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From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 1 Jan 2003 15:17:33 -0600
Subject: Administrivia: Microscopy Listserver Archives for 2002

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Happy 2003 Colleagues!

The Microscopy Listserver Archives and Search Engine have been
updated. The contents for all of 2002 are now available on-line at:

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/

For those of you that are curious,

There were 3974 postings in 2002.

The Email traffic delivered by the Microscopy Listserver
for 2002 averaged 25.5 Gbits/month.

Finally there were 4229 "SPAM" messages which were
rejected by the filters in 2002.

Cheers...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.





From daemon Wed Jan 1 16:58:15 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net (by way of
Date: Wed, 1 Jan 2003 16:47:55 -0600
Subject: RE: MSA Election Results

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Newly elected officers of MSA
Terms beginning 1/1/03

President-Elect: Sara Miller
Secretary: Janet Woodward
Director, Biological: Jeanette Killius
Director, Physical: Michael O'Keefe



Ron Anderson
For the Microscopy Society of America.


From daemon Wed Jan 1 20:35:13 2003



From: Chamusco, Karen :      KChamusco-at-ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Jan 2003 21:15:47 -0500
Subject: caffeine in fixative/TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I was wondering if anyone could tell me if addition of caffeine to the
fixative affects antigenicity, generally speaking. I understand it's good
for dealing with plant materials high in polyphenolic compounds. Does
anyone know exactly what it's doing to the polyphenolics? Thanks, Karen


From daemon Thu Jan 2 00:07:11 2003



From: dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Wed, 1 Jan 2003 23:54:23 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:LM: rhododendron seeds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
January 1, 2003 at 18:45:55
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com
Name: donald haslam

Organization: kornfeld mackoff silber

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: vancouver bc canada

Question: I am an amateur botanist interested in studying
rhododendron seeds for the purposes of identification of species and
sub-species. I will be using a trinocular microscope of 10x to 40x
magnification. If I use a digital camera, what is the recommended
minimum number of pixels that I should insist on to usefully record
images? Thank you. don p.s. How useful in such endevour is a zoom
microscope?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jan 2 10:32:59 2003



From: johnson.junior-at-ondikoi.com :      johnson.junior-at-ondikoi.com
Date: 2 Jan 2003 14:48:42 -0000
Subject: HELP FROM BRo/johnson junior

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



]
FROM BRo/johnson junior
IVORY COST
WEST AFRICA
PHONE225 07464760
A CRY FOR HELP
Dear Sir,

It is my pleasure to write you after much
consideration since telephone communication can not be
suitable enough to communicate to you at first.
Being the only son of my father, late Chief johmson SMITH
from KWAZULU NATAL in Republic of South
Africa (SA) I am 18 years of age. My father was
limited liability Cocoa and Gold merchant in
JOHANNESBURG South Africa before his untimely death.
After his business trip to Abidjan -C?te d'Ivoire, to
negotiate on a cocoa and gold business he wanted to
invest in Abidjan - C?te d'Ivoire. A Week after he
came back from Abidjan, he was attacked with my mother
by unknown assassins, which my mother died instantly
but my father died after five days in a private
hospital on that faithful afternoon. I didn't know
that my father was going to leave me after I had lost
my mother. But before he gave up the ghost, it was as
if he knew he was going to die. He my father, MAY HIS
SOUL REST IN PERFECT PEACE he disclosed to me that he
deposited the sum of $15,800,000,00 US Dollars
(FIFTEEN MILLION EIGHT HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS) in a
bank here in Abidjan- C?te d'ivoire.That the money was
meant for his cocoa and Gold company he wanted to
establish in Abidjan - C?te d'Ivoire though, according
to my father he deposited the money in a confident
account of the bank and he handed to me all the
relievant documents of the deposited fund and
instructed me to seek for a reliable and trust worthy
business partner for my life time investment abroad.
Now I have succeeded in locating the bank here in
Abidjan - C?te d'Ivoire. Now I am soliciting for your
assistance to help me to transfer this money out from
Abidjan to your safe account abroad so that we will
invest it in any meaningful lucrative business in your
country because this is my only hope in life.
Awaiting anxiously to hear from you so that we can
discuss the modalities of this transaction.
Please kindly contact me through email immediately
for more discussion or call me on225-07464760.
Thanks for your kind attention.

Yours sincerely

johnson junior


From daemon Thu Jan 2 10:32:59 2003



From: christ.geso-at-ondikoi.com :      christ.geso-at-ondikoi.com
Date: 2 Jan 2003 14:49:02 -0000
Subject: FROM Engr CHRIST GESO

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FROM THE DESK OF;Engr CHRIST GESO,
ABIDJAN COTE D,IVORIE
WEST AFRICA
PHONE 225 07464760
e-MAIL;christ.geso-at-ONDIKOI.COM

Dear sir,

On behalf of group of IVORY COST Senators i hereby
propose the above to you.

I am Engr CHRIST.I.C.GESO Chairman Senate Committee on
Contracts Review and foreign payments. There is
presently available the sum of US$50m {Fifty Million
United States Dollars} which members of this committee
wish to transfer into your account, to be used for our
re-election in 2003 general elections in IVORY COST

SOURCE OF FUND. This amount was realized from inflated
or over-invoiced aspect of contracts executed by some
foreign firms in 1999 when IVORUY COST hosted the world
youth soccer Championship.ln the course of our duty we
observed that there were some un-paid claims.lt is one
of them that we intend to lodge into your bank account
for our mutual benefit.

REMUNERATION. We have unanimously agreed that you will
be entitled to 30% of the total sum, while 10%
is set aside to offset expenses incurred during the
transaction.

INVESTMENT. You will be required to place 60% of the
total sum into any high yield investment facility in
your country, for an initial duration of 8 months.
During the 2003 elections, you will return 30% to us,
but this time as a foreign loan for our election
purposes. The accrued interest and the remaining 30%
is what you will re-invest in the same process for a
period of 4 years.

OPERATIONAL MODALITIES. We shall present you as one of
the contractors awaiting payment for over-due contract
payment for job executed for the Federal RepubliQU DE
COTE,D,IVOREA in 1999.Application for claims, processing of
approvals will be undertaken by my committee in
conjunction with some highly placed officials, to
ensure that fund is wired into your nominated bank
account.

REQUIREMENTS. Your company details, banking details,
as well as your confidential tel and fax numbers
should be sent to me immediately to indicate your
interest.

CONCLUSION. You do not stand any risk at all for being
parts of this project, and your present line of
business or profession is no hindrance. Honestly, our
re-election in 2003 will be determined by this
transaction and your ability to partner with us in all
sincerity will enhance its success.

Note: That this transaction is expected to last
between 7-14 days from the time we received this
information, so i am waiting for your reply via my
private e-mail address christ.geso-at-caramail.com
MY PHONE NUMBER 225 07464760
Thanks for your co-operation and understanding while
your urgent response is expected.

Yours faithfully

Engr CHRIST GESO
PHONE 225 07464760






From daemon Thu Jan 2 12:23:08 2003



From: Anthony J. Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2003 13:10:40 -0500
Subject: Surplus equipment available

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X-Sender: tonygr-at-hesiod (Unverified)
X-Mailer: QUALCOMM Windows Eudora Version 5.0.2


I have available two surplus X-ray analyzers (without detectors):

1: LINK/Oxford eX/L Mk. I, ca. 1988. Has been out of use for about 3
years, was in working order when last turned on. Has no video
monitor. Has pulse processor, microscope scan control and electron image
acquisition. Comes with SEM software suite.

2: LINK/Oxford Isis 300, ca. 1996. In use until recently. You provide
the computer (works well with 300MHz Pentium, Win98 - it needs a computer
with an ISA slot for the Translink card). Comes with Isis software suite
on floppies, and key disks for TEM/STEM software suite (X-ray analysis,
X-ray mapping, digital imaging, drift correction, etc). Has no work table.

Both have the original Link documentation.

These systems are offered on a strictly as-is basis, free to an academic
user, you arrange the transport and take all responsibility. First-come,
first-served. Easiest if you can visit Cambridge, MA and pick up. The
Isis will fit into a family car. The eX/L might fit a car with a large
trunk, but will certainly fit a station wagon or small pick-up.

I am not prepared to split these systems up for parts. If you want/need a
specific board, then you take the whole thing and arrange disposal of the
parts you do not need.

You can try calling with questions, but e-mail works well.

Tony Garratt-Reed.




** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6478
**




From daemon Thu Jan 2 14:52:54 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2003 15:39:34 -0500
Subject: Skin repilca

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Fellow scopesters

Does anyone have a good protocol for doing SEM on replicas (casts) of human
skin on a living, breathing person. I presume one would use a silicon
rubber. Can that be imaged directly or would one make an epoxy cast from
it? This is our first foray into cosmetology.

Greg
Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
University of Florida
P.O. Box 118525
Gainesville, FL 32611
352-392-1295



From daemon Thu Jan 2 15:38:30 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Jan 2003 16:26:33 -0500
Subject: paraformaldehyde fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Mark,

If you are looking to blot against naturally soluble proteins, then my first
suggestion is to work with an assumption that during preparation of the
tissue such proteins generally end up in the buffers, or the alcohols, etc.
If not soluble, then the method that you must use to homogenize/subdivide
any tissue to 'solubilize' portions of otherwise insoluble macromolecules
should be sufficient to provide a useful specimen for blotting even if
substantial crosslinking has occurred. By any standard, the blotting method
that starts with fixed, processed and sectioned tissue (or vibratomed???)
tissue should be compared at every step with fresh, unfixed and otherwise
unprocessed tissue. IF the only difference between the section and the
fresh tissue is HCHO, then that and its solvent constitute the only
variables. You can compare fresh with HCHO-solvent, and solvent alone to
see the effect of each. It would seem that blotting is an appropriate
method for such determinations when assaying either Ab dilutions or epitope
availability/presence.

Please remember the following. The anatomist looks at the bone and wonders
where the molecule is. The biochemist looks at the molecules and wonders
how they were assembled to form the bone. The histochemist looks at the
molecule in the bone and wonders if that's where it was when the bone was
still part of the living organism. For insoluble molecules the answers
appear much more apparent (e.g., glycogen!).

Forgetting for the moment about "soluble or insoluble". If fixation was
permitted to proceed for days beyond 24hr, then you are working with tissue
in which there will be at least some frequency of methylene bridges linking
adjacent molecules together. I am not very experienced with blotting in any
case, but I have some familiarity with the methods. If the epitope for
which you are going to assay has been tested on fixed tissue, with the same
monoclonal you will use for blotting, without a requirement for retrieval,
then the homogenized tissue sections (I assume that is what you will do with
them.) should have the exposed epitope as well. If retrieval is necessary
for immunohistochemistry, then there is no reason to expect that the
homogenizing procedure alone will not also 'retrieve' a substantial amount
of the epitope. Controlling fixed sections against unfixed tissue sections
for normal consituent proteins is problematic but doable if you have a
torsion balance with which to weigh the starting sectioned material.

Returning to the soluble and insoluble point again. If one compares
identical amounts of fixed and fresh liver and calculates the amount of
protein per cell, one should find that there is substantially more protein
per cell in the fresh tissue and that the amount of protein per cell in
fixed tissue falls with duration of fixation until no more diffusibile
protein can escape the matrix or none remains.

Just for the sake of argument. Years ago a method by which one could
ostensibly remove bound HCHO from a section was 1N NaOH. While this method
might remove an -MeHO group, it probably isn't more likely to remove a
so-called methylene bridge (a cross link) than any other hydrolytic method.
In fact, if one turned to look, dreamily, out the window during such a
procedure, the section might magically disappear.

} From my point of view, your question poses its own experimental answer. In
modern immunohistochemistry each Ag/Ab pair places its own set of demands on
the operator of the method.

Hope this helps,

Fred Monson
Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.






-----Original Message-----
} From: Beveridge, Mark J. [mailto:bevermj-at-peds.ufl.edu]
Sent: Monday, December 30, 2002 9:56 AM
To: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'


i would like to know if there is any way to unfix tissue fixed in
paraformaldehyde for immunoblotting?


From daemon Thu Jan 2 15:41:23 2003



From: Richard Geissler :      geissle-at-uky.edu
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2003 16:31:18 -0500
Subject: RMC, Inc.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Can anyone tell me of the fate of RMC, Inc.? I haven't seen anything from
them in several years. We have an MT6000-XL ultramicrotome in our lab
that's in need of some service. Any suggestions are welcome.

Richard Geissler
Director, EM Laboratory
Department of Pathology & Lab Medicine
859-257-5068
geissle-at-mail.uky.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 2 16:09:21 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Thu, 2 Jan 2003 16:55:55 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:LM: rhododendron seeds

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Donald,
No zoom is desirable for specific photmicrography. Indeed, zooming
is OK for photographing for show, but is disconcerting for quantitative
characterizing. Zoom if you must, but insure that you capture images at the
same magnification for your quantified studies. As to a; camera, I would
wager that the new Nikon Coolpix 4500? would do the trick nicely. You can
find good and reasonable adapters widespread on the new (the Nikon adapter
is the highest priced of all). The most important determinant for a CCD
camera is the purpose for which you purchase it. You must know its limits -
there are few with film because the enlarging capacity is so great. Such is
not the case with CCD images. You can zoom in 1-3X and see pixels. Scan a
2x2" 35mm transparency at 24-bits and you have a file of size 285MB. VERY
BIG PRINTOUT!!! or WORTHLESS RESOLUTION WHEN THERE IS NO PRINTER FOR
BILLBOARDS AVAILABLE. My Olympus CCD camera is a 1.3M-Pixel and provides
great 5x7 color prints. If I use a CCD camera on a microscope, I have to be
close to the publishing mag when I capture the image. Not so with film -
though there are limits in this as well.

Here's a link: http://www.leubner.ch/index.html

Here's another to an encyclopedic source for seeds:
http://hort.cabweb.org/SeedSci/Pdfs/ssr08075.pdf
The above is for a PDF file so if you don't have the reader,
you should get it free from Adobe.

I am not a botanist, so might I suggest you find one at a nearby college.
Having some help in such an endeavor would likely lead to the collection of
data that are publishable. Even a lawyer or a legal assistant should
appreciate the prospect of starting with some notion of what work would be
most productive.

Also, when you discover the best species for pie, please let me know so I
can purchase a pack of the seed.

Hope this helps,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.


-----Original Message-----
} From: dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com [mailto:dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 12:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
January 1, 2003 at 18:45:55
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: dhaslam-at-kmslawyers.com
Name: donald haslam

Organization: kornfeld mackoff silber

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: vancouver bc canada

Question: I am an amateur botanist interested in studying
rhododendron seeds for the purposes of identification of species and
sub-species. I will be using a trinocular microscope of 10x to 40x
magnification. If I use a digital camera, what is the recommended
minimum number of pixels that I should insist on to usefully record
images? Thank you. don p.s. How useful in such endevour is a zoom
microscope?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jan 2 19:57:56 2003



From: Cochran :      fisher-at-meganet.net
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2003 20:45:24 -0500
Subject: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I followed the discussions concerning pregnancy and sem operation with
interest in the past. Unfortunately, I did not save the replies as it
seemed unlikely to occur in our lab. We currently have a pregnant
occassional operator. At her request, the decision has been made to
transfer sem work to another individual for the duration of the pregnancy.

When I mentioned that the list server has covered this topic in the
past, I was asked if I the information was still available. I welcome
any new infomation and hope that some one can pass along archived info.

Thanx,
Ray Cochran




From daemon Thu Jan 2 20:19:43 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 02 Jan 2003 21:10:01 -0500
Subject: SEM: Replicating human skin, in vivo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gregory W. Erdos wrote:
=============================================================
Does anyone have a good protocol for doing SEM on replicas (casts) of human
skin on a living, breathing person. I presume one would use a silicon
rubber. Can that be imaged directly or would one make an epoxy cast from
it? This is our first foray into cosmetology.
=============================================================
I would reference my own (old) publications:

"Characterizing Cosmetic Effects and Skin Morphology by Scanning Electron
Microscopy", presented at SCC Annual Educational Symposium, May 1975, St.
Louis; J. Soc. Cosmet. Chemists, 27, 509-531 (November 1976).

If one does not have easy access to this journal, a "sample" of this type of
work can be seen on the SPI Supplies website at URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/a.html

While we were not the very first to ever replicate, in vivo, human skin, we
were the first to publish a testing method for evaluating skin care products
for the cosmetics and toiletries industries, and later for the
pharmaceutical industry.

For "cosmetology" which I assumed is for the substantiation of cosmetics
industry advertising claims, one must use a very rapidly curing resin for
the original cast or "negative" replica, otherwise the cast itself, and the
occlusiveness of the covering creates changes ("moisturing effects" if you
will) that are greater than the effects of the products being studied.
Hence the need for a replicating system that cures in literally seconds,
instead of minutes or even hours. The system we developed is what has
evolved over the years into the SPI Supplies Wet Replica Kit, see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/wet_rep_kits.shtml

Can it be imaged directly? Well, yes it can but it is not the preferred way
. It is far less confusing to make a positive replica from the negative, and
photograph the positive. That is why the replicating kit described above
comes with a pololefinic powder that so far as we are concerned makes the
very best positives with the least amount of shrinkage or distortion.

Does it pass the test of being "pretty good?" I think so since many of the
leading laboratories in the cosmetics and toiletries industry use this kit
for their work. It has been pretty extensively peer-reviewed by a number of
technical persons working on skin care products and "moisturizer" products.


I would be happy to elaborate more on this technique if there were any
questions, either on or off the listserver.

Chuck
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================


From daemon Fri Jan 3 03:31:43 2003



From: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 2003 10:10:42 +0100
Subject: Re: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Ray,

You can find the old replies in Nestor's excellent archive:

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/

There are a number of contributions under the heading "pregnant electron
microscopists" May 13 and 14,1997.

Best regards,
Jorgen.

{:::} --- {:::} --- {:::--- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::}

Joergen B. Bilde-Soerensen
Senior Research Scientist, Ph. D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 4677 5802 (direct)
phone: +45 4677 4677 (switchboard)
fax: +45 4677 5758
website: http://www.risoe.dk/afm/Personal/jqbi/jqbi.htm




From daemon Fri Jan 3 08:31:40 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 14:16:44 -0000
Subject: Re: Skin repilca

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greg
Dental silicone is excellent for replicating skin. The product I am
familiar with is Kerr Reflect, though there are others no doubt. The
setting time at body temperature is rapid, the material is
comparatively non-toxic, releases very cleanly and the replica
contains information with resolution approaching 100nm. Positive
replicas can be made with epoxy, but I have had better results
using hot-melt plastics such as polycarbonate. My method was
fairly unrefined - the silicone negative replica was placed in an oven
at just above the melting point of the plastic, a piece of 3mm
plastic sheet placed on top and weighted with a brass weight.
PTFE or silicone sheet was used to prevent adhesion between
plastic and weight. The specimens were allowed to cool to room
temperature with the weights in place before separating positive
from negative. With care more than one copy can be made if
necessary, though I daresay fine detail is gradually degraded by
this.
I think the main reason this has worked better for me than
replicating with epoxy is that I use it for replicating leaves, which
are covered with wax crystals. The silicone picks up these waxes,
so epoxy only sees their undersides, especially when cold-
polymerized. At high temperature, polycarbonate displaces the
molten wax and can replicate the negative replica of the outer
surface. This may not be an issue for you in replicating skin, but
the combination of high temperature and pressure also helps
displace air from features like hairs, which epoxy can be reluctant
to enter. Vacuum infiltration of epoxy at high temperature may
improve this though.

Hope this is of some use.
Best wishes for the new year
Chris

On 2 Jan 03, at 15:39, Greg Erdos wrote:

} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
} Fellow scopesters
}
} Does anyone have a good protocol for doing SEM on replicas (casts) of
} human skin on a living, breathing person. I presume one would use a
} silicon rubber. Can that be imaged directly or would one make an
} epoxy cast from it? This is our first foray into cosmetology.
}
} Greg
} Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} University of Florida
} P.O. Box 118525
} Gainesville, FL 32611
} 352-392-1295
}
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Fri Jan 3 09:57:08 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 2003 10:42:37 -0500
Subject: January '03 Microscopy Today Table of Contents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Friends,

Here is the table of contents for the January '03 issue of Microscopy
Today:

Carmichael: Out with the Old, In with the New
Boyes: Pros and Cons of Low Voltage SEM EDX Elemental Analysis
Basgen: Basic Stereology
Sedgewick: Segmentation Before Quantization By Using Photoshop:
Darkfield Images
Clarke: Rediscovery of Darkfield Dispersion Staining while Building a
Universal Student Microscope
Beanland: Rapid Cross-Section TEM Specimen Prep. of III-V Materials
Harmsen: Scan Speed, Mag and Accuracy. That is the Question!
Maleeff: Removing Very Fine Wrinkles from Half-Micron Epoxy Sections
Killius: Problems with Hydrophobicity of Coated Grids
Mascorro: The Versatile Family of Epoxy Resins: Designing Embedding
Media with Specific Viscosity Properties
Fandrich, et al.: Secondary Melt Ornamentation On Westwater, Utah:
Microspherules: Evidence Of An Extraterrestrial Provenance

Some news about Microscopy Today: As of 12/31/02 we have 17,411
subscribers, making us the largest microscopy magazine in the USA.

I will close the subscription list for mailing the January issue on
January 7th. You must subscribe before then to receive this issue.

All subscriptions/changes/unsubscribes must come via our website:
www.microscopy-today.com

Note that if you live in the USA and received the November issue of MT,
along with the M&M-2003 Call for Papers, you probably already have a
subscription.

Best wishes for the New Year!

Ron Anderson, Editor



From daemon Fri Jan 3 10:43:05 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:30:53 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 10:43:09 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:30:53 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 10:43:10 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:33:21 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 10:50:38 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:35:30 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 11:02:18 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:42:53 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 11:02:23 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:49:10 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 11:02:38 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?mike=5Fcacus-at-libero.it?= :      mike_cacus-at-libero.it
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 17:33:21 +0100
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?FROM_MIKE_CACUS?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


MR MIKE CACUS
ABIDJAN COTE D´IVOIRE

I wish this my proposal will not come to you as a
surprise. I am MIKE CACUS, a Director with an
International Bank in San Pedro - Cote d´Ivoire
formerly called Ivory Coast.

We had a foreign client (name with held) who deposited
a huge sum of money (US$9.6 million United States
dollars) with our company. Eventually, this client was
among the victims of EGYPT AIR BOEING 767 FLIGHT N°
990 that crashed on the 31-10-1999 in USA, since then
we have not had anybody coming for the claims as the
next of kin. A situation I have monitored closely with
my position in the company.

Now, haven monitored this deposit and managed it over
the years before his death, and hence nobody has
showed up as the next of kin for the past two year
plus, I have removed the file to my private vault.

I now solicit for your assistance to present you as
the next of kin as every other arrangement has been
concluded by me and I am only waiting for a foreigner
to enable me move the fund to his account. This does
not have any risk attached to it as all the internal
documentation will be handled by me.

I therefore request you to confirm your interest by a
return message and I will furnish you with details.
Your interest will be negotiable before we commence
the operation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Regards.

MR MIKE CACUS







From daemon Fri Jan 3 12:15:36 2003



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-vancouverbc.net
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 2003 10:03:42 -0800
Subject: Re: Skin repilca

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You could use a dental impression material; they are usually silicone-based
but can be other things, and all are completely harmless to the subject and
the experimenter. It is possible to image the negative made this way, but
there are problems with its behaviour under vacuum. The negative can be used
to make a positive in epoxy resin which is virtually indistinguishable under
SEM from the original.

Wieland M, Chehroudi B, Textor M, Brunette DM.
Use of Ti-coated replicas to investigate the effects on fibroblast shape of
surfaces with varying roughness and constant chemical composition.
J Biomed Mater Res. 2002 Jun 5;60(3):434-44.
PMID: 11920667 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

2: Chehroudi B, Brunette DM.
Subcutaneous microfabricated surfaces inhibit epithelial recession and
promote long-term survival of percutaneous implants.
Biomaterials. 2002 Jan;23(1):229-37.
PMID: 11762842 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Hope this helps.

Lesley Weston.




on 02/01/2003 12:39 PM, Greg Erdos at gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Fellow scopesters
}
} Does anyone have a good protocol for doing SEM on replicas (casts) of human
} skin on a living, breathing person. I presume one would use a silicon
} rubber. Can that be imaged directly or would one make an epoxy cast from
} it? This is our first foray into cosmetology.
}
} Greg
} Gregory W. Erdos, Ph.D.
} Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
} University of Florida
} P.O. Box 118525
} Gainesville, FL 32611
} 352-392-1295
}
}



From daemon Fri Jan 3 12:26:43 2003



From: William McManus :      billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 11:17:53 -0700
Subject: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ray:

As I was the instigator of this subject, I thought that I would give
you a synopsis of what I learned.

1. It is against Federal Law to ask any employee if they are pregnant,
plan to get pregnant, or are sexually active (both male and female).
2. The lab is legally responsible for any damage which may occur to the
mother or fetus due to working in the lab.
So, the lab is responsible, and therefore the management liable, but it
is against the law to know what condition your workers are in vis a vis
reproduction.
3. What I have gone to here is treating everyone as if they are
reproductive. With the appropriate protocols this is possible and makes
for a much safer work environment for everyone.
4. The use of modern microscopes is not dangerous from radiation. If
there is radiation coming out of your scope , get it fixed or get rid
of it. There are many good scopes out there for a pittance. If you are
really paranoid, get one of those badges and have your heaviest user
wear it, if it show radiation, see above.
5. With the use of appropriate hoods and safety equipment, anyone
should be able to prepare samples. Do however, use the safer chemical
and/or procedure when possible. Such as Hepes, not Cacodylate;
microwave fixation in hood, not conventional.
6. Once you know that you have a pregnant worker, contact your safety
people and have the worker prepare a personal hygiene plan and have it
approved by the safety office and suggest that her doctor have a look at
it to see if he/she has any concerns.
I had two pregnant workers in the lab at the same time, there were no
problems.

Just one personal aside, it is much easier to manage an employee if you
know that she is pregnant, some have little to no problems, but others
can have a very hard time. If you do not know what is going on, the
possibility is there to misjudge the performance of that individual, but
the law allows for the worker to privacy. Just one more thing to deal
with in the modern world.

Bill

William McManus
Supervisor
Microscopy Facility
Utah State University
Logan UT 84322-5305

billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
office 435-797-1920
cell 435-757-2976


-----Original Message-----
} From: Cochran [mailto:fisher-at-meganet.net]
Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 6:45 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi All,

I followed the discussions concerning pregnancy and sem operation with
interest in the past. Unfortunately, I did not save the replies as it
seemed unlikely to occur in our lab. We currently have a pregnant
occassional operator. At her request, the decision has been made to
transfer sem work to another individual for the duration of the
pregnancy.

When I mentioned that the list server has covered this topic in the
past, I was asked if I the information was still available. I welcome
any new infomation and hope that some one can pass along archived info.

Thanx,
Ray Cochran





From daemon Fri Jan 3 14:30:35 2003



From: celik ayten :      celik-at-ews.uiuc.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 14:19:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Fri, 3 Jan 2003, William McManus wrote:

[skip]

} 6. Once you know that you have a pregnant worker, contact your safety
} people and have the worker prepare a personal hygiene plan and have it
} approved by the safety office and suggest that her doctor have a look at
} it to see if he/she has any concerns.
} I had two pregnant workers in the lab at the same time, there were no
} problems.
}
:

How long is it going to take to go through each step of the procedure
mentioned above? By the end of that procedure it might be too late for the
fetus.

I believe that as soon as a lady learned or suspect she is pregnant she
should stop working with radiation stuff. There is no safe dose of
radiation. Risk might be small but it is always positive.

Kind regards,
Ayten.


} Just one personal aside, it is much easier to manage an employee if you
} know that she is pregnant, some have little to no problems, but others
} can have a very hard time. If you do not know what is going on, the
} possibility is there to misjudge the performance of that individual, but
} the law allows for the worker to privacy. Just one more thing to deal
} with in the modern world.
}
} Bill
}
} William McManus
} Supervisor
} Microscopy Facility
} Utah State University
} Logan UT 84322-5305
}
} billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
} office 435-797-1920
} cell 435-757-2976
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Cochran [mailto:fisher-at-meganet.net]
} Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 6:45 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Pregnancy & SEM
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi All,
}
} I followed the discussions concerning pregnancy and sem operation with
} interest in the past. Unfortunately, I did not save the replies as it
} seemed unlikely to occur in our lab. We currently have a pregnant
} occassional operator. At her request, the decision has been made to
} transfer sem work to another individual for the duration of the
} pregnancy.
}
} When I mentioned that the list server has covered this topic in the
} past, I was asked if I the information was still available. I welcome
} any new infomation and hope that some one can pass along archived info.
}
} Thanx,
} Ray Cochran
}
}
}
}




From daemon Fri Jan 3 14:40:33 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 09:32:10 +1300
Subject: Re: SEM examination of wood cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, Lou

I'm fairly interested in this, too, would you please copy
responses to me?

I don't know how others feel, but I'm always a bit disappointed
when people ask for off-list replies, as it shuts me out of the
loop, having given a tantalising initial glimpse of a thread. It
seems to me that one of the wonderful things about this list is
the discussions, and I would hate for it to be merely a bulletin
board on which people posted their requests for information.

Commercial and personal privacy issues occasionally preclude
open discussion, I understand that, but that's pretty rare.

Happy New Year

rtch


}
} Hi,
}
} We have a researcher on campus who would like to examine the cell size
} of 3000 year old wood. Any ideas on the sample preparation protocol to
} preserve the cell structure without shrinking?
}
} Please direct your responss to Cheryl Jensen (jensenc-at-missouri.edu).
}
} Thanks in advance.
} Lou Ross
} --
} Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} W136 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-5120
} (573) 882-4777, fax 884=5414
} email: rosslm-at-missouri.edu
} web: www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc
}

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Fri Jan 3 15:24:30 2003



From: Ron L'Herault :      lherault-at-bu.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2003 22:05:11 -0500
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Your pont is well taken, but the law does not let us take this kind of
action. In the past, companies have used pragnancy as a tool to demean
women, and even if meant in the best of intentions, a lab manager cannot
get involved until it is probably too late, a catch 22. That is why, I
have set up my lab so that all workers are treated the same, is if they
are pregnant, even the men. An issue generally not discussed is, what
are the ramifications to male gametes when exposed to chemical and
radiation exposure? But again, let me repeat, if you have an EM that is
leaking radiation that is bad, and should be dealt with, period. Fix it
or pitch it. In reality, we are exposed to more teratigens and
carcinogens in the grocery store than in a well run EM lab.

Bill

-----Original Message-----
} From: celik ayten [mailto:celik-at-ews.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2003 1:20 PM
To: William McManus
Cc: fisher-at-meganet.net; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I was once told that the only possible way to get irradiated by an SEM
was to have your body under the beam while it is operating. I have not
tried it yet to see if it is true or not.

Ron L

-----Original Message-----
} From: celik ayten [mailto:celik-at-ews.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2003 3:20 PM
To: William McManus
Cc: fisher-at-meganet.net; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




On Fri, 3 Jan 2003, William McManus wrote:

[skip]

} 6. Once you know that you have a pregnant worker, contact your safety
} people and have the worker prepare a personal hygiene plan and have it
} approved by the safety office and suggest that her doctor have a look
at
} it to see if he/she has any concerns.
} I had two pregnant workers in the lab at the same time, there were no
} problems.
}
:

How long is it going to take to go through each step of the procedure
mentioned above? By the end of that procedure it might be too late for
the
fetus.

I believe that as soon as a lady learned or suspect she is pregnant she
should stop working with radiation stuff. There is no safe dose of
radiation. Risk might be small but it is always positive.

Kind regards,
Ayten.


} Just one personal aside, it is much easier to manage an employee if
you
} know that she is pregnant, some have little to no problems, but others
} can have a very hard time. If you do not know what is going on, the
} possibility is there to misjudge the performance of that individual,
but
} the law allows for the worker to privacy. Just one more thing to deal
} with in the modern world.
}
} Bill
}
} William McManus
} Supervisor
} Microscopy Facility
} Utah State University
} Logan UT 84322-5305
}
} billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
} office 435-797-1920
} cell 435-757-2976
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Cochran [mailto:fisher-at-meganet.net]
} Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 6:45 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Pregnancy & SEM
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi All,
}
} I followed the discussions concerning pregnancy and sem operation with
} interest in the past. Unfortunately, I did not save the replies as it
} seemed unlikely to occur in our lab. We currently have a pregnant
} occassional operator. At her request, the decision has been made to
} transfer sem work to another individual for the duration of the
} pregnancy.
}
} When I mentioned that the list server has covered this topic in the
} past, I was asked if I the information was still available. I welcome
} any new infomation and hope that some one can pass along archived
info.
}
} Thanx,
} Ray Cochran
}
}
}
}








From daemon Sat Jan 4 22:20:04 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 04 Jan 2003 23:02:22 -0500
Subject: SEM: More on replicating skin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Chris Jeffree wrote:
==========================================================
Dental silicone is excellent for replicating skin. The product I am
familiar with is Kerr Reflect, though there are others no doubt. The
setting time at body temperature is rapid, the material is comparatively
non-toxic, releases very cleanly and the replica contains information with
resolution approaching 100nm. Positive replicas can be made with epoxy, but
I have had better results using hot-melt plastics such as polycarbonate. My
method was fairly unrefined - the silicone negative replica was placed in
an oven at just above the melting point of the plastic, a piece of 3mm
plastic sheet placed on top and weighted with a brass weight. PTFE or
silicone sheet was used to prevent adhesion between plastic and weight. The
specimens were allowed to cool to room temperature with the weights in
place before separating positive from negative. With care more than one
copy can be made if necessary, though I daresay fine detail is gradually
degraded by this. I think the main reason this has worked better for me
than replicating with epoxy is that I use it for replicating leaves, which
are covered with wax crystals. The silicone picks up these waxes, so epoxy
only sees their undersides, especially when cold- polymerized. At high
temperature, polycarbonate displaces the molten wax and can replicate the
negative replica of the outer surface. This may not be an issue for you in
replicating skin, but the combination of high temperature and pressure also
helps displace air from features like hairs, which epoxy can be reluctant
to enter. Vacuum infiltration of epoxy at high temperature may improve this
though.
================================================================
The polymerization time of the Kerr "Reflect" system is longer than the
system I described a few days ago as the SPI Wet Replica Kit. I agree that
the faster polymerization time for the replication of leaves might not be
important, and a longer time might even be at times an advantage. But once
the silicone is applied to skin, it literally stops all transepidermal water
loss. And the trapped water has no where to go but to build up in the
stratum corneum (the outer most layer of skin, or the dead skin layer),
creating an experimentally induced artifact effect. This effect is often
times more profound than the subtle difference one is trying to discern in
terms of product efficacy or whether one product is better than another.
That is one reason why so many times projects of this type, where one is
looking for differences fail because the transepidermal moisture buildup
makes everything look the same!

We have not looked lately at this particular Kerr product but we have looked
at other dental silicones and in order to impart to them the kind of
dimensional stability needed for dental impressions, they are loaded with an
inorganic additive system to give them that desired dimensional stability.
When one starts going up in magnification, about about 500X, the additives
from the negative replicating material can be resolved (as an artifact
effect). The SPI Wet Replica Kits does not have to have such good
dimensional stability, and therefore has a different type and loading of the
inorganic additives, and one can generally achieve magnifications (before
artifacts set in) about 1.5X higher, to about 750X. While this might not
sound very high in magnification in SEM terms, it tends to be more than high
enough for visualizing the effects of cosmetic and topically applied
pharmaceutical products to human skin. It has been our experience that most
meaningful work is done not higher than about 300X although for some kinds
of work up to about 600X.

The advantage of a much faster polymerizing system is that the replica
essentially "cures" before the body generated moisture buildup starts to
create effects all of its own. And that is what makes possible the
visualization of very subtle effects from the application of a product,
either short term of long term.

The negatives made this way are understandably fragile but the non-wetting
characteristics of the silicone on skin, even on dry flaky skin, leads to
an easy lift-off without much in the way of disruption. We have found that
on most types of skin, and in particular, dry skin, a first positive is made
and thrown out; its function is to serve as a "cleaning replica", to clean
off any remains of skin flakes. The second replica is what is then used for
the microscopy. The low melting polyolefinic very fine powder used for the
positive replicas will flow pretty easily into the cylindrical "holes" that
would be representing a shaft of hair. The entrapment of air bubbles is not
a serious problem.

We have found that for skin work, epoxies and just about anything else much
more brittle than the polyolefin used for the positive does not work as well
; that way even curved channels and irregularly shaped volumes can be
successfully transmitted to the positive replica where as if done in other
materials, for example, an epoxy, such micro-volumes would be snapped off
then the two replicas were separated.


Chuck
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Sun Jan 5 06:35:41 2003



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 07:58:37 +1100
Subject: Re: SEM examination of wood cells

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dick
I understand that the Kerr Reflect product range has been replaced by
a new range known as Extrude. The closest equivalent to the Kerr
Reflect Wash
(low viscosity formulation) that I used is Kerr Extrude Wash. Check
out the
other impression materials in their range. There is, for example, a
product based on sodium alginate
that is aqueous, hydrophilic, and has faster setting times than the
Kerr silicone.
For details and suppliers contact Kerr Dental:

www.KERRDENTAL.com
Mailing Address :
1717 West Collins Orange, CA 92867
Phone :
(800) KERR-123 (800-537-7123), (714) 516-7400

Fax (Order) :
(800) 537-7345 or (714) 516-7635

http://kerrdental.com/Extrude/OrderInfomation/index.html

http://www.kerrdental.com/Contact/ContactSales.htm

Silicone impression materials are supplied by most dental laboratory
supply dealers
throughout UK, and probably in US too.

Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Richard Gordon" {gordonr-at-Ms.UManitoba.CA}
To: "Chris Jeffree" {cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk}
Cc: "Richard Gordon" {gordonr-at-Ms.UManitoba.CA}
Sent: Saturday, January 04, 2003 11:51 PM


Here is my reply to this, with some additions:

One way to do this would be to freeze the tissue in the cryo-prep chamber
of cryoSEM, then observe frozen at low kV. Or plunge freeze in LN2,
cryoplane, transfer to cryostage, etch, observe. If the wood is dry,
freezing is probably unnecessary. And if you just want to look at cell
size on a surface, you may get away without coating at very low kV.
Depends on how much you are able to process this wood. Roger Heady -
Roger.Heady-at-anu.edu.au, http://sres.anu.edu.au/people/headyr.html - is an
expert in examining wood in SEM and could give much better advice - I don't
think he's on this email list.
cheers,
Rosemary
}
}
} Hi, Lou
}
} I'm fairly interested in this, too, would you please copy
} responses to me?
}
} I don't know how others feel, but I'm always a bit disappointed
} when people ask for off-list replies, as it shuts me out of the
} loop, having given a tantalising initial glimpse of a thread. It
} seems to me that one of the wonderful things about this list is
} the discussions, and I would hate for it to be merely a bulletin
} board on which people posted their requests for information.
}
} Commercial and personal privacy issues occasionally preclude
} open discussion, I understand that, but that's pretty rare.
}
} Happy New Year
}
} rtch
}
}
} }
} } Hi,
} }
} } We have a researcher on campus who would like to examine the cell size
} } of 3000 year old wood. Any ideas on the sample preparation protocol to
} } preserve the cell structure without shrinking?
} }
} } Please direct your responss to Cheryl Jensen (jensenc-at-missouri.edu).
} }
} } Thanks in advance.
} } Lou Ross
} } --
} } Senior Electron Microscope Specialist
} } Electron Microscopy Core Facility
} } W136 Veterinary Medicine
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-5120
} } (573) 882-4777, fax 884=5414
} } email: rosslm-at-missouri.edu
} } web: www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc
} }
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From daemon Mon Jan 6 09:29:06 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 09:09:07 -0600
Subject: RE: Evaporator cold trap

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Allen,

I appreciate your take on o-rings and greases.

Thanks,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



Allen Sampson
{ars-at-sem.com} To: "'Sergey Ryazantsev'" {sryazant-at-ucla.edu} ,
"microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com"
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
12/22/02 05:26 AM cc:
Please respond to Subject: RE: Evaporator cold trap
"ars-at-sem.com"





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Sergey,

That is a strong pump for this system - the normally configured system uses

a 250 L/sec pump. A diffusion pump, as any pump, is a differential system
- The ultimate pressure achieved is a balance between the leak rate in the
input, the back pressure in the output and the bypass rate in the pump (how

much gas can pass from the output to the input for a given pressure
differential, giving rise to the mechanical pump oil contamination in a
system). Although these pumps are rated up to 10-9 pressures, this is
never seen in operational systems. If you were to cap the diffusion pump
with a metal sealed, solid metal cap and had an enormous backing pump, you
may come close to the rated ultimate rating. In practical systems, these
levels are but a dream.

I'd be interested in knowing what roughing pump you are using.

No vacuum system has no leaks, particularly when elastomeric seals are
used. The standard Denton, with its manual valves and bell jar seal, has a

lot of elastomeric seals. And a cold cathode vacuum gauge accuracy is
debatable at 10-6 or less.

I've only recommended and used Santovac 5 for over twenty years. It is a
great diffusion pump oil. My main reason for recommending it is not the
ultimate vacuum attainable (debatable considering the greater temperature
apparently needed by Santovac, although I've never had a problem using it
in any diffusion pump), but rather it's relative insensitivity to sudden
air inrushes when hot. That means that it will 'crack' and polymerize less

than other oils. In other words - it will last longer and cause less hard
deposits on the pump.

As far as o-rings, I've found Buna to be quite acceptable, lightly coated
with Brayco, for static seals. Where dynamic seals are used (rotational or

translational forces are common), I use Buna with Apiezon (the waxier
Apiezon has more staying power, although it will also hold particulate
contaminants more). The reason for cracked o-rings is neglect, not the
suitability of vacuum greases. The reason for greasing o-rings is to
provide a light coating that preserves the qualities of the elastomeric
material, not to make up for insufficiencies in the vacuum sealing
surfaces. In this respect, the better vacuum greases do a good job and do
not compromise either Buna or Viton. I have many 25+ year old systems that

have original o-rings that are indistinguishable from new, in appearance,
shape or conformance.

The deformability of Buna is actually a plus, at least in systems that are
mostly held at vacuum. You may have noticed that a system that was just
rebuilt with new or rebuilt o-rings takes some time to come to an ultimate
vacuum equilibrium. That, of course, involves the outgassing of the system

components after being exposed to atmosphere for some time during the
rebuild. But it also includes the time required for the elastomeric vacuum

seals to be 'sucked' into place. A well designed o-ring seal will depend
on the mechanical pressures on the o-ring, but will ultimately depend on
the o-ring's conformance under the gas pressures it's subjected to.

In my experience, the Buna o-rings will deform to provide a good seal
faster and, properly maintained, will continue to conform to a shape that
best seals. I generally use Viton for it's improved resistance to high
temperatures. In either case, I use an acetone wipe for cleaning o-rings
every time I recondition them. It tends to swell the o-rings with two
effects - it restores them to their original shape and helps to provide a
quick seal when the system is pumped down again.

BTW, I've cleaned more DPs and refurbished more vacuum systems than I'd
like to elucidate. In my business, I tend to get the instruments that the
manufacturers don't service anymore, didn't service properly or have been
neglected for some time.

Just a few ruminations from a long career of servicing many vacuum
instruments.


Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174

phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com


On Sunday, December 22, 2002 3:12 AM, Sergey Ryazantsev
[SMTP:sryazant-at-ucla.edu] wrote:
} Allen
}
} DV502A has 800 l/sec DP!!! It enough to pump down a huge volume. If you

} don't have any leaks in your system, the vacuum would be directly
dependent
} from the ultimate vacuum for the pump (which is somehow dependent from
} pump's actual construction/quality and DP Oil). In most cases leaks are
the
} reason of vacuum degradation. Any normally serviced vacuum evaporator
} should deliver at least very good 10-6 torr. 10-5 is very bad and
actually
} you may not use it for biological sample preparation. In my particular
} case, I've replaced ALL O-rings on viton with touch of Apiezon L, cleaned

} and polished DP and used Santavac-5. Santavac-5 is great DP oil. You
have
} to try. On my DV502A I have 2*10-6 after about 40 min pumping (no LN2)
and
} better than 5*10-7 overnight. I am using MKS cold cathode gauge with
} sensitivity up to 10-9 torr (which I don't need). I think, the vacuum
} quality is mostly a function of how clean your system and how many
10-year
} old cracked "buna" O-rings is inside your system. The problem with
"buna"
} - it does not hold the shape and easily deformed even if it's not old.
It's
} also destroyed by vacuum grease (does not matter what manufacturers told
} you). Viton is much better. Since I spent $500 on Santavac-5 8 years
ago,
} I never touch my DP again. By the way, I have another vacuum system,
which
} I build by myself. It has exact the same volume and similar amount of
} O-rings but 400 l/s TP from SEIKO. That system is oil-free. I mean, it
} has scroll pump as a backing device and TP itself does not have any oil
} (it's magnetically levitated beauty). So, when I build the system, I was

} expecting similar productivity for this system as for DV502A but
} oil-free. I was completely wrong! This "baby" easily delivered to me
} 5*10-7 torr in 20 (yes, twenty) min! After a few hours, it's going into
} 10-8. So, my "theory" is that in the standard setup, oil from mechanical

} pump contaminated the whole system (and your sample!) and adsorbs a lot
of
} air, which slowly released during the high vacuum pumping cycle. Because

} my new system is oil-free, it's much faster. It has 12x12" Bell Jar with

} 6' collar. Another example: my old Polaron with 100 l/s DP (Santavac-5
} again) and 12x12" Bell Jar. This system is very comfortable with 2*10-6
} (no LN2) after I repaired manufacturers defect in DP. All tricks how to
get
} good vacuum perfectly described in the Wil Bigelow book. Have a great
} Holidays (don't start cleaning DP- it's messy)! Sergey
}
}
} At 08:13 PM 12/20/02 -0600, you wrote:
} } Sergey,
} }
} } Have you verified that vacuum level with an independent, calibrated
vacuum
} } gauge? Vacuum sounds way to high for that system. I agree with all of
} } your recommendations, but case in point, the vacuum you claim is on an
} } order of what we normally find in a valve isolated electron gun (much
} } smaller vacuum and seal volumes) pumped by a 20 L/sec ion pump. The
vacuum
} } level you stated for the start of your work is far closer to the best I
} } have seen out of this particular evaporator after a complete rebuild.
} }
} } Allen R. Sampson
} } Advanced Research Systems
} } 317 North 4th. Street
} } St. Charles, Illinois 60174
} }
} } phone (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 http://www.sem.com
} }
} }
} } On Friday, December 20, 2002 3:01 PM, Sergey Ryazantsev
} } [SMTP:sryazant-at-ucla.edu] wrote:
} } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FA
Q.html
} } }
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Randy
} } } I am sorry for late comments. I agree with Wil Bigelow that LN2 trap
will
} } } reduce the pump performance. If you need just to increase the
system's
} } } overall performance, I would suggest you have to do very good service

for
} } } it first (replace all suspicious O-rings, clean everything up). I
highly
} } } recommend to use Santovac-5 DP (I assume, it's DP based system,
because
} } TP
} } } don't need LN2). When I come in UCLA, I had DV-502A vacuum system
with
} } } 5*10-5 torr. I cleaned up DP (messy work and a lot of solvents),
} } replaced
} } } all O-rings (the system was 10 y.o. at the moment) and used
} } } Santovac-5. Since that I do have 5*10-7 with no LN2 (and no further
} } } service for more than 5 years). As an alternative, you may install
some
} } } "cold finger" with protective screens near your sample in the Bell
} } } Jar. You really need LN2 trap over DP if you pump a lot of water in
your
} } } experiments. Sergey
} } }
} } } At 06:09 PM 12/16/02 -0600, you wrote:
} } }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } Hi All,
} } } } I have a Hitachi HUS-4 vacuum evaporator. I'm hoping to put a
LN2
} } cold
} } } } trap
} } } } on it, in an attempt to clean up the vacuum a tad more. There is a
3.5
} } inch
} } } } by 4.5 inch plate right above the diffusion stack which looks to be
a
} } great
} } } } place to attach a cold trap. Rumor has it that this was an option.
Are
} } there
} } } } any old traps kicking around that one can acquire? I could have our
} } machine
} } } } shop manufacture one, but was hoping for a cheaper route.
} } } } Thanks in advance,
} } } } Randy Nessler
} } } } 319-335-8142
} } }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------
} } }
} } } Sergey Ryazantsev, Ph.D.
} } } Electron Microscopy
} } } Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine
} } } University of California, Los Angeles
} } } Box 951737
} } } Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737
} } }
} } } (310) 825-1144 (office)
} } } Pager: (310) 845-0248
} } } FAX: (310) 206-5272 (departmental)
} } } mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
} } }
} } }
}
} ------------------------------------------------------
}
} Sergey Ryazantsev, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscopy
} Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine
} University of California, Los Angeles
} Box 951737
} Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737
}
} (310) 825-1144 (office)
} Pager: (310) 845-0248
} FAX: (310) 206-5272 (departmental)
} mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu
}
}
}








From daemon Mon Jan 6 09:29:50 2003



From: William McManus :      billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 08:22:32 -0700
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Depending on the motivation of the pregnant worker, and the quality of
your safety personnel, about a week. In the interim, the person can be
given other duties, or in our case just carefully follow the procedures
already in place, which have been designed to protect. The biggest
question is: Will the lab administration give you the time to get set up
before the fact. In a real sense, it is always too late to begin
preparations after definitive knowledge of pregnancy is know. In
Kathy's case se would have been better off to wait to tell everyone of
her condition, this is a shame, however, and we have not come as far as
we would like to think with women's rights. In my case it was very
beneficial to know that the worker was pregnant, her work dropped off
substantially and she napped at the micortome. If I was unaware of the
situation. I might have reacted in a negative sense, but instead, I was
able to protect her from those who would not understand.

Bill

-----Original Message-----
} From: celik ayten [mailto:celik-at-ews.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 03, 2003 1:20 PM
To: William McManus
Cc: fisher-at-meganet.net; microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




On Fri, 3 Jan 2003, William McManus wrote:

[skip]

} 6. Once you know that you have a pregnant worker, contact your safety
} people and have the worker prepare a personal hygiene plan and have it
} approved by the safety office and suggest that her doctor have a look
at
} it to see if he/she has any concerns.
} I had two pregnant workers in the lab at the same time, there were no
} problems.
}
:

How long is it going to take to go through each step of the procedure
mentioned above? By the end of that procedure it might be too late for
the
fetus.

I believe that as soon as a lady learned or suspect she is pregnant she
should stop working with radiation stuff. There is no safe dose of
radiation. Risk might be small but it is always positive.

Kind regards,
Ayten.


} Just one personal aside, it is much easier to manage an employee if
you
} know that she is pregnant, some have little to no problems, but others
} can have a very hard time. If you do not know what is going on, the
} possibility is there to misjudge the performance of that individual,
but
} the law allows for the worker to privacy. Just one more thing to deal
} with in the modern world.
}
} Bill
}
} William McManus
} Supervisor
} Microscopy Facility
} Utah State University
} Logan UT 84322-5305
}
} billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
} office 435-797-1920
} cell 435-757-2976
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Cochran [mailto:fisher-at-meganet.net]
} Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 6:45 PM
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Pregnancy & SEM
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hi All,
}
} I followed the discussions concerning pregnancy and sem operation with
} interest in the past. Unfortunately, I did not save the replies as it
} seemed unlikely to occur in our lab. We currently have a pregnant
} occassional operator. At her request, the decision has been made to
} transfer sem work to another individual for the duration of the
} pregnancy.
}
} When I mentioned that the list server has covered this topic in the
} past, I was asked if I the information was still available. I welcome
} any new infomation and hope that some one can pass along archived
info.
}
} Thanx,
} Ray Cochran
}
}
}
}





From daemon Mon Jan 6 13:02:35 2003



From: Rajesh Patel :      rpatel-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 13:53:01 -0500
Subject: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I've recently developed a problem with a newly purchased Kodak EM film. The
EM film box says "new formulation" on it.

Well, this new formulation on film is lowering my contrast and I get some
funky fog on it.

I was wondering if anyone else have experienced this problem and if so what
can we do?

I've used old film ( old formulation ) and experience no fogging and get
nice contrast. Its also not a scope specific problem or light leaks or
developer. Its the film.


Rajesh Patel
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Department of Pathology
675 Hoes Lane
Piscataway, NJ 08854

Phone: (732) 235-4648
Fax: (732) 235-4825
E-mail: rpatel-at-umdnj.edu






From daemon Mon Jan 6 14:49:52 2003



From: Eric Anderson :      andersone1-at-southernct.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 15:41:02 -0500
Subject: Best Air Compressor for EM400T?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


New Year's Greetings!

Say, can anyone recommend a super-reliable and quiet brand (and size) of
air compressor to use with a Philips EM400T?

Unfortunately, in addition to being very, very loud, the low grade air
compressor we've been using has the intermittent habit of blowing it's
circuit breaker (twice in the last couple of weeks), which has set us
way back on getting our "new" microscope fully evacuated for the first
time.

I'm waiting for a catalog from Jun-Air, but would like to know what
model/size has been used reliably by others over the years. The Philips
installation manual doesn't give much more than the air pressure
requirement, so I'm uncertain what is ideal in terms of pump and tank
capacities. I've asked the folks at Jun-Air, but they are reluctant to
make any recommendation based solely on the pressure spec.

Thanks for any tips!

Best regards,
Eric Anderson
Southern CT State University Physics Dept.
501 Crescent Street, JE108B
New Haven, CT 06515
203-392-6468



From daemon Mon Jan 6 16:51:35 2003



From: Steve Barlow :      sbarlow-at-sciences.sdsu.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2003 14:41:58 -0800
Subject: teaching and imaging presentations

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Those of you planning to attend the 2003 Microscopy and Microanalysis
meeting August 3-7, 2003 in San Antonio meeting

I am soliciting presentations for the following session at this
upcoming meeting. Related topics described below, as well as
outreach programs for grades 6 and above, would be considered. Please
contact me should you wish to participate.

See you in Texas!

41. Teaching Microscopy and Imaging in the Digital Age

Organizer: Steve Barlow

Computer technology is changing the ways we access equipment, view
samples, and record or manage images. Computer-controlled microscopes
and digital imaging have created many new training methods. In
addition, these changes make it possible for classroom students to
analyze microscopy data and images without requiring access to
expensive microscopes. This session will look at new training
approaches, such as virtual microscopes and telemicroscopy, and new
teaching tools, such as CDs, DVDs, and computer software. The session
will discuss using digital technology to create laboratory training
protocols and to teach classroom analysis of data contained in
digital images.
--
Dr. Steven Barlow
EM Facility/Biology Dept.
San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
San Diego CA 92182-4614
phone: (619) 594-4523
fax: (619) 594-5676
email: sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/emfacility

Chairman, Educational Outreach subcommittee
promoting microscopy instruction and increased access to microscopes
Microscopy Society of America
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/


From daemon Mon Jan 6 18:12:58 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 16:05:58 -0800
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rajesh
If it's film, nothing to do with it! May be for "new formulation" they
suggested "new" developing procedure? Check Instruction and definitely
contact Kodak. If this product going under "old" trade name, like "4489
film" it should be exact the same every time. I would suggest, you may
return the whole batch of the "new formulation" film back to manufacturer.
Kodak sold film through distributors, so it's possible that film was stored
improperly before shipped to you (another reason to return it back). Sergey


At 10:53 AM 1/6/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Mon Jan 6 19:47:52 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 17:40:36 -0800
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear colleague
From time to time the issue of EM safety appeared on this
ListServer. Somehow, the biggest concern was the safety of the (already)
pregnant women. In my point of view, when women IS pregnant and fetus is
already developed, IT'S TOO LATE TO TALK (or do something) about safety in
the EM Lab! Most our "dangerous" stuff has tendency to be accumulated in
the body over time (UA, Pb and so on). Some substances are carcinogens
(epoxy resins for instance) and therefore has "long-term" effect to us as
well. Breathing the oil mist from rotary pumps (my biggest concern) may
cause lung cancer many years later... So, radiation in this '"row" of
"dead substances" is nearly negligible - it's easy to detect (how you could
detect epoxy on your skin or U in the bones?) and most institutions already
has taught regulations on radiation issue. Safety in EM Lab should
complain with all local and federal regulations ANY time, not only if
pregnant women decided to do EM.

If exposure to the dangerous substances (not only in EM Lab) is a concern,
the couple (both male&female) should avoid danger well before they decided
to have baby. I would suggest at LEAST 6 month before fertilization they
should avoid driving car on freeways (carbon dioxide, poly-carbons, nitric
oxide), do not stay close to the buildings with granite decorative panels
(some banks has luxury to use granite for ex/in-teriors) - radioactivity!;
do not fly (radioactivity again), do not eat fast-food ( carcinogens in the
overheated oil). This "poor" couple should also seriously inspect their
living place. If place is 20-30 years old, it's very possible that
painting contains Pb, some flooring - asbestos (lung cancer) and the wood
impregnated with poly-phenols (carcinogen). Who knows, may be 10 years ago
somebody broken body-thermometer with mercury and mercury is still here
(may cause mental disorders). Synthetic carpet delivers static electricity
which may interfere with fertilization (sperm may be shocked by
high-voltage discharge!!!). If this hypothetical couple will manage to
avoid all those dangerous things, THEN we should start worrying about
safety at the working place: computer CRT monitors (radiation), dust,
clearness of the drinking water in the fountains/bottled (very
questionable), artificial illumination (baby needs natural light to be
correctly developed), cubicles (claustrophobia, bad for developed fetus),
equipment's noise (may scary the fetus, I am serious), THEN - exposure to
the chemicals from neighbor's Lab (somebody spoil acetic acid on the floor)
and so on. Each chemical/instrument coming in our Labs has detailed
Instruction how to use it. You just has to follow instructions and comply
with local and federal regulations.

So, the bottom line is: work in the EM Lab should be SAFE any time and to
EVERY person at the level of the local and federal regulations. Each
professions has some 'professional risk', which we could not
avoid. Signing working contract (or accepting monthly salary payment) we
automatically agree with some risk, connected to the duties you suppose to
perform. Another issue here, that institution offering the job should
clearly state what the professional risk is for this particular job and if
for some reasons you don't want to take this risk, you have to quick.

People who seriously concern about pollution should go to Russia: because
of economic problems, most industrial manufacture is shout down or
working at 5-10% of full power. Russia also has much less cars and widely
uses hydro-powered electricity generation (not good for eco-systems, but
pollution-free). Russia was only the country at Kioto Conference who
DECREASED air pollution over last 10 years. Another advantage being in
Russia (I really miss it), the ticket in Bolshoi is $5 and most museums
available for free (or 5-10 cents ticket).

Sergey

At 07:22 AM 1/6/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Mon Jan 6 19:53:39 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Ike=20Oguocha?= :      oguocha-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 01:46:19 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Bill:

I have followed your submissions to this thread with great interest.
It's a new terrain for me. I have a related question.

What advice do you have for a teacher whose pregnant grad student
has on-going electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) research project? I would
lik to read you views on this.

Many thanks in advance.

Ike Oguocha


--- William McManus {billemac-at-biology.usu.edu} wrote: }
} Depending on the motivation of the pregnant worker, and the quality
} of
} your safety personnel, about a week. In the interim, the person can
} be
} given other duties, or in our case just carefully follow the
} procedures
} already in place, which have been designed to protect. The biggest
} question is: Will the lab administration give you the time to get set
} up
} before the fact. In a real sense, it is always too late to begin
} preparations after definitive knowledge of pregnancy is know. In
} Kathy's case se would have been better off to wait to tell everyone
} of
} her condition, this is a shame, however, and we have not come as far
} as
} we would like to think with women's rights. In my case it was very
} beneficial to know that the worker was pregnant, her work dropped off
} substantially and she napped at the micortome. If I was unaware of
} the
} situation. I might have reacted in a negative sense, but instead, I
} was
} able to protect her from those who would not understand.
}
} Bill

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Everything you'll ever need on one web page
from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts
http://uk.my.yahoo.com


From daemon Mon Jan 6 19:53:58 2003



From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Ike=20Oguocha?= :      oguocha-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 01:47:09 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Bill:

I have followed your submissions to this thread with great interest.
It's a new terrain for me. I have a related question.

What advice do you have for a teacher whose pregnant grad student
has on-going electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) research project? I would
lik to read you views on this.

Many thanks in advance.

Ike Oguocha


--- William McManus {billemac-at-biology.usu.edu} wrote: }
} Depending on the motivation of the pregnant worker, and the quality
} of
} your safety personnel, about a week. In the interim, the person can
} be
} given other duties, or in our case just carefully follow the
} procedures
} already in place, which have been designed to protect. The biggest
} question is: Will the lab administration give you the time to get set
} up
} before the fact. In a real sense, it is always too late to begin
} preparations after definitive knowledge of pregnancy is know. In
} Kathy's case se would have been better off to wait to tell everyone
} of
} her condition, this is a shame, however, and we have not come as far
} as
} we would like to think with women's rights. In my case it was very
} beneficial to know that the worker was pregnant, her work dropped off
} substantially and she napped at the micortome. If I was unaware of
} the
} situation. I might have reacted in a negative sense, but instead, I
} was
} able to protect her from those who would not understand.
}
} Bill

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Everything you'll ever need on one web page
from News and Sport to Email and Music Charts
http://uk.my.yahoo.com


From daemon Mon Jan 6 20:05:13 2003



From: Prensa y Comunicacion Links :      prensa-at-links.org.ar
Date: Mon, 06 Jan 2003 21:05:42 -0300
Subject: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Invitacion_para_integrar_el_Grupo_de_Trabajo_de_Telemedicina_del_Plan_Organizacional_y_Estrat=E9gico_para_la_Sociedad_de_la_Informaci=F3n_en_Argentina_?=

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Invitacion para integrar el Grupo de Trabajo de Telemedicina del Plan Organizacional y Estratégico para la Sociedad de la Información en Argentina

Durante el mes de Diciembre, comienzó la actividad de los Grupos de Trabajo (GT) para la elaboración colectiva de un plan estratégico para el desarrollo de la Sociedad de la Información en Argentina (POESIA). El objetivo fundamental del plan es establecer bases que permitan contribuir a la generación y puesta en marcha de propuestas concretas que contribuyan a la transformación estructural que la Argentina requiere para salir de la crisis.

Se crearon cuatro grupos de trabajos en las áreas elegidas; e-gobierno, e-educación, e-salud (telemedicina) y e-economía. Como parte de las actividades a realizarse en forma on line y en forma presencial, todos los participantes podrán presentar los temas principales que segun su visión, constituirán los ejes tematicos de cada grupo de trabajo. Posterior debate y puesta en comun, los primeros resultados se darán a conocer en un evento presencial a realizarse en abril de 2003 con la presencia de todos los miembros participantes de los GT´s.

Quienes deseen ampliar la información sobre los requerimientos y mecanismos de participación en el POESIA pueden consultar el sitio web de la nueva asociación (http://www.links.org.ar), en donde podrán solicitar a cada coordinador del GT su inclusión en el grupo de su interés e interiorizarse sobre la metodología de trabajo.

Sobre Links
LINKS, la primera Asociación para el Estudio y Promoción de la Sociedad de la Informacion en el pais, fue creada en octubre de 2002. Esta entidad cuenta como socios fundadores a distinguidos investigadores, intelectuales, técnicos y organizadores sociales, especializados en estudios y acciones sobre la Sociedad Informacional, que unen sus esfuerzos con el fin de contribuir a la construcción de una sociedad innovadora, usando las herramientas de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TIC). Entre los objetivos de la entidad se destacan el estudio y la promoción de la Sociedad de la Información, las acciones para integrar a la población a las nuevas oportunidades, y la transferencia de los conocimientos de la Sociedad Informacional a la comunidad. LINKS pretende constituirse en referente en temas concernientes a la aplicación de una adecuada política de Estado en materia de la Sociedad de la Información tanto en Argentina como en América Latina

Contacto
Dra. Lucia E. Muñiz
lmuniz-at-links.org.ar







From daemon Mon Jan 6 21:22:06 2003



From: Matthias Floetenmeyer :      m.floetenmeyer-at-mailbox.uq.edu.au
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 13:17:33 +1000
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Rajesh,

I can remember a couple of messages Robert Grassucci has mailed to the 3D-EM
newsgroup in October 2001 and March 2002 concerning a new emulsion for Kodak
SO 136 EM-film. He reported a decrease in sensitivity of app. 10% for the
new emulsion. He also mentioned reports about an increase in the fog level.
To access the original messages you can visit the 3dem messages archive:
http://3dem.sdsc.edu/list/maillist.html


Matthias Floetenmeyer

Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis
University of Queensland,
Queensland 4072,
Brisbane, Australia

E-mail: m.floetenmeyer-at-mailbox.uq.edu.au
Tel: ++61 (0)7 336 53249 Time GMT +10h
Fax: ++61 (0)7 336 52119



From daemon Mon Jan 6 23:07:00 2003



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 00:11:16 -0500
Subject: Re: Best Air Compressor for EM400T?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric,

I bought a Jun-Air unit (oil type, not oil-less) for use as a dry air source
for an FTIR (consumption rate may be higher than for an EM) and found it
very tricky. The unit has worked well but the specs are very misleading and
they charge extra for every little nut and bolt beyond the basic unit.

If you are using the air only to operate valves, consumption rate is
probably not a problem. However if you need a steady stream of air, be
aware that the rated flow volume is cited while running full-out.... but the
compressor cannot run at more than a 50% duty cycle - so you have to halve
the delivery volume right off the bat. Next, the compressor has very small
cooling fins and gets excessively hot even on a 50% duty cycle in an ambient
of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. When the intake air is preheated (expanded) on
the way in, the flow volume drops off very steeply (and the duty cycle
becomes excessive and ... there you go again). Therefore you have to have
forced cooling. Although it has an overtemp cutout, that apparently applies
only to the electrical motor because the compressor head is not supposed to
exceed 55 Celsius. Before the fan, I discovered it was running too hot to
touch, I would guess about 80 Celsius. They sell an add-on fan but by then
my wallet was tapped out and I added my own. The oil darkens a lot in use
but so far seems to be functioning properly. I needed two oil mist
separators (.5 micron last). Those do seem to function well. The unit is
quiet, as described, but draws down the line voltage sharply when it kicks
in, even though it is well below the rating for the circuit that it's on.
For some reason the starting capacitors are not properly selected for the
motor, I guess.

