul Gerroir's request for the Gary Larson SEM cartoon, can anyone
e-mail or FAX one to me? I had forgotten that I had it, and another Gary
Larson one involving a light microscope attached to a car steering wheel as
a 'cool option', on the wall near our SEM. Then we had an explosion that
ruined my lab and SEM -- and the cartoons. (The lab has since been rebuilt
& SEM replaced.)

Thanks!

Jane L. LaGoy
Development Engineer
Bodycote IMT, Inc.
155 River Street
Andover, MA 01810
978-470-1620
FAX 978-475-2951
jlagoy-at-bodycote-imt.com



From daemon Wed Jan 31 20:11:04 2001



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 15:43:18 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: HV tank oil disposal

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Hi, Jon and Listers-

} My EH&S guy wants to know about the current knowledge regarding the
} disposal of HV tank oil that may be contaminated with PCB's. He has an HV
} tank from a Philips x-ray machine, circa 1970's, rated at 100KV. He asked
} me what is usually done to dispose of these tanks. The information he finds
} is ambiguous. In some cases if the oil is drained, it can be disposed of
} one way that may be cheaper than getting rid of the whole thing intact. On
} the other hand, if he can just get rid of the whole thing as one piece it
} would be a lot less mess.

{snip}

We managed to talk our local electric company into taking our old oil off
our hands - it was a miniscule amount for them. It was rather under the
table, to avoid all the inevitable paperwork, so call in any favors you
can think of... They are, however, prepared to deal with HV oil with PCBs
in it.

Good luck!
Tina
****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 31 23:17:25 2001



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 23:10:52 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Network Problems

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Colleagues:

If things appear quiet or problematic with the Listserver it is due to
network problems. Connectivity will be sparse to intermittent
at best for the next few days until we sort out what is wrong.
As far as I can tell the problem is "outside" my local LAN.
The worrying thing is that it may be somewhere under the snow
and ice.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp




From daemon Thu Feb 1 00:38:06 2001



From: R. Cross :      r.cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 10:20:56 +0200
Subject: Microscopy of Invertebrate Reproduction

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Hi Jon,

PCB's were a real concern even in the early 70's.
Your oil tank may or may not have PCB's at all as I believe they were banned
at that time.
The procedure we used (in the early 70's) was to first confirm the PCB's by
testing.
Several outside labs tested for a modest fee.

I really don't know who would test nowadays.
Maybe someone on the listserver would know.

Earl


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 2:33 PM


At Oklahoma State they have a group that disposes of what ever you have as
long as you know what it is and were it came from. You don't need to know
if it has in it just the source. High voltage oil would be good enough for
them. They do the testing if needed. It is a lot cheaper for the
university for one office to deal with it than a bunch.

Gordon
Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com
Stillwater, OK www.couger.com/gcouger
405 624-2855 GMT -6:00

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jon Krupp" {jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 4:33 PM


TO: THOSE INVOLVED IN MICROSCOPY OF INVERTEBRATES

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT

The 9th International Congress on Invertebrate Reproduction &
Development is to be held in South Africa (Rhodes University,
Grahamstown) from July 15-20th. This integrative meeting
welcomes papers on all aspects of invertebrate reproduction. The
second circular with details is available at the conference web site:
http://www.rhodes.ac.za/conferences/icird2001 where it is also
possible to register online. The deadline date for registration and
submission of abstracts is March 31st after which a late fee will
apply. The current exchange rate is very much in favour of overseas
delegates. With registration delegates get entrance to all
conference sessions, daytime refreshments, lunches, conference
literature and evening functions. Delegates can also book
excursions to some of the local game parks where the "big five"
can be seen in malaria-free reserves. The International Society for
Invertebrate Reproduction was founded in 1975 - come to Africa to
celebrate 25 years of the society. We want to know about your
research on invertebrate reproduction.

If you require further information please do not hesitate to contact
the conference organiser, Alan Hodgson (A.Hodgson-at-ru.ac.za)

Alan Hodgson
--------------------------------------
Professor Alan Hodgson
Dept. Zoology & Entomology
Rhodes University
Grahamstown 6140
South Africa
Tel. (+46) 6038526 Fax (+46) 6224377
Cellphone 083 598 4892

Convener 9th International Conference on Invertebrate Reproduction
& Development 15-20 July 2001. For information visit:
http://www.rhodes.ac.za/conferences/icird2001/


From daemon Thu Feb 1 03:35:58 2001



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se
Date: Thu, 01 Feb 2001 10:41:30 +0100
Subject: EM Meeting in Stockholm

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} Date: Thu, 01 Feb 2001 10:25:14 +0100
} To: "Bob Price" {price-at-dcsmserver.med.sc.edu} ,
microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com, confocal-at-listserve.acsu.buffalo.edu
} From: Gareth Morgan {Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se}
} Subject: EM Meeting in Stockholm
} In-Reply-To: {041b81404221f11SERVICES-at-connect.med.sc.edu}
}
} Bob
}
} Thanks for the meeting announcement. Have you seen this one?
}
} http://www.biosci.ki.se/SCANDEM2001/
}
} I hasten to add that I have no association with the conference. The
conference scientific programme looks interesting and Sweden and Stockholm
are worth a look. I know - I moved here 2 years ago.
}
}
}
}



Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab

Tel +46 8 728 3734
Fax +46 8 728 3688
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se

"Words are the seeds of misunderstanding - use them carefully."

"Give us the wisdom to know and not to feel that not knowing is less than
wisdom itself."

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Institutionen för Mikrobiologi, Patologi och Immunologi(IMPI), H5,
Karolinska Institutet,
Avdelningar för biomedicinsk
laboratorievetenskap och
biomedicinska ämnen,
Lindhagensgatan 92, Box 12773,
S 112 96, Stockholm
Sverige

NB/Obs! Visiting address =
Lindhagensgatan 92
Kungsholmen


From daemon Thu Feb 1 05:13:18 2001



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 04:59:42 -0600
Subject: RE: Question

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