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From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 08:59:58 -0600
Subject: Testing Jan 01, 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This is just simple test to check that the new
files for 2002 are operating correctly.

Nestor


From daemon Tue Jan 1 13:15:26 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 13:08:38 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: 2001 Archives and Search Engine Updated

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Colleagues...

Well, I had some spare time on my hands these last few days (a bad sign),
so I've finally got around to updating the Listserver Search Engine as so
many of you have requested.

You can now search the Microscopy Listserver Archives by
a specific Month/Year or if you choose for a complete Year at a time.
Just go to:

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/

and follow the Listserver Utilies links. Remember searching
a full year can take some time and produce a long output
page if your not careful with your search parameters.

A minor problem occurs when/if you do a "complete year " search
of the older archives. There will be a few anomolies in the output
files created as the file format for these very old data files changes alot,
and sometimes on a monthly basis. Fixing the formats is ALOT
of work, so if you supect problems just do a monthly search.

Hope you all enjoy the New Years present.


Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From daemon Tue Jan 1 17:36:08 2002



From: Earl Weltmer :      eweltmer-at-home.com
Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2002 15:28:23 -0800
Subject: Cold FE Guns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All & Happy New Year,

In my daydreaming & contemplating the universe I have come across a question
concerning FE guns that may seem like a stupid question to some but I would
like a response anyway.

Hitachi series cold FE guns have three elements: the FE tip, the extraction
or first anode (the equivalent to a wehnelt cap on conventional SEMs) & the
second anode ( the equivalent to the anode on standards SEMs).

Gun activation is done by a microprocessor in the following manner:

1. The FE tip & the first anode is raised to the primary voltage, say -15
KV.
2. The first anode voltage is reduced from the primary voltage in 100 volt
increments until the desired emission current is reached: usually 5 to 10
uA. The first anode voltage is nominally reduced from the primary voltage by
3 kv to 6.3 kv depending upon the filament life. In this example say it
takes 5 kv to extract the desired 10 uA of emission current, then the
filament is at -15 KV while the first anode is at -10 KV.
3. The second anode is at ground potential (0 volts).

I understand the physics behind this as electrons are extracted from the
source by the first anode. In this case the electrons are at a -15 KV
potential and continue to be accelerated down the column as the second anode
is at ground potential. All well & good.

The problem that I have is when the primary voltage is at say -1 kv.
Using the same filament and parameters, the filament is at -1 kv while the
first anode is at +4 kv.
The electrons that are extracted from the filament are at the primary
voltage: - 1 kv.

The first anode is now at +4 KV while the second anode is at 0 volts.
The electrons that are extracted are now between the first & second anode at
a -1 kv potential.
It would seem that when electrons are at the - 1 kv potential that they
would be attracted to the first anode as the first anode is now at +4 kv.
Instead the -1 kv electrons continue down the column in seeming defiance of
the laws of physics.

I have measured the voltages in question & I have examined the gun
components.

I am sure the laws of physics are intact but there is something that I am
missing that can be explained away (Dr. Fred Schamber are you listening?).

Not that this presents an immediate problem but just to satisfy my
curiosity.

Thanks to All.

Earl Weltmer
Scanservice Corp.




From daemon Wed Jan 2 09:02:16 2002



From: Simon Watkins :      swatkins+-at-pitt.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 09:52:59 -0500
Subject: Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Folks:
I thought I should let you all know about the Fourth Annual Course in
Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy to be taught between June 16 and
21st 2002 at the Mount Desert Island Marine Biology Laboratories in
Arcadia National Park in Maine.
This team taught course led by Dave Piston (Vanderbilt), Mike Nathanson
(Yale), Guillermo Romero (Pittsburgh) and myself focusses specifically
on the development and application of modern fluorescence microscopic
methods. This intensive course covers all aspects of the technology
from microscope and dye design, cameras, confocal microscopy, live cell
microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and GFP. Considerable attention is
also given to quantitative analysis in 2 and 3 dimensions and time. The
specific focus of the course allows an in depth treatment of these
methods.
The goal of the course it to teach students how to best implement these
methods within their labs, using either their own cells and tissues or
using material supplied by the course. An extensive array
instrumentation, provided by all the major microscope and associated
software, hardware and camera manufacturers will be available for
students to use. For the last 3 years it has been a very successful
event and we were encouraged to give the course again. A full
description of the course lectures together with lecture outlines,
registration etc. is available at http://sbic6.sbic.pitt.edu/microscopy.
I would encourage you to spread the word, or sign up if you are
interested.
The total number of students is limited to 20, it generally fills up
pretty early though final enrollment is decided by the course faculty.
If you have any further questions please feel free to contact me
Thanks
Simon

-------------------------------------------
Simon C. Watkins Ph.D. MRC Path
Professor Cell Biology and Physiology
Director: Center for Biologic Imaging
BSTS 225
3500 Terrace St
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh PA 15261
Tel: 412-648-3051
Fax: 412-383-8894
URL: http://www.cbi.pitt.edu
--------------------------------------------



From daemon Wed Jan 2 09:04:01 2002



From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Richard=20Muscat?= :      themuscat-at-yahoo.co.uk
Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 14:58:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: The Future?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all,

My name is Richard Muscat and i am currently in
my
third year of studying biology at Lancaster
University, England. My final year dissertation is on
microscopes and a number of people recommended this
emailing list to me and encouraged to me to try and
obtain some information this way.

I understand that most of you on this emailing
list will be very busy but if you have any spare time
i
would really appreciate your views on where you think
microscopy is heading in the future.

Thank you very much for your time. Happy new year to
all.

Yours sincerly

Richard Muscat

Email: themuscat-at-yahoo.co.uk


Richard Muscat,
Lonsdale College,
Lancaster University,
Lancaster,
Lancs,
LA1 4YU
England


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Everything you'll ever need on one web page
from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts
http://uk.my.yahoo.com


From daemon Wed Jan 2 12:45:43 2002



From: Lesley S. Bechtold :      lsb-at-jax.org
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 13:30:58 -0500
Subject: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Happy New Year to everyone!
}
} We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} tolerated and what can't?
}
} Thank you!
}
} Lesley
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191

Lesley S. Bechtold
Supervisor, Biological Imaging
The Jackson Laboratory
600 Main St.
Bar Harbor, ME 04609
207-288-6191



From daemon Wed Jan 2 12:56:15 2002



From: Julian Martinez Fernandez :      julianmartinezfernandez-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 19:50:20 +0100
Subject: Help about CDU EDAX detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear colleges:

We have recently purchased a “Phoenix” EDAX microanalysis system for our
Philips CM200 TEM microscope with a sapphire detector and CDU (Compact
Detecting Unit). We are currently waiting for the equipment to arrive.

The distributor of EDAX for Philips microscopes is suggesting now changing
the configuration and substituting the CDU unit for a 10-liter Liquid
Nitrogen Dewar, maintaining the original price. The reason that they give us
for this suggestion is that the nitrogen in the 10-liter detector last
longer than in the CDU unit. According to them, neither of these systems
needs to have nitrogen when they are not been used.

I would like advising in this matter because we always had thought that the
CDU unit had a superior performance.

Many thanks,
Julian

___________________
Julian Martinez Fernandez
University of Seville
Spain


_________________________________________________________________
MSN Photos es la manera más sencilla de compartir, editar e imprimir sus
fotos favoritas. http://photos.latam.msn.com/Support/WorldWide.aspx



From daemon Wed Jan 2 13:29:31 2002



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 13:22:33 -0600
Subject: Parts needed

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All,

We have an old (at least 1960's) Wild Heerbrugg Stereomicroscope that
needs a new fine focus. The model number is M7 S. The bit that
is broken is the rack and pinion with the focusing knob. This part
mounts to the microscope stand and the microscope head mounts into it.

Anyone out there know of someone who might have this part or a
substitute? The scope is a nice one and we can't afford to replace it
right now.

Thanks,
Karen Pawlowski, Ph.D.



From daemon Wed Jan 2 14:17:17 2002



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 2 Jan 2002 14:07:10 -0600
Subject: Re: Cold FE Guns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Your analysis is correct as far as it goes.

But you may have forgotten that the electrons passing through the
hole in Anode 1 each have 5 keV of kinetic energy. As they continue
on their merry past the +4 kV electrode, they slow down and this does
effect the aberration coefficients of the "electrostatic gun lens".

However, they reach Anode 2 before they slow down completely. In fact
they still have 1 keV of kinetic energy at this point and are now
able to zip down the column in a beam along the axis. The gun lens
will bring this beam to a focus at some point along the axis. In fact
the earliest CWICSCAN FE SEMs used only this lens to focus the beam.

Cheers,

Jim P.


}
}
} The problem that I have is when the primary voltage is at say -1 kv.
} Using the same filament and parameters, the filament is at -1 kv while the
} first anode is at +4 kv.
} The electrons that are extracted from the filament are at the primary
} voltage: - 1 kv.
}
} The first anode is now at +4 KV while the second anode is at 0 volts.
} The electrons that are extracted are now between the first & second anode at
} a -1 kv potential.
} It would seem that when electrons are at the - 1 kv potential that they
} would be attracted to the first anode as the first anode is now at +4 kv.
} Instead the -1 kv electrons continue down the column in seeming defiance of
} the laws of physics.
}
} I have measured the voltages in question & I have examined the gun
} components.
}
} I am sure the laws of physics are intact but there is something that I am
} missing that can be explained away (Dr. Fred Schamber are you listening?).
}
} Not that this presents an immediate problem but just to satisfy my
} curiosity.
}
} Thanks to All.
}
} Earl Weltmer
} Scanservice Corp.

--
****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
"A scientist is not one who can answer questions
but one who can question answers."
Theodore Schick Jr., Skeptical Enquirer, 21-2:39


From daemon Wed Jan 2 16:48:58 2002



From: Victor Sidorenko :      antron-at-space.ru
Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 01:30:24 +0300
Subject: Re: Cold FE Guns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Earl!

I think, not all depends on voltages on anodes and tip only.
It is necessary to consider as well where equipotential
curves are located, i.e. what is the field strength picture,
i.e. it is necessary to analyze also the form of electrodes.
The similar situation exists in a mirror electron
microscope: electrons are braked near sample, but reach it,
because previously were accelerated.
Regards and season greetings,

Victor Sidorenko, ANTRON Ltd., Moscow, Russia.

EW} Hi All & Happy New Year,

EW} In my daydreaming & contemplating the universe I have come across a question
EW} concerning FE guns that may seem like a stupid question to some but I would
EW} like a response anyway.

EW} Hitachi series cold FE guns have three elements: the FE tip, the extraction
EW} or first anode (the equivalent to a wehnelt cap on conventional SEMs) & the
EW} second anode ( the equivalent to the anode on standards SEMs).

EW} Gun activation is done by a microprocessor in the following manner:

EW} 1. The FE tip & the first anode is raised to the primary voltage, say -15
EW} KV.
EW} 2. The first anode voltage is reduced from the primary voltage in 100 volt
EW} increments until the desired emission current is reached: usually 5 to 10
EW} uA. The first anode voltage is nominally reduced from the primary voltage by
EW} 3 kv to 6.3 kv depending upon the filament life. In this example say it
EW} takes 5 kv to extract the desired 10 uA of emission current, then the
EW} filament is at -15 KV while the first anode is at -10 KV.
EW} 3. The second anode is at ground potential (0 volts).

EW} I understand the physics behind this as electrons are extracted from the
EW} source by the first anode. In this case the electrons are at a -15 KV
EW} potential and continue to be accelerated down the column as the second anode
EW} is at ground potential. All well & good.

EW} The problem that I have is when the primary voltage is at say -1 kv.
EW} Using the same filament and parameters, the filament is at -1 kv while the
EW} first anode is at +4 kv.
EW} The electrons that are extracted from the filament are at the primary
EW} voltage: - 1 kv.

EW} The first anode is now at +4 KV while the second anode is at 0 volts.
EW} The electrons that are extracted are now between the first & second anode at
EW} a -1 kv potential.
EW} It would seem that when electrons are at the - 1 kv potential that they
EW} would be attracted to the first anode as the first anode is now at +4 kv.
EW} Instead the -1 kv electrons continue down the column in seeming defiance of
EW} the laws of physics.

EW} I have measured the voltages in question & I have examined the gun
EW} components.

EW} I am sure the laws of physics are intact but there is something that I am
EW} missing that can be explained away (Dr. Fred Schamber are you listening?).

EW} Not that this presents an immediate problem but just to satisfy my
EW} curiosity.

EW} Thanks to All.

EW} Earl Weltmer
EW} Scanservice Corp.



From daemon Wed Jan 2 17:44:58 2002



From: David Stokes :      stokes-at-saturn.med.nyu.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 18:33:03 -0500
Subject: TEM: NYSBC faculty positions in cryoEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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POSITIONS IN CRYOELECTRON MICROSCOPY

NEW YORK STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY CENTER

The New York Structural Biology Center (http://www.nysbc.org ) seeks
both junior and senior applicants for two faculty level positions in the
field of Cryoelectron Microscopy.The Center was founded by nine New York
academic research institutions* to implement high-end, state-of-the art
instrumentation for both NMR and Cryoelectron Microscopy in order to
stimulate their institutional research programs. The Center is
purchasing three cryoelectron microscopes at 120, 200, and 300 kV, the
last with a liquid-helium stage and an energy filter.In addition to
housing independent investigators with active research programs, the
Center will serve as a research resource for consortium members,
providing local investigators with excellent opportunities for
collaboration on a wide array of biological targets.We now seek
applicants for two CryoEM positions at the Center who have a record of
excellent research achievement and active research programs in any of
three CryoEM fields: tomography, single-particles, or
crystallography.Send a biographical sketch, a brief statement of
research accomplishments and future plans, together with names and
addresses of three individuals who can provide letters of
recommendation.Applications should be sent as soon as possible to:
CryoEM Search Committee, at nysbc-at-nysbc.org .

* Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University, City
University of New York, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mt.
Sinai School of Medicine, New York University, Rockefeller University,
Wadsworth Center, Weill Medical College at Cornell University.
** this ad will appear in Jan 3 issue of Nature and can be accessed at
http://www.nysbc.org/cem1.htm



--
------------------------------
David L. Stokes
Skirball Institute
NYU Medical Center
540 First Ave
New York, NY 10016
tel and FAX: 212-263-1580
http://saturn.med.nyu.edu/~stokes
------------------------------





From daemon Wed Jan 2 17:45:36 2002



From: David Stokes :      stokes-at-saturn.med.nyu.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 18:34:27 -0500
Subject: TEM: EM manager position at NYSBC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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MANAGER IN CRYOELECTRON MICROSCOPY
NEW YORK STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY CENTER

The New York Structural Biology Center ( http//www.nysbc.org )
seeks a technical manager for a high-end, state of the art facility in
Cryoelectron Microscopy. The facility will include three cryoelectron
microscopes at 120, 200, and 300 kV, the last with a liquid-helium stage

and an energy filter, as well as all necessary ancillary equipment. The

facility will be used by investigators from nine New York academic
research institutions*, and for in-Center researchers, on a broad range
of biological targets employing any of three CryoEM methodologies:
tomography, single-particles, and crystallography. The appointee will
act initially as liaison between scientists and manufacturers in
developing specifications, testing, and installing the three
instruments, and later in maintaining their performance, and in
supporting user applications and new developments. In addition, the
appointee will implement a variety of specialized technologies
associated with cryoEM, especially for automated data collection. A
strong technical background in electron microscopy is essential and
familiarity with biological samples would be a bonus. Send a
biographical sketch, a brief statement of previous research experience,
together with names and addresses of three individuals who can provide
letters of recommendation. Applications should be sent as soon as
possible to: CryoEM Search Committee, at nysbc-at-nysbc.org .

* Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University, City
University of New York, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mt.
Sinai School of Medicine, New York University, Rockefeller University,
Wadsworth Center, Weill Medical College at Cornell University.
** this ad can be accessed at http://www.nysbc.org/cemm2.htm



--
------------------------------
David L. Stokes
Skirball Institute
NYU Medical Center
540 First Ave
New York, NY 10016
tel and FAX: 212-263-1580
http://saturn.med.nyu.edu/~stokes
------------------------------





From daemon Wed Jan 2 18:01:33 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 15:55:56 -0800
Subject: Re: Help about CDU EDAX detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've been looking at the CDU as part of their "Falcon" system.

From what I have seen, the CDU has the same performance
as the 10L detector. Supposedly, the 10L detector can be
fitted with a smaller dewar. The idea behind the CDU is that
it is intended for intermittent use. i.e., not used everyday.
So its Dewar capacity is smaller but same performance as
big Dewar unit. LN2 is poured in (smaller amount) and
in an hour, the system is ready to go. The LN2 in the CDU
might last only a day or so, whereas the larger Dewar
would keep the detector cold for more days.

As far as I can see, it is an issue of frequency of use
and how often, therefore, you have to fill the Dewar.

gary g.


At 10:50 AM 1/2/2002, you wrote:

} Dear colleges:
}
} We have recently purchased a “Phoenix” EDAX microanalysis system
} for our Philips CM200 TEM microscope with a sapphire detector and CDU
} (Compact Detecting Unit). We are currently waiting for the equipment to arrive.
}
} The distributor of EDAX for Philips microscopes is suggesting now
} changing the configuration and substituting the CDU unit for a 10-liter
} Liquid Nitrogen Dewar, maintaining the original price. The reason that
} they give us for this suggestion is that the nitrogen in the 10-liter
} detector last longer than in the CDU unit. According to them, neither of
} these systems needs to have nitrogen when they are not been used.
}
} I would like advising in this matter because we always had
} thought that the CDU unit had a superior performance.
}
} Many thanks,
} Julian
}
} ___________________
} Julian Martinez Fernandez
} University of Seville
} Spain
}
}
} _________________________________________________________________
} MSN Photos es la manera más sencilla de compartir, editar e imprimir sus
} fotos favoritas. http://photos.latam.msn.com/Support/WorldWide.aspx
}



From daemon Wed Jan 2 19:32:29 2002



From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 21:02:13 -0500
Subject: Re: Help about CDU EDAX detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Dr. Pawley,

This makes sense.
I assumed that the electrons had only -1 kv of energy as the filament is a -
1kv.

Thank You for you explanation.

Now perhaps I can daydream about other more important issues.

Happy New Year.

Earl Weltmer



----- Original Message -----
} From: "James Pawley" {jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 12:07 PM


We have had a CDU/Sapphire detector on an SEM for over 2 years, and it does
work as EDAX promised. It does save Liq. N2 if you have an environment in
which the EDX analysis is performed only infrequently. I have discerned no
degradation in performance in that time, and obviously icing is not a
problem. It is much lighter than the 10L system, and that might alter the
mechanical effects on the microscope column, but the 10L system is fine in
that regard anyway.

There are downsides, though. It will not stay cold over the weekend, and
takes a couple of hours to cool after you fill it. This means that you
can't do EDX on a Monday morning, and you (or your users, in a multi-user
facility) have to remember to check that the dewar is cold a couple of
hours before starting work, but without interfering with other users of the
microscope. On a high-resolution TEM this might (would?) also degrade the
thermal stability. If your EDX workload is heavy, the CDU will take more
of your technician's time, as it will have to be filled more often to keep
it cold.

I'm not aware of any way in which the CDU is supposed to have any technical
advantage over the 10L system.

Each potential customer will have to judge the relative merits. The
hardware works, at least for us, as advertised.

Tony Garratt-Reed

At 07:50 PM 1/2/2002 +0100, Julian Martinez Fernandez wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jan 2 21:13:40 2002



From: Tony Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2002 22:06:57 -0500
Subject: Re: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There are some of us who have spent most of the last 20 years trying to
justify how to move our labs to the coast of Maine, just to get the granite
bedrock!

Vibration, sound and electromagnetic interference are all huge unknowns,
when it comes to microscope performance. Each manufacturer will provide
you with a set of specifications which are "required" for their instrument
to meet its specifications. I would strongly suggest that you build a new
lab to be significantly better than those specs, because the lab will
(hopefully!) outlast the instruments you buy now. New instruments will, in
all probability, have tighter specs than the present ones. Not only that,
but not even the manufacturer KNOWS, for certain, that the instrument will
work, even in an environment that meets the specs.. Only eating the
pudding will provide the answer!

This, by the way, is because the specifications are entirely empirical.
There is no magic formula a manufacturer can use, plugging in various
pieces of information about the microscope, which tells them the tolerable
interference levels. They just pluck a figure from the air (well, based on
the experience of *lots* of earlier installations, and their own lab
instruments), and hope for the best. If your installation has
difficulties, the next customer will find the specs tightened. Each site
is slightly different, and can present some new twist of vibrational
frequency, direction, or whatever, that can excite a previously unknown
resonance in the microscope system. Alternatively, perhaps, your system
may be subtly different from others (a new batch of wire for some of the
springs in the stage, for example, changing the resonant frequencies), so
it respondes differently.

Some listers may not agree with my next comment, but in my experience,
manufacturers will not abandon you if your site is a few percent out of
spec - they will work with you, within reason, to get the instrument
running well (it is bad publicity for them otherwise). The difference is
that you may have to pay for extra amelioration, whereas if your site is in
spec, they will (usually) pay.

Intuitively, granite would be thought to be a good site - after all, don't
we try to put pilings down to bedrock to get stable sites in other areas.
However, it also transmits vibrations very well if any are induced.
Sandstone, I am told, is much better, because it damps the vibrations much
more. Any of them, I am certain, are better than the mud-filled
saltmarshes on which MIT is built (hence my opening remark!).

So where does that leave us, as users? Architects will ask you for the
"Specifications" of the instruments you want to install, and will find the
cheapest way of meeting them. In 1980, our EM site easily met the
requirements for our EM300 and JEOL200CX. Surprise, surprise - it doesn't
come close for a modern FEG-IVEM! On the other hand, given your location,
is there much that can be done? Usually one tries to reach the bedrock,
but in your case, the bedrock reaches you. It may be a case of what you
have is all you can get. If there is too much vibration on your floor, you
may have to live with what improvement an isolation system can provide
(modern active ones are very effective).

Get qualified, experienced engineers to perform your surveys. Your
architects should have contact with people they have worked with in the
past, and the microscope vendors certainly have such contacts. Don't
forget acoustical interference, electromagnetic problems (magnetic fields,
once generated, cannot be eliminated - only moved!). Ask for - nay, DEMAND
- the best site money can buy. It will, in the long run, be a good
investment for you lab.

By the way, very little of the above represents quality scientific research
- just a lot of strongly held subjective opinions formed over the years.
Good lock!

Tony Garratt-Reed

At 01:30 PM 1/2/2002 -0500, Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Jan 3 02:23:21 2002



From: rajdeep-at-aripune.ernet.in (Rajdeep Dongre)
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 02 11:12:07 PST
Subject: SEM Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear Friends,

I have two problems regarding SEM Stereoscan S120:

1. Do you no any supplier who can supply with Spray Aperture? Tell me
address of Indian suppliers, if you know any?

2. Tell why I am getting poor quality image and a very astigmatic
image, even at high KV. I have cleaned the column many times but
cannot get improvement in the quality of the image.

a) Is it because of the problem of Spray Aperture? [I am use since
12 years]

OR

b) I found the screw attached with the electro-optic column magnetic
in nature. I have changed it. Is it because of the column having
similar problem?

Thanks in advance.

Rajdeep Dongre
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Agharkar Research Institute
G.G. Agarkar Road
Pune - 411 004, India



From daemon Thu Jan 3 05:31:08 2002



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=E4=BE=BA=D9=C5=C2=EC_=B9=C7=C5=B9=D4=C5_=28PAIBOON_?=
Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2002 18:23:38 +0700 (ICT)
Subject: Re: SEM Problem

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Dear Dongre


Most problems of poor image quality and astigmatism are from
objective aperture and for the image contrast is from scintillator
(electron
detector) .
Clean column it does mean clean or new apertures as well.
No effect from the scews.

Good luck

Paiboon Nuannin
Scientific Equipment Center
Prince of Songkla University
Hatyai
Thailand


On Thu, 3 Jan 2002, Rajdeep Dongre wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Friends,
}
} I have two problems regarding SEM Stereoscan S120:
}
} 1. Do you no any supplier who can supply with Spray Aperture? Tell me
} address of Indian suppliers, if you know any?
}
} 2. Tell why I am getting poor quality image and a very astigmatic
} image, even at high KV. I have cleaned the column many times but
} cannot get improvement in the quality of the image.
}
} a) Is it because of the problem of Spray Aperture? [I am use since
} 12 years]
}
} OR
}
} b) I found the screw attached with the electro-optic column magnetic
} in nature. I have changed it. Is it because of the column having
} similar problem?
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Rajdeep Dongre
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Agharkar Research Institute
} G.G. Agarkar Road
} Pune - 411 004, India
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 3 11:25:25 2002



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 11:17:00 -0600
Subject: Thanks for Parts lead

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thankyou everyone who responded for my plea for a lead on who might be
able to fix or get parts for our old Wild Heerbruug microscope.
You people are great!

Karen Pawlowski



From daemon Thu Jan 3 11:33:24 2002



From: Mick Thomas :      mgt3-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 12:29:06 -0500
Subject: basic bio TEM questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow microscopists,

I was recently asked for some help with TEM of biological specimens
(cells). Since I work in the materials side of microscopy, I could answer
some questions but not all. I would appreciate any help with the following
questions:

1) Specimen thickness: How thick can a cell structure be and still be able
to resolve 20nm features at 100keV? 300keV?
2) Beam damage: What sort of damage typically occurs to such specimens and
are cold stages required?
3) Charging: Do bio specimens need to be coated for TEM (to dissipate the
charge) and if so what kind of coating is used and how thick?
4) Contrast: Are such specimens typically stained and if so what sort of
staining is used?

I realize many volumes could probably be written on each of the above, but
any help pointing us in the right direction would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,

Mick Thomas

-------------------------------------------------
Mick Thomas
UHV-STEM Laboratory
E-1 Clark Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853

Phone: 607-255-0650
Fax: 607-255-7658
e-mail: mgt3-at-ccmr.cornell.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 3 12:27:01 2002



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 10:22:23 -0800
Subject: Re: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Lesley,
There is, in Physics Today an article about the Triebenberg Lab that Hannes Lichte has built to isolate his high-resolution microscopes from vibration, fields, etc. He told me last January that the information limit of his microscope went from 1.2A to 0.9A just by relocating it to the new
facility. The article is at http://physicstoday.org/pt/vol-54/iss-3/p24.html
Also, check out:
“Design and implementation of a site for a one-Ĺngstrom TEM”, John H. Turner, Michael A. O’Keefe and Robert Mueller, in 55th Ann. Proc. MSA, Cleveland, Ohio (1997) 1177-1178.
“The Triebenberg laboratory -- Designed for highest resolution electron microscopy and holography”, Hannes Lichte et al., in 59th Ann. Proc. MSA, Long Beach, California (2001) 894-895, Microscopy & Microanalysis 7, suppl.2.
Happy New Year,
Michael A. O'Keefe

"Lesley S. Bechtold" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} } Happy New Year to everyone!
} }
} } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} } up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} } environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} } exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} } standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} } tolerated and what can't?
} }
} } Thank you!
} }
} } Lesley
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191



From daemon Thu Jan 3 15:04:21 2002



From: Nguyen Hoan :      hoan-at-opea.com
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 21:50:52 +0100
Subject: Electron Energy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,
The electrons are emitted from the cathode. They go down to the earth
potential. Their energy is the potential between cathode and earth, even

when there are any kind or number of potential on their trajectory.
Happy New Year
Hoan

--

Hoan Nguyen
OPEA
114 rue de la Jarry
94300 VINCENNES (F)
Tél. 33 1 43283496
Fax. 33 1 43280364
E-mail: hoan-at-opea.com
WEB: www.opea.com





From daemon Thu Jan 3 15:12:43 2002



From: Yan Xin :      xin-at-magnet.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2002 16:12:54 -0500
Subject: service contract for microscope with Specialty Underwriters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I would appreciate very much if anyone could provide me information on the
pit falls to pursue microscope service contract with third party (in
particular, the Specialty Underwriters) instead of Jeol. Inc.

We have one Jeol SEM and one Jeol-2010 TEM to be put on contract this
year. I have encountered difficulties in persuading our purchasing agent
to go with Jeol Inc., because Specialty Underwriters has a quotation $1,000
lower. Because of the State Law, we need to provide evidence not to choose
the lowest price vendor. I read comments concerning the pit falls of the
service contract with third party on the server. But I would really need
hard data.

It will be great if anyone could help.

Best Regards
Yan Xin


=======================================
Yan Xin (Ph.D)
Magnet Science & Technology
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
Florida State University
1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310
Tel: (850) 644 1529
Fax: (850) 644 0867
========================================





From daemon Fri Jan 4 00:48:40 2002



From: M, Prabhakar (CORP, GEITC) :      M.Prabhakar-at-geind.ge.com
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 12:08:50 +0530
Subject: SEM Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dongre,
Refer to problem no 2.
Poor image quality/Astigmatism could be due to various reasons.
If the scintillator tip is coloured or damaged, you might try replacing it.
Check to see if the pole pieces are not misaligned. Make sure that the gap
is at the lower end of the pole piece assembly. (Align the gun with spot
size 5-6)
If you fail after above rectifications, you should try removing the
condensor lenses and clean the stigmator assembly. Minutest dust sitting in
this area can result in poor image/image movement/astigmatism.
Regards
Prabhakar





-----Original Message-----
} From: rajdeep-at-aripune.ernet.in [mailto:rajdeep-at-aripune.ernet.in]
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2002 12:42 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Friends,

I have two problems regarding SEM Stereoscan S120:

1. Do you no any supplier who can supply with Spray Aperture? Tell me
address of Indian suppliers, if you know any?

2. Tell why I am getting poor quality image and a very astigmatic
image, even at high KV. I have cleaned the column many times but
cannot get improvement in the quality of the image.

a) Is it because of the problem of Spray Aperture? [I am use since
12 years]

OR

b) I found the screw attached with the electro-optic column magnetic
in nature. I have changed it. Is it because of the column having
similar problem?

Thanks in advance.

Rajdeep Dongre
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Agharkar Research Institute
G.G. Agarkar Road
Pune - 411 004, India



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From daemon Fri Jan 4 01:33:21 2002



From: PECZ Bela :      pecz-at-mfa.kfki.hu
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 08:35:58 +0100
Subject: Re: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleague,

I took the information leaflet of JEOL 3010 and found for floor
vibration: 1 micrometer at 2 Hz and 2 micrometer from 3 to 9 Hz. External
magnetic field should be 0.1 microTesla or less. (Of course I knew this data
by heart, as our microscope was installed last November.)
However, it is surprising, that Philips advertising materials do not
contain the specs for the installation room.
For the antivibration table we went down to 3 m and made a block of
concrete, which is isolated from the sorrounding by several other layers,
the most important is a 5 cm layer of cork. Strain magnetic field was
decreased by changing the second ceiling of the room for a wooden one.
Anyway, the microscope works well, 0.122 nm is very nice on images (Al,
311), even a colleague took 440 spacings of GaAs, which is just below 1
Angstrom, while the guarranted line resolution of the microscope is 1.40
Angstrom.
We take nice images, despite we do not have any CCD camera on the
microscope. By the way, does someone know a cheap solution for that?
Sorry, back to the original topic, once the new EM lab will be a
biological one, I think no high resolution is needed, the simple
antivibration table we ordered should be anough for you. Tell me if you need
images on how it was built at the different stages of the work.
Good luck, Bela Pecz
-------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Béla Pécz
Head of the Thin Films Physics Laboratory
Research Institute for Technical Physics and Matl. Sci.
H-1525 Budapest, POBox 49
Hungary
phone: 36-1-392-2587
fax: 36-1-275-4996
E-Mail: pecz-at-mfa.kfki.hu
http://www.mfa.kfki.hu/int/thin/
http://www.mfa.kfki.hu/~pecz/
-------------------------------------------------------





} "Lesley S. Bechtold" wrote:
} } } Happy New Year to everyone!
} } }
} } } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} } } up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} } } environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} } } exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} } } standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} } } tolerated and what can't?
} } }
} } } Thank you!
} } }
} } } Lesley
} } }
} } } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } } The Jackson Laboratory
} } } 600 Main St.
} } } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } } 207-288-6191
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 4 02:29:53 2002



From: Janos Labar :      labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 09:40:22 +0100
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


unsubscribe



From daemon Fri Jan 4 09:35:20 2002



From: JHoffpa464-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 10:26:47 EST
Subject: cincinnati EM people

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


hello all, any univ of cinci EM techs or EM lab managers here. i will be traveling to cinci on buisness at the univ of cinci. would be nice to know someone there, perhaps to talk with if i run into problems. email me back.
John Hoffpauir
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia Pa


From daemon Fri Jan 4 10:22:36 2002



From: James Martin :      james.s.martin-at-att.net
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 11:17:08 -0500
Subject: contract lab for thin-sections by cryotome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings in this new year.

I need cryo sections made of multi-layer polymer films (PE/EVA). Any
recommendations for a contract lab that does cryo sectioning?

James Martin



From daemon Fri Jan 4 11:12:52 2002



From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 18:06:35 +0100
Subject: Re: List of Microscopy Meetings for 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopists,

My apologies for troubles with my Petr's Microscopy Resources
(http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/) during the Christmas and/or
New Year Holiday. The server possessed hardware problems and no
repair was possible, because I was out of institute. Now, the server
is after complete reinstallation and all problems are fixed.

In spite of this, all the links (suggested for the inclusion to the
list of meetings of 2002) have been added.

Regards,

Petr

} Dear Microscopists,
}
} I should like to inform you, that the list of microscopy meetings for
} the year 2002 at so called Petr's Microscopy Resources has been
} extended. You can see it at the
}
} http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/meetings.php#2002
}
} Regards,
}
} Petr Schauer
} +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
} | Dr. Petr Schauer tel.: (+420 5) 41514313 |
} | Head of Electron Microscopy Laboratory fax : (+420 5) 41514404 |
} | INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS (+420 5) 41514402 |
} | ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC e-mail: petr-at-isibrno.cz |
} | Kralovopolska 147, CZ-612 64 Brno petr-at-dp.fce.vutbr.cz |
} | Czech Republic www: http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/ |
} +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 4 12:45:42 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 13:33:48 -0500
Subject: RE: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try: http://www.vibeng.com/microscopy.htm

Happy New Year,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
West Chester University
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu


} ----------
} From: Lesley S. Bechtold
} Sent: Wednesday, January 2, 2002 1:30 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Fwd: vibration isolation standards
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} } Happy New Year to everyone!
} }
} } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} } up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} } environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} } exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} } standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} } tolerated and what can't?
} }
} } Thank you!
} }
} } Lesley
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191
}
}
}


From daemon Fri Jan 4 13:51:11 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 14:45:16 -0500
Subject: Cryo-Sectioning PE/EVA for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

James Martin wrote:
=====================================================================
I need cryo sections made of multi-layer polymer films (PE/EVA). Any
recommendations for a contract lab that does cryo sectioning?
=====================================================================
You can consider the laboratories of Structure Probe, Inc. an independent
analytical laboratory. We have been doing this kind of work for clients
since 1970. We are experienced with multi-layer polymer films generally,
and the PE/EVA system specifically. We are fully equipped to do this kind
of work in-house.

We are accredited by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation
to the standard is ISO Guide 17025. More information about our laboratory
services capabilities can be found on our website URL
http://www.2spi.com/ils/ils.html

Let me know how we can help you.

Chuck

Disclaimer: Structure Probe, Inc. and SPI Supplies operate as one corporate
entity and provide both analytical services as well as products for
microscopy and microanalysis.

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================



From daemon Fri Jan 4 15:22:28 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 13:11:19 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM Problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm not familiar with this system but I suspect that
the basic principles are very close to those of other
SEMs.

I view astigmatism and resolution as two separate topics.
Mostly because they seem to be caused and cured by
mostly different areas in the SEM column. Bad stigmatism
would be seen when the two stig pots are rotated beyond
the 2 O'clock and 10 O'clock positions--basically, +- 45
degrees from zero. If your system has a final aperture
holder with more than one final aperture, move to another
aperture and re-stig. If the stig pots' position moves significantly
between apertures, then most likely, you have dirty final
apertures. If, in the other hand, the other apertures make
little difference in the position of the stig pots, then I would
guess that the scan coil liner is dirty. This little bugger can
have a huge effect on obtaining high resolution images.

The column liner seems to not have much effect on overall
performance--unless it is really dirty. It may also have
an aperture and that should be replaced on a routine
basis. The anode cap may also have one or two apertures
and these too should be replaced. A good check for a
dirty column liner is to obtain an image, increase magnification
to around 10KX. Then, rotate one of the beam alignment
knobs (pots for electronic position, not mechanical alignment
knobs on column) until it stops. Your image will of course
go away. Let it sit for about 30 seconds and then rotate
the pot back into position to re-establish the image.
Now watch the image and see if it drifts up or down or
left to right. If it does, odds are that your column liner
is dirty. If it does not, the liner is clean.

You should be able to find apertures from most any
of the large SEM materials suppliers, like Pella, SPI,
Ladd, etc. The quality seems to vary for regular
Pt apertures. Try different suppliers products until
you find one that works best for you. Any 12 year old
aperture I would think is long past its useful lifetime.

Would need more info about what you are talking about
relative to the magnetic screw. What brought the screw
into issue in the first place?

gary g.


At 11:12 AM 1/3/2002, you wrote:

} Dear Friends,
}
} I have two problems regarding SEM Stereoscan S120:
}
} 1. Do you no any supplier who can supply with Spray Aperture? Tell me
} address of Indian suppliers, if you know any?
}
} 2. Tell why I am getting poor quality image and a very astigmatic
} image, even at high KV. I have cleaned the column many times but
} cannot get improvement in the quality of the image.
}
} a) Is it because of the problem of Spray Aperture? [I am use since
} 12 years]
}
} OR
}
} b) I found the screw attached with the electro-optic column magnetic
} in nature. I have changed it. Is it because of the column having
} similar problem?
}
} Thanks in advance.
}
} Rajdeep Dongre
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Agharkar Research Institute
} G.G. Agarkar Road
} Pune - 411 004, India



From daemon Fri Jan 4 21:27:53 2002



From: nicholas.welham-at-anu.edu.au ()
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 21:18:22 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: heating stage for an inverted metallographic

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (nicholas.welham-at-anu.edu.au) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html#form on
Thursday, January 3, 2002 at 15:44:19
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: nicholas.welham-at-anu.edu.au
Name: Nick Welham

Organization: Australian National University

Education: Graduate College

Location: Canberra, Australia

Question: Probably not the best place to ask this, but here goes....
I have just "inherited" from a store room a Unitron HHS vacuum
heating stage for an inverted metallographic microscope.
Unfortunately, there are no instructions with it and I'm reluctant to
try using it until I have tried getting some instructions. Unitron no
longer have a copy, can you think of anywhere else which may have a
copy I could buy/borrow/get a copy of?
regards
Nick

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jan 4 21:27:53 2002



From: dwhite-at-HuntingtonIndiana.Com ()
Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2002 21:17:52 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: microscopes to do comparisons

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dwhite-at-HuntingtonIndiana.Com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
January 3, 2002 at 13:42:49
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dwhite-at-HuntingtonIndiana.Com
Name: Dawn White

Organization: Marion General Hospital

Education: Graduate College

Location: Huntington, Indiana

Question: I see people using expensive comparison microscopes to do
comparisons (hairs, fibres, bullets etc)I was very surprised when I
heard that these things cost $50,000 or more !

Would it not be cheaper to use a sterio microscope and camera like we
have in our lab and compare the photographs ? This system cost less
than $2,000 and would seem like a cost effective option.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jan 4 22:25:14 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 23:22:46 -0500
Subject: Re: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Lesley,
All of your equipment manufacturers should have specs for vibration. A
long long long time ago I worked for ETEC and their vibration spec was
not more than 10 micro inches displacement in any axis. In general,
frequencies below 17 Hz presented the largest problems. Each instrument
is different.

Ken Converse
owner (wish I were in Maine)
Quaity Images
Delta, PA

Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} } Happy New Year to everyone!
} }
} } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the
} } ground up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a
} } vibration-free environment for optimum equipment operation. They
} } would like to know exactly what vibration is tolerable and what
} } isn't. Are there any standards or measurements out there that detail
} } what limits can be tolerated and what can't?
} }
} } Thank you!
} }
} } Lesley
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
}
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191
}
}
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 4 22:37:43 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2002 23:37:07 -0500
Subject: Re: Fwd: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tony,
I heard about a microscope a long time ago that was sited in a
sub-basement on bedrock. Everyone was very happy.............until it
was installed. Vibes out the wazoo! Turns out US Steel had a
drop-forge plant on the same piece of bedrock about a mile away.

Some say an isolated cement slab on sand gives terrific isolation. I
know sand does a great job isolating 100 year old cast iron water pipe
from nearby dynamite. (Don't ask) Apparently your Charles River mud
transmits too well, huh?

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Tony Garratt-Reed wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} There are some of us who have spent most of the last 20 years trying to
} justify how to move our labs to the coast of Maine, just to get the granite
} bedrock!
}
} Vibration, sound and electromagnetic interference are all huge unknowns,
} when it comes to microscope performance. Each manufacturer will provide
} you with a set of specifications which are "required" for their instrument
} to meet its specifications. I would strongly suggest that you build a new
} lab to be significantly better than those specs, because the lab will
} (hopefully!) outlast the instruments you buy now. New instruments will, in
} all probability, have tighter specs than the present ones. Not only that,
} but not even the manufacturer KNOWS, for certain, that the instrument will
} work, even in an environment that meets the specs.. Only eating the
} pudding will provide the answer!
}
} This, by the way, is because the specifications are entirely empirical.
} There is no magic formula a manufacturer can use, plugging in various
} pieces of information about the microscope, which tells them the tolerable
} interference levels. They just pluck a figure from the air (well, based on
} the experience of *lots* of earlier installations, and their own lab
} instruments), and hope for the best. If your installation has
} difficulties, the next customer will find the specs tightened. Each site
} is slightly different, and can present some new twist of vibrational
} frequency, direction, or whatever, that can excite a previously unknown
} resonance in the microscope system. Alternatively, perhaps, your system
} may be subtly different from others (a new batch of wire for some of the
} springs in the stage, for example, changing the resonant frequencies), so
} it respondes differently.
}
} Some listers may not agree with my next comment, but in my experience,
} manufacturers will not abandon you if your site is a few percent out of
} spec - they will work with you, within reason, to get the instrument
} running well (it is bad publicity for them otherwise). The difference is
} that you may have to pay for extra amelioration, whereas if your site is in
} spec, they will (usually) pay.
}
} Intuitively, granite would be thought to be a good site - after all, don't
} we try to put pilings down to bedrock to get stable sites in other areas.
} However, it also transmits vibrations very well if any are induced.
} Sandstone, I am told, is much better, because it damps the vibrations much
} more. Any of them, I am certain, are better than the mud-filled
} saltmarshes on which MIT is built (hence my opening remark!).
}
} So where does that leave us, as users? Architects will ask you for the
} "Specifications" of the instruments you want to install, and will find the
} cheapest way of meeting them. In 1980, our EM site easily met the
} requirements for our EM300 and JEOL200CX. Surprise, surprise - it doesn't
} come close for a modern FEG-IVEM! On the other hand, given your location,
} is there much that can be done? Usually one tries to reach the bedrock,
} but in your case, the bedrock reaches you. It may be a case of what you
} have is all you can get. If there is too much vibration on your floor, you
} may have to live with what improvement an isolation system can provide
} (modern active ones are very effective).
}
} Get qualified, experienced engineers to perform your surveys. Your
} architects should have contact with people they have worked with in the
} past, and the microscope vendors certainly have such contacts. Don't
} forget acoustical interference, electromagnetic problems (magnetic fields,
} once generated, cannot be eliminated - only moved!). Ask for - nay, DEMAND
} - the best site money can buy. It will, in the long run, be a good
} investment for you lab.
}
} By the way, very little of the above represents quality scientific research
} - just a lot of strongly held subjective opinions formed over the years.
} Good lock!
}
} Tony Garratt-Reed
}
} At 01:30 PM 1/2/2002 -0500, Lesley S. Bechtold wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} }
} } } Happy New Year to everyone!
} } }
} } } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} } } up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} } } environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} } } exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} } } standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} } } tolerated and what can't?
} } }
} } } Thank you!
} } }
} } } Lesley
} } }
} } } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } } The Jackson Laboratory
} } } 600 Main St.
} } } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } } 207-288-6191
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
} }



From daemon Sat Jan 5 09:04:18 2002



From: ykim39-at-uic.edu ()
Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2002 08:52:56 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: fluorescence emission queching

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ykim39-at-uic.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
January 5, 2002 at 08:38:25
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ykim39-at-uic.edu
Name: YOUNGJUN KIM

Organization: UIC

Education: Graduate College

Location: Chicago, IL. USA

Question: Dear all;
I would like to know the principle of fluorescence emission queching.
If you know the information resource about this,
please tell me that(books, review paper)

Best wishs,

01-05-02

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jan 5 12:25:09 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2002 10:04:39 -0800
Subject: Re: cincinnati EM people

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

John -

Are you a MSA member? Members can search the membership list (on the
website) using any address criterion - including city. And anyone can look
at the list of Local Affiliate Society officers; there's an active one in
the Cincinnati area.


Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Sat Jan 5 12:32:49 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2002 10:26:56 -0800
Subject: Re: cincinnati EM people

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} hello all, any univ of cinci EM techs or EM lab managers here. i will be
} traveling to cinci on buisness at the univ of cinci. would be nice to know
} someone there, perhaps to talk with if i run into problems. email me back.
} John Hoffpauir
} Thomas Jefferson University
} Philadelphia Pa

John -

Are you a MSA member? Members can search the membership list (on the
website) using any address criterion - including city. And anyone can look
at the list of Local Affiliate Society officers; there's an active one in
the Cincinnati area.

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Sat Jan 5 13:56:32 2002



From: Nicholas Welham :      Nicholas.Welham-at-anu.edu.au
Date: Sun, 06 Jan 2002 06:48:45 +1100
Subject: LM- Unitron HHS heating stage instructions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Apologies to those who already have received this via Ask-a-microscopist.
I have just inherited a Unitron HHS heating stage but do not have any
instructions for its use. I have a good idea what to do but would prefer to
see if I can find a copy of the original instructions (Unitron don't have
them) before things go bang. Does anyone else have one of these with
instructions?
regards
Nick
___________________________________________________________
Dr. Nicholas Welham
Electronic Materials Engineering
Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering
Australian National University
Canberra
ACT 0200, Australia

tel +61-2-6125-0520 fax +61-2-6125-0511

Nick's homepage: http://rsphysse.anu.edu.au/~njw109/



From daemon Sat Jan 5 17:10:56 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sat, 05 Jan 2002 18:04:34 -0500
Subject: Re: service contract for microscope with Specialty Underwriters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yan Xin,
Is this Specialty Underwriters a third party service company or an
insurance company? This makes a big difference in how to approach the
problem. The name screams insurance company, not service company, in
which case you will still probably have JEOL doing the work but you will
now be a "billable" customer and go to the back of the class behind all
the "contract" customers. How time sensitive are you? Also, if this
is an insurance company, you will not get any direct technical help (a
potential time saver) and the field engineer coming in may not have
talked directly with you beforehand. so there may be misinformation that
causes further delays.

If it is actually a third party service company then you need
references. They could actually be a better deal, or a headache.
References, references references. And call them! Figure out what is
important to you and see how they stack up according to their own customers.

Good luck.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Yan Xin wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi,
} I would appreciate very much if anyone could provide me information on
} the pit falls to pursue microscope service contract with third party
} (in particular, the Specialty Underwriters) instead of Jeol. Inc.
}
} We have one Jeol SEM and one Jeol-2010 TEM to be put on contract this
} year. I have encountered difficulties in persuading our purchasing
} agent to go with Jeol Inc., because Specialty Underwriters has a
} quotation $1,000 lower. Because of the State Law, we need to provide
} evidence not to choose the lowest price vendor. I read comments
} concerning the pit falls of the service contract with third party on
} the server. But I would really need hard data.
}
} It will be great if anyone could help.
}
} Best Regards
} Yan Xin
}
}
} =======================================
} Yan Xin (Ph.D)
} Magnet Science & Technology
} National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
} Florida State University
} 1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
} Tallahassee, FL 32310
} Tel: (850) 644 1529
} Fax: (850) 644 0867
} ========================================
}
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Sun Jan 6 21:59:42 2002



From: kfdavis-at-pacbell.net ()
Date: Sun, 6 Jan 2002 21:38:54 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM prepared slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (kfdavis-at-pacbell.net) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
January 6, 2002 at 19:30:47
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kfdavis-at-pacbell.net
Name: Kenneth Davis

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Rocklin, CA, USA

Question: Recently purchased a stereo binocular zoom
microscope (7-35 with 10x eyepieces) for our
grandson. Can you recommend a source or supplier
of professionally prepared slides, on a range of
subjects, that would complement the instrument
and captivate a Middle School student?

Thanks in advance
KF & JA Davis

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jan 7 02:47:23 2002



From: Mustapha Jouiad :      jouiad-at-lmpm.ensma.fr
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 09:31:29 +0100
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


unsubscribe


--------------------------------------------------------
DR. Mustapha JOUIAD

ENSMA/LMPM
Teleport 2, 1 Ave. Clément Ader, Futuroscope-Chasseneuil 86960
Tel. 33 (0) 5 49 49 82 09
Fax. 33 (0) 5 49 49 82 38
Email. jouiad-at-lmpm.ensma.fr
Web. www.lmpm.ensma.fr
[]
--------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jan 7 05:38:46 2002



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 11:28:36 +0000
Subject: gold removal from SEM specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
coating from
polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.

Are there any other methods which would be preferable?

Best wishes, and Happy New Year

Chris
==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Mon Jan 7 08:54:54 2002



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 08:46:05 -0600
Subject: service contract for microscope with Specialty Underwriters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




-----Original Message-----
} From: Yan Xin [mailto:xin-at-magnet.fsu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2002 3:13 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

I believe that Specialty Underwriters is an insurance (or "service
management") company. As Ken Converse has said, if they are third-party
service providers, then it's a different story and please disregard the
following:

Our experience with insurance companies has been absolutely miserable. At
one point it took us from April to December simply to get a preventive
maintenance visit scheduled on one machine. One insurance company declared
bankruptcy, costing a service provider a LOT of money. Our second insurance
company seems to be very responsible about paying its bills, but we have
definitely been put at the end of the line for service by service providers.

Through some recent discussions (they should be archived by Nestor in the
MSA site), I have been educated to see that this is a combination of several
factors. One is that service providers must ethically give priority to
those holding service contracts with them. Another is that service
providers are very reluctant to deal with ANY insurance company after one
insurance company has burned them for a lot of money. Yet another is that
field service engineers are spread very thin (see reason #1 above).
Finally, I believe that insurance companies are simply not set up to deal
with instruments like electron microscopes. Save them for centrifuges and
elevators.

I strongly (put "strongly" in boldface type and underline it) recommend that
you go with the JEOL contract. The $1000 you save will be nothing in
comparison with the headaches you will have, if our experience is any
indication. When we were on OEM contracts, we had no problems. Hopefully,
we will be in that happy state again in the near future.

(I have no financial, emotional, political, or blood ties with any OEM or
insurance company, by the way.)

I would be happy to discuss this more with you, if you like.

Good luck,

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/






Hi,
I would appreciate very much if anyone could provide me information on the
pit falls to pursue microscope service contract with third party (in
particular, the Specialty Underwriters) instead of Jeol. Inc.

We have one Jeol SEM and one Jeol-2010 TEM to be put on contract this
year. I have encountered difficulties in persuading our purchasing agent
to go with Jeol Inc., because Specialty Underwriters has a quotation $1,000
lower. Because of the State Law, we need to provide evidence not to choose
the lowest price vendor. I read comments concerning the pit falls of the
service contract with third party on the server. But I would really need
hard data.

It will be great if anyone could help.

Best Regards
Yan Xin


=======================================
Yan Xin (Ph.D)
Magnet Science & Technology
National High Magnetic Field Laboratory
Florida State University
1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32310
Tel: (850) 644 1529
Fax: (850) 644 0867
========================================





From daemon Mon Jan 7 10:17:59 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 08:09:11 -0800
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: LM prepared slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Email: kfdavis-at-pacbell.net
} Name: Kenneth Davis
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: Rocklin, CA, USA
}
} Question: Recently purchased a stereo binocular zoom
} microscope (7-35 with 10x eyepieces) for our
} grandson. Can you recommend a source or supplier
} of professionally prepared slides, on a range of
} subjects, that would complement the instrument
} and captivate a Middle School student?
}
} Thanks in advance
} KF & JA Davis
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
To answer your specific question, get a copy of the catalog from a large
supplier, such as Carolina Biological or Flinn Scientific. But if you
really want to "captivate a Middle School student", encourage him to
prepare his own samples. Please look at the MICRO bibliography for a
reviewed listing of books, videos, and CD-ROMs that will help. Don't miss
the "Eye of the Cyclops" middle school video series, prepared by a
naturalist-photographer who lives just a few miles from you, in Loomis.
And since the inverted image of a compound scope frustrates beginners, I
suggest you get the "Scopemaster" CD. Here's an updated listing that will
appear online soon:
-----------------------------
Neuronware 1997 Scopemaster Neuronware, 15 Madison Ave, Toronto,
Ontario M5R 2F2, Canada. For Mac or Windows. $70 - $75 from 3 U.S.
sources: Clearvue, 800-253-2788, Flinn Scientific, 800-452-1261, and
Sargent Welch, 800-727-4368 (New ordering information)
An interactive microscope teaches the use of the controls of a
compound microscope: The user can select three objectives, adjust the
substage diaphragm, and use coarse and fine focus. Advice on microscope
use appears if a mistake is made; if the advice is ignored, the high power
objective even breaks with a resounding "crack" if the slide hits it!
Slides must be centered on the stage in a realistic way that makes the
inverted image of the compound microscope understandable; it will be
nonthreatening, nondestructive practice for a beginner. Ten sets of nine
slides each (mostly biological) are included, each with its own
well-written reference book; the goal is specimen identification. The
images are good color light micrographs; each can be viewed full-screen
after the microscope is in focus, or all can be reviewed quickly in
"teacher" mode. There is a self-test, and a printable test for class use.
More information (and a downloadable update for Windows) is available on
the web at www.snap.ca/neuronware/index.htm. Middle and high school.
RECOMMENDED
---------------------------


Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Mon Jan 7 12:20:24 2002



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 18:16:10 -0000
Subject: Gold removal with KI/I2

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


After the signature there is a collection of replies and search results
when this came up a month or two ago.

+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+-----------------------------------------+
Phone:
{direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
{University internal extension 7867
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+-----------------------------------------+

(a) Recipe 1
4.6 g potassium iodide 1.3 g Iodine 100 ml DI water

Recipe 2
12.5 g potassium iodide 6.25 g iodine DI water to make 40 mls.

(b) 100 grams KI 60 grams I2 100 ml of DI water: dissolve all
together and add to 900 ml of Methanol.

and another version uses

(c) Mix 3 grams of potassium iodide and 5 grams of iodine in a beaker
with 50 ml of water.

b and c seem to have the correct molar ratio of KI to I2 (with I2
slightly in excess?) and I think one of these is the best to go for.





From daemon Mon Jan 7 12:55:29 2002



From: Quinn, Tim Lee :      tquinn-at-ku.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 12:34:45 -0600
Subject: Collagen diameter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listies,

I have a query??????????????????

I'm imaging (TEM) collagen in primate and avian skin. I've found that the
diameter varies from 50 nm to 200 nm within the same "bundle" of collagen.
Is this typical?

Or, am I possibly having fixation / osmilarity problems???????????



Tim Quinn
University of Kansas
Research Assistant
Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center
Dyche Hall Room 414
Lawrence, KS 6604-2454
785-864-4556
tquinn-at-ku.edu


From daemon Mon Jan 7 14:14:45 2002



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 12:06:22 -0800
Subject: Pics of embedding, sectioning, etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

I am trying to track down some pictures of the embedding and sectioning
process to show to students in an introductory cellular biology class. We
want to demonstrate the process of acquiring the sample, processing,
infiltrating, embedding, and sectioning. We would especially like a
picture of the sections coming off the knife and floating as a ribbon on
the water. The instructor would like color photos, web quality for his web
based lecture notes. Any help, pointers to any specific sites, would be
appreciated.





Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
530 754 7536 fax
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 7 14:46:30 2002



From: Caroline Miller :      camiller-at-creighton.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 14:41:46 -0600
Subject: JB-4 Microtomes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Are JB-4 microtomes still made and where can we get supplies for them,
such as chucks? Thanks, Caroline Miller



From daemon Mon Jan 7 15:35:47 2002



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 12:40:53 -0800
Subject: Re: gold removal from SEM specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris:

A similar question arose on another listserver, although it was removing
a 2 mciron gold metallizton from GaAs. The responses from there were
as follows:

Response 1
"Greetings!

It is possible that a cut or buffered aqua regia might do the trick. I
have had some success with the recipe below on Au
metallization at M2 and above on GaAs dice. The interlayer dielectric
was silicon dioxide, so there was not a lot of seepage into the
die substrate layer - this, more than the recipe, might have kept the
damage down. Assuming SiO2 as the ILD on all layers of your
part, this might still work:

50 ml deionized water

30 ml HCl

20 ml HNO3

Swirl or agitate the part in the solution for five minutes. Inspect and
repeat once if needed.

One minute rinse in deionized water, followed by 30 seconds rinse in
acetone. Dry under heat lamp to minimize surface staining.

As always, try this on a practice part first in case this does not
buffer the reaction with GaAs enough.

Good Luck !

Regards,

Carl Nail
National Semiconductor
Carl.Nail-at-nsc.com"

Response 2
"A solution of potassium iodide and iodine in water is a decent gold
etch. I have no idea how it would affect GaAs, but I suspect it would
be less destructive than Aqua Regia.

Alan Street
alan-at-irsi.com"

I hope this helps!

David

Chris Jeffree wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear All
}
} I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
} coating from
} polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
} specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
} sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.
}
} Are there any other methods which would be preferable?
}
} Best wishes, and Happy New Year
}
} Chris
} ==========================================
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
} Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
} Waddington Building
} King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
} EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
} Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
} FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
} Mobile 07710 585 401
} email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
} =========================================

--
David Henriks TEL: +1-949-492-2600
South Bay Technology, Inc. FAX: +1-949-492-1499
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

*** www.southbaytech.com ***


From daemon Mon Jan 7 16:02:44 2002



From: Karl Garsha :      garsha-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 15:54:05 -0600
Subject: oil soluble fluorochrome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
I have a user who wishes to study oil/water emulsions trapped in a
cellulose membrane using confocal microscopy. He wishes to visualize
trapped oil droplets by labeling them with an oil-soluble fluorescent
dye. It appears that Oil Red O works to a degree, however it doesn't hold
up well under the laser. Perhaps Nile Red would be a better
alternative? The membrane yields significant background so any suggestions
for selectively quenching autofluorescence from regenerated nitrocellulose
would be greatly appreciated. I welcome any suggestions for oil soluble
fluorochomes. Thanks in advance.
Cheers,
Karl G.


_______________________________________________
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illiniois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Room B650J
Tel: (217) 244-6292
Fax: (217) 244-6219
www.itg.uiuc.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 7 16:14:57 2002



From: Tracey M. Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 16:10:56 -0600
Subject: Cancer research

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List,
Can anyone who knows or is doing research on adenocarcinoma of the
lung (non-small cell) please contact me off the list for some
references? Thank you so much!




Tracey M. Pepper
Supervisor
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-1020
p. 515.294.3872
f. 515.294.1337



From daemon Mon Jan 7 17:18:58 2002



From: Sklyarov :      andskl-at-csd.uwm.edu
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 16:17:03 -0800
Subject: EDX choice

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

We are very close to buy a new EDX System (instead of old HNU) for our
Topcon SEM. Following a bid process we should choose between PGT and
EVEX systems (both include digitized image subsystem). Price is about
the same for both although PGT offers a system with Be window (and thus
"Na and up") and EVEX - a system with a low element detector. I should
note that our Topcon SEM does not have an intermediate (or "prep")
chamber, and therefore the system will be open to atmosphere during a
sample change. How it might effect a low element detector performance?
How reliable those systems (EVEX and PGT). Shortly, how often did you
have problems with those systems and vendors?
All replies will be accepted with the "great thanks".

Andrey Sklyarov,
Advanced Analysis Facility
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
andskl-at-csd.uwm.edu
414/229-6692



From daemon Mon Jan 7 18:08:48 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 16:04:28 -0800
Subject: Re: gold removal from SEM specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've worked on the same problem but with Au/Pd
on microchips. I use Ar plasma etching by setting
my Anatech Hummer VII to ETCH. I etch at 10%
power setting at 100mT vacuum. The trick is to
know when to stop etching. This is solved by plating
or coating a #1 cover slip the same as is the specimen.
Then, put both in the chamber and etch until the cover
slip is clear.

Use a low power and be prepared to etch for a LONG
time (perhaps an hour). Biological specimens might be
able to handle higher power settings than microchips.
High power for an IC will blow runners and poly. Try
a sacrificial specimen first, before committing your
actual specimen.

gary g.


At 03:28 AM 1/7/2002, you wrote:

} Dear All
}
} I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
} coating from
} polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
} specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
} sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.
}
} Are there any other methods which would be preferable?
}
} Best wishes, and Happy New Year
}
} Chris
} ==========================================
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
} Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
} Waddington Building
} King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
} EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
} Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
} FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
} Mobile 07710 585 401
} email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
} =========================================



From daemon Mon Jan 7 18:42:47 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 16:32:08 -0800
Subject: Re: gold removal from SEM specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Chris,
I believe the best way is to lightly re-polish at the finest grit size used
for the original polish. This may not remove all the gold.
At 11:28 AM 1/7/02 +0000, you wrote:

} Dear All
}
} I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
} coating from
} polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
} specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
} sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.
}
} Are there any other methods which would be preferable?
}
} Best wishes, and Happy New Year
}
} Chris
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Mon Jan 7 20:45:06 2002



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 21:37:55 -0500
Subject: FL Society for Microscopy meeting in March

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mark you calendars!

The FL Society for Microscopy will be meeting with the FL AVS on March
11-12, 2002 at the University of Central Florida

Invited Speakers - Physical Sciences

David Williams, Lehigh Univ.
David Joy, U. Tennessee
David Field, Washington State Univ.
Molly McCartney, Arizona State Univ.
Leonid Chernyak, University of Central Florida

Invited Speakers - Biological Sciences

Eugene Goldberg , University of Florida
Laurie Gower, University of Florida


There will also be a FIB session and FIB users group meeting on March 12.
For more information on submitting an abstract or participating in the
users group meeting please contact either

Lucille Giannuzzi, lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

or

Fred Stevie, fred_stevie-at-ncsu.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone (407) 882-1500
fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Mon Jan 7 20:49:45 2002



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2002 21:44:39 -0500
Subject: Physical Sciences Specimen Prep Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


UCF TEM Specimen Preparation Short Course - 2002

A Short Course With Emphasis on Recent Innovations in Tools and Methods

(Including tripod polishing, ion milling, and FIB techniques.)

Instructors:
Ron Anderson, IBM (retired);
Fred Stevie, NC State;
Lucille Giannuzzi, UCF


At the University of Central Florida (prior to the FL AVS/FL Society for
Microscopy Meeting)
Orlando, FL

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 8,9,10, 2002


for registration information please contact: Lucille Giannuzzi,
lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone (407) 882-1500
fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 8 00:11:30 2002



From: Bill & Sue Tivol :      wtivol-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2002 21:57:41 -0500
Subject: Re: basic bio TEM questions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


on 1/3/02 12:29 PM, Mick Thomas at mgt3-at-ccmr.cornell.edu wrote:
}
} I was recently asked for some help with TEM of biological specimens
} (cells). Since I work in the materials side of microscopy, I could answer
} some questions but not all. I would appreciate any help with the following
} questions:
}
} 1) Specimen thickness: How thick can a cell structure be and still be able
} to resolve 20nm features at 100keV? 300keV?
} 2) Beam damage: What sort of damage typically occurs to such specimens and
} are cold stages required?
} 3) Charging: Do bio specimens need to be coated for TEM (to dissipate the
} charge) and if so what kind of coating is used and how thick?
} 4) Contrast: Are such specimens typically stained and if so what sort of
} staining is used?
}
} I realize many volumes could probably be written on each of the above, but
} any help pointing us in the right direction would be very much appreciated.
}
} Thanks,
}
Dear Mick,
Since no experts have answered you, I'll take a shot.

1) At 100 keV, sections are typically no more than ~100 nm; at 300 keV,
roughly 250-500 nm sections can be examined. I don't know the level of
resolution for these thicknesses, so I can't be sure that 20 nm features can
be resolved, but this seems a modest requirement. Furthermore, these
thicknesses depend on the nature of the cells--the limitation at 300 keV is
likely to be the overlap of features more than transparency of the
section--the staining procedure, and other parameters (such as if you wish
to take a tomographic series, where a high tilt gives a larger effective
thickness).

2) If the cells are fixed, embedded in epoxy, and stained, the specimens
are usually not badly damaged by radiation (i.e., the loss of resolution
after irradiation is usually not significant), so cold stages are not needed
for these conventionally-prepared specimens; cells not fixed, embedded, and
stained are very susceptible to radiation damage, and a cold stage is
essential. Again, if tomography is needed, there will be 50 to 100
exposures of the same area, so the effects of radiation damage will be
greater by that factor, and will not be the same in each exposure.

3) Usually the formvar-covered grid is carbon coated to eliminate charging.

4) Yes. Heavy-metal stains are the most common: uranyl acetate with or
without lead citrate, osmium tetroxide (as both a stain and lipid fixative),
and phosphotungstic acid are the ones I've heard of.

Many volumes have, indeed, been written on these--Hyatt has a whole series,
and Bozzola and Russell have written a book on biological EM. I apologize
to all the other authors on the Microscopy List and elsewhere whom I have
not cited due to ignorance of their work. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol



From daemon Tue Jan 8 00:29:45 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 01:25:37 -0500
Subject: Removal of gold layer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Chris Jeffree wrote:
====================================================
I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
coating from
polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.

Are there any other methods which would be preferable?
===================================================
I would be a bit worried about some of these liquid suggestions possibly
dissolving out or reacting with species in the geological sample.

Could one not

a) put the sample into a sputter coater with etch mode (I realize not all
sputter coaters have the etch mode, but this might be one of the few good
applications for it) and literally sputter off the gold layer? This is not
a brand-specific suggestion, just about any sputter coater with etch should
do it.

b) expose to an oxygen plasma in a reactive plasma etcher such as the SPI
Plasma Prep™ II plasma etcher. I have mentioned this before, and that the
chemistry we have never figured out, but after about thirty minutes, most
gold layers seem to somehow get removed. Unless there were organics in the
geological sample, the exposure should not change the sample. However, the
oxygen plasma will start to etch away the embedding plastic, which might not
necessarily be a bad thing because that will permit a different kind of a
view of the polished geological sample ( you can now look into the voids
that have been opened up).

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies manufactures the Plasma Prep™ II plasma etcher for
this kind of application.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================



From daemon Tue Jan 8 01:44:44 2002



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 08:47:07 +0100
Subject: Re: Collagen diameter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

I can't comment on primate and avian specifically although I guess since we
share so much genome and collagen is so highly conserved the story should
be similar.

Type III would be the thinner of what you are seeing, Type I would be
thicker but not 200nm - more like 80nm if memory serves. Any possibility of
elastin???

Have you seen this 'problem' before??

Nadolig Llawen a Blwddyn Newydd Dda / God Jul och Gott Nytt Ĺr / Merry
Christmas and a Happy New Year

Med vänliga hälsningar/With best wishes

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se

Tel +46 8 728 3734 Fax +46 8 728 3688

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Institutionen för Mikrobiologi,
Patologi och Immunologi(IMPI), H5,
Karolinska Institutet,
Dept of Biomedical Laboratory Science,
Lindhagensgatan 92, Box 12773,
S 112 96, Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: Lindhagensgatan 92
NB! Visiting address:Lindhagensgatan 92


From daemon Tue Jan 8 08:38:56 2002



From: Chen Chen :      cche1-at-mail.jhmi.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 09:34:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: knock-out mice

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, everyone. Does anybody know which company can do knock-out mice?

Thank you.