In summary, I read all the specs and went to the local distributor expecting
to spend $1,400. I ended up spending $3,000; timing the cycle with a stop
watch, and rigging a fan.

John Twilley

Eric Anderson wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} New Year's Greetings!
}
} Say, can anyone recommend a super-reliable and quiet brand (and size) of
} air compressor to use with a Philips EM400T?
}
} Unfortunately, in addition to being very, very loud, the low grade air
} compressor we've been using has the intermittent habit of blowing it's
} circuit breaker (twice in the last couple of weeks), which has set us
} way back on getting our "new" microscope fully evacuated for the first
} time.
}
} I'm waiting for a catalog from Jun-Air, but would like to know what
} model/size has been used reliably by others over the years. The Philips
} installation manual doesn't give much more than the air pressure
} requirement, so I'm uncertain what is ideal in terms of pump and tank
} capacities. I've asked the folks at Jun-Air, but they are reluctant to
} make any recommendation based solely on the pressure spec.
}
} Thanks for any tips!
}
} Best regards,
} Eric Anderson
} Southern CT State University Physics Dept.
} 501 Crescent Street, JE108B
} New Haven, CT 06515
} 203-392-6468





From daemon Tue Jan 7 03:29:33 2003



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 09:41:18 -0000
Subject: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rajesh

if you use a safelight have you done a check on this with the new film? I usually slightly pre-fog test film (with a light or better still about 1/4 normal e.m. exposure) and then place something on the film a bit nearer to the safelight for several minutes. If you get any shadow of the object, there is a problem. This may require a change of distance, filter or bulb.

The only other obvious problems I can think of is if the developer has gone off or is the wrong one for the new film.

The drop in contrast may just be related to the fogging.

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK


----- Original Message -----
} From: Rajesh Patel {rpatel-at-umdnj.edu}


Rajesh,
I did have a box of film (SO163) just before Christmas which gave
very poor results. I suspect that the notch was in the wrong place, which
meant that it was loaded emulsion side down in the microscope. What is the
accelerating voltage of your microscope? If it's 200 kV or more I guess
this would be less noticeable than the blank plates I had.
I've never seen this happen before & I guess I've processed 20,000 TEM
negatives or so in my career. I imagine film quality control is becoming
poorer, since the volume is decreasing due to the rise of digital image
capture systems - just as the quality of records went off in the later days
of vinyl as CDs became dominant.

Richard
_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Rajesh Patel [mailto:rpatel-at-umdnj.edu]
Sent: 06 January 2003 18:53
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



I've recently developed a problem with a newly purchased Kodak EM film. The
EM film box says "new formulation" on it.

Well, this new formulation on film is lowering my contrast and I get some
funky fog on it.

I was wondering if anyone else have experienced this problem and if so what
can we do?

I've used old film ( old formulation ) and experience no fogging and get
nice contrast. Its also not a scope specific problem or light leaks or
developer. Its the film.


Rajesh Patel
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Department of Pathology
675 Hoes Lane
Piscataway, NJ 08854

Phone: (732) 235-4648
Fax: (732) 235-4825
E-mail: rpatel-at-umdnj.edu






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From daemon Tue Jan 7 06:42:07 2003



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 12:32:25 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: NanoFIB 2003 - UK

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



*************** NanoFIB 2003 *****************


The next major EPSRC FIB meeting is on 4th April 2003 in Cambridge, UK.
This will take place directly after Microscopy of Semiconductors MSM XIII.

NanoFIB 2003 will provide an exciting overview of active FIB research both in
the UK and abroad. Registration and abstract submission will be via the RMS
(www.rms.org.uk).

The website for the new EPSRC NanoFIB network is now running at :
www.nanofib.org.
Please look for info on FIB meetings, Network members, links to FIB websites.
The website is to link together people active in FIB. If you would like
something added to the website, such as links to your own websites, send us
your suggestions!


====================================================================

Dr. B.J. Inkson
Dept. of Engineering Materials
The University of Sheffield
Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD
Tel: 0114 222 5925
FAX: 0114 222 5943
www.nanofib.org

-------------------------------------------------
This mail sent through IMP: http://horde.org/imp/




From daemon Tue Jan 7 08:46:00 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 09:33:16 -0500
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} I've recently developed a problem with a newly purchased Kodak EM film. The
} EM film box says "new formulation" on it.
}
} Well, this new formulation on film is lowering my contrast and I get some
} funky fog on it.
}
} I was wondering if anyone else have experienced this problem and if so what
} can we do?
}
} I've used old film ( old formulation ) and experience no fogging and get
} nice contrast. Its also not a scope specific problem or light leaks or
} developer. Its the film.
***************************
Rajesh,
I have not personally experienced thisa, since I'm still working off
an old supply of film, but another EM lab here has been going nuts
for the past few months with this same issue. I can't offer any
advice, but I will print out & pass along your posting to them.
There is comfort in not being alone.
Hopefully, we as a large group of interested users can find a
solution to this problem, or push Kodak to solve it.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jan 7 09:01:05 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 09:50:08 -0500
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
I would just like to put in my 2 cents worth here. I have been
"doing" electron microscopy for over 25 years. I am the mother of a
healthy, normal 10 year old boy. He was the end result of a few
years worth of false starts. Of course I can never know if the 2
miscarriages were genetic or the result of environmental influences,
they were early (6 & 12 weeks) and my vote is with something
genetic....I was no spring chicken at the time!
During the 3+ years that my quest for motherhood took, I made extra
sure that I followed good lab safety procedures. I did double glove
when working with fixatives, etc., had the fume hood in my lab
inspected and avoided acrylic resins (personal bias?). My 'scope is a
100CX-II that was installed in 1982. It has always been maintained
by JEOL and I had no concerns about radiation leaks.
I agree with the idea that good lab safety is good lab safety, and if
rules are set to protect the most delicate among us, the unborn, and
everyone follows them at all times, there should not be a concern.
Napping at the microtome, or putting one's feet up when seated at a
desk may raise some eyebrows, but it does help you get through the
day!
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jan 7 09:26:51 2003



From: Frank Macaluso :      macaluso-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 10:14:07 -0500
Subject: Position Open, Biological EM Tech

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Analytical Imaging Facility of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine
has an opening for an experienced electron microscopy technician. For
details please see the posting on the MSA Placement Office Job Listings page.

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/PlacementOffice/JobListings.html
****************************************************************************
Frank Macaluso tel: 718-430-3547
Analytical Imaging Facility fax: 718-430-8996
Albert Einstein College of Medicine e-mail: macaluso-at-aecom.yu.edu
1300 Morris Park Avenue http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
Bronx, NY 10461
****************************************************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 7 10:47:09 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 11:35:41 -0500
Subject: Sectioning HIPS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers;
We have been microtoming samples of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) that
contains butadiene rubber moieties. These samples have been treated as
follows prior to sectioning:
1) Trim block face to prescribed shape and size
2) Harden & stain block by immersing in 2% OsO4 overnight.

Most of the blocks will section fine. However, there is a fair amount of
compression of the resulting sections. The sections expand slightly when
exposed to chloroform vapors and a lot when exposed to xylene vapors.
Sometimes it is necessary to use both to get the sections to expand.
However, we are concerned about over expansion and possible swelling of
components in the sample.
Is there another solvent that could be used to relax the sections
without concern for over expansion or swelling of components?

Also, is there someone who does cryo-sectioning of HIPS or similar materials
that would be able to do this as a service project for an outside group.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Tue Jan 7 12:44:05 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 10:37:11 -0800
Subject: Re: Best Air Compressor for EM400T?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Monday, January 6, 2003, at 12:41 PM, Eric Anderson wrote:

Dear Eric,

} Say, can anyone recommend a super-reliable and quiet brand (and size)
} of
} air compressor to use with a Philips EM400T?

Since the FEI people are here installing our microscope, I was able to
ask about this. The Jun-Air model 6-25 is the one used both on the new
scopes and the older 400 series.
}
} Thanks for any tips!
}
You're welcome.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 7 12:51:46 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 10:48:00 -0800
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Monday, January 6, 2003, at 10:53 AM, Rajesh Patel wrote:

Dear Rajesh,

} I've recently developed a problem with a newly purchased Kodak EM
} film. The
} EM film box says "new formulation" on it.

Is this SO163? Our newly-purchased SO163 does not say this, but it
would be good to know that the new formulation is coming.
}
} Well, this new formulation on film is lowering my contrast and I get
} some
} funky fog on it.
}
} I was wondering if anyone else have experienced this problem and if so
} what
} can we do?
}
} I've used old film ( old formulation ) and experience no fogging and
} get
} nice contrast. Its also not a scope specific problem or light leaks or
} developer. Its the film.
}
Have you tried developing the film in complete darkness? Very
sensitive EM films can be fogged by safelights, and sometimes the
filter on the safelight can crack and let shorter wavelengths out.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Tue Jan 7 13:59:44 2003



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 11:48:21 -0800
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Richard,
I had a run of about 6 to 8 boxes of Kodak 4489 film with the notch on the
wrong side, three years ago. I noticed because the emulsion side of the film
is lighter under the safelight than the back side, so I loaded them right
side up. I sent in the customer reply card, but never heard anything.


} Rajesh,
} I did have a box of film (SO163) just before Christmas which gave
} very poor results. I suspect that the notch was in the wrong place, which
} meant that it was loaded emulsion side down in the microscope. What is
the
} accelerating voltage of your microscope? If it's 200 kV or more I guess
} this would be less noticeable than the blank plates I had.
} I've never seen this happen before & I guess I've processed 20,000 TEM
} negatives or so in my career. I imagine film quality control is becoming
} poorer, since the volume is decreasing due to the rise of digital image
} capture systems - just as the quality of records went off in the later
days
} of vinyl as CDs became dominant.
}
} Richard
} _______________________________
} Richard Beanland

Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Jan 7 14:08:37 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 15:01:00 -0500
Subject: TEM of HIPS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Debby Sherman wrote:
==============================================================
Listers;
We have been microtoming samples of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) that
contains butadiene rubber moieties. These samples have been treated as
follows prior to sectioning:
1) Trim block face to prescribed shape and size
2) Harden & stain block by immersing in 2% OsO4 overnight.

Most of the blocks will section fine. However, there is a fair amount of
compression of the resulting sections. The sections expand slightly when
exposed to chloroform vapors and a lot when exposed to xylene vapors.
Sometimes it is necessary to use both to get the sections to expand. However
, we are concerned about over expansion and possible swelling of components
in the sample.
Is there another solvent that could be used to relax the sections
without concern for over expansion or swelling of components?

Also, is there someone who does cryo-sectioning of HIPS or similar materials
that would be able to do this as a service project for an outside group.
==================================================================
The laboratory of Structure Probe, Inc. which is the "parent" of SPI
Supplies, has been doing cryo sectioning of HIPS for industry for more than
thirty years. You are quite correct to be concerned about compression
effects in these kinds of samples, because they can create the illusion of
orientation when in fact such apparent "orientation" could be an artifact.

There could be many reasons for the compression effects, which could include
such factors as the diamond knife itself, the conditions of the
ultramicrotomy, temperature of the sectioning ,etc.

Please contact me off-line and describe what the client is trying to
accomplish, because that becomes important in terms of determing what
orientation the sections should have relative to the injection direction of
the molded piece. We can quote you a fixed price to do the entire job. I
can not recall any HIPS sample in recent years that could not be treated as
a "routine" sample, even those that have been modified with other polymers.

Chuck
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Tue Jan 7 15:25:24 2003



From: Tracey M. Pepper :      tpepper-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 15:15:32 -0600
Subject: job for tech/bio at ISU

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


IOWA STATE
UNIVERSITY An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
Vacancy Announcement
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE II
Vacancy Number: 023649
Department: BIOTECHNOLOGY
Proposed Start Date: MARCH, 2003
Appointment Conditions: Continuous, 12 Months, Full Time

Special Conditions:
Description: This individual will be responsible for carrying out a
variety of laboratory techniques and procedures for the preparation of
biological specimens leading to their microscopic observations and analyses
for scientists at Iowa State University, and for off-campus
scientists/clients. This individual will be responsible for assisting both
the Assistant Scientist III and Director of Bessey Microscopy Facility
(BMF) in maintaining the laboratory and work environment for all of the
researchers who use it. Individual will need to effectively work with
researchers and develop a work schedule that fits needs of BMF.
Required Qualifications: Bachelor's degree in a biological sciences
discipline and one year of laboratory experience that
demonstrates knowledge in general and quantitative chemistry, physics,
operation and maintenance of light and electron microscopes, ancillary
equipment, and all phases of handling chemicals for preparing specimens.
Preferred Qualifications: Master's degree in biological sciences
discipline, practical experiences in use of light and electron microscopes,
rotary and ultramicrotomes, digital imaging and PC computers and BEMT
Certification (MSA).
Salary/Wage: $30,128 minimum
Application Deadline: To guarantee consideration, application must be
received by January 30, 2003.
Application Instructions: Send cover letter explaining interest,
email address, resume, and the names, professional titles and phone numbers
of three references to: Dr. Harry T. Horner, Bessey Microscopy Facility,
Room 3A Bessey Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1020, fax:
515-294-1337, or email: hth-at-iastate.edu.




Tracey M. Pepper
Supervisor
Bessey Microscopy Facility
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-1020
p. 515.294.3872
f. 515.294.1337




From daemon Tue Jan 7 16:31:23 2003



From: Robert Bagnell :      rml-at-med.unc.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 17:21:38 -0500
Subject: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rajesh:
We use Kodak 4489 EM film. The "new formulation" is definitely
different in our hands. Our negatives are too thin when we use our
standard microscope exposure and chemical processing methods. I have
made an acceptable correction by increasing the development time of
the film by about 10%, decreasing the exposure of the paper by about
1/3 stop and shortening the development time of the paper by about
10%. I have made no change in the microscope's exposure setting. We
use Kodak Kodabrome II RC F4 paper and process both the 4489 film and
the Kodabrome paper in a Colex automatic processor using Kodak
Polymax RT chemistry. The same correction scheme should work if you
are processing in D19 but the percentages will need adjusting.

I wonder what Kodak has done?

Bob
--
C. Robert Bagnell, Jr., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Microscopy Services Laboratory
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
phone 919-966-2413
fax 919-966-6718
e-mail bagnell-at-med.unc.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 7 18:31:28 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 16:30:40 -0800
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have not used TEM film before, but have used
lots of photo film. First off, I would never
load film under a safe light--it is not safe.
Litho film could be handled in yellow light
without problem. If the TEM film is pan film,
it seems to me that a safe light is not advised.

The flip side of the film is always an issue.
If the TEM film is like traditional film, there
is a blueish anti-halation coating. That side
is the back side. When the film is fixed, the
coating is removed. Check an un-developed piece
of film and see which is which. Another clue
is which side is grainy looking and which is
shiny. Grainy is the emulsion side. Probably
no surprise to anyone.

When a new box of 4x5 or 220 roll film was
purchased, I always developed/processed an unexposed sheet
or roll. This was then measured on a
densitometer for baseline fog D value. If the
D value was lower than normal, the media could
be pre-exposed (fogged) to bring the background
up to that of other media. The idea is to
get the media at a point where the lazy S D/exposure
curve was at a point above the toe. Then, there
is a large linear range of exposure before the
knee, where saturation occurs.

One might try this on old media and the "new" stuff.
This would tell whether the new formula is a
little different or radically different.

gary g.

At 11:48 AM 1/7/2003, you wrote:

} Dear Richard,
} I had a run of about 6 to 8 boxes of Kodak 4489 film with the notch on the
} wrong side, three years ago. I noticed because the emulsion side of the film
} is lighter under the safelight than the back side, so I loaded them right
} side up. I sent in the customer reply card, but never heard anything.
}
}
} } Rajesh,
} } I did have a box of film (SO163) just before Christmas which gave
} } very poor results. I suspect that the notch was in the wrong place, which
} } meant that it was loaded emulsion side down in the microscope. What is
} the
} } accelerating voltage of your microscope? If it's 200 kV or more I guess
} } this would be less noticeable than the blank plates I had.
} } I've never seen this happen before & I guess I've processed 20,000 TEM
} } negatives or so in my career. I imagine film quality control is becoming
} } poorer, since the volume is decreasing due to the rise of digital image
} } capture systems - just as the quality of records went off in the later
} days
} } of vinyl as CDs became dominant.
} }
} } Richard
} } _______________________________
} } Richard Beanland
}
} Mary Mager
} Electron Microscopist
} Metals and Materials Engineering
} University of British Columbia
} 6350 Stores Road
} Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
} CANADA
} tel: 604-822-5648
} e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca



From daemon Tue Jan 7 18:31:29 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 16:25:04 -0800
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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David,
Thanks for such nice comments. My major point was that the Lab should be
safe in all possible ways anytime and for EVERYONE. Another point was,
that people should think about baby well before they actually get it. The
exposure to radiation/chemicals/etc of male and female BEFORE fertilization
may cause serious defects in the fetus later. Actually, male's
reproductive organs tends to be more sensitive to radiation and some
particular chemicals than female's.

From another hand, employees should clearly understand the health risk
factor associated with job. In your particular case, those individuals,
who is oversensitive to formaldehyde should quit, because this
hypersensitivity is a very bad sign: they could develop unusual allergic
reactions with very serious result to health in future. I wish all of us
to have nice safe conditions in the Lab. Sergey


At 10:46 AM 1/7/2003, you wrote:
} I agree in substance, Just a few quick notes. Your concerns
} prior to conception are most valid as well as the points that often the
} labs are safer than home. There is only so much we can do, but we should
} do what we can. There is/should be no legal way to discriminate based on
} risks to fetus. So the lab must be made safe for all.
} I would disagree on several points:
} Federal, State and local safety laws are made for the "Average,
} healthy, normal individuals. The TLV's, for example, are created for
} someone in this class. Few if any body falls into this class, especially
} someone who has just conceived. The presence of formaldehyde is totally
} undetectable in the lab, approximately 2 times less than the TLV, yet
} without special precautions, I have individuals sensitive to formaldehyde
} who react to the small amounts present with skin reactions, or breathing
} problems. We attempt to lower formaldehyde vapors to below the limits of
} those using the lab, but they are the most sensitive indicators of the
} presence of aldehyde vapors, there aren't tests sensitive enough. Kind
} of a catch 22.
} Oil from vacuum pumps, compared with other risks is relatively
} mild. New oil (I know, I know, the breakdown products) has repeatedly
} been checked free from carcinogens. (and we still exhaust to the hood system)
} At least from my information, Uranyl Acetate is not a bone seeker
} like Strontium is. I was told that the biological half life of soluble
} uranium was in the order of 6 weeks. The acute danger to kidneys and
} liver from the heavy metal toxicity may be as great as the radioactive
} hazard to the body. Yes, don't drink it (and especially don't inhale the
} dust, there the damage is greater and the biological half life much
} longer) but I agree there are many more hazardous chemicals in a EM
} Lab. (Cacodylate scares the living hell out of me every time I need to
} use it, and I typically don't let any others use it but do the work for them.)
} Although the persons accept the risks (making the assumption that
} all managers are as careful as you and I in outlining the risks to the
} employees and users and training them to avoid them) the bottom line is:
} regardless what we have them sign or tell them, the legal and moral
} responsibility to protect the employees and users of the laboratory rests
} firmly on the manager and it is the managers responsibility to make the
} lab safe for all who would wish to use it, regardless of preexisting
} conditions, gender etc.
}
} At 05:40 PM 1/6/2003 -0800, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Jan 7 19:29:45 2003



From: saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 2003 20:16:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Why not do an exposure series on the scope with the new film to get more
signal (more illumination) so that you don't have to monkey with both
film development and print exposure? What you need is a properly
exposed negative so that you can get the most out of your prints. If
the problem is truly film formulation (slower film) and not some fogging
problem, I¹d go for the increased beam intensity.

This is not the first time Kodak has changed formulations and or film
format. It doesn't surprise me. We haven't ordered film lately, but
it's useful to have this problem discussed here so the rest of us can
beware when we do get a new batch.

Thanks,
Sara Miller


On
Tue, 7 Jan 2003,
Robert Bagnell wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Rajesh:
} We use Kodak 4489 EM film. The "new formulation" is definitely
} different in our hands. Our negatives are too thin when we use our
} standard microscope exposure and chemical processing methods. I have
} made an acceptable correction by increasing the development time of
} the film by about 10%, decreasing the exposure of the paper by about
} 1/3 stop and shortening the development time of the paper by about
} 10%. I have made no change in the microscope's exposure setting. We
} use Kodak Kodabrome II RC F4 paper and process both the 4489 film and
} the Kodabrome paper in a Colex automatic processor using Kodak
} Polymax RT chemistry. The same correction scheme should work if you
} are processing in D19 but the percentages will need adjusting.
}
} I wonder what Kodak has done?
}
} Bob
} --
} C. Robert Bagnell, Jr., Ph.D.
} Associate Professor
} Director, Microscopy Services Laboratory
} Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
} University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
} Chapel Hill, NC 27599
} phone 919-966-2413
} fax 919-966-6718
} e-mail bagnell-at-med.unc.edu
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265


From daemon Tue Jan 7 21:09:18 2003



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 21:00:02 -0600
Subject: RE: Pregnancy & SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Though my issue was not regarding pregnancy, I had my concerns over
spending a lot of time being bathed in a strong magnetic field. Some
studies suggested correlations to increased health problems, whereas other
studies suggest some magnetic fields were actually beneficial.?????

Anyway, we went through the lab with a trifield meter to ensure that no one
was being unduly exposed to strong emf. While EMs have high voltage and you
sit right next to those power supplies, you could reasonably assume that
microscope is more sensitive to emf than your body and the manufacturers
provide good shielding for image quality.

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services






At 09:50 AM 1/7/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



From daemon Wed Jan 8 02:18:21 2003



From: Steve Bagley :      SBagley-at-picr.man.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 12:48:32 -0000
Subject: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Gary
TEM film is blue-sensitive, orthochromatic not panchromatic, and red
or brown safelights are
generally safe if chosen and used according to the manufacturer's
instructions.
Whether safelight is safe or not depends on film type, safelight
wavelength, intensity, time,
development, EM image exposure, etc.
If you have any anxieties about safe exposure times better to
experiment with these
and determine what actually happens.
Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gary Gaugler" {gary-at-gaugler.com}
To: "MSA listserver" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 08, 2003 12:30 AM



Hi,

I am in the middle of writing a joint grant proposal for an optical disk
jukebox / image archiving solution which should hopefully hold up to ten
years microscopy data. This system hopefully will aid in 'traceability' of
raw data and the image processed result. I was wondering what other research
institutes have in place for image archiving regarding traceability of
images.

Techniques of image manipulation that, in the past, could only be done by
few, and with great care, are now routine, consequently readily available
software has also created ample opportunities to falsify images. Obviously
the raw data and the final data to be published should be stored long term,
but what about the steps in-between? As most research institutes now are
multi-user facilities, the onus of scientific proof should be on the owner
of the data, but since students are replaced every three - four years there
must also be a burden of proof on the research institute especially if the
images are to be reused at a later date.

Should a multi-user microscopy facility demonstrate traceability of data or
should we rely on the users?



Steve


Steve Bagley
Associate Scientist
Applied Imaging Facility
Paterson Institute For Cancer Research
Cancer Research UK
Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Rd,
Manchester. M20 9BX, UK




















This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the Person(s)
('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or opinions
presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie Hospital
NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its contents,
by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach of
civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail as
soon as possible.


From daemon Wed Jan 8 07:06:06 2003



From: Robert Bagnell :      rml-at-med.unc.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 07:58:30 -0500
Subject: EM Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sarah's suggestion is a good one and in fact is what we did first.
However, changing the exposure of the film in this case did not
improve the result. We got more dense negatives but the contrast
remained poor. I've used the old photographer's trick of decreasing
exposure (in this case keeping it the same) and increasing
development (of the film) to improve contrast. This definitely works
for the new 4489 formulation, what ever it is.

Bob
--
C. Robert Bagnell, Jr., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Microscopy Services Laboratory
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
phone 919-966-2413
fax 919-966-6718
e-mail bagnell-at-med.unc.edu


From daemon Wed Jan 8 08:49:12 2003



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 08:39:23 -0600
Subject: Re: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tony,

Just a quick note: if you can wait a bit to buy, I would. Microtek
(I'm 98% sure it's Microtek) has just come out with a flatbed scanner
that uses ICE technology. This is used in the Nikon and other 35mm
slide scanners to remove scratches and dust on the film from the
scanned image. It's a hardware+software system, not just software.
I don't know anything about this scanner yet, other than that it
exists, but it would be worth checking out.

Phil

Hope 2003 is good for you all!!

We are looking at purchasing a photo scanner (Probably an EPSON
Perfection 2450 Photo). We will be using it to scan old 35mm slides
for new Powerpoint presentations.

Since it will also scan negatives and produce positive immages, I was
wondering whether it could scan Electron Microscope negatives as
well. This would save a good deal of effort and money in enlarging
and printing onto photographic paper.

Has anyone tried this?
Any recommendations?

Thanks for your consideration,

Tony Henwood JP, BappSc, GradDipSysAnalys, CT(ASC)
Laboratory Manager
The Children's Hospital at Westmead,
Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, 2145, AUSTRALIA.
Tel: (02) 9845 3306
Fax: (02) 9845 3318

{http://www.histosearch.com/homepages/TonyHenwood/default.html} http://www.histosearch.com/homepages/TonyHenwood/default.html
{http://us.geocities.com/tonyhenwoodau/index.html} http://us.geocities.com/tonyhenwoodau/index.html



**********************************************************************
This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and
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are addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, please
delete it and notify the sender.

Views expressed in this message and any attachments are those
of the individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of the
Childrens Hospital at Westmead

This footnote also confirms that this email message has been
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the Childrens Hospital at Westmead accepts no liability for any
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--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Wed Jan 8 08:53:54 2003



From: Omayra Velez :      mayas003-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 06:47:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: EM FILM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rajesh:
We are having the same problems with the "new" film.
We tested the scope, camera, safe light, enlarger,
desecator, grid holder, and developing solution. We
even tested the film in a new scope at Montclair
University and also concluded it is the film. We
contacted kodak directly, I think you should do the
same.

Omayra Velez
Electron Microscopy Specialist
Pathology Department
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, New York
212-746-6437

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From daemon Wed Jan 8 09:35:22 2003



From: Hanno Dierke :      h.dierke-at-tu-braunschweig.de
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 16:22:30 +0100
Subject: LM, TEM (, AFM): AlMg3 preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all,

I have some problems to prepare the surface of AlMg3 for surface
investigations on the one hand and TEM measurements on the other hand.

TEM is less worse because I currently have an electrolyte based on
perchloric acid which lets me get satisfying specimen. Most specimen are
ion milled afterwards anyway.
If there is a better way (without ion milling to save time ;^)) I
nevertheless would be very interested.

The other purpose is some more interesting for me: On the one hand I
need to investigate the grain structure of my specimen after cold
rolling and don´t get proper grain boundaries to do that. On the other
hand I am very interested in proper surfaces for surface observation in DF.
I also tried to get a smooth surface with an electrolyte composed of
perchloric acid and methanol, but its quite explosive and therefore has
to be cooled by solid carbon dioxide...

Does anybody know any other electrolyte or acids to get the results
mentioned above?

Thanks in advance,

Hanno Dierke

--
Hanno Dierke, Inst. for Metal Physics an Nuclear Condensed Matter Physics
TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany
h.dierke-at-tu-braunschweig.de



From daemon Wed Jan 8 09:55:51 2003



From: Jiang Liu :      jiangliu24680-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 10:46:12 -0500
Subject: Re: Sectioning HIPS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I have been working on phase imaging of HIPS with AFM TappingMode for a
while since we do not have a TEM here. I tried different microtoming
conditions, with a 35-degree diamond knife on a microtone for light
microscope samples (minimum 0.5 um sectioning), for the best cutting faces
and therefore the imaging from them, but with limited success. I found ca.
-30 to -50 C is probably the "right" temperature, but the resulted facing
quality varies from sample to sample. Defects are primarily chatters and
local compressions on polystyrene matrix. I also found difficulties in
parameter settings of the DI AFM for different HIPS samples. However, the
same operation is very successful for ICPs (impact copolymer of
polypropylene and polyethylene).

Does anybody have any experiences, suggestions or comments? Many thanks in
advance.

Debby, did you try AFM on HIPS?

Jiang Liu, PhD
Research and Technology Center
Atofina Petrochemicals, Inc.
Tel: 281-884-0529
email: jiang.liu-at-atofina.com


} From: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
} To: "message to: MSA list" {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Subject: Sectioning HIPS
} Date: Tue, 07 Jan 2003 11:35:41 -0500
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


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From daemon Wed Jan 8 10:35:31 2003



From: Robert Underwood :      underwoo-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 08:26:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Steve,
As the digital revolution has progressed, I have thought image tracability
will become a major issue. I have wondered if anyone has developed a
method of tagging the original data file in a way that you could always
identify the original? So far people have relied on image analysis
techniques to determine originals from manipulations and/or actual theft
of images or parts of images.

Robert Underwood
U of Washington
Seattle

On Wed, 8 Jan 2003, Steve Bagley wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} Hi,
}
} I am in the middle of writing a joint grant proposal for an optical disk
} jukebox / image archiving solution which should hopefully hold up to ten
} years microscopy data. This system hopefully will aid in 'traceability' of
} raw data and the image processed result. I was wondering what other research
} institutes have in place for image archiving regarding traceability of
} images.
}
} Techniques of image manipulation that, in the past, could only be done by
} few, and with great care, are now routine, consequently readily available
} software has also created ample opportunities to falsify images. Obviously
} the raw data and the final data to be published should be stored long term,
} but what about the steps in-between? As most research institutes now are
} multi-user facilities, the onus of scientific proof should be on the owner
} of the data, but since students are replaced every three - four years there
} must also be a burden of proof on the research institute especially if the
} images are to be reused at a later date.
}
} Should a multi-user microscopy facility demonstrate traceability of data or
} should we rely on the users?
}
}
}
} Steve
}
}
} Steve Bagley
} Associate Scientist
} Applied Imaging Facility
} Paterson Institute For Cancer Research
} Cancer Research UK
} Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Rd,
} Manchester. M20 9BX, UK
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the Person(s)
} ('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or opinions
} presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
} those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie Hospital
} NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
} within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
} distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its contents,
} by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach of
} civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
} intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail as
} soon as possible.
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 8 11:17:56 2003



From: Mark Aindow :      m.aindow-at-uconn.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 12:06:42 -0500
Subject: Postdoc Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


University of Connecticut
Institute of Materials Science

Postdoctoral Position
Displacive Phase Transformations

A post-doctoral position is available immediately within the Institute of
Materials Science at the University of Connecticut to work on displacive
phase transformations in crystalline solids. The systems to be studied
include metallic pseudoelastic alloys and ferroelectric thin films. The
ideal candidate will have experience in both microstructural
characterization (particularly TEM) and phenomenological/crystallographic
modeling of phase transformations. This position is a one-year appointment,
with possible renewal for a second year.

To apply, please send a complete resume, together with a list of
publications and contact details for 3 references to either Prof. S. Pamir
Alpay (p.alpay-at-ims.uconn.edu) or Prof. Mark Aindow (m.aindow-at-uconn.edu).
Screening of applications will begin immediately, and will continue until
the position is filled. We encourage applications from under-represented
groups, including minorities, women and people with disabilities.

--
*********************************************************

Mark Aindow, Associate Professor,
Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering
Institute of Materials Science,
97 North Eagleville Road, Unit 3136
University of Connecticut, Storrs,
CT 06269-3136, USA

Tel: +1 (860) 486-2644
FAX: +1 (860) 486-4745
Email: m.aindow-at-uconn.edu

**********************************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 8 11:57:58 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 07:49:07 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Wed, 8 Jan 2003, Philip Oshel wrote:

} Tony,
}
} Just a quick note: if you can wait a bit to buy, I would. Microtek
} (I'm 98% sure it's Microtek) has just come out with a flatbed scanner
} that uses ICE technology. This is used in the Nikon and other 35mm
} slide scanners to remove scratches and dust on the film from the
} scanned image. It's a hardware+software system, not just software.
} I don't know anything about this scanner yet, other than that it
} exists, but it would be worth checking out.

But be aware that any camera or scanner hardware/software that "removes
dust and scratches" usually does so by blurring and eroding and then
unblurring, or similar processing, to despeckle or hide items identified
as dust or scratches, thereby changing image pixels and altering your
data. These programs may identify "real" objects in electron micrographs
as dust and delete them! The technology is great for restoring that old
photograph of your great-grandma, but has the potential to change your
scientific data. Try to find out how the hardware/software works before
deciding which to buy.

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Wed Jan 8 13:33:00 2003



From: Omayra Velez :      mayas003-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 11:23:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: EM FILM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ann:
The new film has the letters "New Formulation" written
in white over a red slip, on the side or top of the
box. Kodak already contacted us today and we are in
process to send them our test material(negatives,
prints, and info). If you do not have this film then
you are lucky, is been a nut house here, with these
unprintable negatives.

Omayra Velez
Electron Microscopy Specialist
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, New York. 010021
212-746-6437

--- "R. Ann Bliss" {bliss5-at-llnl.gov} wrote:
} Omayra:
}
} After following the thread about the "new" film for
} a few days now, I
} finally went to check the new shipment of film I
} received last week.
} Where does one find the words "New Formulation" or
} whatever it was? i
} looked all over the outside of the box and did not
} see those words.
} Am I lucky and don't have the problem (yet) or is it
} on the paper
} work I never read on the inside?
}
} --
}
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
}
} R. Ann Bliss
} Technician, Chemistry and Materials Science
} Materials Science and Technology Division
} Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
}
} _____________________________


__________________________________________________
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From daemon Wed Jan 8 13:49:45 2003



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 12:40:37 -0700
Subject: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

you are touching on an issue that is probably of interest to a much larger
audience. There are at least two areas, where this has been an issue for a
while: Forensics and Pharmaceuticals. The Pharmaceutical industry in the US
is required by the FDA to keep track of data because lives may depend on it.
It used to be lab books that needed to be kept in certain ways, but now that
much of the data is electronic, the FDA has published requirements for the
safekeeping of data (21 CFR rule 11). It may be interesting for you to see
if this answers some of your questions (caution: 21 CFR rule 11 is kind of
messy). But even rule 11 relies on SOPs to ensure data safety and security.
Traceability and audit features are part of 21 CFR rule 11.

21 CFR rule 11 may be overkill for many settings, and a relatively simple
image archive or data base might suffice. Set it up so that certain
information must be entered (for example sample number, patient ID, etc.),
keep the images on a central server and have all imaging instruments store
their data there, and it might do what you want.

I don't think that you can have a 100% watertight system without some
decisions by the users, because it would require, that ALL images are
stored, regardless of content. And even then, the choice of what images to
take still lies with the individuals. You probably have to set up some SOPs
that tell the users that they need to save the images within a system that
allows some measure of control, be it in an archive or save them to CD-R
which then have to be turned in for safekeeping. The question then turns to
finding a system that supports the control you are looking for.


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Bagley [mailto:SBagley-at-picr.man.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, January 08, 2003 5:49 AM
To: 'Micro Discussion Group'



Hi,

I am in the middle of writing a joint grant proposal for an optical disk
jukebox / image archiving solution which should hopefully hold up to ten
years microscopy data. This system hopefully will aid in 'traceability' of
raw data and the image processed result. I was wondering what other research
institutes have in place for image archiving regarding traceability of
images.

Techniques of image manipulation that, in the past, could only be done by
few, and with great care, are now routine, consequently readily available
software has also created ample opportunities to falsify images. Obviously
the raw data and the final data to be published should be stored long term,
but what about the steps in-between? As most research institutes now are
multi-user facilities, the onus of scientific proof should be on the owner
of the data, but since students are replaced every three - four years there
must also be a burden of proof on the research institute especially if the
images are to be reused at a later date.

Should a multi-user microscopy facility demonstrate traceability of data or
should we rely on the users?



Steve


Steve Bagley
Associate Scientist
Applied Imaging Facility
Paterson Institute For Cancer Research
Cancer Research UK
Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Rd,
Manchester. M20 9BX, UK




















This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the Person(s)
('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or opinions
presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie Hospital
NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its contents,
by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach of
civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail as
soon as possible.


From daemon Wed Jan 8 14:48:47 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 15:38:15 -0500
Subject: 2002 Videotapes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The videotapes from the 2002 MSA tutorials in Quebec City are now
available. We are now in a positions to offer the entire library on DVD as
well as VHS. We expect to phase out the VHS versions as the current
supply that is on hand is exhausted. The most up to date catalog can be
viewed at the MSA website or go directly to this URL:
http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/sems/newtape00.htm
As time permits, I am trying to make abstracts of each of the tapes
available online as well so that one has a better idea of what was covered
in the tutorial.
If you are unable to access this site I can provide a printed copy or I
can email a copy of the catalog.
We are now also able to accept VISA or Mastercard for payment. We will
also accept institutional purchase orders for which we will invoice.
As you will notice many of the tapes are quite old and the topics covered
certainly deserve being updated. The Education Committee invites
interested parties to present tutorials or short courses on these topics,
or topics never covered that might be appropriate for tutorials.
The committee may be contact at this
address MSAEdCommittee-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Please feel free to contact me concerning the video library.

Greg Erdos
Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
P.O. Box 118525
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295


From daemon Wed Jan 8 16:56:30 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 14:55:16 -0800
Subject: Re: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It is the ScanMaker 6800. This scanner
will scan reflective media up to 8.5x11"
and transmissive media up to 4x5".

http://www.microtekusa.com/indexICEflash.html

It uses Digital ICE, as do the high end Nikon
CoolScan scanners. The principle of image
correction is based on a separate IR channel.
It scans once to pick up greyscale or RGB
info, then a second time for IR. Then
the image is processed and "fixed" if bad.
One web link says two passes while another
says only one pass. ?? Anyway, about D-ICE...
Sometimes it works really good. Other times
not so good. So, case by case basis. I use
the Nikon Super CoolScan 8000 for slides and
medium format media. It is optical 4K x 4K dpi
with D-ICE and GEM.

It (D-ICE) does not work on old Kodachrome transparencies
since they block the IR. Other media seem OK.
It has a bit of difficulty with b/w slides.
The 6800 is 4800x2400 dpi optical, which
ought to be OK for most applications. With
Firewire and USB for MSRP $399, that is pretty good.

gary g.





At 09:49 AM 1/8/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Wed Jan 8 16:56:33 2003



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 16:48:30 -0600
Subject: Re: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,
Tina's comment is right on. Note also that the original
poster was seeking in part to move their 'good old' projection slides
over to powerpoint. Well, if you are like me, over the years you have
been showing your favorite slides they have accumulated plenty of
dust. If its ok in the slide projector, why worry about it in
powerpoint? It will give your presentation a comfy well worn look
like an elbow patch on a tweed jacket. You can of course also do nice
dodging and burning in photoshop or equivalent to remove egregious
dust specks before dropping them into powerpoint.

Just a thought,
Tobias


}
}
}
} On Wed, 8 Jan 2003, Philip Oshel wrote:
}
} } Tony,
} }
} } Just a quick note: if you can wait a bit to buy, I would. Microtek
} } (I'm 98% sure it's Microtek) has just come out with a flatbed scanner
} } that uses ICE technology. This is used in the Nikon and other 35mm
} } slide scanners to remove scratches and dust on the film from the
} } scanned image. It's a hardware+software system, not just software.
} } I don't know anything about this scanner yet, other than that it
} } exists, but it would be worth checking out.
}
} But be aware that any camera or scanner hardware/software that "removes
} dust and scratches" usually does so by blurring and eroding and then
} unblurring, or similar processing, to despeckle or hide items identified
} as dust or scratches, thereby changing image pixels and altering your
} data. These programs may identify "real" objects in electron micrographs
} as dust and delete them! The technology is great for restoring that old
} photograph of your great-grandma, but has the potential to change your
} scientific data. Try to find out how the hardware/software works before
} deciding which to buy.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************

--
_ ____ __ ____ Tobias I. Baskin
/ \ / / \ / \ \ 109 Tucker Hall
/ / / / \ \ \ Biological Sciences
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ University of Missouri
/ / / \ \ \ Columbia, MO USA
/ / / \ \ \ 65211-7400
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ voice: 573-882-0173
fax: 573-882-0123
http://www.biosci.missouri.edu/Baskin/baskin_lab__home_page.htm


From daemon Wed Jan 8 17:08:41 2003



From: Eric Anderson :      andersone1-at-southernct.edu
Date: Wed, 08 Jan 2003 18:01:12 -0500
Subject: Re: Best Air Compressor for EM400T?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Many, many thanks for all your thoughts and generous replies!

Since the budget allows it, (at the moment), I'm going to follow the crowd (and
FEI technicians) who have suggested the Jun-Air 6-25. (Many wrote just to me
and not to the whole group. Jim, unfortunately the folks at Jun-Air would not
recommend a model suited to my application when I asked them. They only
offered to send a catalog.)

Hopefully, my particular application and environment won't generate the
problems John experienced. We really need the quiet operation (specs say 45
dB), especially because the unexpected cycling of a louder compressor is
scaring folks out of their wits. Not at all a good situation for handling
delicate specimens/procedures.

I'm very tempted to just use nitrogen tanks, but the old 400 has a couple of
slow leaks which I might not get to fixing right away, plus we'll probably have
it running continuously for long periods, so I'd rather not worry about tank
deliveries and running out at a bad time. (One of the same reasons I switched
to natural gas from oil for home heating..., plus cleanliness of course.)

Vitaly, thanks for the reasonably priced alternative that employs a modified
refrigeration compressor. I love being creative, but just don't have the time
right now. Will keep it in mind though.

Thanks & best regards to all!
-Eric

}
}
} Eric Anderson wrote:
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} } New Year's Greetings!
} }
} } Say, can anyone recommend a super-reliable and quiet brand (and size) of
} } air compressor to use with a Philips EM400T?
} }
} } Unfortunately, in addition to being very, very loud, the low grade air
} } compressor we've been using has the intermittent habit of blowing it's
} } circuit breaker (twice in the last couple of weeks), which has set us
} } way back on getting our "new" microscope fully evacuated for the first
} } time.
} }
} } I'm waiting for a catalog from Jun-Air, but would like to know what
} } model/size has been used reliably by others over the years. The Philips
} } installation manual doesn't give much more than the air pressure
} } requirement, so I'm uncertain what is ideal in terms of pump and tank
} } capacities. I've asked the folks at Jun-Air, but they are reluctant to
} } make any recommendation based solely on the pressure spec.
} }
} } Thanks for any tips!
} }
} } Best regards,
} } Eric Anderson
} } Southern CT State University Physics Dept.
} } 501 Crescent Street, JE108B
} } New Haven, CT 06515
} } 203-392-6468



From daemon Wed Jan 8 19:10:23 2003



From: Tom Murray :      murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 8 Jan 2003 16:59:15 -0800
Subject: Sample Stage Repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

I have a GATAN Cryo-Transfer cold stage for a Philips EM420 TEM. The
crystal needs to be replaced and I was wondering if anyone has
knowledge of a third party who does this type of repair?

Thanks in advance.

Tom
--
Thomas M. Murray Phone: (206)543-2836
Manager, Electron Microscopy Center Fax: (206)543-3100
Materials Science & Engineering email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
302 Roberts Hall, Box 352120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-2120


From daemon Thu Jan 9 05:20:27 2003



From: Edward Calomeni :      calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2003 08:21:46 -0500
Subject: Zeiss EM 900 operators manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all

before you rush out and buy the Scanmaker 6800 for its Digital ICE scratch correction you should be aware that this is only available for prints and not negatives. Although the scanner takes negatives, there is no infra red light source which is required for scratch correction on film - see PC magazine review at:
http://www.microtekusa.com/images/pcmag6800.pdf
This is pointed to on the Microtek page:
http://www.microtekusa.com/indexICEflash.html

I also assume that negatives are scanned on a glass plate rather than a glassless carrier of the Microtek Scanmaker 8700 or 1800f types so you will get more dust marks etc.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK

----- Original Message -----
} From: Gary Gaugler {gary-at-gaugler.com}


Morning Folks,

I am in the process of restarting a lab which has a Zeiss EM900 TEM. When I got here, I found the manual waterlogged! Another flood in an EM Lab! I am in need of an operators and any other electrical and mechanical manuals that pertain to this scope. I am willing to pay copying and shipping costs.

Thanks,

Ed


Edward Calomeni
Director EM Lab
Ohio State University - Pathology
M018 Starling Loving Hall
320 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210-1240
calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu



From daemon Thu Jan 9 07:42:06 2003



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 08:34:06 -0500
Subject: Re: Best Air Compressor for EM400T?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Eric:

I've run into compressor issues with every Philips scope I've worked with,
what has always gotten me though is the fact that reliable quite air
compressors are reality not fantasy since JEOL provides air compressors that
are just that, and the HVAC systems for most buildings also using 24/7 air
compressor systems for the thermostats (the little hiss when you change the
thermostat on the wall?) as seem to work well.

Our current system is on a Philips 505. But after having tried several
compressors and repairs, I have wound up building my own compressor
system out of various components.

(1) Using 20 gallon storage tank from previous compressor

(2) Added a Thomas Compact Oilless Reciprocating Air Compressor ($400).
Go well over pressure and volumne needed so as to not stress the
compressor. Remeber your really don't need much volumne.

(3) Built a mounting plate out of aluminium and large rubber bushings

(4) Using high quality air hose as vibration isolation and copper tubing.

(5) Using an Ashcroft indusdrial pressure switch for turning compressor on/off
($130). Mounted on the wall off the compressor (vibration its a killer) - NOTE:
**Do not** go cheap on this component, trust me! I run the compressor
pressure just high enough to minimize cycling and provide the needed
pressure at the scope without relying heavily on pressure regulators. Pushing
the compressors to their "rated" pressure mark and using a regulator will
reduce cycling, but it adds wear to the compressor (Yes, you can run your
car just below red line on the tach, but for how long, eh?)

(6) a few oil filled air pressure gauges

(7) Reusing an exisiting air drying system.

(8) Installed the compressor in the service chaseway behind the scope for
more noise isolation. (I do recommend getting it out of the scope room if
possible, along with the water chillers. Soldered copper piping workes well.)

---} This system has been running (knock-on-wood) very well for over
four years now without a problem. Cycle duty is less than 20% even with
heavy microscope use. The noise is very low, next to the compressor, and
barely noticable in surrounding rooms (don't have a dB meter).

---} Get the air leaks fixed on your 400!

Good luck.

}
} Many, many thanks for all your thoughts and generous replies!
}
} Since the budget allows it, (at the moment), I'm going to follow the crowd (and
} FEI technicians) who have suggested the Jun-Air 6-25. (Many wrote just to me and
} not to the whole group. Jim, unfortunately the folks at Jun-Air would not
} recommend a model suited to my application when I asked them. They only offered
} to send a catalog.)
}
} Hopefully, my particular application and environment won't generate the
} problems John experienced. We really need the quiet operation (specs say 45
} dB), especially because the unexpected cycling of a louder compressor is scaring
} folks out of their wits. Not at all a good situation for handling delicate
} specimens/procedures.
}
} I'm very tempted to just use nitrogen tanks, but the old 400 has a couple of
} slow leaks which I might not get to fixing right away, plus we'll probably have
} it running continuously for long periods, so I'd rather not worry about tank
} deliveries and running out at a bad time. (One of the same reasons I switched
} to natural gas from oil for home heating..., plus cleanliness of course.)
}
} Vitaly, thanks for the reasonably priced alternative that employs a modified
} refrigeration compressor. I love being creative, but just don't have the time
} right now. Will keep it in mind though.
}
} Thanks & best regards to all!
} -Eric
}
} }
} }
} } Eric Anderson wrote:
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------ The
} } } Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America To
} } } Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line
} } } Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } } New Year's Greetings!
} } }
} } } Say, can anyone recommend a super-reliable and quiet brand (and size) of air
} } } compressor to use with a Philips EM400T?
} } }
} } } Unfortunately, in addition to being very, very loud, the low grade air
} } } compressor we've been using has the intermittent habit of blowing it's
} } } circuit breaker (twice in the last couple of weeks), which has set us
} } } way back on getting our "new" microscope fully evacuated for the first
} } } time.
} } }
} } } I'm waiting for a catalog from Jun-Air, but would like to know what
} } } model/size has been used reliably by others over the years. The Philips
} } } installation manual doesn't give much more than the air pressure
} } } requirement, so I'm uncertain what is ideal in terms of pump and tank
} } } capacities. I've asked the folks at Jun-Air, but they are reluctant to make
} } } any recommendation based solely on the pressure spec.
} } }
} } } Thanks for any tips!
} } }
} } } Best regards,
} } } Eric Anderson
} } } Southern CT State University Physics Dept.
} } } 501 Crescent Street, JE108B
} } } New Haven, CT 06515
} } } 203-392-6468
}
}
}



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From daemon Thu Jan 9 08:12:09 2003



From: Jill Olin :      jolin13-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 06:03:48 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM-Need help with protocol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello. I am a graduate student at Hofstra University,
currently working on a retinal analysis of a deep
water shark. I am headed on my first specimen
collection trip this week and have a question about my
fixation protocol. I will be using a mix of
paraformaldehyde/gluteraldehyde in cacodylate buffer
at pH 7.2. Should I be using sucrose, CaCl2, etc..to
adjust the tonicity?

Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you.

Jill Olin
Graduate Student
Department of Biology
Hofstra University
Hempstead, NY 11549


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
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From daemon Thu Jan 9 08:19:14 2003



From: Dorota Wadowska :      wadowska-at-upei.ca
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2003 10:10:23 -0300 (ADT)
Subject: vacuum evaporator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


{color} {param} 0100,0100,0100 {/param} {bigger} Hi everybody,

We are looking into buying a new vacuum evaporator.
We would it like to be equipped in two electrodes (for
carbon and metal evaporation), rotary/tilt stage and
thickness monitor. Our laboratory deals mainly with
biological/veterinary samples. I would like to hear your
recommendations regarding the purchase: equipment
servicing and make (which one is good which is not). Is
Denton the best available on the market? Do they still
supply DV 502A?

Thanks

Dorota {smaller}

{nofill}


From daemon Thu Jan 9 09:40:20 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Thu, 09 Jan 2003 10:24:22 -0500
Subject: Sample Stage Repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes, Tom repairs stages.

Contact Tom Schmelzer at TGS Technologies. And/or see his ad in the
November Microscopy Today on page 44.

He can be reached at 724 453 3865

-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Murray [mailto:murraytm-at-u.washington.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 08, 2003 7:59 PM
To: Microscopy


Hi All,

I have a GATAN Cryo-Transfer cold stage for a Philips EM420 TEM. The
crystal needs to be replaced and I was wondering if anyone has
knowledge of a third party who does this type of repair?

Thanks in advance.

Tom
--
Thomas M. Murray Phone: (206)543-2836
Manager, Electron Microscopy Center Fax: (206)543-3100
Materials Science & Engineering email:
murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
302 Roberts Hall, Box 352120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-2120




From daemon Thu Jan 9 10:14:33 2003



From: Tom Murray :      murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 08:04:36 -0800
Subject: Re: Sample Stage Repairs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi All,

The consensus seems to be that Tom Schmelzer at TGS Technologies is a
good choice.

Thanks for the replies.

Tom
--
Thomas M. Murray Phone: (206)543-2836
Manager, Electron Microscopy Center Fax: (206)543-3100
Materials Science & Engineering email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
302 Roberts Hall, Box 352120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-2120


From daemon Thu Jan 9 11:01:18 2003



From: William McManus :      billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 09:50:57 -0700
Subject: EM service labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear group:

The EM Facility at Utah State University is being closed, March 1st 2003
due to budget cuts to the University. I am looking for other facilities
which will do service work, and pricing rates for that work. Some of
the work will be for University personnel, but most will be for off-site
industrial users. Please let me know if you can do work for one group
or the other or both. This includes both biological and materials; TEM
and SEM (high res, and environmental) and edx.

Thank you for any help in this matter.

Bill

William McManus
Supervisor
Microscopy Facility
Utah State University
Logan UT 84322-5305

billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
office 435-797-1920
cell 435-757-2976



From daemon Thu Jan 9 11:31:53 2003



From: Daniel Geiger :      dgeiger-at-nhm.org
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 09:24:47 -0800
Subject: Re: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tina's comments are quite on the mark. I have a Nikon Coolscan 4000
ED with the scratch removal software (ice cube). I do not use it at
all after some tests. The effect is usually too strong and there is
no preview of the effect as it is possible in photoshop. So I scan in
regular 35 mm slides with no scratch removal, and then take them over
to photoshop, use "Dust and Scratches" diameter usually 2 pixel,
threshold 8 to 12, and check on some areas with particular detail.
Occasionally even that is too much, and then it is back to the
cloning stamp and manual removal of dust and scratches. Use a
feathered cloning stamp: I like diameter 9 - 13 pixels and 75%
hardness, 5% spacing. The feathered tool avoids hard edges around the
cloned areas. Takes a while on a 55-60 MB file (RGB TIFF). Note, that
with the fine removal of dust, you may not be able to get the larger
pieces, which still have to be removed manually. Also, take some time
in prepping your hard copy images: use a dust removal spray, and
possibly a fine optical lens brush. The 10 seconds spent on that are
well worth the time not spent messing around in photoshop.

I would think that the scratch removal effects will be much more
disastrous on TEM images, in which the images is directly lens formed
(i.e., not pixelated), than with SEM images. In the latter, on good
old 4 x 5" negatives you get glorified pixels on a fine grain
emulsion, so scratch removal should be quite effective on SEM
negatives, but may pose problems with TEM images.

Best wishes Daniel

At 7:49 AM -1000 1/8/03, Tina Carvalho wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
**********************************************************************

Daniel L. Geiger, Ph.D.
Molecular Systematics Lab, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA

phone: (213) 763 3431 fax: (213) 746 2999 e-mail {dgeiger-at-nhm.org}
www http://www.sbnature.org/geiger


From daemon Thu Jan 9 11:55:11 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 14:16:24 -0330
Subject: RE: Use of scanner for EM B&W Negatives

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Tina writes ...

} But be aware that any camera or scanner hardware/software that "removes
} dust and scratches" usually does so by blurring and eroding and then
} unblurring, or similar processing, ...

Not exactly true ... as mentioned by another post, if this scanner uses
the ICE procedure, then it uses an infrared scan to detect dust and thereby
corrects only the areas within the image which needs it.

What needs to be mentioned in addition is the fact IR cannot see through a
silver emulsion, and will therefore see all exposed areas as needing
correction. IR aided correction will only work with color transparencies
and chromes.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From daemon Thu Jan 9 13:16:09 2003



From: saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 14:00:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: EM service labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We do all manner of biological TEM and would be happy to help out if the
need arises.

Sara Miller
Contact info in footer


On Thu, 9 Jan 2003, William McManus wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear group:
}
} The EM Facility at Utah State University is being closed, March 1st 2003
} due to budget cuts to the University. I am looking for other facilities
} which will do service work, and pricing rates for that work. Some of
} the work will be for University personnel, but most will be for off-site
} industrial users. Please let me know if you can do work for one group
} or the other or both. This includes both biological and materials; TEM
} and SEM (high res, and environmental) and edx.
}
} Thank you for any help in this matter.
}
} Bill
}
} William McManus
} Supervisor
} Microscopy Facility
} Utah State University
} Logan UT 84322-5305
}
} billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
} office 435-797-1920
} cell 435-757-2976
}
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265


From daemon Thu Jan 9 13:20:36 2003



From: jrobson-at-rdg.boehringer-ingelheim.com
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 14:12:57 -0500
Subject: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve,

Our industry is currently implementing systems to deal with regulatory
agency requirements as stated by Mike Bode in his recent reply. There are a
few companies working on database solutions to solve some of the
traceability issues related to electronic raw data and data manipulation.
I am aware of 2 companies that are marketing database applications to
address these issues (Cyberlab / Nugenesis(SP?)), and there are probably
many more companies. Keep in mind that these applications are not
specifically targeted at imaging data, but rather will address most file
types. In short, the raw data is sent to a server, the database then
archives the file to the database (at some user specified interval). To
view the information the files are "restored" to a specified location where
they can be manipulated. These manipulated files are then returned to the
database using version control methodologies. An audit trail is maintained
which allows for complete tracking of raw data access and manipulations. In
our installation the archived files are maintained on servers making raw
data retrieval a simple affair i.e. no CD's or tapes need be changed /
loaded.

In my opinion this type of archival system would be very cumbersome and
prohibitively expensive for most EM facilities to implement AND maintain.

One final note: It's a sad state of affairs when the assumption is made
that these systems are required to prevent fraud. Dishonest people will
always find a way to "beat" the system. It was true for wet chemistry
methods and it is true for digital imaging as well. In my mind these
systems and procedures are required to prevent the inadvertent, unknowing
alteration of raw data. Accidentally deleting or overwriting a file,
"misplacing" a file, or possibly confusing a raw data file with one that you
knowingly manipulated during analysis. I am speculating but I would assume
that most of us have experienced some or possibly all of these situations at
one point in our digital careers. Honest mistakes, yes, but troubling
errors that must be avoided. They waste time, effort, money, and can be
very costly in terms of your reputation and the credibility of your work.

My two cents worth.


John Robson
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
PO Box 368
900 Ridgebury Rd
Ridgefield, CT 06877

Phone (203)798-5640
Fax (203)798-5698

e-mail jrobson-at-RDG.boehringer-ingelheim.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Bagley [mailto:SBagley-at-picr.man.ac.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, January 08, 2003 7:49 AM
To: 'Micro Discussion Group'



Hi,

I am in the middle of writing a joint grant proposal for an optical disk
jukebox / image archiving solution which should hopefully hold up to ten
years microscopy data. This system hopefully will aid in 'traceability' of
raw data and the image processed result. I was wondering what other research
institutes have in place for image archiving regarding traceability of
images.

Techniques of image manipulation that, in the past, could only be done by
few, and with great care, are now routine, consequently readily available
software has also created ample opportunities to falsify images. Obviously
the raw data and the final data to be published should be stored long term,
but what about the steps in-between? As most research institutes now are
multi-user facilities, the onus of scientific proof should be on the owner
of the data, but since students are replaced every three - four years there
must also be a burden of proof on the research institute especially if the
images are to be reused at a later date.

Should a multi-user microscopy facility demonstrate traceability of data or
should we rely on the users?



Steve


Steve Bagley
Associate Scientist
Applied Imaging Facility
Paterson Institute For Cancer Research
Cancer Research UK
Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Rd,
Manchester. M20 9BX, UK




















This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the Person(s)
('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or opinions
presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie Hospital
NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its contents,
by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach of
civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail as
soon as possible.




From daemon Thu Jan 9 20:34:46 2003



From: chaueter :      chaueter-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 20:22:49 -0600
Subject: HELP NEEDED IN PROCESSING BIOFILM FOR TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,

We are going to process a biofilm with benign strain of E. coli on surface of
catheters for TEM. We are reluctant to scrape the biofilm off, so we are
going to process the biofilm while attached to the catheter. We do not know
if the biofilm, catheter and resin (Glauert Med Embed) will embed well and the
sections will come out good. We appreciate any suggestions before we try this
out.

Thank you,

Claire Haueter

Claire Haueter
EM Technician
Integrated Microscopy Core
Baylor College of Medicine
713-798-4952



From daemon Thu Jan 9 21:28:09 2003



From: Kim Handley :      khan030-at-ec.auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 16:18:33 +1300
Subject: TEM help needed -fixative & fragile material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,

I am a graduate student with the University of Auckland requiring advice on (1)
the post-fixation stage for TEM prep., (2) any advice concerning the treatment
of fragile sample material for TEM (standard viewing or shadowing).

I am using TEM to look at freshly grown microstromatolitic films from a
geothermal brine where the primary mineral component is colloidal silica, with
a minor component of sulphur. The objective is to study biomineralisation.
We have scrape one set of my samples from their glass substrate (a terribly
destructive stage as far a texture goes as the samples are very brittle and
porous), dehydrated them through an ethanol series and added osmium tetroxide
as a post-fixative (after initial fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde/buffer),
however in similar studies the osmium tetroxide stage has been omitted - any
ideas why?

I would be greatful for any advice.

Kind Regards,
Kim
--
Kim M. Handley
Geology Department
University of Auckland
k.handley-at-auckland.ac.nz





From daemon Fri Jan 10 00:02:37 2003



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu (by way of
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 23:51:24 -0600
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



} Steve:


There was symposium on this very topic at the MSA meeting in
Quebec City this past summer. I taped most of it and when I find the
time (ha!) the plan is to publish a synopsis in Microscopy Today and
on the web.

The bottom line if I recall correctly, is that current
Copyright Law currently provides most - but not all -
protection....at least in the US. Probably there will be variations
country-to-country though.

Peter Ingram
Public Policy Chair and Legal Liaison Officer, MSA

}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the Person(s)
} ('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or opinions
} presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
} those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie Hospital
} NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
} within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
} distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its contents,
} by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach of
} civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
} intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail as
} soon as possible.


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.167.174/AEM_LAB.html


From daemon Fri Jan 10 00:04:54 2003



From: chaueter :      chaueter-at-bcm.tmc.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 9 Jan 2003 23:54:46 -0600
Subject: HELP NEEDED IN PROCESSING BIOFILM FOR TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,

We are going to process a biofilm with benign strain of E. coli on surface of
catheters for TEM. We are reluctant to scrape the biofilm off, so we are
going to process the biofilm while attached to the catheter. We do not know
if the biofilm, catheter and resin (Glauert Med Embed) will embed well and the
sections will come out good. We appreciate any suggestions before we try this
out.

Thank you,

Claire Haueter

Claire Haueter
EM Technician
Integrated Microscopy Core
Baylor College of Medicine
713-798-4952


From daemon Fri Jan 10 07:39:46 2003



From: Teresa Flores :      tflore-at-lsuhsc.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 07:18:27 -0600
Subject: HRLM & TEM services

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Bill, our lab will be glad to help if we can fill your needs, please visit
our web site at
http://www.pathology.lsuhsc.edu/Pathist/dx_home.html
Teresa




From daemon Fri Jan 10 07:39:46 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 13:31:30 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: HELP NEEDED IN PROCESSING BIOFILM FOR TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I will try to post references next week.

Briefly, you can set the resin in a section of catheter.
Then peel off the catheter and reembed your core in a
suitable mold. A lot of the biofilm should remain in the
resin.

Dave


On Thu, 9 Jan 2003 20:22:49 -0600 chaueter
{chaueter-at-bcm.tmc.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello Listers,
}
} We are going to process a biofilm with benign strain of E. coli on surface of
} catheters for TEM. We are reluctant to scrape the biofilm off, so we are
} going to process the biofilm while attached to the catheter. We do not know
} if the biofilm, catheter and resin (Glauert Med Embed) will embed well and the
} sections will come out good. We appreciate any suggestions before we try this
} out.
}
} Thank you,
}
} Claire Haueter
}
} Claire Haueter
} EM Technician
} Integrated Microscopy Core
} Baylor College of Medicine
} 713-798-4952
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 10 07:39:46 2003



From: John Arnott :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 08:29:55 -0500
Subject: Re: Vacuum Evaporator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dorota,

As for your evaporator enquiry on the best evaporator, we have reason to
believe Ladd Research provides the best vacuum evaporator available and has
for many years.

Naturally I must confess to a little bias on the subject, but not too much.
You can check our website for more information or contact us.

Disclaimer: Ladd sells all microscopy supplies and accessories, including
the Ladd Vacuum Evaporator.

Best regards,
John Arnott

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
From: Dorota Wadowska
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2003 8:10 AM
Subject: vacuum evaporator


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America To
Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line
Help
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-------------------------------------------------------.

Hi everybody,
We are looking into buying a new vacuum evaporator. We would it like to be
equipped in two electrodes (for carbon and metal evaporation), rotary/tilt
stage and thickness monitor. Our laboratory deals mainly with
biological/veterinary samples. I would like to hear your recommendations
regarding the purchase: equipment servicing and make (which one is good
which is not). Is Denton the best available on the market? Do they still
supply DV 502A?
Thanks
Dorota


Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com




From daemon Fri Jan 10 07:41:31 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 13:34:39 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TEM help needed -fixative & fragile material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Not any relevant experience still ....

Try to avoid disturbing the biofilm if yu substatum is
cheap by adding resin etc to it. People have done this
with cell cultures on coverslips. The resin and mold can
be separated from the glass using liquid nitrogen. The
biofilm should stay with the resin.

Dave


On Fri, 10 Jan 2003 16:18:33 +1300 Kim Handley
{khan030-at-ec.auckland.ac.nz} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello all,
}
} I am a graduate student with the University of Auckland requiring advice on (1)
} the post-fixation stage for TEM prep., (2) any advice concerning the treatment
} of fragile sample material for TEM (standard viewing or shadowing).
}
} I am using TEM to look at freshly grown microstromatolitic films from a
} geothermal brine where the primary mineral component is colloidal silica, with
} a minor component of sulphur. The objective is to study biomineralisation.
} We have scrape one set of my samples from their glass substrate (a terribly
} destructive stage as far a texture goes as the samples are very brittle and
} porous), dehydrated them through an ethanol series and added osmium tetroxide
} as a post-fixative (after initial fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde/buffer),
} however in similar studies the osmium tetroxide stage has been omitted - any
} ideas why?
}
} I would be greatful for any advice.
}
} Kind Regards,
} Kim
} --
} Kim M. Handley
} Geology Department
} University of Auckland
} k.handley-at-auckland.ac.nz
}
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Fri Jan 10 08:05:12 2003



From: Anaspec Luc Harmsen :      luc-at-anaspec.co.za
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 15:32:10 +0200
Subject: EM Technical support engineers needed for South Africa and Australia

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all
A happy new year to all. May this year be the year your lottery numbers come
up!

