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From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 10:37:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Archives for 2003 Now On-Line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year Colleagues :


The Archives for all of 2003 are now on-line at:


http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers...

Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
Nestor


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 1 22:02:03 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:04:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] ISTFA/FA list

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Would someone point me to the listserver
for failure analysis discussion of metallurgical and
integrated circuit devices?

tnx,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 1 22:29:41 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:30:21 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: ISTFA/FA list

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary:

The information is as follows:

====================== EDFAS Discussion List
=============================
This E-mail forum is a service exclusively for members of the
Electronic Device Failure Analysis Society, http://www.edfas.org

To reply or post a message to the whole group, send to:
edfas-at-mh.databack.com

To unsubscribe, send a message to: leave-edfas-at-mh.databack.com

For problems or questions, send an email to:
owner-edfas-at-mh.databack.com

Best regards-

David



--
David Henriks
Vice President

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 38 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for Metallogaphy,
Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is privileged and
confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity addressed.
If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling +1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.


Gary Gaugler wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Would someone point me to the listserver
} for failure analysis discussion of metallurgical and
} integrated circuit devices?
}
} tnx,
} gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 10:09:20 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 08:11:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] temperature controlled SEM stages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all:

I've seen hot/cold stages from Deben that
look like they could hold a standard pin
stub specimen. However, they seem to
be optimized for low temperature work.
Does anyone know of some other supplier
that makes SEM specimen holders that will
heat up to about 200C and perhaps cool
to -25C?

The unit would need to mate to the stage
on a LEO Supra 55VP's specimen interchange
stage or on a FEI Sirion 400, under similar
circumstances.

Gatan makes a series of heated stages but
they seem more for stress testing and bulk
specimens. I will have an IC chip thermal
expoxy'd to a 12mm diameter Al pin stub. I need
to be able to heat this specimen in the SEM
and at any tilt and WD that the SEM will support.
Temperature stability could be as bad as +-5C.
That is OK.

Specimen holder and specimen changeout via
slide out chamber door is OK. Specimen interchange
lock does not have to be used.

thanks for any ideas and leads,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 11:27:25 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:27:42 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In the latest issue of Microscopy Today there is an article on
pseudo-coloring of images. Since this is not something that I normally
do, I read the article with interest. I was surprised to find that the
author says that biologists nearly always use the "spectrum" color table
for the pseudo-coloring of grayscale images. I had thought that those
who study visual perception had found that among pseudo-color scales the
"thermal" scale is much better than all the others at providing a good
intuitive reading of the image. This is, I think, the scale that
Photoshop calls "Black Body". Can someone please clear up my confusion.
--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 11:58:48 2004



From: MicroscopyToday :      microtod-at-optonline.net
Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:59:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Microscopy Today Jan/Feb Table of Contents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers,

Here is the table of contents for the January/February 2004 issue of
Microscopy Today.

New Subscriptions via http://www.microscopy-today.com only, please.
New subscriptions will close on Thursday 8 January for this issue.

There has been a major change in subscription policies coming out of the MSA
Winter Council meeting.

Briefly: Canadians and Mexicans are now offered free subscriptions along
with microscopists in the USA.

MSA members anywhere have free subscriptions.

Non-MSA, non-North American subscriptions have been reduced from $80 or
$110US to $35US. Additional details in the magazine or on our web site.

THIS WILL BE THE LAST ISSUE NON-MSA MEMBER, NON-NORTH AMERICAN, UNSUBSCRIBED
OR NOT-CURRENTLY-SUBSCRIBED INDIVIDUALS WILL RECEIVE!

Listers,

Here is the table of contents for the November/December 2003 issue of
Microscopy Today. This issue is mailed with the Call for Papers for the 2004
Microscopy and Microanalysis meeting

New Subscriptions via http://www.microscopy-today.com only, please
New subscriptions will close on Tuesday 11 November for this issue.

There has been a major change in subscription policies coming out of the MSA
Winter Council meeting.

Briefly: Canadians and Mexicans are now offered free subscriptions along
with microscopists in the USA.

MSA members anywhere have free subscriptions.

Non-MSA, non-North American subscriptions have been reduced from $80 or
$110US to $35US. Additional details in the magazine or on our web site.

PURGING OF NON-MSA MEMBER, NON-NORTH AMERICAN, UNSUBSCRIBED OR
NOT-CURRENTLY-SUBSCRIBED INDIVIDUALS IS UNDERWAY!

January/February 2004
Carmichael: Correlating Fluorescence Microscopy with Electron Microscopy
P.E. Batson: Electron Microscopy Enters a New Era Using Aberration
__Correction
Paula Allan-Wojtas: Microscopy and Imaging of Foods— The Whys and Hows
Jerry Sedgewick: Image Stitching Using Photoshop
Michael Bode: A Few Thoughts About Image File Storage
Paul Beauregard: Behavior of Particle Size Distributions, Means and BET
__Values in Ideal and Non-Ideal Morphology Systems in a TEM
Katerina Moloni: The Moving Finger Writes: Carbon Nanotubes as AFM Probe
__Tips
Robert M. Zucker: Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial Resolution
Shane Roberts, Daniel Flatoff: Enhanced Sample Preparation of Cu Low-k
__Semiconductors via Mechanical Polishing and Ion Beam Etching
Luc Harmsen: The Year That Was! Microscopy in Southern Africa
Robert P. Apkarian: Comments on Cryo High Resolution Scanning Electron
__Microscopy
Jose A. Mascorro: Propylene Oxide: To Use or Not to Use in Biological
Tissue __Processing
M. T. Postek & A. E. Vladár: Is Low Accelerating Voltage Always the Best for
__Semiconductor Inspection and Metrology?


Ron Anderson, Editor
Microscopy Today




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 12:10:04 2004



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 13:09:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes it is unfortunately true that many (most?) biologists do use the
"spectrum" color scale, largely because it makes "prettier-looking"
images. It the cases where they are trying to illustrate
quantitative contrast this is not only grossly misleading but it is
usually plain wrong and can produce horrific artifacts! The worst
offenders are chiefly light microscopists who are trying to represent
weak flourescence contrast and for some reason think it shows up
"better" with a spectrum scale. In the STEM/X-Ray/EELS biological
microanalysis field most of us use some variation of the "black Body"
scale which of course more closely parallels the greyscale that is
intuitively quantitative anyway (black = 0, shades of grey through
white represent more positive values). Relative contrast or
non-linear scaling can be achieved by manipuating the scale either
continuously or by introducing discontinuities to other scales; of
course color then becomes essential (a) because the human eye can
perceive considerably more colors than levels of grey, and (b) one
can extend the scale over a far greater dynamic range(s); most
monitors only display 8-bit levels of grey (24-bit color) but data
are often 32-bit or more in dynamic range.