Chen Chen

Department of Biological Chemistry
The Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
725 N. Wolfe Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21218



From daemon Tue Jan 8 08:43:24 2002



From: Jacqueline D. Garfield :      JGarfield-at-lifecell.com
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 08:46:25 -0500
Subject: RE: service contract for microscope with Specialty Underwriters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Yan,

Specialty Underwriters is an insurance company. In my previous position in
a hospital pathology lab; we tried "Specialty". It wasn't so bad with our
more general equipment, however when it came to the EM scopes; it was a
different story. I must say, I agree with Randy's comments. We were always
the last on the priority list, no matter what the emergency was. It didn't
matter that we were a hospital and that patient care was dependent on our
work. Also, you have to be careful how the contract is written. For
example: 1 PM or 2 for the year; are all parts included or just some; and
how are emergency visits scheduled? Make sure you have all the details of
the contract. Personally, it was a bad experience and certainly not worth
the financial savings.

If you do decide to go with "Specialty", then at least have a good PM from
your current service provider prior to the end of the contract.

Also, one final point, which you should investigate. If there is a lapse in
coverage, some companies will charge a "qualifying or inspection fee" prior
to offering a service contract. I had that happen with Zeiss when we wanted
to switch back to them after having a contract with Specialty. Even though
Zeiss provided the service for the duration of our Specialty contract,
because we didn't have a contract with them exclusively, there was no
guarantee that anyone else hadn't worked on the scope. So for their
protection, they required an instrument inspection at our cost. Of course,
we learned this the hard way. No one warned us of this. So please, talk to
JEOL about this potential cost. If "Specialty" doesn't work out and you
should want to go back to JEOL...Are there any hidden costs to re-sign with
JEOL?

Good Luck with your decision.
Jackie

Jackie Garfield
Electron Microscopist
Lifecell Corporation
One Millennium Way
Branchburg, NJ 08807
E-mail: jgarfield-at-lifecell.com



From daemon Tue Jan 8 09:26:11 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 10:20:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Pics of embedding, sectioning, etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rick Harris wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} I am trying to track down some pictures of the embedding and sectioning
} process to show to students in an introductory cellular biology class. We
} want to demonstrate the process of acquiring the sample, processing,
} infiltrating, embedding, and sectioning. We would especially like a
} picture of the sections coming off the knife and floating as a ribbon on
} the water. The instructor would like color photos, web quality for his web
} based lecture notes. Any help, pointers to any specific sites, would be
} appreciated.
}
} Rick A. Harris, Director
} Microscopy and Imaging Facility
} Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
} 1241 Life Sciences Addition
} University of California
} Davis, CA
} 530 752 2914
} 530 754 7536 fax
} http://katie.ucdavis.edu
} raharris-at-ucdavis.edu

Dear Rick:

Several books on EM sample prep have such photos, but putting them on a
website might be copyright infringment? Does your University have a media dept.
that could take photos for you? Or a photography dept.? Getting good shots of
sections floating in the boat is NOT easy, the sections must be close to
parallel to the film plane for optimum focus, fluorescent lighting makes
correct color balance difficult to achieve, etc.
The movie "The Andromeda Strain" has cinemacrophotography of thin
sectioning in progress, also a nice shot of an RCA/ForgeFlo 4C microscope.

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 8 09:41:55 2002



From: Bradley Starcevich :      starcharuski-at-mysun.com
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 07:33:22 -0800
Subject: TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,

I have a Zeiss TEM (EM-9S-2) available. Needs
chiller and vacuum pump. Many extra spare parts.
Complete with manuals and schematics. First
$1,000.00 takes it. Buyer responsible for
shipping.

Bradley K. Starcevich
Microscopist_1-at-lycos.com


Bradley K. Starcevich
http://www.starcevich.org



From daemon Tue Jan 8 10:29:34 2002



From: Stanley L. Flegler :      flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 11:22:06 -0500
Subject: Osmium Plasma Coater Users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Are there any users of osmium plasma coaters that would be willing to share
their experiences? I am especially interested in knowing the following:

1. How long have you had your unit?
2. Have you had any problems with it?
3. Are you happy with the coatings that you obtain?
4. What type of samples do you typically coat?
5. Have you had opportunity to compare your coatings with other high
resolution coatings?

Any other comments you would care to share would be appreciated.

Stanley L. Flegler, Director
Center for Advanced Microscopy
Michigan State University


From daemon Tue Jan 8 10:29:35 2002



From: Rick Harris :      raharris-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 08:22:29 -0800
Subject: Re: Pics of embedding, sectioning, etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks for your replies. I was approached at noon for these photos by a
faculty member notorious for waiting until the last minute. He wanted the
pics by 5pm. After searching several texts and not finding what he needed
I posted my note to the list then I got out the digital camera and shot the
pictures myself. I was able to get a pic of a ribbon of sections by
shooting thru the eyepiece on the dissecting scope on the
ultramicrotome. I would not consider the picture to be excellent but it
was pretty good. The other stuff was easy and he got what he needed.



Rick A. Harris, Director
Microscopy and Imaging Facility
Section of Molecular and Cellular Biology
1241 Life Sciences Addition
University of California
Davis, CA
530 752 2914
530 754 7536 fax
http://katie.ucdavis.edu
raharris-at-ucdavis.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 8 11:59:25 2002



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 09:51:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Collagen diameter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have looked at human collagen diameters in the reticular dermis and the
fibers tend to run from 80 - 100 nm + or - about 8 nm in a nice bell
curve.

Bob

On Mon, 7 Jan 2002, Quinn, Tim Lee wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear listies,
}
} I have a query??????????????????
}
} I'm imaging (TEM) collagen in primate and avian skin. I've found that the
} diameter varies from 50 nm to 200 nm within the same "bundle" of collagen.
} Is this typical?
}
} Or, am I possibly having fixation / osmilarity problems???????????
}
}
}
} Tim Quinn
} University of Kansas
} Research Assistant
} Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center
} Dyche Hall Room 414
} Lawrence, KS 6604-2454
} 785-864-4556
} tquinn-at-ku.edu
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 8 13:04:01 2002



From: Beth Richardson :      beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 13:55:07 -0800
Subject: agfa photographic paper

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,
does anyone have a favorite place to buy Agfa RC photographic paper
(multi-contrast and #4).
happy new year to everyone,
Beth

***************************************************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Botany Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-7271

Phone - (706) 542-1790 & FAX - (706) 542-1805

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
***************************************************************************

"And it's only the giving that makes you what you are".
Wond'ring Aloud, Jethro Tull (Aqualung)

***************************************************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 8 13:16:03 2002



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 13:10:22 -0600
Subject: RE: service contract for microscope with Specialty Underwriters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I concur with everything Jackie says. We also will be expected to recertify
any scope that was not covered by OEM contracts for a period, if we want to
return to our old service contracts (which we do!), even if the OEM service
engineers were the only ones to touch the scope. This recertification will
cost about $1500 per microscope, unless you have two or more of the same
make that can be done in a single visit.

I repeat my first advice: stay with an OEM contract. Contracts with
third-party service providers are also an option, but have a contract with
somebody who recognizes you as a priority customer they deal with directly.


Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/




-----Original Message-----
} From: Jacqueline D. Garfield [mailto:JGarfield-at-lifecell.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2002 7:46 AM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Dear Yan,

Specialty Underwriters is an insurance company. In my previous position in
a hospital pathology lab; we tried "Specialty". It wasn't so bad with our
more general equipment, however when it came to the EM scopes; it was a
different story. I must say, I agree with Randy's comments. We were always
the last on the priority list, no matter what the emergency was. It didn't
matter that we were a hospital and that patient care was dependent on our
work. Also, you have to be careful how the contract is written. For
example: 1 PM or 2 for the year; are all parts included or just some; and
how are emergency visits scheduled? Make sure you have all the details of
the contract. Personally, it was a bad experience and certainly not worth
the financial savings.

If you do decide to go with "Specialty", then at least have a good PM from
your current service provider prior to the end of the contract.

Also, one final point, which you should investigate. If there is a lapse in
coverage, some companies will charge a "qualifying or inspection fee" prior
to offering a service contract. I had that happen with Zeiss when we wanted
to switch back to them after having a contract with Specialty. Even though
Zeiss provided the service for the duration of our Specialty contract,
because we didn't have a contract with them exclusively, there was no
guarantee that anyone else hadn't worked on the scope. So for their
protection, they required an instrument inspection at our cost. Of course,
we learned this the hard way. No one warned us of this. So please, talk to
JEOL about this potential cost. If "Specialty" doesn't work out and you
should want to go back to JEOL...Are there any hidden costs to re-sign with
JEOL?

Good Luck with your decision.
Jackie

Jackie Garfield
Electron Microscopist
Lifecell Corporation
One Millennium Way
Branchburg, NJ 08807
E-mail: jgarfield-at-lifecell.com



From daemon Tue Jan 8 15:21:35 2002



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 14:13:37 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Xe lamp turning off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are having a minor disagreement here so I thought I'd consult the
experts: Do the same cautions apply when turning OFF Hg and Xe lamps, as
far as protecting computers from a pulse, as when turning the lamps ON?

Sorry if some of you see this twice; I'm cross-posting to both the
Microscopy and Confocal servers.

TIA

Tamara

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|




From daemon Tue Jan 8 18:33:09 2002



From: Rotole, John A. :      John.Rotole-at-ispat.com
Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 18:23:11 -0600
Subject: WDX measurement uncertainty

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Good morning everyone,

I have recently inherited a Joel JXA-8600 EPMA and the quality system
issues associated with it. Can anyone give suggestions as how best
to characterize the measurement uncertainty of WDX measurements? The
goal is for our laboratory to comply with measurement uncertainty
requirements specified in section 5.4 of ISO/IEC 17025. Any
suggestions as to how others have accomplished this task would be
greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

John

John A. Rotole, Ph.D.
Project Engineer
Coatings & Surface Technology
Ispat Inland Product Research
3001 E. Columbus Drive
East Chicago, Indiana 46312
Tel: 219-399-6308
Fax: 219-399-6562


From daemon Wed Jan 9 07:27:33 2002



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 07:09:45 -0600
Subject: RE: Xe lamp turning off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


While there can be some "inductive kick-back" from a transformer when the
load is removed quickly, it is not the same as turning on a high pressure
xenon lamp. To light a Xe lamp, ionization is usually initiated by a rather
high voltage pulse. After ionization, the Xe becomes a good conductor
instead of an insulator. At that point the lower voltage, high current
portion of the Xe power supply takes over to sustain the lamp.

A well designed, filtered, etc. power supply *should not* feed back much
trash to the supply line - starting or otherwise. Can't speak to all
brands/designs... In a poorly shielded system there could be a significant
amount of radiated energy during Xe start-up, but even that should not
damage a PC unless rather tightly coupled.

Woody

} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} We are having a minor disagreement here so I thought I'd consult the
} experts: Do the same cautions apply when turning OFF Hg and
} Xe lamps, as
} far as protecting computers from a pulse, as when turning the
} lamps ON?
}
} Sorry if some of you see this twice; I'm cross-posting to both the
} Microscopy and Confocal servers.
}
} TIA
}
} Tamara
}
} |--------------------------------------------------|
} Tamara Howard
} Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
} University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
} Albuquerque, NM 87131
} thoward-at-unm.edu
} |--------------------------------------------------|
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Jan 9 08:37:47 2002



From: michael shaffer :      rarewolf-at-roadrunner.nf.net
Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 10:59:55 -0330
Subject: RE: WDX measurement uncertainty

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John writes ...

} I have recently inherited a Joel JXA-8600 EPMA and the quality system
} issues associated with it. Can anyone give suggestions as how best
} to characterize the measurement uncertainty of WDX measurements? The
} goal is for our laboratory to comply with measurement uncertainty
} requirements specified in section 5.4 of ISO/IEC 17025. ...

To me, section 5.4 is pretty darn vague ... but is does include a
reference to "Use of latest valid edition of standards" which is most times
difficult to adhere to unless your facility's adherence to 17025 is
extremely focussed. For example, I am not aware of any "valid edition" of
EPMA standards ... although many reference standards are well characterized.

However, I will be exploring the following wwwsite for "ACCREDITED
CALIBRATION & TESTING LABORATORIES" (EPMA), and its "UNCERTAINTY LINKS" for
EPMA references:
http://www.fasor.com/iso25/

genuinely ... michael shaffer :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland



From daemon Wed Jan 9 09:30:25 2002



From: Peter Heimann :      peter.heimann-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 16:23:04 +0100
Subject: EM-Film "AGFA ORTHO 25" ? equivalent successor available ?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues,
we are using for the last 16 years at our ZEISS transmission
electron microscope EM 109 (with transfiber plate) the
orthochromatic b/w roll film type 120 "AGFA ORTHO 25".
However, this film is not produced anymore. Has anybody found an
equivalent successor? Does anybody know an orthochromatic
"120" roll film?
Thank you for a short informal answer!
Peter Heimann
**************************************************
please reply to: peter.heimann-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de ("E-MAIL")

Dr. Peter Heimann
Developmental Biology & Molecular Pathology; W7-107
University of Bielefeld
D 33501 Bielefeld / Germany
phone: xx49(0)521-106-5628 / 5627
FAX : xx49(0)521-106-5654
WEB-Site: http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Entwicklungsbiologie
WEB-Site: http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/SFB549
******************************************************


From daemon Wed Jan 9 14:18:21 2002



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?=22Mirtha_Romano=2E_Lab=2E_Microscop=EDa_Electr=F3nica?=.=?iso-8859-1?Q?=22_=3Cmromano=40pasteur=2Eivic=2Eve=3E?=-at-ivic.ve
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 16:08:32 -0400
Subject: Cell Culture Osteoblast

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all:

I need to buy Cell Culture Osteoblast. Does anyone out there know
what companies sell this kind of cells?

Thanks in advance for your help.
Regards,

Mirtha Romano
Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas
Centro de Microbiología y Biología Celular
Servicio de Microscopía Electrónica
Apartado 21827
Caracas 1020-A
Venezuela

mromano-at-ivic.ve





From daemon Wed Jan 9 20:25:30 2002



From: alan stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 20:16:01 -0600
Subject: RE: WDX measurement uncertainty

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is a problem for all ISO 17025 labs. We are A2LA accredited and have
to comply with this for all of our analytical procedures. Unless all labs
calculate their uncertainty budgets according to some common criteria, it
will be useless, time consuming and expensive exercise.

How do we calculate our uncertainty for something as subjective as grain size?

The whole idea sounds good, but its implementation was not thought out
prior to imposing it onto the labs.

My 2.0000 plus 0.0005/minus 0.0002 worth.





} John writes ...
}
} } I have recently inherited a Joel JXA-8600 EPMA and the quality system
} } issues associated with it. Can anyone give suggestions as how best
} } to characterize the measurement uncertainty of WDX measurements? The
} } goal is for our laboratory to comply with measurement uncertainty
} } requirements specified in section 5.4 of ISO/IEC 17025. ...
}
} To me, section 5.4 is pretty darn vague ... but is does include a
} reference to "Use of latest valid edition of standards" which is most times
} difficult to adhere to unless your facility's adherence to 17025 is
} extremely focussed. For example, I am not aware of any "valid edition" of
} EPMA standards ... although many reference standards are well characterized.
}
} However, I will be exploring the following wwwsite for "ACCREDITED
} CALIBRATION & TESTING LABORATORIES" (EPMA), and its "UNCERTAINTY LINKS" for
} EPMA references:
} http://www.fasor.com/iso25/
}
} genuinely ... michael shaffer :o)
} Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
}




From daemon Wed Jan 9 21:33:37 2002



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 21:26:38 -0600
Subject: Re: Xe lamp turning off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


: }
: }
: } We are having a minor disagreement here so I thought I'd consult the
: } experts: Do the same cautions apply when turning OFF Hg and
: } Xe lamps, as
: } far as protecting computers from a pulse, as when turning the
: } lamps ON?
: }
: } Sorry if some of you see this twice; I'm cross-posting to both the
: } Microscopy and Confocal servers.
: }
: } TIA
: }
: } Tamara
: }
: } |--------------------------------------------------|
: } Tamara Howard
: } Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

The easy way to find out is to connect a fast recording digital oscilloscope
across the connection to the power mains and record what happens when you
turn on and off the light if you suspect the problems coming through the
power line. This should be easily controlled with the proper power
conditioner connected to the light power source. It is nothing more than a
large inductance with capacitors and other elements shorting the high
frequency and high voltage components to ground before they get on the
mains.

If you think the problems are being radiated through the air a spectrum
analyzer should show up any problems in that area. Proper shielding and
grounding should take care of any problems in this area.

In both cases a good short low impedance path to earth ground helps a great
deal. The ground for this should be physically separate from the ground in
the wiring but there should be no potential between the grounds. The should
be electrically connected. To get this to function correctly and meet
electrical code is beyond the scope of most electricians. A good radio
broadcast engineer would be the person I would ask to find some one local to
help or possibly one of the older faculty members in electrical engineering
that has worked with radio frequency transmitters.

Good luck
Gordon

Gordon Couger
Stillwater, OK
www.couger.com/gcouger




From daemon Thu Jan 10 07:36:40 2002



From: Teresa Flores :      tflore-at-lsuhsc.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 07:26:28 -0500
Subject: AGFA ORTHO 25 TEM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Peter, our EM lab has an EM 109 Zeiss and we also encountered this problem
several years ago and resolved it by using:
Technical Pan Film 6415 (TP 120)
Cat # 74133
120mm, E. Kodak #151 1054
Ordered from:
Electron Microscopy Sciences
215-646-1566 Phone
SGK cck-at-aol.com
We use Dektol to develope the TP 120 and KodaFix to fix it.
Hope this helps.Teresa

Colleagues,
we are using for the last 16 years at our ZEISS transmission
electron microscope EM 109 (with transfiber plate) the
orthochromatic b/w roll film type 120 "AGFA ORTHO 25".
However, this film is not produced anymore. Has anybody found an
equivalent successor? Does anybody know an orthochromatic
"120" roll film?
Thank you for a short informal answer!
Peter Heimann




From daemon Thu Jan 10 10:02:32 2002



From: Kathryn Schubel :      schubelk-at-lafayette.edu
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 10:53:09 -0500
Subject: wanted: charles supper precision measuring device

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am interested in obtaining a Charles Supper precision measuring device.
If anyone has one for sale please contact me.

Thanks, KS

Kathryn Schubel
Assistant Professor
Department of Geology and
Environmental Geosciences
Lafayette College
Easton, PA 18042

(610) 330-5194 (phone)
(610) 330-5717 (fax)
schubelk-at-lafayette.edu

Spring 2002:

KAS
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD 21218

schubelk-at-lafayette.edu





From daemon Thu Jan 10 13:18:00 2002



From: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 14:05:49 -0500
Subject: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,
Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W instant
film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM.
Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
still can reorder I prefer not to................

TIA

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
www.tdk.com



From daemon Thu Jan 10 13:41:58 2002



From: Harry Walsh :      h_walsh-at-acs.org
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 14:29:03 -0500
Subject: Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings, I am writing with the request that you include the following
announcement:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------
The American Chemical Society will be offering its popular short course,
Applied Optical Microscopy, on March 15-17, 2002, immediately preceding
PITTCON 2002 in New Orleans, LA. The course is designed for researchers,
technicians, and quality assurance and failure analysis scientists who need
to develop a strong foundation in optical microscopy or who wish to extend
their current capability in the field. A full course description can be
found in the online catalog at www.chemistry.org/shortcourses. Look under
"What's New" for the "ACS Short Courses at PITTCON 2002" catalog which is
downloadable as a pdf file. Or, contact the ACS at shortcourses-at-acs.org or
800-227-5558, extension 4508. The course registration fee is $1,095 for ACS
members and $1,195 for nonmembers.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------

Thank you for your help. Please feel free to contact me if you have
questions or need additional information.


********************************************************************
Harold G. Walsh
Department of Continuing Education
American Chemical Society
1155 Sixteenth Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20036

Phone: 800-227-5558, extension 4507, or 202-872-4507
Fax: 202-872-6336
Email: h_walsh-at-acs.org

Visit our web site at www.chemistry.org/shortcourses
********************************************************************



From daemon Thu Jan 10 13:42:47 2002



From: evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 14:37:46 -0500
Subject: sample prep/wire EDM vendors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

I am looking for a wire EDM (spark cutter) for both slicing specimens and
drilling holes (TEM disks).
Ideally, I would like to buy a model of a small size (not an industrial
scale), that could be put on top of a bench.
I made a search on the Web but it was not very successful.
I would appreciate if somebody could share his/her experience and recommend
a vendor, preferably in the US.

Thank you very much.
Evgenia

**********************************************************
Evgenia Pekarskaya
ExxonMobil Research & Engineering Co.
1545 Route 22 East, Rm. LB388
Annandale, NJ, 08801
Tel. (908) 730-2272
Fax (908) 730-3355
e-mail: evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com



From daemon Thu Jan 10 13:44:37 2002



From: S Keller :      swtkeller-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 11:39:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Service for ISI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All:
There was a thread about ISI service. Who
is now responsible for their service?
Thanks in advance,
Sandra

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail!
http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/


From daemon Thu Jan 10 14:00:12 2002



From: David Spector :      spector-at-cshl.org
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 14:54:37 -0500
Subject: Position Available: Biological Microscopy Core Manager

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on the north shore of Long Island, New
York is seeking an experienced and responsible Biological Microscopy
Facility Core Manager for the laboratory's state-of-the-art central
microscopy facility. The individual should have practical expertise
in transmission electron microscopy, confocal and widefield
fluorescence microscopy, and digital imaging. The successful
candidate will be involved in designing and carrying out experimental
protocols for users, training individuals in the use of various
microscopes, and aligning microscopes and keeping the facility
operating at an efficient and high level of productivity. Interested
individuals should send their resume, including a description of
their expertise and the names and addresses of 3 references to: Dr.
David L. Spector, email: spector-at-cshl.org
--
Dr. David L. Spector
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
One Bungtown Road
Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724
Tel. (516) 367-8456
Fax (516) 367-8876
email: spector-at-cshl.org


From daemon Thu Jan 10 15:55:50 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 16:47:44 -0500
Subject: sample prep/wire EDM vendors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ernest F Fullam http://www.fullam.com/ sells such a unit and so does South Bay Technology https://www.southbaytech.com/

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: "evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2002 2:38 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear Colleagues,

I am looking for a wire EDM (spark cutter) for both slicing specimens and
drilling holes (TEM disks).
Ideally, I would like to buy a model of a small size (not an industrial
scale), that could be put on top of a bench.
I made a search on the Web but it was not very successful.
I would appreciate if somebody could share his/her experience and recommend
a vendor, preferably in the US.

Thank you very much.
Evgenia

**********************************************************
Evgenia Pekarskaya
ExxonMobil Research & Engineering Co.
1545 Route 22 East, Rm. LB388
Annandale, NJ, 08801
Tel. (908) 730-2272
Fax (908) 730-3355
e-mail: evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com



From daemon Thu Jan 10 17:43:58 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 18:42:41 -0500
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Robert,
A "digital camera" is not going to be of any value to you. An SEM takes
pictures by scanning one dot at a time and that is how your Polaroid
film is exposed. You can, however, add a digital imaging system (active
or passive) that will capture your images. Unfortunately your budget is
not suited to that as they tend to run about 10k and up.

On the other hand, you seem to be in a materials oriented application.
Do you have an EDS system? They often have, or can be upgraded to,
digital imaging. This may be your best bet.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

"robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello Listers,
} Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W instant
} film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM.
} Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
} Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
} still can reorder I prefer not to................
}
} TIA
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.tdk.com
}
}
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 10 20:21:51 2002



From: Beverly Giammara :      giammara-at-bellsouth.net
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 20:44:17 -0500
Subject: TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Friends and Colleagues,
To gain space, we have two Philips 201s for sale. They are serviced
and are in excellent condition. If you are interested in one or both,
please call or email Dr. Fred Roisen, Anatomical Sciences and
Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville,
KY.
Telephone: 502-852-5165. The email is fjrois01-at-gwise.louisville.edu
Thank you very much.
Kind regards to all.
Beverly Giammara



From daemon Thu Jan 10 20:25:42 2002



From: IAN HALLETT :      ihallett-at-hortresearch.co.nz
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 15:20:24 +1200
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Robert

For a simple low cost digital image option try looking at ImageSlave
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~sbwisbey/imageslave.html

Ian

} Hello Listers,
} Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W instant
} film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM.
} Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
} Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
} still can reorder I prefer not to................
}
} TIA
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.tdk.com
}
}



Ian Hallett
HortResearch
Mt Albert Research Centre
Private Bag 92 169
Auckland, New Zealand
Fax 64-9-815 4201
Telephone 64-9-815 4200
EMail ihallett-at-hortresearch.co.nz


______________________________________________________
The contents of this e-mail are privileged and/or confidential to the
named recipient and are not to be used by any other person and/or
organisation. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify
the sender and delete all material pertaining to this e-mail.
______________________________________________________


From daemon Thu Jan 10 21:06:30 2002



From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs.anu.edu.au
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 13:59:59 +1100
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Robert

Our facility also uses ImageSlaves for almost all our routine SEM
imaging, we are very happy with them.

Sally

Sally Stowe
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit
http://www.anu.edu.au/EMU/index.html


} } } "IAN HALLETT" {ihallett-at-hortresearch.co.nz} 01/11/02 02:20PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Robert

For a simple low cost digital image option try looking at ImageSlave
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~sbwisbey/imageslave.html

Ian

} Hello Listers,
} Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W
instant
} film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A
SEM.
} Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
} Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
} still can reorder I prefer not to................
}
} TIA
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.tdk.com
}
}



Ian Hallett
HortResearch
Mt Albert Research Centre
Private Bag 92 169
Auckland, New Zealand
Fax 64-9-815 4201
Telephone 64-9-815 4200
EMail ihallett-at-hortresearch.co.nz


______________________________________________________
The contents of this e-mail are privileged and/or confidential to the
named recipient and are not to be used by any other person and/or
organisation. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify
the sender and delete all material pertaining to this e-mail.
______________________________________________________



From daemon Thu Jan 10 22:19:45 2002



From: =?ks_c_5601-1987?B?v8DH9r/s?= :      oh0504-at-mail.kribb.re.kr
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 13:21:35 +0900
Subject: a postdoctoral position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear

I am searching a postdoctoral position.

On my searching activity,
Randy Tindall, EM Specialist, Electron Microscopy Core Facility,University of Missouri, suggest me to send my email to the Microscopy Society of America listserver, which reaches many EM laboratories at universities and companies around the world and tell me this email address.


The followings are my letter of application for a postdoctoral position and my CV.


Dear



I am writing this E-mail to inquire about a postdoctoral position.

Throughout my academic and professional carrier, I have been quite well equipped with broad range of experimental techniques in biological electron microscopy.

(I have been responsibility of electron microscopy lab. for 10 years)

With your kind consideration, I would like to get further information about postdoctoral training and availability of financial support at your lab.

Thank you in advance for your deep concern at my scientific interest and further advanced career.



Sincerely yours





Hyun Woo Oh

Tel: +82-42-860-4255

Fax: +82-42-860-4677

E-mail: ohwoo-at-mail.kribb.re.kr






Curriculum Vitae

Personal Information



Name: Hyun Woo Oh

Sex: Male

Birth date: May 4, 1963

Family relation: Married, one son and one daughter

Birthplace: (Seoul)Korea



Present Address



Electron microscopy Lab,

Korean Collection for Type Cultures,

Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology,

Eundong 52 Yusong, Taejon, Korea

Tel: 82-42-860-4255

Fax: 82-42-860-4677

E-mail: ohwoo-at-mail.kribb.re.kr



Education



1982 - 1986 Seoul National University B.S. Major on Entomology

1986 - 1990 Seoul National University M.S. Major on Entomology

1994 - 1999 Seoul National University Ph.D. Major on Entomology




Techniques


Maintain and operate all aspects of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dark room works.

- Fix, embed, section, stain biological samples for transmission electron microscopy.

- Biological sample preparation for scanning electron microscopy.

- Examine and photograph thin sections using an electron microscope.

- Develop film and print micrographs.

- Prepare micrographs for publication.

- Make formvar or carbon coated grids.

- Order supplies and maintain inventory.

- Direct and occasionally perform the procurement and preparation of tissues(plant, animal), tissue culture specimens, microorganisms(bacteria, fungi, etc.) and other specimens of biological samples.


Recent Journal Articles



Lee, I.H., Y.H. JE, J.H. Chang, J.Y. Roh, H.W. Oh, S.G. Lee, S.C. Shin and K.S. Boo (2001) Isolation and characterization of a Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. kurstaki strain toxic to Spodoptera exigua and Culex pipens. Current Microbiology 43:284-287



Hong, S.G., J. Chun, H.W. Oh and K.S. Bae (2001) Metschnikowia koreensis sp. nov., a novel yeast species isolated from flowers in korea. Int J Syst Evol Micrbial 51:1927-1931


Park, S.J., H.W. Oh, Y.N. Youn and H.Y. Park (2001) Structure of antennal sensilla on the adult asian ladybird, Hamonia axyridis Pallas(Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Korean J. Electron Microscopy 31:91-99



Moon, E.Y., H.W. Oh, P.J. Maeng and K.S. Bae (2001) Identification of Enteric bacteria from Nephila clavata. Kor. J. Microbiol 37:1-8



Kim, M.G., H.W. Oh, H.M. Park and H.Y. Park (2000) Molecular identification of Wolbachia naturally infected in Thecodiplosis japonensis(Diptera: Cecidominideii) Korean J. Entomol. 30:139-146



Oh H.W., M.G. Kim, S.W. Shin K.S. Bae, Y.J. Ahn and H.Y. Park (2000) Ultrastructural and macular identification of Wolbachia endosymbiont in spider, Nephila clavata. Insect Mol Biol 9:539-543

*******************************

Hyun Woo Oh **^^**

oh0504-at-mail.kribb.re.kr


From daemon Thu Jan 10 23:50:45 2002



From: mhkish :      mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 09:07:10 +0330
Subject: LM. Fiber Identification

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleague;
For identification of fibers we use light microscope efficiently to identify
fibers such as nylon, polyester, cotton, wool, etc. Now there are several
type of fibers in market with one broad and general name. I would like to
know: "Is it possible to identify regular polyester from anti- pill
polyester, using light microscope?
Will you please send me the answer to the following E-mail.
With Regards.
Dr. M. Haghighat Kish, Professor
Synthetic Fiber Research Center
Amirkabir University of Technology
Hafez Ave.
Tehran, Iran
E-Mail: mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir




From daemon Fri Jan 11 05:41:52 2002



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 12:27:19 +0100
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ask Jeol. Jeol Finland has developped a usefull system, the SEM-Aphore, to
digitalise the SEM image in photo quality (3200x4000 pixel). In Europe it
costs somethings like 8000E. It takes wunderfull images. Jeol US should be
able to say you if it works on the T220 A. Collegues have it on a
840.

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



From daemon Fri Jan 11 06:32:45 2002



From: Richard W. Fonda :      fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 07:26:41 -0500
Subject: Re: sample prep/wire EDM vendors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I looked into EDMs a couple years ago for similar purposes and was
not able to find any small-sized wire EDMs (for cutting complicated
geometries). Instead we purchased a table-top ram-type EDM from US
EDM Systems (800-837-6808, 7960 S. Roberts Rd., Bridgeview, IL
60455). You can cut TEM disks with a hollow cylinder and can slice
material (up to about 4" wide) with the wire attachment. We've been
generally happy with the versatility and performance of this machine
so far. I was unaware of the Fullam and SBT models at that time, so
I don't know how they compare.

Dick Fonda

_____________________________________________________________
Richard W. Fonda Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 767-2622 Code 6324
(202) 767-2623 fax Washington DC 20375
_____________________________________________________________



At 2:37 PM -0500 1/10/02,
"evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From daemon Fri Jan 11 07:39:07 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 11 Jan 2002 08:27:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 11 Jan 2002 08:27:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

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Robert,
Have you tried the Polaroid Type 55 p/n film. Positives do have to be coated but the negatives give 7x the resolution of the positives and are what we are primarily interested in. Digital cameras are great for most SEM work but we still rely on film for situations requiring maximum resolution or when we expect to enlarge the image. Since we deal with primarily low atomic number samples (biological) the problem of "empty magnification" occurs at relatively low magnifications. Take the originals at higher mags is just not equivalent to taking them on film with the option of enlarging the print using a high quality photographic enlarger.

This is not to say that you should not digitize your instrument. We digitized an older instrument a few years ago. I find that most investigators take more pictures than formerly (very good for sampling reasons) and, of course, spend less in the process with less waste. I feel quite strongly that there is definite need for both options and am puzzled that many people buy new instruments without the option of a film camera. Someday digital will be equivalent but I question whether we are there now with the cameras usually supplied with the instruments.
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907

On Thursday, January 10, 2002 2:05 PM, robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com {robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} wrote:
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From daemon Fri Jan 11 07:40:24 2002



From: John Foust :      jfoust-at-threedee.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 07:24:03 -0600
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

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At 03:20 PM 1/11/2002 +1200, IAN HALLETT wrote:
} For a simple low cost digital image option try looking at ImageSlave
} http://members.ozemail.com.au/~sbwisbey/imageslave.html

ImageSlave and its software look nice. Is there a price?
Also, it seems to use a full-length 8-bit ISA slot, which
is being quite rare these days in new PCs.

As a programmer and tinkerer, I can't help but wonder
what speed and resolution of an analog-to-digital converter
you'd need to watch the slow-scan video output of most SEMs,
and to let the software detect the start and end of scan
lines and image. Is 8-bit enough? Full-speed NTSC color
capture devices are $50-100. You'd think it would be
Simpy A Matter of Programming to tell them to scan less
at slower speeds.

- John



From daemon Fri Jan 11 09:47:14 2002



From: Nancy Zjaba :      nzjaba-at-alfalight.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 09:34:05 -0600
Subject: EDS: Human source contamination

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A while ago someone posted a question about reference EDS spectra for human
source contamination (related to semiconductor manufacturing).

I found some references that I'm posting for anyone who's interested:

R.K. Lowry, et al., "Analysis of Human Contaminants Pinpoint Sources of IC
Defects," Semiconductor International, July 1987, p. 73.

R.W. Thomas, "The Identification and Elimination of Human Contamination in
the Manufacture of ICs," Proceedings of the 23rd International Reliability
Physics Symposium, Mar. 26-28, 1985, Orlando, Fla., p. 228.

J.A. Lange, "Sources of Semiconductor Wafer Contamination," Semiconductor
International, April 1983, p. 124.

"Cosmetics, Skin Oils, Flakes Contaminate Clean Rooms," Semiconductor
International, Sept. 1983, p. 20.

The first article contains both EDS and Auger spectra for spittle,
perspiration, sneeze residue and cosmetics residue.

Regards,

Nancy Zjaba, Technical Staff
Alfalight Inc.
1832 Wright Street
Madison, WI 53704
(608) 240-4875
nzjaba-at-alfalight.com



From daemon Fri Jan 11 11:07:37 2002



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 08:55:20 -0800
Subject: Re: sample prep/wire EDM vendors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Evgenia:

You can find information on our small spark cutter which is designed for
TEM
applications by typing in the key word "TL-SC1" on our website. The
price on the system is $1,895.

If you type in the keyword "EM", you will find an overview of our entire
range of EM related products.

Best regards-

David

"evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Colleagues,
}
} I am looking for a wire EDM (spark cutter) for both slicing specimens and
} drilling holes (TEM disks).
} Ideally, I would like to buy a model of a small size (not an industrial
} scale), that could be put on top of a bench.
} I made a search on the Web but it was not very successful.
} I would appreciate if somebody could share his/her experience and recommend
} a vendor, preferably in the US.
}
} Thank you very much.
} Evgenia
}
} **********************************************************
} Evgenia Pekarskaya
} ExxonMobil Research & Engineering Co.
} 1545 Route 22 East, Rm. LB388
} Annandale, NJ, 08801
} Tel. (908) 730-2272
} Fax (908) 730-3355
} e-mail: evgenia.pekarskaya-at-exxonmobil.com

--
David Henriks TEL: +1-949-492-2600
South Bay Technology, Inc. FAX: +1-949-492-1499
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

*** www.southbaytech.com ***


From daemon Fri Jan 11 11:49:23 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 09:44:31 -0800
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



If your goal is not instant results, why not just use
cut sheet 4x5" film? They fit in the same slot that
the Polaroid holder does and cost about 10 cents a
sheet. Of course they have to be processed in a
darkroom but the image quality and tonal range is
superior to Polaroid positives or PN film. Plus, their
exposure latitude is much wider than Polaroid.

gary g.


At 11:05 AM 1/10/2002, you wrote:
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From daemon Fri Jan 11 12:20:39 2002



From: John C. Wheatley :      John.Wheatley-at-asu.edu
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 11:13:40 -0700
Subject: Position--Arizona State University

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Research Professional in Electron Microscopy
Center for High Resolution Electron Microscopy
Arizona State University

The Center for Solid State Science seeks applicants for the position of
Assistant/Associate/ Senior Research Professional. This appointment is a
state-funded Academic Professional position on a year-to-year basis.
Essential job functions of this position include: design and engineering of
electronic circuits for analog and digital functions; working closely with
faculty and students to design and manufacture items for research and
development; testing circuit functions to the component level using direct
and indirect trouble-shooting methods for failure diagnosis; and diagnosing
and repairing vacuum and mechanical systems

Required Qualifications: Master's degree in physical or engineering
sciences and five years of experience in electronic repair and maintenance
of analytical equipment; or Bachelor's degree in physical or engineering
sciences and 8 years of experience in electronic repair and maintenance of
analytical equipment. Associate and Full Research Professional ranks also
require a Doctorate degree in related area and/or additional extensive
experience appropriate to rank.

Desired Qualifications:
… Previous experience with electron microscopes
… Experience with low and high power distribution systems
… Demonstrated working knowledge of electron microscopy maintenance and repair

Further information about the Center for High Resolution Electron
Microscopy can be found at www.asu.edu/clas/csss/chrem.

Applicants must submit a cover letter, resume/vitae with names, addresses,
phone numbers and email addresses for three professional references to:
CSSS Research Professional Search Committee, Center for Solid State
Science, PO Box 1704, Arizona State University, Tempe Arizona, 85287-1704.
Application deadline is January 28, 2002, or each Monday thereafter until
position is filled.


Arizona State University is an AA/EO employer




John C. Wheatley
Lab Manager
Arizona State University
Center for Solid State Science
PSA-213
BOX 871704
Tempe, AZ 85287-1704


Phone: (480) 965-3831
FAX: (480) 965-9004
John.Wheatley-at-ASU.Edu




From daemon Fri Jan 11 13:04:02 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 13:56:03 -0500
Subject: Passive image capture systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Ian Hallett wrote:
============================================
For a simple low cost digital image option try looking at ImageSlave http:
//members.ozemail.com.au/~sbwisbey/imageslave.html

{ { {snip

} Hello Listers,
} Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W
instant
} film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM

From daemon Fri Jan 11 16:22:49 2002



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 16:15:08 -0600
Subject: EDS System thoughts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like any users to compare and contrast the ease of use and
reliability of the following two EDS systems in a multi-user facility:

EDAX Falcon Genesis with S-UTW/CDU detector or Super-UTW detector

Oxford Inca Energy 200

Please respond offline directly to me.

Thanks

Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Electron Microprobe Lab
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx 75275
voice: 214-768-2756
fax: 214-768-2701
E-mail: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu



From daemon Fri Jan 11 18:02:14 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 15:57:02 -0800
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


ISA is certainly a dead end. Plus, 1Kx1K is not
all that much resolution. If it does the job for some
users, great. I find I mostly capture at 4Kx2600
for 1:5 aspect ratio (same as 35mm slide).

8-bits is plenty of bit depth I think. Regarding speed,
it depends on pixel dwell time. This time affects
image noise and how long you wait for the final image.

Check out these Excel files at http://photoweb.net

mag-ratios.xls
dwelltime.xls

There are no links to them, so load them explicitly.


My ADDA unit will go down to 1.33uS dwell time. I find
that about 7-10uS is optimal for any retained image. Rapid
scan is used for histogram adjustment of contrast and
brightness. Then the slow scan captures the image.
If the image is intended for subsequent deconvolution
focusing, I capture it as 16-bit pixels. This provides the
greatest dynamic range for deconvolution. Otherwise,
8-bits is fine.

So essentially, the A/D conversion time is 1uS or slower.
Not a big deal. Probably the main challenge that could
occur with active scan systems are ground loops. By
having proper isolation and good grounds, synchronizing
to 60Hz will eliminate this problem.

As far as TV rate is concerned, it can be done. But
I don't think it is a direct thing. Direct TV produces
poor resolution. Slow scan with TV readout produces
excellent results. Doing this requires a frame buffer
which collects the scanned info and then outputs it
at TV rate. This output can be easily frame grabbed
at 640x480 8-bit pixels. There are some that are twice
to three times this resolution. But the cost is not low.

gary g.



At 05:24 AM 1/11/2002, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Jan 11 19:19:40 2002



From: Cindy Shannon :      cshannon-at-nctimes.net
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 16:43:12 -0800
Subject: phosphotungstic acid staining of tissue sections for tem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List Server group,
Does anyone use phosphotungstic acid to stain tissue sections for tem?
( or use any other kind of non-radio active staining method )
I would appreciate any information on this subject.
Thank you.
Cindy Shannon
cshannon-at-nctimes.net




From daemon Fri Jan 11 19:41:25 2002



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2002 19:35:44 -0600
Subject: NSOM Costs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A colleague is interested in the purchase price (a range would be
fine) of an NSOM for a wish list they are preparing.

If anyone has good/bad experiences with a particular vendor, this
would be valuable information as well.

I shall forward the info to him. Thank you.

John B.

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Sat Jan 12 13:15:29 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 11:07:22 -0800
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Its a passive system. This can be simple or hard, depending
on signal access for a particular SEM. I found that once
spoiled by active scan, passive is passe.

Orion is not the only system with total isolation. The Soft-Imaging
ADDA is fiber optic isolated between PC and SEM electronics.
Perhaps Orion forgot about that?

gary g.


At 10:57 AM 1/12/2002, you wrote:
} Orion has a PCI buss solution - see
} http://www.bright.net/~secmhs/orion_information/orion_digital_imaging_system.htm
}
}
} At 06:57 PM 1/11/02, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Jan 12 13:15:29 2002



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 13:57:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Orion has a PCI buss solution -
see
http://www.bright.net/~secmhs/orion_information/orion_digital_imaging_system.htm


At 06:57 PM 1/11/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Jan 12 13:15:29 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 11:02:19 -0800
Subject: Re: Digital image capture [take 2]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I'd like to make one clarifying fine point about A/D
conversion of active scan image capture.

Since the purpose of variable pixel dwell time is
to realtime integrate the image captured, the detector
output is not directly converted. I would expect that
the detector output is fed to a sample & hold which
precedes the A/D. The gate to the hold capacitor
is enabled for the pixel dwell time. After this time, the
gate is disabled and a conversion is initiated. Ideally,
the conversion should be as fast as possible--since
either the beam is still at the current position while it
waits for completion of conversion, or the beam moves
to the next pixel while conversion is still underway.

If it is the latter model, then integration is not totally
correct. The beam would be in the new position but
no data was being taken yet. Since this is a slow scan
situation, it seems appropriate to leave the beam as it
until the conversion is completed.

Admittedly a fine point. The folks who have already
implemented these systems certainly would have
already dealt with these issues. Those who are
thinking about new systems or general theory of
image capture may be interested in the finer points.

gary g.



From daemon Sat Jan 12 16:29:27 2002



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2002 17:18:53 -0500
Subject: Did Evex get you?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everybody,

I am just curious. Did Evex Spam anybody else directly, using your post
to the listserver, or did they single me out? I was surprised to receive
anything from the Tarquinio brothers, and I made sure I scanned the
attachment for viruses before I looked to see what they were sending
out now.

Take care,
Darrell
Any views expressed are mine, and ABSOLUTELY not my employers.



From daemon Sun Jan 13 17:37:37 2002



From: ctoretta-at-mit.edu ()
Date: Sun, 13 Jan 2002 17:17:46 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: glass bead that is coated with a metal oxide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ctoretta-at-mit.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
January 13, 2002 at 14:47:51
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ctoretta-at-mit.edu
Name: Cara Toretta

Organization: MIT

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts

Question: I am doing research on a 1mm glass bead that is coated with
a metal oxide. I am trying to take digital pictures of the bead to
look for cracks. I am new to microscopy, so i was wondering how it
could be done. I used a normal microscope where the light was emitted
from the bottom, and nothing could really be seen. What is the best
way to get a 30X image and where could i get one of these
microscopes? Thanks.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sun Jan 13 23:42:27 2002



From: BrigitB22-at-aol.com ()
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 00:33:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: heya

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by
(BrigitB22-at-aol.com) on Monday, January 14, 2002 at 00:33:04
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

message: Hi, my name is Brigit and I am a 19 year old female from San Diego, California. Ever since my 14th birthday, I have been really sexually active, but I am still a virgin. Now I am 19 and away from home, attending school at San Diego State University and sharing a dorm with four of my girlfriends and are all VERY turned on to meet a guy and satisfy ALL of his pleasures. To see our sexy pictures we took just last week and to meet some other couples, go to my website {br} { a href="http://www.joinfreee.com"} http://www.joinfreee.com {br} {br} {br} {/a}

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Mon Jan 14 02:26:22 2002



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 09:16:27 +0100
Subject: sample prep/wire EDM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I take avantage of this topic to ask for help. I have an old EDM unit, the
"Servomet Spark Machine" from Metals Research Limited in Cambridge, which
works well in spite of it's say 35 years old. I have a lot of accessories,
the instruction manual, but... a few pages of the manual are lacking, and
of course these with the circuit diagrams.

I have tried to find if Metals Research still exists, with no results. So
does a listmember knows something about that, or perheps has someone the
same machine, and could send me these diagrams.

Thanks to all

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess
67037 Strasbourg CEDEX
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)0 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



From daemon Mon Jan 14 06:56:19 2002



From: Isabel Nogueira :      isabeln-at-popsrv.ist.utl.pt
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 12:48:12 -0000
Subject: Problems with dimpler model D500i (VCR, now South Bay)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have a VCR dimpler Model D500i which is not working. There seems to be an
electronic problem, but so far we haven't been able to isolate the cause.
Our main difficulty is that the manual has no diagrams of the circuits and
that makes it twice as difficult to locate the origin of the problem.
We have contacted South Bay Technology, who have acquired VCR, asking for
such diagrams and the answer we got was "send us the equipment".
I would like to know if anyone out there as experienced this kind of
problems and/or if anyone knows where we could get the electronic diagrams
of such a dimpler.

Thank you in advance,

Isabel



Isabel Nogueira
Instituto Superior Técnico
Dep. Materiais
Avenida Rovisco Pais
1049-001 Lisboa
Portugal
tel.: +351 218418123
fax: +351 218418120
email: isabeln-at-popsrv.ist.utl.pt




From daemon Mon Jan 14 08:17:25 2002



From: Quinn, Tim Lee :      tquinn-at-ku.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 08:00:59 -0600
Subject: Wrinkles in sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings Darrell and Listers,

I see you received an unsolicited e-mail. (Less then 20 emails sent total)
OOPS! my apologies.
Please disregard that email. Please rest assured the email was an adobe
acrobat file, and anti-virus is installed on all machines.


Regards
Peter
Evex Analytical








Evex Analytical
Microanalysis and Digital Imaging
857 State Road
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-252-9192 T
609-252-9091 F
www.evex.com
sales-at-evex.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Darrell Miles" {milesd-at-US.ibm.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Saturday, January 12, 2002 5:18 PM


Listies

I have wrinkles in my sections that are already on grids. The sections
didn't appear to have wrinkles when I collected them.

Will chloroform work on wrinkles after the sections are on the grids?

Is there another method?

Tim Quinn
University of Kansas
Research Assistant
Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center
Dyche Hall Room 414
Lawrence, KS 6604-2454
785-864-4556
tquinn-at-ku.edu


From daemon Mon Jan 14 09:15:16 2002



From: Sara_Lundgren-at-s-and-s.com
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 10:05:28 -0500
Subject: Please unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Unsubscribe




From daemon Mon Jan 14 09:25:55 2002



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 07:42:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: phosphotungstic acid staining of tissue sections for tem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Oh, I see. You 'accidentally' used one of my posts to send an "unsolicited
e-mail."
Spam is spam, no matter how you want to paint it, or how few your
experiment
reached.

Darrell



"Evex" {ptarq-at-ns1.tradezone.net} on 01/14/2002 09:08:23 AM

Please respond to "Evex" {ptarq-at-ns1.tradezone.net}

To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} , Darrell Miles/Fishkill/IBM-at-IBMUS
cc:



Hi Cindy,
We use PTA on thin sections for TEM to stain the collagen. We use a 1%
solution in distilled water. Leave it as an acidic pH and filter at least
twice through a #1 filter. Best to use it fresh. 30 min staining time done
before UA and lead.

Bob
Derm Research Center
U of W
Seattle

On Sat, 12 Jan 2002, Cindy Shannon wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear List Server group,
} Does anyone use phosphotungstic acid to stain tissue sections for tem?
} ( or use any other kind of non-radio active staining method )
} I would appreciate any information on this subject.
} Thank you.
} Cindy Shannon
} cshannon-at-nctimes.net
}
}
}
}



From daemon Mon Jan 14 10:12:57 2002



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: 14 Jan 2002 11:25:18 -0500
Subject: Core Facility Management

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Before this gets out of hand, I would like to ask that we drop this subject right now.

This is bordering on the personal side. There was an apology given.

Let's remember that Nestor moderates this forum very effectively and fairly.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Darrell Miles [mailto:milesd-at-US.ibm.com]
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2002 10:18 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



Oh, I see. You 'accidentally' used one of my posts to send an "unsolicited
e-mail."
Spam is spam, no matter how you want to paint it, or how few your
experiment
reached.

Darrell



"Evex" {ptarq-at-ns1.tradezone.net} on 01/14/2002 09:08:23 AM

Please respond to "Evex" {ptarq-at-ns1.tradezone.net}

To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} , Darrell Miles/Fishkill/IBM-at-IBMUS
cc:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


List members,
I am in the process of organizing the session on Core Facility Management for M&M 2002. I would appreciate receiving contact information for the following:

1) names of staff members at your school/company who serve as on-site service engineers. These are individuals who maintain electron microscopes and related equipment that are not on OEM service contracts.

2) Individuals at academic institutions who are actively involved in doing microscopy for commercial companies.

3) Individuals from Private for-profit companies who do microscopy for commercial companies or academic institutions.

Thanks in advance,
Debby

Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907




From daemon Mon Jan 14 14:30:15 2002



From: Mary McKee :      mckee-at-helix.mgh.harvard.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 14:18:39 -0600
Subject: digital imaging for Philips CM10 TEM

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for dist-Microscopy; Mon, 14 Jan 2002 14:25:36 -0600 (CST)
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Message-Id: {p05100300b868ed9e4866-at-[206.69.208.21]}


Dear listmembers,

We're getting to the point of seriously considering adding a digital camera
and workstation to our Philips CM10 TEM. I was wondering if anyone has done
a retrofit, what equipment worked well for them, etc. Thanks.

Mary

Mary McKee
MGH Renal Unit
Charlestown, MA 02129
(617)726-3696


From daemon Mon Jan 14 15:53:52 2002



From: Bob :      bobrobs-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 14:46:16 -0700
Subject: Re: digital imaging for Philips CM10 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Mary,

I would recommend taking a close look at Emispec Systems, Inc. Their
system offers the capability for future
expansion that includes all detectors associated with TEM, should your
needs from just digital imaging.

Bob Roberts
EM Lab Services, Inc.
2409 S. Rural Rd Suite C
Tempe, Arizona 85282
480.967.3946


Mary McKee wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear listmembers,
}
} We're getting to the point of seriously considering adding a digital
} camera
} and workstation to our Philips CM10 TEM. I was wondering if anyone
} has done
} a retrofit, what equipment worked well for them, etc. Thanks.
}
} Mary
}
} Mary McKee
} MGH Renal Unit
} Charlestown, MA 02129
} (617)726-3696
}
}




From daemon Mon Jan 14 17:44:41 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 16:34:12 -0700
Subject: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Robert,

you are not the only one in this situation. We have had a number of people
who called us and asked the same question. So perhaps a bit of general
information helps everybody.

Replacing your Polaroid unit with a digital camera may be doable, but is
definitely not straightforward. your Polaroid unit consists of a high
resolution CRT and a Polaroid camera. It may be possible to take out the
camera and put in a digital camera instead, but there are certain things you
need to keep in mind and they may well create problems that can't be
overcome. First, you would have to find a lens, which would allow you to
image the monitor without distortions. You could probably use a macro lens,
but depending on the distance from the monitor and the lens, you could
potential introduce distortions. Second, you need to be able to use an
exposure time of however long it takes to take a photo (2 minutes?). That
may not be possible, depending on software and camera. You may also need a
cooled camera to reduce the amount of dark current accumulated during this
time. Third, the camera is digital with discrete pixels in X and Y. The
phototube is analog in X, but discrete in Y direction. If you are not
careful, you can create Moire Effects from mismatch between the number of
lines and the Y-resolution of the camera. Fourth, I am not so sure, what
kind of non-linearities in the signals are created by the
detector-amplifier-CRT-camera chain.

This leaves of course the direct acquisition of the image signals. If your
SEM has a TV output, you can certainly use a relatively cheap image
acquisition card. However, you would have to run your SEM in TV mode to use
this. The problem is, that TV is pretty much limited to 640x480x8 (NTSC) or
756x564x8 (PAL), i.e., low resolution. If you purchase one of those cards,
stay away from ISA cards. That's technology that went out of fashion with
the Pentium computers, and computers with ISA slots are hard to find these
days. Even worse is EISA, which was never very popular to begin with. The
current technology uses PCI slots, with many cards probably moving to
FireWire (IEEE 1394) in the near future. You also want to make sure you can
frame average to reduce noise.
Unfortunately, it is not so easy to digitize the signals from non-standard
signals. If you have NTSC or PAL, which are TV standards, it is very simple
to acquire and decode the signals, simply because they are standards, and
precisely defined. However, the slower scan (non-standard) signals require,
that one can change timings and/or levels and delays to identify line
retrace and screen retrace signals. This makes them much more expensive.
There is simply no mass production for these devices.

I will not further comment on Gary Gaugler's excellent remarks about passive
and active systems and optical data transmission (suffice it to say that we
were to my knowledge the first ones to implement it).

To summarize: There are various options to replace a Polaroid unit on an
SEM. The price range of 2-3K is a bit "optimistic", as these devices cannot
be "mass-produced" like frame grabbers, around 10K is a more realistic
price. On the other hand, you save about $2-$3 per photo, and do not create
a lot of chemical waste in the process. I'd be more than happy to discuss
this in more detail with you, but we should probably not do that on the list
server.

Mike

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: "robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2002 12:06 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hello Listers,
Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W instant
film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM.
Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
still can reorder I prefer not to................

TIA

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
www.tdk.com



From daemon Mon Jan 14 17:56:40 2002



From: Henry Eichelberger :      heichelb-at-binghamton.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 18:52:34 -0500
Subject: RE: A non-radio active positive stain for sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Cindy:
Phosphotungstic acid has indeed been used, but as a substitute for uranyl
acetate stain, I much prefer bismuth for staining sections on grids.
Bismuth tends to act as a general contrast enhancing stain for sections due
in part to its ability to interact with reduced osmium. It stains DNA,
ferritin, glycogen, lysosomes, polysaccharides, and ribosomes. The one
caveat is that at high mags bismuth stain graininess becomes apparent.
Bismuth can be used with uranyl and lead stain to achieve an even greater
contrast enhancing effect.
Hope this helps,
Henry

Cindy Shannon wrote:.............................
"Dear List Server group,
Does anyone use phosphotungstic acid to stain tissue sections for tem?
( or use any other kind of non-radio active staining method )
I would appreciate any information on this subject.
Thank you.
Cindy Shannon
cshannon-at-nctimes.net"





From daemon Mon Jan 14 19:34:14 2002



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 19:26:18 -0600
Subject: Low Vac SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Group

Looking for anyone who is using Low Vacuum (poor vacuum) SEM to image and
characterize insulating polymer materials. I am not very familiar with this
type of system but understand the basic idea of how it works. Want to
explore the practical side of looking at non-coated insulators or water
containing samples from both an imaging and EDS analysis perspective.

Prefer direct replies.

Thanks

Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Electron Microprobe Lab
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx 75275
voice: 214-768-2756
fax: 214-768-2701
E-mail: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu


From daemon Mon Jan 14 20:10:32 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 21:12:59 -0500
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: glass bead that is coated with a metal oxide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Cara,

Your problem is a good example of the general problem of defining
inspection criteria, since the lighting may critically influence what
one can see. I once had a similar problem looking for cracks in a
graphite coating on quartz fibers. The answerto your question depends a
bit on the size of the cracks and the opacity and reflectivityof the
oxide coated surface. But you should ensure that you have a lighting set
up that allows you to dependably see the cracks before worrying about
the camera. Most of the digital cameras that can be used with a
microscope would probably be adequate to recording the crack, once you
get the viewing situation set up.

Low magnification approaches include the following:
You might first try the microscope that you used before with lighting as
follows: If it has a condenser lens below the sample position,
experiment with placing a sheet of something opaque with a small hole in
it in the light path so that the light is blocked from passing around
your sample. Then you will have a better chance to see any light passing
through your glass bead due to a crack in the coating. You might want to
turn off the room lights to get the best view.

Alternatively, you could arrange for "dark field" illumination by doing
the opposite: cut some disks (or try some coins in different sizes) and
hold them with tweezers in the lightpath beneath the condenser lens so
that light cannot pass through the sample bead directly but must bounce
off the sides of the sample to be seen. This may be effective if the
bare glass in the cracks is more reflective than the coating.

A 1mm round object could be observed well under a stereo-binocular
microscope common in many biology labs as a "dissecting microscope".
This has the advantage of an upright image that will make turning the
sphere to view it from all sides easier, and it has good "depth of
field". However, you would need to arrange the lighting to suit your
problem and if the cracks are very narrow, you might have to inspect at
a magnification that exceeds the upper limit of such a 'scope. The light
generally comes from above on such a microscope. Some microscopes of
this kind are equipped with a "ring light", a small fluorescent lamp or
a fiber optic fixture around the lens that gives a very diffuse light.
This might be helpful if both the bead and the coating are shiny and
tend to reflect strongly.

Another low mag ( or no mag!) approach might be possible with a fiber
optic lamp if one is available and your coating is opaque. If you make
an opaque cover to fit over the end of the fiber optic with a hole in it
that is smaller than 1mm, you might be able to see light projected
through a crack when you place the bead over the hole. Again, use a
darkened room to see the light projected through the bead. If this
works, orient the fiber optic and bead so that they can be observed with
the microscope while you're doing this.

For very narrow cracks there may be no alternative to using
magnification that is too high to allow you to see the entire bead in
focus at one time. In that case, there may be no alternative to racking
the focus up and down and systematically rotating the bead to all
orientations. If you can find a metallurgical microscope (engineering,
materials science departments) it will have a simple means of switching
between bright field and dark field reflected light. Either could be
best, depending on the reflectivities involved.

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist



ctoretta-at-mit.edu {mailto:ctoretta-at-mit.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com {mailto:ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (ctoretta-at-mit.edu {mailto:ctoretta-at-mit.edu} ) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
} January 13, 2002 at 14:47:51
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Email: ctoretta-at-mit.edu {mailto:ctoretta-at-mit.edu}
} Name: Cara Toretta
}
} Organization: MIT
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
}
} Question: I am doing research on a 1mm glass bead that is coated with
} a metal oxide. I am trying to take digital pictures of the bead to
} look for cracks. I am new to microscopy, so i was wondering how it
} could be done. I used a normal microscope where the light was emitted
} from the bottom, and nothing could really be seen. What is the best
} way to get a 30X image and where could i get one of these microscopes?
} Thanks.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}
}




From daemon Mon Jan 14 20:25:08 2002



From: JLCastner-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 21:19:37 EST
Subject: Brightfield Photomicroscopy w Nikon D1X Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello All,

I am a scientific photographer, but have done little in the way of
photomicroscopy. I am in the process of evaluating compound microscopes for
purchase to use specifically with a Nikon D1X professional digital camera. I
will be taking brightfield photomicrographs of prepared botanical specimens
(such as root cross sections, anther cross sections, etc.). I would like to
speak to anyone who has used a Nikon D series digital camera on a compound
microscope in similar photomicroscopy applications. Perhaps you can help me
avoid making an expensive purchasing error.

Thank you very much, and please feel free to reply privately if you feel
most of the list would not be interested.

Sincerely,

Jim Castner
352-371-6439
jlcastner-at-aol.com


From daemon Mon Jan 14 21:59:31 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 22:58:55 -0500
Subject: Re: Digital Camera For JEOL T220 A

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Debbie,
In general, I fully agree with you, especially for those still using
ETECs because the recording system can actually resolve all 2000 lines
in a scan. However, I was recently at JEOL headquarters in Danvers, MA
and saw sometruly outstanding digital images in their lobby. They are
several feet squareand digitally scanned at 16k x 16k (at least one was
made up of 4 of these).

File size still presents a major problemfor digital as you could only
fit 2 of these on a CD-R (256M each or 2 CD-Rs for the 4 part montage).
However, 2k x 2k (4M file) is much more reasonable than it was just a
couple of years ago in terms of both storage costs and processing time
and 4k x 4k, I feel, is probably as good as you'll see off a CRT at 2000
lines. Of course if you're just printing on plain paper, you'll never
get an equivalent image, but if you use "photo" paper in your inkjet,
you're up to a buck a shot, and still not quite as good as film. For
those who ponder this quandry, try glossy brochure paper. It's a lot
cheaper and works almost as well as the "photo" paper.

It pains me to see the lack of interest in high quality photographs in
all areas, but the digital is rapidly getting better, as are the inkjet
printers.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA


Debby Sherman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com {mailto:ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Robert,
} Have you tried the Polaroid Type 55 p/n film. Positives do have to be coated but the negatives give 7x the resolution of the positives and are what we are primarily interested in. Digital cameras are great for most SEM work but we still rely on film for situations requiring maximum resolution or when we expect to enlarge the image. Since we deal with primarily low atomic number samples (biological) the problem of "empty magnification" occurs at relatively low magnifications. Take the originals at higher mags is just not equivalent to taking them on film with the option of enlarging the print using a high quality photographic enlarger.
}
} This is not to say that you should not digitize your instrument. We digitized an older instrument a few years ago. I find that most investigators take more pictures than formerly (very good for sampling reasons) and, of course, spend less in the process with less waste. I feel quite strongly that there is definite need for both options and am puzzled that many people buy new instruments without the option of a film camera. Someday digital will be equivalent but I question whether we are there now with the cameras usually supplied with the instruments.
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu {mailto:dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
} S-052 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
}
} On Thursday, January 10, 2002 2:05 PM, robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com {mailto:robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com} {robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} {mailto:robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com {mailto:ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hello Listers,
} } Due to the fact that Polaroid will soon stop production of 667 B&W instant
} } film, I have an immediate need for a digital camera for my JEOL T220 A SEM.
} } Any help (vendors welcome) would be appreciated on or off listserver.
} } Budget is around 2 - 3k. I am down to my last few boxes, and although I
} } still can reorder I prefer not to................
} }
} } TIA
} }
} } Robert Fowler
} } Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
} } TDK Components USA, Inc.
} } Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} } 1 TDK Boulevard
} } Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} } Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
} } Fax: (770) 487-1460
} } email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com {mailto:rfowler-at-tdktca.com}
} } www.tdk.com {http://www.tdk.com}
} }
} }




From daemon Tue Jan 15 10:59:28 2002



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 16:44:49 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: RE: A non-radio active positive stain for sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would be grateful if you would post your bismuth staining
protocol.

Dave


On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 18:52:34 -0500 Henry Eichelberger
{heichelb-at-binghamton.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Cindy:
} Phosphotungstic acid has indeed been used, but as a substitute for uranyl
} acetate stain, I much prefer bismuth for staining sections on grids.
} Bismuth tends to act as a general contrast enhancing stain for sections due
} in part to its ability to interact with reduced osmium. It stains DNA,
} ferritin, glycogen, lysosomes, polysaccharides, and ribosomes. The one
} caveat is that at high mags bismuth stain graininess becomes apparent.
} Bismuth can be used with uranyl and lead stain to achieve an even greater
} contrast enhancing effect.
} Hope this helps,
} Henry
}
} Cindy Shannon wrote:.............................
} "Dear List Server group,
} Does anyone use phosphotungstic acid to stain tissue sections for tem?
} ( or use any other kind of non-radio active staining method )
} I would appreciate any information on this subject.
} Thank you.
} Cindy Shannon
} cshannon-at-nctimes.net"
}
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Tue Jan 15 14:22:18 2002



From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes :      rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 15:16:21 -0500
Subject: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Microscopists:

I'd like to obtain permission to reproduce a figure from a paper in
Scanning Microscopy Supplement, Volume 10 (1996), a.k.a the Proceedings of
the 14th Pfefferkorn Conference. The publisher is listed as Scanning
Microscopy International, with the following contact information:

Dr. Om Johari
P.O. Box 66507
Chicago (A.M.F. O'Hare), IL 60666-0507
USA

E-mail: 73211.647-at-compuserve.com
Web: http://hem2.passagen.se/smi/
Tel: 847-524-6677

But... the phone number has been disconnected, there's no reply to mail or
e-mail, and the web address gives a "page not found" default (in Swedish);
searching this ISP gave me no results, and neither do the regular search
engines (Google, etc.).

Does anyone know what happened to Scanning Microscopy International and how
to contact them, or who owns the copyright to this publication now?

Thanks in advance,

Rick Powell


*****************************************************************************************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631)
980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
*****************************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Jan 15 17:59:04 2002



From: L. D. Marks :      ldm-at-risc4.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2002 17:49:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Surface session at Durban ICEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


As I am sure you are already aware, the deadline for abstracts for
the 15th International Conference on Electron Microscopy, Durban,
South Africa (http://www.icem15.com) is Febuary 1st - rapidly
approaching. I am organizing a session on "Instrumentation and
Characterization of Surfaces". Loosely I would describe the session
as covering:

a) All TEM/SEM/STEM based techniques for obtaining surface
sensitive signals from surfaces, particularly under controlled
conditions (e.g. UHV, controlled gas).

b) All TEM/SEM/STEM techniques for obtaining nanoscale or
atomic scale information from surfaces. This would include both
profile and plan view imaging of surfaces.

c) Any new types of instrumentation for obtaining surface
information.

d) Other types of surface microscopies, for instance HREM
in plan or profile modes, LEEM, PEEM, REM.

e) New methods of obtaining atomic-scale surface information,
e.g. Direct Methods.

f) Applications of surface-sensitive techniques to problems,
e.g. heterogeneous catalysis, semiconductor or oxide growth.

I hope you will have the opportunity to submit an abstract. Please
feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

-----------------------------------------------
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60201, USA
Tel: (847) 491-3996 Fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:ldm-at-risc4.numis.nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
-----------------------------------------------




From daemon Wed Jan 16 01:57:46 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 08:50:10 +0100
Subject: Fw: Brightfield Photomicroscopy w Nikon D1X Camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jim,

Here at our departement I've been using the Nikon D1 on a Zeiss Stemi 2000 C
and Sv 11 to take photo's of whole mice and organs.
I've to say that with 800 ISO I still needed a shutter time of about more
than 1/10 to get a bright image, but you can fix the camera, so that's not a
real problem in general, only when taking images of live mice it's not
always easy. The Stemi is a stereomicroscope , I don't know if it's such a
one you would like to use?!
The only "problem", don't call it a real problem, but you know what I mean,
is to set up the correct white balance. When you make a small change in the
light intensity of the microscope, it can result in a big change for the
white balance. But in general, I, and the professors/students, are very
satisfied with the results. I hope I was of some help for you, if you need
some more info, feel free to ask!
Best regards,

Sven

__________________________________________
Sven Terclavers
Research Assistent
Center for Molecular and Vascular Biology
Center for Transgene Technology and Gene Therapy
Campus Gasthuisberg O/N
Herestraat 49
3000 Leuven
Belgium
___________________________________________


----- Original Message -----
} From: {"JLCastner-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 3:19 AM
} Subject: Brightfield Photomicroscopy w Nikon D1X Camera
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hello All,
} }
} } I am a scientific photographer, but have done little in the way of
} } photomicroscopy. I am in the process of evaluating compound microscopes
} for
} } purchase to use specifically with a Nikon D1X professional digital
camera.
} I
} } will be taking brightfield photomicrographs of prepared botanical
} specimens
} } (such as root cross sections, anther cross sections, etc.). I would
like
} to
} } speak to anyone who has used a Nikon D series digital camera on a
compound
} } microscope in similar photomicroscopy applications. Perhaps you can
help
} me
} } avoid making an expensive purchasing error.
} }
} } Thank you very much, and please feel free to reply privately if you
} feel
} } most of the list would not be interested.
} }
} } Sincerely,
} }
} } Jim Castner
} } 352-371-6439
} } jlcastner-at-aol.com
} }
} }
}



From daemon Wed Jan 16 07:10:02 2002



From: a7528922 :      a7528922-at-cic.aku.ac.ir
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 06:59:37 -0600
Subject: SEM. polaroid film type 52

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues;
We have a HITACHI SEM. We use Polaroid Type 52 for making pictures. Is
there any
replacement for this type of film without replacing the holder on the
microscope? Where one can buy this type of film? Type 52 seems to be very
rare and it can not be found in the
market.
M. H. Kish
mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir


From daemon Wed Jan 16 07:22:34 2002



From: Val Moshkovskiy :      Moshkovskiy-at-rochester.mellesgriot.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 08:21:26 -0500
Subject: FW: Need a Study

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Can anyone recommend a market research firm or consultant to conduct a
} study on an optical instrument to be used in microscopy. Please, respond
} to moshkovskiy-at-rochester.mellesgriot.com
}
} Thank you,
}
} Val Moshkovskiy
}


From daemon Wed Jan 16 08:06:28 2002



From: Tom :      Hanley_Tom-at-colstate.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 09:00:11 -0400
Subject: high power objective for Leitz pol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to buy a 60 or 100 X objective for one of our Leitz
Laborlux 11 pol. I have seen a couple on ebay but am reluctant. I
am not sure they would fit. Is there a more dependable source?