Anaspec is a EM Technical support company operating from South Africa but
supporting clients around the world.
We are about to open an office in Sydney, Australia and so need a few new
support engineers.
We realise that engineers in this field are as scarce as hens teeth or the
correct lottery numbers these days, but we thought we would at least post a
notice on this list server so that none of our friends and clients around
the world can say, "But we wanted that job!" afterwards.

As with any technical support job the pay is never enough, the hours are
long and the abuse is standard, but you get to work with some real
characters and see laboratories all around the world.

If you do still have a slight interest in joining Anaspec, you can visit our
web site for more details on our company and then send us an email.

Thanks for your time and hope to see some of you at a conference or
laboratory this year.
Cheers

Luc Harmsen
ANASPEC South Africa www.anaspec.co.za
Tel: +27 11 794 8340
Fax: +27 11 794 8349
P.O. Box 2561
Honeydew 2040
Gauteng, South Africa




From daemon Fri Jan 10 08:22:48 2003



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 09:15:05 -0500
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have kinda side stepped the issue of traceability by ensuring the
original data is available. All images are collected into the Analysis
database by Soft Imaging System. There are others out there, this one
happened to be floating around the lab at the time I arrived and seems to
work well. The database is automatically split into CD size chunks which
serve as our archived originals. Users are given read access via a web
browser interface. They can snatch their images when they want, and yes,
they can do what they want with them, but they must always know that an
original exists under my control if there is ever a question.

As an aside for your storage solution, after CD archiving I move the data
to a Snap server (or NAS) and lock the database. Essentially it is a series
of Raid 5 hard drives and an ethernet card. I can keep about 5 years on at
all times (240G) for under $2k and it is completely scalable. Took 5 min to
set up and another 5 to set proper access permissions. It was far cheaper
than the jukeboxes we looked into and definitely faster serving the images.
It works withing most environments PC Mac, unix.... Good luck

Scott Whittaker
Laboratories of Analytical Biology
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural History
PO Box 37012 MRC104
Washington DC 20013-7012
202-357-1651


} } } Peter Ingram (by way ofMicroscopyListServer)
{p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu} 01/10/03 12:51AM } } }
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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



} Steve:


There was symposium on this very topic at the MSA meeting in
Quebec City this past summer. I taped most of it and when I find the
time (ha!) the plan is to publish a synopsis in Microscopy Today and
on the web.

The bottom line if I recall correctly, is that current
Copyright Law currently provides most - but not all -
protection....at least in the US. Probably there will be variations
country-to-country though.

Peter Ingram
Public Policy Chair and Legal Liaison Officer, MSA

}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} This email is confidential and intended solely for the use of the
Person(s)
} ('the intended recipient') to whom it was addressed. Any views or
opinions
} presented are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent
} those of the Paterson Institute For Cancer Research or the Christie
Hospital
} NHS Trust. It may contain information that is privileged & confidential
} within the meaning of applicable law. Accordingly any dissemination,
} distribution, copying, or other use of this message, or any of its
contents,
} by any person other than the intended recipient may constitute a breach
of
} civil or criminal law and is strictly prohibited. If you are NOT the
} intended recipient please contact the sender and dispose of this e-mail
as
} soon as possible.


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.167.174/AEM_LAB.html



From daemon Fri Jan 10 08:41:50 2003



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 09:32:56 -0500
Subject: I might be missing something here and wondered if some of you

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I might be missing something here and wondered if some of you could answer
a
question for me. If we were to add EDS to our ESEM, we could minimize
scattering effects by using helium as the charge suppression gas. It small
size and low z
won't produce spurious x-rays, has minimal beam spreading, and is
ionizable for charge suppression. More importantly, many of you swear by
it. Now
for the question. How do you keep it out of the detector?? Aren't they
sealed, and won't helium pass through the window?? Is it going to trash
the detector vacuum?? or is my understanding
of defector design flawed?? Maybe the pumps recover the vacuum after while
as it diffused back out?? Manufacturers encouraged to chime in here.
Thanks

Scott Whittaker
Laboratories of Analytical Biology
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural History
PO Box 37012 MRC104
Washington DC 20013-7012
202-357-1651



From daemon Fri Jan 10 10:07:03 2003



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 16:53:01 +0100
Subject: PhD positions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,
We have two PhD positions available at the moment. My (rough)
translation of the original advert is below, followed by the original in
German, for those who prefer that.

Best wishes

Ian

*********************************************************************

two PhD positions (Ref. Number 1)

are available in the Structural Research Group of the Department of
Materials and Geological Sciences, as part of the Special Research Area
595 “Fatigue of Functional Ceramics”. Employment is limited to 4 years.

Applicants should have a Bachelors or Masters Degree in Materials
Science, Physics, or Chemistry, and a desire to work towards a PhD in
the interdisciplinary field of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary
methods used in the work shall be X-ray diffraction, Transmission
electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation (at HASYLAB, Hamburg).
There will be opportunities to spend time overseas at partner Institutions.

The Technical University of Darmstadt seeks to increase the proportion
of women in the staff, particularly in technical subjects and suitably
qualified female candidates are therefore especially encouraged to apply.

Suitably qualified disabled persons will be given preferential treatment.

Payment will be calculated using the BAT scale (pay scale for public
sector workers in Germany).

Applications should be sent together with Curriculum Vitae to:
Das Präsidium der TU Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz 5, 64289 Darmstadt

All applications should be received before 10th February 2003


Stellenausschreibung


Im Fachbereich Material- und Geowissenschaften, Fachgebiet
Strukturforschung sind im Rahmen des Sonderforschungsbereichs 595
„Ermüdung von Funktionskeramiken“ zwei Stellen für

Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiter(innen) - halbtags

(Kenn-Nr. 1) in einem befristeten Arbeitsverhältnis (4 Jahre) zu besetzen.

Gesucht werden Materialwissenschaftler, Physiker oder Chemiker mit
abgeschlossenem Diplom, die eine Dissertation in dem praxisnahen,
interdisziplinären Arbeitsgebiet piezoelektrischer Keramiken mitarbeiten
möchten. Eingesetzte Methoden sind Röntgenbeugung,
Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie und Synchrotronstrahlung (am HASYLAB,
Hamburg).
Gelegenheit zu längeren Auslandsaufenthalten wird gegeben.

Die Technische Universität Darmstadt strebt eine Erhöhung des Anteils
der Frauen am Personal, insbesondere in den technischen Bereichen an und
fordert deshalb qualifizierte Frauen nachdrücklich auf, sich zu bewerben.

Schwerbehinderte werden bei gleicher Eignung bevorzugt.

Die Vergütung erfolgt nach dem BAT.

Bewerbungen sind mit den üblichen Unterlagen an das Präsidium der TU
Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz 5, 64289 Darmstadt, zu senden.


Bewerbungsfrist: 10. Februar 2002


--
Ian MacLaren
Strukturforschung, Materialwissenschaft, TU-Darmstadt, Germany
ian.maclaren-at-physics.org / http://homepages.tu-darmstadt.de/~maclaren/



From daemon Fri Jan 10 10:52:04 2003



From: Chaman Singla :      csingla-at-uvic.ca
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 08:56:19 -0800
Subject: Unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello
Please unsubscribe



From daemon Fri Jan 10 12:30:31 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 10:20:44 -0800
Subject: Re: vacuum evaporator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} On Thursday, January 9, 2003, at 05:10 AM, Dorota Wadowska wrote:
}
} } We are looking into buying a new vacuum evaporator. We would it like
} } to be equipped in two electrodes (for carbon and metal evaporation),
} } rotary/tilt stage and thickness monitor. Our laboratory deals mainly
} } with biological/veterinary samples. I would like to hear your
} } recommendations regarding the purchase: equipment servicing and make
} } (which one is good which is not). Is Denton the best available on the
} } market? Do they still supply DV 502A?
}
} Dear Dorota,
} I have also been investigating this, and I've gotten info about
} Cressington, Denton, and Ladd evaporators. The final decision of what
} to buy depends on what you want to do. For routine carbon and metal
} evaporation, Cressington makes a relatively inexpensive (~$4k) benchtop
} carbon coater, which uses only a rotary pump (sold separately) and
} works at a vacuum of ~10^-2 torr. Their high-end turbopumped system
} goes for ~$30k. Denton makes a benchtop turbo system that will handle
} both carbon and metals for about $20k, and their high-end system for
} high-resolution coating--evaporation or sputtering--goes for ~$70k.
} Ladd makes a free-standing system with a diffusion pump that will also
} handle both carbon and metals for about $20k. Other manufacturers:
} Please feel free to contact me off-list. Your requirements for
} uniformity of coating and preference for benchtop vs free-standing
} models--as well as your budget--will determine your choice.

Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Fri Jan 10 13:24:27 2003



From: Chaman Singla :      csingla-at-uvic.ca
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 11:28:53 -0800
Subject: unsubscribe

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello
Please unsubscribe
Thank you
C.Singla



From daemon Fri Jan 10 15:41:05 2003



From: Ralph Common :      Ralph.Common-at-ht.msu.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 16:24:08 -0500
Subject: RE: EM service labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Our service lab does TEM processing and examination of nearly all kinds of
biological samples. We have particular expertise with human muscle, nerve,
and kidney biopsies, and are a CAP certified facility. We also do a lot of
work with Immunobed and JB-4 resins. We are happy to work with other
universities and private industry. For specific information about pricing,
turn-around time, etc., please contact our lab administrator, Donna Craft.

Ralph Common
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology
A608 East Fee Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824

ralph.common-at-ht.msu.edu


Donna Craft
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology
A608 East Fee Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824

craftd-at-msu.edu

517-355-7558
-------------

On Thu, 9 Jan 2003, William McManus wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Dear group:
}
} The EM Facility at Utah State University is being closed, March 1st 2003
} due to budget cuts to the University. I am looking for other facilities
} which will do service work, and pricing rates for that work. Some of
} the work will be for University personnel, but most will be for off-site
} industrial users. Please let me know if you can do work for one group
} or the other or both. This includes both biological and materials; TEM
} and SEM (high res, and environmental) and edx.
}
} Thank you for any help in this matter.
}
} Bill
}
} William McManus
} Supervisor
} Microscopy Facility
} Utah State University
} Logan UT 84322-5305
}
} billemac-at-biology.usu.edu
} office 435-797-1920
} cell 435-757-2976
}
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265


From daemon Fri Jan 10 15:41:22 2003



From: George Langford, Sc.D. :      amenex-at-amenex.com
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 17:41:16 -0800
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



---------- Forwarded message ----------


Hello Microscopists !

Scott's got the right idea as far as I'm concerned.
Whenever I finish a report I provide a CDROM with the
report and [digital copies of] all the original images
obtained during the project. I also include in the names
of the edited images the serial numbers of the originals
from which they were prepared. And I make only globally
applied changes to contrast, brightness, tone, etc. in
addition to rotation and cropping or enlargement. That
means the originals (including the Mavica's thumbnails
and HTML index) are available for all to compare with
my versions. And I place another copy of each CDROM
with the file in case the computer should go belly up.

Best regards,
George Langford, Sc.D.
Principal Consultant
Amenex Associates, Inc.
amenex-at-amenex.com
http://www.amenex.com/


From daemon Fri Jan 10 17:40:46 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 17:32:00 -0600
Subject: A biological what is it?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Okay folks - you know the drill. A client walks into a materials lab with a
biological problem or vice versa. I work in a materials lab with SEM and LM
and had a client walk in today with a biological question. So I am out of
my element. Can you help?

It seems this man's daughter is suffering from some kind of skin ailment
and she has dug stuff out of MANY of the sores on her skin. The doctors in
her HMO have not offered any relief. Her father (from another department on
this campus) is quite determined to find out what the problem might be. He
would take no for an answer and would accept whatever help we could give him.

I examined the samples he brought in have posted images on our web server
at ftp://www.marl.iastate.edu/What_is_it/. Many of them seem to be either
bundles or wads of fibers or else little nodules of "stuff" with the fibers
running throughout them. I suppose the stuff was secreted by the body, but
can't say for sure.

LM pictures show the fibers to be both clear and darkly colored. BSE images
and EDS from the SEM show the fibers to be organic in nature. (The nodules
contain notable amounts of Na, Cl, and K along with some Si. But the fibers
are primarily C and O.) The images don't appear to be like any natural or
manmade fibers that I have ever encountered before. I can't find a match in
our copy of the Particle Atlas.

Have any of you in all your experience come across such things? I would
appreciate whatever expertise you could lend.

Thanking you in advance,
Warren

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Fri Jan 10 17:46:55 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 17:39:27 -0600
Subject: SEM: Examining mercury-wetted contacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A client has approached us asking for assistance in examining some
"mercury-wetted" relay contacts. They have had problems with the contacts
sticking and would like us to examine a few sets of contacts to see if we
can identify the source of the problem.

My question is whether I should be concerned with inserting such samples in
the microscope?

I don't intend to parts to be obviously wetted with mercury. However, I
presume whatever Hg goes in will probably get volatilized and run out
through our diffusion and rotary pump. We have mist traps on the outlet of
our rotary pump. Do I need to be concerned about it reacting in bad ways
with either the pump oil or components in the scope? (This would be in our
conventional SEM rather than our VP-SEM. Its EDS system is down at the moment.)

Thanks in advance for your advice.

Warren

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Fri Jan 10 22:02:19 2003



From: medvitz-at-pitt.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Fri, 10 Jan 2003 23:07:34 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Scott,

The Helium will diffuse through the EDS window and slowly ruin the
vacuum in the EDS detector. Fortunately you are running in a vacuum
and not applying 1 atm He to the window.

When I was in ED XRF back in Be window days, we would say you could
use He instead of vacuum to avoid the absorption of low energy x-rays
( {3 KeV) by air. But those customers who did so eventually had to send
their detectors back for repumping. Today's UTWs also leak Helium.
You will have slow EDS dewar vacuum degradation if you do this.
Another negative is encountered if there is a Ion Pump on the electron
gun. Ion pumps do not pump the noble gases well and get flooded.

Ron Vane
XEI Scientific

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Scott Whittaker" {Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 10, 2003 6:32 AM


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (medvitz-at-pitt.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
January 10, 2003 at 13:13:07
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: medvitz-at-pitt.edu
Name: Neil Medvitz

Organization: University of Pittsburgh

Education: Graduate College

Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA

Question: What is the advantage if any to using gold grids instead of
Nickel for post-embedding immunochem.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jan 11 00:50:31 2003



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com (by way of
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 00:40:10 -0600
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,

I'd like to jump in here with a comment or two on Cyberlab that we are
developing for ERES compliance (Electronic Record/Electron Signature) as
part of validation efforts to be in compliance with FDA regulations.

Cyberlab will store any file type as far as I know, please correct me if you
know otherwise. The server ("archive") system can be set up to poll the
camera workstation computer whenever and however often the user or
"management" decide. This allows for deletion of images that are of no use,
such as poor exposure, poor focus, vibration without having to go through
all the documentation for a totally useless image.

Once the image is taken off the camera workstation computer it is "archived"
by the Cyberlab server "immediately" (users cannot set that on our system)
and can be retrieved at a later time; the original can be retained or
automatically deleted from the workstation after some user defined period of
time. Once retrieved from the server to perform analysis, etc., if it is
stored by the same file name, it is given a version number. If it has a
different name or file extension it is stored by that new name but linkage
to the original is set up. How we will ultimately store terabytes of data
over the years remains to be seen as the issue of long term retrieval
capability as hardware changes have to be addresssed.

I agree with your statement about assumptions of guilt but we have only to
look around us in the business world to see that the need exists. This will
only make it more difficult to "beat" the system. Since such systems are
designed so that users don't have access to the servers or storage, well
that is only a small part of the security of the data that we have to set
up. We also have to have workstation computer security so that only
authorized users can get access and only to their folders etc. so that the
servers see the data as coming from that user. Much more has to be done to
reach compliance or whatever rules are ultimately decided on.

Damian Neuberger
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp.
PO Box 490
Round Lake, IL 6003
damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com



} Steve,
}
} Our industry is currently implementing systems to deal with regulatory
} agency requirements as stated by Mike Bode in his recent reply. There are
a
} few companies working on database solutions to solve some of the
} traceability issues related to electronic raw data and data manipulation.
} I am aware of 2 companies that are marketing database applications to
} address these issues (Cyberlab / Nugenesis(SP?)), and there are probably
} many more companies. Keep in mind that these applications are not
} specifically targeted at imaging data, but rather will address most file
} types. In short, the raw data is sent to a server, the database then
} archives the file to the database (at some user specified interval). To
} view the information the files are "restored" to a specified location
where
} they can be manipulated. These manipulated files are then returned to the
} database using version control methodologies. An audit trail is
maintained
} which allows for complete tracking of raw data access and manipulations.
In
} our installation the archived files are maintained on servers making raw
} data retrieval a simple affair i.e. no CD's or tapes need be changed /
} loaded.
}
} In my opinion this type of archival system would be very cumbersome and
} prohibitively expensive for most EM facilities to implement AND maintain.
}
} One final note: It's a sad state of affairs when the assumption is made
} that these systems are required to prevent fraud. Dishonest people will
} always find a way to "beat" the system. It was true for wet chemistry
} methods and it is true for digital imaging as well. In my mind these
} systems and procedures are required to prevent the inadvertent, unknowing
} alteration of raw data. Accidentally deleting or overwriting a file,
} "misplacing" a file, or possibly confusing a raw data file with one that
you
} knowingly manipulated during analysis. I am speculating but I would
assume
} that most of us have experienced some or possibly all of these situations
at
} one point in our digital careers. Honest mistakes, yes, but troubling
} errors that must be avoided. They waste time, effort, money, and can be
} very costly in terms of your reputation and the credibility of your work.
}
} My two cents worth.
}
}
} John Robson
} Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
} PO Box 368
} 900 Ridgebury Rd
} Ridgefield, CT 06877
}
} Phone (203)798-5640
} Fax (203)798-5698
}
} e-mail jrobson-at-RDG.boehringer-ingelheim.com


From daemon Sat Jan 11 09:56:36 2003



From: Kelli :      kas294-at-nyu.edu
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 10:44:32 -0500
Subject: Trying to locate a Used TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Our Lab is interested in finding a used TEM, specifically a Jeol.

We would appreciate any information with regard to that.

Thank you.



From daemon Sat Jan 11 11:03:35 2003



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 10:35:33 -0600
Subject: Re: Surplus EM Equipment: Trying to locate a Used TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues...

Just a reminder that there is a Surplus Equipment WWW page
at

http://www.msa.microscopy.com/SurplusEquipment

Some of the instruments are freebie's, others are for sale

Nestor


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Jan 11 11:27:25 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 09:26:58 -0800
Subject: Re: the legal issues of image processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Do the users have access to the USB port(s)?

If they do, they could plug in a flash memory
puck and dump up to a gig of data and walk
out with it. Does your system prevent this?

Just a thought.

gary g.




At 10:40 PM 1/10/2003, you wrote:

} John,
}
} I'd like to jump in here with a comment or two on Cyberlab that we are
} developing for ERES compliance (Electronic Record/Electron Signature) as
} part of validation efforts to be in compliance with FDA regulations.
}
} Cyberlab will store any file type as far as I know, please correct me if you
} know otherwise. The server ("archive") system can be set up to poll the
} camera workstation computer whenever and however often the user or
} "management" decide. This allows for deletion of images that are of no use,
} such as poor exposure, poor focus, vibration without having to go through
} all the documentation for a totally useless image.
}
} Once the image is taken off the camera workstation computer it is "archived"
} by the Cyberlab server "immediately" (users cannot set that on our system)
} and can be retrieved at a later time; the original can be retained or
} automatically deleted from the workstation after some user defined period of
} time. Once retrieved from the server to perform analysis, etc., if it is
} stored by the same file name, it is given a version number. If it has a
} different name or file extension it is stored by that new name but linkage
} to the original is set up. How we will ultimately store terabytes of data
} over the years remains to be seen as the issue of long term retrieval
} capability as hardware changes have to be addresssed.
}
} I agree with your statement about assumptions of guilt but we have only to
} look around us in the business world to see that the need exists. This will
} only make it more difficult to "beat" the system. Since such systems are
} designed so that users don't have access to the servers or storage, well
} that is only a small part of the security of the data that we have to set
} up. We also have to have workstation computer security so that only
} authorized users can get access and only to their folders etc. so that the
} servers see the data as coming from that user. Much more has to be done to
} reach compliance or whatever rules are ultimately decided on.
}
} Damian Neuberger
} Senior Research Scientist
} Baxter Healthcare Corp.
} PO Box 490
} Round Lake, IL 6003
} damian_neuberger-at-baxter.com
}
}
}
} } Steve,
} }
} } Our industry is currently implementing systems to deal with regulatory
} } agency requirements as stated by Mike Bode in his recent reply. There are
} a
} } few companies working on database solutions to solve some of the
} } traceability issues related to electronic raw data and data manipulation.
} } I am aware of 2 companies that are marketing database applications to
} } address these issues (Cyberlab / Nugenesis(SP?)), and there are probably
} } many more companies. Keep in mind that these applications are not
} } specifically targeted at imaging data, but rather will address most file
} } types. In short, the raw data is sent to a server, the database then
} } archives the file to the database (at some user specified interval). To
} } view the information the files are "restored" to a specified location
} where
} } they can be manipulated. These manipulated files are then returned to the
} } database using version control methodologies. An audit trail is
} maintained
} } which allows for complete tracking of raw data access and manipulations.
} In
} } our installation the archived files are maintained on servers making raw
} } data retrieval a simple affair i.e. no CD's or tapes need be changed /
} } loaded.
} }
} } In my opinion this type of archival system would be very cumbersome and
} } prohibitively expensive for most EM facilities to implement AND maintain.
} }
} } One final note: It's a sad state of affairs when the assumption is made
} } that these systems are required to prevent fraud. Dishonest people will
} } always find a way to "beat" the system. It was true for wet chemistry
} } methods and it is true for digital imaging as well. In my mind these
} } systems and procedures are required to prevent the inadvertent, unknowing
} } alteration of raw data. Accidentally deleting or overwriting a file,
} } "misplacing" a file, or possibly confusing a raw data file with one that
} you
} } knowingly manipulated during analysis. I am speculating but I would
} assume
} } that most of us have experienced some or possibly all of these situations
} at
} } one point in our digital careers. Honest mistakes, yes, but troubling
} } errors that must be avoided. They waste time, effort, money, and can be
} } very costly in terms of your reputation and the credibility of your work.
} }
} } My two cents worth.
} }
} }
} } John Robson
} } Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
} } PO Box 368
} } 900 Ridgebury Rd
} } Ridgefield, CT 06877
} }
} } Phone (203)798-5640
} } Fax (203)798-5698
} }
} } e-mail jrobson-at-RDG.boehringer-ingelheim.com



From daemon Sat Jan 11 11:34:57 2003



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-vancouverbc.net
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 09:28:53 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM help needed -fixative & fragile material

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It should not be necessary to scrape the sample off the glass to process it.
There was a discussion on this point recently, but it may not have been on
this list - I subscribe to several. You can fix in a primary aldehyde
fixative, followed by a buffer rinse and then secondary fixation with osmium
tetroxide in an aqueous buffer . After rinsing in water, dehydrate through
graded alcohols finishing with several changes of dry absolute alcohol or
with propylene oxide, then in a disposable dish pour a layer of Epon (or
other epoxy resin) onto the slide. Change the Epon at least once, then use
Epon plus accelerator. Cut the bottom off a Beem capsule and place the
capsule tube over the area of interest, then polymerise the whole thing.
Next day, fill the Beem capsule with accelerated Epon and polymerise.
Pulling the Beem capsule off the glass after cooling should bring the sample
with it, or it is possible to chip the glass away before sectioning. I am
assuming the glass is a slide; if it's not then it should be possible to
modify this technique. Use a fume hood and glove;, all the reagents except
alcohol are dangerous, especially OsO4. Hope this helps.

Lesley Weston.



on 09/01/2003 7:18 PM, Kim Handley at khan030-at-ec.auckland.ac.nz wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello all,
}
} I am a graduate student with the University of Auckland requiring advice on
} (1)
} the post-fixation stage for TEM prep., (2) any advice concerning the treatment
} of fragile sample material for TEM (standard viewing or shadowing).
}
} I am using TEM to look at freshly grown microstromatolitic films from a
} geothermal brine where the primary mineral component is colloidal silica, with
} a minor component of sulphur. The objective is to study biomineralisation.
} We have scrape one set of my samples from their glass substrate (a terribly
} destructive stage as far a texture goes as the samples are very brittle and
} porous), dehydrated them through an ethanol series and added osmium tetroxide
} as a post-fixative (after initial fixation with 2.5% glutaraldehyde/buffer),
} however in similar studies the osmium tetroxide stage has been omitted - any
} ideas why?
}
} I would be greatful for any advice.
}
} Kind Regards,
} Kim
} --
} Kim M. Handley
} Geology Department
} University of Auckland
} k.handley-at-auckland.ac.nz
}
}
}
}



From daemon Sat Jan 11 15:37:12 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 16:25:56 -0500
Subject: TEM: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Neil Medvitz asked:
=========================================================================
Question: What is the advantage if any to using gold grids instead of
Nickel for post-embedding immunochem.
===========================================================================
There are several advantages which could be of greater or lesser importance
depending on individual situations:

a) When a pair of normal antimagnetic stainless steel tweezers are used to
hold a typical nickel grid during the typical immunoreaction, you have two
dissimilar metals in contact in a low pH environment and you get a current
flow (this is the basis of electrochemistry). And this current flow is
thought to stunt the strength of the immuno reaction. I don't know to what
degree that is published but this is what customers have told me over the
years as to why they have concerns about nickel grids.

b) Gold grids don't suffer from this problems and they are far more inert
under these same conditions than nickel. Consequently, there is for some a
preference for gold. But gold is softer, and the grids tend to be a bit
less self -supporting and therefore more difficult to work with, whereas
nickel is more stiff, and does not bend as readily, that being the reason
why some workers, at the end of the day, prefer nickel.

One can get around the electrochemistry issues when using Ni grids, however,
if instead of using the normal antimagnetic stainless steel tweezer, gold
plated tweezers are used. See URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/tweezers/precision.html
The gold plating acts as a passivation layer on the antimagnetic stainless
steel tweezers, killing off the chances for an electro chemical reaction,
also leading sometimes to corrosion product in one's samples.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers both gold and nickel grids as well a range
of tweezers including gold plated tweezers.

Chuck

PS: Remember that we are striving to be 100% paperless, therefore there
are no paper copies kept of this correspondence. Please be sure to always
reply by way of "reply" on your software so that the entire string of
correspondence can be kept in one place.
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Sat Jan 11 16:41:10 2003



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 17:30:35 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM: Examining mercury-wetted contacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Warren,
I've not experienced it myself, but I've heard of the gun being shorted
by the Hg vapor generated when the beam hits the Hg and heats it. Your
VP system might be a better bet with the increased pressure and some
sort of through-put of gas.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Warren E Straszheim wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} A client has approached us asking for assistance in examining some
} "mercury-wetted" relay contacts. They have had problems with the
} contacts sticking and would like us to examine a few sets of contacts
} to see if we can identify the source of the problem.
}
} My question is whether I should be concerned with inserting such
} samples in the microscope?
}
} I don't intend to parts to be obviously wetted with mercury. However,
} I presume whatever Hg goes in will probably get volatilized and run
} out through our diffusion and rotary pump. We have mist traps on the
} outlet of our rotary pump. Do I need to be concerned about it reacting
} in bad ways with either the pump oil or components in the scope? (This
} would be in our conventional SEM rather than our VP-SEM. Its EDS
} system is down at the moment.)
}
} Thanks in advance for your advice.
}
} Warren
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 23 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
} materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}
}





From daemon Sat Jan 11 17:48:00 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 2003 17:39:07 -0600
Subject: Re: I might be missing something here and wondered if some of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Now you guys tell me after all these years! {G}

We put an Oxford GEM detector on our VP-SEM back in 1994. We routinely run
Helium as the gas when we are running the scope. We switch over to air for
idle periods. I suppose the column is filled with helium about 20 hours per
week on average. (Sometimes it is operated in high vacuum mode and
sometimes it is plain idle.) I don't think we had any changes in LN2
consumption over the years. We refilled the dewar twice a week and could
probably count on it going 5 days between fills before going dry. The low
LN2 alarm would go off before that happened.

The helium atmosphere certainly does much to improve the quality of the
image and it also reduces the scattering effect on the x-ray signal. I can
pass on details and images to prove the point. In fact I had to prove the
point to one of our service engineers. They hadn't heard that the type of
atmosphere made that big a difference.

During the same time we had a Kevex Quantum detector on our conventional
SEM. We have 170 liter LN2 dewars in each scope room for filling the EDS
dewars and we can count on both of the big dewars to run out within days of
each other. I don't know how dependent that is on evaporation from the big
dewars and how much of it is due to consumption in the EDS systems.

So I too now wonder what the manufacturers would say. Are some detector
systems immune from He diffusion while components in other system render
them more susceptible?

Warren

At 07:48 PM 1/10/03 -0800, you wrote:

} Scott,
}
} The Helium will diffuse through the EDS window and slowly ruin the
} vacuum in the EDS detector. Fortunately you are running in a vacuum
} and not applying 1 atm He to the window.
}
} When I was in ED XRF back in Be window days, we would say you could
} use He instead of vacuum to avoid the absorption of low energy x-rays
} ( {3 KeV) by air. But those customers who did so eventually had to send
} their detectors back for repumping. Today's UTWs also leak Helium.
} You will have slow EDS dewar vacuum degradation if you do this.
} Another negative is encountered if there is a Ion Pump on the electron
} gun. Ion pumps do not pump the noble gases well and get flooded.
}
} Ron Vane
} XEI Scientific
}
} } ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Scott Whittaker" {Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu}
} } To: {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} } Sent: Friday, January 10, 2003 6:32 AM
} }
} } I might be missing something here and wondered if some of you could
} } answer a question for me. If we were to add EDS to our ESEM, we could
} } minimize scattering effects by using helium as the charge suppression
} } gas. It small size and low z won't produce spurious x-rays, has minimal
} } beam spreading, and is ionizable for charge suppression. More
} } importantly, many of you swear by it. Now for the question. How do you
} } keep it out of the detector?? Aren't they sealed, and won't helium pass
} } through the window? Is it going to trash the detector vacuum? or is my
} } understanding of detector design flawed? Maybe the pumps recover the
} } vacuum after while as it diffused back out? Manufacturers encouraged to
} } chime in here.
} } Thanks
} }
} } Scott Whittaker
} } Laboratories of Analytical Biology
} } Smithsonian Institution
} } National Museum of Natural History
} } PO Box 37012 MRC104
} } Washington DC 20013-7012
} } 202-357-1651




From daemon Sun Jan 12 05:54:59 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Sun, 12 Jan 2003 11:43:13 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: A biological what is it?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


No relevant experience still...

This is very odd. I looked at the SEM images wondering if
the fibres would look fungal. They do not look fungal to
me. They look more like paper or cotton and some synthetic
fibres (ribbed longitudinally). Do you think we are
looking mostly at the material used to collect the samples?

Dave


On Fri, 10 Jan 2003 17:32:00 -0600 Warren E Straszheim
{wesaia-at-iastate.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Okay folks - you know the drill. A client walks into a materials lab with a
} biological problem or vice versa. I work in a materials lab with SEM and LM
} and had a client walk in today with a biological question. So I am out of
} my element. Can you help?
}
} It seems this man's daughter is suffering from some kind of skin ailment
} and she has dug stuff out of MANY of the sores on her skin. The doctors in
} her HMO have not offered any relief. Her father (from another department on
} this campus) is quite determined to find out what the problem might be. He
} would take no for an answer and would accept whatever help we could give him.
}
} I examined the samples he brought in have posted images on our web server
} at ftp://www.marl.iastate.edu/What_is_it/. Many of them seem to be either
} bundles or wads of fibers or else little nodules of "stuff" with the fibers
} running throughout them. I suppose the stuff was secreted by the body, but
} can't say for sure.
}
} LM pictures show the fibers to be both clear and darkly colored. BSE images
} and EDS from the SEM show the fibers to be organic in nature. (The nodules
} contain notable amounts of Na, Cl, and K along with some Si. But the fibers
} are primarily C and O.) The images don't appear to be like any natural or
} manmade fibers that I have ever encountered before. I can't find a match in
} our copy of the Particle Atlas.
}
} Have any of you in all your experience come across such things? I would
} appreciate whatever expertise you could lend.
}
} Thanking you in advance,
} Warren
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 23 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Mon Jan 13 03:08:12 2003



From: Jan :      leunissen-at-aurion.nl
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 09:47:44 +0100
Subject: Re: TEM: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gold grids are a good choice for on-grid immunodetection when using
conventional immunogold reagents (with a size suited for visualization
without enhancement, for instance 10 nm gold particles). Gold grids are
virtually chemically inert and thus won't easily interfere with
components in incubation solutions. There is one exception: silver
enhancement. Since gold particles act as catalysts in the deposition of
metallic silver, gold grids may become covered with metallic silver as
well, locally exhausting the enhancement reagents and leading to
non-reproducible results.
Nickel, as far as we have tested, does not seem to act as a catalyst
for silver enhancement and in a practical sense is also chemically
inert towards incubation solutions. In our experience handling such
grids with non-magnetic tweezers (or better, with platinum loops) has
never been a reason for doubting the immuno results. The main downside
to using nickel grids is that they influence the electron beam and
cause astigmatism making more frequent adjustments necessary while
observing specimens in the TEM.

Electrochemical phenomena may already occur whenever a metal surface is
brought into contact with a solution. It does not necessarily involve a
second (different) metal. Whether this actually results in a chemical
reaction depends a.o. on the redox potential of the components involved
and whether the overall conditions are favorable for a reaction to
occur.

I would be interested to learn if there are any listers who would be
willing to comment on the issue of electrochemical reactions
influencing immunodetection. Any documented experience may teach us how
to obtain better results.

Jan Leunissen
Aurion - ImmunoGold Reagents and Accessories
http://www.aurion.nl



From daemon Mon Jan 13 04:45:41 2003



From: Nanovision S.R.L. :      b.rapillo-at-mclink.it
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 11:36:10 +0100 (CET)
Subject: Request for SEM JSM6400F

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Sirs,
I would like to know if somebody can help me to find the procedures for the baking of this field emission (JSM6400F).
We have the connections to the heaters, we need to know if we have to dismount something in the gun before baking and if there is a difference between baking time on the gun and the column. All other information are well accepted.

Best Regards.



From daemon Mon Jan 13 06:12:47 2003



From: Benjamin - Simkin :      simkin-at-egr.msu.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 07:02:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Request for SEM JSM6400F

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have no experience with the JSM6400F, however that said, I would strongly
suspect that the gun bake time should be the longest in the system. The reason
is that residual gas will tend to be driven from the hottest to the coolest
region of the system, and for any microscope the best vacuum is desired in the
gun.
For comparison, the bakeout procedure on our SEM (CamScan 44FE) is:
entire system, pumped by diffusion pump /w cold trap, all heaters on - 1 day
cool lower ion pump; isolate from chamber; pump column+gun+upper ion pump with lower ion pump - 1 day
cool upper ion pump; seal upper/lower pumping line; pump with both ion pumps - 1 day
finally, cool gun assembly.

hope this helps,
Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)


From daemon Mon Jan 13 06:48:14 2003



From: Stefan Geimer :      stefan.geimer-at-uni-koeln.de
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 13:40:08 +0100
Subject: looking for manual Edwards E306 thermal evaporator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear list members,

I am looking for a manual (operation instructions and technical specs.)
for an Edwards E306 thermal evaporator. Of course I will pay for
copy-costs and postage. If you can help me with that, please contact me
directly: stefan.geimer-at-uni-koeln.de

Stefan








From daemon Mon Jan 13 07:52:40 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 08:42:34 -0500
Subject: SEM: Examining mercury-wetted contacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Morning Warren,
While on one of my searches to attempt to insure that our new FEI
ESEM remains as uncontaminated as possible, I came across the following
related to mercury in amalgams and SEM/vacuum:

http://www.gbg.bonet.se/bwf/art/instability.html

I can't speak to the validity of the experimentation, but I have bookmarked
the site.

Hope this helps,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.




-----Original Message-----
} From: Warren E Straszheim [mailto:wesaia-at-iastate.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 10, 2003 6:39 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


A client has approached us asking for assistance in examining some
"mercury-wetted" relay contacts. They have had problems with the contacts
sticking and would like us to examine a few sets of contacts to see if we
can identify the source of the problem.

My question is whether I should be concerned with inserting such samples in
the microscope?

I don't intend to parts to be obviously wetted with mercury. However, I
presume whatever Hg goes in will probably get volatilized and run out
through our diffusion and rotary pump. We have mist traps on the outlet of
our rotary pump. Do I need to be concerned about it reacting in bad ways
with either the pump oil or components in the scope? (This would be in our
conventional SEM rather than our VP-SEM. Its EDS system is down at the
moment.)

Thanks in advance for your advice.

Warren

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Mon Jan 13 08:40:39 2003



From: Ron L'Herault :      lherault-at-bu.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 09:34:10 -0500
Subject: Re: Request for SEM JSM6400F

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Why not just call JEOL and talk to a service engineer? They are very
helpful. You do not have to be on a service contract to get their help
either.

Ron L

-----Original Message-----
} From: Benjamin - Simkin [mailto:simkin-at-egr.msu.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2003 7:02 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com; b.rapillo-at-mclink.it


I have no experience with the JSM6400F, however that said, I would strongly
suspect that the gun bake time should be the longest in the system. The
reason
is that residual gas will tend to be driven from the hottest to the coolest
region of the system, and for any microscope the best vacuum is desired in
the
gun.
For comparison, the bakeout procedure on our SEM (CamScan 44FE) is:
entire system, pumped by diffusion pump /w cold trap, all heaters on - 1 day
cool lower ion pump; isolate from chamber; pump column+gun+upper ion pump
with lower ion pump - 1 day
cool upper ion pump; seal upper/lower pumping line; pump with both ion
pumps - 1 day
finally, cool gun assembly.

hope this helps,
Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)




From daemon Mon Jan 13 09:37:53 2003



From: burtonjoyner-at-insightbb.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 09:26:16 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (burtonjoyner-at-insightbb.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
January 13, 2003 at 09:22:02
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: burtonjoyner-at-insightbb.com
Name: Burton Joyner

Organization: University of KY

Education: Graduate College

Location: Lexington, KY, USA

Question: I am new to electron microscopy and have the opportunity to
use the TEM at UK. Are there any comprehensive TEM sample
preparation references in print? I am not having much luck finding
good resources.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Mon Jan 13 10:06:11 2003



From: saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 10:52:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We've never had any trouble using Ni for immuno. Cu sometimes can react
with reagents, particularly if you incubate overnignt, leaving blobs of
copper sulfate (they turn greenish). As for Au, use them for growing
cells on support films because the Au is not toxic to the cells. However,
I think Au is overkill for immuno; Au grids are EXPENSIVE. If you have
some sort of really corrosive treatment (why would you???), you might
consider Au.

You should use several grids (at least 2; we use 3) for every different
condition (different antibody--positive & negative, different antibody
dilution, different tissue/cell type, etc). This means you'll be using
lots of grids, which would be expensive if you're using Au ones.

Good luck,
Sara Miller


On Fri, 10 Jan 2003, by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (medvitz-at-pitt.edu) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Friday,
} January 10, 2003 at 13:13:07
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: medvitz-at-pitt.edu
} Name: Neil Medvitz
}
} Organization: University of Pittsburgh
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
}
} Question: What is the advantage if any to using gold grids instead of
} Nickel for post-embedding immunochem.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265


From daemon Mon Jan 13 10:37:21 2003



From: saram-at-duke.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 11:23:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: TEM: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


As always, Chuck has some good ideas. One additional one is that we don't
use forceps at all. We use loops made with either Ni or Au wire (like the
wire you put into the vacuum evaporator) glued onto sticks (we use plastic
disposable loops normally used for spreading bacteria onto plates--with
the plastic loop cut off). At the very end, we pick up the grid with
forceps and dry it.

The loops are made with 1-2 inches of wire, wrapped around a drill bit
just larger than the grid and twisted tightly to make a loop at one end.
The other end is wrapped around the end of a plastic handle and glued with
epoxy.

The advantages are that loops are reusable, and there's less likelyhood of
bending the grids. Just make sure you wash grids between solutions
sufficiently. We use 5-6 washes (drops of buffer--which is also probably
overkill).

Good luck,
Sara Miller


On Sat, 11 Jan 2003, Garber, Charles A. wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Neil Medvitz asked:
} =========================================================================
} Question: What is the advantage if any to using gold grids instead of
} Nickel for post-embedding immunochem.
} ===========================================================================
} There are several advantages which could be of greater or lesser importance
} depending on individual situations:
}
} a) When a pair of normal antimagnetic stainless steel tweezers are used to
} hold a typical nickel grid during the typical immunoreaction, you have two
} dissimilar metals in contact in a low pH environment and you get a current
} flow (this is the basis of electrochemistry). And this current flow is
} thought to stunt the strength of the immuno reaction. I don't know to what
} degree that is published but this is what customers have told me over the
} years as to why they have concerns about nickel grids.
}
} b) Gold grids don't suffer from this problems and they are far more inert
} under these same conditions than nickel. Consequently, there is for some a
} preference for gold. But gold is softer, and the grids tend to be a bit
} less self -supporting and therefore more difficult to work with, whereas
} nickel is more stiff, and does not bend as readily, that being the reason
} why some workers, at the end of the day, prefer nickel.
}
} One can get around the electrochemistry issues when using Ni grids, however,
} if instead of using the normal antimagnetic stainless steel tweezer, gold
} plated tweezers are used. See URL
} http://www.2spi.com/catalog/tweezers/precision.html
} The gold plating acts as a passivation layer on the antimagnetic stainless
} steel tweezers, killing off the chances for an electro chemical reaction,
} also leading sometimes to corrosion product in one's samples.
}
} Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers both gold and nickel grids as well a range
} of tweezers including gold plated tweezers.
}
} Chuck
}
} PS: Remember that we are striving to be 100% paperless, therefore there
} are no paper copies kept of this correspondence. Please be sure to always
} reply by way of "reply" on your software so that the entire string of
} correspondence can be kept in one place.
} ============================================
}
} Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
} President 1-800-2424-SPI
} SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
} PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
} West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
} Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com
}
} Look for us!
} ########################
} WWW: http://www.2spi.com
} ########################
} ============================================
}
}
}
}
}

Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710
Ph: 919 684-3452
FAX: 919 684-3265


From daemon Mon Jan 13 11:35:09 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 12:26:19 -0500
Subject: Re: SEM: Examining mercury-wetted contacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Warren;

Have you considered putting the device into a vacuum system first to get any
residual Hg off the surfaces prior to EM? That is, a vacuum system that is
not the SEM column.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: qualityimages [mailto:qualityimages-at-netrax.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2003 5:31 PM
To: Warren E Straszheim; Microscopy


Warren,
I've not experienced it myself, but I've heard of the gun being shorted
by the Hg vapor generated when the beam hits the Hg and heats it. Your
VP system might be a better bet with the increased pressure and some
sort of through-put of gas.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Warren E Straszheim wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} A client has approached us asking for assistance in examining some
} "mercury-wetted" relay contacts. They have had problems with the
} contacts sticking and would like us to examine a few sets of contacts
} to see if we can identify the source of the problem.
}
} My question is whether I should be concerned with inserting such
} samples in the microscope?
}
} I don't intend to parts to be obviously wetted with mercury. However,
} I presume whatever Hg goes in will probably get volatilized and run
} out through our diffusion and rotary pump. We have mist traps on the
} outlet of our rotary pump. Do I need to be concerned about it reacting
} in bad ways with either the pump oil or components in the scope? (This
} would be in our conventional SEM rather than our VP-SEM. Its EDS
} system is down at the moment.)
}
} Thanks in advance for your advice.
}
} Warren
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 23 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
} materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}
}





From daemon Mon Jan 13 11:38:27 2003



From: Dr. Lewis Coons :      lcoons-at-memphis.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 11:32:40 -0600
Subject: Print Processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers:

I am interested in your opinions on the various brands of automatic
black and white processors that produce a dry print. For the present,
our Center must rely in part on silver emulsion processing as well as
digital images. The processors I am looking at are the Colex, the
Fujimoto CP31 and CP51. I would consider other brands.

Your comments, if you wish, can be sent to my e-mail address. In
advance, I than you for your time.


Dr. Lewis B. Coons, Director
Integrated Microscopy Center
The University of Memphis
Memphis, TN
e-mail lcoons-at-memphis.edu



From daemon Mon Jan 13 12:58:42 2003



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 18:38:36 -0000
Subject: Micro + Astro

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Listers,

I think you might be interested to see, for once, Microscopy and
Astronomy working hand in hand in yesterday's Astronomy Picture of the
Day:

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030112.html


+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+-----------------------------------------+
Phone:
{direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
{University internal extension 7867
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+-----------------------------------------+


From daemon Mon Jan 13 14:42:28 2003



From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 15:45:37 -0500
Subject: RE: Cold Cathode Dschg Gauges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have read with some interest the recent discussions of methods for
cleaning cold cathode discharge gauges. In this connection, it might
be of interest to note that there are two different types of CCD
gauges. These are described in Sect 3.2.2 of my book Vacuum Methods
in Electron Microscopy (for a description see
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/books/book48.html). One type, perhaps the
first type developed, is the classical 'Penning Gauge'. In modern
gauges of this type the anode is usually a loop of tungsten wire that
is located in the center of a surrounding cylindrical cathod, as
shown in Fig. 3.12. The other type is commonly known as the
'Magneton Gauge". In this gauge the cylindrical case of the gauge is
the anode, and the cathode is a rod with circular end plates that is
located along the axis of the case, as shown in Fig. 3.13. Magnetron
gauges are usually considered to be capable of recording considerably
lower pressures than Penning gauges, and to be more stable and more
accurate.

It sounds to me as though most of those who commented on the problem
were describing procedures for refurbishing a Magnetron gauge, and
indeed, my experience also suggests that it is best to replace the
central element of this type gauge (the cathode) if it shows
significang erosion, and that a local machine shop can produce a new
one for you much cheaper than you can purchase one from the gauge
manufacturer.

Happy New Year!!
--
Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237


From daemon Mon Jan 13 22:19:05 2003



From: chaueter :      chaueter-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2003 22:08:04 -0600
Subject: Thank you - Biofilm Project

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,

We've received lots of good suggestions. Thank you very much to all who gave
input on the Biofilm project for TEM.

Sincerely,

Claire

Claire Haueter
EM Technician
Integrated Microscopy Core
Baylor College of Medicine
713-798-4952



From daemon Tue Jan 14 01:23:54 2003



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 09:37:20 +0100
Subject: RE: Examining mercury-wetted contacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Why not call JEOL? Procedure will be there.


Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax
(678)467-0012 mobile

This message is made of 100% recycled electrons.

This address can not receive messages larger than 15 kb without prior
notification.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Nanovision S.R.L. {b.rapillo-at-mclink.it}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2003 5:36 AM


Hi Warren

The first care could be to limit evaporation, by use of a cold stage. The
Pelltier stage from an ESEM schould be enought, to be just a bit above the
melting point of Hg.

The second care could be the use of a cold trap in front of the sample,
one like these used in HR-SEM, mounted on the objectif lens, or better,
inserting a cold finger in the scope chamber and tilting the sample in it
direction. This last configuration would limite the risk to evaporate
something in the electron tube. Of coarse, this trap have to be cleaned
after the observation, and the mounting of such a cold finger depends of
what free port you have on the scope in tilting direction.

Third, use the lowest beam current possible (imaging or EDS ?).

An other care could be to pack the sample in Al foil, with a hole at the
place you want to observe, to limit direct relation between the rest of
the sample and the SEM vaccum. The vapor flux is proportionnal to the
surface of metal exposed to the vaccum.

I don't think that you will have a strong evaporation rate in the vacuum
level of a SEM, at room temperature or at -20C. The 10 to 200 pA beam
current from a SEM in current observation conditions are far from the that
of a MBE gun. Have a look at the vapor pressure curves, or at Holland's
book about thin film technologie. Have a look at the vapor pressure
curves, or at Holland's books about thin film technology. He gives the way
to calculate the vapor flux.


J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr

}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Warren E Straszheim [mailto:wesaia-at-iastate.edu]
} Sent: Friday, January 10, 2003 6:39 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: SEM: Examining mercury-wetted contacts
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} A client has approached us asking for assistance in examining some
} "mercury-wetted" relay contacts. They have had problems with the contacts
} sticking and would like us to examine a few sets of contacts to see if we
} can identify the source of the problem.
}
} My question is whether I should be concerned with inserting such samples in
} the microscope?
}
} I don't intend to parts to be obviously wetted with mercury. However, I
} presume whatever Hg goes in will probably get volatilized and run out
} through our diffusion and rotary pump. We have mist traps on the outlet of
} our rotary pump. Do I need to be concerned about it reacting in bad ways
} with either the pump oil or components in the scope? (This would be in our
} conventional SEM rather than our VP-SEM. Its EDS system is down at the
} moment.)
}
} Thanks in advance for your advice.
}
} Warren
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 23 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
} materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 14 09:15:01 2003



From: Linda Rinko :      linda_rinko-at-hms.harvard.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 09:58:03 -0500
Subject: cleaved mica

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am familiar with the techniques of cleaving mica, but what is the
recommended method for cutting mica to a desired shape or size?

Linda Rinko
Design Engineer
Harvard Medical School
060 Seeley G. Mudd
Boston, MA 02115
617-432-2052




From daemon Tue Jan 14 10:57:15 2003



From: jhe1-at-tulane.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 10:46:27 -0600
Subject: High Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers:

A my friend wants to know which company can produce High Oriented Pyrolyzed
Graphite slides used for AFM? or where he can order it?

Thanks.

Jibao He Ph.D.
EM Lab Supervisor
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA 70118
jhe1-at-tulane.edu


From daemon Tue Jan 14 11:39:38 2003



From: Russell E. Cook :      recook-at-anl.gov
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 11:31:36 -0600
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist:TEM Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You'd better restrict yourself to techniques that are specific to the
materials you need to prepare for TEM. Talk to someone knowledgeable
at UK. Tell the Microscopy list the kind of materials you need to
work on.

At 9:26 AM -0600 1/13/03, by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
-----------------------------------------
Russell E. Cook, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Center
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division, Building 212
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439-4838
USA
Telephone: 630-252-7194
FAX: 630-252-4289
recook-at-anl.gov


From daemon Tue Jan 14 12:11:33 2003



From: rcmoretz-at-att.net
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 18:01:58 +0000
Subject: Re: cleaved mica

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Linda:

I have always just used scissors to cut mica to the desired shape and size.

Roger Moretz, PhD
Dept of Toxicology
BI Pharmaceuticals
--
Where the world is only slightly
less weird than it actually is.
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I am familiar with the techniques of cleaving mica, but what is the
} recommended method for cutting mica to a desired shape or size?
}
} Linda Rinko
} Design Engineer
} Harvard Medical School
} 060 Seeley G. Mudd
} Boston, MA 02115
} 617-432-2052
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 14 12:47:08 2003



From: Vladislav Speransky :      Vladislav_Speransky-at-nih.gov
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 13:39:44 -0500
Subject: Fwd: Gold vs Ni Grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Neil,

there is one more possibility - gold-gilded copper grids by Gilder. I
buy mine from Electron Microscopy Sciences and like them for most of
post-embedding labeling, except silver-enhancement of course. They
have proved sturdy and easy to handle and do not seem to react with
PBS. They are not much more expensive than Ni grids.
I dislike Ni grids for the reasons Jan and others listed, but pure
gold ones were too flimsy.

Vlad



} Email: medvitz-at-pitt.edu
} Name: Neil Medvitz
}
} Organization: University of Pittsburgh
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
}
} Question: What is the advantage if any to using gold grids instead
} of Nickel for post-embedding immunochem.
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vladislav V. Speransky, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Structural Biology
NIAMS, National Institutes of Health
50 South Drive, Room 1504
Bethesda, MD 20892-8025
Phone: 301 496-3989
Fax: 301 480-7629
E-mail: Vladislav_Speransky-at-nih.gov


From daemon Tue Jan 14 12:50:29 2003



From: Oparowski, Joseph :      Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 13:44:21 -0500
Subject: Metallograph lamp supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Greetings,

We recently obtained an older metallograph, namely an Aus Jena Neophot 21,
originally sold by Leco Corp. One of the lamps uses a halogen bulb with an
extended base. We are having trouble finding a supplier for this type of
bulb. If there are any Neophot 21 users out there that have found a bulb
supplier, a recommendation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.


Joseph

Joseph M. Oparowski
Center for Materials Science - Consulting and Failure Analysis
Bose Corporation Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
The Mountain, M/S 415 Phone:(508) 766-1371
Framingham, MA 01701-9168 Fax: (508) 766-1313


From daemon Tue Jan 14 16:09:03 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 16:58:37 -0500
Subject: AFM: Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Jibao He wrote:
============================================================================
====
A my friend wants to know which company can produce High Oriented Pyrolyzed
Graphite slides used for AFM? or where he can order it?
============================================================================
====
SPI Supplies has offered highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) for many
years for AFM applications, the details for which can be found on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/new/hopgsub.shtml

A number of custom sizes are shown, but we can make just about any specific
size one might want. It is not easy to cut down to size without the special
equipment and experience, so it is better to order to the size you want
instead of a larger size you might try to cut down.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================



From daemon Tue Jan 14 16:41:38 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 17:33:42 -0500
Subject: Cutting of mica

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Linda Rinko wrote:
============================================================================
==
I am familiar with the techniques of cleaving mica, but what is the
recommended method for cutting mica to a desired shape or size?
============================================================================
==
One must first understand that mica is very very hard and cutting a thin
sheet of mica is nearly like cutting a strip of equal thickness of steel!
So no matter what the edge is that you would be using for the cutting, it is
going to lose its sharpness very quickly, but just how quickly will depend
on the thickness of the mica being cut.

All of the mica pieces described on the SPI Supplies website
See URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/submat/mic_shet.shtml
are prepared by die cutting, other wise there will be delamination at the
edges and also, a large generation of particulates. Carbide tools are
always used for the die cutting, and that is why there is sometimes a not-so
-small tooling charge when special sizes or shapes are needed. This is also
why the mica sheets and discs sold by SPI Supplies have edges far more free
of fracturing and splitting vs. other methods of cutting.

We are often times asked how mica purchased from SPI Supplies can be cut
down to smaller pieces. And the answer depends on the thickness of the
piece being cut.

• Thickness is less than 15 mils (0.015" or 0.381 mm):
For sheets of this thickness or less, one can use either a
very sharp scissors or an Exacto type knife or even a single edge razor
blade. Be sure to wear good eye protection (which should also be worn by
any one nearby watching). One can expect some edge fracturing and splitting
, the amount depending on the sharpness of the scissors or blade. The
splitting can be minimized by holding down the mica, as it is being cut with
a ruler or other "straight edge" instrument, the higher the pressure applied
, the better the result (e.g. less fracturing). The thinnest mica
cleavings can be scissors cut almost as if they were a piece of paper.

• Thickness is greater than 15 mils (0.015" or 0.381 mm) but
less than 30 mils (0.030" or 0.762 mm):
Scissors and razor blades will not work. The only
possibility is to use a guillotine type cutter perhaps even a paper cutter.
There will be a strong tendency for the mica to edge fracture, but that can
be minimized by applying higher downward pressures to the side of the mica
on the flat cutting surface. It can be further minimized by being sure that
the blade is the sharpest possible.

• Thickness is greater than 30 mils (0.030" or 0.762 mm):
We do not believe that anyone can do a credible job cutting
such mica pieces with out resorting to the use of good tooling and die
cutting.


Just remember that any cutting edge that you might use to cut the mica is
going to be become dull quickly. While razor blades and even scissors can
be discarded and new ones then used, one normally does not think of a paper
cutter as being a disposable instrument. At the same time, we are not aware
of any service that resharpens the guillotine blades from worn out paper
cutters.

Chuck
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Tue Jan 14 18:37:29 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 16:37:08 -0800
Subject: Re: Print Processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try Kreonite and Ilford processors.
Used ones can be found at:

http://dunningphoto.com/used.html

http://www.kreonite.com/procpm2.htm

Kreonite has been around a long time.

gary g.



At 09:32 AM 1/23/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Jan 14 18:40:28 2003



From: John Twilley :      jtwilley-at-sprynet.com
Date: Tue, 14 Jan 2003 19:46:39 -0500
Subject: Re: Metallograph lamp supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Joseph,

Just had my catalogues out here....Three possibilities are the following:

Bulb Direct
(www.bulbdirect.com)
800-772-5267

Gilway Technical Lamp (in Woburn)
(www.gilway.com)
781-935-4442

Gray Supply Co. (Top Bulb)
www.topbulb.com)
800-867-2852

John Twilley
Conservation Scientist

Oparowski, Joseph wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Greetings,
}
} We recently obtained an older metallograph, namely an Aus Jena Neophot 21,
} originally sold by Leco Corp. One of the lamps uses a halogen bulb with an
} extended base. We are having trouble finding a supplier for this type of
} bulb. If there are any Neophot 21 users out there that have found a bulb
} supplier, a recommendation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
}
}
} Joseph
}
} Joseph M. Oparowski
} Center for Materials Science - Consulting and Failure Analysis
} Bose Corporation Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
} The Mountain, M/S 415 Phone:(508) 766-1371
} Framingham, MA 01701-9168 Fax: (508) 766-1313





From daemon Wed Jan 15 06:55:23 2003



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 07:42:57 -0500
Subject: RE: Print Processors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Also check out Mohrpro processors. They are available in various sizes.
Reliable and easy to use.
http://www.mohrpro.com/

George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
ph 800.223.7130 x3109
f 800.832.2205
email scisales-at-ngscorp.com

Dear Listers:

I am interested in your opinions on the various brands of automatic
black and white processors that produce a dry print. For the present,
our Center must rely in part on silver emulsion processing as well as
digital images. The processors I am looking at are the Colex, the
Fujimoto CP31 and CP51. I would consider other brands.

Your comments, if you wish, can be sent to my e-mail address. In
advance, I than you for your time.


Dr. Lewis B. Coons, Director
Integrated Microscopy Center
The University of Memphis
Memphis, TN
e-mail lcoons-at-memphis.edu







From daemon Wed Jan 15 10:19:35 2003



From: Michael D. Standing :      Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 08:58:53 -0700
Subject: Metallograph lamp supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Joseph,

I don't know if they supply the bulb you are looking for, but we buy most of
our bulbs from Gray Supply. You can find them at 1-800-TOP-BULB
(1-800-867-2852) or on the web at www.topbulb.com . They have a large
supply of specialty bulbs and one of them may fit your application.

Mike

===========================================
Michael D. Standing
Electron Microscopy Technologist
Brigham Young University
401 WIDB
Provo, UT 84602

Phone: (801) 422-4011
e-mail: Michael_Standing-at-byu.edu
===========================================

-----Original Message-----
} From: Oparowski, Joseph [mailto:Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 11:44 AM
To: 'microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com'
Cc: Shaw, Douglas


Greetings,

We recently obtained an older metallograph, namely an Aus Jena Neophot 21,
originally sold by Leco Corp. One of the lamps uses a halogen bulb with an
extended base. We are having trouble finding a supplier for this type of
bulb. If there are any Neophot 21 users out there that have found a bulb
supplier, a recommendation would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.


Joseph

Joseph M. Oparowski
Center for Materials Science - Consulting and Failure Analysis
Bose Corporation Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
The Mountain, M/S 415 Phone:(508) 766-1371
Framingham, MA 01701-9168 Fax: (508) 766-1313



From daemon Wed Jan 15 11:17:38 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 09:12:17 -0800
Subject: Re: cleaved mica

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Tuesday, January 14, 2003, at 06:58 AM, Linda Rinko wrote:

} I am familiar with the techniques of cleaving mica, but what is the
} recommended method for cutting mica to a desired shape or size?
}
Dear Linda,
I buy mica in ~1 cm x 3 cm x 1 mm pieces, then just use a scissors to
cut a piece lengthwise. I also cut off a corner so I can tell which
side has been carbon coated.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 15 15:41:53 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 16:31:08 -0500
Subject: replacement for S.I.T. camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For more than ten years we've been using a Hammamatsu SIT camera for
imaging at video rates at low light fluorescence. However,the camera has
serious vignetting and noise. Also, the tube has gotten dirty (dust) and
we can't clean much of it.

We'd like to replace this camera with one with a flatter field, similar
sensitivity, and at least 15 FPS at 640X480 or greater.

Yes, the Roper/Cooke/Hammamatsu $16k cooled CCDs could do this in many of
the situation we image, but what about for much less money?

Thanks!



____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Wed Jan 15 17:44:37 2003



From: Ryan Benedict :      bened008-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 17:30:54 -0600
Subject: LM -- Need help with autofluoresing blood vessels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am doing work on fluorescent staining of blood vessel tumor
cross-sections. I was told that blood vessels will autofluoresce without
the aid of staining. Is this true and if so at what wavelength will it
fluoresce? Currently we are double staining to get our results (staining
vessel cells and proteins inside of the cells), but if we only have to stain
once, it would be beneficial. If the autofluorescing does not work well
enough, does anyone have any ideas on what colors/stains would work for the
double staining of cells that makeup the blood vessels (endothelial) and
then tagging something within those cells? Right now we are using texas red
and I am getting a ton of background noise (red) that makes it to difficult
to see. Any information can be mailed to me directly, please, at
bened008-at-umn.edu

Thanks,

Ryan Benedict
Oral Sciences Department
University of Minnesota
612-626-3562



From daemon Wed Jan 15 17:57:46 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2003 17:04:37 -0800
Subject: RE: Cold Cathode Dschg Gauges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Joseph,

I had to face the same problem a while ago (got an old Neophot 21). What I
figured out is that the prices up here in Canada is much lower, compared to
the States. The company I bought the bulbs from is Microlites Scientific.
You can call them at:
1-800-263-8902 or 416-2995301.
Speaking about the scope, does anybody have one for parts or has some spare
parts for the machine?

Regards,

Vlad Igoshev, Ph.D.

Toronto, Canada


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Oparowski, Joseph" {Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: "Shaw, Douglas" {Douglas_Shaw-at-bose.com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 1:44 PM


Wil-

May be you could explain to me what mean "Inverted Magnetron" (or point
some page in your book)? I got AIM-x (Active Inverted Magnetron) Gauge
from Edwards a few years ago. Edwards claimed that this gauge is good up
to 10-9 mbar. In recent discussion, somebody (I am sorry, I don't remember
the name) claimed that "cold cathode gauge" could not perform well over
10-5 torr. How it may happening that my "inverted magnetron" gauge
performed perfectly up to 10-8 torr? Thanks, Sergey.

At 12:45 PM 1/13/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Thu Jan 16 02:45:13 2003



From: SL Kearns, Earth Sciences :      Stuart.Kearns-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 09:30:54 -0000
Subject: Used SEM - Cambridge S250 mkIII

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Michael, you are unlikely to find a camera sensitive enough to decently
record fluorescence image at 15 frames per second, with software, for much
less than $16K.
However if, you agree to wait for 12 long seconds while image downloads from
the camera, then check out http://www.starlight-xpress.co.uk/ . They have
Peltier cooled 1300 x 1030 CCD camera with SONY ICX085AL sensor, at $2,500.
Ask for industrial version, it is designed for long duty cycle. That's the
least expensive one of such resolution on the market. And if you use it in
650 x 515 mode, (which you are looking for), the download takes only 3
seconds. Another company, SBIG, offers the least expensive 640 x 480 camera
with Texas Instrument TC37 sensor, also Peltier cooled, and also very
sensitive, with integrated color filter wheel, at $1,700. You can choose
from a huge variety of filters. Check www.sbig.com . Both cameras come as a
complete package with the power supply, camera/filters control and image
processing software, and all cables. SBIG software is somewhat better for
processing. Control capabilities are similar.

Disclaimer: I have no commercial interest in neither Starlight Express nor
SBIG companies, other than being a satisfied customer.

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax
(678)467-0012 mobile

This message is made of 100% recycled electrons.

This address can not receive messages larger than 15 kb without prior
notification.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 4:31 PM


Dear All,

We are disposing of a trusty old friend, a Cambridge S250 MkIII. I am
keeping several vacuum components and the BSE detector but the remainder
could form useful spares for someone. Removal/shipping costs only.

Stu
----------------------
SL Kearns, Earth Sciences
University of Bristol
Bristol, UK
+44 (0)117 954 5421
Stuart.Kearns-at-bristol.ac.uk


From daemon Thu Jan 16 05:31:02 2003



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:22:00 +0000 ()
Subject: Does anyone want a Philips 301 TEM?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We are shortly saying goodbye to two Philips 301 transmission electron
microscopes. One has a double tilt facility - the other one is not so
high-powered, but might be considered as a source of parts for the first.

Would anyone be interested? If so, please let me know and I will take the
matter higher up as regards arrangements.

+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+-----------------------------------------+
Phone:
{direct line +44 (0) 118 9318572
{University internal extension 7867
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+-----------------------------------------+





From daemon Thu Jan 16 07:52:32 2003



From: Kestutis Smalinskas :      smalinskas-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 05:42:01 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Metallograph lamp supplier

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Joseph:

We, too, have the same metallograph (AusJena Neophot
21 from LECO) in our lab. If the other leads listed
on the Microscopy Listserver don't pan out, you may
want to contact the contractors that service our
equipment:

Hi-Point Optical Calibration
567 North Park Road
Bellefontaine, Ohio 43311
(937) 592-2641

Bob & Mark Pickering (specialists)
Julia Pickering (office clerk)

They purport to be very familiar and experienced with
this particular microscope. You may want to keep them
in mind for any future spare parts needed for your
AusJena metallograph.