The topic of visual perception of data is a fascinating one indeed
and has been addressed in several treatises over the years. However
in my experience, I have found the most (subjectively) pleasing
results to come from visual artists (painters) who seem to have a
natural instinct for such representations. A visit to any good art
museum should convince most people of this!

Sorry if this is a rather brief and simplistic answer to your
question but maybe it helps some!

Peter


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.54.107/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 2 12:41:52 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2004 11:41:04 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Alwyn,

happy new year!

the most common use of Pseudo color is to enhance the contrast of the images
and make small details more visible.

A little background:

Computer monitors are normally set to "True Color". On most graphics cards
that means 32 bit of information per pixel, or "Millions of colors" as they
say. However, each pixel is represented by 3 colors (Red, Green, and Blue),
and each of these colors can take on an 8 bit value. 8 bits mean, that there
are 256 shades of each color available, which can be combined to give you
the "millions of colors" (256 x 256 x 256). What is not so obvious, that for
gray levels you need to combine the 3 colors in at the same strength, i.e.
black is 0,0,0, medium gray is 128,128,128 and white is 255,255,255. This
shows, that even if your monitor can display millions of colors, it can
usually only show 256 levels of gray. Take into account, that the human eye
can distinguish perhaps 50 or so levels of gray and modern cameras can
provide anywhere from 4000 to 64,000 levels of gray, and the need for
different color schemes becomes obvious.

Enter the pseudo colors.

There are as many pseudo color schemes as you can think of. Several have
become "standards". Among them definitely the "black body" scheme, and the
"spectrum" color scheme. The "black body" is perhaps more intuitive, as it
basically goes from Red to White. This provides a linear scale, which is
easy to understand to anybody who has seen a metal heated (and perhaps
burned himself or herself), and it is probably easier to discern small
contrasts both in the red and the bright parts of the spectrum than in b/w
images. However, it does not make full use of the capabilities of a monitor.
The "spectrum" pseudo color, on the other hand, makes full use of the
availble color spectrum, perhaps at the price of an intuitive understanding.
It may be better suited to images that have "many" gray levels, which all
need to be discerned. If used wrongly, however, the spectrum pseudo color
can also lead to misleading coloring.

I hope this helps.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Alwyn Eades [mailto:jae5-at-lehigh.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 10:28
To: MSA listserver

In the latest issue of Microscopy Today there is an article on
pseudo-coloring of images. Since this is not something that I normally
do, I read the article with interest. I was surprised to find that the
author says that biologists nearly always use the "spectrum" color table
for the pseudo-coloring of grayscale images. I had thought that those
who study visual perception had found that among pseudo-color scales the
"thermal" scale is much better than all the others at providing a good
intuitive reading of the image. This is, I think, the scale that
Photoshop calls "Black Body". Can someone please clear up my confusion.
--
.........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 07:27:59 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 09:57:28 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Peter writes ...

} ...
} ... In the STEM/X-Ray/EELS biological microanalysis field
} most of us use some variation of the "black Body" scale
} which of course more closely parallels the greyscale that
} is intuitively quantitative anyway (black = 0, shades of
} grey through white represent more positive values).

I remember an M&M '99 session, which introduced a pseudo-color scale for
quantitative images (e.g., elemental distributions, maps). That is, ranges
of color for representing "orders of magnitude" ... or ranges we might refer
to as "major", "minor", "trace", or "undetected". The session was intended
to be its introduction, such that its color ranges would become familiar to,
and used by all, as so that quantitative images could be actually compared.
I thought it was interesting concept at the time, but also felt it needed
some refinement. Unfortunately my inadequate notetaking didn't allow for me
to ever find the color table and download it.

I have no idea if it was mentioned in the MT article, but the people who
had introduced the color scheme were from NIH (or, was it NIST?). I believe
it is too bad the color scheme never did rise to common use. That is, even
if I did feel it still needed some refinement, it would be a good thing if
quantitative images could all be compared.

cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 10:27:30 2004



From: cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:27:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Re: Greetings

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} In Dec, 2001, a group of animal rights protestors in Cambridge announced that
} they intended to sue "Christianity as a whole" and anyone who celebrates
} Christmas. The shock announcement comes after years of protesting against
} Christmas which, they say, causes unnecessary cruelty to turkeys.

And ignore the use of reindeer as beasts of burden? Or use of swine as ham?
Sounds pretty discriminatory to me.

Some people think the New Year is when it is because it was the celebration of
Jesus's circumcision. If we think this is bad (e.g. castration ritual), do we
refuse to follow the calendar? BTW, the holiday of New Year has become almost
global.

This is a time of year when we should take some time off and relax. This
message is apropos to this bboard specifically because for a few days I didn't
think about microscopy at all. I read novels, slept, ate ham and argued with
family over the Iraq war and mostly trivial stuff. This is happy holidays.

Now, can we get back to microscopy and drop the holiday stuff? Even if some
of us won't be completing our Christmas celebrations until the 6th?




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 11:40:17 2004



From: faj-at-highway1.com.au (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:40:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
Name: Faye Taylor

Organization: Amateur

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: Perth, Western Australia

Question: Hello there,
I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.

I recently aquired a second hand
"MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.

Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
hardware that I possess?
I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.

I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it impossible
with my present configuration?
i would appreciate any comments please

Happy New Year Faye

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 13:32:14 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 11:31:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
} Name: Faye Taylor
}
} Organization: Amateur
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: Perth, Western Australia
}
} Question: Hello there,
} I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
} world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
} purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
} 192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.
}
} I recently aquired a second hand
} "MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
} use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.
}
} Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
} hardware that I possess?
} I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
} to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.
}
} I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it
} impossible with my present configuration?
} i would appreciate any comments please

Faye -

You don't say WHY you can't take photos with your equipment! I
suggest that you contact microscopeworld.com. They sell many Motic
scopes under the U.S. brand name "National", plus camera connectors,
so you should be able to get specific advice on your problem.

You'll find abundant microscopy resources for the grandkids at the
MICRO website; URL below.

Caroline

--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 3 15:23:11 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 22:22:38 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] special on MIcroscopy in the Nanobiosciences

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Friends,
here is the table of content of the last 2003 issue of J.Microscopy
(OXF)
on Microscopy in the Nanobioscience.