The documentation that came with our Leitz scopes has drifted away.

Thanks.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr. Tom Hanley, Department of Chemistry and Geology, Columbus State U.,
4225 University Ave., Columbus, Georgia 31907-5645.
Links to the ACRES project and to 1998 and 1999 pictures I took in Panama may be found at:
http://chemgeo.ColState.edu/th_hp.htm
VOX: 706-568-2075; FAX: 706-569-3133.


From daemon Wed Jan 16 09:10:33 2002



From: Pierre-M. Charest :      pcharest-at-rsvs.ulaval.ca
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 10:00:23 -0500
Subject: Meeting - Microscopy & Microanalysis 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Quebec City will hot the Microscopy & Microanalysis 2002 Meeting on
August 4-8. Deadline for abstract submission is February 15. All
information concerning the scientific program and the abstract
submission process is available on the MSA web site at the following
URL address:

http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html


Quebec City is an exciting destination also for you vacation. The
local French culture is charming and people are very open to
visitors. The historic Old City as well as the close wild nature of
the Laurentides are a Guarantee of the success of your next summer
vacation. For a foretaste of Quebec City, please check the Local
Arrangement Committee web site at:

http://msc.rsvs.ulaval.ca


Pierre M. Charest, Chair
LAC - M&M 2002
pcharest-at-rsvs.ulaval.ca
--
******************************************
MICROSCOPY& MICROANALYSIS 2002
QUEBEC CITY 4-8 AUGUST 2002
VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT:
http://msc.rsvs.ulaval.ca/2002/2002.html
http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MMMeeting.html
******************************************
Dr. Pierre M. Charest, Professeur titulaire
Departement de phytologie
Pavillon C.-E. Marchand, bureau 4245
Universite Laval
Sainte-Foy, Que., CANADA
G1K 7P4
Tél. (418) 656-7792 (bur), 656-2131 #6629 (lab)
Fax (418) 656-7176
Email: pcharest-at-rsvs.ulaval.ca
http://msc.rsvs.ulaval.ca
http://www.rsvs.ulaval.ca/
http://alpha.eru.ulaval.ca/phytowww/CV/pm_charest.html
http://www.crefsip.ulaval.ca/
******************************************


From daemon Wed Jan 16 09:25:41 2002



From: Robin Scribailo :      RScrib-at-purduenc.edu
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 08:41:25 -0600
Subject: Dear Microscopy listserver,

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopy listserver,

I have a Nikon SMZ-U and Nikon optiphot 2 microscope that I am trying to adapt to digital photography. Both have trinocular tubes and are hooked up to a Nikon HFX-DX 35 mm camera system. I was informed that the Nikon coolpix 5000 cannot be adapted to these microscopes because Nikon does not (and does not plan to) make a lens for this. As a result I purchased their coolpix MDC lens and a Diagnostic instruments, Inc. Part # D 10 NLC C-Mount for a 38 mm ISO port to adapt for the Nikon Coolpix 995 .
I have since learned that a stop-down ring is made for the coolpix 5000 to adapt it to optional lenses for the coolpix 995. Would this work with the microscopes or would parfocality be a problem?

I have been told that the megapixel difference between the two cameras will not make any difference to image quality particularly at higher mag since the microsocope aperture size will limit this anyway.

Part of the issue here is that the camera will also be used for outdoor photography and close-ups. Although the megapixels may not make a difference for microscopy it will make a difference for outdoor shots where the images will be blown up considerably.

Any advice would be most appreciated. Please send the information directly to me and I will summarize for the group.

Sincerely,

Robin

Robin W. Scribailo Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director of the Aquatic Plant Herbarium
Biological Sciences
Purdue University North Central
1401 S. U.S. 421
Westville, IN 46391-9528
(219) 785-5255
Fax (219) 785-5483




From daemon Wed Jan 16 09:37:25 2002



From: Kevin Mackenzie :      k.s.mackenzie-at-abdn.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 15:29:45 +0000
Subject: TEM collagen fibrils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




A colleague is planning to investigate collagen reinforcement in natural
tissues using the TEM.
Part of the project is to measure the diameter and spacing of the collagen
fibrils. However they are finding that the preparation of the tissue is
changing both the diameters and spacing of the fibres.

Has anyone suggestions/comments on how to improve tissue structure or any
other alternative methods.


thanks


Kevin
Electron Microscope unit
Department of Zoology
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
AB24 2TZ

Tel 01224-272847
Fax 01224-272396
------------
Kevin Mackenzie
k.s.mackenzie-at-abdn.ac.uk



From daemon Wed Jan 16 09:46:30 2002



From: Mark Germani :      mgermani-at-micromaterialsresearch.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 09:38:35 -0600
Subject: Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Electron Microscopy and Microanalysis is a one-day short course to be held
on Sunday March 17, 2002 at PITTCON 2002 in New Orleans. The course is an
introduction to SEM, TEM and x-ray microanalysis and is designed for
analytical chemists and others who need to use these techniques for
industrial problem-solving and product research and development. For more
information and online registration visit www.pittcon.org. The short course
is number 229 and can be found under the Microscopy section on the Short
Courses web page.

Mark Germani, Ph.D.
MicroMaterials Research, Inc.
136 Shore Drive, #200
Burr Ridge, IL 60521

(630) 325-8170
(630) 325-8178 fax

mgermani-at-micromaterialsresearch.com





From daemon Wed Jan 16 11:56:26 2002



From: Tina Schwach :      tschwach-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 11:47:22 -0600
Subject: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rick,
The organization is Scanning and you can find them at www.scanning-fams.org.

Dr.Tina S. Schwach, President
Microscopy Consulting Services Inc.
651-681-0112
----- Original Message -----
} From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 2:16 PM


Hello Microscopists:

I'd like to obtain permission to reproduce a figure from a paper in
Scanning Microscopy Supplement, Volume 10 (1996), a.k.a the Proceedings of
the 14th Pfefferkorn Conference. The publisher is listed as Scanning
Microscopy International, with the following contact information:

Dr. Om Johari
P.O. Box 66507
Chicago (A.M.F. O'Hare), IL 60666-0507
USA

E-mail: 73211.647-at-compuserve.com
Web: http://hem2.passagen.se/smi/
Tel: 847-524-6677

But... the phone number has been disconnected, there's no reply to mail or
e-mail, and the web address gives a "page not found" default (in Swedish);
searching this ISP gave me no results, and neither do the regular search
engines (Google, etc.).

Does anyone know what happened to Scanning Microscopy International and how
to contact them, or who owns the copyright to this publication now?

Thanks in advance,

Rick Powell


****************************************************************************
*************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631)
980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
****************************************************************************
*************



From daemon Wed Jan 16 12:12:31 2002



From: Ken Gaugler :      ken-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 10:10:07 -0800
Subject: Re: Service for ISI

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sandra,

Richard Murphy is an excellent service engineer and who worked for ISI
for
many years. He gave me great support when I was at Lawrence Berkeley
Laboratory and elsewhere. I will forward his pager number to you.

Best Regards,
Ken Gaugler

S Keller wrote:

}
}
} Hi All:
} There was a thread about ISI service. Who
} is now responsible for their service?
} Thanks in advance,
} Sandra
}
}

--
Ken Gaugler
Santa Clara, CA.
~~ spark: N6OSK ~~
PGP: 2EF7 437E 1D0B 602D BC2C 92D1 A548 C11B B901 8CDE





From daemon Wed Jan 16 16:27:03 2002



From: Don Grimes :      microtoday-at-mindspring.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 16:58:40 -0600
Subject: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Tina,
I humbly suggest that you are making a mistake. What this guy is looking for
is what us old folks called the "SEM Conference" - which Om Johari ran for
many years and which he closed down a number of years ago.
"Scanning", a meeting and a publication, is a more recent operation run by
the FAMS group and which is still in existance. I do not believe, and I
could be wrong, that the new "SCANNING" acquired the old "SEM Conference".
The last address that I had for Om has been given to the requester.
Regards,
Don Grimes, Microscopy Today

-----Original Message-----
} From: Tina Schwach [mailto:tschwach-at-mindspring.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 11:47 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; Rick Powell at Nanoprobes


Rick,
The organization is Scanning and you can find them at www.scanning-fams.org.

Dr.Tina S. Schwach, President
Microscopy Consulting Services Inc.
651-681-0112
----- Original Message -----
} From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 2:16 PM


Hello Microscopists:

I'd like to obtain permission to reproduce a figure from a paper in
Scanning Microscopy Supplement, Volume 10 (1996), a.k.a the Proceedings of
the 14th Pfefferkorn Conference. The publisher is listed as Scanning
Microscopy International, with the following contact information:

Dr. Om Johari
P.O. Box 66507
Chicago (A.M.F. O'Hare), IL 60666-0507
USA

E-mail: 73211.647-at-compuserve.com
Web: http://hem2.passagen.se/smi/
Tel: 847-524-6677

But... the phone number has been disconnected, there's no reply to mail or
e-mail, and the web address gives a "page not found" default (in Swedish);
searching this ISP gave me no results, and neither do the regular search
engines (Google, etc.).

Does anyone know what happened to Scanning Microscopy International and how
to contact them, or who owns the copyright to this publication now?

Thanks in advance,

Rick Powell


****************************************************************************
*************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631)
980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
****************************************************************************
*************





From daemon Wed Jan 16 16:42:20 2002



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 16:42:29 -0600
Subject: Texas Society for Microscopy Sring Meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All: the Texas Society for Microscopy Spring meeting will
be held in Fort Worth, TX
on April 18-20 at the Ramada Plaza Hotel, 1701 Commerce St.,
Fort Worth Tx.
Please see our website at http://www.microscopy.cjb.net/ for
more details.
Schedules and registration will be available at a later
date. Any questions about the
meeting should be directed to Alice Stacey, Program Chair.
Her email address is
kevalc-at-earthlink.net.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
webmaster for TSM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From daemon Wed Jan 16 18:24:04 2002



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 19:14:28 -0500
Subject: Re: gold removal from SEM specimens

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To All;

We routinely use a potassium iodide mixture off the shelf made by Acton
Industries, Pennsylvania, USA, on GaAs semiconductors. It's called "GE-6". I
imagine for "gold etch." The pure Au metal is ~ 3.5 uM and is removed
cleanly by this material. The only caveat is that it attacks exposed GaAs
very quickly.

If anyone needs details, please contact me directly.

Peter Tomic
Group Leader
Failure Analysis & Analytical Services
Anadigics, Inc.
Warren, New Jersey

-----Original Message-----
} From: David Henriks [mailto:henriks-at-southbaytech.com]
Sent: Monday, January 07, 2002 3:41 PM
To: c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
Cc: Microscopy Listerver


Chris:

A similar question arose on another listserver, although it was removing
a 2 mciron gold metallizton from GaAs. The responses from there were
as follows:

Response 1
"Greetings!

It is possible that a cut or buffered aqua regia might do the trick. I
have had some success with the recipe below on Au
metallization at M2 and above on GaAs dice. The interlayer dielectric
was silicon dioxide, so there was not a lot of seepage into the
die substrate layer - this, more than the recipe, might have kept the
damage down. Assuming SiO2 as the ILD on all layers of your
part, this might still work:

50 ml deionized water

30 ml HCl

20 ml HNO3

Swirl or agitate the part in the solution for five minutes. Inspect and
repeat once if needed.

One minute rinse in deionized water, followed by 30 seconds rinse in
acetone. Dry under heat lamp to minimize surface staining.

As always, try this on a practice part first in case this does not
buffer the reaction with GaAs enough.

Good Luck !

Regards,

Carl Nail
National Semiconductor
Carl.Nail-at-nsc.com"

Response 2
"A solution of potassium iodide and iodine in water is a decent gold
etch. I have no idea how it would affect GaAs, but I suspect it would
be less destructive than Aqua Regia.

Alan Street
alan-at-irsi.com"

I hope this helps!

David

Chris Jeffree wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear All
}
} I have been asked for methods of removing the gold sputtered
} coating from
} polished geological specimens that have been used as SEM
} specimens. I have suggested washing with mercury, or alkaline
} sodium cyanide solution, or ammonium thiocyanate solution.
}
} Are there any other methods which would be preferable?
}
} Best wishes, and Happy New Year
}
} Chris
} ==========================================
} Dr. Chris Jeffree
} University of Edinburgh
} BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
} Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
} Waddington Building
} King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
} EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
} Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
} FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
} Mobile 07710 585 401
} email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
} =========================================

--
David Henriks TEL: +1-949-492-2600
South Bay Technology, Inc. FAX: +1-949-492-1499
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

*** www.southbaytech.com ***


From daemon Wed Jan 16 20:54:40 2002



From: Oliver Hockenhull :      hereticfilms-at-shaw.ca
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 18:44:54 -0800
Subject: video footage request

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I am a media artist based in Canada. I am presently working on a low
budget, art funded DVD project destined for non-profit art gallery use.

The work is a philosophic and poetic look at evolution and bio-diversity.

I am very interested in getting and using some of the video members may
have made on life forms such as viruses, bacteria, etc.

I would be also interested in
acquiring from you a high quality beta-sp or preferable dv tape you might
have of these studies as well as other studies you may have of microscopic
life forms/elements dna, diatoms, etc. Full credit to your organization
(and the videographer if desired) would be given in the final piece. I
would pay for all shipping and handling costs.

The video and images would be a small component of a much longer work.

My last work recently screened at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C.
and I have had shows at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and at
many other prestigious venues around the world. I include my bio. below.

Please get back to me regarding my request.


Best Wishes,
Oliver Hockenhull
Contact: hereticfilms-at-shaw.ca



From daemon Thu Jan 17 00:11:41 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 01:04:29 -0500
Subject: Market research firm

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Val Moshkovskiy wrote:
==========================================================
Can anyone recommend a market research firm or consultant to conduct a
study on an optical instrument to be used in microscopy.
============================================================
We have used in the past the following group:

Microscopy/Marketing & Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118-2140
PH: (413) 746-6931
FX: (413) 746-9311
Email: mme-at-map.com

Our contact there is Ms. Barbara Foster. We have no financial interest in
this firm, we are just a satisfied client.

Chuck

===================================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-(610)-436-5400
President 1-(800)-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-(610)-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail: cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA Cust. Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com


Look for us!
############################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
############################
==================================================



From daemon Thu Jan 17 05:36:05 2002



From: Anaspec :      anaspec-at-icon.co.za
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 13:24:37 +0200
Subject: ICEM 15, Durban South Africa 1 - 6 September ***Reminder****

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all
A good new year to all from all of us down here in sunny South Africa.

News on the 15th International Conference on Electron Microscopy ( ICEM 15 )
to be held in South Africa, is that things are well in hand. The Scientific
Programme is filling up very quickly and promising to be very interesting.
( http://www.icem15.com/Scientific%20Prog.htm )

Tourists to the country will also be glad to hear that the South African
currency is moving in their favour !!!

Just for those who have not heard of ICEM before, this conference does not
only cover electron microscopy but all disciplines of microscopy. Come along
and see for your self.

We are also pleased that the world Earth Summit, Johannesburg, has
rescheduled their conference to the week before ICEM 15 and not in the same
week as was planned. This conference will attract an estimated 60,000
delegates to Johannesburg, South Africa, which would have made flight
bookings a bit of a problem.( For more on this summit
http://www.joburgsummit2002.com/ ) However we do suggest that you do get
your booking done as soon as possible as most delegates of the earth summit
are sure to visit Durban just to see the beaches. Your travel bookings can
be done via the Turners website (
http://www.turners.co.za/icem15/default.htm ) who are the conference
organisers and travel agents.

However, the main reason for the email is as a reminder that abstracts must
be in by February 2002. Yes, you should panic, that is only a few weeks
away. Please make sure you get them in on time.
If you are having any problems please consult with the relevant people for
your session.

Should you have any further questions, queries or simply would like to see
the current scientific programme, please consult www.icem15.com website for
more details .

Any suppliers still interested in exhibiting should also contact us fairly
quickly, as there are not many stands left.

Best regards and look forward to seeing all 1500, and more, of you at the
beach in Durban.

Luc Harmsen

Marketing ICEM15



From daemon Thu Jan 17 07:25:14 2002



From: ramos-at-argo-tech.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 08:12:57 -0500
Subject: SEM. polaroid film type 52

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


M.H. Kish

We utilize both digital photography and type 52 polariod in our
metallographic and SEM lab areas. We buy the type 52 film (by the case)
from:
Laube Photo and Digital Imaging
151 West Exchange Street
Akron, OH 44302
1-800-395-2748



Kelly A. Ramos
Argo-Tech Corporation
Materials Laboratories
Metallurgical Engineer/Supervisor
23555 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44117
216-692-5904 (or 216-692-5446)
FAX---} 216-692-5816


Dear Colleagues;
We have a HITACHI SEM. We use Polaroid Type 52 for making pictures. Is
there any
replacement for this type of film without replacing the holder on the
microscope? Where one can buy this type of film? Type 52 seems to be very
rare and it can not be found in the
market.
M. H. Kish
mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir




From daemon Thu Jan 17 07:25:15 2002



From: Jaakko Keranen :      jaakko.keranen-at-tut.fi
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 15:16:14 +0200
Subject: Summer School on Electron Crystallography and Tomography

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

The 8th Euro School on Electron Crystallography, 7 - 12 June 2002, Tampere,
Finland

The School will consist of a series of tutorial lectures at a level suited
to graduate students and others wanting to explore the principles of
electron crystallography and tomography. The topics of the School are as
follows: high resolution electron microscopy and image simulation,
quantitative electron diffraction, crystallographic image processing,
convergent beam electron diffraction, Fourier synthesis, direct methods for
crystal structure refinement, and electron tomography of virus structures.
Practical software training is an essential part of the School. The
participants are welcome to present posters.

Applications should be sent before the 15th of February 2002. The number of
participants is limited to 50. You can use on-line registration at the
homepage of Electron Crystallography School,
http://conferences.tut.fi/ecschool2002. For further information, please
contact the Conference Secretary of Electron Crystallography School 2002:
Ms. Minnamari Vippola, Tampere University of Technology, Centre for
Electron Microscopy, e-mail: minnamari.vippola-at-tut.fi

Further information on electron crystallography in the Finnish wilderness
can be found by clicking on the website
http://www.conferences.tut.fi/ecschool2002

***********************************************************************************
Jaakko Keränen

Research Fellow

Tampere University of Technology
Institute of Materials Science
Centre for Electron Microscopy
P.O. Box 589
FIN-33101 Tampere
FINLAND

Phone +358-(0)3-3115 3562
Fax. +358-(0)3-3115 2330
Email jaakko.keranen-at-tut.fi
http://www.tut.fi/units/ms/elm/enindex.htm

The 8th Euro Summer School on Electron Crystallography will be held in
Murikka, Finland, on 7 - 12 June 2002.

Log on to http://www.conferences.tut.fi/ecschool2002/

The 53rd meeting of The Scandinavian Society for Electron Microscopy
SCANDEM 2002 will be held in Tampere, Finland, on 12 - 15 June 2002

Log on to http://www.scandem2002.tut.fi/
***********************************************************************************



From daemon Thu Jan 17 08:04:02 2002



From: Zulal Misirli :      zmisirli-at-boun.edu.tr
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 07:54:15 -0600
Subject: About ESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear sirs,
Would you give me some information about observation of polymer
emulsions by ESEM-FEG .
I could saw something at crosssectioned(fractured in liquid nitrogen)
samples( a water-soluble substance was considered as a surface
activator is not seen so good as a network.
I have not cryogenic specimen preparation system.
Thank you for your help.
Sincerelly,
Zulal Misirli


From daemon Thu Jan 17 09:25:36 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 10:14:00 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM collagen fibrils

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The skeletal muscle folks always fix in situ or with extirpated muscle under
slight tension (by pinning) to prevent tetanic collapse of sarcomeres during
fixation. This effect is established rather quickly after fixation is
begun.

If one looks at the CT fibers in air-dried (on the slide and stained with
Gomori's aldehyde fuchsin followed by H&E or one of the common blood dyes)
mesentery with BrtFld LM, for example, one will note that the magenta (from
Gomori) elastic fibers run straight while the collagen bundles commonly run
'wavy'. So, to the point.

It would appear that elastin is generally stretched and collagen is normally
NOT under tension in those tissues in which one finds randomly organized
loose connective tissue (LCT) or even the 'woven' fibrous CT of dermis.
Again, to the point.

My suggestion to someone who is trying to normalize the appearance of
collagen filaments, fibrils and/or fibers would be to insure that every
tissue is under equivalent, circumferential tension during fixation. Given
the 'wavy', relaxed(?) condition of collagen bundles in most non-tendinous,
non-ligamentous CT, I would exert sufficient tension on the subject tissues
to insure that the fibers themselves were under tension (i.e., slightly
stretched). Using a tensometer with a 4x40mm slice of dermis(skin) for
example, one should be able to define the tensile force rise point easily as
the slice is stretched and then determine, microscopically, in semi-thin
sections, those fiber bundles of collagen that were under tension when
fixed. They will be straight.

Hope this helps,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
The best research
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
occurs before work
West Chester University
at the bench.
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu




} ----------
} From: Kevin Mackenzie
} Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 10:29 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM collagen fibrils
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} A colleague is planning to investigate collagen reinforcement in natural
} tissues using the TEM.
} Part of the project is to measure the diameter and spacing of the collagen
}
} fibrils. However they are finding that the preparation of the tissue is
} changing both the diameters and spacing of the fibres.
}
} Has anyone suggestions/comments on how to improve tissue structure or any
} other alternative methods.
}
}
} thanks
}
}
} Kevin
} Electron Microscope unit
} Department of Zoology
} University of Aberdeen
} Aberdeen
} AB24 2TZ
}
} Tel 01224-272847
} Fax 01224-272396
} ------------
} Kevin Mackenzie
} k.s.mackenzie-at-abdn.ac.uk
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Jan 17 10:05:21 2002



From: zubkova lidia :      zubkoval-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 07:58:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Quantification of Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hi, listers,

Does anyone do quantification of Images
using Co-localization algorithm.Where can I get the
software? Any help would be appreciate.


Dr.Lidia A Zubkova
Pharmacology department
845 Union Ave
University of Tennessee
Memphis, TN 38107
Ph(901) 4486009
e-mail:Lzoubkova-at-utmem.edu

__________________________________________________
} } } } Do You Yahoo!?
} } } } Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail!
} } } } http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/
} } }
} }
} }
} } _______________________________________

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail!
http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/


From daemon Thu Jan 17 10:28:56 2002



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 08:21:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Quantification of Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have been doing alot of fluorescence double immuno localization of
proteins and have found simple image multiplication to be very useful in
showing areas of co-localization. If a pixel has a low value in the one
image and its counterpart in the adjacent image is a high signal or value,
the result of multiplication will give you a low value. But if there is a
good signal at that location in both images the multiplication gives you a
amplified pixel value. These values can very quickly become out of the
range of your image display (255 grey values) so we have been using the
multipication in "the Image Processing Tool Kit" Reindeer Games Inc.. It
does the multiplication and then rescales it to fit the scale of the
original images.

Bob
U of Washington
Seattle

On Thu, 17 Jan 2002, zubkova lidia wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} Hi, listers,
}
} Does anyone do quantification of Images
} using Co-localization algorithm.Where can I get the
} software? Any help would be appreciate.
}
}
} Dr.Lidia A Zubkova
} Pharmacology department
} 845 Union Ave
} University of Tennessee
} Memphis, TN 38107
} Ph(901) 4486009
} e-mail:Lzoubkova-at-utmem.edu
}
} __________________________________________________
} } } } } Do You Yahoo!?
} } } } } Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail!
} } } } } http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/
} } } }
} } }
} } }
} } } _______________________________________
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do You Yahoo!?
} Send FREE video emails in Yahoo! Mail!
} http://promo.yahoo.com/videomail/
}
}



From daemon Thu Jan 17 10:44:10 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 11:32:47 -0500
Subject: FW: Cornea disease Not HO HO

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




} ----------
} From: Monson, Frederick C.
} Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 11:31 AM
} To: 'WWmn916-at-aol.com'
} Subject: RE: Cornea disease Not HO HO
}
} Not disease, BUT!!!!
}
} I remember an early electron microscopist describing how, as a graduate
} student, he would sit at his dissecting scope watching the course of
} osmium tetroxide fixation. He would stop when his foggy cornea would no
} longer permit him to see anything. He would resume when his cornea
} cleared a couple days later. He did not publish the data he collected on
} corneal renewal, because he didn't think of it as an experiment in
} progress, but only as an experiment delayed.
}
} Oh well, I've done my damage for the day,
}
} Fred Monson
}
} Frederick C. Monson, PhD
} The best research
} Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
} occurs before work
} West Chester University
} at the bench.
} West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
} 610-738-0437
} fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
}
}
} ----------
} From: WWmn916-at-aol.com
} Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2002 8:43 PM
} To: histonet-at-pathology.swmed.edu
} Subject: Cornea disease
}
} Greetings to all,
} I'm curious if anyone would know if developing cornea disease is
} somewhat common in the lab world? With all the chemicals and fumes we
} work with, I wouldn't be surprised.
}
} Deb King, HT
} Sacramento, CA
}
}


From daemon Thu Jan 17 11:06:16 2002



From: Delilah Wood :      wood-at-pw.usda.gov
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 09:01:40 -0800
Subject: Re: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rick, Actually, Scanning Microscopy International is defunct. Scanning is NOT the same organization.


De Wood


At 11:47 AM 1/16/2002 -0600, Tina Schwach wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.

}

}

} Rick,

} The organization is Scanning and you can find them at www.scanning-fams.org.

}

} Dr.Tina S. Schwach, President

} Microscopy Consulting Services Inc.

} 651-681-0112

} ----- Original Message -----

} } From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes

} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

} Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 2:16 PM

} Subject: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International

}

}

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------

} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html

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}

}

} Hello Microscopists:

}

} I'd like to obtain permission to reproduce a figure from a paper in

} Scanning Microscopy Supplement, Volume 10 (1996), a.k.a the Proceedings of

} the 14th Pfefferkorn Conference. The publisher is listed as Scanning

} Microscopy International, with the following contact information:

}

} Dr. Om Johari

} P.O. Box 66507

} Chicago (A.M.F. O'Hare), IL 60666-0507

} USA

}

} E-mail: 73211.647-at-compuserve.com

} Web: http://hem2.passagen.se/smi/

} Tel: 847-524-6677

}

} But... the phone number has been disconnected, there's no reply to mail or

} e-mail, and the web address gives a "page not found" default (in Swedish);

} searching this ISP gave me no results, and neither do the regular search

} engines (Google, etc.).

}

} Does anyone know what happened to Scanning Microscopy International and how

} to contact them, or who owns the copyright to this publication now?

}

} Thanks in advance,

}

} Rick Powell

}

}

} ****************************************************************************

} *************

} Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com

} NANOPROBES, Incorporated

} 95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

}

} US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631)

} 980-3608

}

} Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html

} ****************************************************************************

} *************

}

}

}

{bold} ********************************************************************

Delilah F. Wood

Botanist

USDA-ARS-WRRC

800 Buchanan St.

Albany, CA 94710


Tel: 510-559-5653

Fax: 510-559-5818 {/bold}


From daemon Thu Jan 17 11:37:25 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 08:31:16 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM. polaroid film type 52

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Mr. Kish,
We have always used Polaroid type 55 in our Hitachi SEM, since it also
gives a negative for reproducing the photos. It is slower than the type 52,
so you have to adjust your exposure. As far as we know, it is still
available. However, several years ago we switched our SEM to a digital image
capture system, since it acquires the photo in computer-compatible format,
and we have not used the Polaroid since.
At 06:59 AM 1/16/02 -0600, you wrote:
}
} Dear Colleagues;
} We have a HITACHI SEM. We use Polaroid Type 52 for making pictures. Is
} there any
} replacement for this type of film without replacing the holder on the
} microscope? Where one can buy this type of film? Type 52 seems to be very
} rare and it can not be found in the
} market.
} M. H. Kish
} mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir
}
Regards,
Mary
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Thu Jan 17 12:30:11 2002



From: Wilson, Nick :      nwilson-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 13:22:37 -0500
Subject: Anyone used a Gatan PanaCL unit?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We are considering purchasing a Gatan PanaCL detector for our Philips XL30
SEM?
Anybody used one of these and do you have any comments / recommendations?
We would be using it for petrological and paragenetic studied of sandstones
etc.
Thanks
Nick Wilson
Dr. Nick Wilson
Research Scientist
Geological Survey of Canada
3303-33rd St. N.W.
Calgary AB, Canada T2L 2A7
Tel: 403-292-7045
Fax: 403-292-7159
Email: nwilson-at-nrcan.gc.ca {mailto:nwilson-at-nrcan.gc.ca}


From daemon Thu Jan 17 13:18:25 2002



From: Kim Riddle :      riddle-at-bio.fsu.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 14:13:23 -0500
Subject: service providers - Galveston, TX area

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,

Could someone send me the names and phone #'s of service providers other
than JEOL for service on an 100CX in the Galveston, TX area?

Thanks, Kim
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Kimberly A. Riddle
Florida State University tel: 850.644.6519
Biological Science Imaging Resource
119 Bio Unit I, 4370 fax: 850.644.0481
Tallahassee, FL 32306 riddle-at-bio.fsu.edu
http://bio.fsu.edu/~taylor/imaging
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



From daemon Thu Jan 17 15:20:03 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 16:11:34 EST
Subject: Re: Quantification of Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 1/17/02 11:07:24 AM, zubkoval-at-yahoo.com writes:

} Does anyone do quantification of Images
} using Co-localization algorithm.Where can I get the
} software? Any help would be appreciate.

Two of the software packages that I know contain that functionality are Image
Pro Plus version 4.5 (http://www.mediacy.com) and Fovea Pro
(http://reindeergraphics.com). Probably there are many others as well.


From daemon Thu Jan 17 17:03:37 2002



From: rnessler :      rnessler-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 16:55:44 -0600
Subject: RE: SEM. polaroid film type 52

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} } Dear Colleagues;
} } We have a HITACHI SEM. We use Polaroid Type 52 for making pictures. Is
} } there any
} } replacement for this type of film without replacing the holder on the
} } microscope? Where one can buy this type of film? Type 52 seems to be very
} } rare and it can not be found in the
} } market.
} } M. H. Kish
} } mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir


Try http://www.ngscorp.com/photo_film.php
We have ordered Polaroid film from them in the past, so my only connection is
as a customer (insert financial interest disclaimer here).
Randy



From daemon Thu Jan 17 17:03:38 2002



From: Linda Jenkins :      lcjenkins-at-asub.arknet.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 16:49:30 -0600
Subject: Training for Optical Microscope Technician

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I need to be trained to maintain and repair optical microscopes that are
used in biology, microbiology, and A & P classes. Where is such training
available?
Thank-you,
Linda




From daemon Thu Jan 17 21:26:14 2002



From: DAS :      metallurgy-at-skynet.be
Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2002 18:57:00 +0100
Subject: Measuring microscopes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


An interest exists in measuring cross sections of tubes, wires, etc
(diameters, thickness). I would deeply appreciate if you submit some
information on supplies and any existing experience.

Thanking you in advance,

Dr Dimitri ASLANIDIS
AMS World Services
rue de la Chaussee 1, 1320 Beauvechain, Belgium
tel +32 478 296969, fax +32 10 862134



From daemon Thu Jan 17 21:41:12 2002



From: mtl :      mtl-at-njcc.com
Date: Thu, 17 Jan 2002 22:39:00 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM. polaroid film type 52

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We no longer use Polaroid Type 52 in our lab. We found that Polaroid Type 72
gives better exposure range and doesn't require coating. Our last bulk film
purchase was from FilmAce (www.filmace.com) who advertised in Microscopy
Today. However, they also sell Type 52. Usual customer disclaimers.
Roy Nelson
Material Testing Lab.
mtl-at-njcc.com

a7528922 wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Colleagues;
} We have a HITACHI SEM. We use Polaroid Type 52 for making pictures. Is
} there any
} replacement for this type of film without replacing the holder on the
} microscope? Where one can buy this type of film? Type 52 seems to be very
} rare and it can not be found in the
} market.
} M. H. Kish
} mhkish-at-cic.aku.ac.ir



From daemon Fri Jan 18 07:07:57 2002



From: Bill Miller :      microbill-at-mohawk.net
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 07:58:50 -0500
Subject: Re: About ESEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Zulal - the hardest part is sample preparation - as the biology guys know
from many years of experience, cryo preparation is fraught with freezing
artifacts. There is a large body of literature about freeze
fracture/freeze etch that you can peruse for the myriad of artifacts and
pitfalls associates with the technique. You certainly do not need an ESEM
- indeed, you probably do not even want to use an ESEM - to do this - it
will only make a difficult task harder.

Briefly, the sample must be frozen extremely rapidly - you'll need a jet
freezer, spray freezer, diamond anvil slammer or high pressure freezer -
even then the most artifact free material you can expect is less than
500um and most of the techniques yield good samples only in the 15-25um
range. The sample must be kept below -100C or the amorphous ice will change
to crystalline ice and ruin your samples. You will,of course have to have a
cold stage in your microscope and a good cry transfer system to do all of
this.


Bill Miller


At 08:54 AM 1/17/02, Zulal Misirli wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Fri Jan 18 07:45:20 2002



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 08:38:31 -0500
Subject: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?

Thanks
Henk Colijn


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.



From daemon Fri Jan 18 08:34:50 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 07:28:20 -0700
Subject: Re: Quantification of Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Just for the record:

The mFIP (multiple Fluorescence Image Processing) module in our analySIS
software also includes colocalization.

mike

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
1675 Carr St., #105N
Lakewood, CO 80215
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: "DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 2:12 PM
To: zubkoval-at-yahoo.com; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



In a message dated 1/17/02 11:07:24 AM, zubkoval-at-yahoo.com writes:

} Does anyone do quantification of Images
} using Co-localization algorithm.Where can I get the
} software? Any help would be appreciate.

Two of the software packages that I know contain that functionality are
Image
Pro Plus version 4.5 (http://www.mediacy.com) and Fovea Pro
(http://reindeergraphics.com). Probably there are many others as well.


From daemon Fri Jan 18 09:50:25 2002



From: heiko.stegmann-at-amd.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 16:41:20 +0100
Subject: RE: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Henk,

which particular 3D reconstruction technique are you referring to?
Reconstruction from serial sections, single axis tilt series, randomly tilted single particles... ????

-Heiko



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Hendrik O. Colijn [mailto:colijn.1-at-osu.edu]
Gesendet: Freitag, 18. Januar 2002 14:39
An: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Hi all,

We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?

Thanks
Henk Colijn


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.




From daemon Fri Jan 18 13:06:28 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 10:58:32 -0800
Subject: SEM of feces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This topic came up earlier but did not come to
a conclusion, as I recall. I subsequently found some references
to SEM of skunk and opossum feces at several
veterinary sites. Their purpose was to examine the
animal feces for remnants of honey bees. Apparently,
these nocturnal mammals raid bee hives and eat the
bees.

I did not find any references to SEM of human feces.
From what I can see, there are basically two types
of feces. One is of a slime nature while the other
is more compacted and solid. The nature is basically
determined by its location in the sequence of expulsion.

I collected both types of specimens (slime on Al stub,
compacted on C stub) and began working with
the slime type. Both were vacuum desiccated at 40mT for
4 hours. After this, the slime specimen was coated with
60A of Pt. The specimen was placed in high vacuum SEM
chamber and allowed to reach about 2E-8T.

The images were rather boring. The set of images taken
can be found at:

http://photoweb.net/feces/Catalog.pdf

This PDF file is about 3.9MB in size. Individual files
can be uploaded but I did not do this yet.

From the images, it is clear that the slime cracks
severely under vacuum. Some of the gaps are between
1-5um. Even with 60A of coating, some "islands"
of slime charge. Thus, it would seem that 60A is
not enough coating to prevent charging. I did some
other images (in the PDF catalog) which were BSE.

Even so, there does not seem to be anything
remarkable about this specimen. This is in stark
contrast to LM analysis using BF, DIC, phase and DF.
The problem with LM is that the bacteria are motile and
cannot effectively be photographed--due to too long
of exposure time. If I cool the specimen, I can approach
useable images, since the bacterias' movement slows
appreciably. But the limited depth of field does not
make are particularly great image.

In the SEM, there simply is not much to discern.
I suspect that part of the problem is that I am not
able to prepare these specimens as biological types.
I am fundamentally set up for metallurgical work.

The specimens should be rinsed, filtered, fixed and
then mounted. Without fixation, the water in the
bacteria is removed and the structure/morphology
of the bacteria is destroyed. Additionally, without
removing the indigenous liquid material, one cannot
see the bacteria anyway, since they are below the
surface of the liquid. This is where filtering would
help. I've had this same problem with samples of
pus and of spider blood. The fluid is so thick compared
to any solid object that might be in the fluid, all
that is seen is the surface of the fluid. The LM,
as would a TEM, can see through the fluid. The
SEM does not.

My conclusion is that for my particular setup,
SEM of feces is not possible--or at least, not
useful. If anyone has any alternative ideas about
SEMing feces, I'd appreciate hearing them.
If it is a worthless effort, I'd appreciate knowing that too.

tnx,
Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.
Microtechnics, Inc.
Granite Bay, CA
916.791.8191



From daemon Fri Jan 18 13:27:30 2002



From: John Sutko :      sutko-at-med.unr.edu
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 11:29:38 -0800
Subject: Antibodies against human cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We need an antibody or antibodies, preferably against a cell surface antigen,
that recognizes cells of human origin specifically (i.e. does not stain cells
from other mammalian species), and which works for immuno-fluorescence. We
would like to investigate a wide range of cell types from different organs. We
have made enquires with many companies, spent a significant amount of money, but
have yet to find a suitable antibody. Thanks in advance for any and all
suggestions. This message has been sent to several lists, apologies for any
duplication.

John

John Sutko
Department of Pharmacology/318
Univ. Nevada, Reno
Reno, NV 89557

Tel. (775) 784-4121, -4537
Fax (775) 784-1620
email sutko-at-unr.edu




From daemon Fri Jan 18 13:58:26 2002



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 11:52:03 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Imod is for linux, runs nicely on a PC, and is free.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Fri, 18 Jan 2002, Hendrik O. Colijn wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi all,
}
} We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
} software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?
}
} Thanks
} Henk Colijn
}
}
} Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
} Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
} (614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
} Fools are pleased when they discover error.
} The wise are pleased when they discover truth.
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 18 15:49:15 2002



From: Everett Ramer :      eramer-at-cellomics.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 16:39:13 -0500
Subject: RE: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have used Slicer for 3D reconstruction of tif images. Slicer will
automatically read in a series of tif images that contain a sequential ID
number in their name and you can set the separation distance between each
image for display. Slicer will also make AVI movies of zooms and rotations.
Everett Ramer
Cellomics, Inc.
Pittsburgh, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: "heiko.stegmann-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"heiko.stegmann-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2002 10:41 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi Henk,

which particular 3D reconstruction technique are you referring to?
Reconstruction from serial sections, single axis tilt series, randomly
tilted single particles... ????

-Heiko



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Hendrik O. Colijn [mailto:colijn.1-at-osu.edu]
Gesendet: Freitag, 18. Januar 2002 14:39
An: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Hi all,

We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?

Thanks
Henk Colijn


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.




From daemon Fri Jan 18 15:51:19 2002



From: Everett Ramer :      eramer-at-cellomics.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 16:43:56 -0500
Subject: RE: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have used Slicer for 3D reconstruction of tif images. Slicer will
automatically read in a series of tif images that contain a sequential ID
number in their name and you can set the separation distance between each
image for display. Slicer will also make AVI movies of zooms and rotations.
Everett Ramer
Cellomics, Inc.
Pittsburgh, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: "heiko.stegmann-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"heiko.stegmann-at-amd.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2002 10:41 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi Henk,

which particular 3D reconstruction technique are you referring to?
Reconstruction from serial sections, single axis tilt series, randomly
tilted single particles... ????

-Heiko



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Hendrik O. Colijn [mailto:colijn.1-at-osu.edu]
Gesendet: Freitag, 18. Januar 2002 14:39
An: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Betreff: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Hi all,

We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?

Thanks
Henk Colijn


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.




From daemon Fri Jan 18 17:08:56 2002



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 14:58:43 -0800
Subject: Rapid fixer yellow precipitate?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi:

Before old time photography fades from the scene completely and no one on
this list remembers it, I have a question I have been curious about for a
while.

Sometimes, after a long time in storage, a yellow precipitate forms in some
containers of Rapid Fix. I just noticed it again in a bottle of Mohr
Profix, similar formula to Rapid Fix, I think.

What is this stuff and why does it form? It is pale yellow, sticks mostly
to the bottom of the bottle. It is hard to clean off and smells a little
sulphurish.

Is there any way to clean it out of the bottle, if I do, is it more toxic
than ordinary fixer?

Inquiring minds want to know.

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From daemon Sat Jan 19 02:01:10 2002



From: Ken Gaugler :      ken-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2002 23:51:50 -0800
Subject: Re: Rapid fixer yellow precipitate?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jonathan,

The yellow precipitate is probably elemental sulfur. Fixer's main ingredient is
sodium thiosulfate, which over time can get oxidized. You can filter the stuff
out, but IMHO if your rapid fixer is that deteriorated, you should probably
toss it. Using bad fixer can cause stains to appear on your prints after a few
weeks or months.

Best Regards,
Ken Gaugler

Jon Krupp wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi:
}
} Before old time photography fades from the scene completely and no one on
} this list remembers it, I have a question I have been curious about for a
} while.
}
} Sometimes, after a long time in storage, a yellow precipitate forms in some
} containers of Rapid Fix. I just noticed it again in a bottle of Mohr
} Profix, similar formula to Rapid Fix, I think.
}
} What is this stuff and why does it form? It is pale yellow, sticks mostly
} to the bottom of the bottle. It is hard to clean off and smells a little
} sulphurish.
}
} Is there any way to clean it out of the bottle, if I do, is it more toxic
} than ordinary fixer?
}
} Inquiring minds want to know.
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu

--
Ken Gaugler
Santa Clara, CA.
~~ spark: N6OSK ~~
PGP: 2EF7 437E 1D0B 602D BC2C 92D1 A548 C11B B901 8CDE





From daemon Sat Jan 19 07:44:22 2002



From: Samuel Purdy :      spurdy52-at-mac.com
Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2002 07:32:09 -0600
Subject: Rapid fixer yellow precipitate?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello!
It is elemental sulphur. It is also a signal that your rapid fix is
beginning to decompose and is losing its strenth. It sould be dumped.

Sam Purdy
spurdy52-at-earthlink.net


From daemon Sat Jan 19 07:44:22 2002



From: Edward_Principe-at-amat.com
Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2002 07:32:29 -0600
Subject: 3-D reconstruction software recommendations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



VolumeJ is an add-in to ImageJ, which is the PC version of NIH image. It
is free. Scan the web, you'll find it.

OpenDX is a unix free software.

Matlab has volume reconstruction capabilities that are quite nice.

Regards,
Ed


"Hendrik O. Colijn" {colijn.1-at-osu.edu} on 01/18/2002 05:38:31 AM


To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:


Hi all,

We are looking for a relatively simple (inexpensive) 3-D reconstruction
software package for Mac or PC. Can anyone recommend some software?

Thanks
Henk Colijn


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.


From daemon Mon Jan 21 08:16:00 2002



From: SJT-at-NP.EDU.SG ()
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 07:54:44 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: ophthalmoloscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (SJT-at-NP.EDU.SG) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
January 21, 2002 at 02:54:09
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: SJT-at-NP.EDU.SG
Name: Jeanette T. Sasam

Organization: NgeeAnn Polytechnic

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Singapore

Question: Can an ophthalmoloscope also be considered a microscope?
What is a typical magnification of an Ophthalmoloscope?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jan 21 08:16:00 2002



From: MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-RUBBER.COM ()
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 07:56:00 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: polymer blends by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-RUBBER.COM) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
January 21, 2002 at 06:07:56
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-RUBBER.COM
Name: MIKE HALE

Organization: AVON-RUBBER

Education: Graduate College

Location: WESTBURY, WILTS, UK

Question: To study the phase morphology of polymer blends by SEM, we
have been staining thin films with osmium tetroxide solution. The
method we have been using is to simply soak small pieces of film
overnight in a 2% OsO4 solution, wash with water an acetone, gold
coat and view. This seems to work quite well, the samples becoming
darker in colour and the SEM SEI images being usable although of
relatively low contrast.

The materials being studied are blends of saturated and unsaturated
polymers but we have noticed the presence of osmium in both phases,
which is not what we would have expected.

I would be most grateful if you can offer any suggestions regarding
the staining of polymer blends with osmium tetroxide as I feel we are
not getting the best from this technique. Thanking you in advance
for your assistance.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jan 21 08:16:00 2002



From: Jesse Rodrigues :      Jesse_Rodrigues-at-kopin.com
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 09:05:30 -0500
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




From daemon Mon Jan 21 11:45:48 2002



From: Caroline Miller :      camiller-at-creighton.edu
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 11:38:57 -0600
Subject: Knifebreakers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like information about an older Sorvall glass knife breaker
making knifes that are 12-13 mm wide. Caroline Miller



From daemon Mon Jan 21 11:57:22 2002



From: Josh Kahn :      4jbk1-at-qlink.queensu.ca
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 12:51:59 -0500
Subject: TEM Poly-l-Lysine coating sinlge slot grids protocol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can I use poly-l-lysine against formvar or does it have to be used against a
carbon coat?

JBK
Read books



From daemon Mon Jan 21 13:26:01 2002



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 21 Jan 2002 13:17:39 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: polymer blends by SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Mike,

I have three comments/suggestions for you:
OsO4 staining is selective not only for unsaturation but also for
certain functional groups (i.e. -OH). I suggest that you research the
stain specificity of OsO4 as it applies to the polymers you are
studying. Sawyer and Grubbs "Polymer Morphology" may provide much of the
information you need.
Vapor staining, instead of solution staining, may improve your results.
During solution staining, the OsO4 may diffuse into both phases but
chemically react with only the unsaturated phase. An excess of OsO4 in
your resin may impede diffusion of unreacted OsO4 out of your sample. I
suggest that the sample be vapor stained by attaching it to the inner
surface of the cap for your vial of OsO4 and staining overnight. Be sure
to degas the sample in a nitrogen purge or vacuum to remove all
unreacted OsO4. If the sample is too thick to permit diffusion of OsO4
throughout the film's full thickness, create a cryogenically sectioned
plane through the film and stain this new surface in OsO4 vapors.
Metal coating the stained sample will reduce the differential contrast
created by OsO4 staining. You may opt to examine the stained samples at
low accelerating voltage in a field-emission SEM or in a variable
pressure SEM. Charging of the stained but uncoated polymer can be
controlled using either of these instruments. If you must coat, a thin
layer of carbon should help to minimize charging and optimize the domain
contrast that you desire.

Good luck,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-
RUBBER.COM () To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: polymer blends by
01/21/02 07:56 SEM
AM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-RUBBER.COM) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
January 21, 2002 at 06:07:56
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: MIKE.HALE-at-AVON-RUBBER.COM
Name: MIKE HALE

Organization: AVON-RUBBER

Education: Graduate College

Location: WESTBURY, WILTS, UK

Question: To study the phase morphology of polymer blends by SEM, we
have been staining thin films with osmium tetroxide solution. The
method we have been using is to simply soak small pieces of film
overnight in a 2% OsO4 solution, wash with water an acetone, gold
coat and view. This seems to work quite well, the samples becoming
darker in colour and the SEM SEI images being usable although of
relatively low contrast.

The materials being studied are blends of saturated and unsaturated
polymers but we have noticed the presence of osmium in both phases,
which is not what we would have expected.

I would be most grateful if you can offer any suggestions regarding
the staining of polymer blends with osmium tetroxide as I feel we are
not getting the best from this technique. Thanking you in advance
for your assistance.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------







From daemon Tue Jan 22 02:11:41 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 03:00:12 -0500
Subject: Staining of polymers for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Mike Hale wrote:
=======================================================
Question: To study the phase morphology of polymer blends by SEM, we have
been staining thin films with osmium tetroxide solution. The method we
have been using is to simply soak small pieces of film overnight in a 2%
OsO4 solution, wash with water an acetone, gold coat and view. This seems
to work quite well, the samples becoming darker in colour and the SEM SEI
images being usable although of relatively low contrast.

The materials being studied are blends of saturated and unsaturated
polymers but we have noticed the presence of osmium in both phases, which
is not what we would have expected.

I would be most grateful if you can offer any suggestions regarding the
staining of polymer blends with osmium tetroxide as I feel we are not
getting the best from this technique. Thanking you in advance for your
assistance.
=============================================================
We have found over the years that in general, TEM is light years better than
the best SEMs for the characterization of the multiphase structure of
modified polymer systems.

When staining polymers, remember that just about any polymer, if left in the
presence of osmium tetroxide, will eventually turn black. What makes the
osmium approach work is that some phases stain far faster than other phases.
A good rule of thumb is that if you want to increase the contrast between
the two phases, slow down the staining, either by reducing the concentration
(if vapor phase, then the partial pressure) of the osmium tetroxide or by
lowering the staining temperature.

If one must use only an SEM, then we have found that we

a) first make a "faced off piece" of the sample with a diamond knife in a
cryo stage ultramicrotome, thereby making the smoothest possible surface,

b) vapor stain the system with osmium tetroxide (or ruthenium tetroxide
depending on the chemistry of the sample). However if it is looked at by
SEM at this point, there can be back ground staining of the unstained
portions of the sample. The next step then is to

c) oxygen plasma etch the sample in a simple RF plasma etcher, such as our
SPI Plasma Prep II (see our website given below), using oxygen. The oxygen
will etch down the unstained portion of the sample and will etch far more
slowly the osmium (or ruthenium) stained portions of the sample. One need
not etch very long but this does produce enough additional topography to
result in acceptable contrast whereby, without etching, there was
insufficient contrast.

d) We think that coating with osmium metal (in the OPC osmium coater, see
URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/osmium-plasma-coater-opc-60.html) instead of
gold or carbon has some advantages. One might normally think that a heavy
metal is not the way to go, but the layer is much thinner and for BSE
imaging, it can have some advantages, for example, see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/osmium-plasma-coater-demonstration.html This is
speculation on my part, but it is based on the experience with osmium
coating of immunogold tagged cells.


The main problem with SEM approaches is that if matrix inclusions are
present, they tend to be small, and are often times missed, whereas by TEM,
they would be seen readily.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers the Plasma Prep II plasma etcher and the
OPC-60 Osmium Plasma Coater. Our laboratory services division performs
polymer electron microscopy on these kinds of samples for commercial clients

From daemon Tue Jan 22 03:20:18 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 10:14:00 +0100
Subject: Multi-photon microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

Here at our lab, I managed to generate a 3D image with a Zeiss LSM510
confocal microscope in tissue with a thickness of about 400 micrometer. The
deepest optical slice I could scan was about 250 - 300 micrometer. This was
in lung tissue. Now I know depth of scanning is dependant of the tissue
density, magnification etc.

In the future, we would like to make scans in pig heart tissue, but I think
that with our confocal, I wouldn't be able to scan deeper than about 200 -
250 micrometer. Now we're looking for a solution to scan through the whole
heart-wall, to detect a fluorophore coupled to the Y-chromosone.

With a multiphoton confocal microscope, it is possible to scan deeper, also
in combination with a non-descanned detector even deeper. But how deep,
with what staining etc.? And the final question: has anyone any experience
with scanning through pig heart tissue, and, how deep were you able to scan?
It is very important for us, because we're thinking about buying such a
multi-photon confocal microscope, but we should be sure before spending the
money!

Thanks in advance,

Sven

___________________________________________
Sven Terclavers
Research Assistent
Center for Molecular and Vascular Biology
Center for Transgene Technology and Gene Therapy
Campus Gasthuisberg O/N
Herestraat 49
3000 Leuven - Belgium
___________________________________________



From daemon Tue Jan 22 08:53:49 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 09:37:51 -0500
Subject: RE: Knifebreakers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Sorvall knifebreaker was manufactured 'in the same breath' as the JB-4
to provide the wide glass knives that would cut small specimens embedded in
GMA. The knife breaker was capable of cutting quite good knives from 6mm
glass for routine thin sectioning. As far as I am aware, the one I bought
in 1983(?) is still working.

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
The best research
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
occurs before work
West Chester University
at the bench.
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu


} ----------
} From: Caroline Miller
} Sent: Monday, January 21, 2002 12:38 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Knifebreakers
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I would like information about an older Sorvall glass knife breaker
} making knifes that are 12-13 mm wide. Caroline Miller
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 22 09:00:21 2002



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 06:55:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Rapid fixer yellow precipitate?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I think you are correct in the "smell test" it is sulphur from the
ammonium thio(sulphate).

Bob
Old Timer

On Fri, 18 Jan 2002, Jon Krupp wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi:
}
} Before old time photography fades from the scene completely and no one on
} this list remembers it, I have a question I have been curious about for a
} while.
}
} Sometimes, after a long time in storage, a yellow precipitate forms in some
} containers of Rapid Fix. I just noticed it again in a bottle of Mohr
} Profix, similar formula to Rapid Fix, I think.
}
} What is this stuff and why does it form? It is pale yellow, sticks mostly
} to the bottom of the bottle. It is hard to clean off and smells a little
} sulphurish.
}
} Is there any way to clean it out of the bottle, if I do, is it more toxic
} than ordinary fixer?
}
} Inquiring minds want to know.
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 22 13:19:42 2002



From: Jo Ann Moore :      jamoore-at-hsc.usf.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 14:06:14 -0500
Subject: need 24 well glass culture plates

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:

A grad student in the Anatomy department is looking for glass 24 well
tissue culture plates however they are only made of plastic now. Does
anyone here at the university have some in their lab that our student
could borrow? Or does anyone know of a source from which to purchase
them?

Please contact me by email or phone if you can help.
Thanks,

Jo Ann Moore
Sr. Biological Scientist
Anatomy Dept.
4 x9446





From daemon Tue Jan 22 22:37:11 2002



From: Cavin Mooers :      cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 22:24:50 -0600
Subject: EM Position Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Research Assistant, Electron Microscopist
Vitreous State Laboratory, Washington, D.C.


Appointment Date: 20 May, 2002

Salary and Benefits: 36,000 to 39,000, 2x matching 401k, (up to 5% of
salary after 1 year,) 21 days paid vacation, 15 days paid holiday, sick
leave, health and life insurance, flexible spending account for
medical/dental reimbursement, tuition reimbursement, (up to 6 credits
per semester,) 5% pay raise after 3 months, (dependent upon positive
review,) and relocation assistance.

Essential Duties: Microstructural characterization of materials
utilizing OLM, SEM, EDS, WDS, TEM, STEM, and XRD. Provide technical
expertise to researchers on equipment operation and microscopy
laboratory protocols. Conduct basic EM maintenance on related
equipment.

Qualifications: Candidate must either have a two-year degree in
electron microscopy, or a BS in physics, chemistry, or materials
science with three years of electron microscopy experience. Candidate
must have operational knowledge of scanning and transmission electron
microscopes, as well as, energy-dispersive spectroscopy systems,
fundamental understanding of image processing and analysis techniques,
capacity to prepare SEM specimens utilizing standard metallographic
techniques, ability to prepare TEM specimens via tripod polishing, jet
polishing, dimpling/ion milling, and extraction replication, a
generally good understanding of electron microscopy lab maintenance,
and strong verbal and written communication skills. Knowledge of FTIR
and Raman spectroscopy operations considered a bonus.

Instrumentation: JEOL 5900LV and 35c SEM’s, JEOL 2000EX / FX TEM,
Noran Vantage and Oxford INCA ENERGY 300/WAVE 700 EDS/WDS systems,
Olympus upright light microscope w/ brightfield/darkfield/polarizing
light, Olympus inverted stage w/
brightfield/darkfield/polarizing/Nomarski’s.


From daemon Wed Jan 23 08:59:34 2002



From: Mike Nesta :      MNesta-at-ebsciences.com
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 09:44:15 -0500
Subject: RE: Knifebreakers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Entire Sorvall, JB-4 Microtomy system for plastics (and paraffin) was
purchased by Energy Beam Sciences around 1990 and we still offer that line
today. It consists of:

1. JB-4(Manual) and JB-4A(Automatic) Microtomes
2. GKM Triangular Knifemaker, for making knives up to 12 mm wide that are
used for thin sectioning.
3. Ralph Knifemaker, for long knives up to 38 mm wide that are used for
semi-thin paraffin or resin embedded sections.

Contact EBSciences for any product, service or accessory information you
need at (800) 992-9037 or via email at ebs-at-ebsciences.com.

Best regards,

Michael R. Nesta
General Manager
Energy Beam Sciences, Inc.
Agawam, MA USA
Tel: (413) 786-9322
www.ebsciences.com
"Adding Brilliance to Your Vision"






-----Original Message-----
} From: Monson, Frederick C. [mailto:fmonson-at-wcupa.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2002 9:38 AM
To: 'Caroline Miller'
Cc: 'List-Microscopy'


The Sorvall knifebreaker was manufactured 'in the same breath' as the JB-4
to provide the wide glass knives that would cut small specimens embedded in
GMA. The knife breaker was capable of cutting quite good knives from 6mm
glass for routine thin sectioning. As far as I am aware, the one I bought
in 1983(?) is still working.

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
The best research
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
occurs before work
West Chester University
at the bench.
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu


} ----------
} From: Caroline Miller
} Sent: Monday, January 21, 2002 12:38 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Knifebreakers
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I would like information about an older Sorvall glass knife breaker
} making knifes that are 12-13 mm wide. Caroline Miller
}
}
}




From daemon Wed Jan 23 11:50:44 2002



From: Maria Ericsson :      maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 12:49:05 -0500
Subject: looking for used Leafscan45

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listers,

We're looking for a used Leafscan45 film scanner for our EM Facility.
Any ideas where I could look for one are welcome.

Thanks,

Maria

____________________________

Maria Ericsson
Harvard Medical School EM Facility
220 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
(617) 432 1698
maria_ericsson-at-hms.harvard.edu
http://www.hms.harvard.edu/core/em.html


From daemon Wed Jan 23 11:50:44 2002



From: John Olesik :      olesik.2-at-osu.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 12:40:59 -0500
Subject: Electron Microscopist/Microprobe Analyst Position Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Electron Microscopist and Microprobe Analyst

The Ohio State University Microscopic and chemical Analysis Research Center
(MARC) is searching to fill an immediate opening for an outstanding Electron
Microscopist and Microprobe Analyst (University title: Research Associate
2-Physical). This person will be responsible for operation of scanning
electron microscope (SEM) and electron microprobe (EPMA) instruments. In
addition, the position includes working with researchers, teaching students
the basic theory and practical SEM and EPMA measurement techniques,
collaborating on research projects and directing staff assistants. We seek
an excellent electron microscopist/microprobe analyst who enjoys the
exciting atmosphere of a major research university and wants to collaborate
with scientists on a broad variety of projects. The MARC serves the entire
Ohio State University as well as other institutions, with projects from
diverse research areas including geology, materials science, environmental
sciences, biological and biomedical sciences, dentistry and textiles. The
MARC focuses on elemental analysis using from microscale to bulk analysis
using SEM, EPMA, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma optical
emission spectrometry and inductively coupled mass spectrometry with laser
ablation or solution sampling. The MARC also teaches traditional or short
courses on each of the techniques. The position is a full time, hard money
funded job.

Experience with both EPMA and SEM is preferred but strong candidates with
extensive experience using one of these will be seriously considered.
Excellent candidates with a range of experience and potential to grow will
be considered.

If you know of a suitable candidate for this position, please contact Dr.
John Olesik, MARC Director, at {mailto:olesik.2-at-osu.edu} or (614) 292-6954.
Details on official application for the position can be found at The Ohio
State University jobs listing web site ( {http://hr.osu.edu/es/jobsort.htm} ).
Search in the UPP section by title “Research Associate-2 Physical”. The job
listing is number U-20908-012202. Although the official deadline is January
28, 2002 and the listing will be on the OSU jobs list web site for only one
week, the search will continue until an excellent candidate is hired.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
John Olesik
Adj. Assoc. Professor, Research Scientist
MARC Director
Microscopic and chemical Analysis Research Center
Ohio State University
125 S. Oval Mall
275 Mendenhall Laboratory
Columbus, OH 43210

Office: 026D Mendenhall
Phone: (614) 292-6954
FAX: (614) 292-7688
E-mail: olesik.2-at-osu.edu
Web page: www.geology.ohio-state.edu/marc
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--



From daemon Wed Jan 23 12:14:11 2002



From: Suzanne Adams :      adamss-at-ohsu.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 10:06:38 -0800
Subject: Salary Survey for Electon Microscopy Technologist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Oregon Health & Science University is requesting your help in gathering salary data for Electron Microscopy Technologist.

The Electron Microscopy Technologist prepares human tissue samples for electron microscopy and performs ultrastructural electron microscopic examinations and photographic documentation for the purpose of detecting pathology and guiding medical therapy in support of State, regional, and local clinical and research pathology programs. Employees in this class may instruct researchers, physicians, and medical students in the use of the electron microscope and associated laboratory facilities and equipment. Employees in this class perform routine repair and maintenance of electron microscopes, microtones, light microscopes, evaporators, and other laboratory equipment.

Do you have a job match? Yes_________ No__________

Salary: MIN_______________ MAX____________________

Please feel free to call Suzanne Adams, OHSU Compensation Analyst at (503) 494-3423 or email at adamss-at-ohsu.edu with questions. Thank you in advance for your help with this survey. You may fax the survey back to me at (503) 494-0045.

Thank you.

Suzanne Adams
Compensation Analyst
Oregon Health & Sciences University
Portland, OR
503 494-3423
adamss-at-ohsu.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 23 13:35:43 2002



From: Michael.A.Peters-at-grace.com
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 14:24:31 -0500
Subject: Vector imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In a recent article on SEM imaging, a new method/imaging technique(to
me)was mentioned (Vector Imaging). What is Vector imaging and why would
it be used instead of rastering?

Thanks In Advance,
Mike Peters
Davison Chemical



From daemon Wed Jan 23 16:04:09 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 13:56:15 -0800
Subject: Re: looking for used Leafscan45

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Try Professional Marketing Services
Phoenix, AZ
480.940.5400
http://www.promarketinc.com

Their latest listing has one priced at $3995 with
SCSI/GPIB interfaces.

gary g.


At 09:49 AM 1/23/2002, you wrote:
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From daemon Wed Jan 23 16:04:09 2002



From: Mike Delannoy :      delannoy-at-mail.jhmi.edu
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 16:43:08 -0500
Subject: Please subscribe

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please subscribe

delannoy-at-jhmi.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 23 21:35:21 2002



From: schlor27-at-aol.com ()
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 21:24:28 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: QC Microscopy work

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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (schlor27-at-aol.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
January 23, 2002 at 10:04:59
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: schlor27-at-aol.com
Name: Lori Mead

Organization: FP & M

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: City, State, Country

Question: Hello Listers

I am interested in having some QC Microscopy work done on several
Polymer samples. I would like to hear from labs that are available
to do this type of work.

Regards

Lori


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Wed Jan 23 21:35:21 2002



From: usseacat-at-iserv.net ()
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 21:25:44 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:LM repairs or supplies parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (usseacat-at-iserv.net) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
January 22, 2002 at 23:25:20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: usseacat-at-iserv.net
Name: Dr. Carl J. Jungblut

Education: Graduate College

Location: Holland, Michigan USA

Question: Firstly, thank you for your help. Ihave two basic questions:
(1) Name and address of a company that repairs or supplies parts for
a monocular, compound Bausch and Lomb microscope.

(2) Name and address(es) of company/companies selling microscope
supplies, especially Wright's stain.

Thank you!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jan 24 03:59:38 2002



From: Dirk Kirch :      kirch-at-imm.rwth-aachen.de
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 10:50:16 +0100
Subject: SEM, hot stage, detector problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Users,

I have a particular problem concerning in-situ investigations of grain
boundary migration with a Jeol 820 SEM. For that purpose we use
a hot stage to heat up the the specimen up to 600 C. But at a
temperature of about 370 C the thermal radiation of the specimen
and the furnace disturbs the electron signal and we do not see
anything on the screen.

We use a semiconductor BSE-detector with two half- which is
positioned underneath the pole-piece.

I would be nice to hear some suggestions concerning this problem.

Maybe another kind of detector, filters for the photonic radiation
etc.

Further information:

1.We cannot use the SE2-detector since SE cannot solve the
orientation-contrast between the different grains.

2.The temperature at the detector is about 100 C during the
heating process.



Dirk Kirch





+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dirk Kirch
Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik
RWTH Aachen
D-52056 Aachen
Germany

Phone : +49-241-8026861
Fax : +49-241-8022301
Internet: http://www.imm.rwth-aachen.de
E-Mail : kirch-at-imm.rwth-aachen.de

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


From daemon Thu Jan 24 07:40:21 2002



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 14:32:56 +0100
Subject: Zeiss 3D-Deconvolution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi listers,

Is there anyone out there using the 3D-deconvolution program from Zeiss? I
have some 3D images that I created with the LSM510 confocal microscope and
I'm thinking of buying the Zeiss-program to deconvolute, but is it worth
it's price or is there a cheaper/better substitute? Can someone run the
program once on one of my images so I can see the effect?
Thanks,

Sven Terclavers
Molecular Cardiovascular Medicine Group
Louvain - Belgium



From daemon Thu Jan 24 10:06:28 2002



From: Judy Trogadis :      trogadisj-at-smh.toronto.on.ca
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 10:50:52 -0500
Subject: Laser Capture Microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fellow Microscopists,

We are planning to purchase a laser capture microscopy system and are hoping for input from users of this technology. We really have no experience in this area, therefore, are not even sure what questions to formulate when evaluating a system.

Basically, we are considering the Arcturus PixCell II from Leica - which uses paraffin and frozen sections and the PALM Laser-MicroBeam System from Zeiss which I believe allows capture of cells from living tissue as well.

All comments and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

Judy Trogadis
Bio-Imaging Coordinator
St. Michael's Hospital, 8Q
30 Bond St.
Toronto, ON
M5B 1W8
Canada

ph: 416-864-6060 x6337
fax: 416-864-6043
trogadisj-at-smh.toronto.on.ca




From daemon Thu Jan 24 10:23:27 2002



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 11:19:01 -0500
Subject: wanted: Link EDS hardware

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

I'm looking for Link eXL hardware (beige units - not grey). I need Lemas
(desktop stage control) module, computer boards, etc. Contact me off line
if you have any of this equipment.

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Facility Engineer
Michigan technological University
Materials Science and Engineering
Rm 626 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
906-487-2002 Ph
906-487-2934 Fax
opmills-at-mtu.edu
www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills/



From daemon Thu Jan 24 10:44:23 2002



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 11:31:26 -0500
Subject: wanted: Link EDS hardware

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello,
I could use spares for the Link eXL grey units.
Thank you.