Regards,

Stu Smalinskas
Senior Metallurgist
SKF USA
Plymouth, Michigan

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com


From daemon Thu Jan 16 09:00:00 2003



From: Emmanuelle Roux :      eroux-at-caprion.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 09:50:33 -0500
Subject: Re: Autofluorescence of blood vessel.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Hi Ryan,
Indeed, blood vessels will be autofluorescent and the problem is that they will autofluoresce in all the channels we are usually using e.g. red, green and blue. I am facing a similar problem right now and to solve it you would have to go with a fluorophore that will emit at a wavelenght close to the infra red end of the spectrum. That would mean around 670-700 nm or higher. You would have to avoid the 450-615 part of the spectrum were a lot of biological material will naturally fluoresce. The problem now is to find the (secondary or tertiary) antibody coupled with the probe you have selected (ex: Cy5, Cy 5.5 or others ...coupled Ab) and the other problem is that you can't see the labeling with your eyes because we can't see the infra-red or close wavelenght. So you need a digital camera linked to a computer to see anything. Obviously you also need the right filter on your microscope...
Hope this helps.
Emmanuelle


Emmanuelle Roux, PhD
Senior Scientist
Caprion Pharmaceuticals
7150 Alexander Fleming
St-Laurent, H4S 2C8
Quebec, Canada
Tel: 514-940-3600 ext. 3773
Fax: 514-940-3620



From daemon Thu Jan 16 10:40:29 2003



From: Edwina Westbrook :      ewestbro-at-vsu.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:02:11 -0500
Subject: EMITECH Freeze Drier Install Instructions

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello ALL,

I have inherited a EMITECH freeze drier K775X which has never been setup. The instructions are not very good for someone who has never used any kind of freeze drier. It would be helpful to have step by step instructions for this instrument. Actually it looks pretty simple, but that is relative, isn't it?

Can someone help me? You may respond back to me directly.

Thanks.

Winnie



Edwina W. Westbrook
Electron Microscopy Laboratories
Agriculture Research Station
P.O.Box 9061
Virginia State University
Petersburg, VA 23806
(804)-524-5659





From daemon Thu Jan 16 11:28:08 2003



From: Corazon D. Bucana :      bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:11:17 -0600
Subject: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90 Mb)
was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased brightness
of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
something I should have done to prevent this?

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.

Cora Bucana



From daemon Thu Jan 16 12:46:47 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 12:37:26 -0600
Subject: Re: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Let me assure you that the images on your laptop have not degraded. If they
had, you would have probably encountered an error reading the file, or you
might have found a bunch of junk pixels in your images.

The culprit here is probably the brightness setting on your laptop display.
Others who do this more than me will quickly tell you that it can be a real
bugaboo trying to get monitors set right so that the image displays
correctly on them and also prints out correctly on the various printers. I
understand that some folks command a pretty good fee for calibrating
monitors and printers for print houses.

I would suggest getting a test image to use for setting your monitor. I
have a grid of gray swatches ranging from black to white. I set up the
controls so black is black, white is white, and I have a pretty good range
of mid-tones.

There is also a control panel from Adobe to help generate an ICM file to
account for monitor characteristics. I have used it some, but am not real
confident about its use.

I have made a test file (testgrad.gif) and the Adobe control panel
available on our server. You may reach them by pointing your browser at
ftp://www.marl.iastate.edu/ and then navigating to the "Test images"
folder. You will need to drop the control applet into your Windows\System
folder and then open up the Control Panel. I use it under Windows 98. It
should work under other versions, but I cannot vouch for it. You will be on
your own.

Hopefully, these will help you consistently setup you laptop so that the
appearance stops changing from month to month.

Warren

At 11:11 AM 1/16/03 -0600, you wrote:

} I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
} several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90
} Mb) was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week
} I find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase
} brightness by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I
} increased brightness of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD
} hoping that the image will not deteriorate there and then compare it with
} the one in my laptop several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone
} else? Is there something I should have done to prevent this?
}
} Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Cora Bucana

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Thu Jan 16 13:52:12 2003



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 11:42:31 -0800 (PST)
Subject: electroscan esem streaky noise on image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Everyone,
I came across a new problem with our Electroscan E3 ESEM, that I've not
been able to track down. At times, the image will become very noisy and
streaky with really bright streaks across the image making it near
impossible to focus. The problem goes away with time by venting and
repumping the chamber, or fiddling with the detector ESD hook wire - but
I'm not sure exactly what is causing it. Anyone ever seen this before?
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793




From daemon Thu Jan 16 17:28:23 2003



From: Wil Bigelow :      bigelow-at-engin.umich.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 18:30:26 -0500
Subject: More about Dschg gauges

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Following the comments I made a few days ago about magnetron cold
cathod discharge gauges, several people have asked about 'inverted
magnetron gauges'.

As it turns out, in addition to the two most common types of cold
cathode discharge gauges that I described in my book, there are at
least three others:
(1) inverted magnerton gauges; (2) Redhead magnetron gauges; and (3)
alphatron CCD gauges. For those interested, these are described in
reasonable detail in Sect. 6.7.3 of the book 'Vacuum Technology'
(2nd. Ed.) by Alexander Roth (ISBN 0-444-86027-4 (Elsevier))

Briefly, the inverted magnetron has a central anode rod that is
surrounded by a cylindrical cathode, as in the ordinary magnetron
gauge, but in addition there is an auxiliary cylindrical cathode that
surrounds theis 'inner cathode', which modifieds the field
distribution at the ends of the anode. These gauges are said to be
useful over the range from 10-4 to 10-13 Torr.

The Redhead magnetron gauge is a modification of the inverted
magnetron which has perforations in the cathode cylinder to improve
conductance. It reportedly is useful down to 10-10 Torr.

The alphatron gauge contains a radioactive source of alpha particles
that produce ionazition of gas molecules at high pressures, allowing
measurements in the range from 10-3 up to 40 Torr.

May all your vacuum leaks be small ones,

Wil Bigelow
--
Wilbur C. Bigelow, Prof. Emeritus
Materials Sci. & Engr., University of Michigan
3062 Dow Bldg.; 2300 Hayward St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 e-mail: bigelow-at-umich.edu;
Fx:734-763-4788; Ph:734-662-5237


From daemon Thu Jan 16 17:42:35 2003



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-Soft-Imaging.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 16:33:44 -0700
Subject: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Corazon,

The only explanation for what you are observing is that the screen of your
laptop has deteriorated or changed. It is statistically impossible that an
image "darkens" while stored on the computer. An image on the computer
consists basically of millions of numbers that describe the intensity at
each point. It is of course possible, that a number gets corrupted and you
get a different brightness at a pixel, but that all pixels deteriorate in
the same fashion is statistically impossible. Another possibility could be,
that your settings for the brightness in Powerpoint changed.




Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Corazon D. Bucana [mailto:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 10:11 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90 Mb)
was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased brightness
of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
something I should have done to prevent this?

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.

Cora Bucana



From daemon Thu Jan 16 19:07:35 2003



From: gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 18:59:31 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: How to View Muscles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
January 16, 2003 at 10:28:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu
Name: Leslie Smith

Organization: Georgia Instituite of Technology

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

Question: My BioMedical Engineeering class is working ona problem
dealing with Electonic Muscle Stimulation. we were wonderng what
types of microscopy would be best for viewing muscles. Thanks so much
Leslie Smith

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jan 16 19:09:34 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 17:11:20 -0800
Subject: Re: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Did your gamma change? i.e., brightness and/or
contrast? That will make a huge difference.
It is totally unlikely that the native files
are changed or perturbed. your viewing situation
is more likely the problem. Try using the Adobe
gamma adjust app to set your display's gamma.
Also note that LCDs are not all that great
for pictures. Active matrix LCDs are better.
CRTs are best...IMO.

gary g.


At 09:11 AM 1/16/2003, you wrote:

} I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
} several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90
} Mb) was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week
} I find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase
} brightness by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I
} increased brightness of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD
} hoping that the image will not deteriorate there and then compare it with
} the one in my laptop several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone
} else? Is there something I should have done to prevent this?
}
} Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Cora Bucana
}



From daemon Thu Jan 16 21:45:55 2003



From: Chaoying Ni :      cni-at-udel.edu
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2003 22:35:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would say that's most probably due to your monitor.

****************************************
Chaoying Ni, PhD
The W.M. Keck Electron Microscope Facility

Mailing address:
201 duPont Hall
Dept of Matls Sci & Eng
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716

(302) 831-8354 (O); -2318(L); -4545(Fax)
http://eml.masc.udel.edu
*****************************************

On Thu, 16 Jan 2003, Corazon D. Bucana wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
} several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90 Mb)
} was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
} find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
} by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased brightness
} of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
} will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
} several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
} something I should have done to prevent this?
}
} Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Cora Bucana
}
}


From daemon Fri Jan 17 04:13:36 2003



From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science :      COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 11:57:52 +0200
Subject: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter -

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

Compliments for the season to all. And for all TEM fans " May all darkness
be filled with stable clear reproducible publishable results!"
We are if full swing here in Gaborone hiding from the scorching 42 degree
Celsius heat in the cold EM lab battling with all the weird and wonderful
samples frown at us a "quick and easy to do"

Please give help in getting a cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane
microdialysis filter to reveal the structure for SEM investigation. We
would not like to embed the filter. All sectioning with blades, scalpels
and under LN did not result in the expected crisp clean filter surface.
Fracture mess and badly smeared surfaces is all we get!

Thanks in advance.


Mr S. H. Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Botswana
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
Botswana

Phone : +267 355 2462/5222
Mobile : +267 718 96 729
Fax : +267 585 097
e-mail : coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw




From daemon Fri Jan 17 07:07:48 2003



From: Scott Whittaker :      Whittaker.scott-at-nmnh.si.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 07:56:55 -0500
Subject: Re: electros can eSEM streaky noise on image

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


No experience with Electros can models. , but on an XL-30 it sounds like
electrical breakdown in the gas field. The "noise" is a good indication you
are very close to full breakdown and arcing is imminent. Bright pulses
indicate arcing. Is detector voltage too high or sample too close to the
detector. From your message it sounds like gas regulation might be flaky if
imaging conditions and sample are similar to what you used in the past. .
Sample charging +or- may also play a role. Again no experience with an E3
though and I almost never use the hook and cone detector system you
describe. Good luck

Scott Whittaker
Laboratories of Analytical Biology
Smithsonian Institution
National Museum of Natural History
PO Box 37012 MRC104
Washington DC 20013-7012
202-357-1651


} } } Gordon Vrololjak {gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU} 01/16/03 02:42PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello Everyone,
I came across a new problem with our Electroscan E3 ESEM, that I've not
been able to track down. At times, the image will become very noisy and
streaky with really bright streaks across the image making it near
impossible to focus. The problem goes away with time by venting and
repumping the chamber, or fiddling with the detector ESD hook wire - but
I'm not sure exactly what is causing it. Anyone ever seen this before?
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron
Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA
94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793





From daemon Fri Jan 17 07:23:11 2003



From: Oakley, Jeff :      oakleyj-at-rayovac.com
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 07:50:35 -0600
Subject: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Gordon,
Sounds like a dirty hi-vac gauge - Cold Cathode, Penning, etc.. Follow
the tips on the List Server lately about cleaning Discharge gauges.

Gary M. Easton, Pres.
Scanners Corporation
SEM Service/EDS/Digital Imaging Products
410-857-7633

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gordon Vrololjak" {gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 2:42 PM


This same phenomenon happens with my reports in Microsoft Word. In addition to images darkening, they sometimes shift to other pages and/or change size and dimension. Adding tables and text boxes to the report adds to the fun.

The software that we use is networked. Our IS department has told us that the networked software has a bug that causes these things to happen when file sizes increase, and that there is not a patch for it. So we have just have to deal with it.

Jeff Oakley


-----Original Message-----
} From: Corazon D. Bucana [mailto:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 11:11 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90 Mb)
was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased brightness
of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
something I should have done to prevent this?

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.

Cora Bucana




From daemon Fri Jan 17 09:53:01 2003



From: David A. Wark :      warkd-at-rpi.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 10:46:10 -0500
Subject: electron microprobe - cup vs absorbed current

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Probists:

In principle, the beam current measured on the CUP should be the same
as the current measured using a faraday cup on the sample holder (the
"ABS" or absorbed current). Also, as one increases the beam current,
the ratio between the two (ABS/CUP), which should be close to one,
should not change. At least that's what we thought.

When we did a very simple and quick test, we found that at low
currents ( {1 na) the ABS current was slightly (a few percent) lower
than the CUP current. Then, as we increased current and compared the
two, the ratio ABS/CUP increased to a value of one at a few na, then
went above one (to about 1.02) with increasing current. In other
words, the ratio wasn't always one, and wasn't constant - it varied
systematically, increasing several percent over a change in current
from {1 to a few hundred na.

This only becomes a problem if the analyst calibrates at one current
and analyzes at another (which we sometimes do for reasons I won't go
into) and if it is the CUP current that is causing this variation
(which we are convinced it is). So we're trying to sort it out.

I'm looking for others on microprobes to run the same test: simply
put a good faraday cup on your sample holder (you can make one with
an old objective aperture mounted on top of a larger hole drilled
part way into brass), then at different currents, measure the ratio
of ABS/CUP. Then plot them versus CUP.

Please send results as an Excel file (if possible) directly to me (so
as not to bore the rest of the list population), and I'll compile
results to share with everyone later.

If you run this test, please let me know what sort of machine you are
using (we have a 15-yr old JEOL 733).

In advance, thanks,

Dave
--
_________________________________________________
David A. Wark
Dept of Earth & Environmental Sciences
1C16 Science Center; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, New York 12180
office: 518-276-2674 fax: 518-276-6680
http://www.rpi.edu/~warkd/wark.html


From daemon Fri Jan 17 14:20:06 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 14:04:36 -0600
Subject: Re: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter - SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Mr Coetzee,

Have you tried Focussed Ion Beam (FIB)? I didn't take the time to look up
the Tg of polysulfone but would expect it to be rather high. FIB has been
shown useful in such samples for preparing sections or flat faces for TEM
and SEM.

Good luck,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"Coetzee, Mr S. H
Physics Science" To: "Listserver Microscopy (E-mail)"
{COETZEES-at-mopipi.u {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
b.bw} cc:
Subject: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane
microdialysis filter - SEM
01/17/03 03:57 AM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear All

Compliments for the season to all. And for all TEM fans " May all darkness
be filled with stable clear reproducible publishable results!"
We are if full swing here in Gaborone hiding from the scorching 42 degree
Celsius heat in the cold EM lab battling with all the weird and wonderful
samples frown at us a "quick and easy to do"

Please give help in getting a cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane
microdialysis filter to reveal the structure for SEM investigation. We
would not like to embed the filter. All sectioning with blades, scalpels
and under LN did not result in the expected crisp clean filter surface.
Fracture mess and badly smeared surfaces is all we get!

Thanks in advance.


Mr S. H. Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Botswana
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
Botswana

Phone : +267 355 2462/5222
Mobile : +267 718 96 729
Fax : +267 585 097
e-mail : coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw









From daemon Fri Jan 17 15:45:46 2003



From: Tamara Howard :      thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 14:36:25 -0700 (MST)
Subject: LM: freezing tissue - method?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm sort of conducting a survey - how do you freeze blocks prior to
cryostat sectioning? A PI in our department is writing a grant and offered
to include a freezing set-up (we just use a dewar of LN2 now) - the only
equipment I've come across on the web is the giant NesLab bath. Is a
styrofoam cooler of LN2 with a beaker of some solvent still a reasonable
way to go, or is there some spiffy gizmo we can buy?

Thanks! (Sorry about the cross-post for those of you on both lists)

Tamara

|--------------------------------------------------|
Tamara Howard
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology
University of New Mexico - Health Sciences Center
Albuquerque, NM 87131
thoward-at-unm.edu
|--------------------------------------------------|



From daemon Fri Jan 17 16:14:09 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 17:07:50 -0500
Subject: Microwave Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Biologists,

A Microwave Specimen Preparation Workshop sponsored by the Life Science
Microscopy Facility in conjunction with Ted Pella, Inc. will be held at
Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN) on March 20-22, 2003. The workshop
will be conducted by Mr. Rick Giberson and will be structured as follows:

Thursday, March 20: Introduction to microwave preparation theory.
Preparation of samples
Friday, March 21: Use of the microwave for Immunocytochemical localization
for LM & EM - theory.... practical for TEM
Saturday, March 22: Evaluating samples, discussion of decalcification, and
other potential uses for scientific microwave ovens.

The course will be limited to 10 hands-on participants. Course emphasis may
change depending on participant's requests.

The cost for the workshop will be $350. This fee includes registration and
meals (3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, 2 dinners). Participants will be
responsible for their transportation and lodging.

Please contact us if you would like additional information or a registration
form.

Thanks,
Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Fri Jan 17 16:17:31 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 17:09:43 -0500
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: How to View Muscles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Leslie,
I you were going to use the taenia coli from a mouse, then you
should consider confocal laser scanning microscopy with an inverted LM.
Perhaps the same would be true if you stripped the muscularis from the mouse
esophagus proximal to the oral cavity. In the former you would get only
smooth muscle and in the latter a transition from skeletal to smooth(I think
that's true for the mouse, though I have no sections by which to check.)
The simplest, multi-cellular 'smooth muscle-like' multicellular
contractile system in the mammal that I have found is the so-called myoid
(or peritubular) layer on the surface of the seminiferous tubule. It is
aneural, thus its contractions are myogenic with potential contributions
from neighbors since they are coordinated and produce a traveling wave that
can be easily seen with a LM. Finally, it responds strongly to oxytocin and
related octapeptides (how many amino acids?) which often leads, in a Petrie
dish, to contractual extrusion of tubular contents leaving the empty
peritubular cylinder. We used Hank's MEM as a medium as well as PBS, and
we did simple things like varying the temp to demonstrate the effect of T on
contraction rates, etc. With an isolated seminiferous tubule from a rat
(they're easier to extract than those in a mouse testis), you could run some
patch-clamp type electrophysiology and couple that with caged-fluorescence.
Simple but sophisticated, non-neural, monolayer myo-cellular system from
which you can visualize intracellular fluorescence while you are treating
the cylinder as a wire!

If you use {seminiferous tubule contractility} as a search string on PubMed
you should find plenty of information to demonstrate how far behind I am in
the literature of the subject.

Hope this helps and good luck,

Fred Monson
Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.


-----Original Message-----
} From: gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu [mailto:gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 8:00 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Thursday,
January 16, 2003 at 10:28:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: gtg187h-at-mail.gatech.edu
Name: Leslie Smith

Organization: Georgia Instituite of Technology

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

Question: My BioMedical Engineeering class is working ona problem
dealing with Electonic Muscle Stimulation. we were wonderng what
types of microscopy would be best for viewing muscles. Thanks so much
Leslie Smith

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Fri Jan 17 17:05:09 2003



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-facstaff.wisc.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 16:56:13 -0600
Subject: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers,

I've been digging through the archives looking at printer comments,
and find no mention of the new (?) Epson 2200 inkjet. Has anyone used
or tested the print quality of this printer? Especially as regards
print resolution?

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From daemon Fri Jan 17 21:15:50 2003



From: Chris Edwards :      fishon-at-umich.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2003 21:06:49 -0600
Subject: Sony DKC 5000 plug-in

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Where can I get the Photoshop plug-in for our Sony DKC 5000 "Catseye"
digital camera? It got lost while the computer was upgraded. Thanks.

Chris A. Edwards, Mgr.
Microscopy and Image-analysis Laboratory
Dept. Cell & Developmental Biology
The University of Michigan, School of Medicine
4747 Medical Sciences II Bldg.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0616
Office: 734-936-4912
Lab: 734-763-1170
FAX: 734-763-1166


From daemon Sat Jan 18 07:46:03 2003



From: Milligust-at-Millipore.com
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 08:35:43 -0500
Subject: NAV detected a virus in a document you authored.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Please contact your system administrator.


The scanned document was QUARANTINED.


Virus Information:
The attachment second).scr contained the virus W32.Klez.H-at-mm and could NOT
be repaired.




From daemon Sat Jan 18 08:58:22 2003



From: keithi-at-svusd.k12.ca.us (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 08:51:05 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (keithi-at-svusd.k12.ca.us) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
January 18, 2003 at 01:25:37
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: keithi-at-svusd.k12.ca.us
Name: Ian Keith

Organization: La Paz Intermediate School

Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School

Location: Mission Viejo CA US

Question: I am trying to find black and white drawings of some of the
most common protozoans found in pond water. I have identified several
single and multicellular organisms but I don't know what they are. I
would like to make a guide that shows these protozoans so my students
can properly identify them. Do you know where I can find such an
item??

Thanks

Ian Keith
La Paz Science

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sat Jan 18 09:29:07 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 11:51:13 -0330
Subject: RE: electron microprobe - cup vs absorbed current

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


David A. Wark writes ...

} In principle, the beam current measured on the CUP should be the same
} as the current measured using a faraday cup on the sample holder (the
} "ABS" or absorbed current). Also, as one increases the beam current,
} the ratio between the two (ABS/CUP), which should be close to one,
} should not change. At least that's what we thought.
}
} When we did a very simple and quick test, we found that at low
} currents ( {1 na) the ABS current was slightly (a few percent) lower
} than the CUP current. Then, as we increased current and compared the
} two, the ratio ABS/CUP increased to a value of one at a few na, then
} went above one (to about 1.02) with increasing current. In other
} words, the ratio wasn't always one, and wasn't constant - it varied
} systematically, increasing several percent over a change in current
} from {1 to a few hundred na.

Are both of these methods using the identical circuitry and picoAmp meter.
I daresay not, and small differences could be due to some impedance or
resistance differences(?) In any case, conclusions from such a study would
be dependent these factors and the variety between manufacturers.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)





From daemon Sat Jan 18 09:29:09 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 11:51:34 -0330
Subject: RE: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Philip writes ...

} I've been digging through the archives looking at printer comments,
} and find no mention of the new (?) Epson 2200 inkjet. Has anyone used
} or tested the print quality of this printer? Especially as regards
} print resolution?

Relative to my experience with an Epson 1280, I believe you'll find the
printer's resolution everything you require. However, there will probably
be gray neutrality issues because it will print grayscale with the colored
inks (if you choose "black ink only", the resolution will be worse by an
approximate factor of 4). The only other issue will probably be speed
(altho this printer is probably faster than my 1280).

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From daemon Sat Jan 18 13:04:44 2003



From: Jim Buckman :      Jim.Buckman-at-pet.hw.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 18:57:00 -0000
Subject: EDX system wanted

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm lookiing to get a couple of complete EDX / EDS systems suitable for an
old Cambridge Instruments S-250 Mk III, and an Electroscan 2020 ESEM. Does
anyone have such , or know of someone who does, and would be willing to
donate to me??? Would of course pay for package and shipping, or if in the
UK can collect. Anything considered,

Cheers,

Jim


Jim Buckman
Pet Eng
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh
Scotland


From daemon Sat Jan 18 13:11:29 2003



From: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor :      MMalecki-at-wisc.edu (by way
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 13:05:29 -0600
Subject: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can you also share your comments on the highest-resolution
dye-sublimation printers?
In particular competition to Codonics (so far unmatched).
Vendors welcome !


At 04:56 PM 1/17/03 -0600 Friday, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


From daemon Sat Jan 18 13:12:23 2003



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 14:05:11 -0500
Subject: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter -

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


And here in Ottawa, Canada, we have a non-scorching -30C at the moment, so
maybe if we could average things out, we'd both be better off!

A key question, is the filter large enough to cut off a piece a few mm in
cross-section and a cm or so in length? If so, then microtomy (diamond
knife sectioning, found perhaps in Biology or the medical school or a major
hospital) could do you just fine. If large enough, but smearing when
sectioned at room temperature (hopefully less than 42C!), you would require
what is called cryoultramicrotomy, ie a microtome outfitted with a liquid
nitrogen attachment to cool the specimen and render it more brittle, hence
easier to section smoothly. As to Gary Gaugler's suggestion of using FIB, I
agree that is probably the best solution, but I suspect that, at several
hundred $k US, there are not too many FIBs in Botswana.

Tom

Dr. Tom Malis
Scientist Advisor / Conseiller Scientifique
CANMET-Mineral Technology Branch / Direction de la technologie minerale
Natural Resources Canada / Ressources naturelles Canada
555 Booth St. / 555 rue Booth, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1
Tel.: (613) 995-7358 FAX: (613) 947-6606
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca



-----Original Message-----
} From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science
To: Listserver Microscopy (E-mail)
Sent: 1/17/2003 4:57 AM


Dear All

Compliments for the season to all. And for all TEM fans " May all
darkness
be filled with stable clear reproducible publishable results!"
We are if full swing here in Gaborone hiding from the scorching 42
degree
Celsius heat in the cold EM lab battling with all the weird and
wonderful
samples frown at us a "quick and easy to do"

Please give help in getting a cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane
microdialysis filter to reveal the structure for SEM investigation. We
would not like to embed the filter. All sectioning with blades,
scalpels
and under LN did not result in the expected crisp clean filter surface.
Fracture mess and badly smeared surfaces is all we get!

Thanks in advance.


Mr S. H. Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Botswana
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
Botswana

Phone : +267 355 2462/5222
Mobile : +267 718 96 729
Fax : +267 585 097
e-mail : coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw




From daemon Sat Jan 18 14:38:52 2003



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 15:25:16 -0500
Subject: May all your vacuum leaks be small ones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I don't know, Wil. Sounds like a curse to me (you know, "May you get
what you wish for."). I think I'd prefer one big leak to 50 small
leaks. Same net effect vacuum-wise, but usually easier to find and fix ;-)

Ken Converse
owner Quality Images
Third party SEM service
Delta, PA




From daemon Sat Jan 18 16:59:30 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 16:47:39 -0600
Subject: Reynold's Pb Citrate - pH?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have always made my Reynold's lead citrate using what I believe is the
standard method (see below) and never tested the pH. Recently I checked it
and it was just over 13. Some sources say it should be 12 +/- 0.1. What's
the consensus - do people check? How do you adjust it if you find it is
high - restart and use less NaOH? Thanks, Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Sat Jan 18 17:58:57 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 15:59:28 -0800
Subject: RE: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


True about the cost of a FIB. But there are probably
places that would be suitable for outsourcing at
a few hundred dollars. They are all over the place
here in California.

gary g.




At 11:05 AM 1/18/2003, you wrote:

} And here in Ottawa, Canada, we have a non-scorching -30C at the moment, so
} maybe if we could average things out, we'd both be better off!
}
} A key question, is the filter large enough to cut off a piece a few mm in
} cross-section and a cm or so in length? If so, then microtomy (diamond
} knife sectioning, found perhaps in Biology or the medical school or a major
} hospital) could do you just fine. If large enough, but smearing when
} sectioned at room temperature (hopefully less than 42C!), you would require
} what is called cryoultramicrotomy, ie a microtome outfitted with a liquid
} nitrogen attachment to cool the specimen and render it more brittle, hence
} easier to section smoothly. As to Gary Gaugler's suggestion of using FIB, I
} agree that is probably the best solution, but I suspect that, at several
} hundred $k US, there are not too many FIBs in Botswana.
}
} Tom
}
} Dr. Tom Malis
} Scientist Advisor / Conseiller Scientifique
} CANMET-Mineral Technology Branch / Direction de la technologie minerale
} Natural Resources Canada / Ressources naturelles Canada
} 555 Booth St. / 555 rue Booth, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G1
} Tel.: (613) 995-7358 FAX: (613) 947-6606
} malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science
} To: Listserver Microscopy (E-mail)
} Sent: 1/17/2003 4:57 AM
} Subject: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter -
} SEM
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Sat Jan 18 21:01:44 2003



From: ncontiSFSU-at-netscape.net (Nelson Conti)
Date: Sat, 18 Jan 2003 21:51:42 -0500
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


keithi-at-svusd.k12.ca.us (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist) wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Good luck,
Nelson Conti

164 Ferne Court
Palo Alto, CA 94306
Email: [ncontiSFSU-at-netscape.net]


__________________________________________________________________
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Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Mail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com/


From daemon Sun Jan 19 10:39:56 2003



From: yimin yao :      yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 17:26:18 +0100
Subject: Cross section for carbon nanotube film on Si

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

I am going to make cross section sample of the interface between carbon
nanotube film (a few hundred micrometer thick) and Si substrate for TEM. I
tried the standard method to make cross section (gluing the samples with
M-bond, mechanical polishing and ion milling), but the film turned to be
peeled off from substrate during polishing or ion milling, due to the large
thickness of film and weak bonding between the film and substrate. Any ideas
and suggestions from your experience?

Best regards,

Yiming
------------------------------------
Dr. Yiming Yao

Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Experimental Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-41296, Göteborg
Sweden

Tel: +46 31 772 3633
Fax: +46 31 772 3224
email: yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
website: http://fy.chalmers.se/~yimin

-------------------------------------



From daemon Sun Jan 19 12:58:46 2003



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 10:47:53 -0800
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Email: keithi-at-svusd.k12.ca.us
} Name: Ian Keith
}
} Organization: La Paz Intermediate School
}
} Education: 6-8th Grade Middle School
}
} Location: Mission Viejo CA US
}
} Question: I am trying to find black and white drawings of some of the
} most common protozoans found in pond water. I have identified several
} single and multicellular organisms but I don't know what they are. I
} would like to make a guide that shows these protozoans so my students
} can properly identify them. Do you know where I can find such an
} item??
}
} Thanks
}
} Ian -

"How to know the protozoa" is a classic; you should be able to locate a
cheap copy on the web. It won't, of course, help with "multicellular
organisms". But I'd really like you to get two books that are listed in
the Project MICRO bibliography (URL below):
----------------------------
Loewer, P. 1996 Pond Water Zoo 90pp, 7x9", hardback, $16.00. ISBN
0-689-31736-0 Athenium Books for Young Readers, Simon & Schuster. Out of
print; try a used book dealer.
This is a well-written natural history of commonly encountered pond
life, from monera to micro-arthropods. The illustrations are excellent
black and white drawings, and it's written for young readers without being
simplistic. Middle school.

Rainis, K.G. and Russell, B.J. 1996 Guide to Microlife 287pp, 5.5x8.5",
paperback, $40.00. ISBN 0-531-11266-7 Franklin Watts, Danbury, CT.
The price of this book is both unfortunate and understandable.
Unfortunate, because it should be in the library of every class that
studies the microlife of our environment; understandable, because almost
every page has one or more excellent color light micrographs. It's a
comprehensive field guide to the microworld. The authors say that the 115
microorganisms described comprise 75-90% of those that may be encountered
in the "wild". The habitats described are diverse: the home, soils, plants
and debris, and four aquatic environments, with detailed advice on
collecting methods for each. Described organisms are equally diverse,
ranging from monerans to millimeter-sized arthropods. Species descriptions
include ecological information, advice on collection and culture, and
frequent suggestions for further investigation. Middle school - adult.
RECOMMENDED
----------------------
If you'd like to share your completed guide with MICRO (a pdf would be
nice), contact me any time.

Caroline


Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Sun Jan 19 13:54:56 2003



From: paul r hazelton, PhD :      Paul_Hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2003 13:51:20 -0600
Subject: Re: Reynold's Pb Citrate - pH?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


personally i prefer the venable's modification. as for pH, the
alkalinity is what makes it go into solution and keeps CO3 precipitates
down. but i never check it.

paul



From daemon Sun Jan 19 16:25:11 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 11:09:50 +1300
Subject: Used EPMA wanted

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Happy New Year

I seem to recall that there is a company which refurbishes ARL EPMAs and sells
them.

Am I remembering right?

Who is it?

cheers

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Sun Jan 19 19:06:38 2003



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 11:59:54 +1100
Subject: Re: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The 2200, and its overseas equivalent, the 2100, is a newish (2002 some
time) Epson printer with 5 coloured inks and 2 shades of black. I imagine
it will be at least equivalent to the 1290/1280 in resolution, etc. Have
just been looking into getting a new printer and think this is the one
we'll go for.
cheers,
Rosemary

} }
} } Listers,
} }
} } I've been digging through the archives looking at printer comments,
} } and find no mention of the new (?) Epson 2200 inkjet. Has anyone
} } used or tested the print quality of this printer? Especially as
} } regards print resolution?
} }
} } Phil
} } --
} } Philip Oshel
} } Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
} } Department of Animal Sciences
} } University of Wisconsin
} } 1675 Observatory Drive
} } Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
} } voice: (608) 263-4162
} } fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From daemon Mon Jan 20 07:08:29 2003



From: Krzysztof Herman :      kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 13:57:06 +0100
Subject: electropolisher..

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi list

Can You help with some prooven instruments/vendors offering TEM preparation
technique as Jet electropolishing (similar like Fischione).
Also appreciate Yr opinion about use of it and reliability of different
models.

regards

Krzysztof Herman
================================
LABSOFT / FEI Service
ul.Ba¿ancia 45A, 02-892 Warszawa
tel/fax: (0 - 22) 6449753, 6449750
kom: (0- 601) 307456
E-mail: kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
================================



From daemon Mon Jan 20 07:28:42 2003



From: David_Bell-at-millipore.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 08:18:44 -0500
Subject: Re: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter - SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello!

Here at Millipore, we take cross sectional images of Polysulfone and
Polyethersulfone just about every day. The key to getting a good freeze
fracture in LN2 is to make sure the membrane is wet first. Here is the
procedure we use:

Setup:
Piece of membrane
1 or 2 pair(s) of forceps
1 weighing tin with Isopropyl Alcohol (just enough to cover the
bottom of the tin)
1 weighing tin with DI or RO water (just enough to cover the
bottom of the tin)
1 Styrofoam coffee cup trimmed down to make it about 2-3 inches
high (5-8cm)
LN2
Paper towel
single edge razor blade

1. Cut a 5mm by 2cm portion of membrane from the sample.
2. Submerge membrane in Isopropyl Alcohol for approximately 1 minute to
make sure the membrane is fully wet with IPA.
3. Submerge the sample in water. During this step, the sample will want
to "jump around" in the water, so it may be necessary to hold it under the
water with the forceps. I also find that dipping it repeatedly back in
the IPA then back in the water helps with the exchange. Remember, there
is TONS of surface area we're dealing with!
4. Once the piece of membrane appears to wet out with the water, pat the
surfaces dry with a paper towel. Make sure to remove water from the
forceps as well.
5. Grasp the sample around one third of the way up with the forceps and
submerge into LN2 until the membrane and forceps are chilled. (the major
bubbling around the forceps will stop. This takes about 10-20 seconds)
6. On this step, timing is key. With the forceps in your right hand,
bring the index finger of your left hand close to the top of the cup. As
soon as you remove the membrane from the LN2, apply pressure to the top of
the strip of membrane with your left index finger until the sample
fractures. This will yield the cleanest fracture.
7. You can now trim the fractured surface from the rest of the strip to
about 1mm and mount it on the stub. Two-sided carbon tape works best for
this.

Alternate fracture method: If you find the "finger" method to not work
well for you, you can use 2 pairs of forceps to hold the strip in the LN2.
When it is all frozen and still in the LN2, pull one pair of forceps
towards you, and one away from you with a bit of a snap, and the membrane
should break. The caveat with this method is that there is less control
of where the break will occur, and sometimes it will break at the edge of
the forceps, resulting in some smearing of the exposed surface.

I hope this is helpful to you, and provides an inexpensive way for you to
achieve your desired results. If you would like to contact me further
regarding this procedure, please feel free to do so!

Sincerely,


David Bell
Scientist
Electron Microscopy Lab
Millipore Corporation
80 Ashby Road
Bedford, MA 01730
(781) 533-2108






"Coetzee, Mr S. H Physics Science" {COETZEES-at-mopipi.ub.bw}
01/17/2003 04:57 AM


To: "Listserver Microscopy (E-mail)" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:
Subject: Cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane microdialysis filter - SEM

------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Dear All

Compliments for the season to all. And for all TEM fans " May all
darkness
be filled with stable clear reproducible publishable results!"
We are if full swing here in Gaborone hiding from the scorching 42 degree
Celsius heat in the cold EM lab battling with all the weird and wonderful
samples frown at us a "quick and easy to do"

Please give help in getting a cross section of Poly polysulfone membrane
microdialysis filter to reveal the structure for SEM investigation. We
would not like to embed the filter. All sectioning with blades, scalpels
and under LN did not result in the expected crisp clean filter surface.
Fracture mess and badly smeared surfaces is all we get!

Thanks in advance.


Mr S. H. Coetzee
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Botswana
Private Bag 0022
Gaborone
Botswana

Phone : +267 355 2462/5222
Mobile : +267 718 96 729
Fax : +267 585 097
e-mail : coetzees-at-mopipi.ub.bw








From daemon Mon Jan 20 08:07:15 2003



From: Jeffrey Roth :      rothj-at-dickinson.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 08:56:48 -0500
Subject: mounting standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to mount a standard for SEM calibration, and was wondering
what the best method was to do so? It appears my predesessor simply
'glued' the standard to a metal plate that was inserted into the sample
holder. But it seems to me that I should use some sort of conductive
adhesive? Thanks,

Jeff Roth

--
==================================================
Jeffrey Roth Science Technician
James Center 205 phone: 717.245.1109
Department of Geology cell: 717.579.0644
Dickinson College fax: 717.245.1971
Carlisle, PA 17013 email: rothj-at-dickinson.edu
==================================================





From daemon Mon Jan 20 08:38:06 2003



From: FRIEDA CHRISTIE :      F.Christie-at-rbge.org.uk
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 14:29:56 -0000
Subject: Polyvinyl alcohol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Can anyone suggest a UK supplier of Polyvinyl Alcohol at 24-32
centipoise viscosity?

Thanks,


Frieda Christie,
Electron Microscopist,
Scientific & Technical Services,
Royal Botanic Garden,
20A Inverleith Row,
Edinburgh,
EH3 5LR

Tel: 0131 248 2817
Fax: 0131 248 2901


From daemon Mon Jan 20 09:40:13 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 09:30:47 -0600
Subject: presentation images

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Jeff,

I, too, have had significant problems working with images imported into
Microsoft Word. However, my software is located on the PC hard drive. The
biggest problem that I have encountered with images in Microsoft Word
occurs when annotating images. After the image is imported into Word,
annotation may be done in two ways (to my knowledge): (1) Text, arrows,
etc. may be simply superimposed over the images. The problem with this
approach is that the annotations are not linked to the image and may not
remain superimposed on the image if the image moves. (2) Annotations can
also be linked (probably not the best choice of words) to the image by
double-clicking on the image to open the image field, adding the
annotation, then closing the image field. These annotations are permanent
unless intentionally moved or deleted.

The problems occur when one implements the second option. Comparing images
before and after annotation, I found that the annotated images often
sustained substantial changes in gray or color levels. Case in point, EDS
maps were so badly affected that the color key was no longer correct.

My solutions follow: (1) Annotate images in Adobe Photoshop before
importing into Word. Note that the effects of lossy compression on
annotations (blurred edges) may be pronounced. (2) Use Microsoft PowerPoint
for image presentation. I have encountered no problems with image files in
PowerPoint.

Good luck to you in your endeavors.

Cheers,

"The opinions expressed are those of Gary M. Brown and do not represent the
opinions of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"Oakley, Jeff"
{oakleyj-at-rayovac.c To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
om} cc:
Subject: RE: presentation images

01/17/03 07:50 AM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


This same phenomenon happens with my reports in Microsoft Word. In
addition to images darkening, they sometimes shift to other pages and/or
change size and dimension. Adding tables and text boxes to the report adds
to the fun.

The software that we use is networked. Our IS department has told us that
the networked software has a bug that causes these things to happen when
file sizes increase, and that there is not a patch for it. So we have just
have to deal with it.

Jeff Oakley


-----Original Message-----
} From: Corazon D. Bucana [mailto:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 11:11 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90 Mb)

was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
by 3- 4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased brightness

of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
something I should have done to prevent this?

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.

Cora Bucana









From daemon Mon Jan 20 12:20:34 2003



From: Lizette Tuason :      tuasonm-at-unbc.ca
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 10:08:53 -0800
Subject: flocs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all! The Limnology people here gave me bottles of riverine water
samples + flocs. They would like SEM images of their natural riverine
flocs. Do you have suggestions on how to process these floc samples?
We're interested in looking at the overall floc morphology and microbial
cells as well. We're also interested in looking at their inorganic
matter composition.

Thanks.

Lizette Tuason
Univ. of Northern British Columbia
3333 University Way
Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9
Canada
Phone (250) 960-5677



From daemon Mon Jan 20 12:39:45 2003



From: Jeff Roth :      rothj-at-dickinson.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 13:31:12 -0500
Subject: SEM mounting standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I would like to mount a standard for SEM calibration, and was wondering
what the best method was to do so? It appears my predesessor simply
'glued' the standard to a specialized metal plate that was inserted into
the sample holder. But it seems to me that I should use some sort of
conductive adhesive? Thanks,

Jeff Roth

========================
Jeffrey Roth
Science Technician
Department of Geology
Dickinson College
Carlisle, PA 17013
rothj-at-dickinson.edu
========================



From daemon Mon Jan 20 13:12:37 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 11:12:24 -0800
Subject: Re: mounting standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If you purchase a Geller MRS standard, they
can be pre-mounted according to your stage's
needs. These standards are for magnification
and resolution cal. Mostly mag. These standards
can be purchased with ISO/NIST certification.
Other standards from Pella, SPI, et. al. are
usually not mounted. But I suspect that you
could get them mounted. There are spheres,
Gold on Tin and Tin balls. These are good
for checking stig and rez. Baseline at
purchase and re-check periodically to see
if rez or stig has shifted appreciably. Then
check apertures and/or column liner.

If you buy standards, I'd recommend storing
them under vacuum when not being used.

gary g.


At 05:56 AM 1/20/2003, you wrote:

} I would like to mount a standard for SEM calibration, and was wondering
} what the best method was to do so? It appears my predesessor simply
} 'glued' the standard to a metal plate that was inserted into the sample
} holder. But it seems to me that I should use some sort of conductive
} adhesive? Thanks,
}
} Jeff Roth
}
} --
} ==================================================
} Jeffrey Roth Science Technician
} James Center 205 phone: 717.245.1109
} Department of Geology cell: 717.579.0644
} Dickinson College fax: 717.245.1971
} Carlisle, PA 17013 email: rothj-at-dickinson.edu
} ==================================================
}
}
}



From daemon Mon Jan 20 13:26:48 2003



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 11:16:50 -0800
Subject: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re:

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The Fuji Pictrograph 3500 blows away the Codonics and costs less,
although we have had two blown circuit boards in ours.

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor [mailto:MMalecki-at-wisc.edu]
Sent: Saturday, January 18, 2003 11:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Can you also share your comments on the highest-resolution
dye-sublimation printers?
In particular competition to Codonics (so far unmatched).
Vendors welcome !


At 04:56 PM 1/17/03 -0600 Friday, you wrote:
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
-
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America

From daemon Mon Jan 20 14:32:18 2003



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 14:20:15 -0600
Subject: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately sized
light microscope slide labels.

ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.

As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
label tediously on a typewriter.

I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide labels
that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
typewriter.

I have found for micrographs and negative envelopes, that a combination of
Microsoft Word mail merged with an appropriate Excel data base does a nice
job using Avery 5160 address labels, but unfortunately, I haven't as yet
been able to find a properly sized label for microscope slides, or even one
that I could cut nicely. :-(

I was just wondering how other people tackled this problem. Do you all do
it the tedious way too? Here is a marketing opportunity for some ambitious
person who wants to make quick money, by solving a problem in the workplace.


From daemon Mon Jan 20 14:47:15 2003



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 12:39:36 -0800
Subject: Re: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re: printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,
Did you mean the "Fuji Pictrography 3500"?
http://www.electroimage.com/fp3k.htm
-Mike

"Mardinly, John" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} The Fuji Pictrograph 3500 blows away the Codonics and costs less,
} although we have had two blown circuit boards in ours.
}
} John Mardinly
} Intel
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor [mailto:MMalecki-at-wisc.edu]
} Sent: Saturday, January 18, 2003 11:05 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re:
} printer hunt
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Can you also share your comments on the highest-resolution
} dye-sublimation printers?
} In particular competition to Codonics (so far unmatched).
} Vendors welcome !
}
} At 04:56 PM 1/17/03 -0600 Friday, you wrote:
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------



From daemon Mon Jan 20 15:26:44 2003



From: Michael Nesson :      nessonm-at-onid.orst.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 13:15:56 -0800
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Michael Nesson wrote:

} Nelson Conti wrote:
}
} } Dear Ian:
} } One guide that I am aware of is titled "The Illustrated Guide to the Protozoa" published by the Society of Protozoologists (URL:http://www.uga.protozoa.edu) (pretty sure). I am a member of that Society which is how I know about such a guide. I have no idea how much such a guide would cost, but perhaps if you tried their site, there should be information about the guide I've suggested.
}
} The correct URL is www.uga.edu/~protozoa .
}
} } ______________________________________________________________________
}
} Michael Nesson, Ph.D. Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics
} 2011 Ag&LS, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7305
} (541)737-5245 FAX:(541)737-0481 nessonm-at-onid.orst.edu

--
_______________________________________________________________________
Michael Nesson, Ph.D. Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics
2011 Ag&LS, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-7305
(541)737-5245 FAX:(541)737-0481 nessonm-at-onid.orst.edu




From daemon Mon Jan 20 17:30:41 2003



From: Hayes, Fred :      Fred.Hayes-at-colaik.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 23:48:50 -0000
Subject: help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes.
John Mardinly
Phone: 408-765-2346
Pager: 877-277-1182

-----Original Message-----
} From: Michael O'Keefe [mailto:MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov]
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 12:40 PM
To: Mardinly, John
Cc: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor;
Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Help Listservers,

I need to explain, justify, etc., to colleagues (who have no
microscopy/microtomy experience or background) reasons why you should
isloate TEM rooms from SEM rooms from microtome rooms? In other words, why
you should avoid putting a TEM, an SEM and a cryoultramicrotome all in the
same room. Thanks

Fred A. Hayes
Analyst
Polymer Microscopy
Collins and Aikman
IntelliMold Systems
4651 Platt Lane
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734-477-7029 direct
734-477-9214 fax
734-477-9212 office
www.IntelliMold.net
www.collinsaikman.com
fred.hayes-at-colaik.com



From daemon Mon Jan 20 18:05:10 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 17:52:32 -0600
Subject: More on Pb Citrate and pH

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In my last posting about the pH of Reynold's lead citrate, I didn't give
the exact method we use. Here it is:

1.33 gm Pb(NO3)2
1.76 gm Na3 citrate -2H20
30 ml dH2O (all water used for this prep is freshly boiled and cooled to
get rid of CO2)
shake vigorously let stand 30 min
Add 8 ml of freshly made 1 N NaOH
dilute to 50 ml total volume.

Reynold's says the pH was "routinely found to be 12.0 +/- 0.1". The only
real difference between my method and Reynold's is that he used 1 N NaOH
prepared by diluting a commercial 10 N carbonate free stock. I make my
NaOH from pellets immediately before use. Assuming I accurately weigh it,
any error would presumably result from some water absorption by the pellets
so the error would be to decrease the NaOH concentration. But the pH we
get implies too much NaOH.

We got a pH of ~13.5 (with good quality pH paper - i don't want to use my
pH meter for this). We cut the volume of NaOH to 7 ml and got a pH of
~12.5 or slightly less (pH paper has 0.5 unit steps). Reynold's notes that
the staining intensity decreases with higher pH



My question remains - do people measure the pH of their Reynolds? do they
get 12? I assume you can't adjust the pH with HCl but I am open to
correction. I fully understand the concept of emphirecally testing it and
seeing the results. I am not sure if my results are the best and
furthermore, I would like to have a method that is consistent and that I
understand so I don't need to re-invent this wheel each time. I am aware
of the other lead formulations but am interested in people's experience
with Reynolds. I may switch but I think switching everytime a problem
comes up without attempting to understand the problem is poor
science. Thanks for any comments. Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Mon Jan 20 18:09:08 2003



From: Brenda Prenitzer :      bsp-at-adelphia.net (by way of
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 18:01:24 -0600
Subject: Proceedings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was wondering if anyone could help me with information about the
proceedings for the 1993 and 1994 (51st and 52nd, respectively) Annual MSA
Meetings. I am looking for the publishers for each of these years. Was it
San Francisco Press or Jones & Begell? Also, I am looking for the editors
for the 1993 year.

Thank you in advance,
Brenda Prenitzer

NanoSpective
9006 Eagle Cove Court
Orlando, FL 32825
407 497-7233


From daemon Mon Jan 20 18:43:17 2003



From: Ron L'Herault :      lherault-at-bu.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 19:30:11 -0500
Subject: SEM mounting standards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If the standard was coated after it was glued on, the coating may
provide sufficient conductive pathway. If it works, it was done OK. I
often mount things with Duco cement but use silver paint on edges to
make sure I have a good electrical connection after coating. A
conductive adhesive is another way to go, for sure.

Ron L

-----Original Message-----
} From: Jeff Roth [mailto:rothj-at-dickinson.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 1:31 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I would like to mount a standard for SEM calibration, and was wondering
what the best method was to do so? It appears my predesessor simply
'glued' the standard to a specialized metal plate that was inserted into

the sample holder. But it seems to me that I should use some sort of
conductive adhesive? Thanks,

Jeff Roth

========================
Jeffrey Roth
Science Technician
Department of Geology
Dickinson College
Carlisle, PA 17013
rothj-at-dickinson.edu
========================







From daemon Mon Jan 20 19:38:20 2003



From: Rosemary Walsh :      rw9-at-psu.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 20:26:10 -0800
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Ian,
In addition to numerous sites accessible via google, I've used earlier
versions of the following for many years and the current version is
available at amazon.com.

Pond Life: A Guide to Common Plants and Animals of North American Ponds and
Lakes (Golden Guide)
by George Kell Reid, Herbert S. Zim (Editor), George S. Fichter (Editor),
Jonathan P. Latimer, Karen Stray Nolting, John L. Brooks, Sally D. Kaicher
(Illustrator), Tom Dolan (Illustrator)
Paperback: 160 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.34 x 5.94 x 3.93
Publisher: St. Martin's Press; ; Revised and Updated edition (April 2001)
ISBN: 1582381305
$6.95
Rosemary




From daemon Mon Jan 20 19:50:07 2003



From: Brenda Prenitzer :      bsp-at-adelphia.net
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 20:41:10 -0500
Subject: MSA Proceedings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was wondering if anyone could help me with information about the
proceedings for the 1993 and 1994 (51st and 52nd, respectively) Annual MSA
Meetings. I am looking for the publishers for each of these years. Also,
I am looking for the editors for the 1993 year.

Thank you in advance,
Brenda Prenitzer

NanoSpective
9006 Eagle Cove Court
Orlando, FL 32825



From daemon Mon Jan 20 20:37:12 2003



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 18:28:51 -0800
Subject: electropolisher..

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Check out the Struers Tenupol. Expensive, but the Hasselblad of Jet electropolishing.
John Mardinly



-----Original Message-----
} From: Krzysztof Herman [mailto:kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl]
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 4:57 AM
To: MSA


Hi list

Can You help with some prooven instruments/vendors offering TEM preparation
technique as Jet electropolishing (similar like Fischione).
Also appreciate Yr opinion about use of it and reliability of different
models.

regards

Krzysztof Herman
================================
LABSOFT / FEI Service
ul.Ba¿ancia 45A, 02-892 Warszawa
tel/fax: (0 - 22) 6449753, 6449750
kom: (0- 601) 307456
E-mail: kherman-at-labsoft.com.pl
================================



From daemon Mon Jan 20 21:11:57 2003



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 21:53:50 -0500
Subject: TEM Specimen Prep Short Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A TEM Specimen Preparation Course Will be offered March 12-14, 2003 at the
Materials Characterization Facility at the University of Central Florida,
Orlando, FL USA

A review of all techniques will be given, with primary emphasis on tripod
polishing, ion milling, and all latest FIB techniques

Instructors:
Ron Anderson, Microscopy Today
Fred Stevie, NC State
Lucille Giannuzzi, UCF
Brian Kempshall, UCF

For more information contact Lucille Giannuzzi, lag-at-mail.ucf.edu

*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
University of Central Florida
4000 Central Florida Blvd.
PO Box 162450
Orlando, FL 32816-2450
email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone 407-823-5770 fax 407-823-0208
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Mon Jan 20 22:14:37 2003



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com (by way of
Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 22:06:09 -0600
Subject: Re: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rosemary,
The two shades of black are for use with different papers. One black for
ordinary papers, the other for glossy photo papers. You can get details on
the Epson web site.
Damian

} The 2200, and its overseas equivalent, the 2100, is a newish (2002 some
} time) Epson printer with 5 coloured inks and 2 shades of black. I imagine
} it will be at least equivalent to the 1290/1280 in resolution, etc. Have
} just been looking into getting a new printer and think this is the one
} we'll go for.
} cheers,
} Rosemary


From daemon Tue Jan 21 00:30:22 2003



From: Anaspec Luc Harmsen :      luc-at-anaspec.co.za
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 08:19:25 +0200
Subject: Looking for manuals and Eproms for JEOL 1200 TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi all
We have a client with an old JEOL 1200 TEM that was modified by the factory
to have two diffusion pumps as the vacuum system. We now have a problem that
the EPROMs that control the vacuum system have gone faulty and are have a
real challenge trying to get some replacements.
Also the manuals are all for systems with either an Ion pump or a Turbo pump
as a second pump for the gun and column. This means we are really having fun
trying to work out the logics.

Can anyone help us out with a set of EPROMS, the software for the EPROMS and
or manuals specific for the double diffusion pump version of the JEOL 1200?

Thanks

Luc Harmsen
ANASPEC South Africa www.anaspec.co.za
Tel: +27 11 794 8340
Fax: +27 11 794 8349
P.O. Box 2561
Honeydew 2040
Gauteng, South Africa






From daemon Tue Jan 21 03:13:49 2003



From: MICRO :      micro-at-formatex.org
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 10:03:50 +0100
Subject: Call for Microscopy Papers: APHYS-2003 Conference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Colleagues

This is to inform you that the Call for Abstracts for the forthcoming
International Meeting on Applied Physics (APHYS-2003), to be held in Badajoz
(Spain), during October 14-18th 2003, is now opened.

Website
www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm

Abstracts submission deadline: March 24th 2003

As you can see, Imaging Techniques and Applied Microscopy will have very
important weight in the scientific Program of APHYS-2003. Some of topics to
be covered will be:

- Surfaces, Interfaces and Colloids
- Imaging Techniques, Microscopy
- Nano-sciences and Technologies
- Materials Science
- Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials
Science&Engineering
- Computational Physics

In addition to the regular Scientific Program, several International
Workshops will be held as pre-conference events. The following two will be
of high interest for the Microscopy community:

1. Workshop on Modern Applied Microscopy in Molecular and Cell Biophysics
Research(please visit the website for details)

2. Pre-conference Workshop: International Interdisciplinar Workshop on
Bioengineered Non-crystalline Solids

For all the information regarding the conference, please visit
www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm


Potencial reviewers are kindly asked to write us with personal data,
field(s) of expertise and a list of publication. The official list of
reviewers will be also included in the conference publications.

Proceedings will be published within several international journals,
depending on each paper topic:

- Journal of Microscopy
- Journal of Non-crystalline Solids
- Applied Surface Science
- Physica Scripta

For issues regarding Commercial Exhibition and Sponsorship, please refer to
the Conference website or contact Ines Solo de Zaldivar
(secretariat-at-formatex.org )

Thank you in advance and please contact us for any suggestion or question.

Antonio Mendez-Vilas
APHYS-2003 Co-ordinator
secretariat-at-formatex.org
www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm



From daemon Tue Jan 21 07:03:23 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:23:25 -0330
Subject: RE: Polyvinyl alcohol

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Frieda writes ...

} Can anyone suggest a UK supplier of Polyvinyl Alcohol
} at 24-32 centipoise viscosity?

Another possibility is mixing PV-acetate with ethanol. I believe my
recipe is 20% by weight, which will lay down, dry and become a
heat-sensitive "glue" for relatively large samples. I'd make the mixture
10% for very small particles.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From daemon Tue Jan 21 07:12:03 2003



From: Edward Calomeni :      calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 08:04:08 -0500
Subject: Re: Reynold's Pb Citrate - pH?

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Morning Tom,

Yes, pH the stain to around 12 +/- 0.1 You do get erratic staining with a higher pH.

Best of Luck,

Ed


Edward Calomeni
Director EM Lab
Ohio State University - Pathology
M018 Starling Loving Hall
320 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210-1240
614-293-8806
calomeni-1-at-medctr.osu.edu

} } } Tom Phillips {phillipst-at-missouri.edu} 01/18/03 05:47PM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I have always made my Reynold's lead citrate using what I believe is the
standard method (see below) and never tested the pH. Recently I checked it
and it was just over 13. Some sources say it should be 12 +/- 0.1. What's
the consensus - do people check? How do you adjust it if you find it is
high - restart and use less NaOH? Thanks, Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu







From daemon Tue Jan 21 08:16:37 2003



From: Vladislav Speransky :      vlad-at-linus.niams.nih.gov
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:07:35 -0500
Subject: Re: More on Pb Citrate and pH

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Tom,

I am a happy user of commercial CO2-free, titrated NaOH. I buy mine
from Electron Microscopy Sciences [in which I have no commercial
interest, wish I had :)]. It is inexpensive, something like $10 a
bottle. This *is* the consistent method, as long as you keep using
the same water of course. When I was making Reynolds from pellets,
sometimes I would get stain that peppers easily and sometimes the
stain would come out too weak. I think NaOH stock is the key, once
you have good water.

Paper shows pH of my stain about 12. I never measured with pH meter
but I know there are electrodes which would allow you to do that, I
once asked an Orion tech. I do remember seeing in publications that
it is important that the pH be 12+/-0.1, and if I was running a
teaching lab, I would probably get a proper electrode and measure and
maybe experiment adjusting if the pH turned out different from
12+/-0.1. Here, however, I am content with the fact that my Reynolds
stains reproducibly well.

As for the other lead stain recipes, I often use the
Venable-Cogeshall [sp?] instead of Reynolds. It does not make as
"sweet" a picture 20k and above as Reynolds but does seem to give
more contrast. I use it for no more than 2 days, then make fresh the
next time (have pre-weighed LC aliquotes sitting in 15 ml Falcons and
just add water and NaOH when the time comes). Again, keeping the same
water and NaOH stock makes it highly consistent.

All the best,
Vlad

} In my last posting about the pH of Reynold's lead citrate, I didn't
} give the exact method we use. Here it is:
}
} 1.33 gm Pb(NO3)2
} 1.76 gm Na3 citrate -2H20
} 30 ml dH2O (all water used for this prep is freshly boiled and
} cooled to get rid of CO2)
} shake vigorously let stand 30 min
} Add 8 ml of freshly made 1 N NaOH
} dilute to 50 ml total volume.
}
} Reynold's says the pH was "routinely found to be 12.0 +/- 0.1". The
} only real difference between my method and Reynold's is that he used
} 1 N NaOH prepared by diluting a commercial 10 N carbonate free
} stock. I make my NaOH from pellets immediately before use.
} Assuming I accurately weigh it, any error would presumably result
} from some water absorption by the pellets so the error would be to
} decrease the NaOH concentration. But the pH we get implies too much
} NaOH.
}
} We got a pH of ~13.5 (with good quality pH paper - i don't want to
} use my pH meter for this). We cut the volume of NaOH to 7 ml and
} got a pH of ~12.5 or slightly less (pH paper has 0.5 unit steps).
} Reynold's notes that the staining intensity decreases with higher pH
}
}
}
} My question remains - do people measure the pH of their Reynolds?
} do they get 12? I assume you can't adjust the pH with HCl but I am
} open to correction. I fully understand the concept of emphirecally
} testing it and seeing the results. I am not sure if my results are
} the best and furthermore, I would like to have a method that is
} consistent and that I understand so I don't need to re-invent this
} wheel each time. I am aware of the other lead formulations but am
} interested in people's experience with Reynolds. I may switch but I
} think switching everytime a problem comes up without attempting to
} understand the problem is poor science. Thanks for any comments. Tom
}
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu


--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vladislav V. Speransky, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Structural Biology
NIAMS, National Institutes of Health
50 South Drive, Room 1504
Bethesda, MD 20892-8025
Phone: 301 496-3989
Fax: 301 480-7629
E-mail: Vladislav_Speransky-at-nih.gov


From daemon Tue Jan 21 08:56:11 2003



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:43:54 -0500
Subject: Re: help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Fred,
Get you hands on a copy of the book in the Glauert series :Design of
the Electron Microscope Laboratory (or something very close to that
name, I don't have it in from of me). I have found it of enormous
value, although it remains to be seen if I too will succeed in a
similar argument.
good luck,
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From daemon Tue Jan 21 09:05:14 2003



From: Matthew Libera :      mlibera-at-stevens-tech.edu (by way of
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 08:59:18 -0600
Subject: Post-Doctoral Research Associate Position Open

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Stevens Institute of Technology

There is a post-doctoral opportunity within the Department of Chemical,
Biochemical, and Materials Engineering at the Stevens Institute of
Technology to develop and apply advanced techniques of transmission
electron microscopy to quantitatively study the morphology of both dry
and hydrated synthetic and natural polymers.

The ideal candidate will have experience in electron optics, electron
energy-loss spectroscopy, and cryo-TEM. Acceptable candidates will at
least have: (1) experience with transmission electron microscopy, either

from a physical or biological sciences perspective; (2) a willingness to

develop a leadership role in problems associated with the nanoscale
morphology of hydrated polymeric biomaterials; and (3) good
communication skills.

This is an NIH-funded position associated with a new inter-institutional

NCRR on Polymeric Biomaterials. This NCRR is associated with the New
Jersey Center for Biomaterials and involves core laboratories at
Rutgers, NJIT, and Stevens. A multi-year appointment for this position
is anticipated.

The Stevens Institute of Technology is a small private university
concentrated on engineering, science, and technology management.
Stevens is located in very close proximity to New York City. The
Stevens electron-optics laboratory contains a Philips CM20 FEG TEM/STEM,

a Philips CM30 SuperTwin TEM, and a LEO 982 FEG SEM. The CM20 FEG
TEM/STEM is equipped with a Gatan Enfina ccd PEELS system and a Gatan
Multiscan digital camera. Both are interfaced to an Emispec Vision
acquisition and control system. The facility is fully equipped with
cryomicrotomy and cryo-transfer capabilities to deal with frozen
hydrated materials.

For further information please contact:

Professor Matthew R. Libera
Dept. Chemical, Biochemical, and Materials Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, New Jersey 07030
ph: 201-216-5259
fax: 201-216-8306
mlibera-at-stevens-tech.edu

http://www.mat.stevens-tech.edu/faculty/libera.html


From daemon Tue Jan 21 09:24:05 2003



From: Doug Cromey :      dcromey-at-email.arizona.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 08:13:00 -0700
Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Gary,

MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with images. A couple
of tricks I've discovered over the years.

1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly on the page, it
seems to give you much greater control over the location on the page. It
also makes it much easier to add text annotations that stay with the image.


If you don't want the text box to have a border you can remove it by selecting
the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the Draw toolbar,
then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like the text box to
be transparent, select the text box outline and look for the "paint bucket"
icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and select "none". If
you discover its hard to find the text box border once you made the edge
"invisible", first select the image with a single left click (it should have
the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the keyboard left or right
arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox outline (with black
bordered resizing "handles").

2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as opposed to copying
and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images are harder to work
with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP images into Word,
you don't have to use JPEG.

FYI: Last known, there was inexpensive software on the web that compressed
bloated Powerpoint files. I also have a freeware utility on my PC called
"packword" that compresses Word 97 and 2000 files. I'm sorry I don't have
the URLs, I'm writing this from home.

Best regards,
Doug



} -- Original Message --
} Date: Mon, 20 Jan 2003 09:30:47 -0600
} From: "gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word
} To: oakleyj-at-rayovac.com
} Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

}
} "Oakley, Jeff"

}
} {oakleyj-at-rayovac.c To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
}
} om} cc:

}
} Subject: RE: presentation
} images
}

}
} 01/17/03 07:50 AM

}
}

}
}

}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

..........................................................................
Douglas W. Cromey, M.S., Principal Research Specialist
Dept. of Cell Biology & Anatomy, University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85724-5044 USA
520-626-2824
{cromey-at-arizona.edu}
..........................................................................
http://swehsc.pharmacy.arizona.edu/exppath/
Home of: "Microscopy and Imaging Resources on the WWW"



From daemon Tue Jan 21 09:47:03 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      dusevichv-at-umkc.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:38:57 -0600
Subject: RE: help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Usually all microscope columns are sensitive to electromagnetic
fields and should be placed on distances at least 10 feet
from each other and from power lines. Additionally microscopes
are sources of vibrations and acoustic noise which could
degrade images of high resolution instruments.

And, sure, it is absolutely inconvenient for operators
to have SEM and TEM in the same room: working TEM requires
full darkness and this will give SEM operator only unnecessary
eye fatigue and problems with specimen replacement. I could
agree that it is possible to install couple of older (and
less sensitive) SEMs in the same room, but each TEM should
have separate light-tight room.

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy


}
} Help Listservers,
}
} I need to explain, justify, etc., to colleagues (who have no
} microscopy/microtomy experience or background) reasons why you should
} isloate TEM rooms from SEM rooms from microtome rooms? In
} other words, why
} you should avoid putting a TEM, an SEM and a
} cryoultramicrotome all in the
} same room. Thanks
}
} Fred A. Hayes
} Analyst
} Polymer Microscopy
} Collins and Aikman
} IntelliMold Systems
} 4651 Platt Lane
} Ann Arbor, MI 48108
} 734-477-7029 direct
} 734-477-9214 fax
} 734-477-9212 office
} www.IntelliMold.net
} www.collinsaikman.com
} fred.hayes-at-colaik.com
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 21 09:47:50 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      dusevichv-at-umkc.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 09:41:08 -0600
Subject: RE: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am using Fuji Pictrograph printer for three years and
agree that it is much better than dye-sublimation printers.