215
Foreword
A. Diaspro


217
Polysaccharide properties probed with atomic force microscopy
N. I. Abu-Lail, T. A. Camesano


239
Encapsulated yeast cells inside Paramecium primaurelia: a model system
for protection capability of polyelectrolyte shells
S. Krol, O. Cavalleri, P. Ramoino, A. Gliozzi, A. Diaspro


244
Insights into the regulation of transcription by scanning force
microscopy
R. T. Dame, C. Wyman, N. Goosen

254
Monitoring enzymatic reactions in nanolitre wells
I. T. Young, R. Moerman, L. R. Van Den Doel, V. Iordanov, A. Kroon, H.
R. C. Dietrich, G. W. K. Van Dedem, A. Bossche, B. L. Gray, L. Sarro,
P. W. Verbeek, L. J. Van Vliet

264
The molecular machines of DNA repair: scanning force microscopy
analysis of their architecture
A. Janiijevi, D. Ristic, C. Wyman

273
TectoRNA and 'kissing-loop' RNA: atomic force microscopy of
self-assembling RNA structures
H. G. Hansma, E. Oroudjev, S. Baudrey, L. Jaeger

280
The nacre protein perlucin nucleates growth of calcium carbonate
crystals
S. Blank, M. Arnoldi, S. Khoshnavaz, L. Treccani, M. Kuntz, K. Mann,
G. Grathwohl, M. Fritz

292
Atomic force microscopy study of living diatoms in ambient conditions
I. C. Gebeshuber, J. H. Kindt, J. B. Thompson, Y. Del Amo,
H. Stachelberger, M. A. Brzezinski, G. D. Stucky, D. E. Morse, P.
K. Hansma

300
Self-assembly and recrystallization of bacterial S-layer proteins at
silicon supports imaged in real time by atomic force microscopy
E. S. Györvary, O. Stein, D. Pum, U. B. Sleytr

307
Fluorescent resolution target for super-resolution microscopy
P. R. H. Stark, L. J. Rinko, D. N. Larson


I hope is of interest

All my best
ALby



.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 4 17:50:49 2004



From: Peter Ingram :      p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 18:53:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Mike!

I meant the "visual perception" of quantitation which is what
Alwyn's initial observation referred to. Of course I agree totally
with you that its easer to distinguish different colors from one
another than shades of any color or grey. The question is rather "is
bright green more or less than yellow?" Any quantitative color scale
must also have factored in parameters such as Hue, Saturation abd
Brightness; this is one of the main failings of the "spectrum scale"
- it doesn't!

Cheers etc

Peter



} Hello Peter,
}
} in actuality, the situation is a bit more complex than that. I am looking at
} the LUT right now that we have in our analySIS software, and you are of
} course right that a pixel with no intensity (intensity 0) is displayed as
} black (0,0,0). However, the intensity "1" is displayed as (R:41, G:0, B:0).
} Technically, it goes from black to white, but realistically, it goes from
} "dark red" to white.
}
} The situation becomes mor complex at the other end. To make yellow, you have
} to add in a green component, and to make white you also have to add in blue.
} So, it is not straightforward "black to white" or "red to white". Other
} colors get mixed in at the higher intensities to make yellow to white.
}
} As for qantitation: I am not sure, what you are referring to. Quantitaion is
} best done on the b/w images with the help of a computer, which has no
} problems distinguishing intensity 2976 from 2977. For the display of small
} contrasts for the human eye I agree with you, but there an even better
} choice is the spectrum LUT. It's easier to distinguish yellow from green
} than it is to distinguish "dark orange" from "darker orange".
}
} mike
}
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Peter Ingram [mailto:p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu]
} Sent: Friday, January 02, 2004 12:03
} To: Mike Bode
} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Psuedo color
}
}
}
} Actually the "black body" scale goes from black to white, albeit
} through red, orange and yellow, not simply red to white - a vital
} distinction when quantitation is involved!
}
} Peter
}
}
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
DURHAM NC 27708-0319

Tel: 919 660-2695
Fax: 919 660-2671
Email: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
Web: http://152.3.54.107/AEM_LAB.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 08:44:39 2004



From: Ervin, Matt (Civ, ARL/SEDD) :      mervin-at-arl.army.mil
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 09:47:25 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary-
I have been using a dual microprobe I purchased from Ernest F.
Fullam Inc.:

900 Albany Shaker Rd.
Latham
NY 12110-1491
800-833-4024, 518-785-5533

Part #15855 dual, o-ring sealed manipulator. They had suggested that I
purchase micromanipulators that had metal bellows rather than o-ring
seals since I have a FE-SEM, but since all of the other seals on my
specimen chamber were o-rings, including detectors that run in and out,
I opted for the less expensive o-ring sealed option, and I have had no
trouble with them. I cannot say if the microprobes I have will meet
your positioning accuracy requirements as I am currently using fairly
blunt tips. I also do not have verniers to check reproducibility. I
just watch where I am placing them using the SEM. The probes are
essentially the same as one might find on an electrical probe station
for testing devices. The one problem I do have with them is that since
I work with the probe tips near the pole piece, the probes induce a
significant aberration. I do not know if the set screws holding the tips
in are magnetic, making the problem worse or not. I do know that there
are magnetic knurled nuts about 2" up the shaft. You may need to
specify the materials you want the probe arms made out of, as well as
working at longer WD/higher kV. I haven't bothered to correct this, or
to move the probes further from the pole piece, as the resolution is
adequate for my experiments. I have found Fullam to be very helpful and
open to customizing their products for individual needs. They have a
web site at: http://www.fullam.com/. Good luck.

Sincerely,
Matthew Ervin, Ph.D.
(301)394-0017 phone, (301)394-1559 fax
MErvin-at-ARL.Army.mil

M/S: AMSRL-SE-RL
US Army Research Laboratory
2800 Powder Mill Road
Adelphi, MD 20783-1197

Disclaimer: The opinions and views expressed above are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army Research
Laboratory or any other government agency



-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 10:11 PM
To: MSA listserver

Hi all:

Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
stability.

I need two contact probes.

gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 09:42:19 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:45:01 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:02:05 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 10:04:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: nylon SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Phil,

I suggest that you check out "Polymer Microscopy", 2nd edition, by Sawyer &
Grubb. I believe that they addressed this issue.

Cheers,

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



Philip Oshel
{peoshel-at-wisc.edu} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] nylon SEM
12/23/03 02:55 PM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Materials micromavens,

We have a user doing SEM of nylon, with embedded bits. We'd like to
chemically etch the nylon, which is something of an entertaining
problem, since nylon is used to mask things against etchants.
Does anyone have a recipe for something that will etch nylon and not
silica?
Thanks.

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:34:32 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 12:37:02 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:44:59 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 11:54:09 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 10:52:17 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 10:55:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Administrivia: Archives for 2003 Now On-Line

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Nestor,

Many thanks to you for all your hard work over the past years. I very much
appreciate the service that you provide for the microscopy/microanalysis
community.

Cheers,

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



"Nestor J. Zaluzec"
{zaluzec-at-microscopy.c To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
om} cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Archives for
2003 Now On-Line
01/01/04 10:37 AM







------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Happy New Year Colleagues :


The Archives for all of 2003 are now on-line at:


http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver


Cheers...

Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp
Nestor







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:35:40 2004



From: Lehman, Ann :      Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 12:38:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Kathleen,

I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
Philips TEM).

Here is the contact info:

Doug Wagner
Haskris Co.
100 Kelly Street
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
847-956-6595 (fax)
doug-at-haskris.com

Good luck!
Ann

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Mailstop: LSC-314
Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
f. 860-297-2538
www.trincoll.edu/~alehman


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to

Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another

company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:39:32 2004



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:42:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Check out Haskris. I believe that they are the best on the market, in my
opinion, and they would make a model which would easily handle the Zeiss 10.

http://www.groupeinterconnexion.com/LaboratoryListingsAddPages/Chiller_Cryog
entics_Adds/HaskrisWaterChillerHA2953.htm


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 11:41:30 2004



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 11:44:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

sorry, that website is: www.haskris.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 12:28:56 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 13:31:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hakris is a reasonably reliable chiller. I've had several on EM diff pumps. They also make a 115V version that I used on a Hitach S4500 FESEM since my lab had no chilled water supply. Unless strapped for cash, junk the old one. If it fails it can make a nasty mess of things. I think I spent 2K$ [American] for the one I bought 6 years ago.

Happy new year. [Can I say that?]

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA



-----Original Message-----
} From: Lehman, Ann [mailto:Ann.Lehman-at-trincoll.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 12:39 PM
To: Kathleen Roberts; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Dear Kathleen,

I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
Philips TEM).

Here is the contact info:

Doug Wagner
Haskris Co.
100 Kelly Street
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
847-956-6595 (fax)
doug-at-haskris.com

Good luck!
Ann

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Ann Hein Lehman
Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
Mailstop: LSC-314
Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT 06106
v. 860-297-4289
e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
f. 860-297-2538
www.trincoll.edu/~alehman


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to

Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another

company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:07:58 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:17:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ann-

Oooh, thank you! You just made things a lot easier for me. :o) I
guess I should talk to LEO as well to see what options I need, unless
your Zeiss and mine are similar enough?

God, how I love listservs....thank you, Nestor!

Thanks again-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Lehman, Ann wrote:

} Dear Kathleen,
}
} I have a Zeiss EM900 and my Coolwell also just bit the dust about
} 2months ago. I went with a Haskris Model 075 chiller, which includes
} Option (K), a 220V interlock as specified by LEO. I have two other
} Haskris chillers that have been very reliable (on a JEOL SEM and on a
} Philips TEM).
}
} Here is the contact info:
}
} Doug Wagner
} Haskris Co.
} 100 Kelly Street
} Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
} 847-956-6420, x243 (tel)
} 847-956-6595 (fax)
} doug-at-haskris.com
}
} Good luck!
} Ann
}
} ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} Ann Hein Lehman
} Assistant Director, Electron Microscopy Facility
} Mailstop: LSC-314
} Trinity College
} 300 Summit Street
} Hartford, CT 06106
} v. 860-297-4289
} e. ann.lehman-at-trincoll.edu
} f. 860-297-2538
} www.trincoll.edu/~alehman
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 11:54 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:11:23 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:20:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Pat-

Yes, Dr. Bonder is still at Rutgers-I just did a search for him on
Rutgers' website. I don't know him personally, though, as he is on the
Newark campus, where I have never been, and I am on the New Brunswick
campus. Worlds apart... :o)

Kathleen

Pat Connelly wrote:

} Kathleen,
} WE have been using a Haskris Co. water chiller (RO 75) since 1996 for
} my Phillips 200 TEM. It works very well and the only complaint that I
} have had is that we use a timer to shut down our ancient scope at
} night and the one on the chiller keeps dying - it just stays on.
}
} This company was recommended to me when our previous chiller, also a
} Haskris,died after 25 years or so, by a refrigeration specialist who
} does some contract work here.
}
} Do you know if Dr. Ed Bonder is still at Rutgers? He was in EM the
} last time I had heard from him but I do not know the exact department
} - Biology? He was a grad student here at Penn a few decades ago!
}
} Pat Connelly
} Research Specialist




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:21:08 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:30:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To all who wrote in reply to my question-
}
} Thank you for the information, you all have made my life much easier. :o)
}
} Now I can sit down with my boss and be able to give him some real
} information about replacing this poor thing, instead of "I'm still
} searching for a source..."
}
} Thanks again-
} Kathleen
} Neurotoxicology Labs
} Rutgers University




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:26:57 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:36:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ouch! That is an expensive repair...would LEO install a temp. sensor on
a 'scope that is so old? My impression was that LEO didn't service
Zeiss 'scopes anymore.

Thanks for the information-
Kathleen

Ken Tiekotter wrote:

} Dear Kathleen,
}
} I just had a major life change as my Coolwell went down, was repaired, and
} crashed again for the third and final time. The issue was exasperated by a
} series of facilities failures. The outcome was about an $18k repair bill to
} include a new Haskris chiller (~$5600.00)
}
} Unfortunately, the Zeiss EM 10CA does not a temperature sensor to determine
} glycol temperature, but rather only flow rate. The repair included a
} complete overhaul of the column because oil vapors were not condensing in
} the diffusion pump and consequently went everywhere in the column.
}
} After almost 20 years with my beloved EM10, the hospital decided to donated
} the scope and close my lab. You may want to check with Zeiss (LEO) about
} installing a temperature sensor and automatic relay to shut the HV value if
} the circulator temperature gets too high.
}
} Best wishes to you and your EM10!
} Ken
}
} _______________________________________
} Kenneth L. Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
} The University of Portland
} Department of Biology
} 5000 N Willamette Blvd.
} Portland, OR 97203 USA
}
} Director, MicroImaging Dx Center
} Legacy Portland Hospitals
} Legacy Holladay Park Medical Center
} 1225 NE 2nd Avenue
} Portland, OR 97232 USA
}
} Tel.: 503.413.5391
}
}
}
}
}
} On 1/5/04 8:54 AM, "Kathleen Roberts" {kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu} wrote:
}
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:40:57 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 14:50:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Joel-

I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's an
overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
reading way above the overtemp limit.

There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.

I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
old anyway.