Please contact:
Jim Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 2242
Storrs, CT 06269-2242
bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
860 486-2914 voice
860 486-1936 fax


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From daemon Thu Jan 24 10:46:28 2002



From: Vickie Frohlich :      frohlich-at-uthscsa.edu
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 10:45:41 -0600
Subject: Optical Microscopy Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA)

with Support from Hamamatsu Photonics KK

will offer a course on

"Optical Microscopy in the Biological Sciences"

June 5-12, 2002
Application Deadline -March 1, 2002


Tuition - $1,750 (includes room and board) $1300 (without room)
$$$$$ Limited number of complete scholarships are available $$$$$


Topics to be covered:
Microscope Optics: Phase Contrast, Dark-field, DIC, Polarization
Detectors * Digital Processing * Fluorescence Filters and Probes
Live Cell Imaging * FRET * FLIM * Green Fluorescent Proteins
Confocal * Multiphoton * Deconvolution * 3-D Reconstruction

Faculty:
Robert Blystone, Trinity University * Victoria Centonze Frohlich, UTHSCSA
* Robert Hard, SUNY-Buffalo
Brian Herman, UTHSCSA * Ernst Keller, Carl Zeiss * James Lechleiter, UTHSCSA
Kate Luby-Phelps, Medical College of Wisconsin * Masafumi Oshiro, Hamamatsu
Photonics KK
Peter So, MIT * Kenneth Spring, NIH * Simon Watkins, Univ. Pittsburgh

Participating Vendors:
Bio-Rad Inc., Carl Zeiss, Inc., Chroma Technology Corp., Coherent Laser
Group, Compix Inc., DVC Co. Inc., Hamamatsu Photonics Systems, Improvision
Inc., Intelligent Imaging Innovations, Leica Inc./Meyer Instruments, Inc.,
Media Cybernetics, Molecular Probes, Nikon Inc., Olympus America, Inc.,
Omega Optical, Optronics, Roper Scientific, Universal Imaging Corp.

For admission application form and information visit:

www.uthscsa.edu/csb/image/Announcements.html

or contact

Microscopy Course
Department of Cellular and Structural Biology
UTHSCSA, Mail Code 7762
7703 Floyd Curl Drive
San Antonio, TX 78229-3900




From daemon Thu Jan 24 15:31:25 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 13:24:11 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM, hot stage, detector problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The typical solid state BSE detector is fundamentally
a reverse biased diode. When a BSE hits the diode,
current flows. This current is converted to a voltage
and displayed on the SEM's monitor. A solid state
diode has a characteristic known as leakage current.
This current increases with temperature. Thus, I
suspect that your solid state BSE detector diodes are
becoming saturated via high temperature leakage
current. As a consequence, there is no useable
signal.

The option for using these solid state detectors in
a high temperature environment is to thermally
cool them. This could be done using a Peltier cooler.
However, this would be difficult to set up and would
reduce your working distance.

An alternative, which is not thermally sensitive, is
to use a scintillator BSE detector such as the Robinson
Model 6. While not a low cost or zero cost solution,
I think you would find the Robinson detector to solve
your problem and even provide better performance
than a solid state detector does. You should check
with Robinson to be sure that the temperature at the
BSE probe position does not exceed its specified
or allowed temperature. The scintillator detector
works on a totally different principle. But the detector
probe will still have some upper limit of temperature
based on when it might be damaged by heat. If this
temperature limit is too low for your application, then
of course, the detector would not be a viable option.

It would help to know what the temperature is at the
pole piece based on specimen temperature and working
distance.

Gary Gaugler



At 01:50 AM 1/24/2002, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Thu Jan 24 19:34:54 2002



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 14:25:05 GMT+1200
Subject: anti-backstreaming traps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Happy New Year

I've forgotten who makes/sells those regeneratable back-streaming
traps which, I think, are called Micro Maze, and I can't seem to
sucessfully websearch for them.

Can someone point me in the right direction, please?

cheers

rtch


Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Thu Jan 24 19:34:55 2002



From: Jon Hiller :      hiller-at-anl.gov
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 19:26:21 -0600
Subject: IC package removal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Does anybody have a chemical solution for removing IC packaging without
damaging the internal components? Simple grinding from the top down is not
suitable because I need all the interconnects intact. Any help in this
matter is greatly appreciated.

Sincere regards,

Jon Hiller
==================================================================
Jon M. Hiller
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division
Electron Microscopy Center
Tel: 630-252-9558
Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: hiller-at-anl.gov
==================================================================


From daemon Thu Jan 24 19:34:57 2002



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2002 19:27:07 -0600
Subject: Temperature controlled Stages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to get the names of some recommended vendors of temperature
controlled stages that I can use to observe crystal formation by optical
microscopy. Stage should have a temperature range of 5 to 60 deg. C. and
should have at least two fluid connections. Any recommendations would be
greatly appreciated. Vendors may contact me directly. TIA

Damian Neuberger, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp
POBox 490, WG3-2S
Round Lake, IL 60073
Fax 847.270.5888


From daemon Thu Jan 24 19:36:40 2002



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 14:29:53 GMT+1200
Subject: Re: anti-backstreaming traps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Of course, about a millisecond after I pressed the "send" button, I
remembered that they are from Lesker

thanks anyway

rtch



} From: Self {GLGNOV2/RSIMS}
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: anti-backstreaming traps
} Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 14:25:05 GMT+1200

} Happy New Year
}
} I've forgotten who makes/sells those regeneratable back-streaming
} traps which, I think, are called Micro Maze, and I can't seem to
} sucessfully websearch for them.
}
} Can someone point me in the right direction, please?
}
} cheers
}
} rtch
}
}
Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Fri Jan 25 05:59:11 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 06:50:07 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM, hot stage, detector problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gary,
The BSE detectors are also "solar cells" and are quite sensitive to
both visible light and infrared. The latter is most likely what is
wiping out the signal. You're right that a Robinson would probably fis
the problem if it can take the heat.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} The typical solid state BSE detector is fundamentally
} a reverse biased diode. When a BSE hits the diode,
} current flows. This current is converted to a voltage
} and displayed on the SEM's monitor. A solid state
} diode has a characteristic known as leakage current.
} This current increases with temperature. Thus, I
} suspect that your solid state BSE detector diodes are
} becoming saturated via high temperature leakage
} current. As a consequence, there is no useable
} signal.
}
} The option for using these solid state detectors in
} a high temperature environment is to thermally
} cool them. This could be done using a Peltier cooler.
} However, this would be difficult to set up and would
} reduce your working distance.
}
} An alternative, which is not thermally sensitive, is
} to use a scintillator BSE detector such as the Robinson
} Model 6. While not a low cost or zero cost solution,
} I think you would find the Robinson detector to solve
} your problem and even provide better performance
} than a solid state detector does. You should check
} with Robinson to be sure that the temperature at the
} BSE probe position does not exceed its specified
} or allowed temperature. The scintillator detector
} works on a totally different principle. But the detector
} probe will still have some upper limit of temperature
} based on when it might be damaged by heat. If this
} temperature limit is too low for your application, then
} of course, the detector would not be a viable option.
}
} It would help to know what the temperature is at the
} pole piece based on specimen temperature and working
} distance.
}
} Gary Gaugler
}
}
}
} At 01:50 AM 1/24/2002, you wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Dear Users,
} }
} } I have a particular problem concerning in-situ investigations of grain
} } boundary migration with a Jeol 820 SEM. For that purpose we use
} } a hot stage to heat up the the specimen up to 600 C. But at a
} } temperature of about 370 C the thermal radiation of the specimen
} } and the furnace disturbs the electron signal and we do not see
} } anything on the screen.
} }
} } We use a semiconductor BSE-detector with two half- which is
} } positioned underneath the pole-piece.
} }
} } I would be nice to hear some suggestions concerning this problem.
} }
} } Maybe another kind of detector, filters for the photonic radiation
} } etc.
} }
} } Further information:
} }
} } 1.We cannot use the SE2-detector since SE cannot solve the
} } orientation-contrast between the different grains.
} }
} } 2.The temperature at the detector is about 100 C during the
} } heating process.
} }
} }
} }
} } Dirk Kirch
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} }
} } Dirk Kirch
} } Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik
} } RWTH Aachen
} } D-52056 Aachen
} } Germany
} }
} } Phone : +49-241-8026861
} } Fax : +49-241-8022301
} } Internet: http://www.imm.rwth-aachen.de
} } E-Mail : kirch-at-imm.rwth-aachen.de
} }
} } +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
}
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 25 08:01:03 2002



From: Diane.Ciaburri-at-gd-ais.com
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 08:50:58 -0500
Subject: Re: IC package removal (LONG)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jon,

I assume you're speaking about plastic packages since you want a chemical
removal technique. Below your message is a summary of responses that I
received when I asked a similar question. I can't comment on them,
because my project dried up after I asked the question and I never got to
try any of the techniques, but there look like some good ones.

Diane Ciaburri
General Dynamics
Pittsfield, MA





Does anybody have a chemical solution for removing IC packaging without
damaging the internal components? Simple grinding from the top down is
not
suitable because I need all the interconnects intact. Any help in this
matter is greatly appreciated.

Sincere regards,

Jon Hiller
==================================================================
Jon M. Hiller
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division
Electron Microscopy Center
Tel: 630-252-9558
Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: hiller-at-anl.gov
==================================================================




Here's the summary (long) for all those interested in deencapsulating
plastic
encapsulated ICs. I have no preferences as I haven't tried any yet, but
thought the fuming sulfuric acid might be 'fun'. Thanks again!

_______________________________________________________________________
********************************************************************************
********************

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Hi Diane,

The way this is generally done is to mill the plastic down on a grinding
wheel to the point where only a fairly thin layer of plastic remains.
Then,
using a plasma etcher, and a mixture of oxygen to CF4 (for example, 30%
oxygen/70% CF4), whereby the oxygen etches away the plastic and the CF4
etches away the glass frit that is usually found in the plastic, you can
remove the remaining plastic (package) without damaging the device itself.
Different people like to use different gas ratios, of course, and that is
probably a function, at least to some degree, of the concentration of
glass
frit in their particular plastic.

The SPI Plasma Prep II unit, as shown on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/instruments/etchers1.html in the world, is
probably the most widely used unit for doing this type of operation. It
is
inexpensive and highly reliable, and requires virtually no maintenance.

Chuck
____________________________________________________________________________
********************************************************************************
***************************
The ion beam approach works well. I have not used it recently on finer
pitch
ICs. With as-built feature sizes of 2-4u, it is fine. It will stop at
the
passivation and leave the Al bond wires intact. The resulting package
looks
like it has a V-shaped pit in it (which it does). The extent of the pit
depends
on the size of the die and if you want to blast
down to the lead frame or substrate.

I have not done this on finer pitch devices. I would be a bit skeptical
about
these mostly because of the smaller bond pads. The etching would still
stop at
the passivation.

There are numerous places in Silicon Valley that do this on an outsource
basis.
Typical costs are about $75 per IC. I can get some contacts for you if
you'd
like.

gary g.
___________________________________________________________________________
********************************************************************************
*************************

Diane: attached is a text document outlining the procedure my FA lab
uses.
Yellow fuming nitric is usually the acid of choice. If you can get a few
extra
parts to practice on, that would be best. And you're right, plasma takes
FOREVER. If I can be of any more help, please let me know.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-598-1291 (pager)
KFAB Physical Analysis Labs--SEM/FIB/FA
Kilby Center West
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


TOOLS, EQUIPMENT, & SUPPLIES
1. Milling machine and appropriate end mills
2. Stabilo SuperFine OH pen or equivalent
3. Fume hood properly equipped for exhausting acid fumes and solvent
vapors (see
reference 3.4)
4. Explosion proof hot plate (see reference 3.4)
5. Ultrasonic cleaning apparatus
6. An optical microscope capable of 100X to 500X magnification, equipped
with a
lighting system.
7. Chemical resistant latex gloves
8. Chemical resistant laboratory coat
9. Chemical resistant safety glasses (see reference 3.5)
10. Hand tools (tweezers, scalpels and etc.)
11. Plastic micro-pipette
12. Fuming red nitric acid
13. Yellow nitric acid
14. Methyl alcohol
15. Acetone


1. RECORDING OF PACKAGE MARKINGS
Record all of the device markings that are on the top and bottom sides of
the
devices prior to starting any of the decap operations.
2. CAVITY MILLING
Determine the exact location of the chip within the package and mark the
top of
the device package showing the chip perimeter, using a Stabilo SuperFine
OH pen
and a straight edge. A SAM plot or X-ray image may
be used to help determine the exact location of the chip and also to
determine
the thickness of the mold compound covering the chip.
Note: This should be done on devices having large chips. Devices with
small
chips (less than 0.125 inches in their longest dimension) do not require
this
step.
Mill a cavity out of the plastic package that is centered over the chip.
The
size of the milled cavity should typically be .050 to .100 inches larger
than
the length and width dimensions of the chip. The depth of the
milled cavity depends on the thickness of the mold compound and the
location and
loop height of the bond wires. During the milling operation use a vacuum
line to
pick up the loose plastic particles generated.
Caution: do not mill into the bond wires or the chip. Mill counter bores
on
devices with chip dimensions greater than 0.400 inches on a side. These
counter
bores should be made on one or more levels within the bond pad perimeter
and at
the outermost corners of the cavity (this is necessary to facilitate
etching of
the mold compound at the corners of the chip before the sides are exposed
and
subsequent damage to the leadframe). Care must be taken during the milling
operation to avoid excessive pressure on the mill resulting in filler
induced
damage to the chip P.O. The end mill should not bind, bend, or "smoke"
during
the milling operation.
3. PACKAGE ETCHING
All etching must be performed in a chemical hood that meets the
requirements
defined in references #.3 and
4.Heating of acid or device prior to application of acid must be done
using an
explosion proof hot plate that meets the requirements of reference #4.
Obtain the appropriate acid for use on the mold compound being removed.
Following are the acids that have been identified for the removal of the
various
mold compounds.
Mold Compound Acid/Temperature
Shinetsu Red fuming nitric acid at 140-150 degrees Celsius
Plascon & Sumitomo Red fuming or yellow nitric acid 140-150 degrees
Celsius
Note: Fuming sulfuric acid reacts with exposed aluminum bond pad
metallization
and may result in ball bond discontinuity thus hampering further analysis.

· When using red fuming nitric acid it may be helpful to start the etching
process using a mixture of red and yellow nitric acids in order to slow
down the
etch process until a "residue crust" is formed over the cavity and then
switch
to the red nitric acid.
· Apply the acid in drops using a plastic micro-pipette. The drops should
be
placed in the center and at the corners of the cavity in approximately a
1:1
ratio.
· Allow the acid to react with the mold compound and form a crust of
dissolved
compound. Caution: Do not allow the crust to dry out completely before
adding
additional drops of acid.
· Remove the dissolved material using cotton swabs or by rinsing with
acetone
when the dissolved materials threaten to spill over the cavity. Caution:
Rinse
the device immediately with acetone if acid
spills onto the package pins.
· Soak the device in acetone for a minimum of 10 minutes, followed by a
spray of
methanol to remove loose residue and to clean the residue from the cavity
rim.
· Perform a thorough microscopic inspection to determine whether all
necessary
areas of the chip are exposed.
· If dried mold compound residue persists on the chip surface, use the
following
in the order shown to attempt removal:
· Solvent bath (such as methyl alcohol) in ultrasonic cleaner
· Several drops of room temperature fuming sulfuric acid applied to the
chip
(with the chip at room temperature) for several seconds then rinse the
device in
DI water.
· Several drops of fuming sulfuric acid applied to the chip with the chip
on a
100 degree Celsius hot plate. Note: Fuming sulfuric acid will attack
aluminum
bond pads and is therefore the method of last resort.

_____________________________________________________________________
*********************************************************************
Can't comment on sulfuric, but I have used red fuming nitric at near
boiling
temperature. Apply acid, let react. Flush witn more acid, let react,
etc.

Woody White

_______________________________________________________________________
***********************************************************************

Diane,
Yes, hot fuming sulfuric and/or hot fuming nitric are used as standard
procedures for removing plastic from IC's. The process is not quite that
simple. For example, water rinses will almost certainly etch the bond
pads
on the IC and thus removing connection to the outside world. Additionally,
the plastic contains fire retardants which some regions don't like being
washed down the drain. There is more detailed help through EDFAS.org (one
of ASM's branches). B&G International sells a very safe, effective etcher
which performs decapsulation automatically in minutes.

I have no association with B&G International.

David Saxon
Analytical Microscope Services
11826 Reservoir Rd. E.
Puyallup, WA 98374
253-848-7701 voice & fax
email: info-at-analyticalmicroscope.com
website: www.analyticalmicroscope.com

_________________________________________________________________________
*************************************************************************
Diane,

I used to do failure analysis on semi conductor memories which
were
starting to be made of plastic/epoxy with glass rods about 20 years ago.

I have some technics and possible help but its too much to write.
Basically you drill a small hole about 0.1" deep then heat the IC on a hot
plate and then you drop your acid to remove the plastic. I dont know
chemistry, I'm and Electronics Technician. I did this work with a meterial
sicentist, my mentor.
We used fumming sulfuric acid and fuimg nitric acid, also some type of
organic pink and blue solutions to stop some of the acids etching effect.

The company back then was Burroughs Corp. today is Unysis.

I presently work for the U S Department of Energy in New York City. My
phone number is 212 6203650, I'll be happy to walk through some ideas and
things I learned.

Regards
Peter Roiz
______________________________________________________________________
**********************************************************************

Perhaps it's time to comment on this thread.

Dichloromethane and dimethylformamide are relatively effective disrupters
of
most epoxies but their action is accompanied by great swelling because the
polymer becomes engorged with the liquid before any significant solvation
takes
place. This will destroy wire bonds on an IC.

Fuming (essentially anhydrous) sulfuric acid acts by the completely
different
process of sulfonating reactive groups that remain on the polymer. The
depolymerized and sulfonated byproducts are quite soluble not only in the
acid
but usually in water as well. The worst thing that you could do in this
relatively straightforward process is to wash with water at intervals
because
this would initiate almost instantaneous corrosion. It would be advisable
for a
chemist, as someone trained in the handling
of reactive materials, to carry this out or at least to establish
procedures and
train others with less experience. The action of sulfuric acid in this
regard
is quite different than that of nitric. Nearly anhydrous nitric acid
(completely anhydrous is extremely difficult to prepare) is a very
powerful
oxidizer and could lead to unstable, dangerous byproducts whereas the
sulfonates
resulting from the sulfuric acid reaction are relatively stable. Water
must, of
course, be prevented from splashing into any concentrated acid, especially
sulfuric.

A very strong acid such as sulfuric behaves completely differently in the
absence of water. Since most acids are highly hygroscopic and are sold as
water
solutions, most people do not observe this other side of their behavior.
Without water to create an ionized electrolyte, corrosion of metals will
not
take place. I have de-encapsulated ICs for failure analysis in 200 degree
sulfuric acid and been able to operate the IC
without replacing the .001" aluminum wirebonds that it came with. I
recall one
instance where our company built prototype hybrid microelectronic circuits
out
of such de-encapsulated ICs when their supplier was late getting a new
design on
the market and the only ones available were already encapsulated.

The key is to realize that water must be excluded until the sulfonating
acid has
been completely rinsed away by a non-aqueous liquid. As Mr. Saxon said,
there
are simple and safe devices available for doing this operation. However,
with
proper care and protective gear it can be done in a beaker on a hot plate
in a
fume hood. A few ml.s of sulfuric acid are heated to drive off water
until
heavy vapors are observed over the liquid (which may darken during heating
due
to trace impurities). The IC is carefully lowered into the hot acid and a
vigorous reaction ensues with the epoxy
almost instantly washing into the solution. After a few seconds the IC is
then
quickly lifted out and held over a receiving vessel and flooded with a
stream of
ethanol. Only after this is a final rinse in deionized water carried out,
followed by fresh electronic grade ethanol and forced drying in warm air.

The ready made devices which carry out the operation are typically a small
bowl
with a hinged lid from which air is withdrawn by a gentle vacuum. An
inert
metal feeder tube leads from a heated reservoir for the sulfuric acid and
passes
through the wall of the bowl to a position where the encapsulated device
is
secured. When the lid is closed and the slight vacuum applied, the hot
acid is
pulled into the bowl over the device. It is somewhat self-limiting in
that, if
the lid is opened, there is no driving force to bring more acid into the
container. Naturally, the vacuum source needs to be protected by a trap
and all
waste products properly handled no matter how the procedure is carried
out.

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist
(formerly, Manager of the Reliability Analysis Center,
Teledyne Microelectronics)



From daemon Fri Jan 25 08:35:53 2002



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 08:35:29 -0600
Subject: Hitachi S-570 vibration dampers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Listers,

There were some posts recently from folks looking to pass on Hitachi
S-570 SEMs. I'm in a different boat, keeping ours running. Happily,
it's doing well. We do need to replace the vibration dampers just
under the column (at the corners). New ones from Hitachi are horribly
expensive, of course. There is a good home-brew damper our service
engineer described, but I thought I'd check to see if anyone who had
disposed of a 570, or otherwise has extra parts, happened to have
these dampers. If so, how much would you want for them?

Thanks!

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, AMFSC and BBPIC microscopy facilities
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Fri Jan 25 11:00:08 2002



From: Jon Mulholland :      jwm-at-genome.stanford.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 08:52:01 -0800 (PST)
Subject: EM RA Position availible

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Electron Microscopy Research Assistant

The Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF) at Stanford University has an
opening for a full- time, EM research assistant. The position requires a
person with extensive and varied experienced in EM techniques including
immunohistochemistry and immunogold. Experience in cryo-specimen
preparation and cryo-ultramicrotomy is also desired. The research
assistant will conduct EM experiments for users (primarily Stanford
researchers) of the CSIF as well as train users on facility electron
microscopes and ancillary equipment. In addition, the research assistant
will help setup and manage the daily operation of the EM core including
ordering supplies and assuring that the EM core is in compliance with all
health and safety regulations. The position requires BA/BS degree in
Biology or related field and a minimum of 3-5 years experience in an
electron microscopy research laboratory. Position requires the ability
and desire to develop and apply new techniques. Some experience and
comfort working in a heterogeneous computing environment (PC, MAC, UNIX)
required. The EM core of the CSIF is a new, full service user facility
with state-of-the-art equipment including a JEOL1230 TEM equipped with a
Gatan 791 ccd camera, Leica Ultracut UCT microtomes and Pelco processing
microwave. The CSIF provides Stanford University researchers with access
to state-of-the-art, cutting-edge instrumentation and methodologies for
confocal, multiphoton, deconvolution and electron microscopy imaging.
The successful applicant will have an opportunity to work on many
different research projects and to learn and apply new techniques.
Stanford University provides excellent benefits and an informal work
environment. Salary commensurate with experience. Interested candidates
should e-mail or fax their resume and letter of application directly to:

Jon Mulholland, Director
Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
Beckman Center B062
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305-5301

jwm-at-genome.stanford.edu
650-725-4951 (fax)



From daemon Fri Jan 25 11:00:08 2002



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 11:45:46 -0500
Subject: IC package removal

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Jon,

If it is the black "plastic" (glass filled epoxy), nitric acid works on
some, and sulfuric
acid works on most. There are also some chemicals called "Dynasolve", that
we
use various types of. The differences are in the speed with which the
material is
removed, and what damage is done to interconnects, etc. If you watch the
time
you have the sample in sulfuric acid, it works for most parts.

Hope this helped.
Regards,
Darrell

Jon Hiller {hiller-at-anl.gov} on 01/24/2002 08:26:21 PM

To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:



Does anybody have a chemical solution for removing IC packaging without
damaging the internal components? Simple grinding from the top down is not
suitable because I need all the interconnects intact. Any help in this
matter is greatly appreciated.

Sincere regards,

Jon Hiller
==================================================================
Jon M. Hiller
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division
Electron Microscopy Center
Tel: 630-252-9558
Fax: 630-252-4798
Email: hiller-at-anl.gov
==================================================================






From daemon Fri Jan 25 13:14:43 2002



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 11:06:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject: E3 electroscan ESEM - stage drive motor ?

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Hello everyone,
We have an E3 electronscan ESEM in our laboratory and the most used motor
for the Z-axis has failed. We did a fix by replacing it with the rotation
motor, but we now can't rotate our sample. Does anyone have
any suggestions how we can get an economical replacement for the motor?

I contacted FEI and they want too much money for a replacement - something
like $1300 or more. I also contacted the manufacturer - pittman. They no
longer carry the motor, but will manufacture 25 of them mininum for $300
each.

I was wondering if anyone had a spare replacement motor for this
instrument they can sell or donate? I was also wondering if I could use a
replacement motor from Pittman and build it into the drive myself, using
another encoder and gearbox? The motor has on it WDG#4, 4-phase, 500 cpr,
24:1 G/R, manufactured in 6-18-92.

The pittman web page at:
http://www.pittmannet.com/
has a selection of motors, and I've ordered their catalogue and select
guide, but I have no experience in matching motors (torque/speed/etc).
Anyone with prior experience or helpful advice, suggestions will be
greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your help.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793



From daemon Fri Jan 25 13:54:04 2002



From: Cavin Mooers :      cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 13:45:40 -0600
Subject: EM 300 AVAILABLE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have an Phillips EM300 TEM free to anyone who wants to come pick it
up. It has multiple stages, EDS detector, (no pulse processor,)and a
port for a camera. It does have a mercury diffusion pump, (a problem
for some.)

If we cannot find a home for it in the next 4-6 weeks, it will be
disposed of. Hopefully, it will not come to that.

Sincerly,

Cavin Mooers, Research Assistant
Vitreous State Laboratory
The Catholic University of America
Hannan Hall
Washington, DC 20064
(202) 319-5346phone
(202) 319-4469fax


From daemon Fri Jan 25 14:04:30 2002



From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 15:12:22 -0500
Subject: RE: Micromaze Traps

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The Micromaze foreline traps are available from the Kurt J. Lesker
Co. of Clariton, Pa., (FAX: 412-233-4275). You can probably reach
them on the internet too, but I don't have an e-mail address readily
at hand. The traps are described, and their use is discussed, on p.
147 of my book 'Vacuum Methods in Electron Microscopy" (for a
description see http://www.2spi.com/catalog/books/book48.html or
http://pup.princeton.edu/titles/6484.html)
--
Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237


From daemon Fri Jan 25 17:38:19 2002



From: ever4us-at-comcast.com ()
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 17:28:10 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:Help LM Info for a Middle School

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ever4us-at-comcast.com ) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
January 25, 2002 at 16:20:49
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ever4us-at-comcast.com
Name: Denise Everett

Organization: Pitman Middle School

Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School

Location: Pitman, NJ 08071

Question: I've recently become the science coordinator of our school
but my science background is in enzymology so I don't have alot of
experience with microscopy. We are looking to buy some new scopes
and in the process I've been looking at our old ones. The 400x
magnification is pretty unusable on these. Is that supposed to be oil
immersion use only?
These lenses are pretty dirty and have probably not been maintained.
The top objective does not come out for cleaning as far as I can see.
Do I just need to send these to a technician?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jan 25 18:48:02 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2002 16:37:16 -0800
Subject: Re: Hitachi S-570 vibration dampers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Phil,
The secret that the Canadian rep told me was to put some of the thick
washers that came with the S-570 shipping kit over the rubber vibration
dampers, so that the table is raised up off the shipping posts. You get a
little extra life out of them that way. You will know when the table hits
the posts, since your vibration gets worse.
The vibration dampers for the S-570 are only about one quarter the price of
the ones for the S-2300, so it could be worse.
At 08:35 AM 1/25/02 -0600, you wrote:
} Listers,
}
} There were some posts recently from folks looking to pass on Hitachi
} S-570 SEMs. I'm in a different boat, keeping ours running. Happily,
} it's doing well. We do need to replace the vibration dampers just
} under the column (at the corners). New ones from Hitachi are horribly
} expensive, of course. There is a good home-brew damper our service
} engineer described, but I thought I'd check to see if anyone who had
} disposed of a 570, or otherwise has extra parts, happened to have
} these dampers. If so, how much would you want for them?
}
} Thanks!
}
} Phil
Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Sat Jan 26 13:16:35 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2002 10:07:03 -0800
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:Help LM Info for a Middle School

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Email: ever4us-at-comcast.com
} Name: Denise Everett
}
} Organization: Pitman Middle School
}
} Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School
}
} Location: Pitman, NJ 08071
}
} Question: I've recently become the science coordinator of our school
} but my science background is in enzymology so I don't have alot of
} experience with microscopy. We are looking to buy some new scopes
} and in the process I've been looking at our old ones. The 400x
} magnification is pretty unusable on these. Is that supposed to be oil
} immersion use only?
} These lenses are pretty dirty and have probably not been maintained.
} The top objective does not come out for cleaning as far as I can see.
} Do I just need to send these to a technician?
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Denise -

I'm glad that you've asked for help; we're here to provide it.
There are several topics here. First, new microscopes. Let's assume that
the scopes that you have are salvageable. Since you're in a middle school,
PLEASE consider purchasing "dissecting" rather than compound scopes like
the ones that you have. A lot of introductory microscopy for your age
group is observstion of thick specimens at lower magnifications; looking at
large insects, flowers, shells, etc. So having a mix of types will greatly
expand your capabilities. You'll find a detailed discussion of selection
criteria on Project MICRO's website (URL below). I suggest 20x monocular
dissecting scopes, wich will cost you around $75 each; sources are listed
on the MICRO site and you can find an example online at
www.microscopeworld.com.
Your dirt diagnosis is probably accurate. It would be best if you
learn to clean the scopes yourself; you'll then know how to keep them that
way. The New York Microscopical Society has members and meeting rooms in
New Jersey, and one of their members may be available to show you what to
do; I'm copying this Email to Jean Portell {JeanDP-at-aol.com} , one of their
officers. I also can provide you with detailed cleaning instructions for
teachers, written by a MSA member. 400x is "high dry" - oil immersion is
1000x and inappropriate for middle school.
While you're visiting the MICRO website, don't miss MSA's middle
school manual, "Microscopic Explorations"; it's an excellent introduction
to scientific observation and inquiry, written by the science educators at
the Lawrence Hall of Science. If you want a reference book for your own
use, here's another listing from the MICRO bibliography:

Nachtigall, W. 1995 Exploring With the Microscope 160 pp. hardbound.
6.5x9.5". $19.95. ISBN 0-8069-0866-1 Sterling Publishing Co., NY.
Although this book is intended for adult amateur microscopists, it
is well written and will provide teachers and classroom volunteers with
much useful information on "serious" light microscopy; it's unequalled as a
basic reference for beginners. Almost half of the book is devoted to
simple preparation methods for biological specimens and descriptions (with
good illustrations) of commonly encountered organisms. Adult. RECOMMENDED

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Sun Jan 27 11:35:11 2002



From: Yann Bassaglia :      bassaglia-at-univ-paris12.fr
Date: Sun, 27 Jan 2002 18:22:19 +0100
Subject: Trouble in LM/EM immunolabbeling correlation

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Dear lister,

I'm new in this list , and I wonder if anybody could help us...

We try to localize an epitope in the sarcomeric organization of rat muscle.
We obtained a very clean and strong signal by immunofluorescence on
cryostat sections, even after fixation with 4%PF. So we planned to go to EM
level, to see if our epitope is in or around the myofibrilles...
But at this time, we were unable to obtain any good signal in EM :
- using post-embedding methods after Lowicryl or LRwhite (and of course
Epon...)
- and even using ultracryotomy...
In this last case, we were able to clearly observe our signal on semithin
sections with immunofluorescence, but no specific signal was obtained on
ultrathin sections with colloidal-gold !

The only result we could get in EM was by pre-embedding, using peroxydase
on cryostat sections. But this is not very clean, and do not allow us to
answer to our question because the precipitate could deposit into the
sarcomere.

I plan to use, in pre or post embedding methods :
- antifluorescein antibodies, linked to gold : I would appreciate any
advice or recommandation about this kind of antibodies (specificity ? can
we hope an amplification ?)
- tyramide-biotin amplification : here also, I would appreciate any advice.
In particular, is there an estimation of the maximum distance between the
site of production and the site of fixation of the tyramide product ?

Any advice, or suggestion for another method, will be wellcome...

Thank you for your help !
Yann

_____________________________________________
Dr. Yann BASSAGLIA, PhD
Universite Paris-Val de Marne
Laboratoire CRRET / UPRESA CNRS 7053
Avenue du general de Gaulle
F-94010 CRETEIL Cedex
FRANCE

Tel : (33) 1 45 17 14 55
Fax : (33) 1 45 17 18 16
e-mail : bassaglia-at-univ-paris12.fr





From daemon Mon Jan 28 07:02:50 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 07:47:00 EST
Subject: Announce: Image Processing and Measurement Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The three-day intensive hands-on workshop on Image Processing and Measurement
presented by John Russ (author of "The Image Processing Handbook" and
"Practical Stereology") through the North Carolina State University
Department of Continuing and Professional Education is now in its 20th year.
The course dates for 2002 are May 8 - 10 in Raleigh, NC, June 10-12 at the
Danish Technological Institute in Taastrup, Denmark (near Copenhagen), and
November 6-8, 2002, in Raleigh. This course has generated highly favorable
reviews from the thousands of previous students. The primary focus is on
images from various types of microscopy, with practical guidance in
correcting imaging defects, enhancing the images for presentation and
measurement, and performing stereological meaningful measurements on them.
Textbooks and computer software are provided to attendees. Lab sessions with
an opportunity to bring your own images makes this course immediately useful
and highly productive.

For full information on the course, including outlines, faculty information,
a downloadable brochure, and on-line registration, go to

http://members.AOL.com/IPCourse/

Class size is limited to maintain a high ratio of instructors to students, so
make your reservation now. You may also contact Cindy Allen at NCSU Contin.
Ed., at 919-515-8171


From daemon Mon Jan 28 07:04:55 2002



From: R. Cross :      r.cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 14:59:21 +0200
Subject: ICEM-15

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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News update!

15th International Congress on EM (ICEM-15), Durban, South
Africa, 1 - 6 September 2002.

* abstracts
* scientific programme
* good news for international delegates
* important travel information

As the deadline for receipt of abstracts is rapidly approaching
anyone intending to contribute should send their abstracts as soon
as possible, according to the instructions in the Second Circular
and Call for Abstracts, by courier please to the ICEM-15 office at
this address:

ICEM-15
Turners Conferences
37 Jonsson Lane (off Victoria Embankment)
Durban, South Africa

Those who received the Second Circular will have seen that a wide-
ranging programme of scientific symposia has been put together by
the programme committee, the advisory committee and the IFSEM
executive. This has been further developed and there is now
something for everyone in the programme, and a most impressive
group of scientists from throughout the world has been assembled
to chair the symposia and give invited lectures. This will be
supplemented by the Technical Forum during which issues of a
more technical nature will be discussed.

Excellent news for international delegates is that because of the
complexities of international currency markets the South African
Rand has depreciated to a large extent against the US$ and major
European currencies over the past year. This means that cost of
practically everything such as accommodation, meals, souvenirs,
tours, car hire, etc, for delegates will be very low, and represents
probably the best value for money that is obtainable anywhere.

Because the 2002 Earth Summit is taking place in Johannesburg
during August, seats on flights to and from South Africa, and to
come extent within Southern Africa, will be in high demand during
that time. Delegates to ICEM-15 are therefore advised to book
early. Contact your travel agent, or email Dudley Randall at Turners
Conferences (turner17-at-galileosa.co.za) for advice and assistance.

We looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible in
Durban in September. Everything is in place to ensure that ICEM-
15 provides all those who attend with a scientifically rewarding,
memorable and most enjoyable experience.

Anyone requiring information should address enquiries to:

icem-at-ru.ac.za (general)
turner17-at-galileosa.co.za (travel, accommodation, etc)
graham-at-nu.ac.za (local arrangements)
bruton-at-nu.ac.za (trade exhibition)

or go to the ICEM-15 websites:

www.icem15.com
www.turners.co.za/icem15

Kind regards.

Robin H Cross
Chairman: ICEM-15






From daemon Mon Jan 28 08:30:33 2002



From: Christopher Ware :      Warec-at-nu.ac.za
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 08:20:06 -0600
Subject: TEM on clays

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Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Description: HTML

I am currently looking at TEM of clays within heavy mineral
containing coastal dunes in South Africa. I have completed extensive
X-ray analyses of these clays but the expertise are not available in
our university for the TEM studies. Are there any outstanding books
available on this subject. Any advice would be welcome. Thanks.
Chris Ware
School of geological & computer sciences
University of Natal
South Africa
{mailto:warec-at-nu.ac.za} warec-at-nu.ac.za


From daemon Mon Jan 28 13:25:28 2002



From: Jon Mulholland :      jwm-at-genome.stanford.edu
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 11:14:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM film processor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow microscopists,
We are looking into purchasing a processor (Mohr, #2950 from ted
pella) to process our TEM negatives. This processor will be dedicated to
TEM film processing. We would like to hear from others who have used this
type of mechanical processing for TEM negatives (kodak 4489). Does it
leave spots or residues, do you routinely lose negatives, is it expensive
it terms of chemicals etc.? Thanks in advance for your responses.


Jon Mulholland
Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
Beckman Center B050
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305



From daemon Mon Jan 28 14:09:57 2002



From: Matt Olszta :      molsz-at-mse.ufl.edu
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 15:03:16 -0500
Subject: TEM Bone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am currently trying to embed mineralized (CaCO3) collagen samples in TAAB
epon resin, but am finding that it is not hard enough. As I am not as
familiar with the different resins, I was hoping someone on here would be
able to help me. I heard that I might possibly use PMMA. Any suggestions
would be appreciated.

Regards,
Matt Olszta
Graduate Research Assistant
University of Florida



From daemon Mon Jan 28 15:32:41 2002



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 13:24:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM on clays

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The journal,
Clays and Clay Minerals, has a lot of articles on clays and often analysis
by TEM. You should do a search of this journal for the particular
clay/minerals you are interested in.

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Mon, 28 Jan 2002, Christopher Ware wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
} Content-Description: HTML
}
} I am currently looking at TEM of clays within heavy mineral
} containing coastal dunes in South Africa. I have completed extensive
} X-ray analyses of these clays but the expertise are not available in
} our university for the TEM studies. Are there any outstanding books
} available on this subject. Any advice would be welcome. Thanks.
} Chris Ware
} School of geological & computer sciences
} University of Natal
} South Africa
} {mailto:warec-at-nu.ac.za} warec-at-nu.ac.za
}



From daemon Mon Jan 28 15:33:57 2002



From: Curtis Olson :      COlson-at-scpglobal.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 14:26:05 -0700
Subject: SEM sample prep of Semiconductor Xsect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am new to the SEM field and am tasked with learning how to prepare cross sections of microchips from silicon wafers (features of {0.25um). I have been unable to locate any information so references and any other advice would greatly help. Tools, accessories, books, on-line info., etc. Thank you

Curtis



From daemon Mon Jan 28 17:45:42 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 18:22:05 -0500
Subject: SEM sample prep of Semiconductor Xsect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


1) Get your hands on the MRS books on TEM sample prep III and IV. Sorry, I don't' have the MRS vol numbers on hand, but you can probably look them up on the MRS web site.
2) Look into taking the Lehigh course on TEM sample prep this summer. Two excellent instructors! http://www.lehigh.edu/~inmatsci/shortcourses/Microscourses.html

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Curtis Olson [mailto:COlson-at-scpglobal.com]
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2002 4:26 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I am new to the SEM field and am tasked with learning how to prepare cross sections of microchips from silicon wafers (features of {0.25um). I have been unable to locate any information so references and any other advice would greatly help. Tools, accessories, books, on-line info., etc. Thank you

Curtis



From daemon Mon Jan 28 18:32:30 2002



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:24:28 GMT+1200
Subject: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, listers

When I cleaned out my EDS detector dewar, I discovered quite a bit of
crud, including an ant, plus, of course a few ml of water.

I guess I should try to filter the LN2 as I pour it into the
detector, but I've never been able to visualise what seems like a
satisfactory funnel/filter configuration.

While it would be nice to filter out particles, and maybe even
suspended ice crystals, I don't want to introduce additional
problems.

Neither do I want to go through the occasionally heart-stopping
performance of warming up the detector, taking it off the 840,
cleaning out the dewar, remounting and recooling it any more
frequently than I absolutely have to.

How do others deal with this?


cheers

rtch

Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Mon Jan 28 21:47:30 2002



From: Angela Klaus :      avklaus-at-amnh.org
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 22:38:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all...

Sorry for this really basic question:

Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs. phosphate
buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have a colleague
having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like to use
phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just curious as to why
one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity issues. I've
always used cacodylate for sperm.

Best,

Angela

Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.

Director, Core Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024 USA

Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
Tel: 212-769-5977




From daemon Mon Jan 28 21:49:39 2002



From: Mike Dalbey :      dalbey-at-biology.ucsc.edu
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 19:44:22 -0800
Subject: LM Unitron Objective ID?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Perhaps someone will be able to provide some information regarding an
unusual Unitron microscope objective.

The most unusual aspect of the objective is its length (8 cm or 3 inches).
The threads are standard. It is engraved on one side of the barrel with
"Phase Contrast D. M. UNITRON No.866" I know this indicates a Dark Medium
Phase Contrast objective, and indeed I can see the phase annulus when I
peer through it. But it is several times longer and heavier than another
Unitron Phase objective I have. Althogh I can thread it into the nosepiece
of my Unitron inverted scope, the nosepiece cannot be lowered far enough to
accommodate the objective between the nosepiece and the stage.

The other side of the barrel is engraved "Coated F. F. 40X n.A.
0.45 T.L. 170 Quartz 1.00"

I know that T.L. = Tube Length and N. A. = Numerical Aperture.

What does the F. F. designation mean (Flat Field?) and what is the
significance of the "Quartz 1.00?

What is the application for this objective?
Mike Dalbey

Lecturer in Biology
University of California, Santa Cruz

831-459-3674

dalbey-at-biology.ucsc.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 29 00:45:20 2002



From: Arthur Day :      ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 17:37:13 +1100
Subject: Re: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} When I cleaned out my EDS detector dewar, I discovered quite a bit of
} crud, including an ant, plus, of course a few ml of water.
}

Hey rtch,

Did the ant wake up again? Was it thirsty? Just wondering!

Can't really suggest a good filter but the Ln2 shoud be pretty clean
and ice free already? I imagine most filters would make the filling
process a bit of an ordeal. We just make sure the transfer dewars are
completely clean and dry before starting and only carry the Ln2 with
lids on the dewars. Using a lid substantially stops the ice you get
from humidity being pulled out of the air. You should normally be
able to go for many years without the ice getting so bad that it
impacts on the performance of the dewar/eds?

This question has stimulated my curiosity about how long people
generally find they can go before having to de-ice their systems --
in general.

Cheers mate.

Arthur.





Arthur Day, Electron Microscope Unit Phone: 61-2-9717-3457
Ansto Materials Division Fax: 61-2-9543-7179
PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Email: ard-at-ansto.gov.au
Australia www: http://www.ansto.gov.au/


From daemon Tue Jan 29 01:08:53 2002



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 22:58:57 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM sample prep of Semiconductor Xsect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Curtis:

You certainly came to the right place. I'm sure there are many members of the list who can share their experience with you on this subject. I would also suggest that you visit our website at www.southbaytech.com. If you click on "Applications Support" you will find sections containing application
notes and technical reports. You will find numerous references to SEM and TEM cross sectioning. You can also type in the keyword "EM" to find all of our EM preparation equipment. Of particular interest will be our Model 590S Tripod Polisher.

In addition to the information you fins on our website, we also have our technical support staff who can walk you through the process. We can offer on-site training classes.

I hope this information helps. If you need anything else, please feel free to contact me directly off-line.

DISCLAIMER: South Bay Technology produces equipment and supplies as described above and, therefore, has a vested interest in promoting their use.

Best regards-

David

Curtis Olson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I am new to the SEM field and am tasked with learning how to prepare cross sections of microchips from silicon wafers (features of {0.25um). I have been unable to locate any information so references and any other advice would greatly help. Tools, accessories, books, on-line info., etc. Thank you
}
} Curtis

--
David Henriks TEL: +1-949-492-2600
South Bay Technology, Inc. FAX: +1-949-492-1499
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

*** www.southbaytech.com ***




From daemon Tue Jan 29 01:34:28 2002



From: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes :      rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 02:31:53 -0500
Subject: Re: Contact info for Scanning Microscopy International:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Microscopists:

Thanks for your suggestions for contacting Scanning Microscopy
International. This organization closed its Chicago office due to lack of
funds; it is not associated with journal 'Scanning' in any way. No-one was
able to provide current contact information for Dr. Om. Johari.

I was able to obtain the required permission by contacting Dr. Godfried
Roomans, one of the editors of the volume in question, directly, so this
seems to be the approach that works. He's on the MSA membership directory:

Godfried M. Roomans
Medical Cell Biology
Univ Uppsala Box 571
Uppsala, S-75123, SWEDEN
Tel: (46)18 4714114
Fax: (46)18 551120

Rick Powell


*****************************************************************************************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631)
980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
*****************************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Jan 29 02:16:43 2002



From: Gerhard Frank :      Gerhard.Frank-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 09:09:05 +0100
Subject: Re: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Ritchie,
We use a cut 1.5 l PET lemonade bottle (the ones with rather thick walls, no the
thin stuff; it does not get too cold and does not crack if dropped on the floor)
as a funnel with a coffee filter bag taped into it. It works quite well. Be sure
that there is enough space for the nitrogen to escape which boils off during
filling . I always find a lot of debris in the filter when I change it (app. 2
times a year).
Hope this helps
Gerhard Frank


Ritchie Sims schrieb:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hi, listers
}
} When I cleaned out my EDS detector dewar, I discovered quite a bit of
} crud, including an ant, plus, of course a few ml of water.
}
} I guess I should try to filter the LN2 as I pour it into the
} detector, but I've never been able to visualise what seems like a
} satisfactory funnel/filter configuration.
}
} While it would be nice to filter out particles, and maybe even
} suspended ice crystals, I don't want to introduce additional
} problems.
}
} Neither do I want to go through the occasionally heart-stopping
} performance of warming up the detector, taking it off the 840,
} cleaning out the dewar, remounting and recooling it any more
} frequently than I absolutely have to.
}
} How do others deal with this?
}
} cheers
}
} rtch
}
} Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand

--
Gerhard Frank
UNIVERSITAET ERLANGEN-NUERNBERG Phone: +49 9131 85 28606
Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaften VII Fax: +49 9131 85 28602
Cauerstr. 6, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany Gerhard.Frank-at-ww.uni.erlangen.de


From daemon Tue Jan 29 02:44:58 2002



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 08:50:50 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I tend to agree with Arthur's approach. Use clean, dry N2
buckets and don't let the N2 stand before filling to
prevent ice buildup.

Many years ago I used a steel funnel with a mesh filter in
the bottom to prevent water (ice) and dirt from entering
the detectors but it was so much slower that I began to
think that I was more likely to get water in from the ice
buildup during the prolonged fill, so I gave up.

Don't use plastic funnels that are likely to shatter easily
when cold. Apart from the safety aspect a little plastic
piece in the EDX dewar really can affect the performance
from the continual boiling.

As for regular cleaning of the dewar it is not something I
have ever undertaken. We have cleaned out dewars when they
are removed for service etc. (and also to remove a piece of
plastic funnel) but never just to check the dewar is clean.

Regards to all,
Ron


On Tue, 29 Jan 2002 17:37:13 +1100 Arthur Day
{ard-at-ansto.gov.au} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} } When I cleaned out my EDS detector dewar, I discovered quite a bit of
} } crud, including an ant, plus, of course a few ml of water.
} }
}
} Hey rtch,
}
} Did the ant wake up again? Was it thirsty? Just wondering!
}
} Can't really suggest a good filter but the Ln2 shoud be pretty clean
} and ice free already? I imagine most filters would make the filling
} process a bit of an ordeal. We just make sure the transfer dewars are
} completely clean and dry before starting and only carry the Ln2 with
} lids on the dewars. Using a lid substantially stops the ice you get
} from humidity being pulled out of the air. You should normally be
} able to go for many years without the ice getting so bad that it
} impacts on the performance of the dewar/eds?
}
} This question has stimulated my curiosity about how long people
} generally find they can go before having to de-ice their systems --
} in general.
}
} Cheers mate.
}
} Arthur.
}
}
}
}
}
} Arthur Day, Electron Microscope Unit Phone: 61-2-9717-3457
} Ansto Materials Division Fax: 61-2-9543-7179
} PMB 1, Menai (Sydney), NSW, 2234 Email: ard-at-ansto.gov.au
} Australia www: http://www.ansto.gov.au/
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk



From daemon Tue Jan 29 05:32:17 2002



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 11:23:37 +0000
Subject: CCD camera for fluroescence microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am considering purchase of a digital camera for
publication quality photography of fluorescence images
on a Leica MZFLIII stereomicroscope.
I would be grateful for advice / user recommendations on this

with best wishes

Chris Jeffree
==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Tue Jan 29 06:22:46 2002



From: Oparowski, Joseph :      Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 07:17:39 -0500
Subject: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Richie,

When we fill our dewar, we use a filter wipe (Kimwipes EX-L) to trap any ice
or dirt. These filter wipes are an elongated strip which can be placed in
the dewar neck to create a cavity approximately 3" deep. The extra length
allows the edges to remain outside the dewar neck so it does not fall in.
As with any filter, the fill time takes a little longer. After filling, we
pull the filter wipe out, let it warm up to room temp, and use it to wipe
any frost off of the dewar cap body. As a worst case, I have seen only
~10ml of water (max.) in the dewar over two years.

Hope this helps.

p.s. To follow the usual disclaimers, I have no affiliation with
Kimberly-Clark.

Joseph M. Oparowski
Materials Science Research - Consulting and Failure Analysis
Bose Corporation Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
The Mountain, M/S 415 Phone: (508) 766-1371
Framingham, MA 01701-9168 Fax: (508) 766-1313


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:24 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi, listers

When I cleaned out my EDS detector dewar, I discovered quite a bit of
crud, including an ant, plus, of course a few ml of water.

I guess I should try to filter the LN2 as I pour it into the
detector, but I've never been able to visualise what seems like a
satisfactory funnel/filter configuration.

While it would be nice to filter out particles, and maybe even
suspended ice crystals, I don't want to introduce additional
problems.

Neither do I want to go through the occasionally heart-stopping
performance of warming up the detector, taking it off the 840,
cleaning out the dewar, remounting and recooling it any more
frequently than I absolutely have to.

How do others deal with this?


cheers

rtch

Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Tue Jan 29 06:25:06 2002



From: Janos Labar :      labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:44:39 +0100
Subject: M&M 2001 Long Beach Proceedings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

During registration to the Long Beach conference, I checked the option that
the Proceedings volume should be sent to me by post. It still has not
arrived.

Is there anyone in Europe who already received it by post? Might there be a
problem with my copy?

Thank you in advance. Best regards:

János Lábár





Dr. habil, Janos L. Labar
Scientific Advisor
Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science
H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege u. 29-33
Postal address: H-1525 Budapest-114, Po Box 49
Tel: (36)(1) 392-26-92
Fax: (36)(1) 275-49-96
Fax/Phone: (36)(1) 392-25-86
home page: www.mfa.kfki.hu/~labar




From daemon Tue Jan 29 07:03:10 2002



From: alan stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 06:53:49 -0600
Subject: Re: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We simply clamp in loosely packed cheesecloth and it works perfectly.




At 01:24 PM 1/29/2002 +0000, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Tue Jan 29 07:03:11 2002



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 12:15:19 -0000
Subject: Re: Filter funnel for LN2 for EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

One of my clients in New Zealand uses the following filter technique with
great success.

They pass their LN2 through a pad of cotton wool to filter out ice and other
garbage. The important feature of the cotton is that it is the "clean
fibres" type, not the type which has little bobbles within the fibres.

It works for them so if you can get a cotton that does not flake off when a
liquid is passed through it, then I guess you have the right material for
the task?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
For consultancy and professional training in EM world wide
Tel 44+ 1280 814774 Direct Line 816512 Fax 814007
www.emcourses.com



From daemon Tue Jan 29 09:03:05 2002



From: rcmoretz-at-att.net (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 08:52:52 -0600
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Angela:
The main reason for using cacodylate instead of
phosphate is that uranyl salts precipitate in the
presence of phosphate. If one uses phosphate in the
original fixative, then several washes into another
buffer (e.g. through Tris into cacodylate) is required
before finishing. Since I use en bloc staining with
uranyl acetate, I prefer to use cacodylate throughout.
I also think (based only on my own biased sampling) that
I have less uranyl precipitation when staining on grids
with cacodylate vs phosphate buffered tissues.
Roger

--
Where the world is only slightly
less weird than it actually is.
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi all...
}
} Sorry for this really basic question:
}
} Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs. phosphate
} buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have a colleague
} having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like to use
} phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just curious as to why
} one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity issues. I've
} always used cacodylate for sperm.
}
} Best,
}
} Angela
}
} Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
}
} Director, Core Imaging Facility
} American Museum of Natural History
} Central Park West at 79th Street
} New York, NY 10024 USA
}
} Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} Tel: 212-769-5977
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 29 10:11:56 2002



From: Jacqueline D. Garfield :      JGarfield-at-lifecell.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 10:41:33 -0500
Subject: re:Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Angela,

I too prefer cacodylate buffer. However quite a few labs still use
phosphate buffer, probably for safety reasons. I know that phosphate buffer
can produce a precipitate. In Hayat's book Principles and Techniques of
Electron Microscopy, Biological Applications, Third Edition; there is a
section on buffers which may be helpful.
Good Luck,

Jackie Garfield
Lifecell Corporation
One Millennium Way
Branchburg, NJ 08876
(908) 947-1182
e-mail: jgarfield-at-lifecell.com


From daemon Tue Jan 29 10:26:42 2002



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 10:06:23 -0600
Subject: Exploring an Idea

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




List

I have recently seen a micromanipulator assembly that can be added to a
port on an SEM or FIB to probe samples within the vacuum at high
magnifications (submicron resolutions). I would like the List to think with
me for a bit about possible applications for such a device. The obvious one
that comes to my mind is the electrical probing of devices in
microelectronics, or maybe moving micro-particles around on a sample. If any
of you in material science or biology can think of any possible applications
I would like to hear from you off line.


Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Electron Microprobe Lab
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx 75275
voice: 214-768-2756
fax: 214-768-2701
E-mail: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 29 10:39:19 2002



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 08:27:57 -0800
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Angela
We always use cacodylate buffer unless we are doing immuno labelling.
Cacodylate does not react with uranyl acetate whereas you get aweful
precipitates if there is any suggestion of phosphate buffer left when
the specimen is put into uranyl acetate either with enblock or
on-grid staining.

So if you are using phosphate buffer, you have to be very careful
with washing. We would normally have a warm water wash to remove the
phosphate before UA staining.
Elaine

} Hi all...
}
} Sorry for this really basic question:
}
} Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs. phosphate
} buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have a colleague
} having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like to use
} phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just curious as to why
} one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity issues. I've
} always used cacodylate for sperm.
}
} Best,
}
} Angela
}
} Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
}
} Director, Core Imaging Facility
} American Museum of Natural History
} Central Park West at 79th Street
} New York, NY 10024 USA
}
} Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} Tel: 212-769-5977

--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, Biosciences Electron Microscopy Facility
First Vice President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-unixg.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From daemon Tue Jan 29 11:17:29 2002



From: Gary Liechty :      gdliechty-at-alliedhightech.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 09:12:38 -0800
Subject: SEM sample prep of Semiconductor Xsect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Mr. Olson,

Allied High Tech Products, Inc. offers a complete line of equipment and
consumables for sample preparation including IC cross-sections.

You can visit our website for information: www.alliedhightech.com, contact
me to discuss your needs personally, or you can schedule a visit to Allied's
facility for hands on training and demonstration of the equipment and
polishing supplies that are used. An additional option is to have an Allied
Product Application Specialist in your area come and discuss your
applications.

Sincerely,

Gary Liechty
Manager, Technical Products

{ {...OLE_Obj...} }
2376 E. Pacifica Place
Rancho Dominguez, CA 90220

310-635-2466
310-762-6808 Fax

www.alliedhightech.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Curtis Olson [mailto:COlson-at-scpglobal.com]
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2002 1:26 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I am new to the SEM field and am tasked with learning how to prepare cross
sections of microchips from silicon wafers (features of {0.25um). I have
been unable to locate any information so references and any other advice
would greatly help. Tools, accessories, books, on-line info., etc. Thank you

Curtis




From daemon Tue Jan 29 11:53:53 2002



From: Tina Schwach :      tschwach-at-mindspring.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 11:48:12 -0600
Subject: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I used phosphate buffer for years in fixing bacterial samples for EM.
However, when I started adding ruthenium red to my primary fix to better
stabilize acidic mucopolysaccharides found on bacterial surfaces,
precipitates started forming. So I switched to cacodylate buffer and the
problem went away. I then use osmium in the post-fix step. Now, I am
actually thinking of switching to HEPES buffer (used in tissue culture work)
so I can get away from cacodylate and still use RR. I've fixed sperm with
the same protocol.

Dr.Tina S. Schwach, President
Microscopy Consulting Services Inc.
651-681-0112
----- Original Message -----
} From: Angela Klaus
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2002 9:38 PM


Hi all...

Sorry for this really basic question:

Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs. phosphate
buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have a colleague
having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like to use
phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just curious as to why
one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity issues. I've
always used cacodylate for sperm.

Best,

Angela

Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.

Director, Core Imaging Facility
American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024 USA

Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
Tel: 212-769-5977



From daemon Tue Jan 29 12:46:09 2002



From: akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 13:44:23 -0500
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Janos,

I have asked Bill Bailey, the editor of the Proceedings to find out if your
copy was shipped or if there was another problem. Once I find out I will let
you know.

Sorry about the problems.

Bob Price,
Program Chair - M&M 2001 Long Beachs

} From: "Janos Labar" {labar-at-mfa.kfki.hu}
To: "Microscopy ListServer" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}


Another minor reason involves convenience. In my experience, the
concentrated phosphate buffer stock that was stored in the refrigerator
gradually developed crystals that had to be dissolved before the stock
could be used. This didn't happen with the concentrated cacodylate buffer
stock.

Kent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--On Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:52 AM -0600 "by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec"
{rcmoretz-at-att.net} wrote:

}
} Angela:
} The main reason for using cacodylate instead of
} phosphate is that uranyl salts precipitate in the
} presence of phosphate. If one uses phosphate in the
} original fixative, then several washes into another
} buffer (e.g. through Tris into cacodylate) is required
} before finishing. Since I use en bloc staining with
} uranyl acetate, I prefer to use cacodylate throughout.
} I also think (based only on my own biased sampling) that
} I have less uranyl precipitation when staining on grids
} with cacodylate vs phosphate buffered tissues.
} Roger
}
} --
} Where the world is only slightly
} less weird than it actually is.


} } Hi all...
} }
} } Sorry for this really basic question:
} }
} } Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs.
} } phosphate buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have
} } a colleague having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like
} } to use phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just
} } curious as to why one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity
} } issues. I've always used cacodylate for sperm.
} }
} } Best,
} }
} } Angela
} }
} } Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
} }
} } Director, Core Imaging Facility
} } American Museum of Natural History
} } Central Park West at 79th Street
} } New York, NY 10024 USA
} }
} } Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} } Tel: 212-769-5977



From daemon Tue Jan 29 13:33:41 2002



From: jshields-at-cb.uga.edu
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 14:30:33 -0500
Subject: Southeastern Microscopy Society meeting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Southeastern Microscopy Society will be having its annual
meeting in Athens, Georgia, May 15-17, 2002 at the University of
Georgia campus.
More information can be found at:
http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/

John Shields
EM lab
UGA


From daemon Tue Jan 29 16:27:36 2002



From: John Basgen :      basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 16:20:16 -0600
Subject: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:

I am using the measure tool of Adobe Photoshop 6.0 to measure distances on my EM
images. I am making multiple measurements on each image. I cannot figure out
how to save these measurements without writing them on a piece of paper. Does
Photoshop save these measurements? If not, is there a plug-in that saves the
measure tool measurements to a spreadsheet?

Go Rams,

John

John M. Basgen
Department of Pediatrics
University of Minnesota
Mayo Mail Code 491
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
USA
Phone: 612-625-7979
FAX: 612-626-2791
E-mail: basgen-at-umn.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 29 17:15:16 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 18:09:43 -0500
Subject: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Consider getting John Russ' Image Processing Toolkit for Photoshop.

You can do what you want to do by adding a layer and drawing lines on top of the features that you want to measure. After the micrograph magnification has been calibrated in IPTK, you run the measure features plug-in in IPTK and you will get a text file. You can open the text file in Excel and get a list of all the features of all of the lines that you drew. You are only interested in the length of the lines. It works very well when you want to make a bunch of measurements say of a thickness of film in cross section and average them and find a standard deviation. There are other IPTK tools that actually can give you these values, without going into Excel, but I like to see the actual measurements.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: John Basgen [mailto:basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2002 5:20 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Listers:

I am using the measure tool of Adobe Photoshop 6.0 to measure distances on my EM
images. I am making multiple measurements on each image. I cannot figure out
how to save these measurements without writing them on a piece of paper. Does
Photoshop save these measurements? If not, is there a plug-in that saves the
measure tool measurements to a spreadsheet?

Go Rams,

John

John M. Basgen
Department of Pediatrics
University of Minnesota
Mayo Mail Code 491
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
USA
Phone: 612-625-7979
FAX: 612-626-2791
E-mail: basgen-at-umn.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 29 17:28:06 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 15:24:21 -0800
Subject: Re: SEM sample prep of Semiconductor Xsect

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you been thrown into the kitchen without any utensils?
Sounds like it. Not a good situation.

At less than 0.25u feature size, the die will most certainly
have barrier metal and probably TiW or TiN plugs. These
die may also use Cu interconnects rather than Al. The ability
to obtain good sections such that vias, runners, poly and
passivation are all resolvable is a big challenge. The most
direct and most accurate method is IMO a focused ion beam.
Unfortunately, these are quite expensive (~$2M new, $600K used).

Larger feature size die can be sectioned with mechanical
tools like those made by Buehler. These tools are not costly.
They are typically set up as a sequential set of lapping
stations (3-4 total) where each one uses progressively smaller
size grinding powder and finally, a polishing powder.

In either case, the final step is "decoration." This is where
the planar edge is selectively etched to recess oxide or metal.
This can be done chemically, but plasma is best all around.
The challenge here is to develop a recipe for recessing
what you want to recess. This can take a bit of doing. An
Oxford ICP-80 is a good tool for this. A key thing to watch
out for is buying a plasma etch tool that cannot and will not
handle corrosive gasses. And don't forget that your gasses
will need to be in a gas cabinet and you may require a
scrubber for exhaust gas.

Typical gasses are CF3, CF4, O2, Ar, N, BCL4, to name a few.
A good oxide etch is CF4+O2. The O2 will kill a non-corrosive
turbo and standard mechanical pump. Handling corrosive
gasses drives the cost up.

Depending on your particular situation, why not outsource
this work? There are many companies that will do this
sectioning for under $200 a die. To get set up yourself
is perhaps going to cost at least $100K + time. If there is
a proprietary IP issue, how about mechanical reduction in-house
with final finishing out-house?

gary g.



At 01:26 PM 1/28/2002, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Jan 29 18:20:37 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 19:13:49 EST
Subject: Re: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 1/29/02 5:33:32 PM, basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu writes:

} I am using the measure tool of Adobe Photoshop 6.0 to measure distances
} on my EM images. I am making multiple measurements on each image. I cannot
figure
} out how to save these measurements without writing them on a piece of paper.
} Does Photoshop save these measurements? If not, is there a plug-in that
saves
} the measure tool measurements to a spreadsheet?

The measurement tool in Photoshop 6 does not produce values that are
accessible to a plugin, and I do not know of a way to save them to a file. In
the Image Processing Tool Kit we instead used the approach of allowing the
user to draw lines on the image in any selected color (i.e., something not
present naturally, such as black in a color image or red on a grey scale
picture), and then measure the length of all the lines at once and write them
to a spreadsheet file. The drawback of that method is that the order of the
output values is not the way the user created them, but on the other hand
they can be labelled with numbers and appear on the image so it is easy to
print out a record of what you measured.

John Russ


From daemon Wed Jan 30 01:48:24 2002



From: Mike Mizell :      mizell-at-emispec.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 01:39:52 -0600
Subject: Course Announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers;
Emispec Systems, Inc. would like to remind you we are hosting a
course on ES Vision, April 15-18, 2002 at our facility in sunny/warm
Tempe, AZ. This course introduces attendees to fully integrated
electron microscopy and microanalysis through Emispec's ES Vision
software. Through advances in software, it is now possible to control
and acquire data from all of the detectors attached to an electron
microscope (SEM/TEM/STEM) through one computer interface. This
complete integration makes for more efficient experimentation, and
opens the door for simultaneous acquisition from multiple detectors.
Emispec's applications laboratory includes an FEI, LEO and JEOL
TEM/STEMs that will be used for hands-on learning by attendees.
Various detectors attached to these microscopes include: BF/DF STEM
detectors, CCD cameras, TV cameras, EDX detectors and EELS
spectrometers. These detectors will be used in combination to
illustrate the fundamentals behind integrated microscopy.
If you are interested in signing up for the course please logon to
Emispecs website www.emispec.com navigate to the news page and select
short course.
If you have any additional questions you can contact us directly.

**********************************************************************
Michael K. Mizell Phone: 480-894-6443 ext 28
Manager of Sales and Marketing Fax: 480-894-6458
Emispec Systems, Inc. Cell: 602-743-2169
2050 Cottonwood Dr. Email: mizell-at-emispec.com
Tempe, AZ 85282
**********************************************************************
Please visit Emispec's website www.emispec.com





From daemon Wed Jan 30 01:48:24 2002



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Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 05:22:19 -0700
Subject: WHOLESALE CELLULAR ACCESSORIES FACE PLATES AS LOW AS 2.98 1608

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From daemon Wed Jan 30 04:39:17 2002



From: Malcolm Haswell :      malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 10:38:07 +0000
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Angela

I apologise if this has already been mentioned but phosphates also have
a habit of precipitating calcium and magnesium ions which may be added
at various stages during fixation to stabilise lipid based structures in
the specimen (e.g. preservation of spindle fibres, myelin and
membranes). Cacodylate has often been chosen simply because it has
similar fixative vehicle properties to phosphate buffer but without the
precipitation. It is also assumed that it will have better keeping
properties because of its toxicity. I know that it was particularly
popular for a lot of animal tissue fixation and I'm sure that I read
somewhere once that it may cause more extraction giving a clearer cell
matrix and so is better for nice contrasty pictures.

I do still have a bottle of cacodylate locked away but I prefer to use
PIPES (or perhaps HEPES) because of the toxicity of cacodylate. PIPES
seems to be a good general replacement for cacodylate and has none of
the precipitation problems of phosphate. The only problem is that PIPES
is more expensive, but is that really an issue when considering the
safety and disposal of cacodylate?

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
Electron Microscopy
School of Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
Tyne and Wear
UK

Tel (44) (0)191 515 2872
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk

"akc-at-umich.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Another minor reason involves convenience. In my experience, the
} concentrated phosphate buffer stock that was stored in the refrigerator
} gradually developed crystals that had to be dissolved before the stock
} could be used. This didn't happen with the concentrated cacodylate buffer
} stock.
}
} Kent
}
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
} Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
} University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
} Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
} akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
}
} --On Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:52 AM -0600 "by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec"
} {rcmoretz-at-att.net} wrote:
}
} }
} } Angela:
} } The main reason for using cacodylate instead of
} } phosphate is that uranyl salts precipitate in the
} } presence of phosphate. If one uses phosphate in the
} } original fixative, then several washes into another
} } buffer (e.g. through Tris into cacodylate) is required
} } before finishing. Since I use en bloc staining with
} } uranyl acetate, I prefer to use cacodylate throughout.
} } I also think (based only on my own biased sampling) that
} } I have less uranyl precipitation when staining on grids
} } with cacodylate vs phosphate buffered tissues.
} } Roger
} }
} } --
} } Where the world is only slightly
} } less weird than it actually is.
}
} } } Hi all...
} } }
} } } Sorry for this really basic question:
} } }
} } } Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs.
} } } phosphate buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have
} } } a colleague having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like
} } } to use phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just
} } } curious as to why one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity
} } } issues. I've always used cacodylate for sperm.
} } }
} } } Best,
} } }
} } } Angela
} } }
} } } Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
} } }
} } } Director, Core Imaging Facility
} } } American Museum of Natural History
} } } Central Park West at 79th Street
} } } New York, NY 10024 USA
} } }
} } } Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} } } Tel: 212-769-5977


From daemon Wed Jan 30 07:51:45 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 08:37:22 -0500
Subject: Re: FoolProof Alternative to LN2 Filter Funnel

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I thought I'd see this one by now, but then....