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy


}
}
} Yes.
} John Mardinly
} Phone: 408-765-2346
} Pager: 877-277-1182
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Michael O'Keefe [mailto:MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov]
} Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 12:40 PM
} To: Mardinly, John
} Cc: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor;
} Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re:
} printer hunt
}
}
} John,
} Did you mean the "Fuji Pictrography 3500"?
} http://www.electroimage.com/fp3k.htm
} -Mike
}
} "Mardinly, John" wrote:
}
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} }
} } The Fuji Pictrograph 3500 blows away the Codonics and costs less,
} } although we have had two blown circuit boards in ours.
} }
} } John Mardinly
} } Intel
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Marek Malecki, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
} [mailto:MMalecki-at-wisc.edu]
} } Sent: Saturday, January 18, 2003 11:05 AM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: the highest-resolution dye-sublimation printers WAS: Re:
} } printer hunt
} }
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
} }
} } Can you also share your comments on the highest-resolution
} } dye-sublimation printers?
} } In particular competition to Codonics (so far unmatched).
} } Vendors welcome !
} }
} } At 04:56 PM 1/17/03 -0600 Friday, you wrote:
} }
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} } -
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} } ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} } -------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 21 10:11:46 2003



From: John Skvarla :      jskvarla-at-ou.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 10:06:34 -0600
Subject: Carbon tape reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I posed this question in late December when many were on Christmas
vacation so will try again. Does anyone know the original citation for
double stick carbon tape used on SEM specimen holders? I think it was
first used in the mid 1990's but I have been unable to locate when and
who introduced it.

Thanks in advance.

John Skvarla



From daemon Tue Jan 21 11:10:04 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 12:21:12 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Fred,
TEM rooms must be able to be completely darkened and are the ones that must
be isolated from noise, vibration, air currents, etc. Microtomes would have
to be vibration isolated from the pumps on SEMs and TEMs.
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Hayes, Fred" {Fred.Hayes-at-colaik.com}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 3:48 PM


We have a CoStar label maker that we purchased some time ago for regular
mailing labels. It takes stock of various widths and factors the
appropriate pitch into its software. We just run off a ribbon of labels one
wide by as many long as we need.

Warren

At 02:20 PM 1/20/03 -0600, you wrote:

} I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately sized
} light microscope slide labels.
}
} ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.
}
} As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
} label tediously on a typewriter.
}
} I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
} microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide labels
} that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
} typewriter.
}
} I have found for micrographs and negative envelopes, that a combination of
} Microsoft Word mail merged with an appropriate Excel data base does a nice
} job using Avery 5160 address labels, but unfortunately, I haven't as yet
} been able to find a properly sized label for microscope slides, or even one
} that I could cut nicely. :-(
}
} I was just wondering how other people tackled this problem. Do you all do
} it the tedious way too? Here is a marketing opportunity for some ambitious
} person who wants to make quick money, by solving a problem in the workplace.

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
23 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking




From daemon Tue Jan 21 13:00:47 2003



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:53:59 -0500
Subject: Freeze-substitution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Listers,
We are going to try to plunge freeze and freeze substitute mouse
pancreas. Now I know that the most desirable way to do this would be with
high pressure freezing but that is not an option at the moment. So I am
hoping to get a bit of help with what we do have available.

We have done quite a bit of plunge freezing microbes and fungi into
Liquid nitrogen cooled liquid propane and then substitution in ethanol,
acetone, etc. with good results. Embedding resin depends on tissue...Epoxy
(LX112) or HM20 lowacryl as needed.

I would like advice on using a cryo-protectant for the mouse pancreas
..thinking of using 18% glycerol or 18% propylene glycol. Is this
necessary and do you recommend one over the other?

Also for substitution, I was going to use acetone + 2% osmium for standard
ultrastructure and just acetone for ICC (switched to ETOH for infiltration
with HM20.

I would appreciate comments on above general approach and any other
information you would like to share that may enhance contrast on final
sections.

Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
West Lafayette, IN 47907



From daemon Tue Jan 21 13:18:33 2003



From: Bruce Girrell :      bigirrell-at-microlinetc.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 14:13:21 -0800
Subject: RE: A biological what is it?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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} It seems this man's daughter is suffering from some kind of skin ailment
} and she has dug stuff out of MANY of the sores on her skin. The
} doctors in her HMO have not offered any relief. Her father (from another
} department on this campus) is quite determined to find out what the
problem
} might be.

OK, I'm not a doctor and, compared to most on this list, I know very little
about microscopy, but...

when I was young I had a skin ailment that sounds somewhat like what you are
describing. You provided very little information on the skin ailment itself,
so I may be way off base here. What I had was a rash of boils (at one point
I had 42 of them at one time on various parts of my body). I would expect
the doctors at your HMO to be able to recognize boils, but perhaps they're
not all that common anymore. Anyway, the eruptions had a fibrous core,
sometimes more than one. This core was so cohesive that when finally removed
it left a cylindrical hole in the sore. Sometimes the core would come out on
its own along with gobs of pus, sometimes I would grab it with a pair of
tweezers and pull it out. After removal of the core the skin eruption would
subside and disappear.

Hope that helps.

Bruce Girrell

BTW -
The doctor prescribed moist heat to help the boils drain and would have us
wash them regularly with PhisoHex (no longer available) soap. Sometimes the
doctor would lance the boils to drain them. None of this did anything to
prevent recurrances. My grandfather said "You need a blood cleanser. Drink
burdock root tea." So I drank that nasty stuff (no sweetening or anything
else) for about two weeks. It may just be a coincidence, but I have never
had another boil.



From daemon Tue Jan 21 13:28:45 2003



From: Benjamin - Simkin :      simkin-at-egr.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 14:19:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Carbon tape reference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I'd suggest much earlier than the mid 1990s; I first learned SEM in 1993, and
my impression then was it was old hat already. Perhaps the mid 1980s?
Ben Simkin (simkin-at-egr.msu.edu)
dpt. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
Michigan State University


From daemon Tue Jan 21 13:36:52 2003



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:29:05 -0600
Subject: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Listers,

We are experiencing artifacts in thick epon-araldite resin sections and
are about at our wit's end. You can view the artifact by linking to
http://biotech.missouri.edu/emc/stain_artifact.jpg and noting the dark
magenta blobs in the nuclear layer of the retinal tissue in the image.
We have determined that the "blobs" are associated with "dimples" in the
sections, but they have never shown up in hundreds of other samples done
previous to this particular project. We are virtually certain this is
artifact because serial sections show the blobs in different places and
in different concentrations.

What we have done so far is to try varying the section thicknesses from
from 0.4 microns to 3.0 microns, mixing the aqueous toluidine blue 1:1
with varying concentrations of ethanol from 20% to absolute, diluting
the stain with water, mixing fresh stain, cutting on both glass and
diamond histo knives, trying different temperatures on the hot plates,
trying untreated slides and slides treated with BSA, staining in the
microwave at varying wattages and times, and dipping slides and sections
in methanol before staining, then staining normally.

So far, the only things that have made any difference are using ethanol
in the stain and dipping the slides in methanol prior to staining, but
neither are consistent. They might work one time, but not the next and
we still get the blobs showing up in different places (but ALWAYS in the
nuclear layer only) and in different numbers.

HEELLLPPP!!!

Most grateful for ANY assistance with this one!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core----We're the Fun Core!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



From daemon Tue Jan 21 13:51:01 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:41:06 -0600
Subject: Re: Freeze-substitution

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Hi Debby: We just got our new HPF so that will teach you for leaving
us! For freeze-sub without aldehydes or osmium, add 0.1% uranyl to the
acetone since it will increase membrane contrast. a good paper on this is
Moreira et al. J Histochem Cytochem 46(7):847-854. Leica's web site has a
large compilation of freeze sub protocols. I have used cryoprotectants
with fixed material (e.g., the Tokyasu method) but I haven't frozen unfixed
material with cryo-protectants. I would worry about the osmotic stress and
diffusion of the material. I am a little doubtful about the quality of
freezing you will achieve with this approach. Tom

At 01:53 PM 1/21/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Tue Jan 21 15:54:26 2003



From: foabidnazir-at-msn.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 16:40:01 -1700
Subject: Before You Can Say "Fahgeddaboudit" 32668

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From daemon Tue Jan 21 16:31:47 2003



From: Craig Klotz :      cklotz-at-mcw.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 16:20:39 -0600
Subject: Re: slide labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Major Focus has sheets of Laser printer compatible self adhesive paper
labels (15/16" X 15/16") which work well on 3X1 slides, however, they are
not chemical resistant. They can be reached at (828) 313-0923. I have no
financial interest in this company.

Craig M. Klotz B.S., CT (ASCP)
Neuromuscular Pathology
cklotz-at-mcw.edu
EM/Lab Tech.
"Chance favors the prepared mind" - L. Pasteur



From daemon Tue Jan 21 17:19:25 2003



From: Ralph Common :      Ralph.Common-at-ht.msu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 18:02:52 -0500
Subject: Light Microscope Slide Labels

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This may not help with the slide labeling problem, but if there are people
out there that are still typing or writing block labels manually, I can send
them a Word document which acts as a template. Using search and replace,
labels can be made and printed out in a few seconds. A similar approach
formatted to fit on label pages might work with the slides too. I also have
a program I wrote in VBA (in Word) that lets you write negative labels with
almost no typing (magnifications are entered by clicking on screen buttons).
We just print them on regular paper and tape them to the negative sleeves --
not elegant, but cheap and easy. I would be happy to send this out too, but
the code would have to be modified for the magnifications of other
microscopes.

Since the documents will have to be sent as attachments, anybody interested
will have to contact me directly.

Ralph Common
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology


-----Original Message-----
} From: Garry Burgess [mailto:GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca]
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 3:20 PM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately sized
light microscope slide labels.

ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.

As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
label tediously on a typewriter.

I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide labels
that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
typewriter.

I have found for micrographs and negative envelopes, that a combination of
Microsoft Word mail merged with an appropriate Excel data base does a nice
job using Avery 5160 address labels, but unfortunately, I haven't as yet
been able to find a properly sized label for microscope slides, or even one
that I could cut nicely. :-(

I was just wondering how other people tackled this problem. Do you all do
it the tedious way too? Here is a marketing opportunity for some ambitious
person who wants to make quick money, by solving a problem in the workplace.


From daemon Tue Jan 21 17:39:46 2003



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 17:25:35 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Garry,

If you want, I can get the name and address etc. for a computer run printer
that prints directly to slides. It is used at Baxter Healthcare in the
histology lab. They stack slides in the machine, the operator goes to the
computer and types in the necessary information and it automatically begins
printing on the slide; they use slides with a white end to print on.

Damian Neuberger, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp
Tel: 847.270.5888
Fax: 847.270.5897


} I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately
sized
} light microscope slide labels.
}
} ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.
}
} As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
} label tediously on a typewriter.
}
} I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
} microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide labels
} that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
} typewriter.
}
} I have found for micrographs and negative envelopes, that a combination of
} Microsoft Word mail merged with an appropriate Excel data base does a nice
} job using Avery 5160 address labels, but unfortunately, I haven't as yet
} been able to find a properly sized label for microscope slides, or even
one
} that I could cut nicely. :-(
}
} I was just wondering how other people tackled this problem. Do you all do
} it the tedious way too? Here is a marketing opportunity for some
ambitious
} person who wants to make quick money, by solving a problem in the
workplace.
}




From daemon Tue Jan 21 18:30:04 2003



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=F6ran_Axelsson?= :      axelsson-at-acc.umu.se
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 01:22:57 +0100
Subject: Re: help

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Leona Cohen-Gould wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Fred,
} Get you hands on a copy of the book in the Glauert series :Design of
} the Electron Microscope Laboratory (or something very close to that
} name, I don't have it in from of me). I have found it of enormous
} value, although it remains to be seen if I too will succeed in a
} similar argument.
} good luck,
} Lee


The book is :

Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy,
volume 4 : Design of the Electron Microscope Laboratory
Audrey M. Glauert
ISBN 0 7204 4250 8, 0 7204 4259 1 or 0 444 10807 6 depending on the
publisher.

My book is printed in 1975, I took a quick glance in it but I couldn't
see any specific discussion about sites with multiple microscopes.


I got the first emission current from my salvaged TEM tonight. :-)

Göran Axelsson, electronmicroscopist wannabe....





From daemon Tue Jan 21 19:16:31 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 19:09:13 -0600
Subject: Re: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Rando,

The presence of dimples suggests that tiny bubbles may have formed
when the specimen is stained. Bubbles probably originate from
degassing of the water when it is heated. The bubbles distort the
heated plastic and could concentrate the staining by acting as
"micro-dishes" to hold the stain in place even during the rinsing
steps. Ethanol probably would break the tension of the water and
allow a more efficient removal of the stain during the rinsing steps.

The way to check this would be to use thoroughly degassed reagents
(heated/vacuumed) until after the staining step.

Good luck and let us know how you solve the problem.

Do you have any blocks (maybe different tissues) prepped in the same
way that do not show this artifact?



JB

##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From daemon Tue Jan 21 19:16:31 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 14:07:27 +1300
Subject: RE: Polyvinyl alcohol

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}
} } Can anyone suggest a UK supplier of Polyvinyl Alcohol
} } at 24-32 centipoise viscosity?
}
} Another possibility is mixing PV-acetate with ethanol. I believe my
} recipe is 20% by weight, which will lay down, dry and become a
} heat-sensitive "glue" for relatively large samples. I'd make the
} mixture 10% for very small particles.
}

I don't know the application, so it may not matter, but don't forget that PV-acetate does
tend to hydrolyse in the long term and release acetic acid. PV alcohol doesn't do this,
so is to be preferred for archival/longterm applications.

cheers

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Tue Jan 21 21:15:04 2003



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 22:01:12 EST
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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In a message dated 01/20/2003 1:41:50 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca writes:

{ { I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide labels
that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
typewriter.
} }

Garry,

I can't vouch for them, never having used them, but the following labels are
supposed to be temperature-, solvent- and caustic- resistant, as well as
waterproof, and they come in sheets that are laser-printable. They also seem
to be about the same size that you are looking for (7/8" x 7/8").

If you don't want to invest in a slide labeling device, you could probably
use these sheets along with Microsoft Word and do a decent job. Also, Avery
used to have a plug-in for MS Word (kind of like a Wizard). It's probably
still available for download from Avery's website...haven't checked lately,
though.

To see the slide labels, go to:

{A HREF="http://www.divbio.com/slide.html"} Click here: Microscope Slide
Labels {/A}

(that's {http://www.divbio.com/slide.html} , for Diversified BioTech).

There are devices that will print on frosted slides, and some of them come w/
software that will automatically keep track of your accessioning numbers,
outside labs and Docs, etc. Contact me off-list if you need details.

Cautionary note: how resistant is the ink after it's "fused" to the label?
I realize that laser printers use heat to set the ink on the paper (or
label), but you might want to check for chemical resistance after printing
some test labels.

The new Leica IPS Slide Labeler and IPC Cassette Labeler use an inkjet
system, but it's a special ink that gets passed under a Xenon strobe to
polymerize the ink and set it on the frosted slide or the cassette. Other
labelers use heated scribes and metallic foils to do the labeling.So you have
several options!

Good Luck!

Bob Chiovetti


From daemon Tue Jan 21 21:49:51 2003



From: Matthew Libera :      mlibera-at-stevens-tech.edu (by way of
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 21:42:46 -0600
Subject: Post-Doctoral Research Associate Position Open

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Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Stevens Institute of Technology

There is a post-doctoral opportunity within the Department of Chemical,
Biochemical, and Materials Engineering at the Stevens Institute of
Technology to develop and apply advanced techniques of transmission
electron microscopy to quantitatively study the morphology of both dry
and hydrated synthetic and natural polymers.

The ideal candidate will have experience in electron optics, electron
energy-loss spectroscopy, and cryo-TEM. Acceptable candidates will at
least have: (1) experience with transmission electron microscopy, either

from a physical or biological sciences perspective; (2) a willingness to

develop a leadership role in problems associated with the nanoscale
morphology of hydrated polymeric biomaterials; and (3) good
communication skills.

This is an NIH-funded position associated with a new inter-institutional

NCRR on Polymeric Biomaterials. This NCRR is associated with the New
Jersey Center for Biomaterials and involves core laboratories at
Rutgers, NJIT, and Stevens. A multi-year appointment for this position
is anticipated.

The Stevens Institute of Technology is a small private university
concentrated on engineering, science, and technology management.
Stevens is located in very close proximity to New York City. The
Stevens electron-optics laboratory contains a Philips CM20 FEG TEM/STEM,

a Philips CM30 SuperTwin TEM, and a LEO 982 FEG SEM. The CM20 FEG
TEM/STEM is equipped with a Gatan Enfina ccd PEELS system and a Gatan
Multiscan digital camera. Both are interfaced to an Emispec Vision
acquisition and control system. The facility is fully equipped with
cryomicrotomy and cryo-transfer capabilities to deal with frozen
hydrated materials.

For further information please contact:

Professor Matthew R. Libera
Dept. Chemical, Biochemical, and Materials Engineering
Stevens Institute of Technology
Hoboken, New Jersey 07030
ph: 201-216-5259
fax: 201-216-8306
mlibera-at-stevens-tech.edu

http://www.mat.stevens-tech.edu/faculty/libera.html


From daemon Tue Jan 21 22:03:32 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 19:55:54 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM- need help on maintenance

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Hello-
I have an old JEOL 100CX, Which had been relocated
twice but was working fine. Recently there was a water
leak and the water fell on the HT cable going down to
the HT tank. After the leak repair and clearing, the
system was switched on after a week's time, Upon
puttng on HT there were lots of discharges with high
Beam current. Does any one suspect that water may have
seeped in the Tank. or there is some circuiting
problem in the cable. Any advices.

Shashi Singh
Scientist
CCMB-Hydearbad
INDIA


__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com


From daemon Tue Jan 21 22:08:18 2003



From: tuttle-at-cox.net
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 21:01:15 -0700
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I've never had a similar need, but this is what I would suggest. Avery 3383 Sticker Project Paper and one of those paper guillotines, or a
better yet, a rotary paper trimmer with the perforating blade.
OpenOffice (which is on this computer I'm using) has a built-in label designer where you can specify pitch, rows, columns, etc., then
database fields can be used to fill in the labels. I would guess MS Office or other office suites also have this ability.

Regards,
Dave Harrison


On 20 Jan 2003 at 14:20, Garry Burgess wrote:

} }
} I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately sized
} light microscope slide labels.
}
} ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.
}
} As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
} label tediously on a typewriter.
}



From daemon Tue Jan 21 23:16:39 2003



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 16:10:29 +1100
Subject: Re: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Randy,

Is it possible that you have a dirty batch of slides, so your sections are
not adhering as usual, and/or the stain is picking up the dirt? Perhaps if
the stain binds to the nuclear layer and there is dirt/grease underneath,
then it won't rinse out properly - hence the blobs. My only suggestion is
to clean the slides to death and/or try with some of those expensive
pre-cleaned slides (people here use them for in situs).

Ethanol in the stain might loosen up this dirt, and methanol dipping also,
but perhaps a ferocious clean of the slides might do the trick (if this is
the problem, of course). From experience, a cheap brand of slides we used
to get suddenly became very dirty and we had to change brands. Not sure
what the problem was but we never went back to the original brand to see
they recovered their quality.

my 2c worth,
good luck,
Rosemary

}
}
} Dear Listers,
}
} We are experiencing artifacts in thick epon-araldite resin sections and
} are about at our wit's end. You can view the artifact by linking to
} http://biotech.missouri.edu/emc/stain_artifact.jpg and noting the dark
} magenta blobs in the nuclear layer of the retinal tissue in the image.
} We have determined that the "blobs" are associated with "dimples" in the
} sections, but they have never shown up in hundreds of other samples done
} previous to this particular project. We are virtually certain this is
} artifact because serial sections show the blobs in different places and
} in different concentrations.
}
} What we have done so far is to try varying the section thicknesses from
} from 0.4 microns to 3.0 microns, mixing the aqueous toluidine blue 1:1
} with varying concentrations of ethanol from 20% to absolute, diluting
} the stain with water, mixing fresh stain, cutting on both glass and
} diamond histo knives, trying different temperatures on the hot plates,
} trying untreated slides and slides treated with BSA, staining in the
} microwave at varying wattages and times, and dipping slides and sections
} in methanol before staining, then staining normally.
}
} So far, the only things that have made any difference are using ethanol
} in the stain and dipping the slides in methanol prior to staining, but
} neither are consistent. They might work one time, but not the next and
} we still get the blobs showing up in different places (but ALWAYS in the
} nuclear layer only) and in different numbers.
}
} HEELLLPPP!!!
}
} Most grateful for ANY assistance with this one!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core----We're the Fun Core!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From daemon Tue Jan 21 23:44:38 2003



From: Jan Coetzee :      janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 07:36:58 +0200
Subject: Re: Welcome to the Microscopy Listserver

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Nestor J. Zaluzec wrote:
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} Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.
} *********************************
} End of File
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} *********************************
} End of File
} *********************************
}


--
Jan Coetzee
Lab for Microscopy and Microanalysis
University of Pretoria, South Africa.
Tel: 012-420-2075, Fax 012-362-5150
www.up.ac.za/academic/electron/emunit1.htm



From daemon Wed Jan 22 01:04:53 2003



From: Malc :      m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 08:55:36 +0200
Subject: Position vacant - electron microprobe operator

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Apologies for multiple postings and potentially horrible layout!

Dear All,
We have a vacancy for a probe operator in our department. We are
particularly keen on finding someone interested in research and
particularly with an interest in studying for a higher degree. For more
information on the post and what is entailed/expected please contact me
directly. As you'll see, application forms are available on-line.
Cheers,
Malc.

RHODES UNIVERSITY

Grahamstown

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

Applications are invited from suitably
qualified candidates for the following post from
as early a date as possible:

PRINCIPAL TECHNICAL OFFICER : ELECTRON
MICROPROBE LABORATORY

Candidates should have a minimum of a
BSc(Honours) degree with a strong
background in Earth Science or related
disciplines and be computer literate. Primary
responsibilities include the operation and
basic maintenance of the Department' s
JEOL 733 electron microprobe regional research
facility. Duties will also include
assisting staff, students, and visiting
researchers in the use of the facility.
Applicants should be committed to working in a
productive research environment
and will be strongly encouraged to further
their own research interests. Candidates
should have experience in a chemical
analytical environment and experience with
x-ray analytical techniques would be an
advantage.

Applications forms, further particulars and
salary details are available from
http://www.ru.ac.za/jobs or by phoning
046-6038004/6038115. Completed
applications should be returned to the
Recruitment & Selection Section by 17
February 2003.

Curricula vitae which are not accompanied by
an official Rhodes University
application form will, regretfully, be
returned to candidates.

SALARY RANGE:
From R69612 to R99276 per annum (pension fund)

From R65676 to R93624 per annum (provident
fund)

- - - - o 0 o - - -
-

PRINCIPAL TECHNICAL OFFICER

ELECTRON MICROPROBE LABORATORY



Main job objectives

This is a technical position which relates to
the routine maintenance and operation
of the Geology Department' s electron
microprobe regional analytical facility. The
job exists to provide support for internal and
external users, ensuring smooth and
trouble-free operation of the instrument,
thereby access to as many users as
possible.

Key responsibility areas

maintenance - routine maintenance of the
electron microprobe and allied
equipment/ materials to ensure
operational efficiency;
planning - to organise routine services
through liaison with technical service
companies, and to manage the booking of
time slots for instrument
utilisation;
supervision and training - to provide
supervision and technical support for
facility users. Also to provide practical
training of new users of the instrument,
to ensure maximum utilisation of the
instrument;
research - to conduct own research and to
collaborate in research projects of
internal and external users of the
instrument as required. Own research
should lead towards higher academic
degrees where appropriate;
consultancy - to carry out analytical
work for industry and similar
organisations as and when appropriate for
the purpose of generating income
for the regional analytical facility.





January/February 2003



--
Dr MP Roberts Phone: [+27](0)46 603 8313 (work)
Dept of Geology [+27] (0)46 6361197 (home)
Rhodes University Fax: [+27](0)46 622 9715
6140 Grahamstown Cell: 083 4060 262
SOUTH AFRICA e-mail: m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za




From daemon Wed Jan 22 01:44:07 2003



From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 08:35:52 +0100
Subject: Meetings for microscopists

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear microscopists,

The collection of meetings in 2003 is ready for you at the Petr's
Microscopy Resources

http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/meetings.php#2003

If your conference, seminar, workshop, .. is missing, use the New
Submission choice (on the page mentioned) to fill in the easy form for
including your meeting to the list.

Best regards,
Petr Schauer
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dr. Petr Schauer tel.: +420 541 514 313 |
| Head of Electron Microscopy Laboratory fax : +420 541 514 404 |
| INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS +420 541 514 402 |
| ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC e-mail: petr-at-isibrno.cz |
| Kralovopolska 147, CZ-612 64 Brno petr-at-dp.fce.vutbr.cz |
| Czech Republic www: http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/ |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+



From daemon Wed Jan 22 01:44:07 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 23:48:04 -0800
Subject: Re: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Rando

These dimples are plastic's areas, which did not stick well to the glass
forming sort of "pockets" which holds the stain. In most cases there was
air bubble here before water is dried out on hot plate. I do have such
artefacts from time to time on my semithings. It looks like drying the
slides in the vacuum oven may help. I did not play so much with vacuum
because those dimples don't bother me. What I figured out, that vacuum
should be just a few mm Hg, otherwise it generates even more bubbles. I
was using +60oC. As for special dimple's localization on your sections, I
think this is because the different tissue area has different properties
and impregnated with plastic differently. Plastic tends to change volume
being in water. Those changes may be different from area to area
(different tissue properties). In your particular case that area extended
in the water (plus heat) more than others. It generates sort of folding,
which made those "pockets" when dry. If you did not have it before, it,
perhaps, mean, you slightly changed the protocol/chemicals/solvents. You
may try to extend all dehydratation/embedding steps for more uniform
plastic penetration/embedding/polymerization. I hope it helps. Good
luck. Sergey

At 07:09 PM 1/21/03 -0600, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

------------------------------------------------------

Sergey Ryazantsev, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy
Department of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

(310) 825-1144 (office)
Pager: (310) 845-0248
FAX: (310) 206-5272 (departmental)
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 22 02:24:34 2003



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 09:58:58 -0500
Subject: Re: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The stain blobs are only or mainly in the nuclear layer,
not elsewhere in the section or on the background, so it is probably
not dirt on the glass that is staining. Yes, its quite possible as
Rosemary suggests that
the sections are not uniformly adhering, and stain is being trapped.
The fact that the
stain is mostly in the nuclear layer and not elsewhere in the section
suggests that this region is
adhering to the glass least well. Why would this happen? My guess is
that the section is not flat,
and that the distortion is greatest in the nuclear layer. If that is
so, the ripple should be detectable under
the microscope - the section will be go in and out of focus.
Three possible ways of curing this. 1) make sure the section gets
really hot on the drying hot plate,
and has enough time to relax. High plate temperature, large blob of
distilled water. Thick sections may need
longer to flatten fully than they get before the drop dries.
2) Use chloroform vapour to flatten section 3) Use heat pen to flatten
section
Cleaning the slide will help with adhesion, but if the section is
rippled there will probably still be voids beneath.
A simple quick way of cleaning slides is to immerse in 1:3 conc. HCl :
ethanol for a few minutes, then
Rinse with abs. ethanol and air dry. This can be done in a glass or
plastic slide rack.
hth
Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Rosemary White" {rosemary.white-at-csiro.au}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 5:10 AM


Hi Randy:

I agree with the others who responded to your plea for help, blobs of
stain trapped under the section. I suspect that the problem is confined to
the nuclear layer becasue infiltration is marginal here due to a high
nucleus/cytoplasm ratio. So for your next processing run try more
infiltration time in pure resin and another change of pure resin on a
rotator or under vacuum. Also, might be time for a fresh batch of resin and
accelerator?
For the material you already have the other responders have good
suggestions. Basically you need to give the sections more time to stretch
out and flatten in warm water (or dilute alcohol or acetone) on the slide.
If you look at unstained sections with phase contrast or Nomarski optics I
think you will see out of focus areas that correspond to 'bubbles' in the
section where the stain is accumulating due to lack of adhesion.
The other thing you could try is to stain the sections free-floating,
then rinse and mount on a slide.
Good luck and let us know how things work out

Geoff


"Tindall, Randy D." wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear Listers,
}
} We are experiencing artifacts in thick epon-araldite resin sections and
} are about at our wit's end. You can view the artifact by linking to
} http://biotech.missouri.edu/emc/stain_artifact.jpg and noting the dark
} magenta blobs in the nuclear layer of the retinal tissue in the image.
} We have determined that the "blobs" are associated with "dimples" in the
} sections, but they have never shown up in hundreds of other samples done
} previous to this particular project. We are virtually certain this is
} artifact because serial sections show the blobs in different places and
} in different concentrations.
}
} What we have done so far is to try varying the section thicknesses from
} from 0.4 microns to 3.0 microns, mixing the aqueous toluidine blue 1:1
} with varying concentrations of ethanol from 20% to absolute, diluting
} the stain with water, mixing fresh stain, cutting on both glass and
} diamond histo knives, trying different temperatures on the hot plates,
} trying untreated slides and slides treated with BSA, staining in the
} microwave at varying wattages and times, and dipping slides and sections
} in methanol before staining, then staining normally.
}
} So far, the only things that have made any difference are using ethanol
} in the stain and dipping the slides in methanol prior to staining, but
} neither are consistent. They might work one time, but not the next and
} we still get the blobs showing up in different places (but ALWAYS in the
} nuclear layer only) and in different numbers.
}
} HEELLLPPP!!!
}
} Most grateful for ANY assistance with this one!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core----We're the Fun Core!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/

--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 22 09:06:58 2003



From: shizgal-at-delongamerica.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 06:58:42 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: TEM- need help on maintenance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Have you checked your vacuum behavior during discharge
to make sure that the problem is not IN THE column ?

If the vacuum is getting worse when discharge occurs -
then the problem is likely from the region around the
cathode & in the column.

If there is no vacuum change then it is probably from
the tank or circuitry...

Ephram Shizgal

On Tue, 21 Jan 2003, shashi singh wrote:

}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} {a
href="http://mail.delongamerica.com/jump/http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html"} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html {/a}
}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Hello-
} I have an old JEOL 100CX, Which had been relocated
} twice but was working fine. Recently there was a water
} leak and the water fell on the HT cable going down to
} the HT tank. After the leak repair and clearing, the
} system was switched on after a week's time, Upon
} puttng on HT there were lots of discharges with high
} Beam current. Does any one suspect that water may have
} seeped in the Tank. or there is some circuiting
} problem in the cable. Any advices.
}
} Shashi Singh
} Scientist
} CCMB-Hydearbad
} INDIA
}
}
} __________________________________________________
} Do you Yahoo!?
} Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
} {a
href="http://mail.delongamerica.com/jump/http://mailplus.yahoo.com"} http://mailplus.yahoo.com {/a}


From daemon Wed Jan 22 09:30:15 2003



From: Philip Slakmon :      slakmon-at-arctectechnologies.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 10:19:49 -0500
Subject: Re: printer hunt

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Dr. Oshel,

In response to your email regarding printers, I would like to suggest the
following Sony printers as possible solutions for your applications:
UPD70A, UPD50, UPDR100

Should you have any questions or need PDF's of the specifications, please
feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Best Regards,

Philip Slakmon
Director of Sales & Marketing
Arctec Technologies Inc.
Innovative Solutions For Science & Technology
Tel: 514-482-2856 x: 228
Fax: 514-482-2556

Email: slakmon-at-arctectechnologies.com
Web Site: www.arctectechnologies.com
For Information: info-at-arctectechnologies.com




From daemon Wed Jan 22 09:37:33 2003



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-urmc.rochester.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 10:30:13 -0500
Subject: Re: LM: Resin Thick Sections: Staining Artifacts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Randy:

Try this method on your normal slides....I feel the problem is the
epoxy/araldite plastic section is not completely spread to it's maximum
smoothness, thereby trapping some of your stain. The method below works
because of the differences in surface tension between water and xylene.

METHOD:

Cut at 1-2microns, place the section on a drop of water on slide, and then
place ONE drop of 100% xylene DIRECTLY on top of the floating section.

You will see the section get kinda of "wrinkly/crinkly" and then start to
smooth out. Wait until it reaches its maximum smoothness (around 15-45
seconds).

Very carefully (sometimes I use a dissecting needle to hold a corner of the
section while I drain the slide) drain the slide and let it completely dry
in an upright position.

Put it on the hot plate and let heat around 1 minute then stain as you would
have done before you had all these problems.

Good Luck!

Karen

Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954


-----Original Message-----
} From: Rosemary White [mailto:rosemary.white-at-csiro.au]
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 12:10 AM
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi Randy,

Is it possible that you have a dirty batch of slides, so your sections are
not adhering as usual, and/or the stain is picking up the dirt? Perhaps if
the stain binds to the nuclear layer and there is dirt/grease underneath,
then it won't rinse out properly - hence the blobs. My only suggestion is
to clean the slides to death and/or try with some of those expensive
pre-cleaned slides (people here use them for in situs).

Ethanol in the stain might loosen up this dirt, and methanol dipping also,
but perhaps a ferocious clean of the slides might do the trick (if this is
the problem, of course). From experience, a cheap brand of slides we used
to get suddenly became very dirty and we had to change brands. Not sure
what the problem was but we never went back to the original brand to see
they recovered their quality.

my 2c worth,
good luck,
Rosemary

}
}
} Dear Listers,
}
} We are experiencing artifacts in thick epon-araldite resin sections and
} are about at our wit's end. You can view the artifact by linking to
} http://biotech.missouri.edu/emc/stain_artifact.jpg and noting the dark
} magenta blobs in the nuclear layer of the retinal tissue in the image.
} We have determined that the "blobs" are associated with "dimples" in the
} sections, but they have never shown up in hundreds of other samples done
} previous to this particular project. We are virtually certain this is
} artifact because serial sections show the blobs in different places and
} in different concentrations.
}
} What we have done so far is to try varying the section thicknesses from
} from 0.4 microns to 3.0 microns, mixing the aqueous toluidine blue 1:1
} with varying concentrations of ethanol from 20% to absolute, diluting
} the stain with water, mixing fresh stain, cutting on both glass and
} diamond histo knives, trying different temperatures on the hot plates,
} trying untreated slides and slides treated with BSA, staining in the
} microwave at varying wattages and times, and dipping slides and sections
} in methanol before staining, then staining normally.
}
} So far, the only things that have made any difference are using ethanol
} in the stain and dipping the slides in methanol prior to staining, but
} neither are consistent. They might work one time, but not the next and
} we still get the blobs showing up in different places (but ALWAYS in the
} nuclear layer only) and in different numbers.
}
} HEELLLPPP!!!
}
} Most grateful for ANY assistance with this one!
}
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core----We're the Fun Core!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From daemon Wed Jan 22 11:22:20 2003



From: Haixin Xu :      xu-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 12:11:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: Freeze-substitution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Debby,

we have done frozen fixation/freeze-substitution (with HPF machine) for
many years. We had tried many cryo-protectants. It seems that 8% methanol
in water was the best for us (plant and fungal material). We did not often
see cryo damage mm deep in a leaf sample and did not have contamination
either. By the freeze-substitution we uses 0.5% Osmium in acetone. We had
excellent cell preservation (see Xu and Mendgen 1994, Planta 195:282). Plastic
tubes(ependorf) or stainless steel containers were used. It did not give
us any trouble. For morphological study we embedded the samples in
epon/Araldit and for immmunohistochemical ones we embedded them in LR
white (without Osmium).
Good luck!

Haixin Xu
University of Maryland Baltimore County
Biological Sciences



On Tue, 21 Jan 2003, Debby Sherman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Listers,
} We are going to try to plunge freeze and freeze substitute mouse
} pancreas. Now I know that the most desirable way to do this would be with
} high pressure freezing but that is not an option at the moment. So I am
} hoping to get a bit of help with what we do have available.
}
} We have done quite a bit of plunge freezing microbes and fungi into
} Liquid nitrogen cooled liquid propane and then substitution in ethanol,
} acetone, etc. with good results. Embedding resin depends on tissue...Epoxy
} (LX112) or HM20 lowacryl as needed.
}
} I would like advice on using a cryo-protectant for the mouse pancreas
} ..thinking of using 18% glycerol or 18% propylene glycol. Is this
} necessary and do you recommend one over the other?
}
} Also for substitution, I was going to use acetone + 2% osmium for standard
} ultrastructure and just acetone for ICC (switched to ETOH for infiltration
} with HM20.
}
} I would appreciate comments on above general approach and any other
} information you would like to share that may enhance contrast on final
} sections.
}
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-052 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907
}
}



From daemon Wed Jan 22 11:57:41 2003



From: Charles Murphy :      murphyc-at-ba.ars.usda.gov
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 13:57:50 -0500
Subject: Re: Freeze-substitution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We believe it originated in Japan around 1990, give or take a few years. We
added it to our product line on customer demand. All we can tell you is the
demand seemed to develop around the early to mid '90's.

John Arnott

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "John Skvarla" {jskvarla-at-ou.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2003 11:06 AM


Hi

A quick test of your tank would be to switch off the HT and remove the HT
cable from the tank. Then switch on the HT. If you still have discharge
sounds the problem is the tank. If not, then the problem is your cable or
the cable connection.

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
EM Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: "shashi singh" {shashis_99-at-yahoo.com}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 3:55 AM


Hi Debby and others: According to an old Balzers pub., "Artefacts and Specimen Preparation Faults in Freeze Etch Technology", it was stated that using glycerol before fixation causes mitochondrial swelling (L. Bachmann and W.W. Schmitt, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 2149-2152, 1971) and transformation of the laminar system of the ER into a vesicular system. (H. Moor, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. 261, 121-131, 1971) . Both pubs state that fixation before freezing will prevent this occurrence. Charlie Murphy

Charles Murphy
USDA, ARS,
Electron Microscopy Unit
Bldg. 177B, BARC East
Beltsville, MD, 20705
(301) 504-8046
(301) 504-8923 fax
murphyc-at-ba.ars.usda.gov






From daemon Wed Jan 22 13:29:58 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 14:22:36 -0500
Subject: SIT camera for LM thank you

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thank you for your replies regarding a replacement for our SIT
camera. We're going to try the Retiga EX.

____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Wed Jan 22 14:06:45 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 13:58:37 -0600
Subject: Nikon 8000 ED Scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A colleague of mine was wondering if the Nikon 8000 ED is able to
scan intact, 3.25 x 4 inch TEM negatives at high resolution (4000
ppi). Any information would be appreciated.

Thank you.

##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################


From daemon Wed Jan 22 15:23:17 2003



From: Peter Steele :      STEELEP-at-allkids.org
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 16:12:05 -0500
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Garry,

We use a DataMax E-4203 (w/ Thermal Transfer, 203 dpi, Firmware Ver 02.02) from a local supplier (Mintek Barcode Technologies). Ribbon and labels are from a supplier found on the internet (Electronic Imaging Materials). The Techs print directly from Meditech (our LIS). Surgical #, Pt. Name, Date, Institution, and bar code is printed on the approx. square slide label. This printer can also be accessed from word processors if necessary (it would not be difficult to make a template for Word). There is a wide range of labels available depending your budget including some which are xylene resistant.

Everyone seems very happy with it - in fact we are buying more of them.

No commercial interest, & just my opinion

Regards,

Peter O. Steele, PhD, PMIAC, CLDir
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
All Children's Hospital
St. Petersburg, FL, USA
727 892-4465


Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply e-mail and destroy all copies of the original message.




From daemon Wed Jan 22 20:01:08 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 17:57:11 -0800
Subject: Re: Nikon 8000 ED Scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


No...it cannot. The largest it will do
is 6x9cm. The width limit is a killer.
If you center your subject, you can trim
the neg and use the glass holder to scan
a 6x9 field.

gary g.


At 11:58 AM 1/22/2003, you wrote:

} A colleague of mine was wondering if the Nikon 8000 ED is able to scan
} intact, 3.25 x 4 inch TEM negatives at high resolution (4000 ppi). Any
} information would be appreciated.
}
} Thank you.
}
} ##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
} ##############################################################



From daemon Wed Jan 22 20:13:44 2003



From: Damian Neuberger :      neuberger1234-at-attbi.com
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 20:06:08 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Microscope Slide Labels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Garry,
Here is the name and address of the slide printer.

Shur/Mark
Cassette & Slide Labeling Instrumentation

Triangle Biomedical Sciences
2604-G Carver St
Durham, NC 27705
Tel: 919 477-9283

The machines connect to your computer for the label text/numbering. The
slides are those with a white end. The Cassette labeler is for labeling
embedding cassettes for tissue sample. So both the tissue and slide have
the same label, if you want. You mentioned "Even upstairs with the
thousands of slide labels that they make, they have to tediously type them
all out 1 by 1 on the typewriter." This would be a real help for them.
Disclaimer: no financial interest in TBS, etc.
Damian Neuberger, PhD
Senior Research Scientist
Baxter Healthcare Corp
Tel: 847.270.5888
Fax: 847.270.5897


} } I haven't been able to find any laser printer sheets of appropriately
} sized
} } light microscope slide labels.
} }
} } ie: 7/8" wide X 6/8" high.
} }
} } As a result, we have always been forced to use rolls, and type out each
} } label tediously on a typewriter.
} }
} } I was just wondering if anyone knows of any slicker system for labelling
} } microscope slide labels. Even upstairs with the thousands of slide
labels
} } that they make, they have to tediously type them all out 1 by 1 on the
} } typewriter.
} }
} } I have found for micrographs and negative envelopes, that a combination
of
} } Microsoft Word mail merged with an appropriate Excel data base does a
nice
} } job using Avery 5160 address labels, but unfortunately, I haven't as yet
} } been able to find a properly sized label for microscope slides, or even
} one
} } that I could cut nicely. :-(
} }
} } I was just wondering how other people tackled this problem. Do you all
do
} } it the tedious way too? Here is a marketing opportunity for some
} ambitious
} } person who wants to make quick money, by solving a problem in the
} workplace.
} }
}




From daemon Wed Jan 22 20:42:34 2003



From: Beth Richardson :      beth-at-dogwood.botany.uga.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 21:32:37 -0800
Subject: Re: Freeze-substitution

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Debby,
There are some HPF's not far from you (Miami, OH and St Paul, MN)...it is
worth the drive if you want to freeze chunks of tissue. Sounds like you
know that the success of different freezing methods is sample size
dependent - especially plunge freezing ( {20 um). So are you slicing and
dicing the pancreas before you freeze it? If so, what solution will it be
in? Ringers? I don't work on animal tissue so don't laugh too hard at that
if that is way off but it would help to know your prep method.
I had an animal tissue cryoprotectant recipe from Hong Yi at Emory
University {hyi-at-emory.edu} but my filing system is failing me on locating
that at the moment. I use a 15% dextran solution (MW 40,000 -Sigma) for HPF
of plant material and fungi and I when I worked with a student on freezing
frog retina slices and he used 35% dextran (178,000 MW). The reference is:
M T Wilson et al. (1998) Ultrastructure of the frog retina after high
pressure freezing and freeze substitution. J of Microscopy 189, 219-235.
I agree with the others about adding some uranyl acetate to the
substitution fluid. It really jazzes up the contrast.
good luck, and I wanna know if you have success plunge freezing that pancreas.
Beth

} Listers,
} We are going to try to plunge freeze and freeze substitute mouse
} pancreas. Now I know that the most desirable way to do this would be with
} high pressure freezing but that is not an option at the moment. So I am
} hoping to get a bit of help with what we do have available.
}
} We have done quite a bit of plunge freezing microbes and fungi into
} Liquid nitrogen cooled liquid propane and then substitution in ethanol,
} acetone, etc. with good results. Embedding resin depends on tissue...Epoxy
} (LX112) or HM20 lowacryl as needed.
}
} I would like advice on using a cryo-protectant for the mouse pancreas
} ..thinking of using 18% glycerol or 18% propylene glycol. Is this
} necessary and do you recommend one over the other?
}
} Also for substitution, I was going to use acetone + 2% osmium for standard
} ultrastructure and just acetone for ICC (switched to ETOH for infiltration
} with HM20.
}
} I would appreciate comments on above general approach and any other
} information you would like to share that may enhance contrast on final
} sections.
}
} Debby
}
} Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
} Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
} Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
} S-052 Whistler Building
} West Lafayette, IN 47907


**********************************************************************
Beth Richardson
EM Lab Coordinator
Plant Biology Department
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-7271

Phone - (706) 542-1790 & FAX - (706) 542-1805

"Between the two evils,
I always pick the one I never tried before". Mae West (1893-1980)
**********************************************************************

"And it's only the giving that makes you what you are".
Wond'ring Aloud, Jethro Tull (Aqualung)

***************************************************************************




From daemon Wed Jan 22 21:50:44 2003



From: kathleen.smith-at-sjvls.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2003 21:40:51 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: The Human Body Through the Electron Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (kathleen.smith-at-sjvls.org) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Wednesday,
January 22, 2003 at 16:06:43
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kathleen.smith-at-sjvls.org
Name: Kathleen Smith

Organization: San Joaquin Valley Information Service

Education: Graduate College

Location: Fresno, California USA

Question: Dear Microscopist:

I am a public librarian with the San Joaquin Valley Information
Service in Fresno California. I have a patron who is looking for a
video called "The Human Body Through the Electron Microscope." It was
originally produced by Time Life Educational Films in the last 70's,
possible 1979. I have not been able to find a source for this video
in any library or for purchase, possible because of its age. I
thought I would avail myself of this organization's specialty in this
area. I did not see it listed on any of the video tape bibliographies
posted on the MSA's site. Have you ever heard of this video? Do you
happen to know of a source? Thanks for your help.

Kathleen Smith, Librarian
San Joaquin Valley Information Service
Fresno, CA 93704
Ph: 559-488-3229
Fax: 559-488-2965
Email: kathleen.smith-at-sjvls.org
URL: http://www.sjvls.org/sjvis

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Thu Jan 23 00:35:17 2003



From: MICRO :      micro-at-formatex.org
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 09:53:38 +0100
Subject: scientific reviewers for APHYS-2003

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Also, make sure that tank connector is clean, and has ~~ 1 inch (2+ cm) of
transformer oil in it. Especially since water presence is suspected. Start
at 20 kV, then step voltage up. Do not exceed 80 kV with that little oil in
the empty connector well.

Vitaly Feingold
Scientific Instruments and Applications
2773 Heath Lane, Duluth GA 30096
(770)232-7785 ph.
(770)232-1791 fax
(678)467-0012 mobile

This message is made of 100% recycled electrons.

This address can not receive messages larger than 15 kb without prior
notification.

----- Original Message -----
} From: Steve Chapman {protrain-at-emcourses.com}
To: shashi singh {shashis_99-at-yahoo.com}
Cc: MSA {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 1:55 PM


Dear Colleagues

The organizers of the forthcoming International Meeting on Applied Physics
(APHYS-2003), www.formatex.org/aphys2003/aphys2003.htm are asking for
qualified Scientific Reviewers for the Microscopy, Imaging Techniques and
Surfaces topics of the Conference. If you would like to participate as
reviewers, please contact us at secretariat-at-formatex.org with your contact
data, field(s) of expertise and a list of publications. Accepted papers
after review will be published in several special issues (Journal of
Microscopy, Applied Surface Science and a book edition). The official list
of reviewers will be included in the publications.

Thank you in advance for your help.

A.Mendez-Vilas
APHYS-2003 Scientific Coordinator



From daemon Thu Jan 23 03:23:55 2003



From: Justin Ritherdon :      J.Ritherdon-at-liverpool.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 09:16:47 -0000
Subject: Powder size distribution measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all,
I would like to measure the particle size distribution from a batch of
alumina powder with a nominal size of 1µm.
I am presently measuring particle sizes from SEM images as we don't have an
automated system but it is very labour intensive, slow and somewhat
subjective.
I have sought help from outside but it seems that our powder is of an
awkward size at the lower limit of laser measurement's capabilities.
Can anyone suggest a UK company or institution who could measure powder of
this size range. Failing that, if anyone could give me the name of a
technique it would be of great help as I would then know what to look and
ask for.
Thanks in advance,

Justin


----------------------------------
Justin Ritherdon,
Materials Science and Engineering,
Department of Engineering,
University of Liverpool,
LIVERPOOL,
L69 3GH,
United Kingdom

Tel. 0151 794 5396
Fax. 0151 794 4675
International. +44 151 794 ....



From daemon Thu Jan 23 04:28:52 2003



From: Hans van Hirtum :      hhm-at-novaknowledge.nl
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 11:16:17 +0100
Subject: Post-graduate short-courses on histological techniques

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear listservers,

My name is Hans van Hirtum and I work for Hogeschool Brabant Nova
Knowledge in Etten-Leur, the Netherlands. We organize International
post-graduate short-courses on a variety of biomedical laboratory
techniques. All international courses are organized in close
collaboration with experts in the field of interest. This spring we
offer the following courses on histological techniques:

- FISH Techniques in Moleculair Pathology
- Confocal Light Microscopy: fundamentals and biological applications
- Tissue micro-array
- Multiple Staining in Immunohistochemistry

Please visit our website http://www.novaknowledge.nl/english.htm for
detailed information about these courses and other courses that we offer
(e.g. quantitative PCR and strategic protein purification).

Best regards,
Hans van Hirtum



Ing. J.P. van Hirtum
Hogeschool Brabant Nova Knowledge
P.O.box 5690
4801 EB Breda, the Netherlands
T: +31 (0) 76 572 2644
F: +31 (0) 76 572 2640
E: hvanhirtum-at-hsbb.nl
W: http://www.novaknowledge.nl


From daemon Thu Jan 23 05:39:02 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 03:29:13 -0800 (PST)
Subject: TEM- need help on maintenance

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Ephram Shizgal,

We do have a problem with vacuum because of an
inefficient Gun/Column Valve But once it attains high
vacuum and ready state we do not encounter any
problems. These discharges are post leak and the beam
emission current increases if the HT is switched on
for even 5 min, and even at 20kV.
Shashi Singh



=====
Shashi Singh
Scientist
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad-500 007
INDIA
PH-91-40-7192575,7192761,7192615
FAX-91-40-7160591, 7160311

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com


From daemon Thu Jan 23 06:10:15 2003



From: Petr Schauer :      Petr-at-isibrno.cz
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 13:02:13 +0100
Subject: Re: Meetings for microscopists

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} If your conference, seminar, workshop, .. is missing, use the New
} Submission choice (on the page mentioned) to fill in the easy form for
} including your meeting to the list.

Dear Colleagues,

Thank you for the yesterday's submission of interesting meetings. All
submissions have been displayed. Note that also your Laboratories can
be submitted and listed in the extensive list of Microscopy
Laboratories (http://www.petr.isibrno.cz/microscopy/laboratories.php).
Keep in your mind that your Laboratory can be much easily searchable
if listed as much as possible.

Regards,
Petr Schauer



From daemon Thu Jan 23 07:11:55 2003



From: Bob Voigt :      bobv-at-restechimage.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 08:02:27 -0500
Subject: RE: printer hunt, Vendor response

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I agree with John Mardinly, the Fuji Pictography printer provides the best photographic quality print. This printer can print up to 400 DPI, and offers built-in color calibration. It only has a SCSI II connection, so must be connected to a computer, but can be networked as a shared resource. The list price for this printer is $3995, and prints are approximately $3.00 each. This printer actually uses a photographic process to print images on Fuji photo paper. The paper is fed from a roll, and the printer has an automatic sheet cutter. (http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/Products.jsp?nav=1&parent=PRODUCT_CATEGORY_474433&product=6213061)

A less expensive alternative, although certainly not as full featured or robust, is the Olympus P400. This is a dye-sub printer, offering 314 dpi, and will print up to 7.64 in. x 10 in. images on A4 paper. This printer has USB and parallel port interfaces, and can be networked by a print server. It also accepts SmartMedia(tm) 3V (3.3V): 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128MB
PCMCIA PC Card Type II (ATA format or PC Card Adapter for CompactFlash or Memory Stick), to print directly from your digital camera media. The list price for this printer is $499 and prints are approximately $2.00 each. The printer has a 50 sheet paper tray. (http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_product_lobbypage.asp?l=1&bc=23&p=19&product=632)

Depending on the quality you require, an excellent alternative is the Xerox Phaser 8200. This printer uses a solid ink, and offers a 1200 dpi photo mode. This is a production printer, delivering 16 pages per minute, with the first print as fast as 9 seconds. You can print on a variety of materials ranging from 16 lb paper to 110 lb business cards or envelopes. It can be purchased with a duplex option, and two additional 500 sheet feeders, providing up to 1200 sheet paper capacity. In its least expensive form, this printer offers USB and parallel connections. The other three models have built in networking. This printer is offered in 4 models with prices ranging from $1500 to $3500. Prints are approximately $0.20 each. (http://www.officeprinting.xerox.com/perl-bin/product.pl?product=8200)

Please contact me directly if you have additional interest in any of these printers.

Thank you,
Bob Voigt (bobvoigt-at-restechimage.com)
Resolution Technology, Inc. (www.restechimage.com)
Phone (614) 921-0045 FAX (614) 921-0046



From daemon Thu Jan 23 07:59:09 2003



From: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 08:55:40 -0500
Subject: Aspex PSM 75 SEM users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Is there anyone out there using the Aspex PSM 75 SEM? any comments about
this equipment would be helpful good or bad. I cannot find any info at the
Aspex website due to under construction. Thanks as always

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Technician (Failure Analysis)
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.315
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: rfowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com


THIS TRANSMISSION IS INTENDED FOR THE SOLE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND ENTITY
TO WHOM IT IS ADDRESSED AND MAY CONTAIN PRIVILEGED AND/OR CONFIDENTIAL
INFORMATION.

If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that any use,
dissemination, distribution or duplication of this transmission is strictly
prohibited. If you received this transmission in error, please notify the
sender immediately by electronic reply to this transmission or by phone
(847-803-6100). Thank you.




From daemon Thu Jan 23 09:22:11 2003



From: Robert H. Olley :      r.h.olley-at-reading.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 15:12:17 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: OM with laser for optical trapping

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



One of our undergraduates has a project to set up a microscope with laser
for an optical tweezer experiment. The highest power lens on the
microscope has the following data on it:

50x / 0.80 "infinity" / 0.17-A

The first two figures I understand to be magnification and numerical
aperture, but I would like to ask a few things:

(1) what does the second set of figures refer to?

(2) how would one estimate the focal length of this lens?

(3) if one is shining a parallel laser beam down into this lens from
above, how could one determine the widest diameter of beam which would
actually go through this lens without being stopped?

Any help would be much appreciated.

+-----------------------------------------+
Robert H.Olley
J.J.Thomson Physical Laboratory
University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading RG6 6AF
England
+----------------------------------------+
Phone:+44 (0) 118 9318572
Fax: +44 (0) 118 9750203
University internal extension 7867
Email: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/~spsolley
+----------------------------------------+



From daemon Thu Jan 23 09:33:18 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 10:24:50 -0500
Subject: Measuring alumina powders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Justin Ritherdon wrote:
===============================================================
I would like to measure the particle size distribution from a batch of
alumina powder with a nominal size of 1µm.
I am presently measuring particle sizes from SEM images as we don't have an
automated system but it is very labour intensive, slow and somewhat
subjective.
I have sought help from outside but it seems that our powder is of an
awkward size at the lower limit of laser measurement's capabilities.
Can anyone suggest a UK company or institution who could measure powder of
this size range. Failing that, if anyone could give me the name of a
technique it would be of great help as I would then know what to look and
ask for.
================================================================
It might not be the complete solution you are asking for but it will help,
"it" being our "Tacky Dot Slide" products as shown on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/new/tacky.shtml

If you use the 15 um dots (smallest dot size available), at the most,
several particles will appear per dot, and while you will still have the
"counting" issue, at least it will be far less confusing and certainly much
less subjective. And if the powder is arranged on orthogonal centers, then
it might even be possible to have them analyzed automatically using
appropriate software.

Chuck

PS: Remember that we are striving to be 100% paperless, therefore there
are no paper copies kept of this correspondence. Please be sure to always
reply by way of "reply" on your software so that the entire string of
correspondence can be kept in one place.
============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Thu Jan 23 10:23:05 2003



From: Pmtl :      mtl-at-njcc.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 11:12:24 -0500
Subject: Re: Powder size distribution measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You may be using or have access to an older laser unit. We have a laser
particle counter with both forward and right-angle scattering. The lower
limit for our laser sizer is 0.05 µm. Given the very low cost of particle
sizing by laser, I would find a local materials lab with a modern laser unit.
If you want more details on particles sizing or morphology by other methods
you can contact me off-line.
Roy Nelson, PhD
mtl-at-njcc.com
Material Testing Lab.
Pennington, NJ 08534

Justin Ritherdon wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Hello all,
} I would like to measure the particle size distribution from a batch of
} alumina powder with a nominal size of 1µm.
} I am presently measuring particle sizes from SEM images as we don't have an
} automated system but it is very labour intensive, slow and somewhat
} subjective.
} I have sought help from outside but it seems that our powder is of an
} awkward size at the lower limit of laser measurement's capabilities.
} Can anyone suggest a UK company or institution who could measure powder of
} this size range. Failing that, if anyone could give me the name of a
} technique it would be of great help as I would then know what to look and
} ask for.
} Thanks in advance,
}
} Justin
}
} ----------------------------------
} Justin Ritherdon,
} Materials Science and Engineering,
} Department of Engineering,
} University of Liverpool,
} LIVERPOOL,
} L69 3GH,
} United Kingdom
}
} Tel. 0151 794 5396
} Fax. 0151 794 4675
} International. +44 151 794 ....



From daemon Thu Jan 23 10:33:44 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 11:26:16 -0500
Subject: Powder size distribution measurement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Justin;

This is just a thought but in the semiconductor industry partricle size/
distribution is critical. A device known as a "Surfscan" can do two things,
measure particle size and provide a geographical distrubution with
statistics on particulates residing on a flat surface. Try this website;
http://ceaspub.eas.asu.edu/csser/surfscan.htm

The one caveat to this technique is that if you have particles that are
co-joined, the system may not recognize them as separate and distinct from
each other. This system does us a laser and claims a 90% detection
probability of 0.22 uM diameter latex spheres on a flat silicon surface.

These tools are primarily found in semiconductor fabrication facilities and
in some universities that have same.

Regards,

Peter Tomic

-----Original Message-----
} From: Justin Ritherdon [mailto:J.Ritherdon-at-liverpool.ac.uk]
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 4:17 AM
To: Microscopy Listserver


Hello all,
I would like to measure the particle size distribution from a batch of
alumina powder with a nominal size of 1µm.
I am presently measuring particle sizes from SEM images as we don't have an
automated system but it is very labour intensive, slow and somewhat
subjective.
I have sought help from outside but it seems that our powder is of an
awkward size at the lower limit of laser measurement's capabilities.
Can anyone suggest a UK company or institution who could measure powder of
this size range. Failing that, if anyone could give me the name of a
technique it would be of great help as I would then know what to look and
ask for.
Thanks in advance,

Justin


----------------------------------
Justin Ritherdon,
Materials Science and Engineering,
Department of Engineering,
University of Liverpool,
LIVERPOOL,
L69 3GH,
United Kingdom

Tel. 0151 794 5396
Fax. 0151 794 4675
International. +44 151 794 ....



From daemon Thu Jan 23 10:48:00 2003



From: James Pawley :      jbpawley-at-wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 10:39:31 -0600
Subject: SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT: UBC 3D Live-cell Course, June 15 - 26

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT

Eighth Annual INTERNATIONAL 12-Day Short Course on

3D Microscopy of Living Cells
June 15 - 26, 2003 (Pre-course: afternoon, June 14)

Seventh, Post-course Workshop on

3D Image Processing,
June 28 - July 30, 2003

Organized by Prof. James Pawley,
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)

in association with

The Departments of Pharmacology and Physiology
and the Brain Research Centre,
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


DATES

Applications must be received by March 15, 2003
Deposit due April 15, 2003
Registration 5:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday, June 14, 2003
First Lecture 7:30 PM Saturday, June 14, 2003
Live-cell Course ends, noon Thursday, June 26, 2003
3D Image Processing Course, June 28 - 30, 2003

APPLICATIONS

Applicants must complete a questionnaire on the web to assess
knowledge level, field of interest and proposed personal, live-cell,
project. www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/application.htm

Enrollment will be limited to about 24-32 participants
(exact number depends on number of 3D Systems available). Selection
will be made on the basis of background and perceived need. Those
without previous LM experience will be provided with access to basic
texts to read before the course begins. Application forms can be
obtained from:

Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU

Additional information is available from:
www.3dcourse.ubc.ca/brochure.htm

We expect to have at least 11, 3D microscope workstations for student
use during 14 3D-Lab session and there will be an international faculty of 20.

Application deadlines:

Application forms must be received for screening by March 15, 2003.
Successful applicants will be notified by April 1, and a deposit of
50% must be received by April 15, 2003. In general, refunds of the
deposit will only be possible if someone on the waiting list can take
the place. The remainder is due before Registration.


Pre-Course Tuition (1/2 day Basic Optical principles) $120 (US)
3D Live-cell Course Tuition (includes lunches and snacks): $2450 (US)
Workshop Tuition (includes lunches and snacks):
$900 (US)

Room/board about $40/day (US) depending on room type.

I hope that this includes all of the information that you need, but
if not, please get back to me.

Jim Pawley
--
****************************************
Prof. James B. Pawley, Ph. 608-263-3147
Room 223, Zoology Research Building, FAX 608-265-5315
1117 Johnson Ave., Madison, WI, 53706 JBPAWLEY-at-WISC.EDU
"A scientist is not one who can answer questions but one who can
question answers." Theodore Schick Jr., Skeptical Enquirer, 21-2:39


From daemon Thu Jan 23 10:53:03 2003



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 08:44:44 -0800
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: The Human Body Through the Electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Email: kathleen.smith-at-sjvls.org
} Name: Kathleen Smith
}
} Organization: San Joaquin Valley Information Service
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: Fresno, California USA
}
} Question: Dear Microscopist:
}
} I am a public librarian with the San Joaquin Valley Information
} Service in Fresno California. I have a patron who is looking for a
} video called "The Human Body Through the Electron Microscope." It was
} originally produced by Time Life Educational Films in the last 70's,
} possible 1979. I have not been able to find a source for this video
} in any library or for purchase, possible because of its age. I
} thought I would avail myself of this organization's specialty in this
} area. I did not see it listed on any of the video tape bibliographies
} posted on the MSA's site. Have you ever heard of this video? Do you
} happen to know of a source? Thanks for your help.
}
} Kathleen -

Congratulations on your thoroughness! I wrote one of the MSA video tape
bibliographies, for Project MICRO. It's the product of a lot of searching,
and I've never heard of that tape. Your patron may have an alternate title
for one of Lennert Nilssen's tapes; they seem to have been issued more than
once, and they definitely predate the 90s. Here's the MICRO description:

Nilssen, L. 1996 "The Photographer's Secrets" 1 hour, $19.95 from WGBH
Boston Video, P.O.Box 2284, South Burlington, VT, 05407, 800-255-9424.
Lennart Nilssen is famous for his beautiful images of human
development. This is part three of the Nova series "Odyssey of Life" (or
part 4 of the series "The Wonder of Life") It explains his use of SEM and
other imaging tools that blur the line between microscopy and
macrophotography; it will be particularly interesting for budding
microscopists. All ages.


Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Thu Jan 23 16:04:46 2003



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 16:50:58 -0500
Subject: General - Periodic Table wall chart

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All,

I'm looking for help finding a source for periodic table wall charts. I'm
using them for microanalysis so I need K, L & M lines in keV. I've been
using the small ones, 2' x 3', that the vendors give away but I'd like to
get bigger ones. I need 6 of them.

Anyone run across something like this?

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From daemon Thu Jan 23 18:33:54 2003



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 07:46:41 +0100
Subject: Re: Ask-A-Microscopist: The Human Body Through the Electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html






Hi

} Lennart Nilssen is famous for his beautiful images of human
} development.
... and he works at Karolinska Institute here in Stockholm.

Have a good weekend.

Gareth


Obs/NB New postal/visiting address from July 2002!

Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-impi.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institutet,
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.



From daemon Fri Jan 24 05:49:53 2003



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 08:43:54 -0500
Subject: History of carbon tape in SEM labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Justin,

Have you thought of using image analysis software to get size information
and statistical values? Without seeing any images I can't say if it is
possible in your case, but if you wish, I can provide you with the name and
phone numbers of a colleague of mine in the UK. He might be able to help you
directly.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Justin Ritherdon [mailto:J.Ritherdon-at-liverpool.ac.uk]
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 10:17 AM
To: Microscopy Listserver


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

The first in the world to market a product one might call (generically) a
double sided adhesive conductive carbon filled tape was a company in Japan
called Oken Shoji. This would have been in the early 1980's. The owner of
that firm was and still is Mr. Hisashi Sato. He also applied for and
received a Japanese patent for the tape at that time. Apparently it covers
only tape cut 8 mm wide and tapes either larger or smaller than that width
somehow don't infringe. I know that sounds a bit irrational but that is the
way it has been explained to me.

I have also been told that there is another name on the patent, that of a
professor in Japan. I believe that the original user (inventor) of the tape
for this application was that professor, who happened to know Mr. Sato and
then it was Mr. Sato who actually commercialized the product. It is of
course all in Japanese so this information comes to me second-hand.

In any case, the tape was widely used in Japanese SEM laboratories before it
was even known here in the USA or in Europe. It was the Japanese service
engineers who brought samples of the tape to the USA from Japan and when the
US employees of the Japanese microscope firms went to Japan for training,
they brought samples back with them as well. It was my further recollection
that the first SEM manufacturer to be encouraging their customers to use the
carbon tape as a means of promoting column cleanliness was ISI/Topcon.

SPI Supplies was introduced to the tape by the ISI people during that time
frame and almost simultaneously, the tape was introduced in the USA and
Canadian markets by both SPI Supplies and E. F. Fullam, Inc. Some time
later after that, the tape was then offered by Ted Pella, Inc., Electron
Microscopy Sciences, Inc. and later on by Energy Beam Sciences, Inc. In
Europe at that time (early 1980's) the tape was offered by Polaron
Equipment Ltd. and Agar Scientific Ltd.