Thanks,
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

McClintock, Joel wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} I take care of a Zeiss 902 with a coolwell chiller. I have fixed this thing several times. What is the problem with it? Often the temp sensor goes haywire. I have found it is often the switch. I have replaced it for around $7. As others have recommended Haskris is my favorite. If money is tight I may be able to direct you to a used one.
}
} Joel McClintock
} EM Specialist
} U of Kentucky
} 859-257-1242
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 11:54 AM
} To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc:
} Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi, all-
}
} We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
} ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
} dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
} Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
} under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
} possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
} much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
} course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
} company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
} EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
} sources that I can try.
}
} Hope you all had a happy holiday!
}
} Thanks in advance-
} Kathleen Roberts
} Principal Lab Technician
} Neurotoxcology Labs
} Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
} Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} Rutgers University
} 41 B Gordon Rd
} Piscataway, NJ 08854
}
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 13:47:21 2004



From: jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 13:49:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary,
I have seen presentation on two micro-manipulator type systems: Zyvex - a MEMS based system (www.zyvex.com), and Klendiek (http://kleindiek.com, http://www.ascendinstruments.com/product_nanoprober.asp) a micro-motor based system distributed in USA by Ascend Instruments. They are geared to manipulate specimen inside a FIB or SEM chamber and both can be used for electrical measurements. The problem is that they are expensive (~100K). Since I have not actually used either one of them I cannot recommend them. We are thinking of a versatile solution that would allow TEM sample extraction, transfer, in DB-FIB and also allow us to perform occasional electrical measurements on powered devices.

Regards and Happy New Year to all.

Jerzy

PS: If you get other replies, please post them since I would also be interested in a less expensive system but with less flexibility. I do not have any vested interest in either company, we only had sales presentations from both distributors.

******************************************************
Jerzy Gazda, Ph.D. Advanced Micro Devices
Supervising Engineer 5204 E. Ben White Blvd. - MS 512
PCAL - AIM Section Austin, TX 78741
TEL: 1-800-538-8450, Ext. 51453
jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
******************************************************



-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:11 PM
To: MSA listserver

Hi all:

Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
stability.

I need two contact probes.

gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:05:53 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:11:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: micro probes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Another source is Omniprobe, http://www.omniprobe.com/. Click the Products nav button. They can do electrical testing, TEM lift-out, mechanical testing, etc.
I have no financial interest in the company.

jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Gary,
} I have seen presentation on two micro-manipulator type systems: Zyvex - a MEMS based system (www.zyvex.com), and Klendiek (http://kleindiek.com, http://www.ascendinstruments.com/product_nanoprober.asp) a micro-motor based system distributed in USA by Ascend Instruments. They are geared to manipulate specimen inside a FIB or SEM chamber and both can be used for electrical measurements. The problem is that they are expensive (~100K). Since I have not actually used either one of them I cannot recommend them. We are thinking of a versatile solution that would allow TEM sample extraction, transfer, in DB-FIB and also allow us to perform occasional electrical measurements on powered devices.
}
} Regards and Happy New Year to all.
}
} Jerzy
}
} PS: If you get other replies, please post them since I would also be interested in a less expensive system but with less flexibility. I do not have any vested interest in either company, we only had sales presentations from both distributors.
}
} ******************************************************
} Jerzy Gazda, Ph.D. Advanced Micro Devices
} Supervising Engineer 5204 E. Ben White Blvd. - MS 512
} PCAL - AIM Section Austin, TX 78741
} TEL: 1-800-538-8450, Ext. 51453
} jerzy.gazda-at-amd.com
} ******************************************************
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2003 9:11 PM
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] micro probes
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi all:
}
} Has anyone seen a source of micro probes for SEM that allow electrical
} contact to a SEM chamber specimen? I need very precise
} positioning--like within 0.15u or better and 0.05u repeatability and
} stability.
}
} I need two contact probes.
}
} gary g.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:34:46 2004



From: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 16:37:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: unstained blood smears

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net
Name: Elizabeth Colvin

Organization: Homeschool

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Pearblossom, CA-L.A. county

Question: I have obtained several unstained blood smears. I have
Wright's stain and methylene blue available. Can you please tell me
how long to leave the stain on the slide before rinsing. And do I
rinse with distilled water. Thank you.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 16:52:04 2004



From: Kenneth Tiekotter :      tiekotte-at-up.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 14:52:15 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen,

Good question from Joel. The alarm (buzzer)you are hearing more than
likely is the chiller fluid flow indicator on the EM10. The pressure
must be maintained at 1.5 - 2liters per minute. The flow indicator is
located on the right-hand side of the column inside the gray hinged
'door'. These is a small glass window to show where the float is in
relationship to the flow of fluid: the higher the float, the greater
the number of liters/minute.

On the front of the Coolwell chiller is also a flow indicator, which
should be adjusted to meet the 1.5 - 2 liter flow on the microscope.
Also check to see if the temperature gauge on the Coolwell remains the
same or fluctuates. It could be the chiller is fine, but the pump is
going out.

Ken


Kathleen Roberts wrote:


}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

---------------------------------------
Kenneth L, Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
Dept. of Biology
The University of Portland
5000 N Willamette Blvd,
Portland, OR 97203 USA


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:16:32 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 15:35:19 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Image processing position available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,
I am posting the following for Dr. Jensen, the head of our cryo-EM
group:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------
I'm looking for an image processing scientist/computer programmer to
help with our expanding biological electron tomography projects here at
Caltech. We are currently imaging many specimens including cells,
viruses, and purified protein complexes with a state-of-the-art 300kV,
helium-cooled, energy-filtered, automated, FEG TEM. We are in the
process now of purchasing a large new supercomputer for the structural
biology groups. Duties would include applying existing programs as well
as developing new software for image processing needs, handling large
amounts of image data, managing processes on our supercomputer, working
with students to help them solve image processing problems, and being a
creative member of a growing scientific team. Minimum qualifications
are a bachelor’s degree, strong programming skills, mathematical
aptitude, an ability to work well with others, and enthusiasm for
biology research. Graduate education or extended experience in related
fields is preferred. Interested persons seeking either a post-doctoral
position or a permanent staff position are encouraged to apply. Salary
will be commensurate with qualifications. CalTech is located in
Pasadena, California (a suburb of Los Angeles) next to the San Gabriel
mountains, and offers an extraordinarily rich intellectual environment
for computationally-inclined scientists, all within a sunny, affordable,
diverse community that will make you want to stay. Please send CV and
three letters of reference to jensen-at-caltech.edu or

Dr. Grant Jensen
California Institute of Technology
Biology Division, Mailcode 114-96
1200 E. California Blvd.
Pasadena, CA 91125
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------

Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:40:32 2004



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jan 2004 17:45:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen,

Just to add to what Ken said just below, if the flow alarm is in fact what
you are hearing, then just check the various filters in the cooling water
system, probably one in the chiller tank, probably another one on the input
side to the microscope. Or, the lines may be plugged up somewhere with crud
such as algae or corrosion products. After checking the filters and cleaning
or replacing them, if problem persists may have to have scope and/or
delivery lines flushed to clear them. I had to do that once for in an SEM's
interior cooling lines.