Last time I contaminated an detector Dewar it was because I hadn't cleaned
the transfer Dewar and poured the 'last' little bit into the detector
vessel. So, my solution was to place signs on the detector Dewar and the
transfer Dewar. They read:

Transfer: "Danger, I have hard water in my bottom.

Please clean my bottom regularly!!!"

Detector: "Don't you dare put water from your bottom in
me"!!!

I observed the signs and didn't have any further problem.

Hope this helps.


Frederick C. Monson, PhD
The best research
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
occurs before work
West Chester University
at the bench.
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu


From daemon Wed Jan 30 07:57:39 2002



From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 08:51:38 -0500
Subject: Re: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John,

If you want a quick and inexpensive way of getting that information into a
spreadsheet format try UTHSCSA image tool. It is great for making multiple
measurements and the information is stored in a format that excel can read.
And best of all it is free. It was written by the Univ of Texas. You can
find a link to the download page by going to
http://www.ddsdx.uthscsa.edu/dig/itdesc.html . Give it a try and I am sure
you will find that for taking measurements and even for simple image
analysis of objects it is very simple and user friendly.

______________________________
Roberto Garcia
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/asm




From daemon Wed Jan 30 10:00:50 2002



From: Krishnakumar R :      rkrishnakumar-at-vsnl.net
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 21:24:39 +0530
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html






From daemon Wed Jan 30 10:12:23 2002



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 15:59:55 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have been thinking of switching from cacodylate to HEPES
or PIPES (which is better?). Would you mind posting your
HEPES/PIPES protocol?

Dave


On Wed, 30 Jan 2002 10:38:07 +0000 Malcolm Haswell
{malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Angela
}
} I apologise if this has already been mentioned but phosphates also have
} a habit of precipitating calcium and magnesium ions which may be added
} at various stages during fixation to stabilise lipid based structures in
} the specimen (e.g. preservation of spindle fibres, myelin and
} membranes). Cacodylate has often been chosen simply because it has
} similar fixative vehicle properties to phosphate buffer but without the
} precipitation. It is also assumed that it will have better keeping
} properties because of its toxicity. I know that it was particularly
} popular for a lot of animal tissue fixation and I'm sure that I read
} somewhere once that it may cause more extraction giving a clearer cell
} matrix and so is better for nice contrasty pictures.
}
} I do still have a bottle of cacodylate locked away but I prefer to use
} PIPES (or perhaps HEPES) because of the toxicity of cacodylate. PIPES
} seems to be a good general replacement for cacodylate and has none of
} the precipitation problems of phosphate. The only problem is that PIPES
} is more expensive, but is that really an issue when considering the
} safety and disposal of cacodylate?
}
} Malcolm
}
} Malcolm Haswell
} Electron Microscopy
} School of Sciences
} Fleming Building
} University of Sunderland
} SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
} Tyne and Wear
} UK
}
} Tel (44) (0)191 515 2872
} e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
}
} "akc-at-umich.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Another minor reason involves convenience. In my experience, the
} } concentrated phosphate buffer stock that was stored in the refrigerator
} } gradually developed crystals that had to be dissolved before the stock
} } could be used. This didn't happen with the concentrated cacodylate buffer
} } stock.
} }
} } Kent
} }
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
} } Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
} } University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
} } Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
} } akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} }
} } --On Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:52 AM -0600 "by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec"
} } {rcmoretz-at-att.net} wrote:
} }
} } }
} } } Angela:
} } } The main reason for using cacodylate instead of
} } } phosphate is that uranyl salts precipitate in the
} } } presence of phosphate. If one uses phosphate in the
} } } original fixative, then several washes into another
} } } buffer (e.g. through Tris into cacodylate) is required
} } } before finishing. Since I use en bloc staining with
} } } uranyl acetate, I prefer to use cacodylate throughout.
} } } I also think (based only on my own biased sampling) that
} } } I have less uranyl precipitation when staining on grids
} } } with cacodylate vs phosphate buffered tissues.
} } } Roger
} } }
} } } --
} } } Where the world is only slightly
} } } less weird than it actually is.
} }
} } } } Hi all...
} } } }
} } } } Sorry for this really basic question:
} } } }
} } } } Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs.
} } } } phosphate buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have
} } } } a colleague having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like
} } } } to use phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just
} } } } curious as to why one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity
} } } } issues. I've always used cacodylate for sperm.
} } } }
} } } } Best,
} } } }
} } } } Angela
} } } }
} } } } Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
} } } }
} } } } Director, Core Imaging Facility
} } } } American Museum of Natural History
} } } } Central Park West at 79th Street
} } } } New York, NY 10024 USA
} } } }
} } } } Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} } } } Tel: 212-769-5977
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Wed Jan 30 11:34:32 2002



From: Don Gantz :      Gantz-at-med-biophd.bu.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 12:27:49 -0500
Subject: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear John Basgen:
Another software program that you may want to consider for measuring is
ScionImage (freeware available at www.scioncorp.com). Using the "line" tool
you can quickly measure distances which are automatically recorded in a
results window and subsequently exported to Excel.

Go Pats

Donald Gantz
Dept. Physiology & Biophysics
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, Massachusetts 02118
Email: Gantz-at-Biophysics.bumc.bu.edu
Phone: 617-638-4017




From daemon Wed Jan 30 12:01:56 2002



From: Gillmeister, Russ :      RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 12:55:26 -0500
Subject: IR microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
One of my customers has a request about IR microscopy which is a little out
of my expertise. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who may have some
information to share on instrumentation which may fulfill this customer's
requirements which to me sound quite impossible. I would also appreciate
hearing from anyone who may provide this expertise as a service.
The requirements read as follows:

"We need an IR microscope that is extremely sensitive to the wavelength of
1.5 um. Ideally it should also cover the visible light so the system can
be used for multiple purposes. We are detecting low intensity light with a
power less than 1 mW. The focal length should be 3 cm or higher and the
field view should be 1 mm or less. It should resolve features less than a
few micros. The system will be used to detect the light distributions among
optical fibers, waveguide and the interconnect area. We have some
components such as monitor, frame et al. in house that can be part of the
system."

Thanks for any information, You can reply to me directly -at-
RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com


Russ Gillmeister
Microscopy
Bldg. 114-42D
Xerox Corp.
800 Phillips Rd.
Webster, NY 14580
(585) 422-5317



From daemon Wed Jan 30 12:07:44 2002



From: Christoph Bauer :      cbauer-at-midway.uchicago.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 12:01:44 -0600
Subject: EM position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Opening for an electron microscopist to head a state of the art EM
facility at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Rockefeller
University. We seek someone who combines extensive and varied experience
in EM with an intellectual and scientific interest in cell biology. We
study the dynamics of epidermal cell-cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton
in normal and disease states. Position is at level of Senior Res.
Specialist, Res Assoc. or Res. Assoc. Assistant Professor, depending
upon qualifications. Minimum 5 yr. experience in EM, including immunoEM.
Please send CV, reprints and 3 references to: Dr. Elaine Fuchs, Howard
Hughes Medical Institute, 5841 S. Maryland Ave. MC1028, Chicago, IL
60637


From daemon Wed Jan 30 12:30:45 2002



From: Harry Walsh :      h_walsh-at-acs.org
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 13:17:48 -0500
Subject: ACS Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is to ask that you post the following announcement. Thank you for your
help.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------
The American Chemical Society will be offering its popular hands-on short
course, Applied Optical Microscopy, on March 15-17, 2002, immediately
preceding PITTCON 2002 in New Orleans, LA. The course is designed for
researchers, technicians, and quality assurance and failure analysis
scientists who need to develop a strong foundation in optical microscopy or
who need to extend their capability in the field. A full course description
can be found in the online catalog at www.chemistry.org/shortcourses.
Scroll down to "What's New" to find the "ACS Short Courses at PITTCON 2002"
catalog which is downloadable as a pdf file. Or, contact the ACS at
shortcourses-at-acs.org or 800-227-5558, ext. 4508. The course registration
fee is $1,095 for ACS members and $1,195 for nonmembers. The course is
strictly limited to 20 participants to ensure time for individual
consultations with the instructors.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------

********************************************************************
Harold G. Walsh
Department of Continuing Education
American Chemical Society
1155 Sixteenth Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20036

Phone: 800-227-5558, extension 4507, or 202-872-4507
Fax: 202-872-6336
Email: h_walsh-at-acs.org

Visit our web site at www.chemistry.org/shortcourses
********************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 30 12:37:52 2002



From: rose evelyn :      roseevelyn-at-thetwinstar.com
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 18:30:23 -0000
Subject: EM safety and family plan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

One of my EM technicians came up with a question---She intends to have a

family, will her everyday duty involving EM influence her pregnancy? I
just
haven't got a clue. Her duty is looking after the users on SEMs and TEMs

facilities, including sample preparations. We are dealing with mostly
inorganic materials (90%) and biological tissues(10%). As we also have
regular admission of female research students (1-3yrs) in the EM center,
it
was time to find out the safety and health for such an issue.

Cheers,
Evelyn



From daemon Wed Jan 30 12:59:16 2002



From: Holly Aaron :      hollya-at-socrates.berkeley.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 10:53:29 -0800
Subject: RE: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear John -

Just my (not so) humble opinion: scrap Photoshop and use NIH-Image or
ImageJ - available FOR FREE at http://rsb.info.nih.gov/nih-image/.

Photoshop, while a lovely program and very useful for color management and
picture touch-ups and more, was never intended to be used for scientific
measurements. Not that it can't be, but as you have found out, it is not
set-up for that purpose. I am less familiar with the new brother ImageJ,
but in NIH-Image all your measurements are written to a text file
automatically. And you can choose *which* measurements are recorded. Then
all you have to do is save the file. From there, you can open it in any
program - Excel, Word, Igor, IDL, LabView, MatLab, etc. With a little
programming you can also create your own analysis package - easiest to do by
using some of the example macros included or downloaded from the website.
And did I mention it was FREE?

Anyway, if you want to know more about how to use Image, send me a note.

Best of luck,
Holly


Holly Aaron
Molecular Imaging Center
http://imaging.berkeley.edu


} -----Original Message-----
} From: John Basgen [mailto:basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2002 2:20 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Adobe Photoshop Question
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers:
}
} I am using the measure tool of Adobe Photoshop 6.0 to measure
} distances on my EM
} images. I am making multiple measurements on each image. I
} cannot figure out
} how to save these measurements without writing them on a piece of
} paper. Does
} Photoshop save these measurements? If not, is there a plug-in
} that saves the
} measure tool measurements to a spreadsheet?
}
} Go Rams,
}
} John
}
} John M. Basgen
} Department of Pediatrics
} University of Minnesota
} Mayo Mail Code 491
} 420 Delaware Street SE
} Minneapolis, MN 55455
} USA
} Phone: 612-625-7979
} FAX: 612-626-2791
} E-mail: basgen-at-umn.edu
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 30 13:22:43 2002



From: Neusa Nogueira :      nogueira-at-cena.usp.br
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 17:16:35 -300
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




unsubscribe



From daemon Wed Jan 30 14:47:45 2002



From: Anita Garg :      Anita.Garg-at-grc.nasa.gov
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 15:37:26 -0500
Subject: Grain boundary etch for Cu

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues
Does anybody know of an etchant to reveal grain boundaries in Cu and its
alloys?
Any help would be appreciated.
TIA
Anita



From daemon Wed Jan 30 16:52:16 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 17:45:10 -0500
Subject: RE: Adobe Photoshop Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have NIH-Image and Photoshop. I've used them both for a number of years. If you do image analysis infrequently, then in my opinion, NIH-Image is harder to use than the Image Processing Toolkit and Fovea Pro. NIH-Image is also not that easy to program to do some of the things that IPTK and FP can do. For a modest fee, you don't have to reinvent the wheel or have to commit a huge chunk of time.

For what it does and the documentation that comes with it, plus its tie to John's Textbook, Image Processing Handbook, I do not think that it is overpriced and it turns Photoshop into something that can be used in a scientific way. In addition, the plug-ins work in other programs including NIH-Image (although I have not tried them in it.)

Another very important point to consider is that Photoshop works very similarly across both the Mac and PC platform. As someone who works for a company that will not allow any more Macs to be purchased and who goes to other laboratories to do work, this is very important to me. I have used the IPTK on both PC and Mac platforms in Photoshop and have been very pleased.

Another point in favor of IPTK is that you get John Russ's expertise. He's one of us! John monitors this listserver and chirps in regularly. He has always been ready to help with questions of both a scientific nature and on IPTK. He has been committed to teaching Quantitative Microscopy for many years.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Holly Aaron [mailto:hollya-at-socrates.berkeley.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 1:53 PM
To: John Basgen; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear John -

Just my (not so) humble opinion: scrap Photoshop and use NIH-Image or
ImageJ - available FOR FREE at http://rsb.info.nih.gov/nih-image/.

Photoshop, while a lovely program and very useful for color management and
picture touch-ups and more, was never intended to be used for scientific
measurements. Not that it can't be, but as you have found out, it is not
set-up for that purpose. I am less familiar with the new brother ImageJ,
but in NIH-Image all your measurements are written to a text file
automatically. And you can choose *which* measurements are recorded. Then
all you have to do is save the file. From there, you can open it in any
program - Excel, Word, Igor, IDL, LabView, MatLab, etc. With a little
programming you can also create your own analysis package - easiest to do by
using some of the example macros included or downloaded from the website.
And did I mention it was FREE?

Anyway, if you want to know more about how to use Image, send me a note.

Best of luck,
Holly


Holly Aaron
Molecular Imaging Center
http://imaging.berkeley.edu


} -----Original Message-----
} From: John Basgen [mailto:basgen-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2002 2:20 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Adobe Photoshop Question
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers:
}
} I am using the measure tool of Adobe Photoshop 6.0 to measure
} distances on my EM
} images. I am making multiple measurements on each image. I
} cannot figure out
} how to save these measurements without writing them on a piece of
} paper. Does
} Photoshop save these measurements? If not, is there a plug-in
} that saves the
} measure tool measurements to a spreadsheet?
}
} Go Rams,
}
} John
}
} John M. Basgen
} Department of Pediatrics
} University of Minnesota
} Mayo Mail Code 491
} 420 Delaware Street SE
} Minneapolis, MN 55455
} USA
} Phone: 612-625-7979
} FAX: 612-626-2791
} E-mail: basgen-at-umn.edu
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 30 17:10:55 2002



From: R. Ann Bliss :      bliss5-at-popcorn.llnl.gov
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 15:05:35 -0800
Subject: Black art of electropolishing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:

Are there any electropolishing gurus out there? I have been working
with a single crystal Ta with a -1,0,1 foil normal. The equipment is
a Fischione Twin Jet polisher. My solution is 350 ml methanol, 150 ml
butoxyethanol, 25 ml sulfuric acid and 5 ml hydrofluoric acid. It is
at -25šC. The voltage is at 80v and the amperage is about 75mA. This
is a new analog power unit.

The sample polishes nicely most of the way through. Then a small
portion starts to extrude and the perforation happens at the peak of
the bump. There are many cracks and bends. These are the same
parameters I have used in the past. This problem is new. I have tried
to lower the temperature by 10 š. The same results, but it took longer

Any ideas?
Thanks in advance,
--

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

R. Ann Bliss
Technician, Chemistry and Materials Science
Materials Science and Technology Division
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

_____________________________


From daemon Wed Jan 30 17:15:27 2002



From: Kai Lorcharoensery :      kai-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 18:10:00 -0500
Subject: Re: Grain boundary etch for Cu

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I normally use a mixture of

1 part (volume) of water
1 part of ammonium hydroxide
1 part of 30% hydrogen peroxide

A lot of annealing twins will come up too.

Some people use 3% H2O2 instead of 30%. It will take longer time.
You can search for other etchants at
http://www.kaker.com/etch/demo/search.html. Or take a look in the back
of Vander Voort's "Metallography Principles and Practice"

Kai


From daemon Wed Jan 30 18:41:24 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 14:33:32 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Sputter coaters and BSE detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, All-

I am interested in hearing opinions, positive and negative, from anyone
who has recently researched or bought a sputter coater or backscattered
electron detector, both destined for use with a Hitachi S-800 FESEM.

Thanks in advance for letting me mine the expertise of the group!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 30 18:56:20 2002



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 11:53:01 +1100
Subject: solubilities of fixatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear microscopists,

Does anyone have to hand, or know where I can look up the solubilities of
fixatives such as paraformaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide in
aqueous and a variety of organic solvents? I need to know this for
phase-partition fixation. Have tried handbook of chemistry and physics -
various editions, Merck index, and web sources, but nothing quantitative
enough in these. Perhaps there is a specific chemistry handbook that has
this sort of info?

TIA,
rosemary

Rosemary White
Microscopy Centre
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

phone 61-2-6246 5475 or 61-0402 835 973
fax 61-2-6246 5000
email rosemary.white-at-csiro.au




From daemon Wed Jan 30 19:20:45 2002



From: K.N. Bozhilov :      bozhilov-at-citrus.ucr.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 17:15:19 -0800
Subject: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Could any suggest good source/vendor of reference X-ray Microanalysis
standards for TEM for most of the rock-forming elements including Si, Al, K,
Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, V, Co etc. in oxide or silicate form?

I have tried the so called "Standards" sold by Electron Microscopy Sciences
Inc. and I do not recommend them to anyone who wants to do quantitative
measurements. First all grids were contaminated with salt (NaCl). After I
send the original set back to the company they were polite enough to replace
it with a new one which again was a little bit too "salty" to my taste. The
second even more important problem was that the so called "standards" were
not homogeneous both in terms of concentration and elemental composition.

Also I would be very thankful to anyone who could sent or sell to me crystal
or mineral grains (0.1 grams is plenty) of chemically well characterized and
homogeneous materials containing any set of the above mentioned elements.

Thank you,

Krassimir N. Bozhilov, PhD
Central Facility for Advanced Microscopy and Microanalysis
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521

Tel 909 787 2998
Fax 909 787 4324




From daemon Wed Jan 30 20:37:42 2002



From: Matt Olszta :      molsz-at-mse.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 21:24:53 -0500
Subject: Micromanipulator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have money in our budget to obtain a micromanipulator. Our work involves
ionic salts, and so it wouldn't have to be anything extremely complicated.
I was wondering if anyone has one that they prefer, and if so, the type of
work that they do on it. Any advice would be much appreciated.

Regards,
Matt Olszta
University of Florida
Department of Materials Science



From daemon Wed Jan 30 22:23:38 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 23:25:02 -0500
Subject: Re: Grain boundary etch for Cu

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Anita,

The ammonia and peroxide etch already cited on the list is a good one.
Experience will dictate how strong the peroxide should be, generally the
lower the copper content in the alloy, the lower the peroxide concentration.

An alternative is ammonium persulfate in water. Try 10% and vary the
concentration with experience. You may experience precipitate formation
with some alloy ingredients. This can be ameliorated by swabbing during
the etch.

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist

Anita Garg wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear Colleagues
} Does anybody know of an etchant to reveal grain boundaries in Cu and
} its alloys?
} Any help would be appreciated.
} TIA
} Anita
}
}
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 30 22:39:28 2002



From: Ampai Sahapattana :      Ampai.S-at-student.chula.ac.th
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 11:33:43 +0700 (GMT+0700)
Subject: SEM:Scanning coil detail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'm study Master degree in Chulalongkong university and got an assignment
to study scanning coil of sem. I try to look from internet but can't found
matching info. So please suggest websites or give me more details
about the structure,materials,required theory for understanding it.

Ampai Sahapattana
Nuclear Technology Dept.
Engineering Faculty



From daemon Thu Jan 31 04:16:32 2002



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-marconi.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 09:51:37 -0000
Subject: IR microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Russ,
we do this kind of thing. I have a polyvar infrapol (pulled out of
a skip - yes, literally! a few years ago). It's a lovely microscope with a
variety of filters you can use for incident light (reflection and
transmission) as well as light leaving the sample before it hits the camera.
Cross polarisers too if you need them. There's a variety of objectives on a
turret so getting the right mag is not a problem.
The camera will have to be a vidicon type, since CCD cameras don't go that
far into the IR. I use a Hamamatsu C2400 to do electroluminescence studies
on 1.5um lasers. You can put the output into a standard video framegrabber,
or use the more expensive Hamamatsu framegrabber which allows you to have
more control over the camera.

Good luck,

Richard


-----Original Message-----
} From: Gillmeister, Russ [mailto:RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com]
Sent: 30 January 2002 17:55
To: 'MSA'


Hi,
One of my customers has a request about IR microscopy which is a little out
of my expertise. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who may have some
information to share on instrumentation which may fulfill this customer's
requirements which to me sound quite impossible. I would also appreciate
hearing from anyone who may provide this expertise as a service.
The requirements read as follows:

"We need an IR microscope that is extremely sensitive to the wavelength of
1.5 um. Ideally it should also cover the visible light so the system can
be used for multiple purposes. We are detecting low intensity light with a
power less than 1 mW. The focal length should be 3 cm or higher and the
field view should be 1 mm or less. It should resolve features less than a
few micros. The system will be used to detect the light distributions among
optical fibers, waveguide and the interconnect area. We have some
components such as monitor, frame et al. in house that can be part of the
system."

Thanks for any information, You can reply to me directly -at-
RGillmeister-at-crt.xerox.com


Russ Gillmeister
Microscopy
Bldg. 114-42D
Xerox Corp.
800 Phillips Rd.
Webster, NY 14580
(585) 422-5317



From daemon Thu Jan 31 05:25:49 2002



From: Terry Cooper :      terry.cooper-at-btinternet.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 11:10:25 -0000
Subject: TAAB Resin and mineralised collagen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Matt,

We at TAAB had a request from a major customer a couple of years ago to
overcome just the problem you describe. We have modified our own epoxy
resin (amazingly called TAAB Embedding Resin!) to have an extreme hardness
yet still maintain the ability to trim and cut easily. It was so successful
with our customer that they now use it for all their TEM embedding
requirements. It comes only as a Premix Kit where all the components are
pre-measured and combined just before use.

Please feel free to contact me for further details,

Best regards

Terry Cooper
TAAB Laboratories Equipment Ltd
Tel ++44 (0)118 981 7775 Fax ++44 (0)118 981 7881
e-mail sales-at-taab.co.uk


From daemon Thu Jan 31 07:22:36 2002



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 07:15:00 -0600
Subject: RE: Sputter coaters and BSE detectors

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Hi Tina,

I have been using a GW Electronics BSE system on an Etec SEM (now a Hitachi
S-3500) for a long time; the latest model system for just a few years. No
problems/break-downs combined with excellent performance translates to one
very satisfied customer.

I have made a few suggestions for improvement, but if, as a vendor, you ever
sold me some equipment, that would not surprise you {g} .

My Polaron coaters work fine, but are a bit too old to relate to your
inquiry.

Regards,
Woody White
McDermott Technology, Inc.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Tina Carvalho [mailto:tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 7:34 PM
} To: Microscopy Listserver
} Subject: Sputter coaters and BSE detectors
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
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} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
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} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi, All-
}
} I am interested in hearing opinions, positive and negative,
} from anyone
} who has recently researched or bought a sputter coater or
} backscattered
} electron detector, both destined for use with a Hitachi S-800 FESEM.
}
} Thanks in advance for letting me mine the expertise of the group!
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} **************************************************************
} **************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho *
} tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251
} *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa *
} http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} **************************************************************
} **************
}
}


From daemon Thu Jan 31 07:33:16 2002



From: Per =?iso-8859-1?Q?H=F6rstedt?= :      per.horstedt-at-pathol.umu.se
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 14:24:01 +0100
Subject: EM-high vacuum: ion pumps

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Need to have two ion getter pumps regenerated.
Does anybody know if there are any companies/labs in Europe, preferably in
scandinavia, that can do this for me?

Yours sincerely

Per Hörstedt
Department of Medical Biosciences
Pathology
Unit for Electron Microscopy
University of Umeĺ
S-90187 Umeĺ
Sweden

per.horstedt-at-pathol.umu.se
phone int-46-90-7851541
fax int-46-90-7851215



From daemon Thu Jan 31 08:47:30 2002



From: Karen Pawlowski :      kpawlow-at-swbell.net
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 08:37:14 -0600
Subject: Re: Cacodylate vs. phosphate buffers

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Malcom,

It's nice to know there might be a good alternative to cacodylate. We
typically use phosphate buffer, wherever possible, but it is impossible
when working with fine ultrastructure of otoconia in the inner ear. In
our case, the phosphate buffer seems to "reform" the otoconia, which
are made of calcite. Leave the specimen in the phosphate buffer
solution
for a medium length of time and the clacite pebbles start to shrink and
grow, like the calcium is dissolved off one and deposited on another.
Leave it in long enough and they turn into one big rock!

Karen Pawlowski



Malcolm Haswell wrote:
}
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Angela
}
} I apologise if this has already been mentioned but phosphates also have
} a habit of precipitating calcium and magnesium ions which may be added
} at various stages during fixation to stabilise lipid based structures in
} the specimen (e.g. preservation of spindle fibres, myelin and
} membranes). Cacodylate has often been chosen simply because it has
} similar fixative vehicle properties to phosphate buffer but without the
} precipitation. It is also assumed that it will have better keeping
} properties because of its toxicity. I know that it was particularly
} popular for a lot of animal tissue fixation and I'm sure that I read
} somewhere once that it may cause more extraction giving a clearer cell
} matrix and so is better for nice contrasty pictures.
}
} I do still have a bottle of cacodylate locked away but I prefer to use
} PIPES (or perhaps HEPES) because of the toxicity of cacodylate. PIPES
} seems to be a good general replacement for cacodylate and has none of
} the precipitation problems of phosphate. The only problem is that PIPES
} is more expensive, but is that really an issue when considering the
} safety and disposal of cacodylate?
}
} Malcolm
}
} Malcolm Haswell
} Electron Microscopy
} School of Sciences
} Fleming Building
} University of Sunderland
} SUNDERLAND SR1 3SD
} Tyne and Wear
} UK
}
} Tel (44) (0)191 515 2872
} e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk
}
} "akc-at-umich.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Another minor reason involves convenience. In my experience, the
} } concentrated phosphate buffer stock that was stored in the refrigerator
} } gradually developed crystals that had to be dissolved before the stock
} } could be used. This didn't happen with the concentrated cacodylate buffer
} } stock.
} }
} } Kent
} }
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} } A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
} } Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
} } University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
} } Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
} } akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
} } ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} }
} } --On Tuesday, January 29, 2002 8:52 AM -0600 "by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec"
} } {rcmoretz-at-att.net} wrote:
} }
} } }
} } } Angela:
} } } The main reason for using cacodylate instead of
} } } phosphate is that uranyl salts precipitate in the
} } } presence of phosphate. If one uses phosphate in the
} } } original fixative, then several washes into another
} } } buffer (e.g. through Tris into cacodylate) is required
} } } before finishing. Since I use en bloc staining with
} } } uranyl acetate, I prefer to use cacodylate throughout.
} } } I also think (based only on my own biased sampling) that
} } } I have less uranyl precipitation when staining on grids
} } } with cacodylate vs phosphate buffered tissues.
} } } Roger
} } }
} } } --
} } } Where the world is only slightly
} } } less weird than it actually is.
} }
} } } } Hi all...
} } } }
} } } } Sorry for this really basic question:
} } } }
} } } } Does anyone have any direct experience with using cacodylate vs.
} } } } phosphate buffers with glutaraldehyde for fixing spermatozoa? I have
} } } } a colleague having some sperm shipped from Africa, and she would like
} } } } to use phosphate rather than cacodylate buffer. Also, I'm just
} } } } curious as to why one might be superior to the other, barring toxicity
} } } } issues. I've always used cacodylate for sperm.
} } } }
} } } } Best,
} } } }
} } } } Angela
} } } }
} } } } Angela V. Klaus, Ph.D.
} } } }
} } } } Director, Core Imaging Facility
} } } } American Museum of Natural History
} } } } Central Park West at 79th Street
} } } } New York, NY 10024 USA
} } } }
} } } } Email: avklaus-at-amnh.org
} } } } Tel: 212-769-5977



From daemon Thu Jan 31 10:09:34 2002



From: Lara.Sciaraffa-at-abbott.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 08:36:49 -0600
Subject: Prepared Lead Citrate Stability Data

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Hi Listers,
I am searching for well documented data on the shelf life/stability of
prepared lead citrate (premixed). I am using the Fahmy method for the
preparation. Has anyone had good results using this method? Right now we
are labeling it for daily use, due to vague and incomplete stability data.
*Long shelf life*, is insufficient for GMP labs. Thanks in advance for your
assistance.

Best Wishes,
Lara


Lara A. Sciaraffa, Microscopist
Microscopy & Microanalysis
Dept R45M, Bldg. AP31
200 Abbott Park Road
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

Lara.Sciaraffa-at-Abbott.Com



From daemon Thu Jan 31 10:19:19 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 11:12:19 -0500
Subject: Re: EM safety and family plan

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HI Evelyn,
this question came up a while back,so you may want to scan the
archives, but here are my 2 cents...
I have a healthy, happy 9 year old son. I have been doing TEM & SEM
for 25 years. While I was "family pIanning" and pregnant, I wore
double gloves and worked in the hood when appropriate, washed my
hands frequently, followed OSHA guidelines and used common sense. I
still do (except for the double gloves part). Yes, much of what we
use can be dangerous to ourselves as well as our progeny, but with
appropriate care I don't think one needs to take a leave or stop
doing your job.

JMHO,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Thu Jan 31 11:03:05 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 11:58:04 -0500
Subject: Re: solubilities of fixatives

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Dear Rosemary:

Short answer: I don't know. I think you need to ask a chemist where to
find this information or how to determine this yourself. Hmmm. Sounds like a
good senior project for some chem student?
Long answer: The concentrations of fixatives in aqueous solutions will
equilibrate with an organic phase, until 1. an equilibrium is reached or 2.
the organic phase is saturated. I don't know the time factor involved but an
initial shaking in a separtory funnel followed by a few hours of standing
should be sufficient. Glutaraldehyde can be purchased in aqueous solutions as
concentrated as 70%. You could make your own concentrated paraformaldehyde
solutions, I would think 20% would be more than sufficient. I seem to remember
someone, somewhere put 40% (yes, forty) osmium in carbon tetracholride.
What are you fixing?

Rosemary White wrote:

} Dear microscopists,
}
} Does anyone have to hand, or know where I can look up the solubilities of
} fixatives such as paraformaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide in
} aqueous and a variety of organic solvents? I need to know this for
} phase-partition fixation. Have tried handbook of chemistry and physics -
} various editions, Merck index, and web sources, but nothing quantitative
} enough in these. Perhaps there is a specific chemistry handbook that has
} this sort of info?
}
} TIA,
} rosemary
}
} Rosemary White
} Microscopy Centre
} CSIRO Plant Industry
} GPO Box 1600
} Canberra, ACT 2601
} Australia
}
} phone 61-2-6246 5475 or 61-0402 835 973
} fax 61-2-6246 5000
} email rosemary.white-at-csiro.au

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Thu Jan 31 12:19:34 2002



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 10:03:12 -0800
Subject: Re: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

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Dear Krassimir:

You may want to try Geller MicroAnalytical. They have a long list of reference
materials at http://www.gellermicro.com/std-list.pdf.

I hope this helps.

David

"K.N. Bozhilov" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Could any suggest good source/vendor of reference X-ray Microanalysis
} standards for TEM for most of the rock-forming elements including Si, Al, K,
} Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, V, Co etc. in oxide or silicate form?
}
} I have tried the so called "Standards" sold by Electron Microscopy Sciences
} Inc. and I do not recommend them to anyone who wants to do quantitative
} measurements. First all grids were contaminated with salt (NaCl). After I
} send the original set back to the company they were polite enough to replace
} it with a new one which again was a little bit too "salty" to my taste. The
} second even more important problem was that the so called "standards" were
} not homogeneous both in terms of concentration and elemental composition.
}
} Also I would be very thankful to anyone who could sent or sell to me crystal
} or mineral grains (0.1 grams is plenty) of chemically well characterized and
} homogeneous materials containing any set of the above mentioned elements.
}
} Thank you,
}
} Krassimir N. Bozhilov, PhD
} Central Facility for Advanced Microscopy and Microanalysis
} University of California
} Riverside, CA 92521
}
} Tel 909 787 2998
} Fax 909 787 4324
}

--
David Henriks TEL: +1-949-492-2600
South Bay Technology, Inc. FAX: +1-949-492-1499
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA e-mail: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

*** www.southbaytech.com ***




From daemon Thu Jan 31 13:26:34 2002



From: Raghavan Narayanan :      narayanr-at-ecn.purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 14:18:17 -0500
Subject: Re: [Fwd: Fwd: Grain boundary etch for Cu]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Copper etch procedure:

1. For normal etching I use 2 solutions:
i. Mixture of ditilled water or ethanol (100-120 ml),FeCl3(5-10 ml) and
HCl(20-50 ml). Apply this on the polished surface for 20-25 seconds and
wash it thoroughly
ii. Then, use a 50%nitric acid+50%water solution and apply this on the
surface for 10-15 seconds.

2. (OPTIONAL) Before etching, if you want a stress free surface then do
the following. Take a solution of one part acetic acid, 2 parts nitric
acid and 1 part phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Heat the solution to 70 deg C
and immerse the copper specimen for 5-10 seconds. This will remove all
surface stresses and leave a shiny surface.

-Raghavan


From daemon Thu Jan 31 13:38:30 2002



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Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 05:22:19 -0700
Subject: WHOLESALE CELLULAR ACCESSORIES FACE PLATES AS LOW AS 2.98 1608

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From daemon Thu Jan 31 13:58:43 2002



From: kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 14:53:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: imaging

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am trying to find a way to have photoshop automatically put scale bars on SEM
images when given certain information (ie magnification and/or image size). IF
anyone knows how to do this or has any suggestions the help would be
appriciated.
thanks
kelly
kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu


From daemon Thu Jan 31 14:57:45 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 15:35:00 -0500
Subject: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The best analytical standards that I have made for TEM have been by taking powders of known bi-metal oxide, sulphide, or nitride powders and microtoming them. If you are in a hurry, crush them and collect them on a carbon coated grid and only do the data collection in areas that show kinematical contrast if they are crystalline. Unfortunately, they are hard to come by. We have different glass compositions that we have carefully measured their compositions with the microprobe and I have used them as standards.

I have used the EMS standards because they are the only samples available. However, I would not discount them entirely. You do have to look around for both the correct phase and suitable thickness for them to be reproducible.

NIST has glass samples available. Again, I suggest that you use microtoming to prepare them because it is least likely to change the composition compared to ion milling or other methods. They have done a correlation of particle size and microprobe measured microprobe results. Sorry-I can't remember the reference or the NIST numbers for the glasses.

You also have to be very careful with some of the elements in your list in inorganic samples. Several will migrate under the beam and it is aggravated by decreasing the probe size. For example, you will not see Na, Ca, and Mg with a 20-50 Angstrom size probe, but they do show up at about 100 Angstrom. No telling what the concentration is because they are still migrating.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: K.N. Bozhilov [mailto:bozhilov-at-citrus.ucr.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 8:15 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Could any suggest good source/vendor of reference X-ray Microanalysis
standards for TEM for most of the rock-forming elements including Si, Al, K,
Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, V, Co etc. in oxide or silicate form?

I have tried the so called "Standards" sold by Electron Microscopy Sciences
Inc. and I do not recommend them to anyone who wants to do quantitative
measurements. First all grids were contaminated with salt (NaCl). After I
send the original set back to the company they were polite enough to replace
it with a new one which again was a little bit too "salty" to my taste. The
second even more important problem was that the so called "standards" were
not homogeneous both in terms of concentration and elemental composition.

Also I would be very thankful to anyone who could sent or sell to me crystal
or mineral grains (0.1 grams is plenty) of chemically well characterized and
homogeneous materials containing any set of the above mentioned elements.

Thank you,

Krassimir N. Bozhilov, PhD
Central Facility for Advanced Microscopy and Microanalysis
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521

Tel 909 787 2998
Fax 909 787 4324




From daemon Thu Jan 31 15:26:02 2002



From: Johnson, Bradley R :      Bradley.Johnson-at-pnl.gov
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 13:20:06 -0800
Subject: RE: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Krassimir,
Have you considered ordering some of the SRM standards from NIST,
and then preparing your own TEM standards from them? SRM 1412 might have
some of the components you are looking for. Here is a web link for several
oxide SRM produced by NIST:

http://srmcatalog.nist.gov/srmcatalog/tables/112-3.htm


-Brad

----------
From: K.N. Bozhilov
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2002 5:15 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Subject: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
On-Line Help
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-----------------------------------------------------------------------.


Could any suggest good source/vendor of reference X-ray
Microanalysis
standards for TEM for most of the rock-forming elements including
Si, Al, K,
Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, V, Co etc. in oxide or silicate form?

I have tried the so called "Standards" sold by Electron Microscopy
Sciences
Inc. and I do not recommend them to anyone who wants to do
quantitative
measurements. First all grids were contaminated with salt (NaCl).
After I
send the original set back to the company they were polite enough to
replace
it with a new one which again was a little bit too "salty" to my
taste. The
second even more important problem was that the so called
"standards" were
not homogeneous both in terms of concentration and elemental
composition.

Also I would be very thankful to anyone who could sent or sell to me
crystal
or mineral grains (0.1 grams is plenty) of chemically well
characterized and
homogeneous materials containing any set of the above mentioned
elements.

Thank you,

Krassimir N. Bozhilov, PhD
Central Facility for Advanced Microscopy and Microanalysis
University of California
Riverside, CA 92521

Tel 909 787 2998
Fax 909 787 4324






From daemon Thu Jan 31 15:31:31 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 16:25:33 EST
Subject: Re: imaging

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In a message dated 1/31/02 3:03:25 PM,
kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

} I am trying to find a way to have photoshop automatically put scale bars
} on SEM images when given certain information (ie magnification and/or image
size).
} IF anyone knows how to do this or has any suggestions the help would be
} appriciated.

One of the (many) functions of The Image Processing Tool Kit (a set of
photoshop-compatible plug-ins for serious image analysis). See
http://reindeergraphics.com



From daemon Thu Jan 31 16:19:31 2002



From: Eric Steel :      eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 19:13:20 -0500
Subject: Re: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is an older posting of mine that describes a method for putting scale bars on micrographs. For an SEM or a TEM, you could do the same thing at the various mags that you would use routinely. The scale markers that I created look black on white just like the transfer lettering I used. I have put how to do that at the very end of this message because that too was a previous message.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)

______________



I am trying to find a way to have photoshop automatically put scale bars on SEM
images when given certain information (ie magnification and/or image size). IF
anyone knows how to do this or has any suggestions the help would be
appriciated.
thanks
kelly
kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu


_________________________________



There is a NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) specifically designed for
calibrating the relative sensitivity factors for X-ray analysis on the
TEM/STEM. I have a bias in my answer in that I helped to prepare the
material as part of my job at NIST so that I had a "monetary interest" in
its production, but get no remuneration for sales.

Here is a brief description of the material, so that you can see if you
might be interested:

http://srmcatalog.nist.gov/srmcatalog/tables/103-3.htm

The standard is called "SRM 2063a Microanalysis Thin Film" and consists of a
thin film of sputtered mineral glass supported by a carbon film and a copper
TEM grid. The composition is certified as listed below and was determined
by several independent techniques after the glass was deposited on the
grids. Thus the certified composition values take into account sample
preparation. The thickness of the glass (76 nm) and density (3.1 gm/cm**3)
are reported (though not certified). No preparation is necessary for use in
the TEM.

Table of Concentration Values for SRM 2063a Mineral Glass
Element Concentration Uncertainty
(% wt.) (% wt.)
O 43.2 1.6
Mg 7.97 0.34
Si 25.34 0.98
Ca 11.82 0.37
Fe 11.06 0.88

The composition allows for a range of relative sensitivity values to be
determined for many commonly analyzed elements and x-ray lines. Thus the
standard can be a primary, traceable way of checking other in-house
standards you may use. The standard is robust under many handling and beam
conditions, though very high beam dose may cause a change in composition
(as noted on the certificate of analysis.) Typically we spread the TEM
beam out over roughly 10 micrometers or use a STEM raster of similar
dimensions during spectral accumulation. We have used one standard grid
for over 10 years in our laboratory to monitor/compare several instruments
and detectors. I have not seen any particular instability or stress
problems in the standard -- even the Ar has remained stable after many years.


For more information about obtaining the SRM 2063a standard you may contact:

Standard Reference Materials Program
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-0001
USA

Phone: 301-975-6776
FAX: 301-948-3730
e-mail: SRMINFO-at-enh.nist.gov


Eric B. Steel, Leader e-mail: eric.steel-at-nist.gov
Microanalysis Research Group Office: 301-975-3902
N.I.S.T. FAX: 301-417-1321
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8371
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8371
http://www.nist.gov/micro



From daemon Thu Jan 31 20:21:51 2002



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 21:14:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: TEM lab temperature, humidity, pressure, and field mornitoring

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Dear colleagues,

I'm running a multi-user EM facility at the college of Engineering,
University of Delaware. We feel our FETEM does not perform fully to the
specs possibly due to some issues with the location and/or construction of
the lab. So, even though I do record temperature and humidity on daily
basis, I have been strongly suggested to set up a monitoring system to
record continuously (preferably multi-points) the lab temperature,
humidity, fluctuation of pressure differential, and electro-magnetic
field. I was wondering if any of you had the experience with the set-up of
such a system, or the similar. Please advise. Thanks very much.

Chaoying Ni
W.M. Keck Electron Microscopy Facility
College of Engineering
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-8354 (Phone)
(302) 831-4545 (Fax)
http:/eml.masc.udel.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 31 21:09:46 2002



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 14:07:41 +1100
Subject: Re: solubilities of fixatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Geoff,

We've been fixing desiccated plant material, part of a project figuring out
how best to deal with this sort of material. We'd like to know what
concentration of fixative from aqueous solution ends up in the organic
solvent. Hence the question about exact solubilities for the fixatives.
There is some info for OsO4 in "Solubilities of inorganic and organic
compounds", but only for water and CCl4, and general info for formaldehyde,
paraformaldehyde and glutaraldehyde. And from Handbook of Chemistry and
Physics, you get info on relative solubilities in water and a few organic
solvents. But, as you note, to work out the concentration of fix that ends
up in the organic solvent, we need numbers on these solubilities. An
additional complication is that we don't know the exact composition of some
of the perfluorocarbon solvents we've tried.

I suspect we'll either have to be vague about how much fix is in the
solvents, or interest a chemist.....
Rosemary

} Dear Rosemary:
}
} Short answer: I don't know. I think you need to ask a chemist where to
} find this information or how to determine this yourself. Hmmm. Sounds like a
} good senior project for some chem student?
} Long answer: The concentrations of fixatives in aqueous solutions will
} equilibrate with an organic phase, until 1. an equilibrium is reached or 2.
} the organic phase is saturated. I don't know the time factor involved but an
} initial shaking in a separtory funnel followed by a few hours of standing
} should be sufficient. Glutaraldehyde can be purchased in aqueous solutions as
} concentrated as 70%. You could make your own concentrated paraformaldehyde
} solutions, I would think 20% would be more than sufficient. I seem to remember
} someone, somewhere put 40% (yes, forty) osmium in carbon tetracholride.
} What are you fixing?
}
} Rosemary White wrote:
}
} } Dear microscopists,
} }
} } Does anyone have to hand, or know where I can look up the solubilities of
} } fixatives such as paraformaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide in
} } aqueous and a variety of organic solvents? I need to know this for
} } phase-partition fixation. Have tried handbook of chemistry and physics -
} } various editions, Merck index, and web sources, but nothing quantitative
} } enough in these. Perhaps there is a specific chemistry handbook that has
} } this sort of info?
} }
} } TIA,
} } rosemary
} }
} } Rosemary White
} } Microscopy Centre
} } CSIRO Plant Industry
} } GPO Box 1600
} } Canberra, ACT 2601
} } Australia
} }
} } phone 61-2-6246 5475 or 61-0402 835 973
} } fax 61-2-6246 5000
} } email rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
}
} Geoff
} --
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
} mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************





From daemon Thu Jan 31 22:15:03 2002



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 17:06:41 GMT+1200
Subject: Video Camera on JEOL 840 OM

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Further to my questions last year, I have now managed to mount
a cheap video camera on to the rather awkwardly-situated optical
microscope of my JEOL 840.

Thanks to those who offered suggestions.

If anyone wants to know how, please contact me off-list.

Has anyone managed to arrange transmitted-light illumination for an
840?

cheers

rtch


Dr Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand


From daemon Fri Feb 1 02:06:50 2002



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 31 Jan 2002 23:59:24 -0800
Subject: Re: solubilities of fixatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Rosemary

Solubility depends from may parameters, I would suggest 'just to try'. Mix
your fixatives with solvent, see what happening and publish the
results. We will thank you for such job. Sergey

At 07:07 PM 1/31/02, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Fri Feb 1 04:14:19 2002



From: Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 11:06:18 +0100
Subject: Thick sections for confocal microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi everyone,

I am looking for a method to cut thick sections (50 to 100 µm) from
crustaceans (2-4 cm in length), which can be incubated with
antibodies and viewed on a confocal microscope.

So far I use(d) gelatin-embedded specimens, cut on a kryostat.
The problem is, that when these thick sections get thawed, much
of the animal just "swims" away, because e.g. nerves and vessels
are not attached to something anymore, but float freely in the
water/hemolymph.

To avoid this, I'd like to embedd the animals into something. Here's
a list of thoughts, and reasons why I rejected them:

- gelatin is just not fluid enough to penetrate all hemolymph space;
- celloidin needs a preincubation w/ the antibodies, but this is just
not possible (because the animals are quite large, and the
antibodies e.g. for receptors quite expensive...);
- nanoplast (a water soluble resin) works just like celloidin;
- LR White (thermally cured) seems to be too hard for thick
sections; at least I just cannot get thicker sections then 2 µm with
my microtom and glass knives (and not 10 µm as in the literature).

If someone knows a nice method, I would appreciate help ! ! !

Truly yours,

:-) Torsten

Ph.D. student





Torsten Fregin

Universität Hamburg - Zoologisches Institut
Abt. Neurophysiologie
AG Wiese - Raum 413
Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3
20146 Hamburg, Germany
Telefon *49-(0)40-42838-3931
Fax *49-(0)40-42838-3937
eMail Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
oder TorstenFregin-at-gmx.de




From daemon Fri Feb 1 07:33:31 2002



From: Michiel De Mol :      mdemol-at-uni-hohenheim.de
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 14:20:28 +0100
Subject: Embedding wood with Mistletoe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello everybody,

We're trying for months now to embed wood infected with mistletoe for
making sections with a microtome.
We mostly used Technovit, but the plastic infiltrates not deep enough in
the woody tissue, which leeds to holes in the sections.
Sections 5 micron would be fantastic, but sections of 20 micron would do
the job.

Any thoughts, ideas or remarks are welcome!!!

Michiel De Mol
University of Hohenheim
Institute of Botany (210)
Garbenstrasse 30
70599 Stuttgart
Germany




From daemon Fri Feb 1 07:33:31 2002



From: Stanley L. Flegler :      flegler-at-pilot.msu.edu
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 08:25:25 -0500
Subject: Fujifilm Imaging Plate System

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Does anyone know of any US distributors for the Fujifilm FDL 5000 Imaging
Plate System? Any leads would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Stanley L. Flegler, Director
Center for Advanced Microscopy
Michigan State University


From daemon Fri Feb 1 07:51:10 2002



From: R. Cross :      r.cross-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 15:45:33 +0200
Subject: ICEM-15 abstract deadline

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15th International Congress on Electron Microscopy (ICEM-15)

* submission of abstracts - new deadline

Many appeals for concessions are being received from prospective
delegates who, for reasons such as holidays at this time of year
and beginning-of-year commitments, have had difficulty meeting the
1 February deadline for submission of abstracts. Consequently, the
Organizing Committee has agreed to extend the deadline to 25
FEBRUARY.

Please note that this new deadline cannot be extended.


Robin H Cross
Chairman : ICEM-15


From daemon Fri Feb 1 08:01:02 2002



From: joe.p.neilly-at-abbott.com
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 07:54:19 -0600
Subject:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I like to use the actions in Photoshop for placing scale bars on light
micrographs, but this only works in version 6.0 or higher. I have several
actions set up to automatically place the bar and corresponding dimension
below it. Each action is designed to place a scale bar on an image at a
specific magnification. Thus, I have many actions for all the magnifications
that I commonly use. Once you set up the action, you can run them with one
click. If you have many images taken at the same magnification, you can run
the action on all of them at once in the batch mode. It is important to run
the scale bar action before you do any resizing of the images. As a double
check I often run the actions on an image of a magnification standard to
confirm that the scale bars are correct.

Joe Neilly, Senior Microscopist
Abbott Laboratories
D-45M, AP31
200 Abbott Park Rd.
Abbott Park, IL 60064-6202

voice: (847)-938-5024
fax: (847)-938-5027
e-mail: joe.neilly-at-abbott.com



"kellymcg-at-seas.
upenn.edu" To:
Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
01/31/02 01:53 Subject: imaging
PM






------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I am trying to find a way to have photoshop automatically put scale bars on
SEM
images when given certain information (ie magnification and/or image size).
IF
anyone knows how to do this or has any suggestions the help would be
appriciated.
thanks
kelly
kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu






From daemon Fri Feb 1 08:50:12 2002



From: Larry Allard :      L2A-at-ornl.gov
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 09:40:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Fujifilm Imaging Plate System

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stan:

John Wheatley recently provided me with the following contact:

Fuji Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc.
333Ludlow Street, P. O. Box 120035
Stamford, CT 06912-0035
1-800-446-5450 Ext. 6112
FAX (203) 327-6485


hope this helps.

Larry




At 8:25 AM -0500 2/1/02, Stanley L. Flegler wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
Dr. Lawrence F. Allard
Distinguished Research Staff Member
High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
1 Bethel Valley Road
Bldg. 4515, MS 6064
PO Box 2008
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064

865-574-4981
865-576-5413 Fax
allardlfjr-at-ornl.gov


From daemon Fri Feb 1 12:26:23 2002



From: Michiel De Mol :      mdemol-at-uni-hohenheim.de
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 19:12:57 +0100
Subject: Re: Embedding wood with Mistletoe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Tamara,

That is certainly not a dumb question, but it doesn't work. The problem is
that the mistletoe tissue is to soft, relative to te wood, to make fresh
sections with a sliding microtome. The mistletoe tissue would be torn out. And
if that is not the case, the bark or the cambium of the tree would be damaged.

As for the hand sections: we want to make a 3D reconstructon of the endophyte
of the Mistletoe, so we need rather thin serial sections.

We have tried infiltrating at room temperature, but also at 4°C. The
infiltration steps we used, coming from Ethanol 100%, are: Ethanol/Technovit
2/1, 1/1, 1/2, Technovit 100%. The longest infiltration times we tried are 48h
and the last step for 4 days.
After each transfer, we infiltrated under vacuum for 15 min, any longer would,
we think, damage the soft tissues.

Anyway thank you for thinking with me

Michiel De Mol
University of Hohenheim
Institute of Botany (210)
Garbenstrasse 30
70599 Stuttgart
Germany




From daemon Fri Feb 1 14:11:07 2002



From: jesus.echeverria-at-unavarra.es (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 14:03:47 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: heavy metals on clay minerals

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (jesus.echeverria-at-unavarra.es) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
February 1, 2002 at 02:39:26
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jesus.echeverria-at-unavarra.es
Name: Dr. J. EcheverrĚa

Organization: Universidad P™blica de Navarra (Spain)

Education: Graduate College

Location: Pamplona, Navarra, Spain

Question: We are studying the retention on heavy metals on clay
minerals (illite). We know that at a given pH, metals precipitate.
So, we would like to visualize the formation of new phases. Our
question is, what is the best way to prepare the sample for scanning
electron microscopy?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Feb 1 14:11:09 2002



From: pollyr-at-cheque.uq.edu.au (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 14:02:38 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: observe gel structures in a confectionery

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (pollyr-at-cheque.uq.edu.au) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
January 31, 2002 at 20:29:14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pollyr-at-cheque.uq.edu.au
Name: Polly Ramesh Sukha

Organization: University of Queensland

Education: Graduate College

Location: Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Question: I would like to observe gel structures in a confectionery
jelly that contains both starch gel structures and gelatine
structures. What would be the appropriate method to use to observe
these structures, with regards to staining and microscopy method?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Feb 1 14:15:47 2002



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 15:08:15 -0500
Subject: RE: Thick sections for confocal microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Torsten,
I notice that you have not mentioned PEG (polyethylene glycol) or
diethylene glycol distearate (DGD). You might want to look in "PEG as an
embedment.....", Gao, K.(ed), 1993, CRC Press, ISBN: 0-8493-4323-2. Also,
if you have tried gelatin, how about polyacrylamide. These are used for
cryotomy.
Neither have you mentioned glycol methacrylate which is often used
as the dehydrator and infiltrator, provides celloidin-like support without
the miscibility problems and can be thick sectioned. It should hold
structures in place and should permit economy of antibody as it is
hydrophilic.
Cutting thick sections from non-brittle embedment is best done with
a sledge microtome which mounts the knife at an angle to its movement. This
permits a 2-axis sectioning motion that has worked well for taking sections
of small mammals that are partly ossified.
How these may affect confocal imaging I can't predict, but....
Just some more ideas to exclude, but in sum probably worth at least
an EUD.

Regards,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
The best research
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
occurs before work
West Chester University
at the bench.
West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
610-738-0437
fmonson-at-wcupa.edu



} ----------
} From:
} "Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Sent: Friday, February 1, 2002 5:06 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Thick sections for confocal microscopy
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi everyone,
}
} I am looking for a method to cut thick sections (50 to 100 µm) from
} crustaceans (2-4 cm in length), which can be incubated with
} antibodies and viewed on a confocal microscope.
}
} So far I use(d) gelatin-embedded specimens, cut on a kryostat.
} The problem is, that when these thick sections get thawed, much
} of the animal just "swims" away, because e.g. nerves and vessels
} are not attached to something anymore, but float freely in the
} water/hemolymph.
}
} To avoid this, I'd like to embedd the animals into something. Here's
} a list of thoughts, and reasons why I rejected them:
}
} - gelatin is just not fluid enough to penetrate all hemolymph space;
} - celloidin needs a preincubation w/ the antibodies, but this is just
} not possible (because the animals are quite large, and the
} antibodies e.g. for receptors quite expensive...);
} - nanoplast (a water soluble resin) works just like celloidin;
} - LR White (thermally cured) seems to be too hard for thick
} sections; at least I just cannot get thicker sections then 2 µm with
} my microtom and glass knives (and not 10 µm as in the literature).
}
} If someone knows a nice method, I would appreciate help ! ! !
}
} Truly yours,
}
} :-) Torsten
}
} Ph.D. student
}
}
}
}
}
} Torsten Fregin
}
} Universität Hamburg - Zoologisches Institut
} Abt. Neurophysiologie
} AG Wiese - Raum 413
} Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3
} 20146 Hamburg, Germany
} Telefon *49-(0)40-42838-3931
} Fax *49-(0)40-42838-3937
} eMail Torsten.Fregin-at-zoologie.uni-hamburg.de
} oder TorstenFregin-at-gmx.de
}
}
}
}


From daemon Fri Feb 1 14:25:37 2002



From: dharvey-at-inplane.com ()
Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 14:21:59 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: nemarsky microscopic techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dharvey-at-inplane.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
February 1, 2002 at 12:55:23
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dharvey-at-inplane.com
Name: Doug Harvey

Organization: Inplane Photonics Inc.

Education: Graduate College

Location: South Plainfield, NJ 07080

Question: Hello, my background is not in optics. I would like to get
more information on using nemarsky microscopic techniques for
measuring the depth of features, e.g. the rounding of circuit traces.
Would you have any information or could point me in the right
direction?

Regards,
Doug

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Feb 1 15:06:18 2002



From: Glen MacDonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 12:59:37 -0800
Subject: Re: Thick sections for confocal microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Celloidin will only need pre-incubation for epitopes denatured by ethanol
and ether. I suspect that if your epitopes can withstand paraffin
embedding, they should tolerate celloidin. The downside will be shrinkage,
especially with soft tissues within rigid structures. Section celloidin
with a slege microtome. sections can be cut, set onto disks of filter
paper then stacked in a jar full of 70% isopropanol or terpineol for later
use.

I've used the rubber cement-paraffin mixture. Its like embedding in Noxema
cream, weird texture but very easy to cut on a slege and dissolves out
with xylene.

} - celloidin needs a preincubation w/ the antibodies, but this is just
} not possible (because the animals are quite large, and the
} antibodies e.g. for receptors quite expensive...);

--
---
Glen MacDonald
Center for Communication Research
Box 357923
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-7923
USA
(206) 616-4156
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu




From daemon Fri Feb 1 15:08:27 2002



From: Doug Cromey :      Cromey-at-Arizona.edu
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 14:03:49 -0700
Subject: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,

We have an Olympus IMT-2 set up for time lapse imaging using DIC. During
our over-night exposures we find that the lamp does not provide consistent
illumination, dimming occasionally. This makes for somewhat less than
satisfactory movies. Is there a way we could make the lamp more stable?

Details: 50W tungsten bulb, electrical power goes through a UPS before it
enters the microscope, the lamp is typically at a setting of about 10/12 on
the LCD, I will concede that the UPS is old & I'm unsure of the state of
the batteries, although I'm inclined more to believe its the lamp or lamp
housing.

Thanks for your comments.

Doug

....................................................................
: Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy :
: Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona :
: (office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044 :
: (voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA :
: (FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: Cromey-at-Arizona.edu) :
:...................................................................:
http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"



From daemon Fri Feb 1 17:39:40 2002



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 15:05:22 -0800
Subject: Re: Embedding wood with Mistletoe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Michiel,
I would suggest you use a low viscosity resin such as Spurr's and apply
vacuum three times to get the thin resin into the pores of your wood.
At 02:20 PM 2/1/02 +0100, you wrote:
}
} Hello everybody,
}
} We're trying for months now to embed wood infected with mistletoe for
} making sections with a microtome.
} We mostly used Technovit, but the plastic infiltrates not deep enough in
} the woody tissue, which leeds to holes in the sections.
} Sections 5 micron would be fantastic, but sections of 20 micron would do
} the job.
}
} Any thoughts, ideas or remarks are welcome!!!
}
} Michiel De Mol

Regards,
Mary

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Fri Feb 1 19:37:49 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 01 Feb 2002 17:32:46 -0800
Subject: Re: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Your UPS is most likely a passive UPS....like APC
and similars. What you need is a dual conversion
UPS. These units continuously convert power line AC
to DC and back to AC. The passive units just sit there
and kick into battery if the input power line fails. There
is no regulation at all. I see input voltage varying between
103VAC to 117VAC. It is not constant 120VAC.

I use two maker's units....Powerware 9120 and Falcon
UPS Plus. These are very nice units. The 1KVA units
run about $500 or so. I use a mix of 1KVA and 1.5KVA
units. The nice thing about the Powerware units is that
they can be monitored over the LAN. The standard monitor
port for both is a COM port.

If you need contact info for either maker, pls let me know.
I am a very satisfied user of both product families.

gary g.



At 01:03 PM 2/1/2002, you wrote:
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Feb 2 00:44:45 2002



From: Kenneth Livi :      klivi-at-jhu.edu
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 00:23:13 -0600
Subject: re: X-ray Microanalysis Reference Standards for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Krassi,

I think the Smithsonian Institute still supplies a limited amount of
mineral standard grains for microprobe analyses which are well suited
for TEM grain mounts. Some of them are big enough to make ion milled
samples. You well know the potential problems of shadowing the
detector in grain mount samples. The variety of minerals available
covers the rock-forming elements and then some. Let me know if they
have stopped this service.
Ciao for now,
Ken


From daemon Sat Feb 2 10:09:44 2002



From: David Burton :      dburton-at-nwlink.com
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 07:59:16 -0800
Subject: Re: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Doug,

Because the lamp in mounted in this microscope with the socket up, large
amounts of heat are concentrated in the lampsocket. You are also drawing a
lot of current through the connections. Check the cables that connect the
power supply to the lamp, there are two, a long one and a short one. You
are looking for damage to the connectors, four of them. Changing these
cables or assuring that the contacts are clean and tight may solve the
problem.

Dave Burton



From daemon Sat Feb 2 11:10:30 2002



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 11:04:47 -0600
Subject: RE: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Don't know if anyone makes something commercially, but a lamp current
control based on feedback from sampling the light intensity should do it.

Woody

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Doug Cromey [mailto:Cromey-at-Arizona.edu]
} Sent: Friday, February 01, 2002 4:04 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Listers,
}
} We have an Olympus IMT-2 set up for time lapse imaging using
} DIC. During
} our over-night exposures we find that the lamp does not
} provide consistent
} illumination, dimming occasionally. This makes for somewhat
} less than
} satisfactory movies. Is there a way we could make the lamp
} more stable?
}
} Details: 50W tungsten bulb, electrical power goes through a
} UPS before it
} enters the microscope, the lamp is typically at a setting of
} about 10/12 on
} the LCD, I will concede that the UPS is old & I'm unsure of
} the state of
} the batteries, although I'm inclined more to believe its the
} lamp or lamp
} housing.
}
} Thanks for your comments.
}
} Doug
}
} ....................................................................
} : Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy :
} : Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona :
} : (office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044 :
} : (voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA :
} : (FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: Cromey-at-Arizona.edu) :
} :...................................................................:
} http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
} Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"
}
}


From daemon Sat Feb 2 13:20:01 2002



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 13:09:50 -0600
Subject: Re: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree with Gary Gaugler in general but, if you only need to power a
50w light source, a good, adjustable, regulated power supply for this
alone (12 volts, 5 amps???) can be obtained for much less than $500.
Just run the lamp directly from this.

Jim P.



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 10 - 20, 2002, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: http://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2002


From daemon Sat Feb 2 14:37:27 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 15:30:09 EST
Subject: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There has been a recent thread discussing methods for using Photoshop to
place micron markers on micrographs. One thing that people seemed to want was
a method to directly use the (presumably known) image magnification to create
the final result. In response, I've created a plug-in for Photoshop (and
compatible programs) that does this. You enter the magnification of the image
(e.g., 1000x), the dpi with which it was acquired (e.g., 300 dpi for your
scanner, or the corresponding pixel spacing for your camera), and the length
of the bar you desire (in microns), and the program draws and labels the bar
in the lower right corner of the image using the selected foreground and
background colors. Using a Photoshop action, you can easily apply this
procedure to an entire folder of images.

This plug-in is freely downloadable for use on either Mac or Windows
computers from the ReindeerGraphics web site, at
{http://www.reindeergraphics.com/free.html#entermag} . It can be used on 8 and
16 bit grey scale images or 24 or 48 bit RGB color images. While it is
compatible with the Fovea Pro and Image Processing Tool Kit software, it does
not require them (but please do see what other kinds of processing and
measurement are available when you visit the web site).

If you have comments on the plug-in, or urgent needs for other features or
capabilities, please let me know.

John Russ
John_Russ-at-NCSU.edu



From daemon Sat Feb 2 16:31:24 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 14:26:35 -0800
Subject: Re: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Very good point, Jim. Yes indeed. For one little lamp,
a regulated DC supply will do nicely. I use these myself
as well. The only area of concern, or potential difficulty,
is mating the lamp itself to the supply. If I recall the
IMT-2 correctly, it has a separate lamp house with
interconnecting cable to the un-regulated AC supply
in the stand. She would either have to find a mating
connector to affix to the DC supply or whack off the
current connector and do whatever is necessary to
mate with the DC supply. Either way, it is definitely
cheaper than a dual conversion UPS.

Powerware makes lower VA rating units, down to
I think 500 VA. These units are a few hundred dollars.
I used to use DC supplies for 'scope lamps but with
all of the bad power problems last year here in California,
the dual conversion UPS solved many problems. I got
way larger units than I probably needed, only to ensure
long backup time.

A good source of supply for various DC supplies is
http://www.digikey.com

By all means, do not get a B&K 10Amp unit. It has
a soft start over-current feature which will trip with
a halogen lamp. When cold, they have low resistance
and have high starting current. I found out the hard
way about the B&K.

gary g.



At 11:09 AM 2/2/2002, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Feb 2 21:00:32 2002



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-couger.com
Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 00:29:36 -0600
Subject: Re: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Kelly,

Try http://www.carnoy.org/ - you can download Carnoy program from this web
site. Carnoy is $15 shareware. It is written at Katholieke Universiteit
Leuven, in Netherlands http://www.kuleuven.ac.be .

First you have to calibrate the software for a particular instrument by
measuring known features of images taken with calibration sample at various
magnifications. Result of each measurement has to be written into the menu
along with the magnification value. Once set, use of the program becomes
simple. Just open the image file, then open the menu, choose magnification
value, length unit (from kilometer to nanometer- it will also work for
maps), number of units (length of the scale bar), and appearance of the
scale bar and characters (color, height, and location), and click OK.
Program will automatically superimpose scale bar and a legend on the image.
All these things can be set as default. Then only 3 clicks will put scale
bar on the image (open menu, choose mag., click OK).

You can undo the scale bar before the image file is saved, but once saved,
scale bar becomes part of the image.

Other features will allow you to define and count particles, measure
perimeters and densities, and convert image files into various formats back
and forth.

The only inconvenience which I encountered while using Carnoy software was
somewhat different response of the controls, as compared with expected
response of a standard Windows program. But technical support via e-mail was
adequate.

Disclaimer: SIA does not have any financial interest in Carnoy software. We
are just satisfied customers.

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax
(678)467-0012 mobile

This message is made of 100% recycled electrons.
----- Original Message -----
} From: {"kellymcg-at-seas.upenn.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2002 2:53 PM



You can get power supplies that have sensing circuits built in them. I would
require some interface circuitry to be build to lock the power supply to the
light output.

Gordon

Gordon Couger
Stillwater, OK
www.couger.com/gcouger

} From: "White, Woody N." {nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com}

: Don't know if anyone makes something commercially, but a lamp current
: control based on feedback from sampling the light intensity should do it.
:
: Woody
:
: } -----Original Message-----
: } From: Doug Cromey [mailto:Cromey-at-Arizona.edu]
: } Sent: Friday, February 01, 2002 4:04 PM
: } To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
: } Subject: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse
: }
: }
: } --------------------------------------------------------------
: } ----------
: } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
: } of America
: } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
: } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
: } On-Line Help
: } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
: } --------------------------------------------------------------
: } ---------.
: }
: }
: } Listers,
: }
: } We have an Olympus IMT-2 set up for time lapse imaging using
: } DIC. During
: } our over-night exposures we find that the lamp does not
: } provide consistent
: } illumination, dimming occasionally. This makes for somewhat
: } less than
: } satisfactory movies. Is there a way we could make the lamp
: } more stable?
: }
: } Details: 50W tungsten bulb, electrical power goes through a
: } UPS before it
: } enters the microscope, the lamp is typically at a setting of
: } about 10/12 on
: } the LCD, I will concede that the UPS is old & I'm unsure of
: } the state of
: } the batteries, although I'm inclined more to believe its the
: } lamp or lamp
: } housing.
: }
: } Thanks for your comments.
: }
: } Doug
: }
: } ....................................................................
: } : Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy :
: } : Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona :
: } : (office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044 :
: } : (voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA :
: } : (FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: Cromey-at-Arizona.edu) :
: } :...................................................................:
: } http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
: } Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"
: }
: }
:
:



From daemon Sun Feb 3 03:29:56 2002



From: alan stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 09:31:32 -0600
Subject: Re: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


After doing a bit of searching myself, I posted a request to a mailing list for The Gimp, asking how one might write a script to enter scale bars, using existing images at various magnifications. The Gimp (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free software project that works on GNU/Linux or Windoze, I think, as well as Mac OS/X, I think also. It is highly capable.

I wanted to show that there are other ways to do things than the old, hackneyed solutions.

Alan Davis

Begin forwarded message:




We had a similar problem with a metallograph. As it turned out, the dealer
included bulbs with oxidized leads. This led to arcing and subsequent
damage to the socket. We polished the contacting surfaces in the socket,
sputter coated them with gold, returned the old bulbs to the dealer and
purchased bulbs from another dealer with newer stock. The illumination is
stable and we haven't replaced a bulb in many years.