Today, the tape is not all the same. Some is on a white plastic core and
some is on a cardboard core. The tape on the cardboard core to the best of
my knowledge has direct traceability to the original tape that has been
produced since the early 1980's. Anyone who has used this tape knows very
well how the cardboard core starts to disintegrate and particulate, hardly a
good thing for EM lab cleanliness. The newest version of this tape has a
white plastic core that does not shed particulates. For more information
see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/cond_adhes-tapes.shtml

Today, one can use this kind of product not only in tape form but also in
die cut discs and sheets. It is also available as a double sided adhesive
silver filled sheet. All of these products trace their progeny back to the
original carbon tape concept and patent.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers all of the mentioned products so we have a
vested interest in promoting their use.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From daemon Fri Jan 24 08:11:14 2003



From: Gerroir, Paul J :      Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 08:45:26 -0500
Subject: TEM: Embedding Resins for Polymeric Materials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


January 24, 2003

Good morning all,
I am looking for the "one size fits all" type of embedding resin that can be
used for polymers. For a number of years we have been using a two part epoxy
resin which for most general purpose applications has been very
satisfactory. Because the availability of these components has become
uncertain I wanted to ask other users and suppliers for their suggestions or
recommendations. Most of the materials that we wish to embed and section
have glass transition temperatures (Tgs) between 50 and 70 degrees C. For
some materials: blends, copolymers and the like cryo-sectioning may be
necessary. Embedding resins that require curing at elevated temperatures are
out of the question. Obviously we must be certain that any curing protocol
leaves the sample unchanged. Are (is) there a single embedding resin that
meets all these requirements? Thanks.

Trying to stay warm in the Great White North ... it is a cool -20C today.
Thankfully there is little wind chill to worry about.

Regards,
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com



From daemon Fri Jan 24 09:52:21 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 10:40:21 -0500
Subject: General - Periodic Table wall chart

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Try this.

http://www.webelements.com/webelements/index.html

Regards,

Fred Monson
Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.


-----Original Message-----
} From: Owen P. Mills [mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 4:51 PM
To: Microscopy


Dear All,

I'm looking for help finding a source for periodic table wall charts. I'm
using them for microanalysis so I need K, L & M lines in keV. I've been
using the small ones, 2' x 3', that the vendors give away but I'd like to
get bigger ones. I need 6 of them.

Anyone run across something like this?

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From daemon Fri Jan 24 10:04:28 2003



From: Lucille A. Giannuzzi :      lag-at-mail.ucf.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 10:56:47 -0500
Subject: 1st Meeting of FIB FIG

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The 1st Meeting of the MSA FIB FIG will held in conjunction with the 4th
Annual FIB Users Workshop at the FLAVS/Florida Society for Microscpy
meeting at the University of Central Florida on Tuesday, March 18, 2003.

A List of Confirmed Speakers Include:

Joe Michael, Sandia National Lab
Richard Langford, Oxford University
Jeff McDowell, Sela
Richard Young, FEI Company
Peter Gnauk, LEO Elektronenmikroskopie
Kevin McIlwraith, Hitachi
Janice Lomness, UCF
David Fries, USF
Tom Kelly, Imago Scientific
Fred Stevie, NCSU
Brian Kempshall,UCF
Lucille Giannuzzi,UCF

There will also be a FIB Users Workshop consisting of 10 minute
presentations of theory, techniques, and/or applications of FIB/dual
beam/cross beam instrumentation. For more information, or if anyone would
like to participate as a presenter in the Workshop please contact:

Lucille Giannuzzi, lag-at-mail.ucf.edu, (407 823-5770)


*******************************************************************
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
University of Central Florida
4000 Central Florida Blvd.
PO Box 162450
Orlando, FL 32816-2450
email lag-at-mail.ucf.edu phone 407-823-5770 fax 407-823-0208
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"Good judgement comes from experience.

Experience comes from making bad judgement."

Mark Twain
********************************************************************




From daemon Fri Jan 24 10:30:27 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 11:19:45 -0500
Subject: General - Periodic Table wall chart

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry Owen, I missed a better one.

http://www.edaxppd.com/applications/period.html

The image downloads as a fairly large JEPEG.

Thanks to EDAX.

Regards,

Fred Monson
Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
An FEI (Quanta 400 and Technai 12),
Oxford INCA Energy 400, and
Olympus FV-300 Shop.


-----Original Message-----
} From: Owen P. Mills [mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 4:51 PM
To: Microscopy


Dear All,

I'm looking for help finding a source for periodic table wall charts. I'm
using them for microanalysis so I need K, L & M lines in keV. I've been
using the small ones, 2' x 3', that the vendors give away but I'd like to
get bigger ones. I need 6 of them.

Anyone run across something like this?

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From daemon Fri Jan 24 11:09:39 2003



From: G.J. Brakenhoff :      brakenhoff-at-science.uva.nl
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 17:54:06 +0100
Subject: Focus on Microscopy 2003, 13-16 April, Genoa. Abstract deadline

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear all,

Deadlines are getting nearer for the FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 2003 conference 13-16
April 2003, University of Genoa, Italy. Conference location: Palazzo Ducale,
Genoa. See http://www.palazzoducale.genova.it

The important deadlines are:
Abstract due date: February 1st, 2003
Early registration until: February 15th, 2003

Abstract submission and registration preferably on-line through our website
http://www.focusonmicroscopy.org where all information about the conference
can be found.

OPERA! We have been able to reserve for the conference a number of seats for
the the premiere of the opera La Boheme by Giacomo Puccini in the Genova
Opera house on the evening of 15 April. http://www.carlofelice.it
For more information on the opera and reservation see our web-site.

Hotels in Genoa may be a bit tight around the conference period, so timely
booking is suggested.

Greetings and looking forward to see you in Genoa!

Alberto Diaspro, University of Genoa, Italy
Cesare Usai, National Research Council, Italy
Fred Brakenhoff, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

===================================================================
Meeting Info:

FOCUS ON MICROSCOPY 2003
16th International Conference on 3D Image Processing in Microscopy
15th International Conference on Confocal Microscopy

April 13th-16th, 2003
University of Genoa, Italy
Conference location: Palazzo Ducale, Genoa

Confocal, multiphoton excitation and deconvolution imaging techniques have
become indispensable tools in microscopy for the study of three-dimensional
structures such as are encountered in biology, medicine and material sciences.
We see time-resolved micro-spectroscopy, FRET and related advanced type of
fluorescence imaging modes combined with a trend towards faster -3D- image
collection at lower specimen dosage and ever increasing resolutions.
New non-linear excitation modes like harmonic and coherent anti-Stokes Raman
imaging are rapidly evolving. Sophisticated data processing like Image
Correlation Spectroscopy (ICS) can provide access to the statistics of the
underlying specimen structures down to the ten nm range. Recent developments
in these areas will be covered with an eye on their practical applications.
Special sessions will be devoted to the application of 3D techniques for the
microscopy of living cells and tissues and the use of GFP and other labeling
techniques in these studies.

These conferences offer an efficient meeting point for developers and users
working in these rapidly developing fields and play an important role in the
dissemination of information about new developments in microscopy.

Further information:

http://www.focusonmicroscopy.org
====================================================================
--
+-----------------------------------------+
Prof. Dr. G.J. Brakenhoff
University of Amsterdam
Institute for Molecular Cell Biology
Section Molecular Cytology
Kruislaan 316
1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Tel. : 31-20-5255189
Fax. : 31-20-5256271
Email: brakenhoff-at-science.uva.nl
+-----------------------------------------+


From daemon Fri Jan 24 12:06:53 2003



From: Boron nitride :      boronnitride-at-hotmail.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jan 2003 11:49:39 -0700
Subject: Seeking external TEM, SEM and XRD users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

Well we need to look at your problem step by step.

1) Switch off the HT. Then if you remove the gun cable from the tank and
switch on do you hear discharges?

2) If you do not hear discharge it tells us that the problem is in the
cable or the gun vacuum.

3) Do you have a penning gauge that you could fit in one of the gauge
positions in the gun area?

4) If we can monitor the vacuum we will be able to find out if it is a
vacuum problem you have, or a gun cable problem.

5) If we decide it is a gun cable problem you will need to contact an
organisation in your country that will be able to replace the cable, using
your current cable ends.

6) This type of company may make or repair x-ray sets in your hospitals,
these also use high voltage cables. Another alternative is a company that
makes cables for other high voltage applications. I have used both when I
have had service problems around the world.

I have just returned from running courses in India it is unfortunate I did
not see your posting until recently.

Please keep the information flowing so that I may guide you to a solution.

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
EM Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: "shashi singh" {shashis_99-at-yahoo.com}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Cc: {shizgal-at-delongamerica.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2003 11:29 AM


Dear all,

The Department of Physics at Boston College just finished installation
of a state-of-the-art JEOL 2010F FEG TEM. It is a multi-purpose
ultrahigh resolution analytical electron microscope with a wide range of
capabilities such as high resolution image observation, nano area X-ray
analysis, versatile analysis by convergent-beam electron diffraction,
and analysis of the atomic structure and/or bonding state of atoms.

The Physics Department is also equipped with a JEOL 6340F Scanning
Electron Microscope (SEM), a JEOL 200CX TEM, and an X-ray diffractometer.

All the above equipment is open to external users. Universities,
Institutions, corporations as well as other scientific collaborators
are welcome to use our facilities. Interested party please contact Dr.
Jianyu Huang at the following address:

-----------------------------------------------
Department of Physics
Boston College
140 Commonwealth Avenue, Higgins Hall
Chestnut Hill, MA 02467

Tel: (617) 552-3586
Fax: (617) 552-8478
Email: huangje-at-bc.edu
http://ph99.bc.edu/EMXRD/index.html
-----------------------------------------------






_________________________________________________________________
MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus



From daemon Fri Jan 24 15:40:00 2003



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 2003 09:17:20 -0800
Subject: Re: TEM: Embedding Resins for Polymeric Materials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Paul,

All Ladd resins require heat or generate heat upon curing, including Mercox
Corrosion casting resin.

John Arnott

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Gerroir, Paul J" {Paul.Gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com}
To: "Microscopy-at-MSA. Microscopy. com (E-mail)"
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2003 8:45 AM


} January 24, 2003
}
} Good morning all,
} I am looking for the "one size fits all" type of embedding resin that can be
} used for polymers. For a number of years we have been using a two part epoxy
} resin which for most general purpose applications has been very
} satisfactory. Because the availability of these components has become
} uncertain I wanted to ask other users and suppliers for their suggestions or
} recommendations. Most of the materials that we wish to embed and section
} have glass transition temperatures (Tgs) between 50 and 70 degrees C. For
} some materials: blends, copolymers and the like cryo-sectioning may be
} necessary. Embedding resins that require curing at elevated temperatures are
} out of the question. Obviously we must be certain that any curing protocol
} leaves the sample unchanged. Are (is) there a single embedding resin that
} meets all these requirements? Thanks.
}
} Trying to stay warm in the Great White North ... it is a cool -20C today.
} Thankfully there is little wind chill to worry about.
}
} Paul -

Have you ever tried Epofix? It cures at room temperature, and has good
cutting qualities. All such RT polymerizations are exothermic, tho, and I
haven't checked its temperature rise.

Caroline

Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/PMHomePage.html
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html




From daemon Sun Jan 26 10:34:36 2003



From: nasen.baer-at-planet-interkom.de (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2003 10:17:06 -0600
Subject: Ask-A-Microscopist: Looking for slides

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (nasen.baer-at-planet-interkom.de) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
January 25, 2003 at 17:03:35
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: nasen.baer-at-planet-interkom.de
Name: Klaus Fischer

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Stuttgart, Germany

Question: Hello,

I'm looking for a set or single slides concerning nerve-system,
sens-organs (human and animal),
nerve-cells and nerve-endings in skin, sens-organs and motor nerve endings.
Do you have an idea, where I can get such things?

Thank you and best regards
Klaus

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From daemon Sun Jan 26 16:44:30 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2003 16:27:57 -0600
Subject: Anti-static gun and resin thin sectioning

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We recently demo'ed a cryo-ultramicrotome and saw the amazing improvement
that using a Diatome Static Line II ionizing gun so we bought one when we
got our new cryo-ultramicrotome. I just tried out the ionizer as I
sectioned some Epon sections at room temp on water. I was really surprised
by how much better the block sectioned and the quality of the ribbons. I
was getting great ribbons and as soon as I turned off the ionizer, the next
section would crumble. This happened at least 6 times. Is this type of
improvement typical? Are other users using ionizers with resin
sections? Since my cryo-ultramicrotome is in a different location than my
two regular ultramicrotomes, i may be forced to buy another one of
these. Standard disclaimer: I have no financial interest in Diatome or
much else. Tom

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Cor
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Sun Jan 26 18:39:09 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2003 16:38:09 -0800
Subject: RE: Nikon 8000 ED Scanner

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Consider the Polaroid Sprintscan 45. It will
do 2000x4000 (2500 equivalent) up to 4x5".

Does one really need 4000 dpi for a TEM neg?

gary g.


At 02:36 PM 1/24/2003, you wrote:
} I do not know about the Nikon but Polaroid has a scanner, the SprintScan
} 4000 Plus that scans 35mm to 6x7 at 4000 x 4000 dpi. It is a great scanner!
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2003 5:57 PM
} To: John J. Bozzola
} Cc: MSA listserver
} Subject: Re: Nikon 8000 ED Scanner
}
} No...it cannot. The largest it will do
} is 6x9cm. The width limit is a killer.
} If you center your subject, you can trim
} the neg and use the glass holder to scan
} a 6x9 field.
}
} gary g.
}
}
} At 11:58 AM 1/22/2003, you wrote:
}
} } A colleague of mine was wondering if the Nikon 8000 ED is able to scan
} } intact, 3.25 x 4 inch TEM negatives at high resolution (4000 ppi). Any
} } information would be appreciated.
} }
} } Thank you.
} }
} } ##############################################################
} } John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} } I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} } 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} } Southern Illinois University
} } Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} } Phone: 618-453-3730
} } Fax: 618-453-2665
} } Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} } Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
} } ##############################################################



From daemon Sun Jan 26 21:20:27 2003



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2003 21:12:04 -0600
Subject: TSM meeting announcement and 1st call for papers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


**FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS**

The 2003 Spring Meeting of
THE TEXAS SOCIETY FOR MICROSCOPY
“Embracing All Forms of Microscopy”

April 3, 4, 5, 2003

Meeting will be held in Hubbard Hall on the campus of Texas
Woman’s University, Denton, TX.

THURSDAY WORKSHOP
Microwave Techniques
Presented by Rick Giberson, Research and Development
Manager, Ted Pella, Inc.
Workshop sponsored by Ted Pella, Inc. and TSM

MSA LAS-SPONSORED SPEAKER
FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 2003
HUBBARD HALL
TWU - DENTON CAMPUS
Dr. Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Engineering and Director,
UCF/Cirent Materials Characterization Facility, University
of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.
Topic: "Focused Ion Beam Specimen Preparation for
Everything". Focused ion beam techniques have been developed
to prepare site-specific specimens in a reproducible and
rapid manner for SEM and TEM analysis. The conventional and
the lift-out methods of specimen preparation will be
discussed and FIB applications on a wide range of materials
will be presented. The usefulness for using the FIB for
solving scientific research problems will be emphasized.

Registration forms, hotel information, and author's
instructions can be found on our website,
http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/ . Questions about the
program can be directed to Jo Taylor, Program Chair, at
jtaylor-at-sfasu.edu. Author's and abstract questions should
be directed to our Editor, Camelia Maier, at cmaier-at-twu.edu.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (webmaster-at-texasmicroscopy.org)
TSM webmaster
http://www.texasmicroscopy.org/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From daemon Sun Jan 26 22:58:53 2003



From: Frank Eggert :      eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 05:49:08 +0100
Subject: Re: General - Periodic Table wall chart

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Owen,

please try

http://www.mikroanalytik.de/software.phtml

There you will find a table of most intense line energies in keV, visible with
EDX-spectrometer. In addition, critical excitation
energies and most probable line overlaps (K/L, K/M and L/M) are presented
(atomic numbers). The element names are in
German (left column) and in English (right column).

Klick at the animated table image. Your browser will load the entire image in
JPG-format (956 KByte). Then store the image
on your computer and print it out. Use the maximum size and best resolution,
available with your printer.

Sorry, until now the homepage is only in German. in a couple of weeks you will
find there a English version and the program to
download, from this the poster is a screen shot.

Good luck

Frank

"Owen P. Mills" wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Dear All,
}
} I'm looking for help finding a source for periodic table wall charts. I'm
} using them for microanalysis so I need K, L & M lines in keV. I've been
} using the small ones, 2' x 3', that the vendors give away but I'd like to
} get bigger ones. I need 6 of them.
}
} Anyone run across something like this?
}
} Owen
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills



From daemon Mon Jan 27 00:35:36 2003



From: venkat-at-www.ccmb.res.in
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 12:01:10 +0000
Subject: Jeol 100cx HV tank

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have water in the HV tank, please suggest us how to remove the
water and what are the parts likely to be replaced. Since we are
not trained in this system, any diagram assisting to above
could be sent to me personally.

regards,
B.Venkatanarayana.


From daemon Mon Jan 27 07:02:54 2003



From: Dr. Manfred Rohde :      mro-at-gbf.de
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 13:52:38 +0100
Subject: X-ray film developer from agfa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear microscopists,

since Agfa has stopped to produce the x-ray film developer G-230 I would
like to ask if someone still has got the original Agfa recipe for this
developer i-or the G-150 developer- in his/her hands. I am asking
because I am not very satisfied with the results we obtained with
Kodak's D-19 developer for our last 2000 sheets of Agfa Scientia film.

Thank's in advance.
Manfred



From daemon Mon Jan 27 08:04:07 2003



From: Ladd Research :      ladres-at-worldnet.att.net
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 08:54:52 -0500
Subject: RE: Kodak 4489 film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We too have had some concerns expressed to us by our customers concerning
the new formulation of 4489 film. The concern has been limited in volume,
but for those customers who are concerned we maintain a stock of the old
formulation of the film. If you require any just be sure to ask for the old
formulation.

John Arnott

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com




From daemon Mon Jan 27 09:17:39 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 09:08:07 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM: Embedding Resins for Polymeric Materials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Paul,

Do you embed all your samples? If so, why? I understand that the samples
some encounter can only be addressed by embeddment. However, I routinely
work with polymeric materials (films, molded materials, granules, fibers,
fabrics, etc) using optical microscopy, SEM, LVSEM, TEM and AFM. I embed
only when absolutely necessary. Obviously some samples must be embedded.
Many, however, can be sectioned or faced after gluing onto mounts or
grasped with handmade polyethylene chucks.

Consider working without epoxy wherever possible. The benefits of
unembedded samples include: shortened prep; improved microtomy conditions;
and elimination of the complications of epoxy that is infiltrated into or
surrounding the part during the analysis (contaminates, charging, etc).

Feel free to reach me off-line for more information.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com




"Gerroir, Paul J"
{Paul.Gerroir-at-crt. To: "Microscopy-at-MSA. Microscopy. com (E-mail)"
xerox.com} {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:
Subject: TEM: Embedding Resins for Polymeric Materials
01/24/03 07:45 AM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


January 24, 2003

Good morning all,
I am looking for the "one size fits all" type of embedding resin that can
be
used for polymers. For a number of years we have been using a two part
epoxy
resin which for most general purpose applications has been very
satisfactory. Because the availability of these components has become
uncertain I wanted to ask other users and suppliers for their suggestions
or
recommendations. Most of the materials that we wish to embed and section
have glass transition temperatures (Tgs) between 50 and 70 degrees C. For
some materials: blends, copolymers and the like cryo-sectioning may be
necessary. Embedding resins that require curing at elevated temperatures
are
out of the question. Obviously we must be certain that any curing protocol
leaves the sample unchanged. Are (is) there a single embedding resin that
meets all these requirements? Thanks.

Trying to stay warm in the Great White North ... it is a cool -20C today.
Thankfully there is little wind chill to worry about.

Regards,
Paul

Paul J. Gerroir
Microscopy
Materials Characterization
Xerox Research Centre of Canada
2660 Speakman Drive
Mississauga, Ontario L5K 2L1

Phone: (905) 823-7091, ext. 216
FAX: (905) 822-7022
email: paul.gerroir-at-crt.xerox.com








From daemon Mon Jan 27 11:45:22 2003



From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      AllanWojtasP-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 12:27:26 -0500
Subject: Food Structure and Functionality Symposium 2003

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Food Structure and Functionality Symposium 2003
Held in conjunction with the 94th AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo
May 4-7, 2003
Kansas City Convention Center, Kansas City, Missouri, USA

Schedule as of January 27th, 2003

Sunday, May 4, 2003
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Short Course: Roadmap guide to Image Analysis for the Food Industry given by Dr. John Russ, Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, USA

Monday, May 5, 2003
Opening of Symposium

Microencapsulation of Food Ingredients and Nutrients: Opportunities and Challenges.
Chairs: Moshe Rosenberg, University of California, USA and
Beatrice Conde-Petit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Starch as Encapsulation Agent: Structural Properties of Starch-Flavor Inclusion Complexes. B. Conde-Petit

Water-Insoluble Microcapsules and Microspheres Consisting of Whey Proteins. M. Rosenberg

Use of Microencapsulation for the Stabilization of Oxidatively Sensitive Lipids and Nutrients, Such as Omega 3 Oils, to Significantly Improve Shelf Life and Handling Characteristics. P. Lee

Improvement of Flavor Performance by Microencapsulation.. K.B. de Roos

Agricultural Applications of Microscopy and Imaging. Chairs R. Gary Fulcher, University of Minnesota, USA and S. Shea Miller, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Canada
2:00-4:00 p.m.

3 speakers confirmed, no further information available at this time.

Food Structure and Functionality Forum Dedicated Poster Session
4:00p.m. to 6:00p.m.

Food Structure and Functionality Forum Division Board Meeting
6:00p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, May 6, 2003
Colloidal and Interfacial Properties for Understanding Tailoring Food Product Behavior I - Dairy Applications
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Chairs: Mark Auty, Dairy Products Research Centre, Ireland and John A. Lucey, University of Wisconsin, USA

The Influence of Vegetable Fat on Sensory Characteristics of a Cheese. S. Karlsson

Recent Progress on Understanding the Melting Process in Cheese. J.A. Lucey

Colloidal and Interfacial Properties of the Caseins. D.S. Horne

Role of C-terminal Region of Bovine. P. Qi

Influence of the Oil Characteristics on the Interfacial Properties on Oil-In-Water Emulsions. C. Granger

Stability of Pickering Emulsions in Tablespreads. D. Rousseau

Creaminess: Its Origin in Microstructure. M. Paques

Food Structure and Functionality Forum Division Luncheon 12:00p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Speaker: Moshe Rosenberg, University of California, USA.
Topic: Science and Technology in manufacturing High Quality Cheese: Challenges and Opportunities

Colloidal and Interfacial Properties for Understanding and Tailoring Food Product Behavior II
2:00-5:00 p.m.
Chairs: Marcel Paques, Friesland Coberco Dairy Foods, The Netherlands and David G. Pechak, Kraft Foods, Inc., USA

Pickering Stabilization of Water-in-Oil Emulsions. S.M. Hodge

Structural Studies of Interfaces in Frozen Dairy Desserts. H.D. Goff

Creaminess Versus Fattiness in Oil-in-Water Semi-Solid Emulsions. R. Janssen

New Information on the Internal Structure of Starch from Atomic Force Microscopy Studies. V.J. Morris

Accuracy Evaluation of Low-Resolution NMR of Oil Drop Size Distribution in Triglyceride Emulsions. N. Denkov

Interfaces and Food Functionality. M. Martin

Food Structure and Functionality Forum Division Members Meeting 5:00p.m. to 6:00p.m.

Wednesday, May 7, 2003
New Methods & Techniques for Food Structure and Functionality Analysis
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Chairs: Kathy Groves, Leatherhead Food International, UK and Maud Langton, Swedish Institute for Food and Biotechnology, Sweden.

3-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid Crystallization by Widefield Deconvolution Microscopy. J. Litwinenko

High Pressure Homogenization of Raw Bovine Milk: Effects on Fat Globule Size Distribution, Protein Functionality and Microbial Inactivation.. J.C. Cheftel

Electron Microscopy of Wet Samples at Atmospheric Pressure: Unique Analytical Capabilities for Food, Emulsions, and Biological Specimens. O. Gileadi

Light Scattering Intensity Fluctuations and Gel Formation in Opaque Systems. D. Horne

Processed Foods: Structural, Functional and Chemical Properties
2:00-5:00 p.m.
Chairs: Diana Kittleson, General Mills Technology East, USA and Bernhard Tauscher, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, Germany.

Rheometric Measurement of Cocoa Butter Tempering Properties. J. Alander

Complex Formation of B-Cyclodextrin in Liquid Foods. K.A. Schmidt

Alteration of Food Peptides and Proteins under High Hydrostatic Pressure. A. Fernandez- Garcia

Closing of Symposium.

For more details, visit the website:

http://www.aocs.org/meetings/annual_mtg/interest.asp?area=5



Paula M. Allan-Wojtas
Research Scientist - Food Microstructure / Chercheur scientique - microstructure des aliments
Food Safety and Quality Team / Salubrité et qualité des aliments
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada /Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone / Téléphone: 902-679-5566
Facsimile / Télécopieur: 902-679-2311
32 Main Street / 32 rue Main
Kentville, Nova Scotia / Kentville (Nouvelle-Écosse)
B4N 1J5
allanwojtasp-at-agr.gc.ca








From daemon Mon Jan 27 12:15:07 2003



From: Paula Allan-Wojtas :      AllanWojtasP-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 12:58:56 -0500
Subject: Image Analysis of Food Short Course 2003

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Roadmap Guide to Image Analysis for the Food Industry
May 4, 2003
Held in conjunction with the 94th AOCS Annual Meeting
Kansas City Convention Center
Kansas City, MO, USA

Course Faculty
Dr. John Russ, visiting professor, Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, USA.

Sponsored by the Food Structure and Functionality Forum Division of the AOCS

Course Description
Image analysis is an extremely valuable technique for generating data from images. The tools presented in this class can be applied to a broad range of food applications. Statistical analysis of data generated from images can be very useful in aiding product development, processing, packaging, and quality control for raw ingredients and processed foods.

This one-day short course is intended to provide a condensed guide to the process of image analysis. The class will cover the steps used to acquire, process, extract features, and make measurements from images. It will also demonstrate how image analysis can be applied to problem solving for food research, production, or quality control. Specific topics include: image acquisition, correction of image defects, detail enhancement, thresholding of image features, binary image processing, feature automation, and batch processing. Participants are invited to submit images or image analysis problems prior to the course. The images may be discussed or used in the course demonstrations. However, it may not be possible to offer a full solution due to the time constraints of a one-day short course. The class is limited to 20 participants.

For more information visit the website:

http://www.aocs.org/meetings/fsffcourse/

or contact coordinator

Diana Kittleson, General Mills Technology East

(Diana.Kittleson-at-genmills.com)







Paula M. Allan-Wojtas
Research Scientist - Food Microstructure / Chercheur scientique - microstructure des aliments
Food Safety and Quality Team / Salubrité et qualité des aliments
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada /Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone / Téléphone: 902-679-5566
Facsimile / Télécopieur: 902-679-2311
32 Main Street / 32 rue Main
Kentville, Nova Scotia / Kentville (Nouvelle-Écosse)
B4N 1J5
allanwojtasp-at-agr.gc.ca









From daemon Mon Jan 27 13:28:05 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 09:17:40 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Need recommendations SEM digital acquisition

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, All-

Within about the next two hours (11:30 Hawaiian time, 1:30 West Coast
time) I need to come up with a replacement for our digital acquisition on
our FESEM. Don't you just love grant administrators?

We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM, one of the last Hitachi SEMs without
digital image acquisition. We have happily been using Printerface from GW
Electronics for many years. However, it's life is limited, and I've been
handed a bucket of money I can use - by noon today. I'd like to know what
some of you have used on your analog SEMs (especially if you're happy).

Other places to put my money might be a new sputter coater (and I'm
finally getting a new CPD).

The money can only be used for equipment over $5,000, whereas most of what
I want is just under that!

Mahalo,
Tina

78F degrees, sunny with a few clouds, surf coming down from 20-25 feet

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Mon Jan 27 13:48:26 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 08:40:20 +1300
Subject: Periodic Table chart for wds?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Thanks, that's a great one.

Does anyone know of a wds-friendly version?

cheers

rtch

}
} Dear Owen,
}
} please try
}
} http://www.mikroanalytik.de/software.phtml
}
} There you will find a table of most intense line energies in keV,
} visible with EDX-spectrometer. In addition, critical excitation
} energies and most probable line overlaps (K/L, K/M and L/M) are
} presented (atomic numbers). The element names are in German (left
} column) and in English (right column).
}
} Klick at the animated table image. Your browser will load the entire
} image in JPG-format (956 KByte). Then store the image on your computer
} and print it out. Use the maximum size and best resolution, available
} with your printer.
}
} Sorry, until now the homepage is only in German. in a couple of weeks
} you will find there a English version and the program to download,
} from this the poster is a screen shot.
}
} Good luck

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Mon Jan 27 14:27:01 2003



From: Rick Hugo :      hugo-at-pdx.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 12:18:22 -0800
Subject: Sulfur embedding?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all - have any of you any experience embedding materials
(especially rocks) in sulfur for subsequent thin sectioning? Or does
anyone know of good references for this technique?

Thanks!

--
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Rick Hugo, Ph.D.
Geomicrobiology and Electron Microscopy Lab
Department of Geology, Portland State University
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}




From daemon Mon Jan 27 18:05:28 2003



From: Shannan Little :      littlesm-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 18:44:05 -0500
Subject: RE: Ask-A-Microscopist: protozoans

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Micscape Magazine online (the online magazine of Microscopy UK) has an on-line Pond Life ID kit.
Here's the link -
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/pond/index.html


Shannan Little
Electron Microscopy Technician
Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
Lethbridge Research Centre



From daemon Mon Jan 27 18:48:42 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 19:38:48 -0800
Subject: Am Chem Soc Light Microscopy Course

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The American Chemical Society is once again offering "Applied Optical Microscopy" in conjunction with the upcoming PITTCON in Orlando Florida. This is one of the few hands-on courses remaining in the ACS curriculum and is also one of the few courses with extensive material on polarized light. Note that, while this is an offering of the Chemical Society, the course is very multi-disciplinary. Participants from all scientific disciplines are welcome.

} Dates: March 7-9, 2003
} Location: Renaissance Orlando Resort at SeaWorld, Orlando, Florida
} Registration, course materials, and coffee breaks: $1345 for ACS members, $1445 for non-members
} Housing and food: on your own, but PITTCON does have a housing bureau
} Syllabus, course description and registration information: www.MicroscopyEducation.com
} Instructors:
} Barbara Foster, Microscopy/Microscopy Education, Inc.
} Dr. Barry Fookes, Chemistry Dept/Criminalistics Division, University of Central Florida
} Dr. Kenneth Piel, Microscopy/Microscopy Education

} Participants are encouraged to bring samples from their own work.

A verbatim testimonial from a recent student:"Doing light microscopy with taking this ACS course is like doing the laundry without a washing machine".


Best regards,
Barbara Foster (organizer and principal lecturer)
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com




From daemon Mon Jan 27 20:37:16 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 16:28:25 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Need recommendations for Image Acquisition

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, All-

Many thanks for the recommendations. I have enough info for the
budget; now I only have to cross my fingers for a couple of months. Also
asking for a new CPD, sputter coater, and perhaps a backscattered electron
detector.

There were enthusuastic recommendations from people using SIS's ADDA II,
4Pi, Emispec, Quartz PCI, Orion, Advanced Database Systems, and Evex. The
first two got multiple "votes", and I'm sure over the course of several
days there would be more. However, I've got what I need for now.

Thanks to you all!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Tue Jan 28 08:31:14 2003



From: Paula Sicurello :      patpxs-at-gwumc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 09:20:17 -0500
Subject: Positive control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listers,

I've been doing some EM immuno's lately and getting funky, non-specific
results. My negative controls come out clean, but the immunos are so
random I'm doubting myself. What I'd like to do is run a known positive
control on human cell lines. I'd like something that stains some part
of the cell but not all over the cell.

Suggestions?

Anything you give me is gratefully accepted and I thank you in advance,
or TIA for the instant message crowd ;-)

Drowing my sorrows in cold water fish gelatin,

Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
George Washington Univ. Medical Center
Dept. of Pathology, Ross Hall rm 505
Electron Microscope Lab
2300 Eye St.
Washington, DC 20037
202-994-2930 phone
202-994-2518 fax


From daemon Tue Jan 28 09:11:35 2003



From: atcsem :      atcsem-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 10:03:04 -0500
Subject: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS analysis?

Any information is greatly appreciated.
Pavel



From daemon Tue Jan 28 09:15:09 2003



From: atcsem :      atcsem-at-earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 10:08:59 -0500
Subject: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS =
analysis?

Any information is greatly appreciated.
Pavel





From daemon Tue Jan 28 09:40:42 2003



From: Barbieri Thomas-r53545 :      Thomas.Barbieri-at-motorola.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 08:31:06 -0700
Subject: Need recommendations SEM digital acquisition

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Tina,

We have a JEOL 6301 SEM, and we use a PC with a Flashbus card (Integral Technologies, Inc) to capture digital images. The card comes with a variety of input cable types in order to accomodate the many different types of video output ports (i.e., s-video, BNC, 4-pin din, RGB, etc.) found on laboratory equipment.

It's 78 degrees here too, today!

Best Regards,
Tom Barbieri

-----Original Message-----
} From: Tina Carvalho [mailto:tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2003 12:18 PM
To: Microscopy Listserver


Hi, All-

Within about the next two hours (11:30 Hawaiian time, 1:30 West Coast
time) I need to come up with a replacement for our digital acquisition on
our FESEM. Don't you just love grant administrators?

We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM, one of the last Hitachi SEMs without
digital image acquisition. We have happily been using Printerface from GW
Electronics for many years. However, it's life is limited, and I've been
handed a bucket of money I can use - by noon today. I'd like to know what
some of you have used on your analog SEMs (especially if you're happy).

Other places to put my money might be a new sputter coater (and I'm
finally getting a new CPD).

The money can only be used for equipment over $5,000, whereas most of what
I want is just under that!

Mahalo,
Tina

78F degrees, sunny with a few clouds, surf coming down from 20-25 feet

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Tue Jan 28 10:00:59 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 09:53:35 -0600
Subject: Re: Sulfur embedding?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Rick,

As memory serves me (and it seems to serve more poorly with each passing
year), Polymer Microscopy, by Grubb & Sawyer, may address it. Good luck.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."




Rick Hugo
{hugo-at-pdx.edu} To: Microscopy List
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc:
01/27/03 02:18 PM Subject: Sulfur embedding?





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Hello all - have any of you any experience embedding materials
(especially rocks) in sulfur for subsequent thin sectioning? Or does
anyone know of good references for this technique?

Thanks!

--
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
Rick Hugo, Ph.D.
Geomicrobiology and Electron Microscopy Lab
Department of Geology, Portland State University
{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}









From daemon Tue Jan 28 15:04:04 2003



From: Anthony J. Garratt-Reed :      tonygr-at-mit.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 15:52:55 -0500
Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The original electron microprobe was built by Raymond Castaing in Paris
around 1950. It had a fixed electron beam and crystal spectrometers. A
commercial version was first marketed by Cameca. When I was a new graduate
student in 1967, a Cameca microprobe was being installed in my department
in Oxford. It, too, had a fixed beam, two or three (I don't remember
which) crystal spectrometers, and an optical microscope to set the position
of the sample under the beam. I don't know how the beam was aligned or
focused (I never used the instrument myself, though other members of my
group did).

The SEM didn't come along until later, in the early '60's, commercialized
by Cambridge Instruments. As time has passed, the "microprobe" and the
"SEM" have become more alike, until today microprobes can generate
respectable SEM images of a sample, and the beam can be steered
electrically to the position of interest. Almost all SEMs have a port on
which can be mounted a crystal (or wavelength) spectrometer. The majority
of both types of instruments also typically have an EDX spectrometer.

So the difference is now mainly semantics. A microprobe is an instrument
optimized for stable, high beam current and with a chamber designed for
mounting several wavelength spectrometers, together with an EDX detector,
while an SEM is an instrument which is fundamentally the same, but
optimized for generation of fine electron probes and capable of working
well at lower voltages, and with a specimen chamber designed for
flexibility in mounting samples.

WDX and EDX spectroscopy are two methods of getting at the energy (or its
equivalent, wavelength) of an x-ray in order to determine the chemistry of
a sample. Both methods have unique attributes, which is why both
techniques are still in use.

Tony Garratt-Reed.



At 10:08 AM 1/28/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


** Anthony J. Garratt-Reed
** MIT Room # 13-1027
** 77 Massachusetts Avenue
** Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
** USA
**
** Phone: (+) 1-617-253-4622
** Fax: (+) 1-617-258-6478
**




From daemon Tue Jan 28 15:04:06 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      dusevichv-at-umkc.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 14:56:02 -0600
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microprobe is essentially a specialized SEM with:
a) several (3-5) WDS and, possibly, EDS.
b) higher beam stability
c) optical scope in a specimen chamber for bringing specimen
in focal plane of WDS.
d) staff better qualified for X-ray microanalysis (optional).

Vladimir

}
} What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS =
} analysis?
}
} Any information is greatly appreciated.
} Pavel
}
}
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 28 16:22:57 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 16:14:32 -0600
Subject: TEM imaging of sooty oil specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have someone who is interested in using TEM to image sooty, 0.06
micrometer particles suspended in (gasp!) lube oil from an engine.
Does anyone have experience examining such samples?

My inclination is to solvent-clean the soot until the oil is removed
totally and then place the particles on a carbon substrate. However,
the researcher is concerned that this will remove the dispersant
additives, leaving the soot free to agglomerate. I agree that this
may occur, but we would be able to suspend the particles
(ultrasonically, perhaps) prior to deposition on the grid.

Suggestions?

Thank you.

##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From daemon Tue Jan 28 16:28:09 2003



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 17:33:37 -0500
Subject: FW: Need a back copy of Microscopy Today

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi

I have not worked on a JEOL tank but assume it is similar to other Japanese
models. In which case the tank components are attached to the top of the
tank. Unbolting and lifting the top clear of the oil (its very heavy, a
crane would be of assistance) should allow the components to drip dry. The
place in which you do this must be free from dust.

I would suggest you cover the floor with plastic sheeting as this is a messy
task. Once the tank top has been remove from the tank the dirt oil may be
disposed of through an appropriate agency. Then fresh transformer oil may
be placed in the tank after it has been
thoroughly cleaned. All the tank top components should be checked and where
possible cleaned with a fluff free cloth. Keep this area covered with a
plastic sheet at all times,
do everything in your power to prevent dust and other contaminants from
settling on the components.

When these tasks have been performed the tank top needs to be very very
slowly lowered into the oil. Shake the tank top as it is lowered to try to
encourage all air pockets to be removed. When the top is in place and
bolted down, gently shake the tank for a little while, this again is to help
remove air pockets.

When you switch the HT on, do so at the lowest kV and allow it to operate
under these condition for at least an hour. Repeat this procedure for each
kV. If you cannot carry out this procedure in one day please allow at least
15 minutes at each kV until you reach a step you have not reached before. I
would carry out this procedure with the gun cable removed so that you can be
sure there are no other areas of interference.

Good luck, cleanliness is the secret for success

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
EM Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007
www.emcourses.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: {"venkat-at-www.ccmb.res.in"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2003 12:01 PM


Listers,

Hi. We (Nestor Zaluzec and I) are in the process of scanning back copies
of Microscopy Today into our web page.

The plan is to have downloadable copies available on the web six months
after they appear in print. Free. The entire magazine is available
online--advertisements and all.

You can see what the first six months of MT 2002 look like at
http://www.microscopy-today.com follow the links to the back issue Table
of Contents.

Our plan is to have at least the last five years available for you to
download. The entire ten years can be done if there is interest.

*************************
We are missing one issue. The April 2000 issue number 3. Neither Don
Grimes nor I have a copy!
*************************

If anyone has a copy of the April 2000 issue of Microscopy Today (Number
03) in good condition that we can borrow for a couple of weeks please
respond to this note. Don, Nestor, and I will think of some nice reward
for you!

Thank you!

Ron Anderson, Editor
Microscopy Today
microtoday-at-attglobal.net



From daemon Tue Jan 28 17:15:11 2003



From: Yi, Keewook :      kyi-at-iupui.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 18:07:20 -0500
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} What is Electron Microprobe?
}
See
http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/empa.html

Best

Keewook Yi
Research Analyst / electron microscope
Indiana University School of Dentistry
415 Lansing st.
Indianapolis, IN 46202-2876
kyi-at-iupui.edu
tel) 317-274-2598

This is the way it's been done for billions of years.
Small moves, Ellie. Small moves. - from "Contact"

} ----------
} From: atcsem
} Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 10:08 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: What is Electron Microprobe?
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS =
} analysis?
}
} Any information is greatly appreciated.
} Pavel
}
}
}
}
}
}


From daemon Tue Jan 28 18:00:18 2003



From: Monson, Frederick C. :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 18:49:32 -0500
Subject: Periodic Table chart for wds?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This may appear some distance from what you want, and it is not always as
obvious as one might desire, however, with a little work this piece of
software can provide nice help in doing XRF which is what WDS is, as I
understand it.

Hoe I'm right, Ritchie, 'cause here's the link:

http://users.skynet.be/xray_corner/

Regards,

Fred Monson
Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging

Mail to:
Geology, CASI
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383

Phone & FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu

For help and information only,
The CASI houses:
An FEI Quanta 400 and Technai 12T,
Oxford INCA Energy 400,
Tousimis AutoSamdri 815 and
Olympus FV-300.


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2003 2:40 PM
To: Frank Eggert; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



Thanks, that's a great one.

Does anyone know of a wds-friendly version?

cheers

rtch

}
} Dear Owen,
}
} please try
}
} http://www.mikroanalytik.de/software.phtml
}
} There you will find a table of most intense line energies in keV,
} visible with EDX-spectrometer. In addition, critical excitation
} energies and most probable line overlaps (K/L, K/M and L/M) are
} presented (atomic numbers). The element names are in German (left
} column) and in English (right column).
}
} Klick at the animated table image. Your browser will load the entire
} image in JPG-format (956 KByte). Then store the image on your computer
} and print it out. Use the maximum size and best resolution, available
} with your printer.
}
} Sorry, until now the homepage is only in German. in a couple of weeks
} you will find there a English version and the program to download,
} from this the poster is a screen shot.
}
} Good luck

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Tue Jan 28 18:13:27 2003



From: Chris Salter :      chris.salter-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 23:59:11 +0000
Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Anthony

For your information,

} When I was a new graduate
} student in 1967, a Cameca microprobe was being installed in my department
} in Oxford. It, too, had a fixed beam, two or three (I don't remember
} which) crystal spectrometers,

Two

} and an optical microscope to set the position
} of the sample under the beam. I don't know how the beam was aligned or
} focused (I never used the instrument myself, though other members of my
} group did).
}

With great difficulty, the MS42 (or was the MS46 it is so long since I
used it towards the end of its life) was difficult to focus, there were
phosphor screens with aperatures in there centres at various points to
align the beam. And I seem to remember using cathodluminenece of thoria
to focus the beam.

} The SEM didn't come along until later, in the early '60's, commercialized
} by Cambridge Instruments. As time has passed, the "microprobe" and the
} "SEM" have become more alike, until today microprobes can generate
} respectable SEM images of a sample, and the beam can be steered
} electrically to the position of interest. Almost all SEMs have a port on
} which can be mounted a crystal (or wavelength) spectrometer. The majority
} of both types of instruments also typically have an EDX spectrometer.
}
} So the difference is now mainly semantics. A microprobe is an instrument
} optimized for stable, high beam current and with a chamber designed for
} mounting several wavelength spectrometers, together with an EDX detector,
} while an SEM is an instrument which is fundamentally the same, but
} optimized for generation of fine electron probes and capable of working
} well at lower voltages, and with a specimen chamber designed for
} flexibility in mounting samples.
}

One other important feature of the microprobe is that the stages are
designed to give fixed geometry between the surface of the sample and
the spectrometers (fixed 0 tilt).
Also modern EPMAs have large high precision computer controlled stages
to make the automatic analysis of many hundreds of points possible in a
day, or the acquistion of large area element maps. (Unlike the MS4?
where every thing was driven by hand and I was lucky if I got the data
for more than 5 slag analyses in a day - the data which then had to be
taken over the road to run through the correction programs).


--
Chris Salter
Department of Materials Characterisation Services,
Begbroke Business and Science Park,
Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Oxford
OX5 1PF.

Tels 01865 283722, EPMA 283741, Home 463424, Mobile 07776031608


From daemon Tue Jan 28 22:14:32 2003



From: Materials Research Laboratories, Inc. :      mrllab-at-raex.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 23:04:43 -0500
Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Pavel..

Electron Microprobe is simply another term for Wavelength Dispersive
Spectroscopy - WDS - they are one and the same. Many in the industry refer
to WDS as EPMA - Electron Probe Microanalysis.

Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Carol Jean Hirt
Vice President
Materials Research Laboratories, Inc.
290 North Bridge Street
Struthers, OH 44471
www.mrllab.com
800 424-1776


}
} What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS =
} analysis?
}
} Any information is greatly appreciated.
} Pavel
}
}
}
}
}



From daemon Tue Jan 28 22:39:22 2003



From: Young W. Kim :      ywkim-at-gong.snu.ac.kr
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 13:29:51 +0900
Subject: Cross section for carbon nanotube film on Si

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dr. Yiming Yao,

I use a good old tube-insertion method to observe the cross-sectional view of multi-wall carbon nanotubes.
Get a tube of metal tube, insert your sample, then soak in low-viscosity glue, like Mbond. After curing, you can handle pretty easily for grinding, lapping, dimpling, and milling. If you need more strength between the tube wall and the sample in the middle, filling the empty space with thin wires would help.
If you use single-modulation from substrate side while milling, it would give better results.
I can get a full view of the 200-micron-thick layer using this technique even though it has visible area at the edge.
Good luck,

Young-Woon Kim, Ph.D.

Research Professor
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Seoul National University
Tel) +82-2-880-7977
Fax) +82-2-883-8197
e-mail) ywkim-at-gong.snu.ac.kr


-----Original Message-----
} From: yimin yao [mailto:yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se]
Sent: Monday, January 20, 2003 1:26 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear all,

I am going to make cross section sample of the interface between carbon
nanotube film (a few hundred micrometer thick) and Si substrate for TEM. I
tried the standard method to make cross section (gluing the samples with
M-bond, mechanical polishing and ion milling), but the film turned to be
peeled off from substrate during polishing or ion milling, due to the large
thickness of film and weak bonding between the film and substrate. Any ideas
and suggestions from your experience?

Best regards,

Yiming
------------------------------------
Dr. Yiming Yao

Microscopy and Microanalysis
Department of Experimental Physics
Chalmers University of Technology
SE-41296, Göteborg
Sweden

Tel: +46 31 772 3633
Fax: +46 31 772 3224
email: yimin-at-fy.chalmers.se
website: http://fy.chalmers.se/~yimin

-------------------------------------




From daemon Wed Jan 29 02:31:16 2003



From: corneliu sarbu :      corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 09:27:15 +0100
Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



As I know, in the current language the "electron microprobe" is
the "surgery knife" you are using for EDS/WDS analysis, i.e.
the fine electron beam itself, to be positioned on the area to be analysed.

Am I wrong ?

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************

At 28/01/03 10:08, you wrote:
} Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




From daemon Wed Jan 29 03:58:27 2003



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 11:04:36 +0100
Subject: TEM: holey carbon grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm looking for a cheap, fast and reliable supplier (for Europe) of
good holey carbon coated grids for Cryo-TEM.

Any suggestions?

Thanks everybody,


Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290



From daemon Wed Jan 29 05:43:33 2003



From: Ron Doole :      ron.doole-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 11:33:57 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: TEM imaging of sooty oil specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi John,

One way is to use a gas reaction cell or a controlled
environment TEM. I have used ours to look at soot
particulate dispersion in engine oil for a commercial
company although your 60nm particles might be tricky.
Specimen prep was to wipe the oil across a carbon filmed
grid.

Seeing your Illinois affiliation try Univ of Illinois
(Iain Robertson in Prof. Birnbaum's group) at Champagne(?)
for a start.

Good luck,
Ron

On Tue, 28 Jan 2003 16:14:32 -0600 "John J. Bozzola"
{bozzola-at-siu.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We have someone who is interested in using TEM to image sooty, 0.06
} micrometer particles suspended in (gasp!) lube oil from an engine.
} Does anyone have experience examining such samples?
}
} My inclination is to solvent-clean the soot until the oil is removed
} totally and then place the particles on a carbon substrate. However,
} the researcher is concerned that this will remove the dispersant
} additives, leaving the soot free to agglomerate. I agree that this
} may occur, but we would be able to suspend the particles
} (ultrasonically, perhaps) prior to deposition on the grid.
}
} Suggestions?
}
} Thank you.
}
} ##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} ##############################################################
}
}

----------------------
Mr. R.C. Doole
Department of Materials,
University of Oxford.
Parks Road, Oxford. OX1 3PH. UK.
Phone +44 (0) 1865 273701
Fax +44 (0) 1865 283333
ron.doole-at-materials.ox.ac.uk
http://www-em.materials.ox.ac.uk/
*********************************

We are pleased to host EMAG'03 in Oxford. 3rd to 5th September 2003.

********************************



From daemon Wed Jan 29 06:06:21 2003



From: Jonathan Wilson :      wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 11:57:18 -0000
Subject: Biocut 2030

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello,
I recently aquired a used Reichert-Jung Biocut 2030 microtome from a lab
auction. I am a bit unfamiliar with this model and am seeking advice from
those list members who might use one. On the left side of the instument is a
small wheel or knob that is associated with a series of three coggs within
the casing of the machine. From what I understand, this is the course
advance knob. However, when I turn the knob either clockwise or counter
clockwise the coggs only make about a quarter of a turn. The course advance
knob is held in place by two flexible pieces of metal and can thus be turned
further without advancing the coggs. I have no manual so I am not sure if
there is something that I should be doing make it work properly.
The microtome got a good bang during shipping and I am not sure if it is
damaged. I replaced the mounting bolts for the metal piece to which the
coggs are mounted and everything looks alright to me. From what I can tell
the fine advance is working OKay and the sections come out alright.
Thanks for any enlightenment.
Sincerely,
Jonathan


Jonathan Wilson (PhD)
CIIMAR
Rua do Campo Alegre 823
4150-180 Porto, Portugal
tel: 351 22 608 0470 / 71
fax: 351 22 608 0479
e-mail: wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
web: www.cimar.org




From daemon Wed Jan 29 06:38:29 2003



From: Spehner Daniele :      daniele.spehner-at-efs-alsace.fr
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 13:30:04 +0100
Subject: RE: holey carbon grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I am really happy with those from Ted Pella. You can send an e-mail directly to Christel at sales-at-tedpella.com or have a look on the online catalog www.tedpella.com
Danièle

--------------------------------------------
Danièle Spehner
Head of the EM Department
INSERM EPI 03 45 - EFS-Alsace
10 rue Spielmann - 67065 STRASBOURG
tel : 03 88 21 25 25 - fax : 03 88 21 25 44
e-mail : daniele.spehner-at-efs-alsace.fr
------------------------------------


-----Message d'origine-----
De : Philip Koeck [mailto:Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se]
Envoyé : mercredi 29 janvier 2003 11:05
À : Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Objet : TEM: holey carbon grids


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I'm looking for a cheap, fast and reliable supplier (for Europe) of
good holey carbon coated grids for Cryo-TEM.

Any suggestions?

Thanks everybody,


Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290




From daemon Wed Jan 29 08:46:43 2003



From: Bruce Ingber :      bingber-at-srrc.ars.usda.gov (by way of
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 08:38:01 -0600
Subject: Re: History of carbon tape in SEM labs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A recent mention of the double-stick carbon adhesive tabs is found in
K. B. Bolte's Technique for Obtaining Scanning Electron Micrographs
of Minute Athropods, Proc Ent Soc Ont, 127:67-87, 1996.

Bruce F. Ingber, Biologist
Electron Microscopy
USDA-ARS, SRRC
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124
bingber-at-srrc.ars.usda.gov
504-286-4270 phone
504-286-4419 fax

} } } "Garber, Charles A." {cgarber-at-2spi.com} 01/24/03 07:43AM } } }
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

The first in the world to market a product one might call (generically) a
double sided adhesive conductive carbon filled tape was a company in Japan
called Oken Shoji. This would have been in the early 1980's. The owner of
that firm was and still is Mr. Hisashi Sato. He also applied for and
received a Japanese patent for the tape at that time. Apparently it covers
only tape cut 8 mm wide and tapes either larger or smaller than that width
somehow don't infringe. I know that sounds a bit irrational but that is the
way it has been explained to me.

I have also been told that there is another name on the patent, that of a
professor in Japan. I believe that the original user (inventor) of the tape
for this application was that professor, who happened to know Mr. Sato and
then it was Mr. Sato who actually commercialized the product. It is of
course all in Japanese so this information comes to me second-hand.

In any case, the tape was widely used in Japanese SEM laboratories before it
was even known here in the USA or in Europe. It was the Japanese service
engineers who brought samples of the tape to the USA from Japan and when the
US employees of the Japanese microscope firms went to Japan for training,
they brought samples back with them as well. It was my further recollection
that the first SEM manufacturer to be encouraging their customers to use the
carbon tape as a means of promoting column cleanliness was ISI/Topcon.

SPI Supplies was introduced to the tape by the ISI people during that time
frame and almost simultaneously, the tape was introduced in the USA and
Canadian markets by both SPI Supplies and E. F. Fullam, Inc. Some time
later after that, the tape was then offered by Ted Pella, Inc., Electron
Microscopy Sciences, Inc. and later on by Energy Beam Sciences, Inc. In
Europe at that time (early 1980's) the tape was offered by Polaron
Equipment Ltd. and Agar Scientific Ltd.

Today, the tape is not all the same. Some is on a white plastic core and
some is on a cardboard core. The tape on the cardboard core to the best of
my knowledge has direct traceability to the original tape that has been
produced since the early 1980's. Anyone who has used this tape knows very
well how the cardboard core starts to disintegrate and particulate, hardly a
good thing for EM lab cleanliness. The newest version of this tape has a
white plastic core that does not shed particulates. For more information
see URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/spec_prep/cond_adhes-tapes.shtml

Today, one can use this kind of product not only in tape form but also in
die cut discs and sheets. It is also available as a double sided adhesive
silver filled sheet. All of these products trace their progeny back to the
original carbon tape concept and patent.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies offers all of the mentioned products so we have a
vested interest in promoting their use.

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================


From daemon Wed Jan 29 08:56:57 2003



From: Philip Koeck :      Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 16:04:20 +0100
Subject: TEM: sucrose in specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Me again,

would 1% sucrose be a problem in frozen hydrated specimens (single
particles)?
If so is it necessary to dyalize it out or is it sufficient to wash it of
the grid before
plunge-freezing?

Thanks in advance,

Philip

Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290



From daemon Wed Jan 29 12:15:55 2003



From: joswiak-at-orca.astro.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 10:03:27 -0800
Subject: Re: Sulfur embedding?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Rick - We have worked on embedding particles in sulfur for some time
now. I have always thought to present this technique at MSA but just
haven't gotten around to it yet. To the best of my knowledge, the
idea to embed in sulfur was conceived by our colleague, John Bradley.
Perhaps others have done so as well. We developed our own set of
sulfur-embedding techniques and methods suitable to our particles.
Embedding materials in sulfur is a wonderful technique to look at
microtomed sections since sulfur will sublimate in vacuum and you can
be left with a section on a TEM grid that is free of embedding
material. We study interplanetary dust particles (IDPs - typically 5
- 10 um in size) which are composed of 1000's of mineral grains,
glass and carbonaceous phases, including organic materials. These
particles are often highly porous and the normal infiltrating epoxy
resins have always made it difficult for us to determine the carbon
compounds vs the epoxy,thus our need for this technique (or other
carbon-free embedding methods).

Sulfur is a very difficult material to work with and requires fairly
extensive experience and practice due to some unusual properties.
For instance, liquid sulfur is one of the rare materials (the only?)
whose viscosity goes up as you heat it to higher temperatures (at
least up to about 190 C); this is due to increasing polymerization of
sulfur ions in the melt with increasing temperature. Our technique
of sulfur embedding is to place a particle (say a 10 um
interplanetary dust particle) in the middle of a clean glass slide.
On a second clean glass slide we heat a tiny crystal of ultra-pure
sulfur above its melting point of 119 C. The sulfur will melt and
after removal of the heat will supercool forming a liquid drop on the
glass slide. I like to have the drop diameter 50 - 100 um or less,
otherwise the liquid sulfur may spontaneously crystallize. While
observing under a good binocular microscope, the particle on the
clean glass slide is lowered into the sulfur drop which will wet both
glass slides. When the two glass slides are separated the particle
on the first glass slide will have a hemispherical liquid drop around
it. At this point you need to crystallize the supercooled sulfur
which surrounds the particle by touching a small sulfur crystal to
the drop which will create nucleation sites and initiate
crystallization. There are other ways to do this besides what I have
just described. Unfortunately, fractures may develop in the sulfur
during crystallization which can lead to contamination and other
problems later. Fracturing of the crystallized sulfur is a problem
with this technique that we haven't found a satisfactory solution to
yet.

The particle in solid sulfur is then mounted with epoxy to a pre-cut
epoxy cylinder which fits the chuck of the microtome. The sulfur
mount must first be dislodged from the slide as the crystallized
sulfur will want to stick to the glass. It can then be trimmed and
microtomed in the usual way but you have to be careful as microtoming
is more difficult than with epoxy resins due to the softness and
fragile nature of crystallized sulfur but it can be done with
practice. For us, this works best on small samples (in the 10 - 20
um range). Another important factor is that many epoxies will
dissolve the sulfur while curing thus you need to experiment to
determine which ones are suitable to hold your sulfur mount. I have
found one or two that are suitable for our needs. Superglue can also
be used.

I haven't provided all the details of our sulfur embedding technique
here and there are more pitfalls than I have described. The
technique is difficult and somewhat unpredictable, but if everything
goes right you can end up with nice microtomed sections free of any
embedding material. This is useful for observing or measuring carbon
by EDX if you mount your sample on a TEM grid with an SiO film (have
to watch out for carbon contamination in the microscope, though). I
can imagine that there are other, perhaps better ways to mount
materials in sulfur than I have described; this is just a technique
that has evolved over the last several years for us.


Dave

Dave Joswiak
University of Washington
Dept. of Astronomy, 351580
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-7702
joswiak-at-astro.washington.edu


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--


From daemon Wed Jan 29 12:42:32 2003



From: zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 12:34:26 -0600
Subject: Philips 501 SEM available for parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues

We have an old Philips 501 SEM which is being retired.

It is no longer suitable for use as a fully operable SEM and
hence I offer it to the community as a source of spare parts.

If you have need of parts (free) please contact me by Feb 12th.
the interested party will be responsible to reimburse ANL
for any shipping costs.

After Feb 12th any remaining items will be disposed of using
ANL's recycling methods (usually just sold for scrap metal).

Cheers...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From daemon Wed Jan 29 15:28:41 2003



From: Beavers, Roy :      rbeavers-at-post.cis.smu.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:17:55 -0600
Subject: Link eXL system repair

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Group,

Looking for anyone that can repair a Link eXL system.

All looked o.k. last night but today I am getting 100% deadtime.

My guess at this point, is that the detector has failed. It is a Pentafet SiLi 133eV rebuilt in march 2000.

Oxford is the obvious choice but would like to consider other options.


Roy Beavers
Southern Methodist University
Department of Geological Sciences
P.O. Box 750395
Dallas, Tx. 75275
Voice: 214-768-2756
Fax: 214-768-2701
Email: rbeavers-at-mail.smu.edu



From daemon Wed Jan 29 16:04:32 2003



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 13:56:40 -0800
Subject: TEM: holey carbon grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have used Agar and found them excellent, but not lately.
John Mardinly
Phone: 408-765-2346
Pager: 877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Philip Koeck [mailto:Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 2:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I'm looking for a cheap, fast and reliable supplier (for Europe) of
good holey carbon coated grids for Cryo-TEM.

Any suggestions?

Thanks everybody,


Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290



From daemon Wed Jan 29 20:22:20 2003



From: Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 20:10:32 -0600
Subject: EDAX: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear List, I have a problem with my Microanalysis: sometimes (often) I have
counts when the Beam is off. But not two or three counts ... thousands of
counts for several days. Normally I try to empty and clean the Dewar to be
sure I have not frozen particles of powder inside, but the problem remains.
So I call Philips technicians, they make tests on the electronic parts and
send the detector to Germany because they cannot find the problem. Ok, I
wait one month and when the detector returns it is ok, but nobody know what
the problem was. The problem has been present for 4 years and now it occurs
two - three times per year. For the ventilation of the chamber I use the
air to be sure I have not high pressure in the chamber wich may damage the
thin window of the detector. My detector is EDAX and my SEM is PHILIPS XL
20.
Please help me! Thanks.

Stefano Maretti
R&D CENTRE
SACMI Imola - Italy -


From daemon Wed Jan 29 20:50:05 2003



From: Microshaw-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 21:42:20 -0500
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Thanks Doug-
Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
Rgds,
Mike Shaw
Roselle, NJ

} Gary,
}
} MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with images. A couple
} of tricks I've discovered over the years.
}
} 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly on the page, it
} seems to give you much greater control over the location on the page. It
} also makes it much easier to add text annotations that stay with the image.
}
}
} If you don't want the text box to have a border you can remove it by selecting
} the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the Draw toolbar,
} then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like the text box to
} be transparent, select the text box outline and look for the "paint bucket"
} icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and select "none". If
} you discover its hard to find the text box border once you made the edge
} "invisible", first select the image with a single left click (it should have
} the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the keyboard left or right
} arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox outline (with black
} bordered resizing "handles").
}
} 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as opposed to copying
} and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images are harder to work
} with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} images into Word,
} you don't have to use JPEG.


From daemon Wed Jan 29 23:14:35 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 21:05:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Biocut 2030

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Jonathan,
have a Reichert ultracutE , I think the knob you are
referring is the same this instrument has. This is the
advance wheel for semithick sectioning. You move it
clockwise it will advance 0.5 micron upto first cog,
the next is for 1 micron and the last is for 2
microns.
Shashi Singh
Scientist, CCMB
Hyderabad
INDIA
----------------.
Hello,
I recently aquired a used Reichert-Jung Biocut 2030
microtome from a
lab
auction. I am a bit unfamiliar with this model and am
seeking advice
from
those list members who might use one. On the left side
of the instument
is a
small wheel or knob that is associated with a series
of three coggs
within
the casing of the machine. From what I understand,
this is the course
advance knob. However, when I turn the knob either
clockwise or counter
clockwise the coggs only make about a quarter of a
turn. The course
advance
knob is held in place by two flexible pieces of metal
and can thus be
turned
further without advancing the coggs. I have no manual
so I am not sure
if
there is something that I should be doing make it work
properly.
The microtome got a good bang during shipping and I am
not sure if it
is
damaged. I replaced the mounting bolts for the metal
piece to which the
coggs are mounted and everything looks alright to me.
} From what I can
tell
the fine advance is working OKay and the sections come
out alright.
Thanks for any enlightenment.
Sincerely,
Jonathan


Jonathan Wilson (PhD)
CIIMAR
Rua do Campo Alegre 823
4150-180 Porto, Portugal
tel: 351 22 608 0470 / 71
fax: 351 22 608 0479
e-mail: wilson_jm-at-cimar.org
web: www.cimar.org





=====
Shashi Singh
Scientist
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad-500 007
INDIA
PH-91-40-7192575,7192761,7192615
FAX-91-40-7160591, 7160311

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
http://mailplus.yahoo.com


From daemon Thu Jan 30 00:33:47 2003



From: Dr. Brendon Price :      priceb-at-kevex.emu.uct.ac.za
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 08:21:45 +0200
Subject: Re: Positive control

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dr. Brendon Price" {priceb-at-uctbc1.uct.ac.za}
} To: "Paula Sicurello" {patpxs-at-gwumc.edu}
} Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 9:50 AM
} Subject: Re: Positive control
}
}
} } Hi Paula
} }
} } In order to try and offer some advice, could you provide information on
} the
} } following:
} }
} } 1. What species was the antibody raised in and what
} protein/ligand/compound
} } was it raised against?
} } 2. Have you cleaned up the antibody preparation by immunoaffinity or
PEG
} 6
} } kDa precipitation?
} } 3. Do you get similar non-specific binding patterns in your Western
} blots.
} } What blocking buffers are you using?
} } 4. What type of TEM immunolabelling are you doing? Cryo, resin? If
resin,
} } is it LR White or the Lowicryls? What fixation procedure are you using?
} } 5. What concentrations of primary antibody are you using?
} } 6. are you using a gold-conjugated linker antibody or [if your primary
} } antibody is from rabbits] protein A gold?
} } 7. When you mention that the labelling is random, do you mean that you
} get
} } labelling randomly throughout the cell, or that the labelling density is
} } highly variable? If the density is variable, is the protein/compound
} } expressed at different stages during the cell cycle? Perhaps it is
} } asymmetrically distributed within the cell and this may result in
variable
} } labelling densities.
} }
} } The most important bit of information I need is the labelling pattern of
} } your Western blots on reducing SDS-PAGE gels. If these are clean [i.e.
} only
} } band(s) at the anticipated molecular weight], then we can proceed
further
} in
} } the troubleshooting.
} }
} } Regards
} }
} } Brendon
} } *********************
} } Dr. Brendon Price
} } Chief Scientific Officer
} } Electron Microscope Unit
} } University of Cape Town
} } Private Bag
} } Rondebosch
} } 7701
} } Tel: +27 21 650-2819
} } Fax: + 27 21 689-1528
} } ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "Paula Sicurello" {patpxs-at-gwumc.edu}
} } To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} } Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 4:20 PM
} } Subject: Positive control
} }
} }
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } } On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} } }
} } }
} } } Hello Listers,
} } }
} } } I've been doing some EM immuno's lately and getting funky,
non-specific
} } } results. My negative controls come out clean, but the immunos are so
} } } random I'm doubting myself. What I'd like to do is run a known
positive
} } } control on human cell lines. I'd like something that stains some part
} } } of the cell but not all over the cell.
} } }
} } } Suggestions?
} } }
} } } Anything you give me is gratefully accepted and I thank you in
advance,
} } } or TIA for the instant message crowd ;-)
} } }
} } } Drowing my sorrows in cold water fish gelatin,
} } }
} } } Paula :-)
} } }
} } } Paula Sicurello
} } } George Washington Univ. Medical Center
} } } Dept. of Pathology, Ross Hall rm 505
} } } Electron Microscope Lab
} } } 2300 Eye St.
} } } Washington, DC 20037
} } } 202-994-2930 phone
} } } 202-994-2518 fax
} } }
} } }
} }
}



From daemon Thu Jan 30 03:16:41 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2003 20:58:36 -0500
Subject: Need recommendations SEM digital acquisition

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Thomas;

It's 8 degrees Fahrenheit here in New Jersey. Try Quartz PCI as a capture
device for slow scan SEM image capture.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
} From: Barbieri Thomas-r53545 [mailto:Thomas.Barbieri-at-motorola.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 10:31 AM
To: 'Tina Carvalho'; Microscopy Listserver


Hello Tina,

We have a JEOL 6301 SEM, and we use a PC with a Flashbus card (Integral
Technologies, Inc) to capture digital images. The card comes with a variety
of input cable types in order to accomodate the many different types of
video output ports (i.e., s-video, BNC, 4-pin din, RGB, etc.) found on
laboratory equipment.