Hope this helps!
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} Kathleen,
}
} Good question from Joel. The alarm (buzzer)you are hearing more than
} likely is the chiller fluid flow indicator on the EM10. The pressure
} must be maintained at 1.5 - 2liters per minute. The flow indicator is
} located on the right-hand side of the column inside the gray hinged
} 'door'. These is a small glass window to show where the float is in
} relationship to the flow of fluid: the higher the float, the greater
} the number of liters/minute.
}
} On the front of the Coolwell chiller is also a flow indicator, which
} should be adjusted to meet the 1.5 - 2 liter flow on the microscope.
} Also check to see if the temperature gauge on the Coolwell remains the
} same or fluctuates. It could be the chiller is fine, but the pump is
} going out.
}
} Ken
} } Kathleen Roberts wrote:
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } Joel-
} }
} } I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
} } know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
} } hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
} } what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's
} an
} } overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
} } reading way above the overtemp limit.
} }
} } There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
} } was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
} } however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
} } is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.
} }
} } I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
} } resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
} } without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
} } managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
} } name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
} } the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
} } help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
} } old anyway.
} }
} } Thanks,
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }

} ---------------------------------------
} Kenneth L, Tiekotter, Adjunct Professor
} Dept. of Biology
} The University of Portland
} 5000 N Willamette Blvd,
} Portland, OR 97203 USA



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 5 17:41:59 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2004 23:48:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Peter,

I did not want to imply that the "spectrum" scale is "perfect". There are
many color scales and depending on what you want to see or show, one or the
other might be better.

You bring up a good point, though: familiarity with the scale. Everybody can
interpret a black and white scale, and the thermal scale is also very
intuitive. Once we get to more colors, I would say that the spectrum scale
is familiar to most people, red on one end, blue on the other. Other scales
need more explanation or a color scale bar on the Image.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Peter Ingram [mailto:p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu]
Sent: Sunday, January 04, 2004 16:54
To: Mike Bode
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time, not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have. Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 01:59:15 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:00:31 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: RE: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




On Mon, 5 Jan 2004, Mike Bode wrote:

} You bring up a good point, though: familiarity with the scale.

And one (little) cent more : I had a look a few weeks ago to the biology
manual
from my daughter (secondary school, french 3°, i. e. 15 years old), an all
the EM and SEM pictures were in pseudo color, whith different color rules
from one picture to an other and without any mention that it was "false
colors" and that the true signal was a monochrome level variation ! I've
than understood why a student asked my once, why we dont't have color
images on the SEM ... " Not enough monney to pay it ?" asked he !
Familarity with a "false" color scale, can be an obstacle to understand
the way the images was obtained (and to understand the image itself,
perheps).

So pseudo color, why not of coarse, but with a color scale along a border
of the picture, like the micron bar, as is often done on AFM images.


J. Faerber
IPCMS
Strasbourg France




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 03:36:16 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 01:41:54 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John
I was thinking, it's only my family is "so creative". When we came to US
my kids very quickly figured out what to do: ever since we do celebrate
everything. Catholic Christmas, New Year, then Russian Christmas, then
Russian "Old" New Year... The whole point there was to have gifts for
every holiday... As far as I remember my kids also enjoyed some Jewish
holidays when they had school off... I really like you description: "the
spirit of Christmas". I think, good spirit should unify us, not separate
by religious believe... Sergey.


At 11:48 PM 1/5/2004 -0800, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 05:30:26 2004



From: Thomas, Frank :      FThomas-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 07:33:09 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kathleen -

I'll also put in my $.02 worth (Cdn) for Haskris chillers. I've
owned both Haskris and Neslab ones over the years, but what I really like
about the Haskris models I've used is the fact that the water tank/reservoir
has a removable lid, so you can always look inside and visually inspect the
condition of the water. The Neslab one we have now, though reasonably
reliable and all, has a completely sealed water tank with just a narrow
little filler neck, so you can never see what's going on inside.
Interestingly, both companies use the same water pumps supplied by a third
company somewhere in Indiana, I believe. These pumps are rebuildable and
replaceable of course, as are the electric motors that power them, so it's
often possible to keep a chiller running for a very long time before it
actually has to be replaced.
To choose an appropriate model for your particular application you
just need to know how much water (usually gallons/minute) and at what
temperature your particular instrument needs it, then match that up to the
model listing. There's not much point in greatly exceeding the needs of your
instrument with a bigger chiller than necessary, since the motor/pump will
be running constantly anyway.
Some folks will let one big chiller cool several instruments. No
doubt this is pretty cost-effective, but the down-side is apparent when the
chiller craps out and you now have several instruments down instead of just
one.......

Frank

F.C. Thomas
FThomas-at-NRCan.gc.ca, 902-426-4635, facsimile 902-426-6152
Natural Resources Canada, Bedford Institute of Oceanography,
P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2
Ressources naturelles Canada, l'Institut Oceanographique du Bedford, B.P.
1006, Dartmouth, (Nouvelle-Ecosse)
B2Y 4A2
Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 12:54 PM
To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

Hi, all-

We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
sources that I can try.

Hope you all had a happy holiday!

Thanks in advance-
Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxcology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 05:50:44 2004



From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=22Michael_Didi=E9=22?= :      Michael.Didie-at-gmx.de
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:53:37 +0100 (MET)
Subject: [Microscopy] Feather Blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello everyone,

I'm searching for some decent disposable blades for our Leica Microtome to
get sections of living hearts.
I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience with
getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?

Thanks

Michael Didié

--
+++ GMX - die erste Adresse für Mail, Message, More +++
Neu: Preissenkung für MMS und FreeMMS! http://www.gmx.net




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 07:29:15 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:32:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time, not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have. Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:12:53 2004



From: lookerr-at-battelle.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:15:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: microchemical tests

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: lookerr-at-battelle.org
Name: Ron Looker

Organization: Battelle

Education: Graduate College

Location: Columbus, OH

Question: I am looking for procedures for various microchemical tests
such as protein. Where would be a good resource for finding such
procedures? Thanks you for your time,


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:21:43 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:04:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


How can I resist!

A number of years ago I took a SEM course and I was told the following:

It seems a number of students comment to their professor that they would
like a real time false color display on the SEM. At the time this was not
a inexpensive request or total practical. The next day the students found
a coffee mug full of Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."

Stay Safe................

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:36:44 2004



From: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US :      RafaelPena-at-kemet.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:39:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All, I know we are not a theological forum ( and I'm not one, I'm
just a SEM tech)
I agree with the last mail about unifying us.
This is only a way as we can Unify Religion with Science including
Microscopy
Microscopy and Science has discovered a world full of distinctive marks
of intelligent design so we can not deny the chance of the existence of a
creator, so if we want to give honor to him we have to make sure that we
are worshipping him in a good way.

As much of us are from different cultures, we also have to be united,
an example of unity is the language, in this case English. But What about
religions, does exist a language in which we agree about belief? Even
when some religious people have influenced wars, Yes, does exist : is the
True. And I'm not being ambiguous I'm talking about the true about the
date of Christ birth ( where Christmas is originated), the true about
Mexican traditions, I mean all of them over the world, dates, even about
the origin of the live (because religions talk about the creator).
Knowing the true about our own traditions and beliefs and talk about
them to others will unify us.