At 01:09 PM 2/2/2002 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Sun Feb 3 11:03:08 2002



From: Xianglin Li :      Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 08:53:57 -0800
Subject: About some Parameters of III-V semiconductor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, all

I am looking for some parameters of III-V semiconductors. If you can
help me, I will very appreciate for that.

1. Melting point of AlSb.
2. Hardness (on the Mohs scale) of GaN, AlSb, and InSb.

Thanks in advance!

Sincerely yours,
Xianglin

Center for Advanced Material
Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Tel: 978-934-3411




From daemon Sun Feb 3 15:36:29 2002



From: gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu ()
Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 15:18:36 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: project pertaining to electron microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
February 3, 2002 at 12:54:22
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu
Name: Christal Moore

Organization: Georgia Institute of Technology

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Atlanta, GA USA

Question: My group in a class is working on a project pertaining to
electron microscopy. We do know that current imaging methods either
have lower spatial resolution or lack the temporal acquisition
capability. We are looking to for a new method or a new way of using
existing ones that would have spatial resolution sufficient for
depicting the smallest possible cellular structures, and temporal
resolution suitable for visualizing as many cellular processes as
possible. We have just begun researching electron microscopy and do
not know that much about it, such as to why are there are obstacles
with the spatial resolution and temporal resolution? Do you know of
any new methods you could share with the group, or perhaps a good
staring point for us to being searching? Also, is it possible to
view cellular processes? What are the steps for doing so? Do you
suggest any other experts to contact? Thank you for your time.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sun Feb 3 18:37:01 2002



From: pcy :      pcy-at-usc.edu
Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2002 16:29:33 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Propidium iodide staining 4 confocal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are hoping to stain the nuclei of polychaete worm larvae with
propidium iodide. The problem is that due to small sample size, it's kind
of a "one-shot" deal and I have no protocol to refer to for concentrations
of stain to use. I've searched the web and found protocols saying
everything between 0.5mg/ml for sea urchin larvae to 1 micromolar for
Xenopus embryos. Should we err on the side of excess and go with the
really high concentration?

Background prep info:
fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde in sea water
labeled with anti-tubulin FITC-conj. antibody

The info sheets from Molecular Probes also recommends RNAse pretreatment.
Do people have input on this?

Thanks,
Pauline Yu
Manahan Research Lab
http://www.usc.edu/manahanlab



From daemon Sun Feb 3 22:28:08 2002



From: Young W. Kim :      ywkim-at-gong.snu.ac.kr
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 00:57:57 -0600
Subject: About some Parameters of III-V semiconductor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


After doing a bit of searching myself, I posted a request to a mailing list for
The Gimp, asking how one might write a script to enter scale bars, using
existing images at various magnifications. The Gimp (GNU Image Manipulation
Program) is a free software project that works on GNU/Linux or Windoze, I think,
as well as Mac OS/X, I think also. It is highly capable.

I wanted to show that there are other ways to do things than the old, hackneyed
solutions.

Alan Davis

Begin forwarded message:



?Xianglin,

Melting temperature of AlSb = 1338K (J. Phys. Chem. Solids 36 (1975) p.931)
microhardness of AlSb = 413 kg /mm2 or 359 kg/mm2(From
Landolt-Bornstein, vol 17, semiconductors, Springer 1982)
Good luck.

Young W. Kim, Ph.D.
Research Professor
School of Materials Science and Engineering
Seoul National University
Kwanak-ku Shinlim-dong San 56-1
Seoul, Republic of Korea 151-744

Tel) + 82-2-880-7977
E-mail) ywkim-at-gong.snu.ac.kr

-----Original Message-----
} From: Xianglin Li [mailto:Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 04, 2002 1:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi, all

I am looking for some parameters of III-V semiconductors. If you can
help me, I will very appreciate for that.

1. Melting point of AlSb.
2. Hardness (on the Mohs scale) of GaN, AlSb, and InSb.

Thanks in advance!

Sincerely yours,
Xianglin

Center for Advanced Material
Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Tel: 978-934-3411


From daemon Mon Feb 4 01:11:09 2002



From: pooley-at-tidewater.net ()
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 00:57:25 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:SEM digitizer?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (pooley-at-tidewater.net) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
February 3, 2002 at 19:28:15
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pooley-at-tidewater.net
Name: Alan S. Pooley, PhD

Organization: retired, volunteer at Umaine marine center

Education: Graduate College

Location: Newcastle & Walpole Maine

Question: Is there a good, relatively cheap digitizer (at least 1024
or 2048 square pixels) for the Zeiss DSM940A SEM? Company name or
web site info sought please

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Feb 4 02:13:35 2002



From: Bharesh_Mandalia-at-gillette.com
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 08:04:54 +0000
Subject: Convert .VTI to .BMP abd vice versa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All,

I was recently sent some images for image analysis. Unfortunately they in
.VTI file format. Is there any software which can convert to .BMP or .TIF
format?

Many thanks,

Bharesh Mandalia



From daemon Mon Feb 4 06:07:01 2002



From: Ken Converse :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 06:58:41 -0500
Subject: Re: solubilities of fixatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rosemary,
Sometimes that information can be found in the MSDS (sorry, Material
Data Safety Sheet - required in the US) for the chemical. VWR has them
on line (probably others do, also).

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Rosemary White wrote:

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From daemon Mon Feb 4 06:14:04 2002



From: microscope-at-tin.it
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 13:09:00 CET
Subject: Microphotography

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Torino 04 January 2002
(Italy)

Dear microscopists,

Does anyone have a triocular LOMO head attachment MFN-11 on the microscope?
I’m a beginner and I’d like to talk about microphotography concerning:
Kind of B/W film
Focusing of specimen on the film plane inside the camera
Filters
Optical microscope setup
Exposure film time

Thank you. Kind Regards,

Massimo




From daemon Mon Feb 4 06:41:40 2002



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 12:35:42 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: TEM of bacteriophages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have some qusetions about EM of bacteriophages.
They are double-stranded DNA phages for the plant
pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae.

1. Negative staining. Could someone suggest a good stain
and protocol for this type of bacteriophage?

2. Embedding in resin. The bacteriophages will be attached
to bacteria on an agar plate. Can anyone suggest a good
way to handle them. I suspect if I just cut out a piece of
agar I could lose a lot of sample during dehydration.

Thanks in advance

Dave

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Mon Feb 4 06:55:25 2002



From: ATC SEM Laboratory :      atcsem-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 07:57:15 -0500
Subject: Re: Convert .VTI to .BMP and vice versa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I do not know any software that can do this, but you could try ctrl+print
screen to copy screen and ctrl+insert to paste the file in windows paint
program or any other program. After you insert the image crop it and save in
BMP format.
If you have any problems e-mail me.

Pavel Lozovyy
Argo-Tech SEM lab
atcsem-at-earthlink.net






From daemon Mon Feb 4 08:36:33 2002



From: michael shaffer :      rarewolf-at-roadrunner.nf.net
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 10:59:09 -0330
Subject: RE: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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John Russ writes ...

} ...
} ... I've created a plug-in for Photoshop (and compatible
} programs) that does this. You enter the magnification
} of the image (e.g., 1000x), the dpi with which it was acquired
} ...
}
} This plug-in is freely downloadable ... at
} {http://www.reindeergraphics.com/free.html#entermag} . ...

Thanks John. I wonder however ... what I had noticed fo a variety of
image acquisition systems, that a specific constant was needed. That is,
even for a specific SEM which indicated the magnification, I had to use a
different magnification constant depending on the acquisition software
(e.g., JEOL's own or alternative Oxford). How would your plugin address
this? (I can tell you one one method, vs the other, acquired only a portion
of the other ... e.g., the Oxford acquired a square image from the center of
the rectangular JEOL image)

My own method was to create a printable spreadsheet for my SEM users,
which (depending on acquisition method) would indicate the "length of a
selection box" for a given magnification. This also allowed for user
preferred fonts, micron-bar placement, and style (e.g., simple line,
outlined box, black on white, W/B, or color). It certainly wasn't
automatic, but it was the only way to accommodate users' presentation
preferences.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland



From daemon Mon Feb 4 08:48:40 2002



From: Heeschen, Bill (WA) :      WAHEESCHEN-at-dow.com
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 09:43:20 -0500
Subject: Re: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've dealt with this problem (supply voltage fluctuation of a few volts) by
using a constant voltage transformer (SOLA). The problem with the UPS it
that it tracks the supply voltage. The only time the UPS' regulated output
kicks in is when the supply voltage disappears. My biggest complaint with
the Sola transformer is that it is mechanically noisy, so it gets annoying
to be in the area for a long time. They also put out a little electrical
noise, but if you can physically isolate the transformer and put it on a
separate circuit from your analytical instrumentation, then that shouldn't
be much of a problem. Most instrumentation has decent filtering on the
power line, anyhow.

For critical work, the light output feedback is the best, assuming you can
get a sensor mounted somewhere.

Bill
William A. Heeschen, Ph.D.
The Dow Chemical Company
Microscopy, Digital Imaging
1897 Bldg, E-84 / 2040 Bldg, 1330
waheeschen-at-dow.com
voice: 989-636-4005 fax: 989-638-6443


-----Original Message-----
} From: Gordon Couger [mailto:gcouger-at-couger.com]
Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2002 1:30 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



You can get power supplies that have sensing circuits built in them. I would
require some interface circuitry to be build to lock the power supply to the
light output.

Gordon

Gordon Couger
Stillwater, OK
www.couger.com/gcouger

} From: "White, Woody N." {nwwhite-at-mcdermott.com}

: Don't know if anyone makes something commercially, but a lamp current
: control based on feedback from sampling the light intensity should do it.
:
: Woody
:
: } -----Original Message-----
: } From: Doug Cromey [mailto:Cromey-at-Arizona.edu]
: } Sent: Friday, February 01, 2002 4:04 PM
: } To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
: } Subject: LM: lamp stability problems in time-lapse
: }
: }
: } --------------------------------------------------------------
: } ----------
: } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
: } of America
: } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
: } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
: } On-Line Help
: } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
: } --------------------------------------------------------------
: } ---------.
: }
: }
: } Listers,
: }
: } We have an Olympus IMT-2 set up for time lapse imaging using
: } DIC. During
: } our over-night exposures we find that the lamp does not
: } provide consistent
: } illumination, dimming occasionally. This makes for somewhat
: } less than
: } satisfactory movies. Is there a way we could make the lamp
: } more stable?
: }
: } Details: 50W tungsten bulb, electrical power goes through a
: } UPS before it
: } enters the microscope, the lamp is typically at a setting of
: } about 10/12 on
: } the LCD, I will concede that the UPS is old & I'm unsure of
: } the state of
: } the batteries, although I'm inclined more to believe its the
: } lamp or lamp
: } housing.
: }
: } Thanks for your comments.
: }
: } Doug
: }
: } ....................................................................
: } : Douglas W. Cromey, M.S. Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy :
: } : Research Specialist, Principal University of Arizona :
: } : (office: AHSC 4212A) P.O. Box 245044 :
: } : (voice: 520-626-2824) Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA :
: } : (FAX: 520-626-2097) (email: Cromey-at-Arizona.edu) :
: } :...................................................................:
: } http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
: } Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"
: }
: }
:
:



From daemon Mon Feb 4 09:20:14 2002



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 09:14:22 -0600
Subject: RE: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have set of images with different magnifications
in Photoshop .psd format with additional layers
with micron bars on them. Now I can just drag and drop
layer with micron bar on new images with the same magnification
after I crop them. It works fine for me since number of
images in publications and presentations anyway is quite limited.
Of course, it is possible to use Photoshop's "automate" to
place micron bars on many images with the same magnification.

To create image with micron bar for copying:
1. create new layer
2. draw micron bar with the same length as original bar.
3. using Type Tool type N Microns (or millimeters or
whatever else), new (third) layer will be created automatically
4. make background layer invisible
5. click on layer-} merge visible
6. make background visible again
7. save in .psd format with name "Magnification M"

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy




From daemon Mon Feb 4 10:08:41 2002



From: Roberto Garcia :      rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 11:00:43 -0500
Subject: Scheduling Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I know that this has been asked before but I just want to see if there has
been any updated software. I would like to know what is available out there
for online scheduling of equipment. Thanks.
______________________________
Roberto Garcia
rgarcia-at-unity.ncsu.edu
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/aif
http://spm.aif.ncsu.edu/asm




From daemon Mon Feb 4 11:51:53 2002



From: Russell McConnell :      russell.mcconnell-at-tufts.edu
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 12:40:52 -0500
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: project pertaining to electron microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Christal,
First, let me wish your group the best of luck with this project, it is
a difficult but worthwhile undertaking. The problem with obtaining
spatial and temporal resolution is a complex one. To start I will point
out one of the fundamentals of microscopy, the Abbe equation: (I would
suggest visiting this web site for a better explanation:
http://lsvl.la.asu.edu/bio598L/notes/lightlenses/ )
resolution = (0.612 x l) / (n sin a)

l = (wavelength of light)
n = refractive index of medium between the objective lens and the
specimen.
a = the aperture angle, which is half the angle of the cone of light
from the specimen accepted by the front lens objective. This is also
called the half aperture angle.
(n sin a) is the 'numerical aperture' of a lens, and is usually printed
on the side of objectives for light microscopes.

What is important to note is that resolution is a function of
essentially two things, your lens and the light you are using. More
specifically, the wavelength of the light is related to resolution in
such a way that shorter wavelength = better resolution. Electron
microscopes achieve their remarkable spatial resolution through the use
of electrons as the 'light'. The wavelengths of visible light are in
the range of 400-700 nm; electrons have a considerably shorter
wavelength, about 0.005nm (recall that matter behaves as a particle and
also as a wave). It is because of this shorter wavelength that electron
microscopes have such excellent spatial resolution.
So, electron microscopes have excellent spatial resolution; why don't
they have temporal resolution as well? Temporal resolution is the
ability to see change over time. To see a cellular process change over
time, you must be looking at a live cell. Unfortunately, it is not
possible to do this with an electron microscope for a number of reasons
(there are probably others, but these are the most obvious, at least to
me). The first has to do with the fact that electrons are very easily
scattered when they pass into/through matter; electrons are so easily
scattered that the tube of electron microscopes must be pumped down to a
vacuum so that the air in the column doesn't scatter the electron beam!
If electrons have a hard time traveling through air, one can imagine
that the relatively denser matter of a biological specimen would be
nearly impenetrable. To make it possible for electrons to get through a
specimen, you have to cut the specimen into very thin sections. A
typical eukaryotic cell might be on the order of 10-15 microns thick;
most sections for transmission electron microscopy are around 0.1
microns thick. After sectioning a specimen, electrons will pass through
it. The challenge then becomes being able to distinguish cellular
structures. A professor of mine once compared this to looking for
chunks of clear Jell-O in a swimming pool. The problem is that
electrons (and light in general) pass through most cell components in
the same way. To get contrast you have to stain specimens with an
electron dense material, usually a heavy metal stain such as Osmium
tetroxide (OsO4). So this gives us three major reasons why living cells
hate electron microscopy:
1. specimens must be placed in a vacuum while they are being viewed
2. you have to cut the specimen into very thin sections
3. electron dense stains (such as OsO4) are usually highly toxic
None of these conditions are compatible with living cells. To make
matters even worse, it is necessary to imbed specimens in a plastic
resin for them to hold their shape during sectioning (otherwise it's a
bit like slicing a tomato with a butter knife).
For information on microscopic techniques currently in use I would
recommend the following web sites:
University of Arizona's web site list
http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/micro/index.html
Lance Ladic's site on confocal microscopy
http://www.cs.ubc.ca/spider/ladic/overview.html
You may also want to visit the home pages for the major microscope
manufacturers, such as Zeiss, Leica, Olympus, Nikon, BioRad, etc.
Again, best of luck to you.
--
Russell McConnell
Confocal Imaging Facility Technician
Department of Neuroscience
Tufts University School of Medicine
M&V Building room #137
136 Harrison Ave.
Boston, MA 02111
Tel. (617) 636-3795

gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
} February 3, 2002 at 12:54:22
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: gtg457a-at-prism.gatech.edu
} Name: Christal Moore
}
} Organization: Georgia Institute of Technology
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: Atlanta, GA USA
}
} Question: My group in a class is working on a project pertaining to
} electron microscopy. We do know that current imaging methods either
} have lower spatial resolution or lack the temporal acquisition
} capability. We are looking to for a new method or a new way of using
} existing ones that would have spatial resolution sufficient for
} depicting the smallest possible cellular structures, and temporal
} resolution suitable for visualizing as many cellular processes as
} possible. We have just begun researching electron microscopy and do
} not know that much about it, such as to why are there are obstacles
} with the spatial resolution and temporal resolution? Do you know of
} any new methods you could share with the group, or perhaps a good
} staring point for us to being searching? Also, is it possible to
} view cellular processes? What are the steps for doing so? Do you
} suggest any other experts to contact? Thank you for your time.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Feb 4 12:14:35 2002



From: Curtis Olson :      COlson-at-scpglobal.com
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 11:05:37 -0700
Subject: Cross Section Thank you

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thank you who responded to my request for help with SEM semiconductor cross sections. Many responses with excellent information.
Curtis Olson



From daemon Mon Feb 4 12:21:17 2002



From: Curtis Olson :      COlson-at-scpglobal.com
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 11:12:43 -0700
Subject: Environmental Noise Impacting JEOL 848 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I operate a JEOL 848 SEM but am limited to less than 30,000x due to at least two frequencies of external noise. The service engineers from JEOL have determined the noise is not due to the SEM. I will be conducting as much of a room survey as possible later in February but I am hoping to obtain some insight into common testing formats, noise sources, and solutions. From what I have been able to learn so far, this noise reduction is something of an art rather than science. Thank you in advance from this microscopist with much to learn.

Curtis Olson



From daemon Mon Feb 4 13:35:27 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 11:26:57 -0800
Subject: RE: lamp stability problems in time-lapse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Sola magnetic resonance transformers are good for this
application. However, they are not cheap--especially
as their VA rating increases. And yes, they get noisy.

For critical work, I suggest either a regulated DC supply
or a dual conversion UPS. The dual conversion UPS
never "kicks in" but rather is always producing regulated
(frequency and voltage) AC from DC. The DC is either
that from rectified line voltage or from the UPS batteries.

gary g.





At 06:43 AM 2/4/2002 , you wrote:
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From daemon Mon Feb 4 15:30:29 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 11:21:55 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

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Hi, All-

Have any of you compared the Nikon Coolpix 995 (or earlier) with the
Olympus C-4040 (or earlier) mounted on a light microscope? They are both
comsumer-level digital cameras with about the same technology, and so I'm
wondering if there is any reason to choose one over the other. The Olympus
has better features on paper, so I'm hoping to hear from someone who uses
one. This will be used to supplement the Magnafire SP I'm proposing to
buy, since I need a camera that will fit into the eyepiece of our
confocal.

Mahalo!
Tina



****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Mon Feb 4 16:46:57 2002



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-urmc.rochester.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 17:21:56 -0500
Subject: Protein dimers and chains

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Dear Listers:

I have been trying to image with negative stain, protein chains and protein
dimers with 2.0% Uranyl Acetate. It seems when I pipet onto the grid,
various dilutions (10-100x) of the buffered protein dimer sample, I get alot
of protein chain formation. I want the dimer form to stay in that
configuration-- not link up into chains. I am photographing at 100,000
using 75 kv on a traditional Hitachi 7100 TEM.

Does anyone out there work with these types of specimen? Is there a special
way to prep the grid, dry the grid, etc.? Should I use some other type of
grid besides the formvar/carbon coated copper grid? Should I sonicate the
specimen before I place the sample on the grid?

Thanks for any help you can provide.

Karen Bentley, M.S.
(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954



From daemon Mon Feb 4 17:27:39 2002



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 18:22:15 -0500
Subject: Environmental Noise Impacting JEOL 848 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Curtis,

Don't be too quick to accept the service engineers claim that the SEM is
not
the source of noise in the image. When they can't easily figure out what
the
problem is, it is too easy for them to blame the "fields," because it is
something
not well understood by most people. I went through all of the field
service
people, the service people at the JEOL headquarters in Massachusetts, and
an "expert" from Japan. The expert's final conclusion was that the problem
was
caused by the fields in the room, and not our new SEM. A while later, we
moved
the SEM some miles down the road to a different building. We had JEOL
check
the room before moving in, and they blessed the room. When we had the
exact
same problem, I had a discussion with the people in Massachusetts.
Eventually,
we had a repaired system that provided excellent images. This all took way
too
long to resolve. The only company that I am aware of having intimate
knowledge
of their systems "noise" was Amray. They used a spectrum analyzer on the
system, and identified every source of every frequency.

Good luck! Your problem will, most likely, not be this difficult.
Darrell

"Curtis Olson" {COlson-at-scpglobal.com} on 02/04/2002 01:12:43 PM

To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:


I operate a JEOL 848 SEM but am limited to less than 30,000x due to at
least two frequencies of external noise. The service engineers from JEOL
have determined the noise is not due to the SEM. I will be conducting as
much of a room survey as possible later in February but I am hoping to
obtain some insight into common testing formats, noise sources, and
solutions. From what I have been able to learn so far, this noise reduction
is something of an art rather than science. Thank you in advance from this
microscopist with much to learn.

Curtis Olson







From daemon Mon Feb 4 17:58:29 2002



From: curari-at-asu.edu
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 16:50:46 -0700 (MST)
Subject: ISI SX-40 help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,

I am a student at Scottsdale Community College. I am working with an
ISI SX-40 Scanning Electron Microscope. It has an old polaroid camera that
snaps a picture of a CRT image. I am looking for options(and donated
equipment) to put these images on to a PC, the big problem is I am on a
very tight budget($800) so I am very willing to look for used equipment
(card or camera or info) . This machine is old and did not
work at all. Over the past 8 months or so I have rebuilt the diffusion pump,
roughing pump, new seals, column cleaning, and learned basic operation by
myself with this apparatus. And I have learned a lot from following this list
server, so I wanted to send out a big thanx to all the listers. Thank you in
advance for your time and consideration. Any and all input is appreciated

Wil Kunkel
Student Extraordinaire

This email was sent with 100.00% recycled electrons.



From daemon Mon Feb 4 19:07:49 2002



From: Bob :      bobrobs-at-earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 10:23:18 -0700
Subject: Re: Environmental Noise Impacting JEOL 848 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Curtis,

I would start with a close inspection of the power supplied to the SEM.
Although measuring for stray fields and floor
vibration may be in order, a good place to begin is with the A/C power
and the potential for ground loops if wired common
or shared with other equipment. The ground terminal into the microscope
main power supply can often be a good source of noise.

On a positive note, if this noise is a problem as low as 30KX it should
be somewhat easier to find.

Regards,

Bob Roberts
EM Lab Services, Inc.
Tempe, Arizona 85284


Curtis Olson wrote:

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From daemon Mon Feb 4 20:40:50 2002



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 20:33:15 -0600
Subject: Second announcement: Seventh Annual UBC Live-Cell course

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Announcing the Seventh Annual INTERNATIONAL 11-Day Short Course on

3D Microscopy of Living Cells, June 10 - 20, 2002

Sixth, Post-course Workshop on, 3D Image Processing, June 22 - 24, 2002

Organized by Prof. James Pawley, University of Wisconsin-Madison

in association with the, UBC Brain Research Centre, Prof. Max
Cynader, Director.
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

(CORRECTION!! some early brochures were sent out with an incorrect URL.
Course info can be found at: ht tp://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca)

THE PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

Modern methods of 3D light microscopy promise a revolutionary
improvement in our ability to view living cells. To help convert
this promise to reality for a wider selection of biological
scientists, the organizers have designed an intensive eleven-day
residential course concentrating on all aspects of the 3D Microscopy
of Living Cells. Sponsored by the Brain Research Centre at the
University of British Columbia, it will be held in June of 2002. The
course includes 4 days on 2D techniques, 5 days of 3D techniques and
2 days on 3D measurement and display. It includes everything from
basic microscopy to confocal and multiphoton microscopy. A half-day
Pre-course is offered for those wishing to brush up on (very!) basic
optics.


INTERNATIONAL FACULTY
o Stephen Adams University of California-SD
o Dan Axelrod University of Michigan
o Mark Cannell University of Auckland, NZ
o Rainer Duden Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, UK
o Ping Chin Cheng SUNY, Buffalo
o Stefan Hell Max Planck Institute, Goettingen
o Alan Hibbs BioCon, Melbourne, Australia
o Iain Johnson Molecular Probes, OR
o Larry Keenan Cell Robotics, NM
o Ernst Keller Carl Zeiss, Thornwood, NY
o Andres Kriete Tissue Informatics, Pittsburgh
o Glen MacDonald Virginia Bloedel Hearing Inst, WA
o Irina Majoul Max Planck Institute, Goettingen
o Felix Margadant University of Sydney, AU
o Tim Murphy University of British Columbia
o Jim Pawley University of Wisconsin-Madison
o Steve Potter California Institute of Technology
o Badri Roysam Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY
o Lee Tierney Eppendorf Scientific,Albequerque, NM
o Michael Weis Agriculture Canada


APPLICATIONS
Applicants will submit an application to assess knowledge level and
field of interest. Enrollment will be limited to 24 - 32
participants (depending on equipment availability). Selection will
be made on the basis of background and perceived need. Those with
little previous LM experience will be provided with basic texts to
read before the course begins, and should take the Pre-course.

Application forms and other course information from this and past
years can be downloaded from the WWW site at

h ttp://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/home.html

or obtained from:

Prof. James Pawley,
Zoology Department.,
1117 W. Johnson Drive,
Madison, WI.
Phone: 608-263-3147 fax. 608-265-5315
Email: jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu

IMPORTANT DATES
Applications must be received by Mar. 15, 2002
Deposit due Apr. 15, 2002
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 pm Sunday, June 9, 2002
Intro. Lecture 7:00 PM, Sunday, June 9, 2002
Last class ends with lunch, Thursday, June 20, 2002
3D IP Workshop Saturday, June 22-24, 2002
--
****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
"A scientist is not one who can answer questions
but one who can question answers."
Theodore Schick Jr., Skeptical Enquirer, 21-2:39


From daemon Mon Feb 4 21:12:24 2002



From: jhardy-at-coh.org ()
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 15:53:52 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Image Supercharger for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (jhardy-at-coh.org) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
February 4, 2002 at 15:28:55
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: jhardy-at-coh.org
Name: John Hardy

Organization: City of Hope Medical Center

Education: Graduate College

Location: Duarte, California

Question: Does anyone have experience with, or comments about the
"Image Supercharger Upgrade" by Ascend Technical Sales? It would be
an add-on image processor for our "mature"(i.e. 1984) Philips 505
SEM. Please contact me off line at:
jhardy-at-coh.org
Thank you in advance
John Hardy
City of Hope Medical Center
Duarte, CA
(626)301-8265

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Feb 4 21:13:31 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 15:53:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:Help LM Info for a Middle School

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



} Email: ever4us-at-comcast.com
} Name: Denise Everett
}
} Organization: Pitman Middle School
}
} Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School
}
} Location: Pitman, NJ 08071
}
} Question: I've recently become the science coordinator of our school
} but my science background is in enzymology so I don't have alot of
} experience with microscopy. We are looking to buy some new scopes
} and in the process I've been looking at our old ones. The 400x
} magnification is pretty unusable on these. Is that supposed to be oil
} immersion use only?
} These lenses are pretty dirty and have probably not been maintained.
} The top objective does not come out for cleaning as far as I can see.
} Do I just need to send these to a technician?
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Denise -

I'm glad that you've asked for help; we're here to provide it.
There are several topics here. First, new microscopes. Let's assume that
the scopes that you have are salvageable. Since you're in a middle school,
PLEASE consider purchasing "dissecting" rather than compound scopes like
the ones that you have. A lot of introductory microscopy for your age
group is observstion of thick specimens at lower magnifications; looking at
large insects, flowers, shells, etc. So having a mix of types will greatly
expand your capabilities. You'll find a detailed discussion of selection
criteria on Project MICRO's website (URL below). I suggest 20x monocular
dissecting scopes, wich will cost you around $75 each; sources are listed
on the MICRO site and you can find an example online at
www.microscopeworld.com.
Your dirt diagnosis is probably accurate. It would be best if you
learn to clean the scopes yourself; you'll then know how to keep them that
way. The New York Microscopical Society has members and meeting rooms in
New Jersey, and one of their members may be available to show you what to
do; I'm copying this Email to Jean Portell {JeanDP-at-aol.com} , one of their
officers. I also can provide you with detailed cleaning instructions for
teachers, written by a MSA member. 400x is "high dry" - oil immersion is
1000x and inappropriate for middle school.
While you're visiting the MICRO website, don't miss MSA's middle
school manual, "Microscopic Explorations"; it's an excellent introduction
to scientific observation and inquiry, written by the science educators at
the Lawrence Hall of Science. If you want a reference book for your own
use, here's another listing from the MICRO bibliography:

Nachtigall, W. 1995 Exploring With the Microscope 160 pp. hardbound.
6.5x9.5". $19.95. ISBN 0-8069-0866-1 Sterling Publishing Co., NY.
Although this book is intended for adult amateur microscopists, it
is well written and will provide teachers and classroom volunteers with
much useful information on "serious" light microscopy; it's unequalled as a
basic reference for beginners. Almost half of the book is devoted to
simple preparation methods for biological specimens and descriptions (with
good illustrations) of commonly encountered organisms. Adult. RECOMMENDED

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From daemon Mon Feb 4 22:32:43 2002



From: Pradyumna Prabhumirashi :      p-prabhumirashi-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Mon, 4 Feb 2002 22:25:12 -0600
Subject: EELS Raw Data

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hello,

I need some help in converting some raw EELS data into formats readable
by either EL/P or digital micrograph. The data I have gathered is in
.ZAL (Zaluzek) format. The data looks very similar to the .TAD format.
Let me know if there is a program that reads .ZAL format and converts it
to .TAD or even two column text. Perhaps Nestor would be able to help in
this regard, right? :).
Thanks in advance,

Prad

Pradyumna Prabhumirashi
Dept. of Materials Science
Northwestern University
Phone: (847)491-7798
Fax : (847)491-7820




From daemon Mon Feb 4 22:47:47 2002



From: Beauregard :      beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 18:37:51 -0500
Subject: Straight parallel micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
To create an image with a labeled micron bar in 20-30 seconds:
1. Make the info tab totally visible as a separate window on the right
side of PS.
2. Crop your image. I assume you are calibrated in cm.
3. Click on the line drawing tool.
4. In the lower left corner, click where you want the marker to start.
5. Drag to the right slightly, then hold down the shift key for a perfect
straight line. (Use the option tab to increase the line width (5-15 pixels).)
6. Drag to the right until the D: in the INFO window that shows the length
you need on the final printed image
You should take into account how you might have changed the DPI values.
For example, if you scanned a neg. at 600 DPI and cut it to 200 DPI, then a
negative of 10,000X will be about 30,000X on the print and the line length
for 1µm should be D: 3.00 CM in INFO. This varies a bit with your
printer. Use scanned graph paper to calibrate your DPI to exactly 3x. I
use 196 DPI on a HP1200TN to get 3X, after scanning at 600 DPI.
7. CAREFULLY release the mouse button, then the shift key and you have
your perfect line.
8. Click on the type tool and click at the position you want the text
above the marker. I use centered, 15 point, crisp, black ink, ariel MT,
bold, etc.
9. Type in using 15 points the length of the line; 1µm, 0.1µm, 0.3 µms, etc.
10.. Highlight the "1µm" text and copy it as a template to the clipboard
for the next image. Click OK.
11. Continue to the next image.

µ = press and hold down the ALT key,
on the NUMSPAD on the right of the keyboard,
type 0181,
release the ALT key.
µ appears in ANY windows program.
Try:
http://www.dtp-aus.com/ext_set.htm
for more extended characters and a nice table you can print.
Ĺ, ˛, ł,©, ®, ±, Ł, ö, •, 0176°

Paul Beauregard
Senior Research Associate
PPG Industries
440 College Park Drive
Monroeville, PA 15146



From daemon Tue Feb 5 00:07:19 2002



From: Mark YEADON :      m-yeadon-at-imre.org.sg
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 14:03:52 +0800
Subject: 300kV LaB6 TEM for polymer analysis?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

We are in process of buying a TEM for our Science Faculty; it would be used
by physicists and materials scientists, and also chemists (inorganic and
organic samples).

We have a 300kV FEG machine with ultra hi res polepiece (restricted tilt).
We do polymers and inorganics, no problem. We now need a LaB6 machine
(budget constraint) with high tilt to be more of a Workhorse Machine.

For the sake of resolution and penetration, we are favoring a 300kV
analytical TEM with ~2.1A resolution, and around 40 degrees tilt. This will
be perfect for the physical scientists.

HOWEVER: The chemists are worried that they will have trouble looking at
their polymer samples in a 300kV LaB6. Can someone help to support me (or
correct me) in my thesis that this machine will be able to support them just
as well as a 200kV machine? (I know eg that the HT can be reduced to 100 or
200kV, but the chemists are still skeptical - they have no prior TEM
experience).

If there is someone with a 300kV LaB6 TEM running polymers, I would be very
glad to hear from you! Any references to your papers that would show
polymers imaged in a 300kV LaB6 machine would be most welcome (esp any soft
copies that I can circulate to our committee).

Thanks to all in advance,

Mark

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Mark Yeadon
Senior Research Fellow
Institute of Materials Research and Engineering
3 Research Link
Singapore 117602

Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science
National University of Singapore
Singapore 119260
http://www.matsci.nus.edu.sg/STAFF/Mark.html

TEL: (+65) 874 8591
FAX: (+65) 872 0785
Email: m-yeadon-at-imre.org.sg


From daemon Tue Feb 5 02:26:25 2002



From: Peter Heimann :      peter.heimann-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2002 09:16:58 +0100
Subject: self coating of EM viewing screen (looking for help/recipe)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues,

who has any personal experience in self coating of an EM viewing
screen and can send me his advice?

a few years ago there was a reply to a similar topic by {underline} Bill Tivol {/underline} ,

however his e-mail adress must have changed and he can`t be

reached by the old one.

peter heimann (Bielefeld / Germany) {color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param}

{nofill}
**************************************************
please reply to: peter.heimann-at-biologie.uni-bielefeld.de ("E-MAIL")

Dr. Peter Heimann
Developmental Biology & Molecular Pathology; W7-107
University of Bielefeld
D 33501 Bielefeld / Germany
phone: xx49(0)521-106-5628 / 5627
FAX : xx49(0)521-106-5654
WEB-Site: http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/biologie/Entwicklungsbiologie
WEB-Site: http://www.uni-bielefeld.de/SFB549
******************************************************


From daemon Tue Feb 5 09:37:59 2002



From: David_R_Stadden-at-armstrong.com
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 10:28:55 -0500
Subject: NIST-traceable stage micrometer?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




I've been asked if the stage micrometers I use for calibrating our optical
scopes are NIST-traceable. Is there such a thing and, if not, what would
satisfy requirements for ISO certification in the area of metrology?

Thanks!

Dave Stadden
Research Scientist
Armstrong World Industries, Inc.
Lancaster, PA




From daemon Tue Feb 5 10:46:05 2002



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 08:35:38 -0800
Subject: Microscope philately

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bob Bloodgood, a cell biologist at the University of Virginia, has posted
nice images of light microscopes on postage stamps on the web at
http://www.med.virginia.edu/med-ed/cell/stamps/index.html

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Tue Feb 5 11:31:27 2002



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 11:22:43 -0600
Subject: Re: Environmental Noise Impacting JEOL 848 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You might also have a look at

Pawley, J.B. Strategy for Locating and Eliminating Sources of Mains
Frequency Stray Magnetic Fields. Scanning 7:43-46 (1985).

Pawley, J.B. Use of Pseudo-Stereo Techniques to Detect Stray Field in
the SEM. Scanning 9-3:134-136 (1987).

The matter of ground loops, and stray fields from bad house wiring
are a bit complex to discuss in emails. Please excuse the
self-advertisement.

Jim P.




} Curtis,
}
} I would start with a close inspection of the power supplied to the
} SEM. Although measuring for stray fields and floor
} vibration may be in order, a good place to begin is with the A/C
} power and the potential for ground loops if wired common
} or shared with other equipment. The ground terminal into the
} microscope main power supply can often be a good source of noise.
}
} On a positive note, if this noise is a problem as low as 30KX it
} should be somewhat easier to find.
}
} Regards,
}
} Bob Roberts
} EM Lab Services, Inc.
} Tempe, Arizona 85284
}
}
} Curtis Olson wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
**********************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU
3D Microscopy of Living Cells Course, June 10 - 20, 2002, UBC, Vancouver Canada
Info: ht tp://www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/ Applications due by March 15, 2002


From daemon Tue Feb 5 13:07:33 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 08:56:42 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Rephrased - Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus digital cameras

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, All-

} From the personal responses I've been getting it seems like a lot of
people haven't figured out that the Olympus C-3030 and C-4040 cameras can,
indeed, be mounted on light microscopes. Olympus can supply all the
adapters needed for this task, and can come in with an easier setup,
better resolution, and a lower price. The main attraction of the Coolpix
seems to be that it can swivel to make viewing the screen easier (I heard
a rumor that this feature is about to be discontinued), but either camera
would benefit by being plugged into a monitor. I haven't had a chance to
compare the cameras, and was hoping to scare up someone who
has. Interestingly, the ones who have replied with information have not
been from the US, so local marketing must be spotty.

} From the replies so far from people who have tried both, one bought the
Nikon, one bought the Olympus.

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Tue Feb 5 13:09:22 2002



From: Dave Hall :      daveh-at-restechimage.com
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 14:02:23 -0500
Subject: Straight parallel micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All:

I'd like to throw out another possible option for creating micron bars
on images. The PAX-it Basic Measurement Module (as an add-on for the
PAX-it image database product) provides this exact capability. Similar
to other software options suggested previously, the Basic Measurement
Module also offers other measurement capability such as point-to-point
distances, angle measurements, segmented line lengths, parallel line
calipers, etc. There is also an Enhanced Measurement Module adding a
range of additional features for area detection, blob counting, sizing,
and sorting, etc. The measurement modules also provide direct report
generating capabilities through (OLE) Automation links to MS Word,
Excel, or PowerPoint.

However, what PAX-it and its measurement modules offer, that other
options mentioned previously do not appear to offer, is a fully
integrated relational database for images and related documents such as
Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, PDF files, PowerPoint presentations.
Everything relating to a project can be entered into the database as
various records with searchable criteria. The database user-interface
is an easy-to-understand visual presentation using file cabinets,
cabinet drawers, file folders, and thumbnails of the images. And, the
entire database can be placed on a file server and, with a special
module, made available across internal networks or the internet to be
accessed using just a standard web browser interface.

PAX-it is a commercial product and we are a reseller for the product.
Hopefully this message is not inappropriate in this forum because we are
not the only reseller for the product, and we are not directly
soliciting sales of the product through this message. The intent is
simply to raise awareness of another option for image measurement and
management.

The manufacturer for PAX-it is MIS (847-455-0450) and the web page is
www.paxit.com. There are multiple dealers nationwide and interested
parties should contact MIS to find the dealer nearest them. (You might
indicate that you became aware of the product through the Microscopy
ListServer.)

*Kind Regards,
*Dave Hall
*Resolution Technology, Inc - (614) 921-0045
*Columbus, OH 43228


-----Original Message-----
} From: Beauregard [mailto:beaurega-at-westol.com]
Sent: Monday, February 04, 2002 6:38 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi,
To create an image with a labeled micron bar in 20-30 seconds:
1. Make the info tab totally visible as a separate window on the right
side of PS.
2. Crop your image. I assume you are calibrated in cm.
3. Click on the line drawing tool.
4. In the lower left corner, click where you want the marker to start.
5. Drag to the right slightly, then hold down the shift key for a
perfect
straight line. (Use the option tab to increase the line width (5-15
pixels).)
6. Drag to the right until the D: in the INFO window that shows the
length
you need on the final printed image
You should take into account how you might have changed the DPI values.
For example, if you scanned a neg. at 600 DPI and cut it to 200 DPI,
then a
negative of 10,000X will be about 30,000X on the print and the line
length
for 1µm should be D: 3.00 CM in INFO. This varies a bit with your
printer. Use scanned graph paper to calibrate your DPI to exactly 3x.
I
use 196 DPI on a HP1200TN to get 3X, after scanning at 600 DPI.
7. CAREFULLY release the mouse button, then the shift key and you have
your perfect line.
8. Click on the type tool and click at the position you want the text
above the marker. I use centered, 15 point, crisp, black ink, ariel MT,
bold, etc.
9. Type in using 15 points the length of the line; 1µm, 0.1µm, 0.3
µms, etc.
10.. Highlight the "1µm" text and copy it as a template to the
clipboard
for the next image. Click OK.
11. Continue to the next image.

µ = press and hold down the ALT key,
on the NUMSPAD on the right of the keyboard,
type 0181,
release the ALT key.
µ appears in ANY windows program.
Try:
http://www.dtp-aus.com/ext_set.htm
for more extended characters and a nice table you can print.
Ĺ, ˛, ł,©, ®, ±, Ł, ö, *, 0176°

Paul Beauregard
Senior Research Associate
PPG Industries
440 College Park Drive
Monroeville, PA 15146




From daemon Tue Feb 5 14:36:35 2002



From: Ayten Celik :      celik-at-students.uiuc.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 14:29:17 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: EM safety and family plan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi,

I have joint this group recently so, I do not know about the previous
discussion. The problem about women radiation workers is that (in my
opinion): At birth each female carries a lifetime supply of egg cells.
These egg cells are not in their final form but anyway they can be damaged
or altered when a female radiation worker is exposed to radiation any
time.

To make it short, it is not only what we are doing during pregnancy, it is
what we have been doing before pregnancy as well.

Recently, I had a baby and I have cancelled my experimental work at
research reactors and my flights during my pregnancy.

Ayten Celik Aktas
-at-UIUC


On Thu, 31 Jan 2002, Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} HI Evelyn,
} this question came up a while back,so you may want to scan the
} archives, but here are my 2 cents...
} I have a healthy, happy 9 year old son. I have been doing TEM & SEM
} for 25 years. While I was "family pIanning" and pregnant, I wore
} double gloves and worked in the hood when appropriate, washed my
} hands frequently, followed OSHA guidelines and used common sense. I
} still do (except for the double gloves part). Yes, much of what we
} use can be dangerous to ourselves as well as our progeny, but with
} appropriate care I don't think one needs to take a leave or stop
} doing your job.
}
} JMHO,
} Lee
}




From daemon Tue Feb 5 16:11:01 2002



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 15:43:01 -0600
Subject: Re: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,

My requirements are that I have to put a label as well as a scale bar on
each optical micrograph and burn CD to archive, all with GLP documentation
(we are working towards a 21CFR Part 11 compliant system). I have
calibrated our research microscope with various optical systems and
photoeyepieces as well as a new macroscope and created about 100 scale bars.
We then automated the whole process as much as we could using Actions and
Droplets and a Word macro to create a label as well as a list of all the
files burned on a CD by filling in a form.

Next we are hoping to be able to write a plug-in that will create a history
text file to document each change to a photograph. I asked Adobe if they
could do that and the person said that it would be feasible but apparently
not enough demand, yet.

Damian Neuberger, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp.
Tel: 847.270.5888
damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com


From daemon Tue Feb 5 16:52:34 2002



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 18:23:07 -0500
Subject: EELS Raw Data

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I evaluated the Nikon Coolpix 990 and Olympus C-3040 for use on my Olympus
SZX12 stereomicroscope when working on-site. When asked, I recommend both
cameras.

I chose the C-3040 because Olympus sells a fixed tubelength adapter
(C2000Z-ADP) that mounts to the trinocular head of the Olympus
stereomicroscope (and my Continuum infrared microscope, which was
manufactured using Olympus components). The adapter makes the camera
parfocal on Olympus microscopes -- no need to focus an adapter. Also, the
C-3040 comes with a remote shutter release as a standard accessory.

Performance on and off the microscopes has been outstanding. In addition to
making still micrographs, I use the camera to record digital video of
solubility and microchemical tests for clients and colleagues. The live
video out function makes focusing and instruction easy (I use a Sony
Trinitron 13 monitor on road trips, or an inexpensive monochrome monitor
when I fly).

I also used the camera to record my son's first rookie hit in Little League.
What does the commercial say? Priceless.

James Martin
Orion Analytical, LLC
Post Office Box 550
Williamstown, MA 01267
t: 413-458-0233 f. 413-458-5542
www.orionanalytical.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Tina Carvalho" {tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu}
To: "Microscopy Listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 1:56 PM


Are you referring to the EMSA format when you are referring to the ZAL format? If you are, there is a program in the EMSA/MAS library that I put in called "EELS_Plot" this last summer. I am about to send Nestor a newer version of this to replace it. It will plot EELS and EDS data in EMSA format and do a few other things as well. If you want to color, display, compare, subtract background, rescale, and display up to five spectra, copy to window applications, and keep notes, this program will do it. If you can't wait, send me your address, and I will send you a copy on CD.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Pradyumna Prabhumirashi [mailto:p-prabhumirashi-at-northwestern.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 04, 2002 11:25 PM
To: Microscopy Listserver (Microscopy Listserver)



Hello,

I need some help in converting some raw EELS data into formats readable
by either EL/P or digital micrograph. The data I have gathered is in
.ZAL (Zaluzek) format. The data looks very similar to the .TAD format.
Let me know if there is a program that reads .ZAL format and converts it
to .TAD or even two column text. Perhaps Nestor would be able to help in
this regard, right? :).
Thanks in advance,

Prad

Pradyumna Prabhumirashi
Dept. of Materials Science
Northwestern University
Phone: (847)491-7798
Fax : (847)491-7820




From daemon Tue Feb 5 17:34:33 2002



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 17:29:16 -0600
Subject: EDS Noran file availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We are using a Noran Voyager 3.3 energy dispersive analyzer to
generate linescan analyses across catalyst granules. We would like to
obtain the data in a spreadsheet format (like Excel or even ASCII)
for use outside of the Noran system. We are able to open regular
analyses saved in the MSA format but the linescans can not be saved
in this format.

Does anyone know how this could be done?

As always, we are very appreciative of any help that you might provide.

JB

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/departments/shops/cem.html
##############################################################


From daemon Tue Feb 5 18:42:16 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 19:34:25 EST
Subject: Re: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 2/5/02 5:11:37 PM, neuberger1234-at-attbi.com writes:

} Next we are hoping to be able to write a plug-in that will create a history
} text file to document each change to a photograph. I asked Adobe if they
} could do that and the person said that it would be feasible but apparently
} not enough demand, yet.

The need to document each step in the image processing chain is also
important for forensic applications. You should check with Chris Russ at
Reindeer Graphics (jcr6-at-AOL.com), who has been working on that need and may
have some ideas or even a plug-in for you to use.



From daemon Tue Feb 5 19:11:06 2002



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2002 20:07:21 -0800
Subject: Re: EM safety and family plan

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} Leona,

What worked for this lab was to ask the female employee in
question to inform you when she intended to become pregnant and then to
arrange for someone in the lab to take responsibility for sample
preparation during the "intention period", 9 months of pregnancy, the
maternity leave and the additional months during which the mother was
nursing the child. This amounted to a substantial amount of time in our
case but I felt better about taking on the added responsibility rather than
deal with possibly serious consequences after the fact.
Rosemary Walsh




From daemon Tue Feb 5 20:21:45 2002



From: gtg990a-at-prism.gatech.edu
Date: Tue, 05 Feb 2002 22:14:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dr. Russ,
We have already contacted Chris and are working on an agreement to help us,
or write for us, the plug-in(s). though someone who reports to me is
handling this, I will be calling Chris myself to discuss it. It is
something that I would like to make available to everybody when done,
perhaps through the IPTK next version.

Damian Neuberger
P.S. I hope that I can take the class this time around, last time I had to
cancel due to travel restrictions.


----- Original Message -----
} From: {DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com}
To: {neuberger1234-at-attbi.com} ; {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 6:34 PM


To whom it may concern:

I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
get answered ASAP:

1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for microscopy
rather than light?
2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
microscope?

Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
understand more of this subject.

Sincerely,
Jenny Wang

-------------------------------------------------
Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/


From daemon Wed Feb 6 02:26:50 2002



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 09:17:31 +0100
Subject: LM - geometry and analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am looking around for information about geometry based algorithms for
analysis of microscopy images. I have some experience with this kind of
algorithms, which are extremely powerful but somewhat CPU-hungry and I
am looking for improvements.

On the top my personal website you will find examples about what I mean
with geometry based analysis of microscopy images of cells and tissues:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm

By the way I also made a webpage about microsocpy and imaging, which
could be useful
for other people too:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/pcrimg.htm

Best regards,

Dr. Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations

Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium

tel.: +32 (0)14 570 619
fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

WWW: www.unionbio.com


From daemon Wed Feb 6 03:26:34 2002



From: David Vowles :      djv23-at-msm.cam.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 09:19:58 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: EDS Noran file availability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,

You wrote:

} We are using a Noran Voyager 3.3 energy dispersive analyzer to
} generate linescan analyses across catalyst granules. We would like to
} obtain the data in a spreadsheet format (like Excel or even ASCII)
} for use outside of the Noran system. We are able to open regular
} analyses saved in the MSA format but the linescans can not be saved
} in this format.
}
} Does anyone know how this could be done?

I have written an application to read the various Voyager file formats
(.eds,.lscan,.grey,.xray) on a PC and display/export data in text format.
For the linescan format it will display the image file with line and each
of the linescans graphs. These can be exported to a text file for use in
Excel, etc. I can let you have a copy of this if you wish.


David Vowles
Electron Microscope Unit
Dept of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge
Pembroke St Cambridge
UK CB2 3QZ
Tel: +44 1223 334325
Fax: +44 1223 334567
Email: djv23-at-cam.ac.uk




From daemon Wed Feb 6 04:23:56 2002



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 11:17:21 +0100
Subject: LM - geometry and analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I am looking around for information about geometry based algorithms for
analysis of microscopy images. I have some experience with this kind of
algorithms, which are extremely powerful but somewhat CPU-hungry and I
am looking for improvements.

On the top my personal website you will find examples about what I mean
with geometry based analysis of microscopy images of cells and tissues:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm

By the way I also made a webpage about microsocpy and imaging, which
could be useful
for other people too:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/pcrimg.htm

Best regards,

Dr. Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations

Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium

tel.: +32 (0)14 570 619
fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

WWW: www.unionbio.com


From daemon Wed Feb 6 08:43:28 2002



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 08:34:47 -0600
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
in this way.


}
}
} To whom it may concern:
}
} I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} Technology.
} I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} get answered ASAP:
}
} 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} microscopy
} rather than light?
} 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} microscope?
}
} Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} understand more of this subject.
}
} Sincerely,
} Jenny Wang
}
} -------------------------------------------------
} Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/

--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Wed Feb 6 09:19:29 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 08:15:31 -0700
Subject: Re: micron bars in Photoshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Damian,

as you have probably noticed, 21CFR Part 11 is a pretty tough cookie, and in
fact involves more than one piece of software. If you read it closely,
you'll find that it involves the operating system, as well as Operating
Procedures, which are outside the realm of any single software. We have
found a solution to this, but I don't want to advertise this here, so please
contact me off-line if you are interested.

Also, regarding the micron bars, I'd like to mention, that this is always an
afterthought for Photoshop. John Russ has done a good job providing some
features to put a scale bar on the image, but for a comprehensive solution,
I think there are other solutions. We, for example (and other programs
probably as well) make sure, that an image is calibrated from the start by
either reding the calibration or magnification from the instrument or
entering the magnification by hand. The scale bar is then displayed at any
time in the viewport. We found, that a scale bar attached to the image or
the overlay is not the best solution in many cases. For example, if you have
a large image, the size of the scale bar depends on the "screen
magnification": if you set that to 100%, the scale bar has a good size to
see, but you may not see it because the image does not fit on the screen. If
you fit the image to the screen, the scale bar may be too small to read. We
tried to solve this problem by calculating the scale bar dynamically and
displaying it as a part of the viewport, not the image (unless, of course,
you want to attach it to the image).

Finally, I'd like to announce that we moved to new locations in Lakewood.
Please make a note of our new address.

Mike Bode

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Damian Neuberger [mailto:neuberger1234-at-attbi.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 2:43 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Listers,

My requirements are that I have to put a label as well as a scale bar on
each optical micrograph and burn CD to archive, all with GLP documentation
(we are working towards a 21CFR Part 11 compliant system). I have
calibrated our research microscope with various optical systems and
photoeyepieces as well as a new macroscope and created about 100 scale bars.
We then automated the whole process as much as we could using Actions and
Droplets and a Word macro to create a label as well as a list of all the
files burned on a CD by filling in a form.

Next we are hoping to be able to write a plug-in that will create a history
text file to document each change to a photograph. I asked Adobe if they
could do that and the person said that it would be feasible but apparently
not enough demand, yet.

Damian Neuberger, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp.
Tel: 847.270.5888
damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com


From daemon Wed Feb 6 09:50:41 2002



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 10:42:49 EST
Subject: Re: NIST-traceable stage micrometer?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 02/05/2002 8:42:07 AM US Mountain Standard Time,
David_R_Stadden-at-armstrong.com-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

{ { I've been asked if the stage micrometers I use for calibrating our optical
scopes are NIST-traceable. Is there such a thing and, if not, what would
satisfy requirements for ISO certification in the area of metrology?

Thanks!

Dave Stadden
Research Scientist
Armstrong World Industries, Inc.
Lancaster, PA
} }

Dave,

Yes, there is such a thing. You can get a stage micrometer that's
NIST-traceable from:

Klarmann Rulings
480 Charles Bancroft Highway
Litchfield, NH 03052
Tel. 800-252-2401
Fax 603-424-0970

If I recall correctly, you pay a minimum fee for certification of a set
number of points on the scale (you can specify which points on the scale are
to be certified). You can also pay a minimal fee to certify additional
points above the minimum number.

The folks at Klarmann can help you with this.

Good luck!

Bob Chiovetti
GTI Microsystems


From daemon Wed Feb 6 10:54:45 2002



From: Brian Wajdyk :      electronmicroscopist-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 09:46:49 -0700
Subject: measurement and calibration onthe SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fellow Microscopists,

SEM has historically been used for metrology of various structures. I can't
seem to find much literature about the artifacts associated with this type
of measurement. We do use the NIST standards to check the calibration of
our equipment, but I haven't characterized how the different beam or sample
parameters effect the measurements. What do you do? Has anyone figured out
his or her actual accuracy and precision? We have found that we can safely
give measurements within +/-5% taking into account most human and equipment
errors. This is based on the precision of measurements made of NIST
structures, measured the same way, over several years. On the other hand,
the smallest structure we can measure on the standard is 2um (line and
space. How do you determine at what magnification you will no longer
guarantee the measurement? I see that my MRS-3 from Geller says it's for
10x to 50kX. How do they figure out that the max magnification it is
useful? Maybe it as simple as being able to fit the structure on the
screen. If that were true, you would expect that the instrument would also
be calibrated to a much higher magnification. How high could I say it is
accurate to? Can I safely measure a 1000A line assuming no obvious issues
(i.e. drift)? Can anyone educate me more on this topic or point me to
resources?


Things that could effect measurements (feel free to add to list):
Drift (mechanical / beam)
Charging (obvious or stretching of image from a slow scan)
Magnification (adjusted for each set of lens relays)
kV (surface vs. subsurface image)
Working Distance
Delineation method (raised vs. depression, materials contrast)
Amount of delineation (3D effect)
Resolution (near resolution limit of SEM?)
Contrast (or lack of, bright / dark line)
Edge effect (bright line)
Consistency between tools (calibration, etc.)
Consistency between methods (SEM, TEM, ellipsometry, AFM, etc.)
Operator's eye (where to measure. Measure outside to inside, center to
center, out to out, in to in?)
Variance in measured layer thickness (topography, sloped profile (i.e. base
larger than top))
Angle to beam
Preparation methods (polish (i.e. smearing), cleave (i.e. pull of soft
material), FIB (i.e. angle))
Type of algorithm if doing it automatically (i.e. %50 threshold)





_________________________________________________________________
MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos:
http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx



From daemon Wed Feb 6 11:02:13 2002



From: Dave Hall :      daveh-at-restechimage.com
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 11:54:52 -0500
Subject: NIST-traceable stage micrometer?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, NIST-traceable stage micrometers do exist. At least one place they
are available from is Klarmann Rulings (www.reticles.com).

We have utilized these NIST-traceable micrometers in previous systems
we've implemented with much success.

Good Luck

*Kind Regards,
*Dave Hall
*Resolution Technology, Inc - (614) 921-0045
*Please visit our website at http://www.restechimage.com to find our
Optimas training schedule and other useful information.


-----Original Message-----
} From: David_R_Stadden-at-armstrong.com
[mailto:David_R_Stadden-at-armstrong.com]On Behalf Of
"David_R_Stadden-at-armstrong.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 10:29 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




I've been asked if the stage micrometers I use for calibrating our
optical
scopes are NIST-traceable. Is there such a thing and, if not, what
would
satisfy requirements for ISO certification in the area of metrology?

Thanks!

Dave Stadden
Research Scientist
Armstrong World Industries, Inc.
Lancaster, PA





From daemon Wed Feb 6 12:04:01 2002



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 11:56:15 -0600
Subject: UPS systems and microtome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am looking for a space in my lab for installation of
2 UPS systems (6 and 8 kVa) from Hitachi. One of the options
is to install them in the same room where ultramicrotome is.
I do not like this option, but space is tight. I appreciate
any comments about microtome performance in the presence of
UPS. Microtome is sitting on the air antivibration table.

Thank you,

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



From daemon Wed Feb 6 12:05:07 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 13:00:41 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Tom Phillips wrote:

} I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} in this way.

Good for you!!

I sent the young lady the same message via private e-mail. I wonder if the
instructor knows about this sort of "research"?

} } To whom it may concern:
} }
} } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } Technology.
} } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} } get answered ASAP:
} }
} } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } microscopy
} } rather than light?
} } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } microscope?
} }
} } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } understand more of this subject.
} }
} } Sincerely,
} } Jenny Wang
} }
} } -------------------------------------------------
} } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
}
} --
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Wed Feb 6 12:33:21 2002



From: curari-at-asu.edu
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 11:27:12 -0700 (MST)
Subject: ISI SX-40 Help w/ type of video signal?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Lister

I would like to thank those who gave me some input to my first
delimma.

I found that there are a ton of different frame grabbers out
there. What I dont know is what kind of output signal the scope produces, as
far as my understanding of the ISI SX-40 SEM it puts a signal out to the
CRT. Some of the venders' questions have been if it is an NTSC, PAL, or
RS170 type signal.I am slightly familiar with the first two, but the latter I
have no idea. I do know that there are a couple of "off the shelf" products
from GW Electronics and Image Slave, but these setups are priced at
$4000+. So what I am looking for is if someone
can point me in the direction of where I can reseach this information.



Wil

This email was sent with 100.00% recycled electrons.

P.S. This is a project that hopefully will get students involved with
microcopy from our Biology and Chemistry departments in order to familiarize
the students with instrumentation available in their area of study.



From daemon Wed Feb 6 13:38:25 2002



From: Jinguo Wang :      jqw11-at-psu.edu
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 15:27:20 -0500
Subject: Epson scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Torino 06 February 2002

Dear Dr. P. Van Osta,

you could try this website of Florence University:

http://www.unifi.it/unifi/dbag/lbs1/lbsdip.htm

(sorry...it is in Italian)
and mail to Dr. Stefano Bianchi at this address:
stefano.bianchi-at-dbag.unifi.it

Good luck.
Best Regards,
Ing. Massimo Tosi
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Peter Van Osta" {pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com}
To: "Microscopy" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 9:17 AM


Dear Lister:

I have a Epson scanner (Perfection 1200 Photo) with a transparency adaptor.
Recently, we have some problems when we scan the negative films. The
pre-scan image looks pretty nice after some adjustment, but the final scan
image is too dark almost just a piece of black stuff.
Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks

Jinguo Wang










From daemon Wed Feb 6 14:35:22 2002



From: tartenon-at-netscape.net
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 15:28:35 -0500
Subject: RE: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nikon Coolpix 995 has 2.3Megapixels non-interpolated

Tina Carvalho {tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




__________________________________________________________________
Your favorite stores, helpful shopping tools and great gift ideas. Experience the convenience of buying online with Shop-at-Netscape! http://shopnow.netscape.com/

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From daemon Wed Feb 6 15:03:04 2002



From: NPGSlithography-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 15:54:32 EST
Subject: Re: Environmental Noise Impacting JEOL 848 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Curtis,

} I operate a JEOL 848 SEM but am limited to less than 30,000x due to at
least
} two frequencies of external noise. The service engineers from JEOL have
} determined the noise is not due to the SEM. I will be conducting as much of
a
} room survey as possible later in February but I am hoping to obtain some
} insight into common testing formats, noise sources, and solutions. From
what
} I have been able to learn so far, this noise reduction is something of an
art
} rather than science. Thank you in advance from this microscopist with much
to
} learn.

I agree that the other responses have very good points.

In addition, if the problem is actually caused by magnetic fields interacting
with the beam, it should get worse at lower kV and at longer working
distances. Do you know the frequencies of the interference? If so, that can
be a very good clue as to its source.

Also, a digital gauss meter that I have found very useful for locating
sources of magnetic fields can be purchased for under $100 US [see the Extech
Model #480823 at www.MetersandInstruments.com, (800) 773-0370, - I have no
financial interest in this company]. This meter makes frequency independent
RMS readings between 30 and 300 Hz. Since line frequency and harmonics are
the most common fields, it works very well.

With such a digital meter, or even a coil of wire connected to an
oscilloscope to act as an uncalibrated magnetic field meter, you can first
check for field strength near the chamber. If a significant magnetic field
(i.e., } 1 mG rms) is observed, it can often be tracked back to the source by
moving the meter around. If the field simply "fills the room", it may be
from a power line with an unbalanced load. For example, if the current runs
on the "hot" wire, but does not return on the neutral or ground wire, then a
large magnetic field will be generated, while normally there are equal and
opposite currents which cancel at any significant distance. In this case,
the wires themselves can be outside the room and the actual wiring problem
may be anywhere in the building!

As a final comment, a good check on environmental problems is simply to come
in after hours when other equipment is more likely to be turned off (or to go
around and turn off everything that you can, but that is typically limited to
your immediate lab). For example, I have watched a gauss meter go from
showing a low field to a significant field simultaneously as an image at high
mag degraded with line frequency interference. The source of the field was
discovered to be power lines outside the SEM room that supplied power to a
laser several labs away. When the laser operator started working in the
morning and increased the laser power, the meter and SEM display clearly
showed the interference.

Good luck.

Joe
_________________________________________
Joe Nabity, Ph.D.
JC Nabity Lithography Systems
E-Beam Lithography using Commercial SEMs & STEMs
PO Box 5354, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA
Voice: (406) 587-0848
FAX: (406) 586-9514
E-mail: info-at-jcnabity.com
Web: www.jcnabity.com


From daemon Wed Feb 6 15:11:24 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 11:05:00 -1000 (HST)
Subject: RE: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Wed Feb 6 15:39:49 2002



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 15:30:35 -0600
Subject: RE: measurement and calibration onthe SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} -----Original Message-----
} From: Brian Wajdyk [mailto:electronmicroscopist-at-hotmail.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 10:47 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: measurement and calibration onthe SEM
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Fellow Microscopists,
}
} SEM has historically been used for metrology of various
} structures. I can't
} seem to find much literature about the artifacts associated
} with this type
} of measurement. We do use the NIST standards to check the
} calibration of
} our equipment, but I haven't characterized how the different
} beam or sample
} parameters effect the measurements. What do you do? Has
} anyone figured out
} his or her actual accuracy and precision? We have found that
} we can safely
} give measurements within +/-5% taking into account most human
} and equipment
} errors. This is based on the precision of measurements made of NIST
} structures, measured the same way, over several years. On
} the other hand,
} the smallest structure we can measure on the standard is 2um
} (line and
} space. How do you determine at what magnification you will no longer

Cheap grating replicas with 2600 lines per mm give 0.46 um per line,
and this is not too bad for calibrating 50,000 magnification. I am
happy I do not need certified standards.

} guarantee the measurement? I see that my MRS-3 from Geller
} says it's for
} 10x to 50kX. How do they figure out that the max magnification it is
} useful? Maybe it as simple as being able to fit the structure on the

Maximum useful magnification is very specimen dependant, especially
for low voltage and low vacuum modes. Of course, for digital images
it is possible to check brightness profiles and if they have slopes
on edges of features, then measure "size" on half height of the slope.
But I am not aware about publications which dependably justify this kind
of measurements (manipulations with brightness and contrast and
specimen tilt could change slopes significantly).

} screen. If that were true, you would expect that the
} instrument would also
} be calibrated to a much higher magnification. How high could
} I say it is
} accurate to? Can I safely measure a 1000A line assuming no

It depends on resolution for your microscope/specimens and on
calibration standard you are using. And I think periodic lines with
spacing 2 um not really good standard to measure feature with
the size of 0.1 um.

} obvious issues
} (i.e. drift)? Can anyone educate me more on this topic or

If you have visible drift during single exposure, then something
wrong with microscope or specimen preparation technique.

} point me to
} resources?
}
}
} Things that could effect measurements (feel free to add to list):
} Drift (mechanical / beam)-

exposure time should be small for significant drift.

} Charging (obvious or stretching of image from a slow scan)
} Magnification (adjusted for each set of lens relays)

Could be eliminated with proper calibration.

} kV (surface vs. subsurface image)
} Working Distance

Could be eliminated with proper calibration.

} Delineation method (raised vs. depression, materials contrast)
} Amount of delineation (3D effect)
} Resolution (near resolution limit of SEM?)
} Contrast (or lack of, bright / dark line)
} Edge effect (bright line)
} Consistency between tools (calibration, etc.)
} Consistency between methods (SEM, TEM, ellipsometry, AFM, etc.)
} Operator's eye (where to measure. Measure outside to inside,
} center to
} center, out to out, in to in?)
} Variance in measured layer thickness (topography, sloped
} profile (i.e. base
} larger than top))
} Angle to beam
} Preparation methods (polish (i.e. smearing), cleave (i.e.
} pull of soft
} material), FIB (i.e. angle))
} Type of algorithm if doing it automatically (i.e. %50 threshold)

Some of the things you have mentioned relate to specimen/experiment,
to stereology, but not to microscope. For example, if I need to measure
size of depression without sharp edges, I have to find (or at least to
declare)right procedure for it's measurements. May be I have to perform
stereo measurements and define an edge as a place, where a depth of
depression become equal to 0.1 um (or 10% of total depth, or
whatever else, depending on a study).

And thank you for your extensive list - it is very helpful for
observation of the problem. And about additions to your list -
I think everybody can say something. For example recently I tried
to measure in ESEM thickness of a layer which, as it turned out,
was a viscous liquid...

Regards,

Vladimir


Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



From daemon Wed Feb 6 15:41:31 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 11:35:53 -1000 (HST)
Subject: RE: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Wed, 6 Feb 2002 tartenon-at-netscape.net-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} Nikon Coolpix 995 has 2.3Megapixels non-interpolated

You made me check into this! Nikon advertises 3.2 megapixels for the
Coolpix 995, and Olympus advertises 4 megapixels for the C-4040, but BOTH
really deliver 2048 x 1536 pixels. Interesting marketing.

They are basically the same technology, with the only difference being the
menus and availability of adapters, I guess. And now all the adapters are
available all kinds of places, so I guess it's a matter of taste. There
aer other manini (a manini is a small fish) differences in number of
threads, recording media, stuff like that.

Mahalo,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Wed Feb 6 16:18:50 2002



From: Marti, Jordi :      jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2002 14:55:44 -0700
Subject: Ceramic Insulator for Hitachi H800 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello!

We have a Hitachi H800 TEM (200 Kev,LaB6) and a few days ago we started having problems with the HV. Static discharges
in the gun area (even at 75 KeV) were traced back to the failed insulator. Hitachi is trying to get us new one, but they
tell me it could take several months since this is normally not a stock item. If any body out there has one that they
are willing to part with (for money) or if any body has other suggestions I would really appreciate your input.

Thanks

Jordi Marti


From daemon Wed Feb 6 17:59:53 2002



From: Mark YEADON :      m-yeadon-at-imre.org.sg
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 10:49:15 +0800
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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RS-170 refers to composite b/w video. NTSC refers
to composite color video added to the RS-170 format.
Composite means that the video signal and sync
pulses (H & V & blanking) are conveyed via a single wire.