It's 78 degrees here too, today!

Best Regards,
Tom Barbieri

-----Original Message-----
} From: Tina Carvalho [mailto:tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2003 12:18 PM
To: Microscopy Listserver


Hi, All-

Within about the next two hours (11:30 Hawaiian time, 1:30 West Coast
time) I need to come up with a replacement for our digital acquisition on
our FESEM. Don't you just love grant administrators?

We have a Hitachi S-800 FESEM, one of the last Hitachi SEMs without
digital image acquisition. We have happily been using Printerface from GW
Electronics for many years. However, it's life is limited, and I've been
handed a bucket of money I can use - by noon today. I'd like to know what
some of you have used on your analog SEMs (especially if you're happy).

Other places to put my money might be a new sputter coater (and I'm
finally getting a new CPD).

The money can only be used for equipment over $5,000, whereas most of what
I want is just under that!

Mahalo,
Tina

78F degrees, sunny with a few clouds, surf coming down from 20-25 feet

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *

* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*

****************************************************************************





From daemon Thu Jan 30 04:11:49 2003



From: corneliu sarbu :      corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 11:49:54 +0100
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I had a problem like this.
Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber camera.
When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second) return
close to zero.

Chris

----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 2:10 AM



Here is a mess of language. According to the rules of science language
"microprobe" is a composite word, from "micro = of a micrometer dimension"
and "probe", i.e. "microprobe = a probe of micrometer dimension". To call
"Microprobe" an instrument (notice the uppercase) means "instrument =
a probe of micrometer dimensions". So, finally, we get to the same point:
microprobe is the instrument of micrometer dimensions we use in order to
perform X-rays EDS/WDS analysis. That "instrument" is the electron beam
itself, as the "whole" instrument is not of micrometer dimensions at all.

Am I right ?

Corneliu

At 29/01/03 09:48, you wrote:
} I think, you are right.
}
} A Microprobe is an instrument that is very similar to an SEM, except that it
} usually is not optimized for imaging (you can do that, too), but for
} elemental analysis using WDX or EDX specroscopy. In many cases these
} instruments are computer controlled to allow the automatic movement of the
} stage to collect reference spectra under identical conditions, and more
} emphasis is placed on beam current and stability.
}
} The "probe" in microprobe is of course the electron beam, which can be
} focused on microscopical areas (hence the name).
}
}
} Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} Soft Imaging System Corp.
} 12596 West Bayaud Avenue
} Suite 300
} Lakewood, CO 80228
} ===================================
} phone: (888) FIND SIS
} (303) 234-9270
} fax: (303) 234-9271
} email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
} web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} ===================================
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: corneliu sarbu [mailto:corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 9:27 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America To
} Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line
} Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} As I know, in the current language the "electron microprobe" is the "surgery
} knife" you are using for EDS/WDS analysis, i.e. the fine electron beam
} itself, to be positioned on the area to be analysed.
}
} Am I wrong ?
}
} Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
} Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.) Catholic
} University of Leuven (KULeuven) Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44 B-3001
} Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
} ****************************************************************
} Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
} +32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
} Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
} e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
} ****************************************************************
}
} At 28/01/03 10:08, you wrote:
} } Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************



From daemon Thu Jan 30 05:16:21 2003



From: Terry Cooper :      terry.cooper-at-btinternet.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 11:06:35 -0000
Subject: Holey carbon films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Attn Philip Koeck

Dear Philip,

We are able to supply reliable holey carbon films on copper, nickel or gold
grids with reasonable delivery. Please contact our Swedish dealer Analytical
Standards AB on the following:

Tel 031 880 810
Fax 031 880 886

They should be able to supply a copy of our Microscopy catalogue on CD ROM.
Any problems please contact me direct by e-mail at:
} Terry.Cooper-at-btinternet.com

Best regards

Terry Cooper
TAAB Laboratories Equipment Ltd
3 Minerva House, Calleva Park
Aldermaston, Berks, RG7 8NA, England
Tel ++44 (0)118 981 7775 Fax ++44 (0)118 981 7881
e-mail sales-at-taab.co.uk
} www.taab.co.uk




From daemon Thu Jan 30 07:30:49 2003



From: Shalvoy, Richard B **CHES :      RBShalvoy-at-archchemicals.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 07:22:50 -0600
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I can share a recent example of how the file size in Word is a huge function
of how the images are imported into it.

A customer sent me a three page memo with 4 of my SEM images in it for my
review. The original image files were all jpgs about 150 kB in size. The
file he sent me was 4.5MB! By clogging up the email system, it's a pain to
work with that large a file. I tried a simple test by deleting the four
images from the memo and using the Insert, Picture, From File command to put
the same four images into Word. I then used the Format Picture menu to
resize the images down to fit side by side in the memo as before and saved
the file. The new file size was only 550 kB! Not tiny, but more in line
with what I would expect.

I informed the customer about this technique and he admitted to simply cut
and pasting them into Word. That is a sure recipe for making huge files
unnecessarily. It's kind of curious that there is such a large difference,
but I have seen it over and over.

Richard Shalvoy
Arch Chemicals, Inc.
350 Knotter Drive
Cheshire, CT 06410
(203) 271-4394
rbshalvoy-at-archchemicals.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 9:42 PM
To: cromey-at-Arizona.edu; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Thanks Doug-
Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
Rgds,
Mike Shaw
Roselle, NJ

} Gary,
}
} MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with images. A couple
} of tricks I've discovered over the years.
}
} 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly on the page, it
} seems to give you much greater control over the location on the page. It
} also makes it much easier to add text annotations that stay with the
image.
}
}
} If you don't want the text box to have a border you can remove it by
selecting
} the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the Draw toolbar,
} then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like the text box to
} be transparent, select the text box outline and look for the "paint
bucket"
} icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and select "none". If
} you discover its hard to find the text box border once you made the edge
} "invisible", first select the image with a single left click (it should
have
} the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the keyboard left or
right
} arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox outline (with
black
} bordered resizing "handles").
}
} 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as opposed to
copying
} and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images are harder to work
} with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} images into Word,
} you don't have to use JPEG.


From daemon Thu Jan 30 07:30:50 2003



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 08:20:16 -0500
Subject: RE: TEM imaging of sooty oil specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


There is an excellent paper, part of which looks at the soot with the
TEM:
SAE # 2002-01-1672


Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor

CMU Biology Department Microscopy Facility web page.
www.cst.cmich.edu/users/willi1gl/BDMF/BDMF.htm

} -----Original Message-----
} From: John J. Bozzola [mailto:bozzola-at-siu.edu]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 5:15 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: TEM imaging of sooty oil specimen
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
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ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
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}
-----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} We have someone who is interested in using TEM to image sooty, 0.06
} micrometer particles suspended in (gasp!) lube oil from an engine.
} Does anyone have experience examining such samples?
}
} My inclination is to solvent-clean the soot until the oil is removed
} totally and then place the particles on a carbon substrate. However,
} the researcher is concerned that this will remove the dispersant
} additives, leaving the soot free to agglomerate. I agree that this
} may occur, but we would be able to suspend the particles
} (ultrasonically, perhaps) prior to deposition on the grid.
}
} Suggestions?
}
} Thank you.
}
} ##############################################################
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
} I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
} 750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
} Southern Illinois University
} Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
} Phone: 618-453-3730
} Fax: 618-453-2665
} Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
} ##############################################################



From daemon Thu Jan 30 07:50:22 2003



From: Spehner Daniele :      daniele.spehner-at-efs-alsace.fr
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 14:42:37 +0100
Subject: TEM: holey carbon grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Philip,
I came exactly to the same conclusion and since I use Ted Pella's I have no problem.
.. and I do not know for your country but in France, shipment included is Ted Pella really sheaper than Agar. Another important point is that you can negotiate the prices for big orders and discuss with them whenever you have to. I have no interest in this compagny, I am a just a very satisfied customer.
Danièle




-----Message d'origine-----
De : Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Envoyé : mercredi 29 janvier 2003 22:57
À : Philip Koeck; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Objet : RE: holey carbon grids


------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


I have used Agar and found them excellent, but not lately.
John Mardinly
Phone: 408-765-2346
Pager: 877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Philip Koeck [mailto:Philip.Koeck-at-biosci.ki.se]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 2:05 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I'm looking for a cheap, fast and reliable supplier (for Europe) of
good holey carbon coated grids for Cryo-TEM.

Any suggestions?

Thanks everybody,


Philip Koeck
Svdertvrns Hvgskola and
Karolinska Institutet
Dept. of Bioscience at Novum
S-14157 Huddinge
Sweden
phone: +46-8-6089186
fax: +46-8-6089290




From daemon Thu Jan 30 08:00:31 2003



From: Gilbert Engler :      gilbert.engler-at-gengenp.rug.ac.be (by way of
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 07:54:13 -0600
Subject: question on confocal microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Since we are planning to implement a new ZEISS 510 confocal microscope
in our lab, I would like to receive some comments from confocal users
having already practical experience with the LSM 510 META. Is the method
of emission fingerprinting and the linear unmixing program really as
useful as it sounds to discriminate overlapping signals?

Sincerely yours,

Gilbert Engler
--
==================================================================
Gilbert Engler
DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SYSTEMS BIOLOGY Fax:32 (0)9
2645349
GHENT UNIVERSITY, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie VIB
mailto:gieng-at-gengenp.rug.ac.be http://www.psb.rug.ac.be
==================================================================


From daemon Thu Jan 30 08:23:02 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 08:15:16 -0600
Subject: Re: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris, your system must be better than ours {g} - when we turn on our
infra-red chamber scope, we get tens of thousands of counts and totally
swamp our detector. It is definitely necessary to make sure the chamber
scope is turned off.

Stefano, I wonder if your problem might also lie with the amplifier
discriminators, particularly the fast discriminator. EDS systems deal with
very small pulses so that the signal threshold needs to be set just above
the noise level. If that threshold has shifted, you could very well find
yourself detecting noise.

What sort of spectrum do you find under these circumstances? I would expect
that you would see a substantial peak at the left side of the spectrum. If
it is a signal from acoustic vibrations or from the infra-red camera, I
would expect the signal to tail off to the right for many channels. If it
is a problem due to the discriminator setting, I would expect only the
first channel or two to have counts. You would then need to adjust your
amplifier.

Unfortunately, I have no idea how the EDAX amps are adjusted. I have seen
amps with trim pots that control the discriminators and I have seen ones
where the controls are done through software. But EDAX should be able to
tell you the proper procedure, and it should be described in the setup or
calibration section of your manual.

Good luck.
Warren

At 10:03 AM 1/30/03 +0000, you wrote:

} I had a problem like this.
} Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber camera.
} When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second) return
} close to zero.
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it}
} To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 2:10 AM
} Subject: EDAX: Counts with Electron-Beam off
}
} }
} } Dear List, I have a problem with my Microanalysis: sometimes (often)
} I have
} } counts when the Beam is off. But not two or three counts ...
} thousands of
} } counts for several days. Normally I try to empty and clean the Dewar
} to be
} } sure I have not frozen particles of powder inside, but the problem
} remains.
} } So I call Philips technicians, they make tests on the electronic
} parts and
} } send the detector to Germany because they cannot find the problem.
} Ok, I
} } wait one month and when the detector returns it is ok, but nobody
} know what
} } the problem was. The problem has been present for 4 years and now it
} occurs
} } two - three times per year. For the ventilation of the chamber I use
} the
} } air to be sure I have not high pressure in the chamber wich may
} damage the
} } thin window of the detector. My detector is EDAX and my SEM is
} PHILIPS XL
} } 20.
} } Please help me! Thanks.
} }
} } Stefano Maretti
} } R&D CENTRE
} } SACMI Imola - Italy -
} }




From daemon Thu Jan 30 08:33:07 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 08:24:39 -0600
Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I believe part of the problem has to do with how MS handles the cut and
paste. If the images are copied, they are likely placed on the clipboard
according to your display setup. Windows has prepared an image at whatever
color depth you are using. It bothers me to see a black and white image
turn into a 24-bit color image just because that is what my display is set
for.

I think new versions of Windows and Word or Excel may have improved their
handling of such images. I know I used to have the same problem when
clients would paste their XRD patterns into Word as a bitmap, but now it
doesn't seem to be such a problem. It seems MS might now be doing some
compression of their own.

Either way, your suggestion to insert the picture directly from the JPG
file is definitely the better way to go.

Warren

At 07:22 AM 1/30/03 -0600, you wrote:

} I can share a recent example of how the file size in Word is a huge function
} of how the images are imported into it.
}
} A customer sent me a three page memo with 4 of my SEM images in it for my
} review. The original image files were all jpgs about 150 kB in size. The
} file he sent me was 4.5MB! By clogging up the email system, it's a pain to
} work with that large a file. I tried a simple test by deleting the four
} images from the memo and using the Insert, Picture, From File command to put
} the same four images into Word. I then used the Format Picture menu to
} resize the images down to fit side by side in the memo as before and saved
} the file. The new file size was only 550 kB! Not tiny, but more in line
} with what I would expect.
}
} I informed the customer about this technique and he admitted to simply cut
} and pasting them into Word. That is a sure recipe for making huge files
} unnecessarily. It's kind of curious that there is such a large difference,
} but I have seen it over and over.
}
} Richard Shalvoy
} Arch Chemicals, Inc.
} 350 Knotter Drive
} Cheshire, CT 06410
} (203) 271-4394
} rbshalvoy-at-archchemicals.com




From daemon Thu Jan 30 09:11:25 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 09:08:04 -0500
Subject: EDAX: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Stefano;

Two things immediately come to mind. First, if there is an "in chamber" I-R
camera it must be turned off or you'll get exactly what you are seeing,
several thousand cps with no beam. It will also intefere with some
backscattered detectors. Second, be sure you have no coupled vibration into
the detector from hoses, machinery, chillers etc.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it [mailto:Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 9:11 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Dear List, I have a problem with my Microanalysis: sometimes (often) I have
counts when the Beam is off. But not two or three counts ... thousands of
counts for several days. Normally I try to empty and clean the Dewar to be
sure I have not frozen particles of powder inside, but the problem remains.
So I call Philips technicians, they make tests on the electronic parts and
send the detector to Germany because they cannot find the problem. Ok, I
wait one month and when the detector returns it is ok, but nobody know what
the problem was. The problem has been present for 4 years and now it occurs
two - three times per year. For the ventilation of the chamber I use the
air to be sure I have not high pressure in the chamber wich may damage the
thin window of the detector. My detector is EDAX and my SEM is PHILIPS XL
20.
Please help me! Thanks.

Stefano Maretti
R&D CENTRE
SACMI Imola - Italy -




From daemon Thu Jan 30 09:14:41 2003



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 10:07:34 -0500
Subject: SEM - JEOL 35C parts available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


JEOL 35C parts available, you pay packaging and shipping or come pick up
what you want.

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer

Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
Mailto: opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/opmills




From daemon Thu Jan 30 09:29:23 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 11:05:38 -0500
Subject: Re: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jpeg are compressed files and inserting them into MSWord would uncompress
the files. So it's better to send the files separately as attachments rather
than in the document.

Pavel


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Shalvoy, Richard B **CHES" {RBShalvoy-at-archchemicals.com}
To: {"Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} ;
{Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 8:22 AM


Hello,

I hope the weather is okay in beautiful Italy.

My first approach, after all you have already done, would be to get a Geiger
Counter and check the area for any radioactivity. Also, if you are using
xray diffraction equipment nearby, see if the mysterious counts correspond
to when that equipment is energized.

Good luck.

Alex Greene
SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTATION SERVICES, INC.
1807 West Slaughter Lane, Number 200-499
Austin, Texas 78748-6200
Phone 512/282-5507 FAX 512/280-0702

Sustaining Member - MICROSCOPY SOCIETY OF AMERICA
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 8:10 PM


Dr, Sarbu;

You may be confusing an "electron microprobe" with an FIB [Focused Ion Beam]
which is in fact like a surgical knife in some respects in that it removes
material.

Peter Tomic
Anadigics

-----Original Message-----
} From: corneliu sarbu [mailto:corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 3:27 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



As I know, in the current language the "electron microprobe" is
the "surgery knife" you are using for EDS/WDS analysis, i.e.
the fine electron beam itself, to be positioned on the area to be analysed.

Am I wrong ?

Corneliu Sarbu, PhD
Department of Metallurgy and Applied Materials Science (MTM Dept.)
Catholic University of Leuven (KULeuven)
Kasteelpark ARENBERG nr. 44
B-3001 Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium
****************************************************************
Phone: +32-16-32.1241 - office
+32-16-32.1264 - secretary of department
Fax: +32-16-32.1992 or +32-16-32.1270
e-mail: Corneliu.Sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
web-site: www.mtm.kuleuven.ac.be
****************************************************************

At 28/01/03 10:08, you wrote:
} Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com






From daemon Thu Jan 30 10:19:35 2003



From: Peter Tomic :      PTomic-at-anadigics.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 11:12:39 -0500
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Folks;

Now I have to ask if this can all be distilled into one general statement.
Would not a SEM, no matter what the detection system is [EDS, WDS] be
generally called an electron microprobe? In my mind it's any instrument that
uses an accelerated electron striking a sample to generate quantitative or
qualitative data about the specimen.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
} From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:dusevichv-at-umkc.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2003 3:56 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Microprobe is essentially a specialized SEM with:
a) several (3-5) WDS and, possibly, EDS.
b) higher beam stability
c) optical scope in a specimen chamber for bringing specimen
in focal plane of WDS.
d) staff better qualified for X-ray microanalysis (optional).

Vladimir

}
} What is Electron Microprobe? How is it different from EDS or WDS =
} analysis?
}
} Any information is greatly appreciated.
} Pavel
}
}
}
}
}




From daemon Thu Jan 30 11:07:02 2003



From: Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 11:00:02 -0600
Subject: EDAX: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Stefano,
I have had this problem in the past. It turned out to be a ground loop fault
on the cover of the pre-amp on the detector. The aluminum of the pre-amp box
had oxidized and was no longer providing the proper electrical ground. This
can also happen if the detector touches something inside the SEM chamber or
if you get a ground loop between the EDX and SEM. You really should have it
checked in your lab, set up on your SEM.
Regards,
Mary
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 6:10 PM


Thanks to all. You are very kind.

David, Alex (The weather is good: cold and sunny), Mike, Randy, Paul J.,
Chuck, Jim and Chris:
I have not IR camera or light inside or near my chamber.
I have not radioactive samples around and I have the problem also when the
chamber is empty.

Russ:
My EDAX system is DX-4 and I have a pre - Sapphire detector (I think).

Peter:
Yes, I always have the backscattered detector installed (do you think it is
the cause of my problem?) and perhaps pre-vacuum pump gives bad vibration.

Paul:
I want to verify your opinion but I need a bit time. Thank you.


Stefano Maretti
R&D CENTRE
SACMI Imola - Italy -


From daemon Thu Jan 30 11:08:06 2003



From: Oakley, Jeff :      oakleyj-at-rayovac.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 15:08:27 -0600
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Stefano,
I have had this problem in the past. It turned out to be a ground loop fault
on the cover of the pre-amp on the detector. The aluminum of the pre-amp box
had oxidized and was no longer providing the proper electrical ground. This
can also happen if the detector touches something inside the SEM chamber or
if you get a ground loop between the EDX and SEM. You really should have it
checked in your lab, set up on your SEM.
Regards,
Mary
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {Stefano_Maretti-at-sacmi.it}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 6:10 PM


Dear Corneliu,
Microprobe is a shorthand word for "Electron Probe Micro Analyser", which is
the proper name of the instrument. It is the analyser which is the
instrument.
Mary
----- Original Message -----
} From: "corneliu sarbu" {corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 2:49 AM


Corneliu,

One big mistake that a person can make is trying to systematically make sense of the English language, even when dealing with scientific words.

Another one that will throw you for a loop is the FIB (Focused Ion Beam). The term that should be reserved for the small probe of gallium atoms has been given to the entire instrument. Of course the better term of "ion mill" had already been assigned to something else.

On the lighter side, English is the language that has us going home, going TO church, and going TO A movie, and going TO THE store. Explain that one. Also, feet smell and noses run.

Don't try to figure it out, just accept it!

Jeff Oakley




-----Original Message-----
} From: corneliu sarbu [mailto:corneliu.sarbu-at-mtm.kuleuven.ac.be]
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 4:50 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com



Here is a mess of language. According to the rules of science language
"microprobe" is a composite word, from "micro = of a micrometer dimension"
and "probe", i.e. "microprobe = a probe of micrometer dimension". To call
"Microprobe" an instrument (notice the uppercase) means "instrument =
a probe of micrometer dimensions". So, finally, we get to the same point:
microprobe is the instrument of micrometer dimensions we use in order to
perform X-rays EDS/WDS analysis. That "instrument" is the electron beam
itself, as the "whole" instrument is not of micrometer dimensions at all.

Am I right ?

Corneliu

At 29/01/03 09:48, you wrote:
} I think, you are right.
}
} A Microprobe is an instrument that is very similar to an SEM, except that it
} usually is not optimized for imaging (you can do that, too), but for
} elemental analysis using WDX or EDX specroscopy. In many cases these
} instruments are computer controlled to allow the automatic movement of the
} stage to collect reference spectra under identical conditions, and more
} emphasis is placed on beam current and stability.
}
} The "probe" in microprobe is of course the electron beam, which can be
} focused on microscopical areas (hence the name).
}
}
} Michael Bode, Ph.D.
} Soft Imaging System Corp.
} 12596 West Bayaud Avenue
} Suite 300
} Lakewood, CO 80228
} ===================================
} phone: (888) FIND SIS
} (303) 234-9270
} fax: (303) 234-9271
} email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
} web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
} ===================================


From daemon Thu Jan 30 15:47:22 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:38:30 +1300
Subject: IR LEDS/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



}
} I had a problem like this.
} Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber camera.
} When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second) return
} close to zero.
}
} Chris
}

What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Thu Jan 30 16:03:33 2003



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 08:59:38 +1100
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Another trick is to put the images and text into a Word table, if you size
the cells in the table to about the size you want, the images will insert
to fit the cell size.

And if copying and pasting, make sure you do "Paste Special" and unclick
the box that says "float over text". That way the images always stay in
the same spot with respect to the surrounding text and don't mysteriously
jump around when you insert or delete text.
cheers,
Rosemary
}
} Thanks Doug-
} Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
} Rgds,
} Mike Shaw
} Roselle, NJ
}
} } Gary,
} }
} } MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with images. A couple
} } of tricks I've discovered over the years.
} }
} } 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly on the page, it
} } seems to give you much greater control over the location on the page. It
} } also makes it much easier to add text annotations that stay with the image.
} }
} }
} } If you don't want the text box to have a border you can remove it by
} } selecting
} } the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the Draw toolbar,
} } then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like the text box to
} } be transparent, select the text box outline and look for the "paint bucket"
} } icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and select "none". If
} } you discover its hard to find the text box border once you made the edge
} } "invisible", first select the image with a single left click (it should have
} } the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the keyboard left or right
} } arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox outline (with
} } black
} } bordered resizing "handles").
} }
} } 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as opposed to copying
} } and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images are harder to work
} } with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} } images into Word,
} } you don't have to use JPEG.





From daemon Thu Jan 30 16:04:18 2003



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 16:36:56 -0500
Subject: light tight container?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


To all,

I need to frequently move two loaded 5 1/2"L x 4 1/2"W x 3"H EM film boxes
through a lighted hallway. Any suggestions for a light tight carrier would
be appreciated. I have seen a rather complex 'portable darkroom' bag but
can use something simpler.

Thank you.
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 2242
354 Mansfield Road
Beach Hall, Room 129
Storrs, CT 06269-2242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu




From daemon Thu Jan 30 17:00:19 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 22:51:44 -0000
Subject: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
here!
I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
the scanning beam to
be visible on the chamber cam.
How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
artefacts might result?

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
Subject: IR LEDS/EDS


}
} }
} } I had a problem like this.
} } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
camera.
} } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
return
} } close to zero.
} }
} } Chris
} }
}
} What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
}
} rtch
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}




From daemon Thu Jan 30 17:13:39 2003



From: joswiak-at-orca.astro.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 15:06:17 -0800
Subject: Re: Sulfur embedding?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Rick:

You can sublimate the sulfur by placing your TEM grid into a vacuum
(roughing pump range OK) for a few minutes, room temperature is fine.
Another possible way to remove the sulfur is to gently heat your
sample at atmosphere for an hour or so. Of course, if temperature
sensitive organic compounds are present you might choose the vacuum
method instead.

Many of the IDPs that we process have very high porosities. Surface
tension wicks the liquid sulfur inside the voids which simply goes
away during sublimation leaving a clean section, at least in theory.
You need to watch for contamination that is present in the sulfur to
begin with though, especially organic contaminants. I would
recommend that you purchase the very cleanest sulfur you can get and
then gently distill it onto a watch glass or petri dish which you can
keep covered.

Dave

Dave Joswiak
University of Washington
Dept. of Astronomy, 351580
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-7702
joswiak-at-astro.washington.edu




} Hello Dave, thank you for this information - it's extremely helpful.
} The prospect of magically removing the embedding medium for TEM
} examination is really cool! You should definitely write this up.
} Some random questions: At what temperature do you sublimate the
} sulfur? Do you experience any degradation of the organics at this
} temperature? Do your IDP's have any porosity? Our samples are often
} quite porous, so infiltration of the sulfur is an issue.
}
} Thanks again,
} Rick
}
} joswiak-at-orca.astro.washington.edu wrote:
}
} } Rick - We have worked on embedding particles in sulfur for some
} } time now. I have always thought to present this technique at MSA
} } but just haven't gotten around to it yet. To the best of my
} } knowledge, the idea to embed in sulfur was conceived by our
} } colleague, John Bradley. Perhaps others have done so as well. We
} } developed our own set of sulfur-embedding techniques and methods
} } suitable to our particles. Embedding materials in sulfur is a
} } wonderful technique to look at microtomed sections since sulfur
} } will sublimate in vacuum and you can be left with a section on a
} } TEM grid that is free of embedding material. We study
} } interplanetary dust particles (IDPs - typically 5 - 10 um in size)
} } which are composed of 1000's of mineral grains, glass and
} } carbonaceous phases, including organic materials. These particles
} } are often highly porous and the normal infiltrating epoxy resins
} } have always made it difficult for us to determine the carbon
} } compounds vs the epoxy,thus our need for this technique (or other
} } carbon-free embedding methods).
} }
} } Sulfur is a very difficult material to work with and requires
} } fairly extensive experience and practice due to some unusual
} } properties. For instance, liquid sulfur is one of the rare
} } materials (the only?) whose viscosity goes up as you heat it to
} } higher temperatures (at least up to about 190 C); this is due to
} } increasing polymerization of sulfur ions in the melt with
} } increasing temperature. Our technique of sulfur embedding is to
} } place a particle (say a 10 um interplanetary dust particle) in the
} } middle of a clean glass slide. On a second clean glass slide we
} } heat a tiny crystal of ultra-pure sulfur above its melting point of
} } 119 C. The sulfur will melt and after removal of the heat will
} } supercool forming a liquid drop on the glass slide. I like to have
} } the drop diameter 50 - 100 um or less, otherwise the liquid sulfur
} } may spontaneously crystallize. While observing under a good
} } binocular microscope, the particle on the clean glass slide is
} } lowered into the sulfur drop which will wet both glass slides.
} } When the two glass slides are separated the particle on the first
} } glass slide will have a hemispherical liquid drop around it. At
} } this point you need to crystallize the supercooled sulfur which
} } surrounds the particle by touching a small sulfur crystal to the
} } drop which will create nucleation sites and initiate
} } crystallization. There are other ways to do this besides what I
} } have just described. Unfortunately, fractures may develop in the
} } sulfur during crystallization which can lead to contamination and
} } other problems later. Fracturing of the crystallized sulfur is a
} } problem with this technique that we haven't found a satisfactory
} } solution to yet.
} }
} } The particle in solid sulfur is then mounted with epoxy to a
} } pre-cut epoxy cylinder which fits the chuck of the microtome. The
} } sulfur mount must first be dislodged from the slide as the
} } crystallized sulfur will want to stick to the glass. It can then
} } be trimmed and microtomed in the usual way but you have to be
} } careful as microtoming is more difficult than with epoxy resins due
} } to the softness and fragile nature of crystallized sulfur but it
} } can be done with practice. For us, this works best on small
} } samples (in the 10 - 20 um range). Another important factor is
} } that many epoxies will dissolve the sulfur while curing thus you
} } need to experiment to determine which ones are suitable to hold
} } your sulfur mount. I have found one or two that are suitable for
} } our needs. Superglue can also be used.
} }
} } I haven't provided all the details of our sulfur embedding
} } technique here and there are more pitfalls than I have described.
} } The technique is difficult and somewhat unpredictable, but if
} } everything goes right you can end up with nice microtomed sections
} } free of any embedding material. This is useful for observing or
} } measuring carbon by EDX if you mount your sample on a TEM grid with
} } an SiO film (have to watch out for carbon contamination in the
} } microscope, though). I can imagine that there are other, perhaps
} } better ways to mount materials in sulfur than I have described;
} } this is just a technique that has evolved over the last several
} } years for us.
} }
} }
} } Dave
} }
} } Dave Joswiak
} } University of Washington
} } Dept. of Astronomy, 351580
} } Seattle, WA 98195
} } (206)543-7702
} } joswiak-at-astro.washington.edu
} }
} } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--


From daemon Thu Jan 30 18:21:25 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 14:11:21 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: light tight container?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We use a Pelican case - one of those cases used for camera equipment where
you want to keep dust, light and/or water out. They come in various sizes
and have foam inserts that where you can either remove cubes or cut holes
to fit your equipment or film boxes. They are not cheap. They work very
well.

I believe there is at least one other brand as well - inquire at your
local camera shop or check the web.

Pelican Products http://www.casesbypelican.com

} I need to frequently move two loaded 5 1/2"L x 4 1/2"W x 3"H EM film boxes
} through a lighted hallway. Any suggestions for a light tight carrier would
} be appreciated. I have seen a rather complex 'portable darkroom' bag but
} can use something simpler.

Aloha,
Tina


****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From daemon Thu Jan 30 19:05:38 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2003 18:57:31 -0600
Subject: Re: light tight container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} I need to frequently move two loaded 5 1/2"L x 4 1/2"W x 3"H EM film boxes
} through a lighted hallway. Any suggestions for a light tight carrier would
} be appreciated. I have seen a rather complex 'portable darkroom' bag but
} can use something simpler.

I use an empty cardboard box that previously contained 500 sheets of
8.5 x 11 photographic paper. When you put the EM film boxes inside of
the black-lined cardboard box, it is completely light tight. You
can't beat the price.
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################


From daemon Thu Jan 30 20:33:58 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:19:32 +1300
Subject: Re: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} My first approach, after all you have already done, would be to get a
} Geiger Counter and check the area for any radioactivity. Also, if you
} are using xray diffraction equipment nearby, see if the mysterious
} counts correspond to when that equipment is energized.
}

Oh come on!

If there were to be sufficient ambient X-radiation to get into the sample chamber of an
SEM from outside, the staff would be all dead by now.

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Thu Jan 30 20:48:08 2003



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 07:17:57 -0000
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


This is getting a bit tiresome.

What on earth would be the point of 'distilling it into one general statement'?

About as much as trying to distill into one general statement the description of, say, a
cat.

By now there have been sufficient sensible replies for us all to know what an electron
microprobe is, haven't there?

It's not some metaphorical, etymological, or philosophical mystery.

Look, as someone suggested, at http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/empa.html.

Or look at the JEOL website.

Just read what Vladimir said. It's like an SEM, with better X-Ray detection, better
stability, an optical microscope, and, (I like this one) better operator training.

Of course an SEM can not be generally called an electron microprobe!

That would be like saying there was no difference between a JSM-840 and a JXA-840.


rtch



} From: Peter Tomic {PTomic-at-anadigics.com}
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Another thing to watch out for is re-using old MSWord reports as templates.
In some cases the file size does not shrink accordingly, and you can get a
document with one 250k image and a file size of 10MB! This problem seemed
to go away with one MSWord update, then come back again with another.

_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Shalvoy, Richard B **CHES [mailto:RBShalvoy-at-archchemicals.com]
Sent: 30 January 2003 13:23
To: '"Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com';
Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


I can share a recent example of how the file size in Word is a huge function
of how the images are imported into it.

A customer sent me a three page memo with 4 of my SEM images in it for my
review. The original image files were all jpgs about 150 kB in size. The
file he sent me was 4.5MB! By clogging up the email system, it's a pain to
work with that large a file. I tried a simple test by deleting the four
images from the memo and using the Insert, Picture, From File command to put
the same four images into Word. I then used the Format Picture menu to
resize the images down to fit side by side in the memo as before and saved
the file. The new file size was only 550 kB! Not tiny, but more in line
with what I would expect.

I informed the customer about this technique and he admitted to simply cut
and pasting them into Word. That is a sure recipe for making huge files
unnecessarily. It's kind of curious that there is such a large difference,
but I have seen it over and over.

Richard Shalvoy
Arch Chemicals, Inc.
350 Knotter Drive
Cheshire, CT 06410
(203) 271-4394
rbshalvoy-at-archchemicals.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: "Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
[mailto:"Microshaw-at-aol.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2003 9:42 PM
To: cromey-at-Arizona.edu; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Thanks Doug-
Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
Rgds,
Mike Shaw
Roselle, NJ

} Gary,
}
} MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with images. A couple
} of tricks I've discovered over the years.
}
} 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly on the page, it
} seems to give you much greater control over the location on the page. It
} also makes it much easier to add text annotations that stay with the
image.
}
}
} If you don't want the text box to have a border you can remove it by
selecting
} the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the Draw toolbar,
} then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like the text box to
} be transparent, select the text box outline and look for the "paint
bucket"
} icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and select "none". If
} you discover its hard to find the text box border once you made the edge
} "invisible", first select the image with a single left click (it should
have
} the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the keyboard left or
right
} arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox outline (with
black
} bordered resizing "handles").
}
} 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as opposed to
copying
} and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images are harder to work
} with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} images into Word,
} you don't have to use JPEG.


From daemon Fri Jan 31 03:31:30 2003



From: =?ISO-8859-2?Q?Old=F8ich_Benada?= :      benada-at-biomed.cas.cz
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:20:36 +0100
Subject: Re: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,
We had just the same problem with high counts some
times ago. Service engineers without any results
several times took out the detector from the column.
The last serviceman grounded the detector to the
microscope column and the problem vanished. All
calibration passed well and the system is just the
same as before the trouble. However, no one has
explained us why the detector has to be connected to
the column (the wrong way according to manuals).

Best regards from Prague. Oldrich

+-----------------------------------+
Oldrich Benada
Acad. Sci. CR
Institute of Microbiology
Laboratory of electron microscopy
Videnska 1083
CZ - 142 20 Prague 4 - Krc
Czech Republic
+------------------------------------+
Phone: +420-241062399
Fax: +420-241062347
WEB: http://www.biomed.cas.cz/mbu/lem113/lem.htm




From daemon Fri Jan 31 04:02:47 2003



From: Ji, Ying :      y.ji-at-imperial.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 09:54:35 -0000
Subject: Angle between diffraction zones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear All

I am doing a double tilting experiment with TEM. From diffraction zone A to
diffraction zone B, I tilted X axis for xx degree and Y axis for yy degree.
Could anyone let me know how to calculate the angle between diffraction
zones A and B.

Thank you very much in advance!

Yun


From daemon Fri Jan 31 07:12:33 2003



From: Richard W. Fonda :      fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 08:05:15 -0500
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


For the situation you are talking about, the total tilt, theta,
generated from your two independent rotations, xx and yy (about
perpendicular axes) is:

cos(theta) = cos(xx)cos(yy)

(for xx and yy { 90 degrees)

Dick Fonda


At 9:54 AM +0000 1/31/03, Ji, Ying wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
________________________________________________________________
Richard W. Fonda Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 767-2622 Code 6324
(202) 767-2623 fax Washington DC 20375
________________________________________________________________


From daemon Fri Jan 31 07:49:28 2003



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:45:56 -0330
Subject: RE: EDAX: Counts with Electron-Beam off

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The point is to understand that the term "electron microprobe" is being used
to describe multiple instruments and is not just a SEM, EDX, WDS, TEM etc.
I agree, enough already it's Friday.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:40 PM
To: Peter Tomic; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Stefano Maretti writes ...

} I have not IR camera or light inside or near my chamber.
} I have not radioactive samples around and I have the problem
} also when the chamber is empty.

At what energy are these x-rays measured? If they're at the low end I
suspect the chip may be warm because of a poor vacuum(?) The improvement
after a 4-month wait could be because the detector could be equalizing with
the chamber vacuum(?)

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (always in progress)




From daemon Fri Jan 31 08:29:20 2003



From: Greg Erdos :      gwe-at-biotech.ufl.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 09:22:27 -0500
Subject: Light tight container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Another cheap container is a new, unused 1 gallon paint can. You can get
these at Lowes or Home Depot or any paint store. It is wise to attach a
church key opener to the can so you always have it with you.
Greg
Gregory W. Erdos Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Biotechnology Program
P.O. Box 118525
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611
gwe-at-ufl.edu
352-392-1295


From daemon Fri Jan 31 08:38:01 2003



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 09:02:22 -0600
Subject: Re: light tight container?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We have an infra red chamberscope camera for checking specimen height and users keep forgetting to turn it off before taking X-ray analyses - it also affects our solid state back-scatter detector.

The x-ray detector is a thin window light element detector and I suspect that they are more prone to infra red than beryllium windows.

Malcolm Haswell
University of Sunderland
UK


----- Original Message -----
} From: Chris Jeffree {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk}



Jim,

When we routinely used film plates for TEM, we carried loaded canisters in
a box for Kodak 8x10" paper. I reinforced the corners with black electrical
tape to ensure it was light-tight. This solution never failed me.

Another solution that I used for desiccating film may come in handy to
some: We all know that EM film plates should be desiccated before use in
the TEM. One problem that can occur is that the paper box containing the
film sucks up lots of moisture that defeats the desiccant. I solved this by
storing my unused film in a developing can made to hold two 35-mm reel. The
can has a light-tight top to allow desiccation.

My belief is that the simplest solutions are the best. Good luck.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."


Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Polymers Center
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



Jim Romanow
{bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.u To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
conn.edu} cc:
Subject: light tight container?

01/30/03 03:36 PM





------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


To all,

I need to frequently move two loaded 5 1/2"L x 4 1/2"W x 3"H EM film boxes
through a lighted hallway. Any suggestions for a light tight carrier would
be appreciated. I have seen a rather complex 'portable darkroom' bag but
can use something simpler.

Thank you.
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 2242
354 Mansfield Road
Beach Hall, Room 129
Storrs, CT 06269-2242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu









From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:12:09 2003



From: Matt Ervin :      mervin-at-arl.army.mil
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:05:09 -0500
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris-
I have run across instances where the sample's cathodoluminescence
has interfered with my EDX analysis. I first noticed it when I was
analyzing a phosphor and the EDX peaks were (uniformly) shifted to higher
energies. Further experiments showed that it took quite a bit of CL
(visible on IR chamber camera) to produce this effect , and a little more
would result in 100% dead time. I was unable to reproduce the effect on
our other SEM/EDX so I am fairly confident it is a complicated function of
thresholds, time constants, window materials, CL wavelength, etc. In
addition, I could fine tune the effect by dimming the IR chamberscope LEDs
to the proper (low) level to affect the peak shift. Of course, normal IR
chamberscope LED levels blind the EDX detector completely. In any case,
it is easy to avoid this CL artifact by reducing the beam energy and/or
current. I found that Zinc Silicate (fluorescent light phosphor) and
synthetic sapphire insulators (small red, yes red, balls) produced enough
CL for this effect in my SEM/EDX system. It did, however, require that I
hit them hard with approximately 1nA at 25kV (I don't remember exactly). I
have received conflicting answers when I have asked whether exposing the
biased EDX detector to bright light, such as the IR chamberscope, for long
periods of time will cause damage so I try to avoid the situation. I know
that my SUTW should be exposed to bright light, but I expect that is
really intense light which could melt it due to poor thermal conductivity
to a heat sink. Does anyone out there know the answer to this question?

Sincerely,
Matthew Ervin, Ph.D.
(301)394-0017 phone, (301)394-1559 fax
MErvin-at-ARL.Army.mil

M/S: AMSRL-SE-RL
US Army Research Laboratory
2800 Powder Mill Road
Adelphi, MD 20783-1197

Disclaimer: The opinions and views expressed above are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army Research
Laboratory or any other government agency




Chris Jeffree {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk}

01/30/2003 05:51 PM
Please respond to Chris Jeffree


To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS


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Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
here!
I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
the scanning beam to
be visible on the chamber cam.
How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
artefacts might result?

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
{microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
Subject: IR LEDS/EDS


}
} }
} } I had a problem like this.
} } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
camera.
} } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
return
} } close to zero.
} }
} } Chris
} }
}
} What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
}
} rtch
}
} Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} Private Bag 92019
} Auckland
} New Zealand
}








From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:12:15 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:04:56 -0000
Subject: Re: light tight container?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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If you need no more than to move the film between rooms then a
black polythene bag will be more than adequate, and cheap.
A good source would be the packaging of large size photographic
paper or xray film, so contact your local photographer. Some of
these bags are foil-lined - even better. Alternatively, thick black
bags are widely sold as rubble sacks in hardware stores.

Chris

On 30 Jan 03, at 14:11, Tina Carvalho wrote:

} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
} We use a Pelican case - one of those cases used for camera equipment
} where you want to keep dust, light and/or water out. They come in
} various sizes and have foam inserts that where you can either remove
} cubes or cut holes to fit your equipment or film boxes. They are not
} cheap. They work very well.
}
} I believe there is at least one other brand as well - inquire at your
} local camera shop or check the web.
}
} Pelican Products http://www.casesbypelican.com
}
} } I need to frequently move two loaded 5 1/2"L x 4 1/2"W x 3"H EM film
} } boxes through a lighted hallway. Any suggestions for a light tight
} } carrier would be appreciated. I have seen a rather complex 'portable
} } darkroom' bag but can use something simpler.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
}
} **********************************************************************
} ****** * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho *
} tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu * * Biological Electron Microscope
} Facility * (808) 956-6251 * * University of Hawaii at
} Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} **********************************************************************
} ******
}
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:15:22 2003



From: Nahirney, Patrick (NIH/NIAMS) :      nahirnep-at-mail.nih.gov
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:08:15 -0500
Subject: Spurr's resin shrinkage artifact in TEM

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As a committed user of Spurr's resin, I have the task now of correlating
Xray diffraction values with measured structures in Spurr's embedded
skeletal muscle samples. Using the 43nm periodicity of C-protein (Myosin
Binding Protein C) in the A-band of the sarcomere and the 38.5nm periodicity
in the thin filaments, I'm routinely seeing a shrinkage artifact of
approximately 15% in the periodicities of the thick and thin filaments, as
well as in the A-band width (1.37 microns in Spurr's embedded samples vs the
generally accepted 1.6 microns for A-bands in LM or laser diffraction) .
For those of you out there that use Spurr's resin and have done morphometry,
what percentage of shrinkage have you commonly seen? Is this about right?
Thanks in advance,
Patrick C. Nahirney, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Muscle Biology
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
National Institutes of Health


From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:51:08 2003



From: Baggethun, Paul :      Paul.Baggethun-at-alcoa.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:43:47 -0500
Subject: Angle between diffraction zones

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The goniometer-measured angle bteween the zones can be calculated by using
standard rotation matrices for rotation around x and y-axes in a Cartesian
basis. The orientation of the specimen before, g, and after tilt, g', is
then related by the compound orthonormal rotation matrix R=RxRy: g' = Rg.

The measured tilt angle, Y, between the zones are then - according to my
calculations -

cos y = (cos a)(cos b) / sqrt( (cos^2(a) sin^2(b)) + (sin^2(a) cos^2(b)) )

where a and b are the measured angles tilted around the two goniometer axes.

Paul

=======================
Paul Baggethun
Engineer
Alcoa Technical Center
Alcoa Center, PA 15069
USA
=======================

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ji, Ying [mailto:y.ji-at-imperial.ac.uk]
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 4:55 AM
To: 'microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com'


Dear All

I am doing a double tilting experiment with TEM. From diffraction zone A to
diffraction zone B, I tilted X axis for xx degree and Y axis for yy degree.
Could anyone let me know how to calculate the angle between diffraction
zones A and B.

Thank you very much in advance!

Yun


From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:51:08 2003



From: Chris Jeffree :      cjeffree-at-srv0.bio.ed.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:41:30 -0000
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

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Matt
That's interesting. With my system, with beam off the chambercam
leds induce an artefactual peak which starts just below Carbon ka
and ramps up to the left (ie peaks at lower energies) and is worth a
few k counts, depending on detector parameters selected.
The other day I was looking at a cathodoluminescent rock
specimen, producing a visible signal on the chamber cam (but with
LEDs off) and at times detected a small, apparently artefactual
peak at a similar position. Background information on the
specimen indicates no elements in the "detected" range. I take it
this could be an artefact arising from specimen
cathodoluminescence?
Best wishes
Chris

On 31 Jan 03, at 10:05, Matt Ervin wrote:

} Chris-
} I have run across instances where the sample's
} cathodoluminescence
} has interfered with my EDX analysis. I first noticed it when I was
} analyzing a phosphor and the EDX peaks were (uniformly) shifted to
} higher energies. Further experiments showed that it took quite a bit
} of CL (visible on IR chamber camera) to produce this effect , and a
} little more would result in 100% dead time. I was unable to reproduce
} the effect on our other SEM/EDX so I am fairly confident it is a
} complicated function of thresholds, time constants, window materials,
} CL wavelength, etc. In addition, I could fine tune the effect by
} dimming the IR chamberscope LEDs to the proper (low) level to affect
} the peak shift. Of course, normal IR chamberscope LED levels blind
} the EDX detector completely. In any case, it is easy to avoid this CL
} artifact by reducing the beam energy and/or current. I found that
} Zinc Silicate (fluorescent light phosphor) and synthetic sapphire
} insulators (small red, yes red, balls) produced enough CL for this
} effect in my SEM/EDX system. It did, however, require that I hit them
} hard with approximately 1nA at 25kV (I don't remember exactly). I have
} received conflicting answers when I have asked whether exposing the
} biased EDX detector to bright light, such as the IR chamberscope, for
} long periods of time will cause damage so I try to avoid the
} situation. I know that my SUTW should be exposed to bright light, but
} I expect that is really intense light which could melt it due to poor
} thermal conductivity to a heat sink. Does anyone out there know the
} answer to this question?
}
} Sincerely,
} Matthew Ervin, Ph.D.
} (301)394-0017 phone, (301)394-1559 fax
} MErvin-at-ARL.Army.mil
}
} M/S: AMSRL-SE-RL
} US Army Research Laboratory
} 2800 Powder Mill Road
} Adelphi, MD 20783-1197
}
} Disclaimer: The opinions and views expressed above are those of the
} author and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army
} Research Laboratory or any other government agency
}
}
}
}
} Chris Jeffree {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk}
}
} 01/30/2003 05:51 PM
} Please respond to Chris Jeffree
}
}
} To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} cc:
} Subject: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -- The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -.
}
}
}
} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here! I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
} cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
} the scanning beam to
} be visible on the chamber cam.
} How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
} artefacts might result?
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
} {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
} Subject: IR LEDS/EDS
}
}
} }
} } }
} } } I had a problem like this.
} } } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
} camera.
} } } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
} return
} } } close to zero.
} } }
} } } Chris
} } }
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} } Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand
} }
}
}
}
}
}
}


==========================================
Dr. Chris Jeffree
University of Edinburgh
BIOSEM - Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility
Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology
Waddington Building
King's Buildings, Mayfield Road
EDINBURGH, EH9 3JN, Scotland, UK
Tel. #44 (0) 131 650 5554 /8669
FAX. #44 (0) 131 650 6563
Mobile 07710 585 401
email c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk
=========================================


From daemon Fri Jan 31 09:54:47 2003



From: Shannan Little :      littlesm-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:47:14 -0500
Subject: re: Enough Already about microprobe

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This listserver is set up to encompass "basically any question/comment/observation or general information/announcement which involves microscopy and/or microanalysis." As long as a discussion thread is being actively participated in, I would say that it is a valid posting. There is a very easy method to rid oneself of postings one is not interested in. It's called the delete function.

Shannan Little


This is getting a bit tiresome.

What on earth would be the point of 'distilling it into one general statement'?

About as much as trying to distill into one general statement the description of, say, a
cat.

By now there have been sufficient sensible replies for us all to know what an electron
microprobe is, haven't there?

It's not some metaphorical, etymological, or philosophical mystery.

Look, as someone suggested, at http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/empa.html.

Or look at the JEOL website.

Just read what Vladimir said. It's like an SEM, with better X-Ray detection, better
stability, an optical microscope, and, (I like this one) better operator training.

Of course an SEM can not be generally called an electron microprobe!

That would be like saying there was no difference between a JSM-840 and a JXA-840.


rtch




From daemon Fri Jan 31 10:16:11 2003



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 08:18:10 -0800
Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word

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What usually happens is that the document's file
becomes fragmented. In this case, more sectors
on disk are used (wasted) and leads to a larger
file size. If you routinely keep disk fragmentation
low, then do a Save As with the same file name.
This should put the new save in a contiguous
area.

gary g

At 11:17 PM 1/30/2003, you wrote:
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From daemon Fri Jan 31 11:00:20 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:49:29 -0600
Subject: Re: Spurr's resin shrinkage artifact in TEM

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I think you would have to worry about two problems - (1) shrinkage during
the actual polymerization step and (2) compression during thin
sectioning. I don't have the reference off the top of my head but Daniel
Studer has a nice paper (J. Microscopy about 1-2 years ago, I think)
in which he shows significant (up to 50% if i remember correctly) along the
cutting axis. his paper showed this could be avoided using an oscillating
diamond knife. this paper has important implications for high resolution
measurements since the compression would be different in the different axes.


At 10:08 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Fri Jan 31 11:00:21 2003



From: Steve D'Angelo :      steve-at-equiprx.net
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 08:50:46 -0800
Subject: Reichert OM-U3 ops/service manual needed

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Please help.
I'll pay any price for a decent copy of a Reichert OM-U3 ops/service manual.
Someone was nice enough to send a copy of a copy, of a copy, etc., but
all the illustrations are illegible.
That was an ops manual, and I'll still need a service manual, or at
least a schematic or wiring diagram.
Anyone with some spare specimen block holders would be helpful also.
The instrument that I have only came with one flat block holder.
I have lots of lab stuff I would be happy to trade.

--

My address is:
Equipment Resurrection
1005 Terra Nova Boulevard, Suite 2
Pacifica, CA 94044.
The phone number is 650-738-0351 and web address, http://equiprx.net/.

EQUIPMENT RESURRECTION purchases only the highest quality surplus and used laboratory equipment. We do repairs and refurbishments to factory specifications, where and when necessary. Only when the instrument meets ALL our quality control specifications, do we resell to labs and scientists interested in high quality, used equipment that is, as good as new in performance, but may be lacking the all the latest features.

BENEFICIAL FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, GOOD FOR YOUR BUDGET
Our primary goal is to reduce the burden on the landfill, by conserving resources and encouraging conservation. We use only 100% recycled or recyclable packing material and encourage our clients to do the same, by reusing it themselves.

NO RISK WARRANTEE
The products we have available are typically one-third the price of a new instrument and generally carry an attractive warrantee.

GREAT SELECTION
EQUIPMENT RESURRECTION specializes in the highest quality optics (microscopes-power supplies-illumination), darkroom equipment, microtomes, balances, incubators, ovens, water baths, hot-plates, centrifuges, compressors and vacuum pumps.

MOST ORDERS SHIPPED WITHIN 24 HOURS
PERSONAL CHECKS WELCOME
DISCOVER, VISA AND MASTER CARD
ARE ACCEPTED FOR ORDERS OVER $25.
SORRY, I CANNOT ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS
THAT DO NOT HAVE AN ADDRESS WITHIN THE USA.

Very best regards,
Steve D'Angelo


http://equiprx.net/




From daemon Fri Jan 31 11:00:22 2003



From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 31 Jan 03 13:40:05 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Tight Box

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Dear Jim,
I use the black plastic bags that the photographic paper comes wrapped in to
transport my film boxes to the dark room. I discovered the hard way that the
boxes themselves were not light tight.
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jim Romanow" {bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 1:36 PM


Dear Ritchie,
I believe the Si(Li) detector is sensitive to visible light, as it is to the
x-ray photons. With a Be window the visible light could not penetrate to the
detector, but with the new thin membrane windows the IR gets right through.
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ; {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 1:38 PM

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More than 25 years ago we had our machine shop make a rectangular
box and cover of sheet stainless steel, complete with handles. It holds both
a loaded film box and an exposed film box from a JEOL 100 CX. It still
looks and works like new and was worth the expense.

Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, Il., 60439



From daemon Fri Jan 31 12:38:10 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 12:24:25 -0600
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

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I always understood this to be due to "photons is photons". Granted that
the energy of an IR photon is much less than an x-ray photon. (What is the
wavelength cutoff for generating an electron-hole pair?) However, there are
just so darn many of those IR photons. So not only do we get the very low
energy counts due to the photons, but also we get a lot of dead-time and
pile-up of photons. I usually see our dead time max out when the light
comes on. It takes several seconds for the circuitry to get back to normal
after we shut the light off.

I know x-ray windows are supposed to be treated to render them opaque to
infra-red. However, that treatment appears to be more effective in some
cases than other. Both of our detectors are affected at least some when the
cameras are turned on.

Regarding cathodoluminescence, I wonder if the signal is too weak to be of
concern. A 20-kV beam at 1 nA is only dumping 20 micro-watts of power into
the sample. Only a small fraction of that gets converted over to light. I
don't know the power rating of our IR bulb on our chamber scope, but I am
sure it is quite a few orders of magnitude more powerful.

Warren

At 10:51 PM 1/30/03 +0000, you wrote:

} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
} cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
} the scanning beam to
} be visible on the chamber cam.
} How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
} artefacts might result?
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
} {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
} Subject: IR LEDS/EDS
}
} } } I had a problem like this.
} } } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
} camera.
} } } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
} return
} } } close to zero.
} } }
} } } Chris
} } }
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} } Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand




From daemon Fri Jan 31 12:53:49 2003



From: Rick Mott :      rickmott-at-alumni.princeton.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:44:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris Jeffree wrote:

}
} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
}
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
}

I expected the usual suspects to leap on this, but since it hasn't
happened, I will chime in. I are an engineer, not a physicist;
take with the appropriate grain of salt, but I have worked in
pulse processor design.

The Al coatings on thin window detectors do a good job of
keeping out visible light, but are fairly transparent to IR.
The IR photons are absorbed just like X-rays, but because
their energy is so low and the flux high compared to X-ray
photons, the result is a nearly continuous flow of current
through the detector which is indistinguishable (to the
pulse processing electronics) from a "leaky detector".
Essentially, high leakage current raises the noise threshold
setting required to prevent false triggering of the pulse
processor. Since thin-window detectors are intended to
trigger on low-energy X-rays, that threshold in a properly
funtioning detector is set fairly low. Therefore, the IR-
induced "leakage current" causes the pulse processing
electronics to start triggering continuously on noise,
causing a large peak at the low end of the spectrum.

Rick Mott




From daemon Fri Jan 31 14:23:38 2003



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 14:08:12 -0600
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Chris: light shining on a semiconductor (which the detector is) generates
electron-hole pairs, just like an x-ray does. But the magnitude of the
number of these pairs is much higher because there are usually more photons
in a light beam than characteristic x-rays being generated by a sample.
This flood of electron-hole pairs overwhelms the amplifier and the counting
electronics. Some detectors have metallized (mere atoms of metal, so they
won't interfere w/ analysis) windows to keep out the 'ambient' light, such
as maybe generated by CL. But if your chamberscope's light source is
oriented so that it shines directly on the detector, enough light can get in
to cause problems. The collimator on the detector nose can also help keep
light out. I've worked on SEMs that have had the chamberscope light source
directly opposite the detector and had to be vigilant about turning it off
when is was not needed. I now have a scope that has the light source behind
the detector and it give no trouble at all. For the curious, on the Oxford
Instruments site, on the page for their EDX hardware
(http://www.oxford-instruments.com/ANLPDP174.htm) near the bottom right hand
side is a list of "Related PDFs" and the last one is "EDX Hardware
Explained". If you've ever wondered what's in the snout of a detector and
how it works its magic, this is a good read.
NOTE: I have no interest, financial or otherwise, in Oxford Instruments.
Just a satisfied customer.

Chris Jeffree wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
} cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
} the scanning beam to
} be visible on the chamber cam.
} How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
} artefacts might result?
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
} {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
} Subject: IR LEDS/EDS
}
} }
} } }
} } } I had a problem like this.
} } } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
} camera.
} } } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
} return
} } } close to zero.
} } }
} } } Chris
} } }
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} } Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand
} }

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From daemon Fri Jan 31 14:23:39 2003



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:04:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Spurr's resin shrinkage artifact in TEM

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As I understood it at M&M 2002 in Quebec City, the Diatome oscillating
knife was close to market, as in the 'fine-tuning' stage. You might want to
inquire of Diatome US as to the state of that knife. The reduction in
compression for soft materials was phenomenal.

Tom Malis

Dr. Tom Malis
Scientist Advisor
Natural Resources Canada
Govt. of Canada
613-995-7358
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips
To: Nahirney, Patrick (NIH/NIAMS)
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: 1/31/2003 11:49 AM


I think you would have to worry about two problems - (1) shrinkage
during
the actual polymerization step and (2) compression during thin
sectioning. I don't have the reference off the top of my head but
Daniel
Studer has a nice paper (J. Microscopy about 1-2 years ago, I think)
in which he shows significant (up to 50% if i remember correctly) along
the
cutting axis. his paper showed this could be avoided using an
oscillating
diamond knife. this paper has important implications for high
resolution
measurements since the compression would be different in the different
axes.


At 10:08 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America

From daemon Fri Jan 31 15:02:44 2003



From: John Hunt :      hunt-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:54:02 -0500
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

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Peter,
In that case, a TEM would also be an electron microprobe. I think
it is better if the names are used specifically. Electron microprobes are
designed quite differently from SEMs. Call an SEM with WDS an SEM with WDS.

At 11:12 AM 1/30/2003 -0500, Peter Tomic wrote:
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John Hunt
CCMR Microscopy Facility
255-0108



From daemon Fri Jan 31 15:20:05 2003



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:50:08 -0500
Subject: Light tight container? Thank You

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Light tight container for film transport?

Black plastic bags win the popularity (and economy) contest!


Quick list of light tight container suggestions:

Black plastic photo paper bag with or without cardboard box
Ammunition storage box
Paint can
Pelican camera equipment case
Spring loaded paper safe box
Plastic tool/tote box
Custom made stainless steel box


Thank you very much for all of the feedback. I am leaning toward the ammo
box because it might hold up well under student abuse; the most bullet
proof solution:}

Regards,
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 2242
354 Mansfield Road
Beach Hall, Room 129
Storrs, CT 06269-2242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu




From daemon Fri Jan 31 15:25:44 2003



From: Richard W. Fonda :      fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 16:20:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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There was some debate about the answer I gave to this question this
morning, so I looked into the math a bit further.

If you consider the standard rotation of cartesian coordinates about
the z axis by an angle, a, as follows:

x' = x cos(a) + y sin(a)
y' = -x sin(a) + y cos(a)
z' = z

and follow this by a rotation about the x' axis by an angle, b:

x" = x'
y" = y' cos(b) + z' sin(b)
z" = -y' sin(b) + z' cos(b)

the resultant y" axis orientation (equivalent to the specimen normal
in this case) is given as:

y" = -x sin(a)cos(b) + y cos(a)cos(b) + z sin(b)

The total tilt is found from the arccos of the dot product of the
initial y axis and the final y" axis, which gives (assuming unit
vectors)

cos(theta) = cos(a)cos(b)

which is what I stated this morning.

Dick Fonda


At 9:54 AM +0000 1/31/03, Ji, Ying wrote:
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From daemon Fri Jan 31 16:14:05 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 17:03:17 -0500
Subject: Seeing green when we should see infra-red

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We're having an odd problem.

We're staining COS cells with Alexa 647 phalloidin (Mol. Probes A-22282 lot
41B1-1). The f-actin is staining fine and looks great when we excite at
633 nm and detect through the Leica AOBS or normal Cy5 filter set.

However, when we excite at 488 nm, we're seeing the f-actin staining
appearing in the green channel too. We checked on different microscopes.

Has anybody else seen something as weird as this? We suspect
contamination, but don't know where it would have come from unless it is an
isomer or something from the manufacturing process.

One of our controls is the Alexa-phalloidin staining alone without any
antibodies, so we know it's not some weird antibody binding artifact.

Any help appreciated.

Thanks.

____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Fri Jan 31 17:37:30 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:31:55 -0800
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 01:54 AM, Ji, Ying wrote:

} I am doing a double tilting experiment with TEM. From diffraction zone
} A to
} diffraction zone B, I tilted X axis for xx degree and Y axis for yy
} degree.
} Could anyone let me know how to calculate the angle between diffraction
} zones A and B.
}
} Thank you very much in advance!
}
Dear Yun,
I don't have my spherical trigonometry book here, having moved
recently, but the way to approach the problem is to imagine the
electron beam incident on the North pole with the Greenwich meridian
facing you, then perform the tilts and locate the position of the
incident beam after these have been done. If you have a double tilt
holder like the one I used when I was in Albany NY, the tilts can be
done in either order, so tilt in Y (keeping the Greenwich meridian
facing you) so the beam is now incident on latitude 90-yy, then tilt
through xx degrees along the great circle perpendicular to the
Greenwich meridian and passing through it at latitude 90-yy. You will
have a right spherical triangle; the hypotenuse is the angle you're
looking for.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu



From daemon Fri Jan 31 17:53:42 2003



From: Qian-Chun Yu, MB, Ph.D. :      qcyu-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 18:45:48 -0500
Subject: Special Microscope?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Fellow Microscopists,

A colleague of mine recently asked about a type of "Laser Scanning Phase
Contrast Microscopy", for which I do not have much knowledge.

Please advise: What's the major difference between this and the
conventional LSCM that we use? Which institution in the East Coast might
have such a facility?

Any advice is highly appreciated and will be forwarded to this
colleague. Have a great weekend!

QC

Qian-Chun Yu, MB, Ph.D.
Director
Biomedical Imaging Core Laboratory
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Pathology & Lab Medicine
School of Medicine
110 Richards Building
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Tel: (215) 573-7766 (Voicemail)
(215)-898-6730 (Main Lab)
FAX: (215)573-2259
E-Mail: qcyu-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://uphs.upenn.edu/morphlab



From daemon Fri Jan 31 22:14:07 2003



From: sghoshro-at-NMSU.Edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 21:03:49 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Light tight container

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We use tin cookie boxes. They come in all different sizes and before
christmas, 2001 we asked regular lab users to save their cookie boxes if
they received any as christmas gift. They are light tight and so far have
been working great.

By the way, we just asked for used, empty boxes, no cookies.

Soumitra

*************************************************************
Soumitra Ghoshroy
College Associate Professor, Biology
Director, Electron Microscopy Lab
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003
Tel: 505-646-3268 (office), 646-3283 (lab)
Fax: 505-646-3282
e-mail:sghoshro-at-nmsu.edu
URL:http://confocal.nmsu.edu/eml




From daemon Fri Jan 31 22:51:52 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 20:43:04 -0800
Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word

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Gary
I think, you wrong: fragmented file occupied more physical space on HD
(yes) but fragmented/non-fragmented files has the same bit-size. So
fragmentation may affect the reading/writing time only, which on the modern
computers is negligibly. If the disk seriously fragmented, yes, it may
affect computer's performance in general. "Save as" command not necessary
writes in non-fragmented space. NTFS usually decently manage this issue and
keep fragmentation at relatively low level, but it's OS decision where to
place your file (for instance, if file is small, it would be placed in the
NTFS analog of FAT at the beginning of drive- this is special precaution
against fragmentation). If the HD is seriously fragmented, even "Save as"
will cause the file fragmentation. Sergey

At 08:18 AM 1/31/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Sat Feb 1 13:13:06 2003



From: Chris Michaelson :      c.michaelson-at-agilixcorp.com (by way of
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 17:21:57 -0600
Subject: coated glass slide

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To All,
}
} The company I work for currently utilizes a coated glass slide that
is
} amine reactive for printing our microarrays. The supplier of the
} substrate is reticent to divulge any information regarding the
chemical
} composition, thickness, and QC measures employed in their process.
} Subsequently, we would like to ascertain as much info as possible
} regarding the coating thickness, surface topography, etc. and were
} hoping that experts in the field of microscopy might offer some
} suggestions or be willing to undertake such a project.
}
}
} Chris Michaelson
}


From daemon Sat Feb 1 13:36:31 2003



From: Pitts, Betsey :      betsey_p-at-erc.montana.edu
Date: Sat, 1 Feb 2003 12:27:15 -0700
Subject: Confocal-Leica or Zeiss

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Hi-
we are in the process of purchasing a new confocal, and are looking
at a Zeiss510 Meta or a Leica AOBS or SP2. I think that in the demo process
we are seeing what we need to, and are impressed by the capabilities of
each. I would appreciate user perspectives that we cannot get from the
manufacturers though- are there instrument aspects of either microscope that
are repeatedly problematic or limiting? Do multi-user facilities have
particular difficulty with either? I do not expect an obvious "winner" for
an answer, but am more interested in hearing what some of the ups and down
are, and seeing if those problems or circumstances would be issues for us.
Thanks for any experience you an offer, I am sure it will be useful.