I agree about giving gifts, I enjoy accepting them and I deeply appreciate
when people give them at any day of the year, without expectation.


Sincerely

Rafael Peña
SEM Tech
Process Enginering
Tel 83297100
Ext 4721
Monterrey Nl Mexico

----- Forwarded by Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US on 01/06/04 08:29 AM
-----


"Tomic, Peter (Peter)" {ptomic-at-agere.com}
01/06/04 07:32 AM


To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} , (bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US)
bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Dec. 25




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not
the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of
remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I
celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is
Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We
are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the
fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they
loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I
celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed
marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and
Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that
it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just
Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time,
not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not
just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just
Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just
Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a
special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas
does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes
of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared
that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have.
Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas
Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:36:44 2004



From: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US :      RafaelPena-at-kemet.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 08:39:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Dec. 25

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All, I know we are not a theological forum ( and I'm not one, I'm
just a SEM tech)
I agree with the last mail about unifying us.
This is only a way as we can Unify Religion with Science including
Microscopy
Microscopy and Science has discovered a world full of distinctive marks
of intelligent design so we can not deny the chance of the existence of a
creator, so if we want to give honor to him we have to make sure that we
are worshipping him in a good way.

As much of us are from different cultures, we also have to be united,
an example of unity is the language, in this case English. But What about
religions, does exist a language in which we agree about belief? Even
when some religious people have influenced wars, Yes, does exist : is the
True. And I'm not being ambiguous I'm talking about the true about the
date of Christ birth ( where Christmas is originated), the true about
Mexican traditions, I mean all of them over the world, dates, even about
the origin of the live (because religions talk about the creator).
Knowing the true about our own traditions and beliefs and talk about
them to others will unify us.



I agree about giving gifts, I enjoy accepting them and I deeply appreciate
when people give them at any day of the year, without expectation.


Sincerely

Rafael Peña
SEM Tech
Process Enginering
Tel 83297100
Ext 4721
Monterrey Nl Mexico

----- Forwarded by Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US on 01/06/04 08:29 AM
-----


"Tomic, Peter (Peter)" {ptomic-at-agere.com}
01/06/04 07:32 AM


To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
cc: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com} , (bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US)
bcc: Rafael Pena/MONT3/MFG/KEMET/US
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: Dec. 25




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Although these are debates that should take place somewhere, this is not
the forum for them. Unless one can tie a microscope to this line of
remarks I would rather not see this on this listserver.

Just my opinion.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 2:48 AM
To: Steven E. Slap; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
Cc: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Steven;
I was kidding about being a Raelian. I am agnostic. I
celebrate the spirit of Christmas, not the religious part. My wife is
Turkish, and is a Moslem. She loves Christmas, as does our daughter. We
are presently being visited by my wife's mother and sister. Despite the
fact that they are both Moslem, and neither of them speaks English, they
loved their first Christmas. When my wife celebrates her holidays, I
celebrate with her. My brother's wife is Jewish (another mixed
marriage-agnostic and Jewish). Their family celebrates both Hanukah and
Christmas. Their two kids love having two holidays to celebrate.
As for the spirit of Christmas, I am sorry to hear that
it has eluded you. You can give gifts to loved ones any time, not just
Christmas. You can try to bring more cheer into peoples lives any time,
not just Christmas. You can get together with your family any time, not
just Christmas. You can put up special decorations any time, not just
Christmas, and you can listen to wonderful music any time, not just
Christmas. It's just that human nature is such that we sometimes need a
special stimulus to prioritize all this in a hectic world, and Christmas
does just that-and more. Finally, if you have ever looked in to the eyes
of a young child contemplating Santa Claus' imminent arrival, and shared
that wonder, then you would know that this a wonderful thing to have.
Steven, you have some homework to do. You need to find out what Christmas
Spirit is. If you do it right, you will have a Happy New Year.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:01 AM
To: Mardinly, John; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:49:58 2004



From: Bruce Girrell :      bigirrell-at-microlinetc.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 09:55:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} The next day the students found a coffee mug full of
} Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
} a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."


Ah, yes... Interactive computer graphics.


Bruce Girrell


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:54:27 2004



From: MICHAEL J DELANNOY :      delannoy-at-jhmi.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:03:06 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] re:holey carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To the listserver,
Is there an easier way to make holey
carbon (small 1.5 um) films, other than
steaming formvar/evaporating carbon and
dissolving formvar with solvents? If not
who sells good small holed pure carbon
films.

thanks
mike d



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 08:58:33 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:01:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Feather Blades/living hearts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael Didié wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

} I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience with
} getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
} supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?
}
} Thanks
}
} Michael Didié
}
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 09:40:53 2004



From: hagglund.kw-at-pg.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 10:22:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: microchemical tests

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Handbook of Chemical Microscopy, Vol II. (1940) E. M. Chamot and C. W. Mason

(1989 Reprints available from McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL.)

Karl Hagglund
(513) 634-0146


} From: lookerr-at-battelle.org (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist) on 01/06/2004 02:15 PM
GMT

lookerr-at-battelle.org To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
(by way of Cc: (bcc: Karl Hagglund-KW/PGI)
Ask-A-Microscopist) Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist:
microchemical tests

01/06/2004 09:15 AM









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Email: lookerr-at-battelle.org
Name: Ron Looker

Organization: Battelle

Education: Graduate College

Location: Columbus, OH

Question: I am looking for procedures for various microchemical tests
such as protein. Where would be a good resource for finding such
procedures? Thanks you for your time,


---------------------------------------------------------------------------





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:01:17 2004



From: gillian.2.brown-at-gsk.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 16:01:05 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Feather Blades

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,
Assuming your message has lost a little in translation you might like to
go to the Leica's own web site www.leica-microsystems.com.
They their own (feather) microtome blades but are you actually using a
vibratome?

I have just seen an ad in Microscopy and analysis Jan 2004 for a new live
cell cutting module for their microdissection kit for live tissue
cultures.
(I have no commercial interest)


Gill Brown

GlaxoSmithKline Medicines Research Centre,
STEVENAGE,






""Michael Didié"" {Michael.Didie-at-gmx.de}

06-Jan-2004 11:53




To: Microscopy

cc:
Subject: [Microscopy] Feather Blades



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello everyone,

I'm searching for some decent disposable blades for our Leica Microtome to
get sections of living hearts.
I heard that Feather Blades should do the trick. Has anyone experience
with
getting sections of living cardiomyoctes and could give me an address of a
supplier of blades, preferrably in Germany/Europe ?