If I recall the SX-40 correctly (let me know if I am
wrong on this), it has a TV rate display for focusing
and stig and eye-ball viewing, but image recording is/was
via the slow scan high rez short persistence 2K line
film recorder CRT. This poses a significant problem
for image capture.

RS-170 video is interlaced between even/odd lines (fields).
One frame (two fields) is not presented
at the same time. The rapid scan (60/s per field)
and the persistence of the viewing CRT, fool the eye
into being able to see integrated sets of lines. A
frame grabber can't be fooled. The purpose of interlacing
is to reduce flicker which would occur if the whole frame
were sent at one time.

The RS-170 format is essentially a frame of 640x480
pixels. But the problem is that to capture the whole
frame, one needs to store the even and odd fields
and then grab the frame. This feature is typically
called an image buffer or frame buffer. Its output
is RS-170 but consisting of a full frame, either
realtime or the result of slow scan.

I don't think you have this in the SX-40. Your only
option, as I see it, is to get a passive capture
system which is attached to the recording CRT.
The passive capture systems connect to the
recording CRT's H & V sync pulses and the
blanking pulse. GW makes passive capture systems,
Soft Imaging does, as do others. But as you have
found, these are not cheap systems. In some
cases, the hardware is not particularly complex.
But the software is.

The passive system follows the scan pulses
from the SEM's scan generator and uses an
A/D converter to sequentially digitize the output
of the SE detector. A challenge with this is
to obtain fidelity between what is seen versus
what is captured. i.e., same contrast and
brightness on the viewing screen as on the
captured image. Doable, once set up properly.

Perhaps you could elicit the assistance of the
Electrical Engineering Department? Some
clever grad student might love to undertake a
project to digitize your SEM.

gary g.


At 10:27 AM 2/6/2002, you wrote:
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Wil,

the answer is fairly simple:

A "video signal" is commonly referred to if the signal follows the standards
set for commercial TV. This allows you to take a camera and connect it
directly to a TV or VCR. As you probably know, there are different standards
in the US and Europe. NTSC is the signal used for color data in the US and
Japan, PAL is the signal used for color data in Europe and other places,
RS170 is for b/w signals. Some frame grabbers can understand all of these
signals, others only one or two.

The problem with a video signal is, that the resolution is very low
(480x640x8bits for NTSC).

If you use the SEM in "slow scan mode", most frame grabbers will not be able
to detect the correct signal because it does not conform to the NTSC or PAL
standards anymore. Then you need to get special electronics, which is not
made in large numbers and is therefore more expensive.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: "curari-at-asu.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"curari-at-asu.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 11:27 AM
To: MSA


Dear Lister

I would like to thank those who gave me some input to my first
delimma.

I found that there are a ton of different frame grabbers out
there. What I dont know is what kind of output signal the scope produces,
as
far as my understanding of the ISI SX-40 SEM it puts a signal out to the
CRT. Some of the venders' questions have been if it is an NTSC, PAL, or
RS170 type signal.I am slightly familiar with the first two, but the latter
I
have no idea. I do know that there are a couple of "off the shelf" products
from GW Electronics and Image Slave, but these setups are priced at
$4000+. So what I am looking for is if someone
can point me in the direction of where I can reseach this information.



Wil

This email was sent with 100.00% recycled electrons.

P.S. This is a project that hopefully will get students involved with
microcopy from our Biology and Chemistry departments in order to familiarize
the students with instrumentation available in their area of study.



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Dear Jenny,

We're glad that you are interested in microscopy, and that you did some
research to find this list: below are a few pointers to get you started.
There are some excellent texts on the subject, some of which I cite below
from my own lecture course, but check out your own library too. Also, there
are some very well known electron microscopists at Georgia Tech whom you
could consult with - be brave and go say hi! You will find the majority of
scientists (microscopists included) are always glad of an excuse to wax
eloquent on their favorite subject, esp over coffee. I guess the best
advice is always to talk to the experts, unless forbidden by your instructor
(which I would doubt - our instructors always encouraged our intiative in
these matters!)

Best wishes for your studies,

Mark

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Mark Yeadon
Senior Research Fellow
Institute of Materials Research and Engineering
3 Research Link
Singapore 117602

Assistant Professor
Department of Materials Science
National University of Singapore
Singapore 119260
http://www.matsci.nus.edu.sg/STAFF/Mark.html

TEL: (+65) 874 8591
FAX: (+65) 872 0785
Email: m-yeadon-at-imre.org.sg


} -----Original Message-----
} From: "gtg990a-at-prism.gatech.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} [SMTP:"gtg990a-at-prism.gatech.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 11:14 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Questions on the Electron Microscope
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} To whom it may concern:
}
} I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} Technology.
} I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
}
} solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope
} will
} get answered ASAP:
}
} 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} microscopy
} rather than light?
[Mark YEADON]
couple of advantages: electrons have a shorter wavelength (much
shorter); since resolution in this case is dependent on wavelength (Abbe's
expression - resolution ~ 0.61 x wavelength / sin alpha [see texts for
fuller explanation]) - in principle we can resolve distances of a fraction
of an atom with 100kV electrons). Also, electrons are IONIZING radiation,
and we can detect signals arising from ionization processes when they
interact with our sample (such as characteristic x-rays, charcteristic of
the atoms the electron has interacted with in your sample)

couple of disadvantages: electrons require a vacuum if you want
them to travel enough distance to be of use in an electron microscope. this
is expensive and requires substantial maintenance. electron guns and
columns are much bigger and more complex than a regular light microscope -
equates to dollars!

However, because the value of alpha (in above equation) is so much
smaller for electron microscopes you also get an amazingly high depth of
field (see texts below for a derivation - esp the first three). ie, you can
see 3D objects such as bugs in clear focus over the entire sample in a
scanning electron microscope with marvelous resolution, whereas in the light
microscope only one small part of the bug will be in focus at high
magnification...

} 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythin to do with the
} spatial
} resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
[Mark YEADON] Absolutely - see above.

} 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} microscope?
}
[Mark YEADON] Spatial resolution relates to dimensions of distance,
for a 200kV TEM with thermionic emission gun you would expect about
2Angstroms spatial resolution. Temporal resolution would relate to time,
and I'm guessing you're thinking of the time taken to capture images - this
would depend upon the imaging system you are using. How quickly can you
record 'frames', one after the other. We get 1/30s temporal resolution for
in-situ experiments quite ok. In principle you can go much better than this
with a very fast CCD camera and a high intensity electron beam. (The more
electrons you have per unit time, the more electrons you can get per frame,
and the better the signal to noise ratio - the limit is usually the
recording equipment (signal to nosie ratio of the CCD chip) and not the TEM.

} Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} understand more of this subject.
[Mark YEADON]
You're most welcome. We love our subject and are delighted to help
you in your understanding. See if you have any of the following in your
library, although there are many other good ones also:

Transmission Electron Microscopy, DB Williams and CB Carter
Electron Microscopy and Analysis, Goodhew and Humphreys
Light and Electron Microscopy, Slayter and Slayter
Handbook Of Microscopy, ed. by S. Amelinckx et al., Wiley -VCH

} Sincerely,
} Jenny Wang
}
} -------------------------------------------------
} Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/


From daemon Thu Feb 7 00:58:03 2002



From: pjfenneran-at-msn.com ()
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 00:39:32 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM of Ecoli bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (pjfenneran-at-msn.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
February 6, 2002 at 10:05:13
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: pjfenneran-at-msn.com
Name: Patrick Fenneran

Organization: Florida Institute of Technology

Education: Graduate College

Location: Melbourne, Florida

Question: I am using an Zeiss 900m TEM looking at E.coli and have the
following questions:

1. The formvar/carbon grids keep on getting blown out, like there is
too much power or the beam is too concentrated.

2. When I am taking pictures, the bacteria do not have resolution,
which adjustments should I make?

3. Do you know of any paperwork that can be obtained that explains
the operation the components of the machine, the only book I have is
the one that came with the machine and it is partly in German.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Feb 7 02:45:17 2002



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 08:48:55 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Ceramic Insulator for Hitachi H800 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jordi,

Sorry to hear about the insulator.

It depends exactly what you mean by 'failed' but we have
had success cleaning ceramic insulators that have been
subjected to tracking of the HT. Even quite deep arcing
tracks have been cleaned out and when returned to service
have worked OK. If they are on the vacuum side they are
just left alone, if they are on a greased joining surface
we ensure that the grease gets well down into the cleaned
track.

I don't know the type of insulator Hitachi use on your
machine but you may be able clean tracks out by polishing
with Al2O3 paste (5um Al2O3 in alcohol). If this does not
work try shot blasting the ceramic with clean Al2O3 beads.
After polishing or blasting blow off with clean N2 (from a
regulated cylinder), clean in several washes of alcohol in
an ultrasonic bath until there is no trace of alumina in
the alcohol and bake out in a clean vacuum oven overnight.
If you cannot get a vacuum oven then heating in air and a
very long pumpout in a vacuum rig may work. It will take a
couple of days but it may get you up and running and may
even save you buying a replacement insulator.

Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for people not
applying common sense to any of the procedures descibed. If
you do not have good technical experience and skills you
are likely to cause further damage.

Good luck,
Ron

On Wed, 6 Feb 2002 14:55:44 -0700 "Marti, Jordi"
{jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello!
}
} We have a Hitachi H800 TEM (200 Kev,LaB6) and a few days ago we started having problems with the HV. Static discharges
} in the gun area (even at 75 KeV) were traced back to the failed insulator. Hitachi is trying to get us new one, but they
} tell me it could take several months since this is normally not a stock item. If any body out there has one that they
} are willing to part with (for money) or if any body has other suggestions I would really appreciate your input.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk



From daemon Thu Feb 7 06:12:30 2002



From: best.defense101-at-laposte.net
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 04:58:50 -0700
Subject: Thank You For Your Interest.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Thu Feb 7 07:36:18 2002



From: Windland, Mark J (MN14) :      Mark.Windland-at-honeywell.com
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 07:32:30 -0600
Subject: EDS system pricing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have blown the window on our old Noran EDS detector. I would like to
find out an approximate price on a new system within about 10k. We would
like to replace the old one. Before we get the formal quotes, I though a
few of you that have recently purchased systems could give me a ballpark
price.
Thanks,

Mark Windland
Honeywell
Minneapolis, Minnesota
763-954-2845



From daemon Thu Feb 7 07:37:06 2002



From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 08:31:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Tom:

I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
raising the issue.

Don


On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:

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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} in this way.
}
}
} }
} }
} } To whom it may concern:
} }
} } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } Technology.
} } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} } get answered ASAP:
} }
} } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } microscopy
} } rather than light?
} } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } microscope?
} }
} } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } understand more of this subject.
} }
} } Sincerely,
} } Jenny Wang
} }
} } -------------------------------------------------
} } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
}
} --
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)
}
}

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718





From daemon Thu Feb 7 08:22:09 2002



From: Visitec-at-t-online.de (Martin Klein)
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 15:08:09 +0100
Subject: AW: Ceramic Insulator for Hitachi H800 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jordi,

We had the same problem with the ceramic insulator (sounds like a law of
nature...). A big help in our case was a dentist. He has much experience in
cleaning ceramic and the perfect tools for doing this job. So my advice is
to bring the part to be cleaned to a dentist in your neighborhood.

Best regards
Martin

VisiTec Microtechnik GmbH
Karl-Marx-Str. 14
D-23936 Grevesmuehlen/Germany
Fon: +49-3881-79049
Fax: +49-3881-79048

email: mklein-at-visitec-em.de
WWW: http://www.visitec-em.de
++++ Home of the world`s largest SEM ++++



-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: rdoole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk [mailto:rdoole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk]Im
Auftrag von Ron Doole
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 7. Februar 2002 09:49
An: 'Microscopy'
Betreff: Re: Ceramic Insulator for Hitachi H800 TEM


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hi Jordi,

Sorry to hear about the insulator.

It depends exactly what you mean by 'failed' but we have
had success cleaning ceramic insulators that have been
subjected to tracking of the HT. Even quite deep arcing
tracks have been cleaned out and when returned to service
have worked OK. If they are on the vacuum side they are
just left alone, if they are on a greased joining surface
we ensure that the grease gets well down into the cleaned
track.

I don't know the type of insulator Hitachi use on your
machine but you may be able clean tracks out by polishing
with Al2O3 paste (5um Al2O3 in alcohol). If this does not
work try shot blasting the ceramic with clean Al2O3 beads.
After polishing or blasting blow off with clean N2 (from a
regulated cylinder), clean in several washes of alcohol in
an ultrasonic bath until there is no trace of alumina in
the alcohol and bake out in a clean vacuum oven overnight.
If you cannot get a vacuum oven then heating in air and a
very long pumpout in a vacuum rig may work. It will take a
couple of days but it may get you up and running and may
even save you buying a replacement insulator.

Disclaimer: I take no responsibility for people not
applying common sense to any of the procedures descibed. If
you do not have good technical experience and skills you
are likely to cause further damage.

Good luck,
Ron

On Wed, 6 Feb 2002 14:55:44 -0700 "Marti, Jordi"
{jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello!
}
} We have a Hitachi H800 TEM (200 Kev,LaB6) and a few days ago we started
having problems with the HV. Static discharges
} in the gun area (even at 75 KeV) were traced back to the failed insulator.
Hitachi is trying to get us new one, but they
} tell me it could take several months since this is normally not a stock
item. If any body out there has one that they
} are willing to part with (for money) or if any body has other suggestions
I would really appreciate your input.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jordi Marti
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk




From daemon Thu Feb 7 08:39:27 2002



From: Lou Bustillos :      lbustillos-at-amalab.com
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 09:52:48 -0500
Subject: Carbon Coater Help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

I have just been given the approval to purchase a new carbon coater. We are looking for a model that doesn't use a water source. We have an existing Denton 502A that we are going to change to a backup system. It has been a workhorse for us for the past 14 years.(Up and running six hours a day.)

At your lab, what has been a proven carbon coater that will last?

I need to submit three vendors to my boss before he will approve a purchase of a new carbon coater. As you can see I have been out of the loop on carbon coaters for fourteen years so any information will help me tremendously.

Thank you for your help.

Luis Bustillos
AMA Analytical Services, Inc.
lbustillos-at-amalab.com


From daemon Thu Feb 7 08:43:07 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 09:36:14 -0500
Subject: Re: Epson scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} Dear Lister:
}
} I have a Epson scanner (Perfection 1200 Photo) with a transparency
} adaptor. Recently, we have some problems when we scan the negative
} films. The pre-scan image looks pretty nice after some adjustment,
} but the final scan image is too dark almost just a piece of black
} stuff.
} Any help will be appreciated.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jinguo Wang
********
I have an Epson Expression 1600 and had the same problem. My
solution was to select "TPU for Pos film" which does not do the
automatic inversion. I then use the Invert function in Photoshop to
reverse the contrast from negative to positive. It works beautifully.
Lee

--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Thu Feb 7 09:00:58 2002



From: Donald Lovett :      lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 09:54:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Polaroid Sprintscan 45 Ultra film holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



About a year ago there was a valuable discussion of negative scanners.
One concern raised about the Polaroid Sprintscan 45 Ultra was the absence
of a film holder for 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 film. A message was sent that said
that John Warren at Polaroid sent several of you free negative holders.

Last year I purchased this scanner and included a 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 negative
holder on the P.O., and have been waiting for the holder. Polaroid told
my sales rep that such a holder never existed and that John Warren no
longer worked a polaroid.

I have (and love) the Polaroid scanner, but am frustrated about not having
the appropriate film holder. Have any of you received this item, does it
have a part number, and how did you come to have it?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Don

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718





From daemon Thu Feb 7 10:05:43 2002



From: Lou Ross :      RossLM-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 09:59:46 -0600
Subject: Microbeam Analysis Society information

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

The Microbeam Analysis Society's home page has a new url,
http://www.microbeamanalysis.org. We apologize for this inconvience and I
want to thank John Mansfield for his prompt attention in establishing our
new domain name. If you are a subscriber to the MAS listeserver, John
autimatically changed your subscription to the new address at
microprobe-at-microbeamanalysis.org.

Also, the MAS membership email service (masmembership-at-excite.com ) was
interrupted for a few weeks in January but is fully functional again.

Lou Ross
MAS Membership Services
masmembership-at-excite.com
1-800-4MASMEM (1-800-462-7636)
www.microbeamanalysis.org


From daemon Thu Feb 7 10:40:49 2002



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      giba-at-puccini.cdl.umn.edu
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 10:45:01 -0500
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM of Ecoli bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Patrick,

Sounds to me like both points 1. and 2. could be explained if the condenser
aperture is out of the column. Its the uppermost adjustable aperture
sticking out of the side of most TEM's. If thats out, you get huge beam
current down the column, big loss of resolution, and its easy to blow out
the sections or support films.

Or even if the condenser aperture is in, if the next adjustable aperture
down the column, the objective aperture, is out, that also could result in
blown out films, and loss of contrast in the image.

As for the German, best to find someone there who can give you a few
pointers - in English,

Good luck,

Gib

--
Gib Ahlstrand
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)625-5754 FAX, giba-at-puccini.cdl.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

} Email: pjfenneran-at-msn.com
} Name: Patrick Fenneran
}
} Organization: Florida Institute of Technology
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Melbourne, Florida
}
} Question: I am using an Zeiss 900m TEM looking at E.coli and have the
} following questions:
}
} 1. The formvar/carbon grids keep on getting blown out, like there is
} too much power or the beam is too concentrated.
}
} 2. When I am taking pictures, the bacteria do not have resolution,
} which adjustments should I make?
}
} 3. Do you know of any paperwork that can be obtained that explains
} the operation the components of the machine, the only book I have is
} the one that came with the machine and it is partly in German.
}




From daemon Thu Feb 7 10:47:43 2002



From: Comstock, Robert J. :      comstorj-at-westinghouse.com
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 11:42:38 -0500
Subject: Database/image analysis for digital images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have progressed during the past few years to where the majority of our
optical and SEM images are digital rather than Polaroid prints. In addition,
we also scan TEM negatives and store them digitally. I am interested in
some recommendations for software that can store the images in a database so
they can be easily retrieved by keywords and also software for image
analysis (e.g., particle size, image analysis, etc.) What options are
available that people have experience with. I'd be interested in hearing
both pro and con.

Thanks,

Bob Comstock
Westinghouse Electric Co.
Pittsburgh, PA 15235


From daemon Thu Feb 7 11:04:23 2002



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 08:58:23 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM of Ecoli bacteria

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Were the bacteria fixed and stained? Did you carbon coat your formvar
grids before use? What mesh size grids are you using? I have no
information on that particular microscope, but if you have never used any
TEM, you normally use a spread weak beam rather than a concentrated one
for imaging (spread the beam with the condensor lense). Electron
microscopes work best in the dark.

We have some procedures on our website you may wish to browse:
http://biology.berkeley.edu/EML

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793

On Thu, 7 Feb 2002 pjfenneran-at-msn.com wrote:
} 1. The formvar/carbon grids keep on getting blown out, like there is
} too much power or the beam is too concentrated.
}
} 2. When I am taking pictures, the bacteria do not have resolution,
} which adjustments should I make?
}
} 3. Do you know of any paperwork that can be obtained that explains
} the operation the components of the machine, the only book I have is
} the one that came with the machine and it is partly in German.
}
}
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}



From daemon Thu Feb 7 11:08:37 2002



From: tartenon-at-netscape.net
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 12:02:19 -0500
Subject: RE: RE: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry You're Right I miss type the numbers it really is 3.2 Megapixels where 2048 X 1536 = 3,145,728 (3.2 Megapixels) I'm using Nikon 995 and I can Photograph Bright, Fluorescence Images My Understanding is that you can increase that resolution using Interpolation, but the real resolution of the image will be 3.2 Megapixels with the Nikon 995. I do not belive Olympus has 4 Megapixels non-interpolated (nor any available digital camera)

Regards

Tina Carvalho {tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




__________________________________________________________________
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From daemon Thu Feb 7 12:18:51 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 12:02:33 -0700
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree with Don and Tom.


Donald Lovett wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Tom:
}
} I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
} and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
} do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
} raising the issue.
}
} Don
}
} On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:
}
}
} } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } in this way.
} }
} } }
} } } To whom it may concern:
} } }
} } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } Technology.
} } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} } } get answered ASAP:
} } }
} } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } microscopy
} } } rather than light?
} } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } microscope?
} } }
} } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } } understand more of this subject.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Jenny Wang
} } }
} } } -------------------------------------------------
} } } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
} }
} } --
} } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} } Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} }
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } Division of Biological Sciences
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} } (573)-882-0123 (fax)
} }
} }
}
} ______________________________________________________________________
} Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} The College of New Jersey
} Ewing, NJ 08628-0718

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




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Hello Listers,

While I agree with what has been said so far in that nobody should do
somebody else's work, especially not homework for students, I am wondering
if that is not being interpreted a bit too narrowly here. After all, this
listserver **IS** a great resource and the students show some initiative in
finding and posting to it. Wouldn't it be better to help the students find
the information they are after rather than denying help? Something like:
"These are very interesting questions, and there are many good books about
this issue. Try reading any one of these books (...) or talk to anyone who
is doing electron microscopy."

Then again, these are my thoughts, and if you disagree, please send me an
email.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Donald Lovett [mailto:lovett-at-tcnj.edu]
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 6:32 AM
To: Tom Phillips
Cc: "gtg990a-at-prism.gatech.edu"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com;
Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



Tom:

I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
raising the issue.

Don


On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} in this way.
}
}
} }
} }
} } To whom it may concern:
} }
} } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } Technology.
} } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
must
} } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope
will
} } get answered ASAP:
} }
} } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } microscopy
} } rather than light?
} } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
spatial
} } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } microscope?
} }
} } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } understand more of this subject.
} }
} } Sincerely,
} } Jenny Wang
} }
} } -------------------------------------------------
} } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
}
} --
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)
}
}

______________________________________________________________________
Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
The College of New Jersey
Ewing, NJ 08628-0718





From daemon Thu Feb 7 14:03:35 2002



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 13:47:36 -0800
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
I would like to find a distributor for Cargille Laser Liquids (series
5610). I would like to do some experiments involving immersion oils of
varied RI in combination with mountants of differing RI in a manner similar
to the method employed in:

Scalettar, Swedlow, Sedat & Agard. 1996. Dispersion, abberation and
deconvolution in multi-wavelength fluorescence images. Journal of
Microscopy. 182:1, 50-60.

Any advice regarding sources of reagents and techniques to adjust the RI of
immersion media appropriate for LSCM/MP is welcome. Thanks in advance.
-Karl G.

_______________________________________________
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illiniois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, IL 61801
Room B650J
Tel: (217) 244-6292
Fax: (217) 244-6219
www.itg.uiuc.edu



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Bob:
You're likely to get a ton of vendor responses on this one, but I'll throw
in a couple of general thoughts.

Disclaimer: the commercial products mentioned here are EXAMPLES. This use
does not constitute any endorsement by myself or Dow Chemical or imply
anything about the quality or applicability of the product. It also does
not imply anything about the competitive products that are NOT mentioned.

First off, for image analysis, you need to keep ImageJ
(http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/) in mind. It is public domain, is fully
customizable (using Java language) has a wide range of users/developers
around the world and works nicely. The user community is doing a lot of
cool stuff, much of which gets back onto the ImageJ download page and is
available for everyone else. This is the next generation of NIH Image, but
it is now a Java app and runs well on MacOS, Windows, UNIX, Linux and any
other OS that supports Java. You are likely to want something commercial
for your "turnkey" stuff, like Image Pro+ (http://www.mediacy.com/), but
ImageJ is a great tool to keep handy.

As for database/archive, I encourage you to do some math:
How many images do you collect per year?
How much additional information do you need to keep with those images in
order for them to be useful?
How many times do you need those images back after the project is complete?
How long do you want to keep the images in on-line storage?
How much on-line storage are you able to afford?
Who will be administering the database and how much will that administration
cost?

We deal with the issue by using our LIMS project number, then burning a
CD(s) with all the images related to that project so that we can pull out
the CD to retrieve the images. We leave the images on the network file
server until the project is complete, then burn the CD and delete the
on-line files.

If we have "definitive" or reference images, we keep those in on-line
storage. These are the ones that really need to be part of a database.

One tool that has been useful is Thumbs+ (http://www.cerious.com/). We can
make an image directory of the project CDs, then browse that to see if we
can find the image we want. Thumbs+ is really aimed at a "smaller"
operation of just a few people. One company that I know of with a product
for maintaining a large-scale database is Advanced Database Systems
(http://www.adsdb.com/), but there are others out there as well. Cost is
proportional to scale!

Bill
William A. Heeschen, Ph.D.
The Dow Chemical Company
Microscopy, Digital Imaging
1897 Bldg, E-84 / 2040 Bldg, 1330
waheeschen-at-dow.com

-----Original Message-----
} From: Comstock, Robert J. [mailto:comstorj-at-westinghouse.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 11:43 AM
To: MicroscopyListserver (E-mail)


We have progressed during the past few years to where the majority of our
optical and SEM images are digital rather than Polaroid prints. In addition,
we also scan TEM negatives and store them digitally. I am interested in
some recommendations for software that can store the images in a database so
they can be easily retrieved by keywords and also software for image
analysis (e.g., particle size, image analysis, etc.) What options are
available that people have experience with. I'd be interested in hearing
both pro and con.

Thanks,

Bob Comstock
Westinghouse Electric Co.
Pittsburgh, PA 15235


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Don:

I'm afraid I disagree with you and Tom. Part of a scientist's training is to learn
how to identify and use resources. And we (collectively) are a resource that I
believe should be made available to all who can benefit. Of course, that leaves open

the question of whether the student benefits more by working things out in isolation,

or by seeking guidance from experts and either really understanding the answers or
(hopefully not) merely regurgitating them by rote. One hopes that the intelligent
student will reject the latter course.

Mike

Donald Lovett wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Tom:
}
} I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
} and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
} do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
} raising the issue.
}
} Don
}
} On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } in this way.
} }
} }
} } }
} } }
} } } To whom it may concern:
} } }
} } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } Technology.
} } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} } } get answered ASAP:
} } }
} } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } microscopy
} } } rather than light?
} } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } microscope?
} } }
} } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } } understand more of this subject.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Jenny Wang
} } }
} } } -------------------------------------------------
} } } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
} }
} } --
} } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} } Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} }
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } Division of Biological Sciences
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} } (573)-882-0123 (fax)
} }
} }
}
} ______________________________________________________________________
} Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} The College of New Jersey
} Ewing, NJ 08628-0718



From daemon Thu Feb 7 18:57:45 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 7 Feb 2002 19:50:12 EST
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 2/7/02 12:22:59 PM,
tartenon-at-netscape.net-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

} My Understanding is that you can increase that resolution using
Interpolation,
} but the real resolution of the image will be 3.2 Megapixels with the Nikon
} 995. I do not belive Olympus has 4 Megapixels non-interpolated (nor any
} available digital camera)

It's really a lot more complicated than that. The actual spatial resolution
of digital cameras is not simply the number of transistors on the chip (and
in that regard I have the new Sony DSC-f707 which has 5 megapixels on the
chip and produces awesome images, as compared to my Nikon 995). The problem
is that the single chip cameras use an array of filters to expose some
transistors to red, green and blue light. In order to get the image that is
stored, they use interpolation to fill in the color information where it was
not directly measured. The filters have broad wavelength coverage, and the
interpolation schemes are pretty good (lots of patents in that area). But by
direct measurement based on the Fourier power spectra none of these cameras
has a spatial resolution that approaches the value you would expect based on
the number of pixels in the stored image (which is usually the same as the
number of transistors, except for Fuji who save images that have even more
than that). For the Nikon and Sony cameras it is typical to find that the
actual resolution elements across an image - beyond which you have empty
magnification - number about 2/3 of the number of pixels. So a camera with
2000 transistors on each line (e.g., 2000 x 3000 = 6 megapixels) would
probably measure as having about 1300-1350 elements of resolution (in other
words, if you reduced the image to that size you would not really be
discarding any information, and any enlargement beyond that size is empty).

The spatial resolution of the 5 M-pixel Sony is not as good as a 35 mm film
camera, but it is extremely good all the same and certainly represents the
best quality available now (and probably good enough for a great many
applications) provided you store the image as uncompressed tif and don't
throw away the important details by allowing the camera to use jpeg
compression (which all of these cameras will do by default, to save memory).
The tonal resolution - range of brightness values from dark to bright - is
much more problematic. I have had good experience using high end consumer
digital cameras for bright field microsopy, but they don't begin to have
enough range for darkfield or fluorescence work. Remember that 8 bits is 256
grey levels, and even the cameras with internal 10 bits or more only produce
about 8 bits on output because of the conversion from a linear detector to a
film-like log output. Film easily covers several thousand discernible
brightness steps, which would require a 12 bit or more range. That's why
cooled cameras are used for these applications, and why the tiny chips used
in consumer cameras won't work (the small transistors simply can't hold
enough electrons to give that kind of dynamic range).

If you want to compare consumer type cameras, there is a wealth of unbiased
information available online at {http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/specs.asp} .
The discussion is centered on more typical photographic applications but
there are comparative images, and a lot of info.

Digital cameras are great, and they save a lot of time and money. But don't
expect an inexpensive consumer type camera to cover all applications.


From daemon Thu Feb 7 20:32:43 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 18:28:04 -0800
Subject: RE: RE: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Pixera 600-series digital camera produce non-interpolated
honest/real 5.8M pixels, RGB.

gary g.


At 09:02 AM 2/7/2002, you wrote:

} Sorry You're Right I miss type the numbers it really is 3.2 Megapixels
} where 2048 X 1536 = 3,145,728 (3.2 Megapixels) I'm using Nikon 995 and I
} can Photograph Bright, Fluorescence Images My Understanding is that you
} can increase that resolution using Interpolation, but the real resolution
} of the image will be 3.2 Megapixels with the Nikon 995. I do not belive
} Olympus has 4 Megapixels non-interpolated (nor any available digital camera)




From daemon Thu Feb 7 21:41:53 2002



From: Beauregard :      beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 22:28:19 -0500
Subject: Re: Polaroid Sprintscan 45 Ultra film holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Don,

Polaroid will not deliver the holder insert. Period. They did make a few
of them. I saw a metal one, photocopied it and measured it.
I have the insert spec's but not at home here. I could scan it and post it
on my web page.
The thing is only a thin but sturdy piece of sheet metal with rounded edges
that has two slots to fit the two pegs in the 4X5 holder. The holder is
bent or stamped to be slightly recessed, to equal the thickness of a sheet
of film and the recess is the size of a sheet of film. This recess depth
matches the rubberized surface of the regular 4X5 holder. You can make one
from copper sheet stock or brass shim. You would make the outer thin and
slotted piece the thickness of your film. Then solder on a thin piece of
copper below the first piece to hold the film 'recessed'. I bought the
copper material but then it did this:

} From a previous email:
I have a Sprintscan 45i using binuscan as a driver 1.0.3 (wish I didn't).
I could not get Polaroid to furnish any type of holder for 3.25 by 4 inch
cut film, like SO-163. I put the film in sideways and use that. That
raises questions about the focal plane of the film and it bending in the
holder. These are minimal problems for me. However sometimes when the
film is dried, it can be bent. So, I also have my own economy fix that you
can build yourself.

Materials needed:
1 or 2 sheets of the cardboard that come with Kodak SO-163 film.
An old exposed sheet or a new yellow sheet of SO-163 film.
One clear sheet of developed clear and colorless SO-163 film.
20 inches of double back tape.
A roll of 3M Scotchbrand® magic mending tape.
One pair of scissors.
Access to a paper cutter, optional.
One 6 inch ruler with metric millimeters on it.
One Sprintscan 45i 4X5 metal film holder.
One magic marker to blacken all surfaces of the cardboard above (optional).

Cut one sheet of the cardboard so that it is square, 93 mm long and 36 mm
high. It should fit snuggly in the opening of the film holder towards the
locking nut or screw end. Once fitted, place a strip of 3M mending tape on
the length of it so that only half of the tape is pressed onto the 93 mm
long side by the opening for the film. Fold the tape over tightly, no
wrinkles, and press the rest of the tape unto the opposite side of the
blackened cardboard. This 93 mm edge will not fray from now on. Cut off
any excess tape overhanging the ends. Take your colored film sheet and
cut two pieces from the two good 4 inch straight edge sides. One piece
will be "4 inches" ( actually 3 and 7/8ths) by 27 mm. The other will be "4
inches" by 12 mm. Take a piece of scrap 3 1/4 X 4" TEM film with an image
on it and decide how much viewing area you are willing to sacrifice or lose
at the edge of the micrograph that will go up against the cardboard side.
1-2 mm should be about right for a Philips CM12 piece of SO-163 3 Ľ X 4"
cut film.

Place a 4 inch piece of double back tape on the back of the 27 mm wide
piece so that it is flush against the 4 inch edge of it. Place it on the
cardboard so that this 4 inch edge is recessed 1-2 mm from the 4 inch edge
of the cardboard and centered so that 2-3 mm is overhanging the ends of the
cardboard. Repeat this with the 12 mm piece and place it exactly on top of
the first colored film piece. You now have a piece of cardboard with two
pieces of centered colored film taped to it but inset 1-2 mm. The
overhanging film edges will support this template holder in the Polaroid
4x5 holder, when installed.

(You can install more cardboard on the bottom of the first cardboard piece,
if you want the holder to be more rigid.)

Take the 3.25 inch edge of the scrap colorless or developed film and cut a
piece off 3 Ľ inches by 10 mm. Using double backed tape, install the tape
so that it's length covers all 3.25 inches and it is set back 1-2 mm from
the straight 3.25 inch edge of this colorless film piece. Turn it over,
center it lengthwise over the dual stack of film and so that the colorless
film's 3.25 inch edge is flush with the edge of the cardboard, not the
colored dual film pieces. Press it into place on top of the colored film
stack. You have now created a two film thick slot to insert your next TEM
film into that you want to scan and it will be automatically aligned. The
top piece is colorless to provide a view of how you are inserting the
negative being mounted.

One job needs to be done. There is a peg on the 4x5 holder that your film
to be scanned will rest up against. There is another one over by the
locking mechanism. Cut the edge of the new template you made so that it
has a notch that lines up with the peg nearest the locking screw. Press
the ends of the template down onto the holder making sure it is square in
the holder. You should now have an opening that is about 93 mm by 76 mm.
That will be the area of your film that will be scanned. You will notice
that the white or blackened cardboard is below the edge of the metal
holder. Put a few pieces of mending tape around the template to hold it in
place permanently and to keep it from sliding around.

To load the film holder:
Slide the new film into the slot so that it is above the white cardboard
and below the clear film piece. Slide the rest of the film up until it
hits the one peg nearest the hinge. Square up the film if needed. Close
the film holder. The film will be centered in the holder and flat all
around the edges.
The best part is this holder is FREE and only should take an hour or two to
make.

My Polaroid scanner lasted 1˝ years and is now defunct. When I turn it on,
it moves the holder in and out continuously. It never initializes. It's
not my favorite piece of equipment. I use a Powerlook III and it's much
faster to scan with it. It does not have the OD range and resolution is
worse but it didn't cost $7000. My customers don't complain.
Use the Fuji setting for low constrast negs. Use regular transmission on
high contrast negs. and invert.

Info on ordering UMAX scanner PLASTIC cut film holders that won't scratch
the glass on your flat bed:
Umax Phone: Area 510 - 651 - 4000 ext 3038
Parts are ordered from Fremont, Calf. only.

#SKIT-29002 PKG of 3 4" by 5" plastic cut film holders. $39.99

??? PKG of 5 2.25" by 3.25" holder
$49.99
These holders can be routed out to make a 3 1/4 X 4" holder. It takes some
skill to do this.
Placing the 3x4 film in sideways in a 4x5 holder works just fine and that's
what I use.

Paul Beauregard
Sr. Research Associate
PPG Industries
Monroeville, PA 15146




} Last year I purchased this scanner and included a 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 negative
} holder on the P.O., and have been waiting for the holder. Polaroid told
} my sales rep that such a holder never existed and that John Warren no
} longer worked a polaroid.
}
} }
} Any help would be appreciated.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Don
}
} ______________________________________________________________________
} Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} The College of New Jersey
} Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
}
}
}
}
}
}

} Last year I purchased this scanner and included a 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 negative
} holder on the P.O., and have been waiting for the holder. Polaroid told
} my sales rep that such a holder never existed and that John Warren no
} longer worked a polaroid.
}
} I have (and love) the Polaroid scanner, but am frustrated about not having
} the appropriate film holder. Have any of you received this item, does it
} have a part number, and how did you come to have it?
}
} Any help would be appreciated.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Don
}




From daemon Thu Feb 7 23:44:00 2002



From: gtg990a-at-prism.gatech.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 00:36:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I assure all of you who responded to me that I will NOT be just regurgitating
the information you have sent me. All the information was greatly appreciated,
and hopefully I can understand it all to apply to my assignment. This is NOT
just a homework assignment, and there is still much more that I am required to
research and think about and discuss with my group before producing a final
solution. The goal of our class is to learn how to research using different
types of sources, and one of the ways we are told, when one has a limited
amount of time to learn something, is to ask others who are more knowledgeable
in the subject, professionals like yourselves. So thank you for your time for
those who were kind enough to help me.
Sincerely,
Jenny

Quoting Michael O'Keefe {MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov} :

} Don:
}
} I'm afraid I disagree with you and Tom. Part of a scientist's training
} is to learn
} how to identify and use resources. And we (collectively) are a resource
} that I
} believe should be made available to all who can benefit. Of course,
} that leaves open
} the question of whether the student benefits more by working things out
} in isolation,
} or by seeking guidance from experts and either really understanding the
} answers or
} (hopefully not) merely regurgitating them by rote. One hopes that the
} intelligent
} student will reject the latter course.
}
} Mike
}
} Donald Lovett wrote:
}
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Tom:
} }
} } I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated
} here,
} } and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not
} to
} } do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us
} and
} } raising the issue.
} }
} } Don
} }
} } On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:
} }
} } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the
} field
} } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required
} to
} } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them
} used
} } } in this way.
} } }
} } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } }
} } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute
} of
} } } } Technology.
} } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that
} we must
} } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that
} I hope will
} } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } }
} } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons
} for
} } } } microscopy
} } } } rather than light?
} } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with
} the spatial
} } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the
} electron
} } } } microscope?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in
} helping me
} } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } }
} } } } Sincerely,
} } } } Jenny Wang
} } } }
} } } } -------------------------------------------------
} } } } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } } } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
} } }
} } } --
} } } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} } } Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} } } Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} } }
} } } 3 Tucker Hall
} } } Division of Biological Sciences
} } } University of Missouri
} } } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } } (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} } } (573)-882-0123 (fax)
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
} ______________________________________________________________________
} } Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} } Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} } P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} } The College of New Jersey
} } Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
}
}


-------------------------------------------------
Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/


From daemon Fri Feb 8 00:29:37 2002



From: Manuel E. Brito :      manuel-brito-at-aist.go.jp
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 15:38:12 +0900
Subject: Macro-, Micro- and Meso-porous Materials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues,

The deadline for abstract submission for the Microscopy &
Microanalysis 2002 (Quebec City, Canada) is rapidly approaching.
Among the featured Symposia at this year meeting, "Electron
Microscopy of Macro-, Micro- and Meso-porous Materials"
will address the current state of the art.

The deadline for electronic abstract submission is
February 15th. We look forward to seeing you in Quebec City!


Manuel E. Brito, AIST, Japan
Douglas Blum, ORNL, USA Dear Colleagues,


--
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
National Institute of Advanced
Industrial Science and Technology
Synergy Materials Research Center

Manuel E. Brito, Eng. D.

Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8687 JAPAN
Tel: +81-52-739-0135 Fax: +81-52-739-0136
e-mail: manuel-brito-at-aist.go.jp

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/




From daemon Fri Feb 8 02:21:44 2002



From: =?ISO-8859-2?Q?Old=F8ich_Benada?= :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:19:31 +0100
Subject: RE: measurement and calibration onthe SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,
I think you have meant 2160 lines per mm giving 0.46 um between two
adjacent lines (a standard replica grating); 2600 lines per mm should
give .38 um spacing.

Best regard from Prague
Oldrich



On 6 Feb 2002 at 15:30, Dusevich, Vladimir wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
}
} } -----Original Message-----
} } From: Brian Wajdyk [mailto:electronmicroscopist-at-hotmail.com]
} } Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 10:47 AM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: measurement and calibration onthe SEM
} }
} }
} } --------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } --------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------.
} }
} }
} } Fellow Microscopists,
} }
} } SEM has historically been used for metrology of various
} } structures. I can't
} } seem to find much literature about the artifacts associated
} } with this type
} } of measurement. We do use the NIST standards to check the
} } calibration of
} } our equipment, but I haven't characterized how the different
} } beam or sample
} } parameters effect the measurements. What do you do? Has
} } anyone figured out
} } his or her actual accuracy and precision? We have found that
} } we can safely
} } give measurements within +/-5% taking into account most human
} } and equipment
} } errors. This is based on the precision of measurements made of NIST
} } structures, measured the same way, over several years. On
} } the other hand,
} } the smallest structure we can measure on the standard is 2um
} } (line and
} } space. How do you determine at what magnification you will no longer
}
} Cheap grating replicas with 2600 lines per mm give 0.46 um per line,
} and this is not too bad for calibrating 50,000 magnification. I am
} happy I do not need certified standards.
}
} } guarantee the measurement? I see that my MRS-3 from Geller
} } says it's for
} } 10x to 50kX. How do they figure out that the max magnification it is
} } useful? Maybe it as simple as being able to fit the structure on the
}
} Maximum useful magnification is very specimen dependant, especially
} for low voltage and low vacuum modes. Of course, for digital images
} it is possible to check brightness profiles and if they have slopes
} on edges of features, then measure "size" on half height of the slope.
} But I am not aware about publications which dependably justify this kind
} of measurements (manipulations with brightness and contrast and
} specimen tilt could change slopes significantly).
}
} } screen. If that were true, you would expect that the
} } instrument would also
} } be calibrated to a much higher magnification. How high could
} } I say it is
} } accurate to? Can I safely measure a 1000A line assuming no
}
} It depends on resolution for your microscope/specimens and on
} calibration standard you are using. And I think periodic lines with
} spacing 2 um not really good standard to measure feature with
} the size of 0.1 um.
}
} } obvious issues
} } (i.e. drift)? Can anyone educate me more on this topic or
}
} If you have visible drift during single exposure, then something
} wrong with microscope or specimen preparation technique.
}
} } point me to
} } resources?
} }
} }
} } Things that could effect measurements (feel free to add to list):
} } Drift (mechanical / beam)-
}
} exposure time should be small for significant drift.
}
} } Charging (obvious or stretching of image from a slow scan)
} } Magnification (adjusted for each set of lens relays)
}
} Could be eliminated with proper calibration.
}
} } kV (surface vs. subsurface image)
} } Working Distance
}
} Could be eliminated with proper calibration.
}
} } Delineation method (raised vs. depression, materials contrast)
} } Amount of delineation (3D effect)
} } Resolution (near resolution limit of SEM?)
} } Contrast (or lack of, bright / dark line)
} } Edge effect (bright line)
} } Consistency between tools (calibration, etc.)
} } Consistency between methods (SEM, TEM, ellipsometry, AFM, etc.)
} } Operator's eye (where to measure. Measure outside to inside,
} } center to
} } center, out to out, in to in?)
} } Variance in measured layer thickness (topography, sloped
} } profile (i.e. base
} } larger than top))
} } Angle to beam
} } Preparation methods (polish (i.e. smearing), cleave (i.e.
} } pull of soft
} } material), FIB (i.e. angle))
} } Type of algorithm if doing it automatically (i.e. %50 threshold)
}
} Some of the things you have mentioned relate to specimen/experiment,
} to stereology, but not to microscope. For example, if I need to measure
} size of depression without sharp edges, I have to find (or at least to
} declare)right procedure for it's measurements. May be I have to perform
} stereo measurements and define an edge as a place, where a depth of
} depression become equal to 0.1 um (or 10% of total depth, or
} whatever else, depending on a study).
}
} And thank you for your extensive list - it is very helpful for
} observation of the problem. And about additions to your list -
} I think everybody can say something. For example recently I tried
} to measure in ESEM thickness of a layer which, as it turned out,
} was a viscous liquid...
}
} Regards,
}
} Vladimir
}
}
} Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} 3127 School of Dentistry
} 650 E. 25th Street
} Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
}
} Phone: (816) 235-2072
} Fax: (816) 235-5524
} Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy
}
}
}


+-----------------------------------+
Oldrich Benada
Acad. Sci. CR
Institute of Microbiology
Laboratory of electron microscopy
Videnska 1083
CZ - 142 20 Prague 4 - Krc
Czech Republic
+------------------------------------+
Phone: +420-2-4752399
Fax: +420-2-4752347
WEB:http://www.biomed.cas.cz/mbu/lem113/lem.htm



From daemon Fri Feb 8 06:18:32 2002



From: Shea Miller :      millers-at-EM.AGR.CA
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 07:14:20 -0500
Subject: help with buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Greetings all;
can anyone provide the formulation for Hank's buffer? I have looked in all of my books (most, but not all of which, admittedly, lean towards plants) and can't find a single reference. It is called for in a protocol for controlling autofluorescence in aldehyde fixed tissue.

thanks in advance
shea


Dr. S. Shea Miller
Agriculture & AgriFood Canada
Eastern Cereal & Oilseed Research Centre
Rm. 2068, K.W. Neatby Bldg.
Central Experimental Farm
Ottawa, Ontario,
Canada K1A 0C6
Phone: (613)759-1760
Fax: (613)759-1701
E-mail: millers-at-em.agr.ca



From daemon Fri Feb 8 06:52:08 2002



From: ĎćÁŐ :      Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 7:47:2 -0500
Subject: Do you have any recommended books?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all;

I have two sets of data to interpreted:
1) X-ray rocking curve data, to analyze the defect (damage) of the wafer surface.
2) XPS data, to trace how the wafer surface composition will change with the increasing of sputtering time.

I need to have some fundamental idea of these two theories to interpreted data. Do you have any recommendations of the textbooks, or other papers I should read?

Any kind of help will be appreciated!

Xianglin Li

Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu



From daemon Fri Feb 8 07:34:32 2002



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 08:27:27 -0500
Subject: Re: Database/image analysis for digital images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I have been quite happy with SIS Analysis package and database. We generate about 10-15k images a year here and it does a nice job managing it all and keeping relevant data with the images. My users may place a copy of the full program on their PC and run the analysis offline hooking directly to the network served db (MS Access based) and a new option will soon allow my users to log in with a web browser and query the db for their data directly- password protected and everything (hit a couple of snags and don't have it worked out yet). All three SEM's capture directly into the db, TEM data is dragged and dropped after capture, and I hope to soon have the LM directly capturing into it as well. I just haven't gotten it installed yet.

Hitachi distributes PCI quartz which seems very similar though I have no experience with it.

On the cheap side there is a program called thumbs+ from Cerious software for simple archiving.

Scott Whittaker
SEM Lab Manager
Smithsonian Institution
PO Box 37012 MRC104
National Museum of Natural History
Washington DC 20560-0104
202-357-1651


} } } "Comstock, Robert J." {comstorj-at-westinghouse.com} 02/07/02 11:42AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


We have progressed during the past few years to where the majority of our
optical and SEM images are digital rather than Polaroid prints. In addition,
we also scan TEM negatives and store them digitally. I am interested in
some recommendations for software that can store the images in a database so
they can be easily retrieved by keywords and also software for image
analysis (e.g., particle size, image analysis, etc.) What options are
available that people have experience with. I'd be interested in hearing
both pro and con.

Thanks,

Bob Comstock
Westinghouse Electric Co.
Pittsburgh, PA 15235




From daemon Fri Feb 8 07:48:17 2002



From: Oakley, Jeff :      oakleyj-at-rayovac.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 07:42:30 -0600
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
experts as a source, just as one would use a book. And besides, if she were
just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
be doing the same with information pulled from a book?

I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!


Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley



} } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } in this way.
} }
} } }
} } } To whom it may concern:
} } }
} } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } Technology.
} } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
must
} } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
hope will
} } } get answered ASAP:
} } }
} } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } microscopy
} } } rather than light?
} } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
spatial
} } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } microscope?
} } }
} } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
me
} } } understand more of this subject.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Jenny Wang



From daemon Fri Feb 8 08:04:10 2002



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Fri, 1 Jan 1904 09:28:42 -0500
Subject: Undergrads wanted for research

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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


NSF REU Program in Nanotechnology at Advanced Materials Processing and
Analysis Center (AMPAC) at
University of Central Florida

Sample Research Projects:
Nanomaterials for coatings, sensors and optics, Nano biology
Solgel, Microemulsion, Laser processing, Mechanical Alloying
Carbon nanotubes, Atomic and Near Atomic Scale Characterization
Nanomaechanics, Focussed Ion Beam in Nanotechnology
Nanospectroscopy using Lasers, Nanostructured TBCs and Polymers

Program Description:
Open to Juniors & Seniors in Fall 2002
Students will work with Faculty in Nanotechnology Projects
Basic concepts in Materials Eng, Physics, Biology, Engineering
Selection: Applicant academic standing, 2 reference letters, statement of
interest

Fellowship: $3000, up to $400 travel, + Accommodation
No of Fellows: 10
Duration: 10 summer weeks ( 20th May - 27th July 2002)
Application Deadline: March 15th 2002
Award Notification: March 25th 2002

For more information contact:

Dr. S. Seal or Karen Glidewell
Room 381, AMPAC, 4000 University Blvd
P.O. Box 162455
UCF, Orlando, Fl 32816
Phone: 407 882 1456 or 823 5277
Fax: 407 882 1462, 823 0208
sseal-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu, kglidewe-at-mail.ucf.edu

Visit our Website
http://nanotech.research.ucf.edu/nsf-reu.htm

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Director, UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility
University of Central Florida
12443 Research Parkway, Suite 305
Orlando, FL 32826 email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone (407) 882-1500
fax (407) 275-4321
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:02:34 2002



From: Jim Quinn :      jquinn-at-www.matscieng.sunysb.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:53:12 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

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for Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:53:12 -0500



Don -

College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers
to elementary questions. Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
was a bad idea.

JQuinn

PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program Director.

} From Microscopy-request-at-sparc5.microscopy.com Fri Feb 8 03:44:15 2002
} Date: Thu, 07 Feb 2002 13:47:36 -0800
} From: "Michael O'Keefe" {MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov}
} Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Don:
}
} I'm afraid I disagree with you and Tom. Part of a scientist's training is to learn
} how to identify and use resources. And we (collectively) are a resource that I
} believe should be made available to all who can benefit. Of course, that leaves open
}
} the question of whether the student benefits more by working things out in isolation,
}
} or by seeking guidance from experts and either really understanding the answers or
} (hopefully not) merely regurgitating them by rote. One hopes that the intelligent
} student will reject the latter course.
}
} Mike
}
} Donald Lovett wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Tom:
} }
} } I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
} } and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
} } do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
} } raising the issue.
} }
} } Don
} }
} } On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } } in this way.
} } }
} } }
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } }
} } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } } Technology.
} } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we must
} } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I hope will
} } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } }
} } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } } microscopy
} } } } rather than light?
} } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the spatial
} } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } } microscope?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping me
} } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } }
} } } } Sincerely,
} } } } Jenny Wang
} } } }
} } } } -------------------------------------------------
} } } } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } } } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
} } }
} } } --
} } } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} } } Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} } } Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} } }
} } } 3 Tucker Hall
} } } Division of Biological Sciences
} } } University of Missouri
} } } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } } (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} } } (573)-882-0123 (fax)
} } }
} } }
} }
} } ______________________________________________________________________
} } Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} } Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} } P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} } The College of New Jersey
} } Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
}
}


From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:18:58 2002



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:13:16 EST
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



In a message dated 2/8/02 10:07:03 AM, jquinn-at-www.matscieng.sunysb.edu writes:

} College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers
} to elementary questions.

Some of them do things even worse than that. As the author of a moderately
well known book on image analysis I get several messages each week asking
questions that boil down to something like this:

"I've been asked to report on X. Could you give me a concise answer so I
won't have to read and digest all of the information in your text? Oh, and I
need it by tomorrow.

The only question that is even more annoying is "I can't afford your book.
Would you please send me a copy?"

The art of reading, digesting and combining information from multiple sources
is vital in education. To try to short cut this and get someone else to chew
the food for you and then regurgitate it is not only lazy and dishonest, it
also prevents students from learning to think, which is a more important part
of education than the factual stuff they seem to be dealing with.



From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:26:48 2002



From: Hendrik O. Colijn :      colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 10:21:24 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

While Jenny's questions were rather vague and sounded like she was looking
for an easy answer to an assignment, we should probably give students the
benefit of the doubt. How many times have *we* presented ill-formed
questions when we were not quite sure of what we were asking?

I agree that we should not do a student's assignment for him, but perhaps
we can somewhat more gently steer them to the source of the answers rather
than flame them. I think that if the questions sound inappropriate, we can
make a comment to the effect that we're not going to provide the answer,
but only the source of the info. The ensuing discussion may lead to a
sharpening of the question as the student thinks though what he is trying
to ask. While there are, indeed, students looking for the easy way out, we
need to be careful not to flame the student who framed the question poorly.

Cheers,
Henk Colijn

{...much deleted material...}


Hendrik O. Colijn colijn.1-at-osu.edu
Campus Electron Optics Facility Ohio State University
(614) 292-0674 http://www.ceof.ohio-state.edu
Fools are pleased when they discover error.
The wise are pleased when they discover truth.



From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:31:39 2002



From: Tom Phillips :      PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:26:06 -0600
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jeff: I am assuming from your rayovac.com you are not an educator.
That doesn't disqualify your opinion but I would be more worried if
other currently teaching academics widely expressed this view.
Learning to look something up in the library is part of the teaching
assignment. Finding the correct information and distilling it is not
trivial. Most experts on the listserver could answer each of those
questions in a few concise sentences. You would be hard pressed to
find any source in a library in which you found the question followed
by the answer. When you read the literature, lots of time you end
up reading additional information on peripheral topics that add to
the learning process. More importantly, students constantly give me
sentences in their papers that are clearly paraphrased from the
literature. I am not suggesting this constitutes plagiarism but it
is often apparent from the sentence that they don't really understand
what it means. They think they do but when I discuss it with them,
they are unable to explain the sophisticated sentence in basic terms.
Students frequently comment in my teaching evaluations that the most
important thing they learned in class was that memorizing and
rephrasing the literature doesn't equate to real understanding. If
the instructor wanted them simply to ask an expert to get the bottom
line answer, why didn't the instructor simply say it in lecture or
give them a handout? Don't you think the instructor knew? Do you
think a bioengineering class was designed to teach web surfing tools.
I don't know if you should feel dirty but I think your batteries need
recharging. Tom Phillips


}
}
} I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
} narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
} experts as a source, just as one would use a book. And besides, if she were
} just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
} be doing the same with information pulled from a book?
}
} I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!
}
}
} Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley
}
}
}
} } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } } in this way.
} } }
} } } }
} } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } }
} } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } } Technology.
} } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
} must
} } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
} hope will
} } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } }
} } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } } microscopy
} } } } rather than light?
} } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
} spatial
} } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } } microscope?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
} me
} } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } }
} } } } Sincerely,
} } } } Jenny Wang

--
Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility

3 Tucker Hall
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
(573)-882-4712 (voice)
(573)-882-0123 (fax)


From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:34:17 2002



From: Gary M. Easton :      gary.easton-at-scannerscorp.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:27:56 -0500
Subject: Looking for used EDS Detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,
I am in need of a used but functional EDS detector ported for an ETEC
AUTOSCAN SEM. Preferences being Tracor/Noran, Kevex, PGT or EDAX, T/W if
possible. If anyone has any leads, please feel free to contact me off line.
Thanks in advance.



Gary M. Easton, President
Scanners Corporation
90 Aileron Court, Suite 6
Westminster, Maryland USA 21157
410.857.7633(v)
410.857.7636(f)
www.scannerscorp.com




From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:36:44 2002



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 16:30:49 +0100
Subject: Re: Database/image analysis for digital images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

There is a collection of image analysis software available on my
"microscopy and imaging" webpage and also several links to image
databases:

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/pcrimg.htm

Which software environment you choose depends largely on your needs.
Most people need a standard package which is easy to use and there are
several software packages on the market. Do you want to do basic image
analysis or do you ever want to do more complicated analysis on large
datasets, this will influence your choice. Most users "use" imaging
software and don't do a lot of basic image algorithm development
themselves.

Most of the software is available for both Windows and Macintosh, like
the "NIH-Image" family. There is also AnalySIS and ImagePro Plus. For EM
there is specialised software from Gatan and a software package like
KHOROS is also suitable.

There are several image databases available, I believe there are now
several packages available with a web based interface which enables you
to browse the database through a webbrowser.

Best regards,

Peter


} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Comstock, Robert J. [mailto:comstorj-at-westinghouse.com]
} Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 11:43 AM
} To: MicroscopyListserver (E-mail)
} Subject: Database/image analysis for digital images
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} We have progressed during the past few years to where the majority of our
} optical and SEM images are digital rather than Polaroid prints. In addition,
} we also scan TEM negatives and store them digitally. I am interested in
} some recommendations for software that can store the images in a database so
} they can be easily retrieved by keywords and also software for image
} analysis (e.g., particle size, image analysis, etc.) What options are
} available that people have experience with. I'd be interested in hearing
} both pro and con.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Bob Comstock
} Westinghouse Electric Co.
} Pittsburgh, PA 15235

--
Dr. Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations

Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium

tel.: +32 (0)14 570 619
fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621


From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:39:43 2002



From: Curtis Olson :      COlson-at-scpglobal.com
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 08:31:24 -0700
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,

I am new to this listserve so I hesitated to respond, but here it goes. I think a student's questions should be answered in a fashion as you suggest. Mining all resources for information (including media such as this) is a very necessary skill in todays (and definitely tomorrows) world. Whether we agree or not, searching table of contents in the hardcopy library is becoming less and less valuable. Having high school students as children, I have been exposed to a tremendous opportunity for expeditious research covering a broad spectrum of resources using this media. At this time, a combination of hardcopy library and electronic media seems appropriate.

The concern of regurgitation may be moot. After all, from what I have read, this student may very well have the best of intentions and will list this server as her information source. This is an ethical question only she can answer for herself. In addition, it's certainly possible that this is a small fraction of her group's assignment and gleaning the answers to preliminary questions here will only open doors to deeper understanding later.

Obviously, to use a resource such as this to do frequent homework assignments is a mis-use of our time. However, the natural and logical consequences are for the student to deal with when he/she reconciles with the ethical questions and attempts to enter the job market.

Thank you.

Curtis Olson



From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:40:14 2002



From: Bruce Ingber :      bingber-at-srrc.ars.usda.gov
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 09:37:21 -0600
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jenny, you are to be commended on your fine response to the negative comments of some of "my" listserver colleagues. Those of us with 10-25 years of "hand's on experience" in various aspects of microscopy are a valuable asset of knowledge for new students in our field. Likewise, there is much we can hopefully learn your age group. Good luck!




Bruce F. Ingber, Biologist
USDA-ARS, SRRC
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124
bingber-at-srrc.ars.usda.gov
504-286-4270 phone
504-286-4419 fax



From daemon Fri Feb 8 09:52:35 2002



From: Windland, Mark J (MN14) :      Mark.Windland-at-honeywell.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:50:35 -0600
Subject: calibration standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We need to purchase a new calibration standard for our SEM that gets us down
to the next level. We need to have accuracy down to 0.010 microns. We have
been using the Geller MRS-3 and now are considering purchasing the MRS-4
traceable standard.
I believe this will give us what we need but I was wondering if there are
other standards out there that are better, the same, worse? I need to hear
from the calibration specialists out there.
Thanks,

Mark Windland
Honeywell
Minneapolis, Minnesota
763-954-2845


From daemon Fri Feb 8 11:08:58 2002



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:45:47 -0600
Subject: Semiconductor Images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Group,

I am looking for some SEM images of semiconductor circuits. Would like to
have a range of magnifications and view angles from those that show whole
die with bond pads and leads to close-ups of circiut elements. Looking for
interesting features and topography. These will be used as guides to build
some 3D models for a SEM animation video I am working on. If anyone can
supply images for this project please send them to me via E-mail.

Thanks for your help!

Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Electron Microprobe Lab
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx 75275
voice: 214-768-2756
fax: 214-768-2701
E-mail: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu





From daemon Fri Feb 8 11:09:48 2002



From: Darrell Miles :      milesd-at-US.ibm.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 12:04:35 -0500
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Though I was not in on the discussion, I am going to throw in my
two cents.

When I read the original post, it looked like someone had a test
sheet, or assignment sheet, with those questions on it. The request
appeared to be for direct answers to those questions. It did not
surprise me that this fine collection of knowledge would conclude
that someone was trying to shortcut the leaning process, and
avoid really learning a subject. If the student was going to just
"regurgitate" something from a book, then we have not contributed
to the current decay in the quality of the knowledge, and understanding,
in the students receiving degrees. Those posts that did give excellent
research sources, ignoring the APPARENT shortcut, did well in my
view. If the request was for help in understanding a concept, function,
process, etc., then a more direct answer from an expert becomes
extremely valuable.

I don't think ANYBODY on the list should be embarrassed or ashamed.
Had Ms. Wang requested help in a different manner, she would have
gotten a stream of replies with all sorts of information, and the simple,
fill out the test, answers probably would have been in there, also.

Darrell

"Oakley, Jeff" {oakleyj-at-rayovac.com} on 02/08/2002 08:42:30 AM

To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:


I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
experts as a source, just as one would use a book. And besides, if she
were
just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
be doing the same with information pulled from a book?

I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!


Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley



} } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } in this way.
} }
} } }
} } } To whom it may concern:
} } }
} } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } Technology.
} } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
must
} } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
hope will
} } } get answered ASAP:
} } }
} } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } microscopy
} } } rather than light?
} } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
spatial
} } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } microscope?
} } }
} } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
me
} } } understand more of this subject.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Jenny Wang







From daemon Fri Feb 8 11:15:22 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 12:11:00 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Roy:

"Beavers, Roy" wrote:

} Gentlemen,
}
} I disagree and find this attitude somewhat surprising coming from educators.
} I took the time to answer her questions and encourage her in her studies. I
} believe this list is just as valuable a resource as any other method she
} could have used. I believe students should feel comfortable in using it in
} the attempt to "learn something along the way".

Her instructor wanted her to research the answer, otherwise he would have
told her the answers (to her very elementary questions) himself. Asking someone
other than her instructor is not research. The way her questions were asked
indicated to me that she was merely repeating questions she had been asked. As
for identifying sources of information, a college-level biology text would have
the answers she wanted. A text book on EM would have the answers. Even a web
site on EM would have the answers. She did not look for any of those, she tried
to get the answers handed to her with no more effort than a e-mail. She probable
still does not know that all of those other resources exist. What will she do if
her server goes down? At my institution, we insist that students look up simple,
straightforward facts for themselves rather than using the faculty as
encyclopeidas. That is what the textbook is for. Once they are in possession of
the facts, we then ask them to use them to solve problems. We don't view
reciting facts to students as higher education.

} Roy Beavers
} Southern Methodist University
} Dept. of Geological Sciences
} Electron Microprobe Lab
} P.O. Box 750395
} Dallas, Tx 75275
} voice: 214-768-2756
} fax: 214-768-2701
} E-mail: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Geoff McAuliffe [mailto:mcauliff-at-UMDNJ.EDU]
} Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 11:59 AM
} To: Donald Lovett
} Cc: Tom Phillips; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I agree with Don and Tom.
}
} Donald Lovett wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } Tom:
} }
} } I read Ms Wang's message, thought the same thoughts you articulated here,
} } and deleted the message. I think that we as a group should agree not to
} } do homework for students. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us and
} } raising the issue.
} }
} } Don
} }
} } On Wed, 6 Feb 2002, Tom Phillips wrote:
} }
} }
} } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } } in this way.
} } }
} } } }
} } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } }
} } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } } Technology.
} } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
} must
} } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
} hope will
} } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } }
} } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } } microscopy
} } } } rather than light?
} } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
} spatial
} } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } } microscope?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
} me
} } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } }
} } } } Sincerely,
} } } } Jenny Wang
} } } }
} } } } -------------------------------------------------
} } } } Sent through Cyberbuzz- A Server for the Students
} } } } http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/
} } }
} } } --
} } } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} } } Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} } } Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
} } }
} } } 3 Tucker Hall
} } } Division of Biological Sciences
} } } University of Missouri
} } } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } } (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} } } (573)-882-0123 (fax)
} } }
} } }
} }
} } ______________________________________________________________________
} } Donald L. Lovett e-mail: lovett-at-tcnj.edu
} } Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Biology voice: (609) 771-2876
} } P.O. Box 7718 fax: (609) 637-5118
} } The College of New Jersey
} } Ewing, NJ 08628-0718
}
} Geoff
} --
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
} mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Fri Feb 8 12:03:34 2002



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 09:57:29 -0800
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John;
You are correct about the small CCDs of consumer digital cameras
have sever performance deficiencies due to their small pixel size. The F707
and other consumer digital cameras that use the same chip (2/3"-Nikon 5000
and Olympus E20N) suffer from noise even in visible light photographs. The
Nikon D1X and the new Canon EOS 1D(advertised 11.5 µm pixels) are
significant improvements, but cost $6000 just for the camera body! One
organization addressing this problem is
http://www.fredmiranda.com/Action_profilesPage/index.html where they discuss
and sell Photoshop plug-ins for noise reduction. Another digital camera site
I really like is:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/


John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: "DrJohnRuss%aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"DrJohnRuss%aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 4:50 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



In a message dated 2/7/02 12:22:59 PM,
tartenon-at-netscape.net-at-sparc5.microscopy.com writes:

} My Understanding is that you can increase that resolution using
Interpolation,
} but the real resolution of the image will be 3.2 Megapixels with the Nikon
} 995. I do not belive Olympus has 4 Megapixels non-interpolated (nor any
} available digital camera)

It's really a lot more complicated than that. The actual spatial resolution
of digital cameras is not simply the number of transistors on the chip (and
in that regard I have the new Sony DSC-f707 which has 5 megapixels on the
chip and produces awesome images, as compared to my Nikon 995). The problem
is that the single chip cameras use an array of filters to expose some
transistors to red, green and blue light. In order to get the image that is
stored, they use interpolation to fill in the color information where it was

not directly measured. The filters have broad wavelength coverage, and the
interpolation schemes are pretty good (lots of patents in that area). But by

direct measurement based on the Fourier power spectra none of these cameras
has a spatial resolution that approaches the value you would expect based on

the number of pixels in the stored image (which is usually the same as the
number of transistors, except for Fuji who save images that have even more
than that). For the Nikon and Sony cameras it is typical to find that the
actual resolution elements across an image - beyond which you have empty
magnification - number about 2/3 of the number of pixels. So a camera with
2000 transistors on each line (e.g., 2000 x 3000 = 6 megapixels) would
probably measure as having about 1300-1350 elements of resolution (in other
words, if you reduced the image to that size you would not really be
discarding any information, and any enlargement beyond that size is empty).

The spatial resolution of the 5 M-pixel Sony is not as good as a 35 mm film
camera, but it is extremely good all the same and certainly represents the
best quality available now (and probably good enough for a great many
applications) provided you store the image as uncompressed tif and don't
throw away the important details by allowing the camera to use jpeg
compression (which all of these cameras will do by default, to save memory).

The tonal resolution - range of brightness values from dark to bright - is
much more problematic. I have had good experience using high end consumer
digital cameras for bright field microsopy, but they don't begin to have
enough range for darkfield or fluorescence work. Remember that 8 bits is 256

grey levels, and even the cameras with internal 10 bits or more only produce

about 8 bits on output because of the conversion from a linear detector to a

film-like log output. Film easily covers several thousand discernible
brightness steps, which would require a 12 bit or more range. That's why
cooled cameras are used for these applications, and why the tiny chips used
in consumer cameras won't work (the small transistors simply can't hold
enough electrons to give that kind of dynamic range).

If you want to compare consumer type cameras, there is a wealth of unbiased
information available online at {http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/specs.asp} .

The discussion is centered on more typical photographic applications but
there are comparative images, and a lot of info.

Digital cameras are great, and they save a lot of time and money. But don't
expect an inexpensive consumer type camera to cover all applications.


From daemon Fri Feb 8 12:03:35 2002



From: Marti, Jordi :      jordi.marti-at-honeywell.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 10:56:43 -0700
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Having read the comments on both sides I tend to think that part of the problem was due to quite a bit of
misunderstanding (mainly on our part). I too had the same negative reaction when I first read Ms. Wang's e-mail. The way
the first e-mail read I felt that the student was trying to have others solve her assignment problem ( which is why I
did not respond to her request). My reaction changed however when I read her latest e-mail explaining more the nature of
the exercise. I hope I learned from this experience and that in the future I will have a better attitude and ask first
for more information before I decide to give an answer.