Betsey
************************************************************************
Betsey Pitts
Research Associate/Facilities Manager, Microscopy
The Center for Biofilm Engineering

366 EPS Building, Montana State University
Bozeman, MT 59717

betsey_p-at-erc.montana.edu
Ph (406) 994-7813
Fax (406) 994-6098

************************************************************************



From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:23 2003



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 12:24:25 -0600
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

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I always understood this to be due to "photons is photons". Granted that
the energy of an IR photon is much less than an x-ray photon. (What is the
wavelength cutoff for generating an electron-hole pair?) However, there are
just so darn many of those IR photons. So not only do we get the very low
energy counts due to the photons, but also we get a lot of dead-time and
pile-up of photons. I usually see our dead time max out when the light
comes on. It takes several seconds for the circuitry to get back to normal
after we shut the light off.

I know x-ray windows are supposed to be treated to render them opaque to
infra-red. However, that treatment appears to be more effective in some
cases than other. Both of our detectors are affected at least some when the
cameras are turned on.

Regarding cathodoluminescence, I wonder if the signal is too weak to be of
concern. A 20-kV beam at 1 nA is only dumping 20 micro-watts of power into
the sample. Only a small fraction of that gets converted over to light. I
don't know the power rating of our IR bulb on our chamber scope, but I am
sure it is quite a few orders of magnitude more powerful.

Warren

At 10:51 PM 1/30/03 +0000, you wrote:

} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
} cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
} the scanning beam to
} be visible on the chamber cam.
} How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
} artefacts might result?
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
} {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
} Subject: IR LEDS/EDS
}
} } } I had a problem like this.
} } } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
} camera.
} } } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
} return
} } } close to zero.
} } }
} } } Chris
} } }
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} } Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:31 2003



From: Bernard Kestel :      kestel-at-anl.gov
Date: 31 Jan 03 13:40:05 -0600
Subject: Re: Light Tight Box

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More than 25 years ago we had our machine shop make a rectangular
box and cover of sheet stainless steel, complete with handles. It holds both
a loaded film box and an exposed film box from a JEOL 100 CX. It still
looks and works like new and was worth the expense.

Bernie Kestel
Materials Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, Il., 60439




From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:32 2003



From: sghoshro-at-NMSU.Edu -at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 21:03:49 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Light tight container

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We use tin cookie boxes. They come in all different sizes and before
christmas, 2001 we asked regular lab users to save their cookie boxes if
they received any as christmas gift. They are light tight and so far have
been working great.

By the way, we just asked for used, empty boxes, no cookies.

Soumitra

*************************************************************
Soumitra Ghoshroy
College Associate Professor, Biology
Director, Electron Microscopy Lab
Box 3EML
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003
Tel: 505-646-3268 (office), 646-3283 (lab)
Fax: 505-646-3282
e-mail:sghoshro-at-nmsu.edu
URL:http://confocal.nmsu.edu/eml





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:33 2003



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 14:08:12 -0600
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

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Chris: light shining on a semiconductor (which the detector is) generates
electron-hole pairs, just like an x-ray does. But the magnitude of the
number of these pairs is much higher because there are usually more photons
in a light beam than characteristic x-rays being generated by a sample.
This flood of electron-hole pairs overwhelms the amplifier and the counting
electronics. Some detectors have metallized (mere atoms of metal, so they
won't interfere w/ analysis) windows to keep out the 'ambient' light, such
as maybe generated by CL. But if your chamberscope's light source is
oriented so that it shines directly on the detector, enough light can get in
to cause problems. The collimator on the detector nose can also help keep
light out. I've worked on SEMs that have had the chamberscope light source
directly opposite the detector and had to be vigilant about turning it off
when is was not needed. I now have a scope that has the light source behind
the detector and it give no trouble at all. For the curious, on the Oxford
Instruments site, on the page for their EDX hardware
(http://www.oxford-instruments.com/ANLPDP174.htm) near the bottom right hand
side is a list of "Related PDFs" and the last one is "EDX Hardware
Explained". If you've ever wondered what's in the snout of a detector and
how it works its magic, this is a good read.
NOTE: I have no interest, financial or otherwise, in Oxford Instruments.
Just a satisfied customer.

Chris Jeffree wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} I am also intrigued to note that some of my specimens show
} cathodoluminescence outputs sufficiently bright for the position of
} the scanning beam to
} be visible on the chamber cam.
} How bright does it need to get to have an impact on counts, and what
} artefacts might result?
}
} Chris
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
} {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 9:38 PM
} Subject: IR LEDS/EDS
}
} }
} } }
} } } I had a problem like this.
} } } Turned out to be caused by the infra-red leds of my chamber
} camera.
} } } When the camera is switched off, the counts (3-5k per second)
} return
} } } close to zero.
} } }
} } } Chris
} } }
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
} }
} } Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
} } Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
} } The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
} } Private Bag 92019
} } Auckland
} } New Zealand
} }

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:35 2003



From: John Hunt :      hunt-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:54:02 -0500
Subject: RE: What is Electron Microprobe?

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Peter,
In that case, a TEM would also be an electron microprobe. I think
it is better if the names are used specifically. Electron microprobes are
designed quite differently from SEMs. Call an SEM with WDS an SEM with WDS.

At 11:12 AM 1/30/2003 -0500, Peter Tomic wrote:
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John Hunt
CCMR Microscopy Facility
255-0108




From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:37 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 20:43:04 -0800
Subject: RE: presentation images in Microsoft Word

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Dear Ritchie,
I believe the Si(Li) detector is sensitive to visible light, as it is to the
x-ray photons. With a Be window the visible light could not penetrate to the
detector, but with the new thin membrane windows the IR gets right through.
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ; {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 1:38 PM


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Gary
I think, you wrong: fragmented file occupied more physical space on HD
(yes) but fragmented/non-fragmented files has the same bit-size. So
fragmentation may affect the reading/writing time only, which on the modern
computers is negligibly. If the disk seriously fragmented, yes, it may
affect computer's performance in general. "Save as" command not necessary
writes in non-fragmented space. NTFS usually decently manage this issue and
keep fragmentation at relatively low level, but it's OS decision where to
place your file (for instance, if file is small, it would be placed in the
NTFS analog of FAT at the beginning of drive- this is special precaution
against fragmentation). If the HD is seriously fragmented, even "Save as"
will cause the file fragmentation. Sergey

At 08:18 AM 1/31/2003, you wrote:
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_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu






From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:41 2003



From: Steve D'Angelo :      steve-at-equiprx.net
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 08:50:46 -0800
Subject: Reichert OM-U3 ops/service manual needed

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Please help.
I'll pay any price for a decent copy of a Reichert OM-U3 ops/service manual.
Someone was nice enough to send a copy of a copy, of a copy, etc., but
all the illustrations are illegible.
That was an ops manual, and I'll still need a service manual, or at
least a schematic or wiring diagram.
Anyone with some spare specimen block holders would be helpful also.
The instrument that I have only came with one flat block holder.
I have lots of lab stuff I would be happy to trade.

--

My address is:
Equipment Resurrection
1005 Terra Nova Boulevard, Suite 2
Pacifica, CA 94044.
The phone number is 650-738-0351 and web address, http://equiprx.net/.

EQUIPMENT RESURRECTION purchases only the highest quality surplus and used laboratory equipment. We do repairs and refurbishments to factory specifications, where and when necessary. Only when the instrument meets ALL our quality control specifications, do we resell to labs and scientists interested in high quality, used equipment that is, as good as new in performance, but may be lacking the all the latest features.

BENEFICIAL FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, GOOD FOR YOUR BUDGET
Our primary goal is to reduce the burden on the landfill, by conserving resources and encouraging conservation. We use only 100% recycled or recyclable packing material and encourage our clients to do the same, by reusing it themselves.

NO RISK WARRANTEE
The products we have available are typically one-third the price of a new instrument and generally carry an attractive warrantee.

GREAT SELECTION
EQUIPMENT RESURRECTION specializes in the highest quality optics (microscopes-power supplies-illumination), darkroom equipment, microtomes, balances, incubators, ovens, water baths, hot-plates, centrifuges, compressors and vacuum pumps.

MOST ORDERS SHIPPED WITHIN 24 HOURS
PERSONAL CHECKS WELCOME
DISCOVER, VISA AND MASTER CARD
ARE ACCEPTED FOR ORDERS OVER $25.
SORRY, I CANNOT ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS
THAT DO NOT HAVE AN ADDRESS WITHIN THE USA.

Very best regards,
Steve D'Angelo


http://equiprx.net/





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:41 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 10:49:29 -0600
Subject: Re: Spurr's resin shrinkage artifact in TEM

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I think you would have to worry about two problems - (1) shrinkage during
the actual polymerization step and (2) compression during thin
sectioning. I don't have the reference off the top of my head but Daniel
Studer has a nice paper (J. Microscopy about 1-2 years ago, I think)
in which he shows significant (up to 50% if i remember correctly) along the
cutting axis. his paper showed this could be avoided using an oscillating
diamond knife. this paper has important implications for high resolution
measurements since the compression would be different in the different axes.


At 10:08 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:43 2003



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:31:55 -0800
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

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Dear Jim,
I use the black plastic bags that the photographic paper comes wrapped in to
transport my film boxes to the dark room. I discovered the hard way that the
boxes themselves were not light tight.
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Jim Romanow" {bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 1:36 PM


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On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 01:54 AM, Ji, Ying wrote:

} I am doing a double tilting experiment with TEM. From diffraction zone
} A to
} diffraction zone B, I tilted X axis for xx degree and Y axis for yy
} degree.
} Could anyone let me know how to calculate the angle between diffraction
} zones A and B.
}
} Thank you very much in advance!
}
Dear Yun,
I don't have my spherical trigonometry book here, having moved
recently, but the way to approach the problem is to imagine the
electron beam incident on the North pole with the Greenwich meridian
facing you, then perform the tilts and locate the position of the
incident beam after these have been done. If you have a double tilt
holder like the one I used when I was in Albany NY, the tilts can be
done in either order, so tilt in Y (keeping the Greenwich meridian
facing you) so the beam is now incident on latitude 90-yy, then tilt
through xx degrees along the great circle perpendicular to the
Greenwich meridian and passing through it at latitude 90-yy. You will
have a right spherical triangle; the hypotenuse is the angle you're
looking for.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:42 2003



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:04:17 -0500
Subject: Re: Spurr's resin shrinkage artifact in TEM

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As I understood it at M&M 2002 in Quebec City, the Diatome oscillating
knife was close to market, as in the 'fine-tuning' stage. You might want to
inquire of Diatome US as to the state of that knife. The reduction in
compression for soft materials was phenomenal.

Tom Malis

Dr. Tom Malis
Scientist Advisor
Natural Resources Canada
Govt. of Canada
613-995-7358
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips
To: Nahirney, Patrick (NIH/NIAMS)
Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Sent: 1/31/2003 11:49 AM


I think you would have to worry about two problems - (1) shrinkage
during
the actual polymerization step and (2) compression during thin
sectioning. I don't have the reference off the top of my head but
Daniel
Studer has a nice paper (J. Microscopy about 1-2 years ago, I think)
in which he shows significant (up to 50% if i remember correctly) along
the
cutting axis. his paper showed this could be avoided using an
oscillating
diamond knife. this paper has important implications for high
resolution
measurements since the compression would be different in the different
axes.


At 10:08 AM 1/31/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
-
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America


From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:43 2003



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 15:50:08 -0500
Subject: Light tight container? Thank You

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Light tight container for film transport?

Black plastic bags win the popularity (and economy) contest!


Quick list of light tight container suggestions:

Black plastic photo paper bag with or without cardboard box
Ammunition storage box
Paint can
Pelican camera equipment case
Spring loaded paper safe box
Plastic tool/tote box
Custom made stainless steel box


Thank you very much for all of the feedback. I am leaning toward the ammo
box because it might hold up well under student abuse; the most bullet
proof solution:}

Regards,
Jim

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 2242
354 Mansfield Road
Beach Hall, Room 129
Storrs, CT 06269-2242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:43 2003



From: Qian-Chun Yu, MB, Ph.D. :      qcyu-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 18:45:48 -0500
Subject: Special Microscope?

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Dear Fellow Microscopists,

A colleague of mine recently asked about a type of "Laser Scanning Phase
Contrast Microscopy", for which I do not have much knowledge.

Please advise: What's the major difference between this and the
conventional LSCM that we use? Which institution in the East Coast might
have such a facility?

Any advice is highly appreciated and will be forwarded to this
colleague. Have a great weekend!

QC

Qian-Chun Yu, MB, Ph.D.
Director
Biomedical Imaging Core Laboratory
University of Pennsylvania
Department of Pathology & Lab Medicine
School of Medicine
110 Richards Building
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Tel: (215) 573-7766 (Voicemail)
(215)-898-6730 (Main Lab)
FAX: (215)573-2259
E-Mail: qcyu-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Website: http://uphs.upenn.edu/morphlab




From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:42 2003



From: Richard W. Fonda :      fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 16:20:25 -0500
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

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There was some debate about the answer I gave to this question this
morning, so I looked into the math a bit further.

If you consider the standard rotation of cartesian coordinates about
the z axis by an angle, a, as follows:

x' = x cos(a) + y sin(a)
y' = -x sin(a) + y cos(a)
z' = z

and follow this by a rotation about the x' axis by an angle, b:

x" = x'
y" = y' cos(b) + z' sin(b)
z" = -y' sin(b) + z' cos(b)

the resultant y" axis orientation (equivalent to the specimen normal
in this case) is given as:

y" = -x sin(a)cos(b) + y cos(a)cos(b) + z sin(b)

The total tilt is found from the arccos of the dot product of the
initial y axis and the final y" axis, which gives (assuming unit
vectors)

cos(theta) = cos(a)cos(b)

which is what I stated this morning.

Dick Fonda


At 9:54 AM +0000 1/31/03, Ji, Ying wrote:
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From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:43 2003



From: Rick Mott :      rickmott-at-alumni.princeton.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 13:44:42 -0500
Subject: Re: Fw: IR LEDS/EDS

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Chris Jeffree wrote:

}
} Don't know, but I would be interested to know. We need a physicist
} here!
} ----- Original Message -----
} From: "Ritchie Sims" {r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz}
} To: "Chris Jeffree" {c.jeffree-at-ed.ac.uk} ;
}
} }
} } What would be the mechanism of this effect, I wonder?
} }
} } rtch
}

I expected the usual suspects to leap on this, but since it hasn't
happened, I will chime in. I are an engineer, not a physicist;
take with the appropriate grain of salt, but I have worked in
pulse processor design.

The Al coatings on thin window detectors do a good job of
keeping out visible light, but are fairly transparent to IR.
The IR photons are absorbed just like X-rays, but because
their energy is so low and the flux high compared to X-ray
photons, the result is a nearly continuous flow of current
through the detector which is indistinguishable (to the
pulse processing electronics) from a "leaky detector".
Essentially, high leakage current raises the noise threshold
setting required to prevent false triggering of the pulse
processor. Since thin-window detectors are intended to
trigger on low-energy X-rays, that threshold in a properly
funtioning detector is set fairly low. Therefore, the IR-
induced "leakage current" causes the pulse processing
electronics to start triggering continuously on noise,
causing a large peak at the low end of the spectrum.

Rick Mott





From daemon Sun Feb 2 00:46:42 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2003 17:03:17 -0500
Subject: Seeing green when we should see infra-red

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We're having an odd problem.

We're staining COS cells with Alexa 647 phalloidin (Mol. Probes A-22282 lot
41B1-1). The f-actin is staining fine and looks great when we excite at
633 nm and detect through the Leica AOBS or normal Cy5 filter set.

However, when we excite at 488 nm, we're seeing the f-actin staining
appearing in the green channel too. We checked on different microscopes.

Has anybody else seen something as weird as this? We suspect
contamination, but don't know where it would have come from unless it is an
isomer or something from the manufacturing process.

One of our controls is the Alexa-phalloidin staining alone without any
antibodies, so we know it's not some weird antibody binding artifact.

Any help appreciated.

Thanks.

____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/




From daemon Sun Feb 2 07:07:17 2003



From: Gordon Couger :      gcouger-at-provalue.net (by way of
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2003 06:56:37 -0600
Subject: Space Shuttle Accident

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Those of you in the path of the debris feild of the tragic break up of the
space shuttle Colombia have a unique opportunity to try to catch microscopic
debris from it over the next few days as the winds move it over the south
east part of the United States. This is the largest event of its kind and
first chance for this kind of research.

Pans of glycerin, water or some other liquid or possibly the sticky side of
tap or some kind of gel to trap the particles on roofs and in the open at
ground level should catch this debris. Some kind of baffles to protect the
pans from wind should help catch small particles and protect from
contamination from the surrounding area.

Reports in California by an astronomer of small flashes following the
shuttle as it pass over may extend the area were debris can be found.

The current winds aloft should carry the debris along the Gulf Coast and
across central Florida if they continue as they are now.

Gordon Couger gcouger-at-couger.com

I collect links on information related to light microscopes.
http://www.couger.com/microscope/links/gclinks.html
Please forward any links or information you think might be useful to others.


From daemon Sun Feb 2 21:26:13 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 16:10:46 +1300
Subject: Stigmator Image Shift

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Hi

I'm trying to set up the column alignment of my JSM 840, and rotation of the Y
stigmator gives such a lot of image shift that it's hard to use. The X stig gives almost
none.

There are trim pots which balance the currents to the stig coils, but the amount of
image shift is way more than can be corrected for by the trim pots.

The currents flowing in all of the 8 coils (4 'X', 4 'Y') are all very similar, and they all
change similarly when the stig controls and the trim pots are turned, so it seems that
the stig electronics and the coils are all OK.

Is this effect likely to be caused by a gross misalignment of the column?

Any tips on how to remedy?

thanks

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Mon Feb 3 08:03:42 2003



From: Valerie Knowlton :      valerie_knowlton-at-ncsu.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 09:04:51 -0500
Subject: TEM film question

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In my last order of Kodak 4489 film, the boxes were marked "new
formulation". Since it has been some time since I've needed to order film,
I was wondering if any of you have noticed sufficient differences in
exposure, density, etc. with this new film that required re-calibration of
the photographic parameters on your microscopes. The last time Kodak
re-formulated their emulsion, we needed to do extensive testing and
calibration of our TEMs to obtain photos with the desired exposure levels.

Thanks.

Valerie M. Knowlton
Research Assistant/Teaching Technician
Center for Electron Microscopy
1219 Gardner Hall, Box 7615
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695

phone (919) 515-2664
fax (919) 515-8293



From daemon Mon Feb 3 10:59:12 2003



From: Baggethun, Paul :      Paul.Baggethun-at-alcoa.com
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 11:48:59 -0500
Subject: Re: Angle between diffraction zones

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Richard Fonda is right.
I made a foolish mistake when multiplying the two rotation matrixes
together.

My sincerest apologies.
Paul

=======================
Paul Baggethun
Engineer
Alcoa Technical Center
Alcoa Center, PA 15069
USA
=======================

-----Original Message-----
} From: Richard W. Fonda [mailto:fonda-at-anvil.nrl.navy.mil]
Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 4:20 PM
To: Ji, Ying; 'microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com'


------------------------------------------------------------------------
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There was some debate about the answer I gave to this question this
morning, so I looked into the math a bit further.

If you consider the standard rotation of cartesian coordinates about
the z axis by an angle, a, as follows:

x' = x cos(a) + y sin(a)
y' = -x sin(a) + y cos(a)
z' = z

and follow this by a rotation about the x' axis by an angle, b:

x" = x'
y" = y' cos(b) + z' sin(b)
z" = -y' sin(b) + z' cos(b)

the resultant y" axis orientation (equivalent to the specimen normal
in this case) is given as:

y" = -x sin(a)cos(b) + y cos(a)cos(b) + z sin(b)

The total tilt is found from the arccos of the dot product of the
initial y axis and the final y" axis, which gives (assuming unit
vectors)

cos(theta) = cos(a)cos(b)

which is what I stated this morning.

Dick Fonda


At 9:54 AM +0000 1/31/03, Ji, Ying wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Mon Feb 3 11:10:58 2003



From: garsha :      garsha-at-itg.uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 11:02:40 -0600
Subject: Re: Confocal-Leica or Zeiss

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Greetings Betsey,
It is a wise idea to contact confocal facilities and get some input
regarding experiences with established instrumentation. Another forum
you may wish to query is the Confocal Listserver
{confocal-at-listserv.buffalo.edu} , and you may wish to look at the
archives (http://listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu/cgi-bin/wa?S1=confocal);
there was a pertinent thread discussing the two platforms last week.
There is a listserver set up as a resource for administrators of Leica
CFM equipment as well which you may wish to address--subscribers
include 60 or so facility coordinators around the globe who manage
Leica confocal microscopes. If you would like I can forward your query
to this listserver (you have to be subscribed to post as an anti-spam
measure). Lastly, you might try to find facilities on the web (eg.
enter "Leica SP-2" into a Google search and see what comes up). Most
facilities are happy to share their experiences.
No high tolerance instrument will perform without incident
indefinitely and intelligent purchase decisions take this into account.
Sophisticated platforms such as the SP-2 and the META showcase synergy
between a number of instrument sub-systems; seemingly minor problems or
mis-calibrations in the imaging pipeline can wreak havoc with important
measurements. It is important that problems can be addressed
effectively and efficiently--for this it is necessary to have sincere
support from a particular manufacturer. An instrumentation purchase
choice implies a commitment to a relationship with a particular brand
for the useful lifespan of the instrument.
It is important for suppliers of confocal instrumentation to remain
abreast of cutting edge technology, but it is also important for
demonstrate a commitment to regular maintenance and dedication to
support of established instruments. Four areas you may wish to get
candid information on include:

1.) Availability of service personnel. Service engineers should have
effective support with scheduling, and should be able to provide an
accurate timeline to the facility visit.

2.) Effective communication between the domestic and global service
infrastructure as well as between service management and facility
managers.

3.) Parts availability. Replacement parts should be available, and
these parts should be ensured to perform acceptably before installation

4.) Preventative maintenance. Heavily used, research critical LSM
instrumentation should be overhauled in a disciplined manner at regular
intervals to ensure maximum reliability. The rate at which certain
components deteriorate should be predictable, and a thorough checklist
which ensures that all the components are performing up to
specification at regular intervals would do much to bolster end user
confidence.

That being said, I feel that the Leica SP-2 showcases some elegant
engineering solutions and I'm not infrequently re-impressed with the
instrument's capabilities. When the platform is in top working
condition I would put it up against any other laser scanning microscope
(the newer AOBS feature seems to be a promising development as well,
but we don't presently have that capability).
I haven't had nearly as much experience with the META at this point,
but I'm sure there are facilities which would be happy to provide you
with input about instrument performance.

Good luck in your decision--feel free to contact me directly if you
have specific questions or concerns.

Best Regards,
Karl G.

On Saturday, February 1, 2003, at 01:27 PM, Pitts, Betsey wrote:

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} .
}
}
}
} Hi-
} we are in the process of purchasing a new confocal, and are looking
} at a Zeiss510 Meta or a Leica AOBS or SP2. I think that in the demo
} process
} we are seeing what we need to, and are impressed by the capabilities of
} each. I would appreciate user perspectives that we cannot get from the
} manufacturers though- are there instrument aspects of either
} microscope that
} are repeatedly problematic or limiting? Do multi-user facilities have
} particular difficulty with either? I do not expect an obvious
} "winner" for
} an answer, but am more interested in hearing what some of the ups and
} down
} are, and seeing if those problems or circumstances would be issues for
} us.
} Thanks for any experience you an offer, I am sure it will be useful.
}
} Betsey
} ***********************************************************************
} *
} Betsey Pitts
} Research Associate/Facilities Manager, Microscopy
} The Center for Biofilm Engineering
}
} 366 EPS Building, Montana State University
} Bozeman, MT 59717
}
} betsey_p-at-erc.montana.edu
} Ph (406) 994-7813
} Fax (406) 994-6098
}
} ***********************************************************************
} *
}
}
Karl Garsha
Light Microscopy Specialist
Imaging Technology Group
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
405 North Mathews Avenue
Urbana, Champaign 61801
Office: B650J
Phone: 217-244-6292
Fax: 217-244-6219

www.itg.uiuc.edu



From daemon Mon Feb 3 14:21:49 2003



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 12:12:03 -0800
Subject: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Everyone
I may be opening a can of worms here but....

What do TEM labs do about the dust created when polymerised resin is
cut with a hacksaw or rasp or razor blade. Any resin - Spurr's, Epon,
HM20, LR Gold, LR White, etc etc.

Is there a vaccum system recommended? Or do you just use a wet towel
system. Or brush the dust into the garbage can and create dust in the
atmosphere and not worry about it. Do you have a policy of only
cutting resin down to manageable size in a fume hood and then vaccum
up the dust?
Elaine

--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
First Vice President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From daemon Mon Feb 3 14:53:05 2003



From: Mike Coviello :      coviello-at-mae.uta.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 14:43:15 -0800
Subject: EM-Looking for known Denka M3 Lab6 suppliers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All:
I am looking for online responses as suggestions of KNOWN suppliers of
Denka M3 Lab6 filaments for a JEOL TEM. I would invite offline
responses as to specific prices. (Essentially, I am comparison shopping
for the supplier with the best prices).
Thanks in advance,
Michael Coviello
Lab Manager,
UT Arlington



From daemon Mon Feb 3 17:14:11 2003



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 15:05:37 -0800
Subject: call for papers MSC Vancouver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hello Everyone
The annual meeting of the Microscopical Society of Canada is meeting
in Vancouver this year June 4-6, 2003 at the University of British
Columbia.

This is a call for papers for two concurrent session in the
Biological and Physical Sciences

Instructions for authors, registration and accomodation can be found
on the website
http://www.emlab.ubc.ca

The list of workshops, exhibitors, local University tours, and
invited speakers should be on the website soon. There are links to
Tourism Vancouver should you wish to extend your visit to one of the
most beautiful places on this planet. (You can probably tell - I am
biased).

And there are links to the International Cryo EM course which will be
in the following week.
Elaine

--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
First Vice President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From daemon Mon Feb 3 17:41:49 2003



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 13:32:19 -1000 (HST)
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi, Elaine-

} Is there a vaccum system recommended? Or do you just use a wet towel
} system. Or brush the dust into the garbage can and create dust in the
} atmosphere and not worry about it. Do you have a policy of only
} cutting resin down to manageable size in a fume hood and then vaccum
} up the dust?

I personally use the wet paper towel system. Wrap it up well and then
throw it in the trash. Of course, then I wonder about its ultimate
fate. Over here a large proportion of our wastes go to an incinerator to
generate electrical power, and then I worry about toxic vapors released
into the atmosphere. Can't decide if that's better or worse than landfill,
where stuff can leach into our water system!

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************




From daemon Mon Feb 3 17:41:49 2003



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 15:32:59 -0800
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sergey is correct, disk fragmentation has little effect on file size.
If you have the program preferences set to "allow fast saves" MS Word
will save the recent changes made to your file, along with the original
file, thereby making the total file size ever larger (until a certain
size is reached after which the file is saved as an original). If you
choose "Save as" then the document is saved as an original, minimizing
the file size. You can force the smallest size files by de-selecting
"allow fast saves"; it will take only a fraction of a second longer to
save each time (unless you are writing a book and have a huge file).

Kim
{} {} {} {} {}
Kim Rensing PhD
Department of Botany, UBC
6270 University Blvd.
Vancouver BC, Canada
V6T 1Z4

On Friday, January 31, 2003, at 08:43 PM, Sergey Ryazantsev wrote:
} Gary
} I think, you wrong: fragmented file occupied more physical space on HD
} (yes) but fragmented/non-fragmented files has the same bit-size. So
} fragmentation may affect the reading/writing time only, which on the
} modern computers is negligibly. If the disk seriously fragmented,
} yes, it may affect computer's performance in general. "Save as"
} command not necessary writes in non-fragmented space. NTFS usually
} decently manage this issue and keep fragmentation at relatively low
} level, but it's OS decision where to place your file (for instance, if
} file is small, it would be placed in the NTFS analog of FAT at the
} beginning of drive- this is special precaution against fragmentation).
} If the HD is seriously fragmented, even "Save as" will cause the file
} fragmentation. Sergey
}
} At 08:18 AM 1/31/2003, you wrote:
} }
} } What usually happens is that the document's file
} } becomes fragmented. In this case, more sectors
} } on disk are used (wasted) and leads to a larger
} } file size. If you routinely keep disk fragmentation
} } low, then do a Save As with the same file name.
} } This should put the new save in a contiguous
} } area.
} }
} } gary g
} }



From daemon Mon Feb 3 20:50:42 2003



From: starband cj :      swngdncr-at-starband.net
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 18:40:21 -0800
Subject: LM: Rank novice, hlp staining/viewing lactobacillis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello all, first off, I am a complete novice, last time I looked through a
microscope was in high school, too many years ago to mention. I have done
some research though-so I'm not completely in the dark. (Besides, I'm a geek
in disguise anyway.) What I want to do is to be able to examine samples of
my sourdough starter to see if, and if possible, what kinds of lactobacillis
are present in the starter. I have a scope w/capability of 970 power
(10x/97xOil)... I was able to stain a sample of yogurt w/methylene blue
sucessfully and see some rod shaped bacteria in that slide. They were
smaller than I thought they would be, but I could distinguish them. My
attempts w/the sourdough are less sucessful. I take a sample of the starter
and dilute it and then put a drop on the slide, dry it, pass it through the
flame, and stain it. I've found instructions for preparing slide with
crystal violet that are a little more involved, using counterstaining etc.
Would I be better off getting some cyrstal violet and using this procedure,
rather than the more simple method w/the methylene blue, or am I just trying
to do something that isn't really possible w/a scope w/only 970 capability.
Any advice or direction to documents that would help would be
preciated. -cj-




From daemon Mon Feb 3 22:44:57 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 20:38:09 -0800
Subject: Re: call for papers MSC Vancouver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Elaine
Nice to hear from you. I was on your Cryo-EM course in the summer last
year and still not received yet the samples, which supposed to be processed
on that course. If I do remember correctly you promised to me to sent
those samples ASAP. Is it still possible to get them back? Your course
was very costly to me. The samples were (it was discussed with you prior I
signed for the course) from trangenic mice with BM transplantation. The
cost of such mice is a few thousand $$ each... As a matter of fact I was
disappointed how the Cryo-course where handled. The samples were not
processed in time (was sitting in refrigerator waiting for what?), specific
antibodies were not ordered in time and then where lost, we did not have
necessary reagents in time and equipment was constantly busy... I
understand, it's normal laboratory life when you have to make reagent at
the last moment (in the cosy environment of your own Lab, not in yours) or
wait for equipment available, but it was Cryo-course I paid for that nearly
from my pocket a few thousand $$. I was expecting to have at least
attention to my needs at such price. I am sorry I made this public
statement, but it seems to me, people should know what they may expect to
have from the course and I am still WANT BACK MY SAMPLES!
Sergey

At 03:05 PM 2/3/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Feb 4 00:00:45 2003



From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 23:48:32 -0600
Subject: Administriva: Listserver Rules

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Colleagues....

Because of a recent posting I find it appropriate to remind you all
of the Listserver Rules, which you all
received copies of upon subscription confirmation. In particuliar
I draw your attention to #4. If you
have a problem with an organization, this is NOT the place to air it.

General Ground Rules on using the
Microscopy Listserver

* 1.) Actively encourage and promote the free exchange and
discussion of information, ideas and opinions, except when the
content would compromise the national security of the United States
(or any other country for that matter) ; violate proprietary rights,
personal privacy, or applicable state/federal/local laws and
regulations affecting telecommunications; or constitute a crime or
libel to the ListServer, it's operator, users, any individual or
organization.

* 2.) Use your REAL NAME and fully disclose any personal,
financial, or commercial interest when evaluating any specific
product or service, or contribution.

* 3.) Do not use this system for delivery of personal mail,
messages or items of a similiar nature (i.e no posting of resume's
etc....) If you are not sure then it probably does not belong here!
If you would like an opinion then Email the message to me and I will
review and comment as appropriate. (Zaluzec-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov).

* 4.) This forum is not to be used as a platform to accuse or
defame any individual or organization in any negative manner. You may
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* 5.) Adhere to these rules and notify the Zaluzec-at-Microscopy.Com
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* 6.) The use of this listserver is not a right, but a privilege.
That privilege may be revoked at any time by the SysOp as his
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commerical purposes without explicit permission in writing from the
SysOp.


Nestor...
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp



From daemon Tue Feb 4 03:20:33 2003



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 01:11:09 -0800
Subject: Re: call for papers MSC Vancouver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear LisServer users

Nestor just informed me that my posting (see below) is inappropriate on
this ListServer, because I violate the rule. Rule #4 states:

# 4.) This forum is not to be used as a platform to accuse or defame any
individual or organization in any negative manner. You may disagree with
any comment posted and post a reply, but this server may not be used to
spread misleading, derogatory or disparaaging comments under any conditions.

I am deeply apologize, I broke the rule and let you to be exposed to my
message. I did not intend to hurt anybody, but express my sincere
impression about mentioned here CryoEM course. I also deeply concerned I
could not receive my very valuable samples for more than 6 month. Again, I
apologize, I posted my message against the rules. I already contact to
Nestor, so he could help me to understand what was wrong in my message and
how I could avoid mistakes in the future. Sincerely, Sergey Ryazantsev.

At 08:38 PM 2/3/2003, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
Box 951737
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1737

Phone: (310) 825-1144
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From daemon Tue Feb 4 04:06:21 2003



From: Malc :      m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 11:57:29 +0200
Subject: Flow counter windows

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Folks,
Is there any one out there who knows how to refurbish windows for
gas flow counters? These are for a JEOL 733. I've a heap of mylar and a
stack of old windows and no idea what to do. I would like to know, how
to clean the old stuff off, how thick the mylar should be, how to attach
a new bit and whether these need C coating afterwards and if so how
thick a layer.
Cheers,
Malc
--
Dr MP Roberts Phone: [+27](0)46 603 8313 (work)
Dept of Geology [+27] (0)46 6361197 (home)
Rhodes University Fax: [+27](0)46 622 9715
6140 Grahamstown Cell: 083 4060 262
SOUTH AFRICA e-mail: m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za




From daemon Tue Feb 4 05:03:30 2003



From: shashi singh :      shashis_99-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2003 04:31:21 -0800 (PST)
Subject: HElp on maintenance-JEOL 100CX.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Elaine

I always try to use an appropriate size of embedding mold to minimise the need for cutting a lot of resin and make sure that the specimen is as close to the tip as possible. Trimming should then be possible by razor blade or glass knife on the microtome and I haven't used a hacksaw on a resin block for some time.

In the unlikely event that I need to saw a specimen I would do so in the fume hood using a small detachable vice to hold the block. The dust would be collected using a damp paper towel, placed in a pot and then dried. This can easily be made safe later by topping up with some waste unpolymerised resin and polymerising for disposal as normal waste.

Many years ago we used an ordinary portable vacuum cleaner but very quickly realized that this would churn out the most hazardous particle sizes of dust. There are apparently lots of new vacuum cleaners with filters in them but I don't know whether their performance would be guaranteed for potentially carcinogenic dust. I have, however, seen a couple of portable machines advertised for disposal of photocopier toner dust which may be suitable. I still don't think that resin dust should be encouraged even if you intend to clean it up later because you don't know how much is already airborne.

I have little worry about the slivers and chips of resin created by razor and glass knife cutting because they are too big to be inhaled (as far as I know), settle very quickly and can be brushed into a waste pot easily. But I would be very concerned about brushing, blowing or vacuuming ~ micron size particles. Of course 20+ years ago information was a bit sparce about the hazards of resins and their dusts and we treated them with a lot less care.

Good luck

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
School of Sciences
University of Sunderland
UK
----- Original Message -----
} From: Elaine Humphrey {ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca}


Thanks everybody,
for your responses. we finally found water in the HT
tank. Trying to arrange for oil to change it.

Shashi Singh
Scientist
CCMB, Hyderabad
INDIA

=====
Shashi Singh
Scientist
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad-500 007
INDIA
PH-91-40-7192575,7192761,7192615
FAX-91-40-7160591, 7160311

__________________________________________________
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Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
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From daemon Tue Feb 4 08:55:39 2003



From: Jerome, Jay :      jay.jerome-at-Vanderbilt.Edu
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2003 08:45:25 -0600
Subject: FW: Need a notice sent to all MSAmembers

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The program committee for M&M 2003 would like to remind everyone that
presentation submissions are due in less than two weeks (February 17).
Instructions for submission and details about the meeting are available
on-line at:

http://www.microscopy.com/MSAMeetings/MM03/MMHomePage.html

The meeting is shaping up to be very exciting with particular focus on
Nanotechnology and Optical Microscopy, as well as the broad coverage of
Electron Microscopy techniques and applications that you expect at M&M.
The program committee encourages you to participate by submitting a
paper on your work, and we hope to see you in San Antonio!


From daemon Tue Feb 4 09:53:16 2003



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2003 10:44:15 -0500
Subject: Call for papers MSC Vancouver

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I just want to say that the recent comment by Sergey to Elaine Humphrey re:
problems with the Cryo course at last year's MSC meeting was inappropriate. He
has a personal complaint that should have been directed specifically to Elaine.
It was totally uncalled for to air it to the whole ListServer community.

I've noticed that this type of grudge comments do occur occasionally on the
ListServer and take up valuable time and space. Please limit comments like that
to the person involved.

Peggy Sherwood

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org



From daemon Tue Feb 4 09:56:16 2003



From: Robin Elizabeth Young :      re.young-at-UMontreal.CA
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 2003 10:49:04 -0500
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Elaine,

In our lab we have an plain old household vaccum cleaner that is used to
suck up the dust. The hose used to be set up on a stand so that it could
suck up the dust as it is made, but the stand wasn`t functional when I got
here 2 years ago, so I couldn`t tell you how it worked. These days I just
vaccum the dust up as I go along and try not to let it get all over the
place (we don`t work in a fume hood). The vaccum bag has never needed to be
emptied in my time here, so I have no idea how the waste is dealt with.

I hope this helps,
Robin
__________________________
Robin Elizabeth Young
Laboratoire de Jacques Paiement
Université de Montréal
re.young-at-umontreal.ca

} What do TEM labs do about the dust created when polymerised resin is
} cut with a hacksaw or rasp or razor blade. Any resin - Spurr's, Epon,
} HM20, LR Gold, LR White, etc etc.
}
} Is there a vaccum system recommended? Or do you just use a wet towel
} system. Or brush the dust into the garbage can and create dust in the
} atmosphere and not worry about it. Do you have a policy of only
} cutting resin down to manageable size in a fume hood and then vaccum
} up the dust?




From daemon Tue Feb 4 10:53:21 2003



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 10:42:28 -0600
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Elaine and Robin: If you are using a plain old vacuum, I would bet you are
capturing the big particles and simply exhausting the small, more dangerous
ones. that's why a regular vacuum is worse for some allergic to
dust. They make vacuums with HEPA filters now but I don't know if they are
really effective. the water trap ones are not according to studies i have
read. the best option for vacuums is one that vents to the outside (e.g., a
built-in whole house vacuum) and these are widely recommended for those
with bad dust allegies. The bottom line is that you may be making things
worse since you are distributing them into the air.

We use a Dremel moto-tool for trimming our blocks. Vastly superior to a
hacksaw or razor blade in my opinion but it generates a ton of dust. I
would never do it outside the fume hood. My guess is you would be risking
the equivalent of silicosis. Tom



At 10:49 AM 2/4/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From daemon Tue Feb 4 11:40:56 2003



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 16:19:11 -0500
Subject: re: Seeing green when we should see infra-red - the answer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Malc,
It has been a long time since I did this on my JEOL JXA-3A, but we used to
use 4 or 6 micron mylar, stretch it over the window and glue it on with
5-minute epoxy, then trim off the excess. I believe we sanded off the old
epoxy from the brass window holder. The windows are usually then lightly
aluminum-coated so they won't charge.
Good luck
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Eng. UBC
6350 Stores Rd.
Vancouver, B.C.
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
fax: 604-822-3619
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Malc" {m.roberts-at-ru.ac.za}
To: "Microscopy discussion group" {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2003 1:57 AM


The answer is that Alexa 647 has a component that, when excited at 470 to
490 nm, has an emission very similar to FITC. This has been confirmed by
our spectrophotometer, a colleague with the Zeiss Meta (posted on the list)
and Molecular Probes themselves.

Practically, this means that while the dye works great at 647 nm, it cannot
be used with GFP or other staining in the green range.

We're gonna try Alexa 633.

Thanks!!
____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From daemon Tue Feb 4 15:28:23 2003



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 16:25:26 -0800
Subject: Re: coated glass slide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Chris,

If there is texture on the surface, what it the general size of the features? Also, what is the thickness specification for the coating?

If you want to do thickness measurements non-destructively, have you considered Raman confocal?

There are a number of approaches to this problem. Please feel free to call me off-line for further discussion.

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

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Optimizing Light Microscopy for Biological and Clinical Labs is available
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At 05:21 PM 1/31/03 -0600, Chris Michaelson (by way of wrote:
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From daemon Tue Feb 4 16:04:12 2003



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 2003 10:53:20 +1300
Subject: Energy of IR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


}
} The Al coatings on thin window detectors do a good job of
} keeping out visible light, but are fairly transparent to IR.
} The IR photons are absorbed just like X-rays, but because
} their energy is so low and the flux high compared to X-ray
} photons, the result is a nearly continuous flow of current
} through the detector which is indistinguishable (to the
} pulse processing electronics) from a "leaky detector".


Just off-the-cuff, and in ignorance, I'm surprised that IR has enough energy to
produce any elextrons/holes at all, as I didn't think it would get through the Au
layer.

I guess this must be the right explanation, though

cheers

rtch

Ritchie Sims Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 7713
Department of Geology Fax : 64 9 3737435
The University of Auckland email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From daemon Tue Feb 4 16:12:54 2003



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 2003 11:05:13 +1300
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Has anyone tried the Leica EM Trim specimen trimmer?

Uses a milling tool to trim down blocks, while observing througha
stereo microscope head. Has a vacuum connection to trim away the
nasties.

Thinking of buying one so any feed back would be appreciated.

Allan
--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Tue Feb 4 17:35:10 2003



From: Steve D'Angelo :      steve-at-equiprx.net
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 15:26:16 -0800
Subject: Reichert, Om-U3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I want to thank all who responded with offers for manuals.
Someone was able send me a scanned copy that is as close to an original
as I could hope for.
I understand that the arm bearing surfaces are probably damaged.
The instrument was transported without using the shipping blocks, even
though they had them in the drawers.
So my question is, does anyone know of a source for replacement specimen
arm bearings?
I already called Leica and they said good luck.
Very best regards to all who replied,
Steve D'Angelo

--


Equipment Resurrection
1005 Terra Nova Boulevard, Suite 2
Pacifica, CA 94044.
650-738-0351
http://equiprx.net/




From daemon Wed Feb 5 05:22:29 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 2003 11:03:23 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I bought a hand held domestic vacuum cleaner. Then one day
I was using it over a black bag and noticed that it
appeared to be depositing fine dust.

I returned to the old method. I do sawing inside a large
plastic bag in a fume hood. I knot the bag and store it the
cupboard (which is vented by the system) under the hood.
When it is full in oh... 2024 when I retire I will
polymerise it.

Dave


On Tue, 04 Feb 2003 10:42:28 -0600 Tom Phillips
{phillipst-at-missouri.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Elaine and Robin: If you are using a plain old vacuum, I would bet you are
} capturing the big particles and simply exhausting the small, more dangerous
} ones. that's why a regular vacuum is worse for some allergic to
} dust. They make vacuums with HEPA filters now but I don't know if they are
} really effective. the water trap ones are not according to studies i have
} read. the best option for vacuums is one that vents to the outside (e.g., a
} built-in whole house vacuum) and these are widely recommended for those
} with bad dust allegies. The bottom line is that you may be making things
} worse since you are distributing them into the air.
}
} We use a Dremel moto-tool for trimming our blocks. Vastly superior to a
} hacksaw or razor blade in my opinion but it generates a ton of dust. I
} would never do it outside the fume hood. My guess is you would be risking
} the equivalent of silicosis. Tom
}
}
}
} At 10:49 AM 2/4/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hi Elaine,
} }
} } In our lab we have an plain old household vaccum cleaner that is used to
} } suck up the dust. The hose used to be set up on a stand so that it could
} } suck up the dust as it is made, but the stand wasn`t functional when I got
} } here 2 years ago, so I couldn`t tell you how it worked. These days I just
} } vaccum the dust up as I go along and try not to let it get all over the
} } place (we don`t work in a fume hood). The vaccum bag has never needed to be
} } emptied in my time here, so I have no idea how the waste is dealt with.
} }
} } I hope this helps,
} } Robin
} } __________________________
} } Robin Elizabeth Young
} } Laboratoire de Jacques Paiement
} } Université de Montréal
} } re.young-at-umontreal.ca
} }
} } } What do TEM labs do about the dust created when polymerised resin is
} } } cut with a hacksaw or rasp or razor blade. Any resin - Spurr's, Epon,
} } } HM20, LR Gold, LR White, etc etc.
} } }
} } } Is there a vaccum system recommended? Or do you just use a wet towel
} } } system. Or brush the dust into the garbage can and create dust in the
} } } atmosphere and not worry about it. Do you have a policy of only
} } } cutting resin down to manageable size in a fume hood and then vaccum
} } } up the dust?
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Wed Feb 5 06:10:02 2003



From: rcmoretz-at-att.net
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 2003 12:01:35 +0000
Subject: Re: Reichert, Om-U3

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Steve:
I don't know where you are located, but Helmut Patzig, of MOC, Valley Cottage,
NY, keeps the OMU-3 here running with the odd bits. Phone number is 845-268-
6450. He might have the arm or bearing (I damaged one of those many, many,
many years ago!!) and some other bits you will likely need. However, _no one_
seems to have any more of the drive belts!

Roger Moretz, Ph.D.
Dept of Toxicology
BI Pharmaceuticals
--
Where the world is only slightly
less weird than it actually is.
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I want to thank all who responded with offers for manuals.
} Someone was able send me a scanned copy that is as close to an original
} as I could hope for.
} I understand that the arm bearing surfaces are probably damaged.
} The instrument was transported without using the shipping blocks, even
} though they had them in the drawers.
} So my question is, does anyone know of a source for replacement specimen
} arm bearings?
} I already called Leica and they said good luck.
} Very best regards to all who replied,
} Steve D'Angelo
}
} --
}
}
} Equipment Resurrection
} 1005 Terra Nova Boulevard, Suite 2
} Pacifica, CA 94044.
} 650-738-0351
} http://equiprx.net/
}
}
}


From daemon Wed Feb 5 09:05:20 2003



From: Patton, David :      David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 5 Feb 2003 14:54:34 +0000 (GMT Standard Time)
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I have just seen a note in Microscopy Today, (downloaded
from http://www.microscopy-today.com follow the links to
the back issue Table of Contents), (March/April 2002).

Karen Pawlowski uses a method that traps the dust in water
in a flask.

Dave


On Tue, 04 Feb 2003 10:42:28 -0600 Tom Phillips
{phillipst-at-missouri.edu} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} Elaine and Robin: If you are using a plain old vacuum, I would bet you are
} capturing the big particles and simply exhausting the small, more dangerous
} ones. that's why a regular vacuum is worse for some allergic to
} dust. They make vacuums with HEPA filters now but I don't know if they are
} really effective. the water trap ones are not according to studies i have
} read. the best option for vacuums is one that vents to the outside (e.g., a
} built-in whole house vacuum) and these are widely recommended for those
} with bad dust allegies. The bottom line is that you may be making things
} worse since you are distributing them into the air.
}
} We use a Dremel moto-tool for trimming our blocks. Vastly superior to a
} hacksaw or razor blade in my opinion but it generates a ton of dust. I
} would never do it outside the fume hood. My guess is you would be risking
} the equivalent of silicosis. Tom
}
}
}
} At 10:49 AM 2/4/2003 -0500, you wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
} }
} }
} } Hi Elaine,
} }
} } In our lab we have an plain old household vaccum cleaner that is used to
} } suck up the dust. The hose used to be set up on a stand so that it could
} } suck up the dust as it is made, but the stand wasn`t functional when I got
} } here 2 years ago, so I couldn`t tell you how it worked. These days I just
} } vaccum the dust up as I go along and try not to let it get all over the
} } place (we don`t work in a fume hood). The vaccum bag has never needed to be
} } emptied in my time here, so I have no idea how the waste is dealt with.
} }
} } I hope this helps,
} } Robin
} } __________________________
} } Robin Elizabeth Young
} } Laboratoire de Jacques Paiement
} } Université de Montréal
} } re.young-at-umontreal.ca
} }
} } } What do TEM labs do about the dust created when polymerised resin is
} } } cut with a hacksaw or rasp or razor blade. Any resin - Spurr's, Epon,
} } } HM20, LR Gold, LR White, etc etc.
} } }
} } } Is there a vaccum system recommended? Or do you just use a wet towel
} } } system. Or brush the dust into the garbage can and create dust in the
} } } atmosphere and not worry about it. Do you have a policy of only
} } } cutting resin down to manageable size in a fume hood and then vaccum
} } } up the dust?
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Associate Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
}
}
}

----------------------------------------
Patton, David
Email: David.Patton-at-uwe.ac.uk
"University of the West of England"



From daemon Thu Feb 6 08:45:46 2003



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 2003 15:25:25 +0100
Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I hate the way Word deals with images. It makes huge files too. I would
recommend Adobe Pagemaker or Deneba Canvas for much more controllable
combination or text and graphics. If you have Acrobat (full version)
installed you can then also export the files to pdf format and share them
easily on the web. Of course, these software packages are not so ideal for
presentations and I have not yet found an alternative to Powerpoint for
that.

(P.S. This is not just Microsoft bashing, I wish they would do a better
job of Graphics handling in word. In my opinion, the competition is better
at this just now. As a pure Word processor I find MS Word very good).

Best wishes

Ian

On Mon, 20 Jan 2003 09:30:47 -0600,
{"gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com"-at-sparc5.microscopy.com} wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
}
} Jeff,
}
} I, too, have had significant problems working with images imported into
} Microsoft Word. However, my software is located on the PC hard drive. The
} biggest problem that I have encountered with images in Microsoft Word
} occurs when annotating images. After the image is imported into Word,
} annotation may be done in two ways (to my knowledge): (1) Text, arrows,
} etc. may be simply superimposed over the images. The problem with this
} approach is that the annotations are not linked to the image and may not
} remain superimposed on the image if the image moves. (2) Annotations can
} also be linked (probably not the best choice of words) to the image by
} double-clicking on the image to open the image field, adding the
} annotation, then closing the image field. These annotations are permanent
} unless intentionally moved or deleted.
}
} The problems occur when one implements the second option. Comparing
} images
} before and after annotation, I found that the annotated images often
} sustained substantial changes in gray or color levels. Case in point, EDS
} maps were so badly affected that the color key was no longer correct.
}
} My solutions follow: (1) Annotate images in Adobe Photoshop before
} importing into Word. Note that the effects of lossy compression on
} annotations (blurred edges) may be pronounced. (2) Use Microsoft
} PowerPoint
} for image presentation. I have encountered no problems with image files
} in
} PowerPoint.
}
} Good luck to you in your endeavors.
}
} Cheers,
}
} "The opinions expressed are those of Gary M. Brown and do not represent
} the
} opinions of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."
}
} Gary M. Brown
} ExxonMobil Chemical Company
} Baytown Polymers Center
} 5200 Bayway Drive
} Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
} phone: (281) 834-2387
} fax: (281) 834-2395
} e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com
}
}
} "Oakley, Jeff"
} {oakleyj-at-rayovac.c To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
} om} cc:
} Subject: RE: presentation images
} 01/17/03 07:50 AM
}
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} This same phenomenon happens with my reports in Microsoft Word. In
} addition to images darkening, they sometimes shift to other pages and/or
} change size and dimension. Adding tables and text boxes to the report
} adds
} to the fun.
}
} The software that we use is networked. Our IS department has told us
} that
} the networked software has a bug that causes these things to happen when
} file sizes increase, and that there is not a patch for it. So we have
} just
} have to deal with it.
}
} Jeff Oakley
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Corazon D. Bucana [mailto:bucana-at-audumla.mdacc.tmc.edu]
} Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2003 11:11 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: presentation images
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------.
}
}
} I created a Power point presentation last November 2002 consisting of
} several fluorescence micrographs. The file which was rather large ( 90
} Mb)
}
} was left in my laptop all this time. When I opened it again this week I
} find that the images are now too dark and I needed to increase brightness
} by 3-4 clicks on the brightness icon of Power point.I increased
} brightness
}
} of all the micrographs and copied the file to a CD hoping that the image
} will not deteriorate there and then compare it with the one in my laptop
} several weeks from now. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there
} something I should have done to prevent this?
}
} Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.
}
} Cora Bucana
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}



--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material-und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany


From daemon Thu Feb 6 09:15:32 2003



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 09:07:13 -0600
Subject: TEM: ultramicrotomy: knife damage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear Listers,

I'm curious as to how many people have had problems using molecular
sieves in dehydration solvents, with respect to knife damage. We seem
to be going through diamond knives at a uncomfortable rate and we're
wondering if this could be a contributing factor. We are very careful
with our knives and try to minimize contact cleaning of the edges. We
soak the knives often in the recommended solution in a commercial
cleansing unit, and the knife manufacturer has evaluated one of our
knives and confirmed that the edge is chipped, not dirty.

As a multi-user facility, we do a LOT of ultramicrotomy on a large
variety of samples, so this may just be normal wear and tear, but we
would sure like to minimize this expense.

Thanks much!

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core---We're the Fun Core!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



From daemon Thu Feb 6 09:15:35 2003



From: Lawrence Oakford :      loakford-at-hsc.unt.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 09:06:56 -0600
Subject: Lithium phosphotungstate Negative Stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I was wondering if anyone on the list is familiar with this stain. I
am trying to find a procedure for either making this stain or a
commercial source for the stain. It was listed in a methods section
for negative staining isolated neurofibrillary tangles (Crowther, R. A.
1991. PNAS 88:2288) but the author did not reference a source for the
stain or a procedure. I would appreciate any help provided.

Thanks


Lawrence X. Oakford, Ph. D.
Technical Manager
Microscopy Core Facility
Department of Cell Biology and Genetics
UNT Health Science Center
3500 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX 76107

Phone: 817-735-2066
Fax: 817-735-2610



From daemon Thu Feb 6 10:34:13 2003



From: Dusevich, Vladimir :      dusevichv-at-umkc.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 10:25:17 -0600
Subject: Again about presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Listers,

Preparing my abstract for MM'03 I have found that:
- Two page document (4 images with superimposed EDS line scans)
saved in Word 2000 format was 758K size.
- Saved in Word 6.0 format (as required for uploading by
submission instructions) it had size of 2.93M (!).
- Saved in PDF format (Acrobat 5.0) file was just 286K,
but line scans, still pretty visible, were looking not
nice.

I believe I should upload PDF files, since Word files
anyway will be converted in PDF for CD publishing. But are not
we loosing quality going digital now?

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Rosemary White [mailto:rosemary.white-at-csiro.au]
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 4:00 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Another trick is to put the images and text into a Word
} table, if you size
} the cells in the table to about the size you want, the images
} will insert
} to fit the cell size.
}
} And if copying and pasting, make sure you do "Paste Special"
} and unclick
} the box that says "float over text". That way the images
} always stay in
} the same spot with respect to the surrounding text and don't
} mysteriously
} jump around when you insert or delete text.
} cheers,
} Rosemary
} }
} } Thanks Doug-
} } Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
} } Rgds,
} } Mike Shaw
} } Roselle, NJ
} }
} } } Gary,
} } }
} } } MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with
} images. A couple
} } } of tricks I've discovered over the years.
} } }
} } } 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly
} on the page, it
} } } seems to give you much greater control over the location
} on the page. It
} } } also makes it much easier to add text annotations that
} stay with the image.
} } }
} } }
} } } If you don't want the text box to have a border you can
} remove it by
} } } selecting
} } } the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the
} Draw toolbar,
} } } then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like
} the text box to
} } } be transparent, select the text box outline and look for
} the "paint bucket"
} } } icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and
} select "none". If
} } } you discover its hard to find the text box border once you
} made the edge
} } } "invisible", first select the image with a single left
} click (it should have
} } } the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the
} keyboard left or right
} } } arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox
} outline (with
} } } black
} } } bordered resizing "handles").
} } }
} } } 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as
} opposed to copying
} } } and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images
} are harder to work
} } } with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} } } images into Word,
} } } you don't have to use JPEG.
}
}
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Feb 6 12:57:32 2003



From: Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D. :      joiner-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 2003 12:47:21 -0600
Subject: TEM & SEM in the same room

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hello Listrers -

I run a clinical EM lab with a geriatric JEOL 100C TEMSCAN microscope. I am
campaigning for new equipment and would like to get a stand alone TEM and
SEM. Currently my scope is in a rather large room that should be able to
accommodate two instruments with their columns at least ten feet apart. I
would hate to have new instruments installed only to find that they
interfered with each other, either electrically or mechanically (vibration,
etc.). I would like to hear from anyone who has wrestled with this
problem....or is it a problem? I am on the second floor and not too near
elevator shafts or electrical traces and vibration for my one scope has not
been a problem.

Joiner
Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D.
Department of Pathology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas U.S.A.



From daemon Thu Feb 6 13:16:19 2003



From: Tobias Baskin :      BaskinT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 13:08:11 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM: ultramicrotomy: knife damage

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Randy,
Some people I know keep their molecular sieve in dialysis tubing.

Tobias

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From daemon Thu Feb 6 13:35:53 2003



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 14:35:58 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM: ultramicrotomy: knife damage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The New England Society for Microscopy announces its Early Spring meeting,
to be held at the JEOL(USA) Inc. facility in Peabody, Massachusetts.



This is something we discovered over 20 years ago: molecular sieves
work well BUT it is necessary to allow the alcohols to stand
untouched for one month in order for the ceramic-like "fines" to
settle out. Also, be very careful when withdrawing sieve-dried
alcohols. Do not pour the alcohols but use a pipette and remove it
from the top of the liquid. When the level drops to less than 1 inch
above the sieves, it's time to move on to the next bottle. Basically,
we would prepare about 6-10 pints of ethanol at one time, allowing
them to "age" for at at least 30 days.

I must admit that now I tend to use 100% ethanol right out of freshly
opened containers (individually sealed pints) except in the most
critical of applications (Spurr's dehydrations, for example) and have
NEVER had a problem with water.

I know of at least two investigators (not me) who have damaged
diamond knives by not taking precautions with molecular sieves.
Basically, once the fines get onto your specimen they are impossible
to remove and will damage your diamond knife.





} I'm curious as to how many people have had problems using molecular
} sieves in dehydration solvents, with respect to knife damage. We seem
} to be going through diamond knives at a uncomfortable rate and we're
} wondering if this could be a contributing factor. We are very careful
} with our knives and try to minimize contact cleaning of the edges. We
} soak the knives often in the recommended solution in a commercial
} cleansing unit, and the knife manufacturer has evaluated one of our
} knives and confirmed that the edge is chipped, not dirty.
}
} As a multi-user facility, we do a LOT of ultramicrotomy on a large
} variety of samples, so this may just be normal wear and tear, but we
} would sure like to minimize this expense.

##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Fax: 618-453-2665
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From daemon Thu Feb 6 15:07:52 2003



From: Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D. :      joiner-at-bcm.tmc.edu
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 2003 14:58:49 -0600
Subject: Re: TEM & SEM in the same room

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Thank you, Valerie. That's a good point about monitor light, etc. and
perhaps a curtain arrangement might help. As for the number of people in
the confined space....Is this an advantage or disadvantage??

Joiner
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
At 03:04 PM 02/06/2003 -0500, you wrote:
We have two microscopes (a JEOL 100S TEM and a Philips 505 SEM) within a
space of about 15 X 20 feet, but separated into 2 rooms, each about 15 X 10
ft. The columns are about 11 feet apart and we have absolutely no problems
with interference or vibration. However, unless both of the new
microscopes can be operated in room light (i.e. have computer monitors &
digital capture), putting both scopes into one room could be a problem when
both scopes need to be used at the same time. Also, if the space is really
small, do you want that many people in there at one time? Having space for
the equipment is one thing, but room for the users too, is another.....

Valerie

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Hello Listrers -

I run a clinical EM lab with a geriatric JEOL 100C TEMSCAN microscope. I am
campaigning for new equipment and would like to get a stand alone TEM and
SEM. Currently my scope is in a rather large room that should be able to
accommodate two instruments with their columns at least ten feet apart. I
would hate to have new instruments installed only to find that they
interfered with each other, either electrically or mechanically (vibration,
etc.). I would like to hear from anyone who has wrestled with this
problem....or is it a problem? I am on the second floor and not too near
elevator shafts or electrical traces and vibration for my one scope has not
been a problem.

Joiner
Joiner Cartwright, Jr., Ph.D.
Department of Pathology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas U.S.A.



From daemon Thu Feb 6 16:28:06 2003



From: Young, Gene (GP) :      GPYoung-at-dow.com
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 17:14:58 -0500
Subject: Re: Resin dust

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Our lab purchased a Leica EM Trim about a year ago. It does a pretty good job of trimming. The vacuum cleaner (purchased separately) comes on automatically when you push the trimming button and does a good job of keeping the dust down.

Gene P. Young
Sr. Analytical Technologist
Analytical Sciences, Polymer Characterization
The Dow Chemical Company
2301 N. Brazosport Blvd., B-1470
Freeport, Texas 77541-3257
Fax: (979) 238-0095
Phone:(979) 238-1579


-----Original Message-----
} From: Allan Mitchell [mailto:allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz]
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2003 4:05 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Has anyone tried the Leica EM Trim specimen trimmer?

Uses a milling tool to trim down blocks, while observing througha
stereo microscope head. Has a vacuum connection to trim away the
nasties.

Thinking of buying one so any feed back would be appreciated.

Allan
--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

Unit: http://www.otago.ac.nz/anatomy/emunit/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/



"Life is a gift, don't waste it"


From daemon Thu Feb 6 16:35:24 2003



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 17:27:07 -0500
Subject: Again about presentation images in Microsoft Word

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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You can set the resolution of your images higher in Adobe Acrobat. I don't know which Acrobat version you have and it is a little different in each. The easiest way is to use PDFWriter and set the resolution output to 300 dpi or a little higher. If you use Distiller, then you will need to go in and change the resolution of your gray scale and line drawings to higher and also make sure that you are using a higher resolution print option. You can set everything to 300 dpi and it should come out pretty good. You can also set your line drawing settings higher than 300 if you want.

In adobe Acrobat 5.0, I save in 4.0 format and for documents that I save for myself for reference, I use a general resolution of 600 dpi. For image compression schemes, I use bi-cubic sampling to 300 dpi for images above 350 dpi for both color and grayscale, and 600 for monochrome images. These settings work fairly well for me and the document sizes don't get too large.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472

Walck-at-PPG.com

(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)



-----Original Message-----
} From: Dusevich, Vladimir [mailto:dusevichv-at-umkc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2003 11:25 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com


Hi Listers,

Preparing my abstract for MM'03 I have found that:
- Two page document (4 images with superimposed EDS line scans)
saved in Word 2000 format was 758K size.
- Saved in Word 6.0 format (as required for uploading by
submission instructions) it had size of 2.93M (!).
- Saved in PDF format (Acrobat 5.0) file was just 286K,
but line scans, still pretty visible, were looking not
nice.

I believe I should upload PDF files, since Word files
anyway will be converted in PDF for CD publishing. But are not
we loosing quality going digital now?

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
3127 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: Rosemary White [mailto:rosemary.white-at-csiro.au]
} Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 4:00 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: presentation images in Microsoft Word
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- Send Email to
} ListServer-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------.
}
}
} Another trick is to put the images and text into a Word
} table, if you size
} the cells in the table to about the size you want, the images
} will insert
} to fit the cell size.
}
} And if copying and pasting, make sure you do "Paste Special"
} and unclick
} the box that says "float over text". That way the images
} always stay in
} the same spot with respect to the surrounding text and don't
} mysteriously
} jump around when you insert or delete text.
} cheers,
} Rosemary
} }
} } Thanks Doug-
} } Great tips- I'm printing them up until I memorize them.
} } Rgds,
} } Mike Shaw
} } Roselle, NJ
} }
} } } Gary,
} } }
} } } MS Word is such a pain because of the way it works with
} images. A couple
} } } of tricks I've discovered over the years.
} } }
} } } 1) Place the image within a text box, rather than directly
} on the page, it
} } } seems to give you much greater control over the location
} on the page. It
} } } also makes it much easier to add text annotations that
} stay with the image.
} } }
} } }
} } } If you don't want the text box to have a border you can
} remove it by
} } } selecting
} } } the box outline and look for the "paint brush" icon on the
} Draw toolbar,
} } } then use the down arrow and select "none". If you'd like
} the text box to
} } } be transparent, select the text box outline and look for
} the "paint bucket"
} } } icon on the Draw toolbar, then use the down arrow and
} select "none". If
} } } you discover its hard to find the text box border once you
} made the edge
} } } "invisible", first select the image with a single left
} click (it should have
} } } the solid black resizing "handles") and then use the
} keyboard left or right
} } } arrow keys and the selection with move out to the textbox
} outline (with
} } } black
} } } bordered resizing "handles").
} } }
} } } 2) Always use the INSERT | PICTURE | FROM FILE option as
} opposed to copying
} } } and pasting an image into Word. I find that the images
} are harder to work
} } } with if I paste them in. Also, you can insert TIFF or BMP
} } } images into Word,
} } } you don't have to use JPEG.
}
}
}
}
}


From daemon Thu Feb 6 16:38:00 2003



From: Kevin Frischmann :      kfrisch-at-amnh.org
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 2003 17:31:14 -0500
Subject: Image quality in Acrobat .pdf

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S