Jordi

-----Original Message-----
} From: Oakley, Jeff [mailto:oakleyj-at-rayovac.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 8:43 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
experts as a source, just as one would use a book. And besides, if she were
just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
be doing the same with information pulled from a book?

I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!


Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley



} } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } in this way.
} }
} } }
} } } To whom it may concern:
} } }
} } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } Technology.
} } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
must
} } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
hope will
} } } get answered ASAP:
} } }
} } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } microscopy
} } } rather than light?
} } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
spatial
} } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } microscope?
} } }
} } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
me
} } } understand more of this subject.
} } }
} } } Sincerely,
} } } Jenny Wang



From daemon Fri Feb 8 12:26:16 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 13:20:01 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


"Oakley, Jeff" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
} narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
} experts as a source, just as one would use a book.

Thank you. Do all disagreements with your educational philosophy fall under this
umbrella?

} And besides, if she were
} just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
} be doing the same with information pulled from a book?

The point is, she didn't use a book. Rather than look it up for herself she
tried to get someone else to give her the answers. Rather like the old rubric
about teaching a man to fish instead of giving him a fish.

} I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!
}
} Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley
}
} } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } } in this way.
} } }
} } } }
} } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } }
} } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } } Technology.
} } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
} must
} } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
} hope will
} } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } }
} } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } } microscopy
} } } } rather than light?
} } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
} spatial
} } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the electron
} } } } microscope?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in helping
} me
} } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } }
} } } } Sincerely,
} } } } Jenny Wang

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Fri Feb 8 12:52:03 2002



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 10:55:15 -0800
Subject: Answers to Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tom,

You are correct, I am not an educator. I also agree with you whole
heartedly that when someone reads a text in search of information, they
learn a great deal more than they had planned on... It happens to me every
time I pick up a book in search of an answer to a question. I'm sure this
probably was the intent of the instructor.

The point I should have made in my previous post is that instead of shutting
someone down and "scolding" them (which is exactly what some of the listers
did) for what appeared to be a Cliff's Notes research method, the person
should have been guided to useful web pages or texts that would have made
them find the answers for themselves (which other posters did - kudos to
those).

It is possible to be helpful while at the same time not giving someone a
free ride.

I don't think my batteries are dead, Tom, I just think we are operating at
different voltages.

Jeff


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 9:26 AM
To: Oakley, Jeff
Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


While I am no longer in academia, were that not
the case, I might have a different view. However,
consider the future relative to all students.

If they are aspiring to science, microscopy, etc.,
given their experience with MSA as a student,
what might their opinion be when they become
professionals? Isn't it possible that they could
have a bad taste in their mouth about MSA
in particular and the list specifically?

I don't belive that professionals should answer
student's questions in a concise and packaged
format. Rather, professionals should be used
primarily as pointers to sources of information.
Sometimes, they might provide specific data.
Either way, it should (emphasis) stimulate the
student towards their goal. If their motivation
for seeking information from professionals
is simply to get their assignment done, this
could lead to several consequences. One of
these is that they will not know the material
and will be unable to perform as an employee.

It seems that this point is what most listers
should be concerned about--and probably are.

Gary Gaugler, Ph.D.




From daemon Fri Feb 8 12:59:58 2002



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 12:54:46 -0600
Subject: RE: measurement and calibration onthe SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you,
Sure, I meant 2160 lines.

Vladimir

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Oldrich Benada [mailto:benada-at-biomed.cas.cz]
} Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 2:20 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: measurement and calibration onthe SEM
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Hi,
} I think you have meant 2160 lines per mm giving 0.46 um between two
} adjacent lines (a standard replica grating); 2600 lines per mm should
} give .38 um spacing.
}
} Best regard from Prague
} Oldrich
}
}
}
} On 6 Feb 2002 at 15:30, Dusevich, Vladimir wrote:
}
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Brian Wajdyk [mailto:electronmicroscopist-at-hotmail.com]
} } } Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 10:47 AM
} } } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: measurement and calibration onthe SEM
} } }
} } }
} } } --------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ----------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} } } of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } --------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Fellow Microscopists,
} } }
} } } SEM has historically been used for metrology of various
} } } structures. I can't
} } } seem to find much literature about the artifacts associated
} } } with this type
} } } of measurement. We do use the NIST standards to check the
} } } calibration of
} } } our equipment, but I haven't characterized how the different
} } } beam or sample
} } } parameters effect the measurements. What do you do? Has
} } } anyone figured out
} } } his or her actual accuracy and precision? We have found that
} } } we can safely
} } } give measurements within +/-5% taking into account most human
} } } and equipment
} } } errors. This is based on the precision of measurements
} made of NIST
} } } structures, measured the same way, over several years. On
} } } the other hand,
} } } the smallest structure we can measure on the standard is 2um
} } } (line and
} } } space. How do you determine at what magnification you
} will no longer
} }
} } Cheap grating replicas with 2600 lines per mm give 0.46 um per line,
} } and this is not too bad for calibrating 50,000 magnification. I am
} } happy I do not need certified standards.
} }
} } } guarantee the measurement? I see that my MRS-3 from Geller
} } } says it's for
} } } 10x to 50kX. How do they figure out that the max
} magnification it is
} } } useful? Maybe it as simple as being able to fit the
} structure on the
} }
} } Maximum useful magnification is very specimen dependant, especially
} } for low voltage and low vacuum modes. Of course, for digital images
} } it is possible to check brightness profiles and if they have slopes
} } on edges of features, then measure "size" on half height of
} the slope.
} } But I am not aware about publications which dependably
} justify this kind
} } of measurements (manipulations with brightness and contrast and
} } specimen tilt could change slopes significantly).
} }
} } } screen. If that were true, you would expect that the
} } } instrument would also
} } } be calibrated to a much higher magnification. How high could
} } } I say it is
} } } accurate to? Can I safely measure a 1000A line assuming no
} }
} } It depends on resolution for your microscope/specimens and on
} } calibration standard you are using. And I think periodic lines with
} } spacing 2 um not really good standard to measure feature with
} } the size of 0.1 um.
} }
} } } obvious issues
} } } (i.e. drift)? Can anyone educate me more on this topic or
} }
} } If you have visible drift during single exposure, then something
} } wrong with microscope or specimen preparation technique.
} }
} } } point me to
} } } resources?
} } }
} } }
} } } Things that could effect measurements (feel free to add to list):
} } } Drift (mechanical / beam)-
} }
} } exposure time should be small for significant drift.
} }
} } } Charging (obvious or stretching of image from a slow scan)
} } } Magnification (adjusted for each set of lens relays)
} }
} } Could be eliminated with proper calibration.
} }
} } } kV (surface vs. subsurface image)
} } } Working Distance
} }
} } Could be eliminated with proper calibration.
} }
} } } Delineation method (raised vs. depression, materials contrast)
} } } Amount of delineation (3D effect)
} } } Resolution (near resolution limit of SEM?)
} } } Contrast (or lack of, bright / dark line)
} } } Edge effect (bright line)
} } } Consistency between tools (calibration, etc.)
} } } Consistency between methods (SEM, TEM, ellipsometry, AFM, etc.)
} } } Operator's eye (where to measure. Measure outside to inside,
} } } center to
} } } center, out to out, in to in?)
} } } Variance in measured layer thickness (topography, sloped
} } } profile (i.e. base
} } } larger than top))
} } } Angle to beam
} } } Preparation methods (polish (i.e. smearing), cleave (i.e.
} } } pull of soft
} } } material), FIB (i.e. angle))
} } } Type of algorithm if doing it automatically (i.e. %50 threshold)
} }
} } Some of the things you have mentioned relate to specimen/experiment,
} } to stereology, but not to microscope. For example, if I
} need to measure
} } size of depression without sharp edges, I have to find (or
} at least to
} } declare)right procedure for it's measurements. May be I
} have to perform
} } stereo measurements and define an edge as a place, where a depth of
} } depression become equal to 0.1 um (or 10% of total depth, or
} } whatever else, depending on a study).
} }
} } And thank you for your extensive list - it is very helpful for
} } observation of the problem. And about additions to your list -
} } I think everybody can say something. For example recently I tried
} } to measure in ESEM thickness of a layer which, as it turned out,
} } was a viscous liquid...
} }
} } Regards,
} }
} } Vladimir
} }
} }
} } Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} } Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} } 3127 School of Dentistry
} } 650 E. 25th Street
} } Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
} }
} } Phone: (816) 235-2072
} } Fax: (816) 235-5524
} } Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy
} }
} }
} }
}
}
} +-----------------------------------+
} Oldrich Benada
} Acad. Sci. CR
} Institute of Microbiology
} Laboratory of electron microscopy
} Videnska 1083
} CZ - 142 20 Prague 4 - Krc
} Czech Republic
} +------------------------------------+
} Phone: +420-2-4752399
} Fax: +420-2-4752347
} WEB:http://www.biomed.cas.cz/mbu/lem113/lem.htm
}
}
}


From daemon Fri Feb 8 14:07:02 2002



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 12:00:35 -0800
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


No offence Jeff, but does anyone else think that this thread has taken on some
of the aspects of the Energizer Bunny?
;-)

"Oakley, Jeff" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Tom,
}
} You are correct, I am not an educator. I also agree with you whole
} heartedly that when someone reads a text in search of information, they
} learn a great deal more than they had planned on... It happens to me every
} time I pick up a book in search of an answer to a question. I'm sure this
} probably was the intent of the instructor.
}
} The point I should have made in my previous post is that instead of shutting
} someone down and "scolding" them (which is exactly what some of the listers
} did) for what appeared to be a Cliff's Notes research method, the person
} should have been guided to useful web pages or texts that would have made
} them find the answers for themselves (which other posters did - kudos to
} those).
}
} It is possible to be helpful while at the same time not giving someone a
} free ride.
}
} I don't think my batteries are dead, Tom, I just think we are operating at
} different voltages.
}
} Jeff
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Tom Phillips [mailto:PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu]
} Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 9:26 AM
} To: Oakley, Jeff
} Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope
}
} Jeff: I am assuming from your rayovac.com you are not an educator.
} That doesn't disqualify your opinion but I would be more worried if
} other currently teaching academics widely expressed this view.
} Learning to look something up in the library is part of the teaching
} assignment. Finding the correct information and distilling it is not
} trivial. Most experts on the listserver could answer each of those
} questions in a few concise sentences. You would be hard pressed to
} find any source in a library in which you found the question followed
} by the answer. When you read the literature, lots of time you end
} up reading additional information on peripheral topics that add to
} the learning process. More importantly, students constantly give me
} sentences in their papers that are clearly paraphrased from the
} literature. I am not suggesting this constitutes plagiarism but it
} is often apparent from the sentence that they don't really understand
} what it means. They think they do but when I discuss it with them,
} they are unable to explain the sophisticated sentence in basic terms.
} Students frequently comment in my teaching evaluations that the most
} important thing they learned in class was that memorizing and
} rephrasing the literature doesn't equate to real understanding. If
} the instructor wanted them simply to ask an expert to get the bottom
} line answer, why didn't the instructor simply say it in lecture or
} give them a handout? Don't you think the instructor knew? Do you
} think a bioengineering class was designed to teach web surfing tools.
} I don't know if you should feel dirty but I think your batteries need
} recharging. Tom Phillips
}
} }
} }
} } I'm rather embarrassed that some of the members of this listserver were too
} } narrow minded and/or arrogant to see that Ms. Wang was using this group of
} } experts as a source, just as one would use a book. And besides, if she
} were
} } just going to "regurgitate" the information learned here, wouldn't she just
} } be doing the same with information pulled from a book?
} }
} } I suddenly feel dirty somehow... Oh my God... It won't wash off!
} }
} }
} } Jeff (I'm in for it now) Oakley
} }
} }
} }
} } } } I think your instructor's hope would be that you figured out the
} } } } answers to class problems on your own. Asking an expert in the field
} } } } and then simply regurgitating that information is a worthless
} } } } exercise. If you are going to invest the time and money required to
} } } } earn a degree, you might want to try to learn something along the
} } } } way. I am a big supporter of listservers but hate to see them used
} } } } in this way.
} } } }
} } } } }
} } } } } To whom it may concern:
} } } } }
} } } } } I am an undergraduate student enrolled at the Georgia Institute of
} } } } } Technology.
} } } } } I am in a biomedical engineering class, and we have a problem that we
} } must
} } } } } solve involving electron microscopes. I have a few questions that I
} } hope will
} } } } } get answered ASAP:
} } } } }
} } } } } 1. What are the advantages and disadvantages in using electrons for
} } } } } microscopy
} } } } } rather than light?
} } } } } 2. Does the wavelength of the electrons have anythign to do with the
} } spatial
} } } } } resolution that the microscope produces in the final picture?
} } } } } 3. What is temporal resolution and how is it produced in the
} electron
} } } } } microscope?
} } } } }
} } } } } Thank you for your time. I greatly appreciate your efforts in
} helping
} } me
} } } } } understand more of this subject.
} } } } }
} } } } } Sincerely,
} } } } } Jenny Wang
}
} --
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D.
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core Facility
}
} 3 Tucker Hall
} Division of Biological Sciences
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} (573)-882-4712 (voice)
} (573)-882-0123 (fax)



From daemon Fri Feb 8 14:43:08 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 15:33:21 +0100
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sending Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program Director was, in my eyes,
really unnecessary. Maybe it was just a nice try from Jenny Wang to get her homework done,
but this is really overdone.

Regards,

Stefan



Jim Quinn wrote:

} Don -
}
} College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers to elementary questions.
} Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
} was a bad idea.
}
} JQuinn
}
} PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program Director.

°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Fri Feb 8 14:49:00 2002



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 15:39:32 +0100
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sending Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program Director
was, in my eyes,
really unnecessary. Even if it was just a nice try from Jenny Wang to
get her homework done,
this is really overdone.

Regards,

Stefan



Jim Quinn wrote:

} Don -
}
} College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers to
elementary questions.
} Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
} was a bad idea.
}
} JQuinn
}
} PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program
Director.



°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Fri Feb 8 14:52:00 2002



From: anthony.borrelli-at-kodak.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 15:45:59 -0500
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} From: Anthony R. Borrelli

Unsubscribe



From daemon Fri Feb 8 15:28:57 2002



From: Cavin Mooers :      cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 16:05:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


My feeling is that those of you who lack a positve and constructive
response to a question that is posed, simply should not respond. I
have seen plenty of queries by "experts" which could be answered rather
simply by opening a book, but I certainly do not stoop to condescension.


Cavin Mooers, Research Assistant
Vitreous State Laboratory
The Catholic University of America
Hannan Hall
Washington, DC 20064
(202) 319-5346phone
(202) 319-4469fax





From daemon Fri Feb 8 15:38:07 2002



From: Ladd Research :      sales-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 16:32:58 -0500
Subject: Re: help with buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Shea,

I believe you may be looking Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution. We can get
it for you if you are looking to buy it, or contact me direct if you
just need some information on it.

Dr. Charles Duvic

--

**** Please Note Our New Address, Fax and Phone Numbers ****

LADD RESEARCH
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495 USA

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

TEL: 1-800-451-3406 (US) or 1-802-658-4961 (anywhere)
FAX: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com

Quality Since 1955


Shea Miller wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.}
} Greetings all;
} can anyone provide the formulation for Hank's buffer? I have looked in all of my books (most, but not all of which, admittedly, lean
towards plants) and ca
}
} thanks in advance
} shea
}
} Dr. S. Shea Miller
} Agriculture & AgriFood Canada
} Eastern Cereal & Oilseed Research Centre
} Rm. 2068, K.W. Neatby Bldg.
} Central Experimental Farm
} Ottawa, Ontario,
} Canada K1A 0C6
} Phone: (613)759-1760
} Fax: (613)759-1701
} E-mail: millers-at-em.agr.ca


From daemon Fri Feb 8 15:47:27 2002



From: Doug Anderson :      danderson-at-schnabel-eng.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 16:41:15 -0500
Subject: RE: vibration isolation standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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List Members,

The killer in vibration impact on sensitive equipment is resonance. We
(Schnabel Engineering) have worked on many projects with varying equipment
vibration problems. The common denominator in all of them is that
resonances in the source, the vibration path (whether geological or
structural) and the receiver (the equipment and its mountings) combine to
produce an impact that must be ascertained. It is certainly desirable for
the impact to be determined in advance, because the range of mitigation
techniques is broader then. However, various retrofits are available. The
key is to use the appropriate retrofit.

Vibration, travelling in waves, is different than heat, and a solution of
just packing "stuff" around the site is generally inadequate; sometimes it
works, but that is then just dumb luck. I have used TEM equipment (in grad
school) and know that the column for a 100kV microscope has a substantially
different construction and configuration, and therefore substantially
different vibration response from a 1.2MV microscope. The taller tower of
the 1.2MV instrument will most probably have lower resonant frequencies than
the 100kV instrument. I am not sure if such information (mechanical
resonance) is available for them, but it certainly can be measured.

Mitigation techniques range from modification of the source, to barriers
(trenches or caissons around the facility), to floating floors, to dynamic
or passive absorbers. Each has its place, and the best (including cost!)
solution may be a combination of the above. Again, the reduction of
resonances is the key to successful vibration mitigation. I would be happy
to discuss such solutions with those interested.

As a side note, I first became acquainted with this list about a year and a
half ago, with respect to optical microscope standards. I am impressed with
the quality and quantity of contributions to the list.

Regards,

Doug Anderson

Douglas A. Anderson, PhD
Senior Consultant
Schnabel Engineering Associates (http://www.schnabel-eng.com)
510 East Gay Street
West Chester, PA 19380
Phone: 610 696-6066, Fax: 610 696-7771

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Lesley S. Bechtold [SMTP:lsb-at-jax.org]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 1:31 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Fwd: vibration isolation standards
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} } Happy New Year to everyone!
} }
} } We are setting up a totally new EM/LM lab - being built from the ground
} } up. We have told our engineers that we need to have a vibration-free
} } environment for optimum equipment operation. They would like to know
} } exactly what vibration is tolerable and what isn't. Are there any
} } standards or measurements out there that detail what limits can be
} } tolerated and what can't?
} }
} } Thank you!
} }
} } Lesley
} }
} } Lesley S. Bechtold
} } Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} } The Jackson Laboratory
} } 600 Main St.
} } Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} } 207-288-6191
}
} Lesley S. Bechtold
} Supervisor, Biological Imaging
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main St.
} Bar Harbor, ME 04609
} 207-288-6191
}
}
}
}
This e-mail including attached files is confidential. Its transmission is
solely as an accommodation for the benefit of the recipient. The recipient
bears the responsibility for checking its accuracy against corresponding
originally signed documents provided by Schnabel Engineering Associates,
Inc. If you received this e-mail in error, its use is prohibited. Please
destroy it and immediately notify postmaster-at-schnabel-eng.com



From daemon Fri Feb 8 17:05:47 2002



From: Xianglin Li :      Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 17:57:09 -0500
Subject: Do you have any recommended books?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all;

I have two sets of data to interpreted:
1) X-ray rocking curve data, to analyze the defect (damage) of the
wafer surface.
2) XPS data, to trace how the wafer surface composition will change
with the increasing of sputtering time.

I need to have some fundamental idea of these two theories to
interpreted data. Do you have any recommendations of the textbooks, or
other papers I should read?

Any kind of help will be appreciated!

Xianglin Li

Center for Advanced Material
Department of Chemical Engineering
University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Xianglin_Li-at-student.uml.edu
Tel: 978-934-3411




From daemon Fri Feb 8 17:23:39 2002



From: Beauregard :      beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Fri, 08 Feb 2002 18:46:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Polaroid Sprintscan 45 Ultra film holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers:

Looks like there are different opinions out there. Before this turns into a
flame war, I would personally like to know what the general opinion is. I
therefore propose a poll. Just send me an email with nothing but one of the
following numbers in the subject line, and I will tally those votes and
provide a summary in a week (if I get enough emails):

1) Students should work through their assignments alone. Let's not support
laziness at all.
2) We should help them help themselves by pointing them to general
microscopy books.
3) We should take their questions and point them to specific microscopy
books dealing with their problems
4) We should encourage them to contact us offline so we can test their
sincerity and then either help them or not. This should be posted on the
server to avoid redundancy.
5) We should help them with their questions by trying to answer them in a
general way
6) We should go all out and answer their questions as best as we can.

I hope the statistics will not be skewed by a zillion students who send me
"6" as an answer ;-)

Any suggestions are welcome! I also promise not to misuse the email
addresses!

} } } please send the email to mb-at-soft-imaging.com { { { { { {

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Oakley, Jeff [mailto:oakleyj-at-rayovac.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 11:46 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Tom,

You are correct, I am not an educator. I also agree with you whole
heartedly that when someone reads a text in search of information, they
learn a great deal more than they had planned on... It happens to me every
time I pick up a book in search of an answer to a question. I'm sure this
probably was the intent of the instructor.

The point I should have made in my previous post is that instead of shutting
someone down and "scolding" them (which is exactly what some of the listers
did) for what appeared to be a Cliff's Notes research method, the person
should have been guided to useful web pages or texts that would have made
them find the answers for themselves (which other posters did - kudos to
those).

It is possible to be helpful while at the same time not giving someone a
free ride.

I don't think my batteries are dead, Tom, I just think we are operating at
different voltages.

Jeff


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 9:26 AM
To: Oakley, Jeff
Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


At 10:28 PM 02/07/02 -0500, Beauregard wrote:
} Polaroid did make a few of them. I saw a metal one, photocopied it
} and measured it. I have the insert spec's but not at home here. I
} could scan it and post it on my web page.

Hi Don,

I have scanned in the photocopy of the special insert for the 4X5 holder.
I made a mistake about it being recessed. The SS45 comes with one (2Ľx2Ľ?)
holder that is recessed and that was what I recalled at home as being
recessed. After looking at the photocopy of an official insert, I realized
my mistake.

The holder is nothing but a totally flat piece of steel with 6 pins
sticking up, a rectangular hole in it to allow transmitted light to shine
through the negative, and along the one outside edge of the insert are two
slots that fit into the two pins on the 4x5 holder.

I will post two JPG images of the insert(s) at:

http://www.westol.com/~beaurega/ss45.htm

I included a scanned image of a steel insert / holder that came standard
with the scanner. Notice the two holders have identical slot alignment in
my one image. Adjust the DPI of the image to get your laserjet printed
insert image to line up with the two pins in the 4x5 holder. Then use this
accurate template to make or have made the insert.

One could use a double layer of old film to make the equivalents of the pin
posts to keep the film in register.
The whole thing is painted black. Use a Dremel tool cut off wheel to make
the slots.

Hope this helps.

Paul Beauregard




From daemon Fri Feb 8 18:19:33 2002



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 18:12:07 -0600
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree, Stefan. Not only overdone, but ugly. Since when did we become proctors of other people's courses? I was satisfied with Jenny's answer. If she had ever considered a career in electron microscopy, I'll bet she's reconsidering now.

Randy Tindall
EM Core
University of Missouri

-----Original Message-----
} From: Stefan Geimer
To: MSA Listserver
Sent: 2/8/2002 8:39 AM


Sending Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program Director
was, in my eyes,
really unnecessary. Even if it was just a nice try from Jenny Wang to
get her homework done,
this is really overdone.

Regards,

Stefan



Jim Quinn wrote:

} Don -
}
} College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers to
elementary questions.
} Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
} was a bad idea.
}
} JQuinn
}
} PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program
Director.



°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Stefan Geimer
MCDB Dept.
Yale University
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520-8103
U.S.A.

Tel.: 203/432-3473
Fax.: 203/432-6210

e-mail: stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°




From daemon Fri Feb 8 19:42:14 2002



From: Helvey, Marc :      Marc.Helvey-at-vlsistd.com
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 17:33:35 -0800
Subject: calibration standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Mark -

VLSI Standards is in the midst of releasing (the product is in beta at this
juncture) a NIST Traceable, 100 nm pitch standard for use with SEMs. The
accuracy is equal to or less than 1 nm in most cases. Besides 100 nm, it
will also be certified for 4 other pitch values. It will come in various
wafer / die form factors to be able to accommodate CD-SEMs utilizing
automated handlers, as found in the Semiconductor and related industries.

Please contact me directly offline and I'd be glad to provide you
information on this exciting new product.

Regards -

Marc Helvey
Strategic Accounts Manager
VLSI Standards, Inc.
3087 North First Street
San Jose, CA 95134-2006
Phone: (408) 428-1800, ext. 108
E-Mail: marc.helvey-at-vlsistd.com {mailto:marc.helvey-at-vlsistd.com}
Internet: http://www.vlsistandards.com




-----Original Message-----
} From: Windland, Mark J (MN14) [mailto:Mark.Windland-at-honeywell.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 7:51 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


We need to purchase a new calibration standard for our SEM that gets us down
to the next level. We need to have accuracy down to 0.010 microns. We have
been using the Geller MRS-3 and now are considering purchasing the MRS-4
traceable standard.
I believe this will give us what we need but I was wondering if there are
other standards out there that are better, the same, worse? I need to hear
from the calibration specialists out there.
Thanks,

Mark Windland
Honeywell
Minneapolis, Minnesota
763-954-2845


From daemon Fri Feb 8 21:12:09 2002



From: Dr Deborah Stenzel :      d.stenzel-at-qut.edu.au
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 22:57:06 -0600
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I don't think it is a simple answer to your questions. If the request is
like
the subject of these discussions, then I would say number three. If the
student has researched the basic information (showing an earnest effort
at learning), and asks for help with understanding what they have found,
or carrying it further, then I see no problem with the experts discussing
and feeding information to the student. Giving them "food for thought"
should not be a problem.

Darrell

Mike Bode {mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com} on 02/08/2002 06:19:42 PM

To: "'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:


Hello Listers:

Looks like there are different opinions out there. Before this turns into a
flame war, I would personally like to know what the general opinion is. I
therefore propose a poll. Just send me an email with nothing but one of the
following numbers in the subject line, and I will tally those votes and
provide a summary in a week (if I get enough emails):

1) Students should work through their assignments alone. Let's not support
laziness at all.
2) We should help them help themselves by pointing them to general
microscopy books.
3) We should take their questions and point them to specific microscopy
books dealing with their problems
4) We should encourage them to contact us offline so we can test their
sincerity and then either help them or not. This should be posted on the
server to avoid redundancy.
5) We should help them with their questions by trying to answer them in a
general way
6) We should go all out and answer their questions as best as we can.

I hope the statistics will not be skewed by a zillion students who send me
"6" as an answer ;-)

Any suggestions are welcome! I also promise not to misuse the email
addresses!

} } } please send the email to mb-at-soft-imaging.com { { { { { {

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Oakley, Jeff [mailto:oakleyj-at-rayovac.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 11:46 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Tom,

You are correct, I am not an educator. I also agree with you whole
heartedly that when someone reads a text in search of information, they
learn a great deal more than they had planned on... It happens to me every
time I pick up a book in search of an answer to a question. I'm sure this
probably was the intent of the instructor.

The point I should have made in my previous post is that instead of
shutting
someone down and "scolding" them (which is exactly what some of the listers
did) for what appeared to be a Cliff's Notes research method, the person
should have been guided to useful web pages or texts that would have made
them find the answers for themselves (which other posters did - kudos to
those).

It is possible to be helpful while at the same time not giving someone a
free ride.

I don't think my batteries are dead, Tom, I just think we are operating at
different voltages.

Jeff


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 9:26 AM
To: Oakley, Jeff
Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


Dear all

I've been reading the discussions on this topic with interest, as a
lecturer who sets similar EM assignment questions for undergraduate
students.

Last year, a couple of my students posted their assignment questions
to the listserver. After an initial feeling of annoyance that the
students were being lazy, and not seeking out information for
themselves, I eventually decided that this probably wasn't such a bad
thing - as Mike said in his email, we are supposed to be teaching
students to identify and utilize different sources of information!

In my case, I hadn't directly told the class about the listserver, so
my students had either sought it out by themselves, or had actually
read through a list of suggested reference texts and websites which
had been given to them early in the semester. Either way, this was
something to be encouraged!

I certainly don't think the listserver is the place where we should
provide full and detailed answers to students' assignment questions -
and particularly not when demanded "ASAP", and without evidence of
the student having done any of their own homework on the topic!

However, I also share the views expressed in some earlier messages
that we are a useful "resource" for students. For those who have the
time and inclination to respond to students' requests, I support the
approach of offering some basic information (brief, easy to
understand) as a starting point, and then suggesting that the student
refer to texts, papers or other sources. Indeed, this is exactly
what happened with my students, and both presented assignments with
information gleaned from a wide variety of sources. Many thanks to
those of you who responded in this way.


Cheers
Deb
*****************************************************
Dr Deborah Stenzel
Lecturer (Microbiology)
School of Life Sciences
and
Applications Specialist (Biological)
Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
Queensland University of Technology
GPO Box 2434
Brisbane 4001
Australia

Phone + 61 7 3864 5036
Fax + 61 7 3864 5100
email d.stenzel-at-qut.edu.au

http://www.sci.qut.edu.au/aemf


From daemon Fri Feb 8 23:09:18 2002



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2002 22:26:07 -0600
Subject: LKB Ultratome

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have a perfectly good LKB Ultramicrotome ("Ultratome")
Model #2088 (circa. 1976) for which we have no need. We have several
others and we DO need the space! It also has most of the parts for a
cryokit.

If anyone is interested: its yours for FREE! Just come and
pick it up or arrange for shipment.

Please feel free to call or leave a message at any time.
--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist, RTI
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.167.174/AEM_LAB.html


From daemon Sat Feb 9 01:39:40 2002



From: pjp6 :      pjp6-at-dana.ucc.nau.edu
Date: Sat, 09 Feb 2002 00:33:41 -0700
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In much less time than it took to find addis for Jenny Wang's chairperson and
program director he could have referred Jenny to Bozzola/Russell or any other
EM text for the answers. This string has become more about those who want to
educate and help vs. those who would judge and punish.

Still listening and learning.
Pete Polsgrove



} ===== Original Message From Stefan Geimer {stefan.geimer-at-yale.edu} =====
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Pete Polsgrove
NAU Flagstaff, AZ.
pjp6-at-dana.ucc.nau.edu
micro2001p-at-netscape.net



From daemon Sat Feb 9 05:28:22 2002



From: Chris Jeffree :      c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 11:23:33 -0000
Subject: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have been stunned by how many would deny answers to a student. I
have to confess that I did not analyse the enquirer's motives, and
offered some simple answers to her questions

Is the objection that the enquiry came via the internet, so was
directed to all on the list?
Would your reaction have been the same if the student made a more
personal, targeted approach
a) Called at your lab/office to ask questions
b) Wrote asking questions
c) Phoned/Faxed you asking questions

I think we have to acknowledge that the pre-internet world of the
printed page and the post-internet
world are totally different. Students are under immense pressure, not
least under the burgeoning weight of the paper literature, and simply
cannot afford the time to plough through roomfuls of books, however
good this would be for their souls. They need entry points to a
problem, and they should be congratulated for using all of the
facilities currently at their disposal to get there. If that changes
the way educators have to go about assessment of project work so be
it. That is our professional problem, not the student's problem. This
list has a significant educational role at all levels within research
and tertiary education, and I would be saddened if barriers are
erected against enquiries from students.


Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
Biological Sciences EM Facility

Inveresk Cottage
26, Carberry Road
Inveresk
Musselburgh
Midlothian
EH21 8PR
Tel: +44 131 665 6062
FAX +44 131 653 6248
Mobile 07710 585 401
Dr. Chris Jeffree
Inveresk Cottage
26, Carberry Road
Inveresk
Musselburgh
Midlothian
EH21 8PR
Tel: +44 131 665 6062
FAX +44 131 653 6248
Mobile 07710 585 401



From daemon Sat Feb 9 05:40:39 2002



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 03:32:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Answers to Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Gary and All,

As for "bad taste" from the MSA response, I taste no such displeasure.

I must say the questions asked were vague and rather general. Have I
missed something? In all this communication, have we heard from the course
professor explaining, defending, or otherwise making a statement as to
what he or she was requiring of the student?! Why is not the professor
explaining this material to the student? The professor should be the
FIRST resource, or at least provide the student with a rudimentary
understanding of the topic and perhaps assigning readings from handouts or
materials on reserve in the library.

I teach a dedicated biomicroscopy course (optical light microscopy, TEM
amd SEM) to upper division biology students, and have for 9 years. I
would never just suggest students be turned out to fend on their own. I
provide a a number of reserve textbooks and a huge number of handouts. I
ALWAYS suggest if students are having a difficult time finding answers to
questions I have proposed, they come to me FIRST!! In this manner, I
have control over the ratio of student ability and information available.

I believe the hallmark of an educator is to entice and DIRECT the student
in a manner of investigation, not to just through out a bunch of
questions, allowing the student to randomly be come up with the answers,
some of which depending of the source may be incorrect.

I must admit, when I saw the original email, my thoughts were divided into
two direction: 1) here is a student who is looking for quick answers to
some vague, rather general questions; and 2) here is a professor who is
too busy with something else and has not put forth the foundation from
which the student could asked specific questions about the general topics,
e.g., "I have read this about the subject and do not understand. Is there
someone on the listserver who can explain it differently from how I
interpret the subject?"

Again, to some extent this is the responsibility of the professor.

Enough said...

Ken
--
Ken Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
The University of Portland
Department of Biology
5000 N. Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97203





From daemon Sat Feb 9 05:58:55 2002



From: Ken Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 03:50:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: help with buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Shea,

According to 'Staining Procedures', Edited by George Clark, 4th
edition, Williams and Wilkins, 1981, page 22:

Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (Hanks' BSS)

1) CaCl2- 2H2O 185.5 mg/liter
2) KCl 400.0 mg/liter
3) KH2PO4 60.0 mg/liter
4) MgSO4-7H2O 200.0 mg/liter
5) NaCl 8000.0 mg/liter
6) NaHCO3 350.0 mg/liter
7) Na2HPO4 47.5 mg/liter
8) Dextrose 1000.0 mg/liter
9) Phenol Red, Na 17.0 mg/liter

Good luck!
Ken


--
Ken Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
The University of Portland
Department of Biology
5000 N. Willamette Blvd.
Portland, OR 97203





From daemon Sat Feb 9 10:35:42 2002



From: rnessler :      rnessler-at-blue.weeg.uiowa.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 10:27:25 -0600
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} ===== Original Message From Dr Deborah Stenzel {d.stenzel-at-qut.edu.au} =====
Hello Group,
I agree with Deb's post. Following this thread, I got to thinking that it
is maybe time WE (as educator/citizens) do a little reading. Times they are a
changin'. Try to find this article: Get Ready for the Net Generation, by Mark
L. Alch, taken from the February 2000 issue of Training & Development. I
found it in the Human Resources 01/02 Annual Editions, ISBN 0-07-243342-6.
The way the new generations are learning happens to be a little different than
the way most of us did. We not only have to understand how they learn, but we
will also have to understand what motivates them once we hire them.
Randy



} Dear all
} Last year, a couple of my students posted their assignment questions
} to the listserver. After an initial feeling of annoyance that the
} students were being lazy, and not seeking out information for
} themselves, I eventually decided that this probably wasn't such a bad
} thing - as Mike said in his email, we are supposed to be teaching
} students to identify and utilize different sources of information!
}
} In my case, I hadn't directly told the class about the listserver, so
} my students had either sought it out by themselves, or had actually
} read through a list of suggested reference texts and websites which
} had been given to them early in the semester. Either way, this was
} something to be encouraged!
}
} I certainly don't think the listserver is the place where we should
} provide full and detailed answers to students' assignment questions -
} and particularly not when demanded "ASAP", and without evidence of
} the student having done any of their own homework on the topic!
}
} However, I also share the views expressed in some earlier messages
} that we are a useful "resource" for students. For those who have the
} time and inclination to respond to students' requests, I support the
} approach of offering some basic information (brief, easy to
} understand) as a starting point, and then suggesting that the student
} refer to texts, papers or other sources. Indeed, this is exactly
} what happened with my students, and both presented assignments with
} information gleaned from a wide variety of sources. Many thanks to
} those of you who responded in this way.
}
}
} Cheers
} Deb
} *****************************************************
} Dr Deborah Stenzel
} Lecturer (Microbiology)
} School of Life Sciences
} and
} Applications Specialist (Biological)
} Analytical Electron Microscopy Facility
} Queensland University of Technology
} GPO Box 2434
} Brisbane 4001
} Australia
}
} Phone + 61 7 3864 5036
} Fax + 61 7 3864 5100
} email d.stenzel-at-qut.edu.au
}
} http://www.sci.qut.edu.au/aemf



From daemon Sat Feb 9 12:58:26 2002



From: Richard Cole :      rcole-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 13:51:23 -0500
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Dear All

I can not believe all the unnecessary and self-righteous email one student
has generated by asking a few questions! For those of you out there who
feel it was "wrong" for a student to ask these questions, don't answer them.
But as for emailing her Dept. head, when did this list become some sort of
regulated police like forum? If this is what it has degraded to, I what
off! As I tell my children and student alike there are no stupid or bad
questions. As professional (at least I thought we all were before this) I
believe that it is not only out duty but our obligation to help other learn.
I don't mean doing there homework for them, but the response that this
girl/women received embarrassed and ashamed me. I simple reply guiding her
were to search for the answers could have saved everyone a lot of time and
seem energy as well. As for people in general asking questions that the
answers can be found in books, again if you don't want to answer them,
don't. As for me, I am not the smartest man in the world nor do not know
every thing and naively thought that this is what forum/list servers like
this one were for. Guess I was wrong

Richard Cole
Research Scientist III
Director of the Laser Microsurgery and Advanced Light Microscopy Core Unit
Wadsworth Center
P.O. Box 509 Albany N.Y. 12201-0509
518-474-7048 Phone
518-486-4901 Fax



From daemon Sat Feb 9 14:13:29 2002



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Feb 2002 10:06:34 -1000 (HST)
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I looked into the background of the student's course early on and sent a
brief explanation to the List, twice, but it never arrived, as far as I
can tell. I'll tack in on below. One of the points of this biomedical
engineering course that has been overlooked is that it is a PBL course.

PBL is a new philosophy of teaching that is being used, in part, by
various medical schools and othe programs. I don't know a whole lot about
it, but I know it exists because the University of Hawaii was the first
place to embrace PBL wholly, instead of partially as at other
institutions. Basically, the medical students here have no formal courses,
but are thrown directly out into the clinics from day one, and are
encouraged to learn what they need to know to do their "jobs" fairly
independently. I'm sure this is an oversimplification, but not by a
lot. There was a hue and cry from many of the instructors - how do you
learn gross anatomy without a gross anatomy class and a cadaver? But I
guess they worked it out. When I ask the current crop of students if they
like it, they say they do. There's more of an emphasis on learning by
doing and asking than just sitting in classrooms all day and with books
all night.

However, here's the point - they are encouraged to go out and learn how to
find answers in the world, using all resources from the library to asking
experts to the Internet. And they are told not to just ask the
teacher".

Do I agree with this method? Mostly no, probably because I didn't learn
that way, and I'm old enough to be kinda set in my ways. . Is it
working? Apparently yes. Now that I'm not an official student, is that
the way I learn *now*? Yes, it is!

This is not an endorsement of the PBL system (y'all need to do some
research on it to understand how the philosophy, as do I), but merely an
explanation of why the students are asking the questions. And then ignore
or guide them, whatever you wish.

Aloha,
Tina


Message that did not reach the List:

I have received several emails recently about TEMs, as have several of you
as well as this List. At first I dismissed tham as being at about the same
level as Mrs. Jones' 6th grade science class who each individually emailed
me to ask "How does an electron microscope work?" However, I looked into
this and found out that this recent spate are from a Biomedical
Engineering class at Georgia Tech. There are 60 students, split up into
teams, involved in a Problem Based Learning curriculum, which encourages
using all resources available, from the library to interviewing
experts. Their project is an interesting one - although I deleted the
original questions, I think it involves designing an original, viable
improvement for the electron microscope, especially in areas that would
allow them to create a 4D database of living cells and their cellular
functions.

I received a couple of messages from students who had apparently done
their library research and were able to ask thoughtful, reasoned
questions. I feel that the ones who simply regurgitate the instructors'
list of questions *do* need to do more background research and then
formulate specific questions and direct them to the particular experts
in the field. But they have only a couple of weeks on this assignment, so
I guess I understand their "spamming" the List to find those experts!

I thought giving you all the background on the project would help you
decide how to respond to the messages. It is an interesting mental
exercise to think about how to build such an electron microscope. Perhaps
they will!


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************






From daemon Sun Feb 10 11:39:53 2002



From: flcy-at-att.net
Date: Sun, 10 Feb 2002 17:21:38 +0000
Subject: Re: help with buffer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





From daemon Sun Feb 10 20:31:57 2002



From: max.sidorov-at-amd.com
Date: Sun, 10 Feb 2002 18:22:04 -0800
Subject: TEM: ctfExplorer update (v. 0.999a)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All:

FYI: ctfExplorer has been updated and it is still free for all.

New features/improvements/fixes:

- Corrected an error in the formula used for Focal Spread calculation which caused too strong damping by temporal envelope at high frequencies. Thanks to Michael O'Keefe, Peter Tiemeijer and Uwe Lucken for pinpointing this error.

- Added a posibility to change values for high voltage and objective lens current instabilities (along with chromatic aberration and energy spread they affect the value of focal spread)

- Added a possibility of editing/saving/restoring of the microscope list

To the best of my knowledge, the software does not have any nasty bugs. It
is tested under Windows 95/98/NT4/2000.

Please give it a try. Please DO direct your suggestions and comments to sidorov-at-yahoo.com
I hope you'll find the software useful.

Here is the link: http://clik.to/ctfexplorer (always use this link. it will
direct you to the right location). Direct link: http://www.maxsidorov.com/ctfexplorer

Enjoy,
__________________________________
Max Sidorov, Ph.D.
max.sidorov-at-amd.com


----------Additional Info----------
ctfExplorer is a highly interactive program which calculates/displays the contrast
transfer function of TEMs. I know that there are similar programs floating
around but ctfexplorer does not only 1d but also 2d calculations/display
with 2-fold and 3-fold astigmatism imposed. There are other unique features
to it. All parameters (defocus, voltage, Cs, etc) can be changed
interactively.

Features
- Calculates 1-Dimensional CTF
- Calculates 2-Dimensional CTF
- Calculates Defocus Map
- Calculates point-to-point resolution, Lichte defocus and info limit
- Shows the effects of 2-Fold and 3-Fold astigmatism
- Allows to change Defocus, 2-Fold and 3-Fold astigmatism in real time
- Shows what happens to 1D CTF in different directions when there's astigmatism
- Displays the damping envelopes
- Allows to select a microscope from a list of microscopes
- Allows to create a custom microscope
- Allows to change HT, Cs, Cc, Energy Spread, Convergence for any microscope
- 2 modes of operation: CTF Explorer (to see everything) and CTF Plotter
- Compares 2 microscopes or 2 settings for 1 microscope
- Saves 1D CTF, 2D CTF and "Defocus Map" as bitmaps or metafiles
- Exports 1D plots to tab-delimited text format





From daemon Sun Feb 10 22:01:41 2002



From: hazrat.hussain-at-iw.uni-halle.de ()
Date: Sun, 10 Feb 2002 21:55:57 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM block copolymer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (hazrat.hussain-at-iw.uni-halle) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Sunday,
February 10, 2002 at 11:35:50
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: hazrat.hussain-at-iw.uni-halle
Name: Hussain

Organization: University of Halle

Education: Graduate College

Location: Germany

Question: Dear Sir,
I have stained a block copolymer isothermally crystallized samples
with RuO4 vapors. The block copolymers constitute poly(ethylene
oxide)(semicrystalline block) and poly(perfluorohexylethyl
methacrylate) as second block.
The structure is as
PFMA-b-PEO-b-PFMA
PEO block length is 227 EO units(20000 g/mol) and each PFMA block
was 5-7 PFMA units.
The TEM morphology that we got from this sample was showing a
layered or lamellar structure.There are dark lines and bright lines.
Now I dont know, which block has been stained with RuO4.
The second question is again the staining assigning problem, I got
TEM pictures from solutions of the same block copolymers, the samples
were stained again with the same dye. we got some spherical micelles
in the TEM picture, but we dont know, the staining blocks.
I hope u will consider answer my questions. I will be grateful
with my best regards
Hussain

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Feb 11 06:19:44 2002



From: Dr Adam Papworth :      ajp5-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 12:08:15 +0000
Subject: subscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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--
Dr Adam Papworth,
Senior Experimental Officer,
Department of Engineering,
The University of Liverpool,
Liverpool,
L69 3GH, UK.

Phone
(Work) 0151 794 4672
(Mobile) 0151 794 7587
07970 24 7587
(Home) 0151 283 8596
(FAX) 0151 794 4675
e-mail ajp5-at-liv.ac.uk




From daemon Mon Feb 11 06:55:12 2002



From: James M. Ehrman :      jehrman-at-mta.ca
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:48:27 -0400
Subject: Re: Answers to Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gee, maybe this whole thread is just a Sociology experiment to gauge
the response of a small group of specialists to a contentious issue! For
my $0.02 ($0.033 Canadian), pick up a copy of "Silicon Snake Oil" by
Cliff Stoll. Relevant reading, I think.

Cheers,

Jim

--
James M. Ehrman
Digital Microscopy Facility
Mount Allison University
Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
CANADA

phone: 506-364-2519
fax: 506-364-2505
email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
www: http://www.mta.ca/~jehrman




From daemon Mon Feb 11 07:50:20 2002



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:40:08 -0500
Subject: staining of block copolymers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Hussain Hazrat wrote:
============================================
Question: Dear Sir,
I have stained a block copolymer isothermally crystallized samples
with RuO4 vapors. The block copolymers constitute poly(ethylene
oxide)(semicrystalline block) and poly(perfluorohexylethyl
methacrylate) as second block.
The structure is as
PFMA-b-PEO-b-PFMA
PEO block length is 227 EO units(20000 g/mol) and each PFMA block
was 5-7 PFMA units.
The TEM morphology that we got from this sample was showing a
layered or lamellar structure.There are dark lines and bright lines.
Now I dont know, which block has been stained with RuO4.
The second question is again the staining assigning problem, I got
TEM pictures from solutions of the same block copolymers, the samples
were stained again with the same dye. we got some spherical micelles
in the TEM picture, but we dont know, the staining blocks.
I hope u will consider answer my questions. I will be grateful
with my best regards
Hussain
========================================================
This kind of question is extremely difficult to "call" on the basis of first
principles (or logic). You really need to see one or two "knowns", and then
you can see which way the area percent of the dark vs. white changes.

If you are seeing some "spherical" features from solution precipitation, and
it is just a guess, it might be that you are seeing segregation of
homopolymer into a more traditional kind of morphology for these kinds of
systems. At least when we have seen such features in other block copolymer
systems that was our conclusion.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Mon Feb 11 07:50:20 2002



From: Jon Ekman :      ekman-at-bio.fsu.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:45:19 -0500
Subject: EM: Exploding Kevex LN2 level sensor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

Just wanted to give a heads up for anyone with older Kevex LN2 cooled
EDS systems. On Friday, our Kevex LN2 level sensor just exploded after
15years of service. Normally we remove the sensor (unplugged from the
system) and place it horizontal in a special holder while we fill the
LN2 then we dry it off and put it back in place. Today the metal top
blew off and hit me in the leg. No injuries except the loud bang may
have shaved a year or so off my life. Luckly, we had a second sensor
on hand for replacement.

If any one has a good explanation why the metal cover decided to tear
itself away from the Styrofoam insulation after all these years we would
like to hear from
you.

TIA

Jon Ekman
Florida State University
Biological Science Imaging Resource
119 Bio Unit I, 4370
Tallahassee, FL 32306
tel: 850.644.6519
fax: 850.644.0481



From daemon Mon Feb 11 07:51:48 2002



From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 14:46:09 +0100
Subject: Microscopy Laboratories

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Microscopists,

Let me inform you the list of microscopy laboratories at the "Petr's
Microscopy Resources" has been completely rebuilt. You can check it
at the
http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/laboratories.php .

Furthermore, the form for a new link submission has been revised to a
great extent. Therefore, the addition of a new link to your
laboratory is very easy and safe now, and your submission will be
very appreciated. You can find the submission form at the new location
http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/PMRform.php .

Regards,

Petr Schauer
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dr. Petr Schauer tel.: (+420 5) 41514313 |
| Head of Electron Microscopy Laboratory fax : (+420 5) 41514404 |
| INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS (+420 5) 41514402 |
| ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC e-mail: petr-at-isibrno.cz |
| Kralovopolska 147, CZ-612 64 Brno petr-at-dp.fce.vutbr.cz |
| Czech Republic www: http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/ |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+


From daemon Mon Feb 11 07:57:10 2002



From: Michael Herron :      herro001-at-umn.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 07:51:11 -0600
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All,

OK so it is a given that consumer grade cameras have relativly poor low
light performance. That said, are there cameras that have better than
average lowlight performance? Are any of the consumer cameras capable
of binning?

Mike


"Mardinly, John" wrote:
}
}
} John;
} You are correct about the small CCDs of consumer digital cameras
} have sever performance deficiencies due to their small pixel size. The F707
} and other consumer digital cameras that use the same chip (2/3"-Nikon 5000
} and Olympus E20N) suffer from noise even in visible light photographs. The
} Nikon D1X and the new Canon EOS 1D(advertised 11.5 µm pixels) are
} significant improvements, but cost $6000 just for the camera body! One
} organization addressing this problem is
} http://www.fredmiranda.com/Action_profilesPage/index.html where they discuss
} and sell Photoshop plug-ins for noise reduction. Another digital camera site
} I really like is:
} http://www.imaging-resource.com/
}

--

________________________________________________________
/ Michael J. Herron, U of MN, Dept. of Pediatrics/BMT /
/ herro001-at-umn.edu /
/ 612-626-4321 Mpls MN 55455 /
/_______________________________________________________/


From daemon Mon Feb 11 08:00:06 2002



From: Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:54:12 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




I see we have the equivalent of a prison snitch in our midst ..or more
appropriately in this case ..a school yard tattle-tale
Jim Quinn wrote:

} Don -
}
} College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers to
elementary questions.
} Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
} was a bad idea.
}
} JQuinn
}
} PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program
Director.



Paul D. Nolan
Electron Optics

Alcan International Limited
Kingston Research and Development Centre
P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9

Tel: (613) 541-2066
Fax: (613) 541-2134
paul.nolan-at-alcan.com



From daemon Mon Feb 11 08:39:37 2002



From: sterling stoudenmire :      sstouden-at-thelinks.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:37:55 -0600
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


yes, "Education is a bueaucracy, learning is a biological activity!
The instructor serves as a resource with the ability to interact with and
to direct the inquiry of the student, but learning happens only at the
pleasure of the student. Sterling Stoudenmire, 1982.


At 10:27 AM 2/9/02 -0600, rnessler wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From daemon Mon Feb 11 10:01:05 2002



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 08:55:14 -0700
Subject: RE: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,

I have been getting emails with responses, but right now the numbers are
probably too low to be statistically significant. I'll wait until the end of
the week.

Also, please note: I had requested the emails to be sent directly to me,
because I did not want to overload the listserver. Again, please send the
responses to mb-at-soft-imaging.com.

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================




From daemon Mon Feb 11 10:31:59 2002



From: David R Hull :      David.R.Hull-at-grc.nasa.gov
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 11:25:10 -0500
Subject: Re: EM: Exploding Kevex LN2 level sensor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The only thing I could think that could cause this would be ice
trapping LN2 in the sensor tube that then warmed up causing N2 gas
pressure high enough to pop the top. The design of our sensors have
the BNC connection on the top of the cap. Did the wires come out
with the metal top?



}
} Hi all,
}
} Just wanted to give a heads up for anyone with older Kevex LN2 cooled
} EDS systems. On Friday, our Kevex LN2 level sensor just exploded after
} 15years of service. Normally we remove the sensor (unplugged from the
} system) and place it horizontal in a special holder while we fill the
} LN2 then we dry it off and put it back in place. Today the metal top
} blew off and hit me in the leg. No injuries except the loud bang may
} have shaved a year or so off my life. Luckly, we had a second sensor
} on hand for replacement.
}
} If any one has a good explanation why the metal cover decided to
} tear itself away from the Styrofoam insulation after all these years
} we would like to hear from
} you.
}
} TIA
}
} Jon Ekman
} Florida State University
} Biological Science Imaging Resource
} 119 Bio Unit I, 4370
} Tallahassee, FL 32306
} tel: 850.644.6519
} fax: 850.644.0481


--
David R. Hull
NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field
Advanced Metallics Branch
Mail Stop 49-1
21000 Brookpark Road
Cleveland, OH 44135

(216) 433-3281
fax (216)977- 7132
david.r.hull-at-grc.nasa.gov
http://www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/AdvMet/ASGWEB2000/asghome.html


From daemon Mon Feb 11 10:55:54 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 11:50:39 -0500
Subject: Re: Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Name-calling is not appropriate in this fourm. You own Mr. Quinn and the
entire list an apology

'"Paul.Nolan-at-alcan.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} I see we have the equivalent of a prison snitch in our midst ..or more
} appropriately in this case ..a school yard tattle-tale
} Jim Quinn wrote:
}
} } Don -
} }
} } College students should not broadcast messages seeking answers to
} elementary questions.
} } Additionally, the use of "ASAP"
} } was a bad idea.
} }
} } JQuinn
} }
} } PS: I sent Jenny Wang's message to her Chairperson and UG Program
} Director.
}
} Paul D. Nolan
} Electron Optics
}
} Alcan International Limited
} Kingston Research and Development Centre
} P.O.Box 8400, 945 Princess Street
} Kingston, Ontario K7L 5L9
}
} Tel: (613) 541-2066
} Fax: (613) 541-2134
} paul.nolan-at-alcan.com

Geoff
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Mon Feb 11 11:06:01 2002



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 11:56:41 -0500
Subject: digging up OLD techiniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Listers,
I have a client who is writing a grant and has "re-discovered" some
old techniques that could be very useful in her research. The
problem is, I'm having trouble finding a source or sources for the
reagents. Any ideas on where we could get the following?
Thoria Sol ( aqueous colloidal thorium, once sold by Polysciences. It
does not appear in their on-line catalog, nor in any of the other
catalogs I've checked) to be used for pinocytotic uptake to label
lysosomes. We could use ferritin, but that's so messy (in my hands,
anyway).
the full protocol for Gomori's method of acid phosphatase labelling.
I have the citation on order from Inter-Library loan (Arch.
Pathol.1941!!!) but don't know when it will come it.
Are the reagents still available? Has anyone out there done either
of these techniques? Any suggestions for alternates (preferably not
immuno)?
Thanks a million,
Lee


--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Mon Feb 11 11:10:18 2002



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 17:04:00 +0000
Subject: Re: Answers to Questions on the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Couldn't find a paper copy in our library so
I downloaded a synopsis from the web, along with the reviews.
Very, very funny, but not true. His dinosaurian heritage is showing,
and paper is definitely dead. Silicon is the world's commonest
material, not cellulose. Scientific publishing has ripped us all off.
We have ownership of the content, we did all the work, and they
charge us so much for the journals our libraries cannot afford the
subscriptions. Nor can universities afford the upkeep of the
libraries. There used to be departmental libraries here in every
department. Not any more. There was a time when Universities
could afford the upkeep of their physical establishments. Now
they're selling of the paintings to keep up with the maintenance.
The revolution is coming, and when it does paper journals will be
first against the wall. Twenty years from now, maybe sooner,
scientists will publish online, and the last 50 years of publishing
will be accessible online from anywhere in the world, and many
tertiary education courses will be distributed, campusless,
attended by students wherever they happen to live in the world.
And the educators? They'll be made by Intel ......

jmtc
Chris

} Gee, maybe this whole thread is just a Sociology experiment to gauge
} the response of a small group of specialists to a contentious issue! For
} my $0.02 ($0.033 Canadian), pick up a copy of "Silicon Snake Oil" by
} Cliff Stoll. Relevant reading, I think.
}
} Cheers,
}
} Jim
}
} --
} James M. Ehrman
} Digital Microscopy Facility
} Mount Allison University
} Sackville, NB E4L 1G7
} CANADA
}
} phone: 506-364-2519
} fax: 506-364-2505
} email: jehrman-at-mta.ca
} www: http://www.mta.ca/~jehrman
}
}
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Mon Feb 11 11:18:51 2002



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 12:29:17 -0600
Subject: Re: EM: Exploding Kevex LN2 level sensor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Mike,
#3, keeping in mind the possible limited sources available to the student
(high school students may not have *any* EM books available in their
library---so they need to be pointed to alternate information sources).
Henry

Henry Eichelberger, Manager
Electron Microscopy Facility
Department of Biological Sciences
Binghamton University
Binghamton, NY 13902-6000

phone: (607) 777-2682
fax: (607) 777-6521
e-mail: heichelb-at-binghamton.edu

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mike Bode [mailto:mb-at-soft-imaging.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 6:20 PM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


Hello Listers:

Looks like there are different opinions out there. Before this turns into a
flame war, I would personally like to know what the general opinion is. I
therefore propose a poll. Just send me an email with nothing but one of the
following numbers in the subject line, and I will tally those votes and
provide a summary in a week (if I get enough emails):

1) Students should work through their assignments alone. Let's not support
laziness at all.
2) We should help them help themselves by pointing them to general
microscopy books.
3) We should take their questions and point them to specific microscopy
books dealing with their problems
4) We should encourage them to contact us offline so we can test their
sincerity and then either help them or not. This should be posted on the
server to avoid redundancy.
5) We should help them with their questions by trying to answer them in a
general way
6) We should go all out and answer their questions as best as we can.

I hope the statistics will not be skewed by a zillion students who send me
"6" as an answer ;-)

Any suggestions are welcome! I also promise not to misuse the email
addresses!

} } } please send the email to mb-at-soft-imaging.com { { { { { {

mike

} } } } } } } } } } WE HAVE MOVED { { { { { { { { {
please make a note of the new address below

Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Oakley, Jeff [mailto:oakleyj-at-rayovac.com]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 11:46 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Tom,

You are correct, I am not an educator. I also agree with you whole
heartedly that when someone reads a text in search of information, they
learn a great deal more than they had planned on... It happens to me every
time I pick up a book in search of an answer to a question. I'm sure this
probably was the intent of the instructor.

The point I should have made in my previous post is that instead of shutting
someone down and "scolding" them (which is exactly what some of the listers
did) for what appeared to be a Cliff's Notes research method, the person
should have been guided to useful web pages or texts that would have made
them find the answers for themselves (which other posters did - kudos to
those).

It is possible to be helpful while at the same time not giving someone a
free ride.

I don't think my batteries are dead, Tom, I just think we are operating at
different voltages.

Jeff


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2002 9:26 AM
To: Oakley, Jeff
Cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


I vaguely recall the cap coming off of our Kevex cap years ago, but without
near so much excitement. I think it just worked loose. A check of the wires
and a little bit of epoxy and the cap was on again and has been fine since.

I can't remember if the dipstick was glued tightly into the Styrofoam plug.
If it was, I could see pressure building up under the cap. I don't think
the metal on ours was not glued all the way around.

Warren

At 11:25 AM 2/11/02 -0500, you wrote:

} The only thing I could think that could cause this would be ice trapping
} LN2 in the sensor tube that then warmed up causing N2 gas pressure high
} enough to pop the top. The design of our sensors have the BNC connection
} on the top of the cap. Did the wires come out with the metal top?
}
} }
} } Hi all,
} }
} } Just wanted to give a heads up for anyone with older Kevex LN2 cooled
} } EDS systems. On Friday, our Kevex LN2 level sensor just exploded after
} } 15years of service. Normally we remove the sensor (unplugged from the
} } system) and place it horizontal in a special holder while we fill the
} } LN2 then we dry it off and put it back in place. Today the metal top
} } blew off and hit me in the leg. No injuries except the loud bang may
} } have shaved a year or so off my life. Luckly, we had a second sensor
} } on hand for replacement.
} }
} } If any one has a good explanation why the metal cover decided to tear
} } itself away from the Styrofoam insulation after all these years we would
} } like to hear from
} } you.
} }
} } TIA
} }
} } Jon Ekman
} } Florida State University
} } Biological Science Imaging Resource
} } 119 Bio Unit I, 4370
} } Tallahassee, FL 32306
} } tel: 850.644.6519
} } fax: 850.644.0481



From daemon Mon Feb 11 13:32:00 2002



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 13:25:25 -0600
Subject: Re: staining of block copolymers

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Hussain,

To answer your question you need to know, among other things, the
specificity of interaction between RuO4 and the comonomers that comprise
your block copolymer. I suggest that you consult the literature for
reactivity of RuO4 with your materials. I usually start with Sawyer and
Grubbs book, Polymer Microscopy. I know that the first edition has
information that should help you.

Good luck,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"Garber,
Charles A." To: MICROSCOPY BB
{cgarber-at-2spi.c {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
om} cc:
Subject: staining of block copolymers

02/11/02 07:40
AM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Hussain Hazrat wrote:
============================================
Question: Dear Sir,
I have stained a block copolymer isothermally crystallized samples
with RuO4 vapors. The block copolymers constitute poly(ethylene
oxide)(semicrystalline block) and poly(perfluorohexylethyl
methacrylate) as second block.
The structure is as
PFMA-b-PEO-b-PFMA
PEO block length is 227 EO units(20000 g/mol) and each PFMA block
was 5-7 PFMA units.
The TEM morphology that we got from this sample was showing a
layered or lamellar structure.There are dark lines and bright lines.
Now I dont know, which block has been stained with RuO4.
The second question is again the staining assigning problem, I got
TEM pictures from solutions of the same block copolymers, the samples
were stained again with the same dye. we got some spherical micelles
in the TEM picture, but we dont know, the staining blocks.
I hope u will consider answer my questions. I will be grateful
with my best regards
Hussain
========================================================
This kind of question is extremely difficult to "call" on the basis of
first
principles (or logic). You really need to see one or two "knowns", and
then
you can see which way the area percent of the dark vs. white changes.

If you are seeing some "spherical" features from solution precipitation,
and
it is just a guess, it might be that you are seeing segregation of
homopolymer into a more traditional kind of morphology for these kinds of
systems. At least when we have seen such features in other block copolymer
systems that was our conclusion.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================









From daemon Mon Feb 11 14:48:22 2002



From: Mike Jercinovic :      mjj-at-geo.umass.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 15:39:23 -0500
Subject: Post-Doc announcement

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All,
Here is an announcement for a post-doc opportunity here at UMass. Please
pass this along to anyone who you think might be interested.

thanks!
Mike Jercinovic


POST-DOC POSITION: MICROPROBE MONAZITE GEOCHRONOLOGY

The Department of Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts invites
applications for a Post-Doctoral Position in Geology. This two-year
position is specifically aimed at the rapidly emerging techniques of
electron microprobe analysis in geochronologic applications. UMass is
currently developing an optimized electron microprobe with Cameca, France
that is specifically designed for the exploration of techniques for age
mapping and dating of minerals (e.g. monazite, zircon) and trace element
analysis. This project includes optimization on virtually all fronts,
hardware, software, and technique development. One future direction will
involve synthesis and analysis of standards for calibration and background
measurement studies. The successful applicant will collaborate with UMass
Geosciences faculty (and associates) and with Cameca, and will be directly
involved with improvements and modifications to software, continued
evaluation of analytical techniques, synthesis and characterization of
standard materials, and application of the new techniques to geologic
problems. Applicants must have completed a Ph.D. in Geology, materials
science, or other physical science, with preference given to those with
significant experience in electron microprobe analysis, x-ray spectrometry,
materials microanalysis, and/or scientific programming.

Please send a letter of application, resume, and two reference letters to
Michael L. Williams, Dept. of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, 611
North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003-9279. The University of
Massachusetts is an Equal-Opportunity Affirmative -Action Employer; women
and members of minority groups are encouraged to apply.

Review of applicants will begin March 15th; the position will remain open
until a successful candidate is identified.


****************
Michael J. Jercinovic
Assistant Professor
Department of Geosciences
University of Massachusetts
611 North Pleasant Street
Amherst, MA 01003-9297
E-Mail: mjj-at-geo.umass.edu
Phone: (413) 545-2431
http://www.geo.umass.edu/faculty/jercinovic.html

Electron Microprobe Laboratory
http://www.geo.umass.edu/probe/probe.html




From daemon Mon Feb 11 14:48:22 2002



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 15:50:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix vs Olympus C-3030 et al.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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For a look at what's coming down the path, see today's (Monday, February
11th) New York Times article on Foveon or that company's website. (I
have no financial interest in the company and was previously unaware of
them.)

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist

Michael Herron wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} All,
}
} OK so it is a given that consumer grade cameras have relativly poor low
} light performance. That said, are there cameras that have better than
} average lowlight performance? Are any of the consumer cameras capable
} of binning?
}
} Mike
}
}
} "Mardinly, John" wrote:
}
} }
} } John;
} } You are correct about the small CCDs of consumer digital cameras
} } have sever performance deficiencies due to their small pixel size. The F707
} } and other consumer digital cameras that use the same chip (2/3"-Nikon 5000
} } and Olympus E20N) suffer from noise even in visible light photographs. The
} } Nikon D1X and the new Canon EOS 1D(advertised 11.5 µm pixels) are
} } significant improvements, but cost $6000 just for the camera body! One
} } organization addressing this problem is
} } http://www.fredmiranda.com/Action_profilesPage/index.html where they discuss
} } and sell Photoshop plug-ins for noise reduction. Another digital camera site
} } I really like is:
} } http://www.imaging-resource.com/
} }



From daemon Mon Feb 11 15:03:29 2002



From: Greg Barclay :      gbarclay-at-trinidad.net
Date: Sun, 10 Feb 2002 16:55:26 -0500
Subject: Wanted: Critical Point Freeze Drier and Sputter Coater

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Hello,
I am setting up a TEM/SEM lab and I need a vacuum coater and
critical point freeze drier for the SEM. I cannot afford new equipment and I will
consider any used but still functioning equipment, complete with manuals.

Thank you.

Greg Barclay

Dr.G.F. Barclay
Plant Science Unit, Dept. of Life Sciences
University of the West Indies
St. Augustine,
Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies




From daemon Mon Feb 11 15:42:49 2002



From: Ayten Celik :      celik-at-students.uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 15:36:21 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Suggestions on sapphire samples

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Dear all,

I'm trying to prepare tem samples from sapphire.
There is a thin metal film on the sapphire substrate, as well.
I don't have too much experience in this field so, I would greatly
appreciate any suggestions about preparing tem samples from sapphire.

Previously, I have prepared couple of Si samples but, sapphire seems to be
much harder and difficult to deal with.


Thank you very much,
Ayten C. Aktas.



From daemon Mon Feb 11 16:53:05 2002



From: cassel-at-biology.queensu.ca ()
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 16:35:17 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Recommendation Needed LM

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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (cassel-at-biology.queensu.ca) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
February 11, 2002 at 15:05:08
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cassel-at-biology.queensu.ca
Name: Stephen Casselman

Organization: Queen's University

Education: Graduate College

Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Question: I am involved in a project which is examining sperm in
fish, we will be using a video camera and a microscope to film motile
sperm. Much of this work will be done in remote locations. We are
interested in buying a new microscope that would able to handle
frequent transportation to these remote locations. Ideally the scope
would have a padded case specifically for it to be transported in.
We generally use a 40 X objective lense. Does such a durable scope
exist?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Feb 11 16:53:12 2002



From: ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 16:35:31 -0600
Subject: Re: Carbon Coater Help

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Lou, have you looked at the Denton Desktop II as a backup or is that too
small for your needs?

Ed


From daemon Mon Feb 11 16:56:09 2002



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 16:52:03 -0600
Subject: Administrivia:Questions on the Electron Microscope

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Colleagues

I think this thread has run it's course, let's bring it to a close.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
-Waving Hi to Everyone from Sunny Sydney-




From daemon Mon Feb 11 16:58:37 2002



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 11 Feb 2002 17:52:14 -0500
Subject: Re: digging up OLD techiniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Lee:

Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

} Hi Listers,
} I have a client who is writing a grant and has "re-discovered" some
} old techniques that could be very useful in her research. The
} problem is, I'm having trouble finding a source or sources for the
} reagents. Any ideas on where we could get the following?
} Thoria Sol ( aqueous colloidal thorium, once sold by Polysciences. It
} does not appear in their on-line catalog, nor in any of the other
} catalogs I've checked) to be used f