Thanks

Michael Didié

--
+++ GMX - die erste Adresse für Mail, Message, More +++
Neu: Preissenkung für MMS und FreeMMS! http://www.gmx.net











From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:04:41 2004



From: Dee Breger :      micro-at-ldeo.columbia.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 11:07:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] theomicroscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is a thoughtful, well-presented magazine called Science & Spirit
that addresses the intersection under discussion, which may be an
appropriate venue for this dialogue. (It might make a good article for
them if anyone wants to pursue it!)



--
***************************************************************
Do not publicly post any of my correspondence without permission

Dee Breger
Mgr. SEM/EDX Facility
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
61 Route 9W
Palisades, NY 10964 USA
T: 845/365-8640
F: 845/365-8155

http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/micro
Journeys in Microspace (Columbia University Press, 1995)
http://www.lsc.org/antarctica/front.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 10:10:32 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 11:19:43 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Joel-

Well, knowing my boss, he will want to start with the smaller stuff -all
the suggestions of what to check on the Coolwell that you and everyone
else has been sending me (thank you oh so VERY much, everyone!)-and then
when all those have been exhausted, go buy a Haskris. So, if it is not
too much trouble, could you please dig up & send me that Grainger part
number, just in case?

I will check everyone's suggestions and see if they work. At the very
least, it would be nice to be at least somewhat functional until we get
the new chiller in, assuming that the Facilities people here can figure
the Coolwell out without diagrams. :o)

Muchas gracias,
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

McClintock, Joel wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} This sounds real familiar. I suspect the switch is your problem with this chiller. No matter what chiller you have the compressor comes on then off, back and forth. On the front of this chiller right in the middle should be a temp adjustment, don't recall exact wording, but if you take a flat blade screw driver and move it around you should hear the cmpressor come on. If you do watch the temperature and see if it goes down. If so the compressor is working. Your problem then is something is not telling it ot come on properly. In my experience it is the switch from the thermocouple. Coolwells are really sensitive and when operating correctly keep the water temp pretty steady. THe compressor comes off and on, on and off quite often. The thermocouple initiates this. The thermocouple is stuck in the water and a copper line with a flat copper plate at it's end. This plate buts up to a switch. The switch has a little button on it and is pretty sensitive. As the water temp changes the copper swells and shrinks turning the switch off and on respectively. If the switch is sticky or fails things don't work. Doesn't take much as you might imagine the copper moves very little. I can dig up the number for this switch if you need it as I got it through a company called Grainger. Sound like you are going with a new one though. Good luck.
}
} One thing to keep in mind is whether you have a Haskris chiller or coolwell over time maintenance and/or repair will be necessary. Over the years I have called Haskris many times and their phone support is very very good. The only way to get any help on a Coolwell is if you had a time machine and even then I would not be hopeful. The design of Haskris is service friendly.
}
} Joel
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 2:50 PM
} To: McClintock, Joel; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} Cc:
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
}
}
}
} Joel-
}
} I will admit that I am not entirely sure what is wrong with it. All I
} know is that when I turn the 'scope on, it's fine for the first half
} hour or so...then a buzzer goes off-there is no indicator light to say
} what that buzzer is for on the 'scope, but my boss tells me that it's an
} overtemp alarm. If you look at the temp gauge on the chiller, it's
} reading way above the overtemp limit.
}
} There was one occasion when a pump in the house distilled water system
} was dying, and when it was replaced, the 'scope stopped buzzing. Now,
} however, the distilled water system appears to be fine, and the 'scope
} is buzzing again, so I am assuming that it is the chiller.
}
} I did get a local HVAC repair guy in (from the same company that
} resurrected our old cryostat), but he said that he couldn't do anything
} without the refrigeration and other specifications for that chiller. I
} managed to get a couple of diagrams from someone else on this list (his
} name escapes my memory for the moment, but thanks again anyway!), but
} the HVAC guy said that it wasn't enough. As Lytron isn't willing to
} help, I'm going to give up and get a new chiller, as this one is pretty
} old anyway.
}
} Thanks,
} Kathleen
} Neurotoxicology Labs
} Rutgers University

}
} McClintock, Joel wrote:
}
} } Kathleen,
} }
} } I take care of a Zeiss 902 with a coolwell chiller. I have fixed this thing several times. What is the problem with it? Often the temp sensor goes haywire. I have found it is often the switch. I have replaced it for around $7. As others have recommended Haskris is my favorite. If money is tight I may be able to direct you to a used one.
} }
} } Joel McClintock
} } EM Specialist
} } U of Kentucky
} } 859-257-1242
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
} } Sent: Mon 1/5/2004 11:54 AM
} } To: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Cc:
} } Subject: [Microscopy] chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } Hi, all-
} }
} } We here at the Neurotoxicology Labs at Rutgers University have an
} } ancient Coolwell chiller for our Zeiss EM 10CA, and it appears to be
} } dying. Coolwell went out of business years ago, and Zeiss pointed me to
} } Lytron, Inc. as the company who bought Coolwell's stuff when it went
} } under. I have tried to contact Lytron online about repairs or a
} } possible replacement for this chiller, but they don't seem to be paying
} } much attention to their email. I am going to call them directly, of
} } course, but what I would like to know is if anyone can recommend another
} } company or particular chiller model that would be appropriate for our
} } EM, so that if Lytron continues to blow me off I will have other
} } sources that I can try.
} }
} } Hope you all had a happy holiday!
} }
} } Thanks in advance-
} } Kathleen Roberts
} } Principal Lab Technician
} } Neurotoxcology Labs
} } Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
} } Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} } Rutgers University
} } 41 B Gordon Rd
} } Piscataway, NJ 08854
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:05:49 2004



From: Moninger, Thomas :      thomas-moninger-at-uiowa.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:08:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Free Kevex Equipment

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Group,
FYI, I have posted the availability of a Kevex Sigma Gold EDS processor and
a Kevex 4855 Digital Beam Control Interface to the surplus equipment list.
Cheers,
Tom


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:07:24 2004



From: Monson, Frederick :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:09:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: unstained blood smears

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Morning Elizabeth,
If you have Wright's Stain you should do the following.
1. find two glass rods that will reach across a dish/bowl on
which you can support a slide with smear up.
2. Wright's Stain is dissolved in methanol (or should be! - 0.5g
Wright's in 100ml (~ { 3oz) - mixed by 'trituration' (grinding with the
end of a round-bottom test tube) in small amounts of the alcohol until
all is dissolved!). It is delivered on the horizontal dry smear slowly,
with a dropper, so that a puddle of stain covers the smear (& perhaps
the entire slide). Leave for 2.5 min.
3. Add water dropwise to the surface of the stain until IT forms
a puddle that covers about 1/2 of the slide. Then blow gently,
back-and-forth, on the surface of the water-stain until the two are
mixed well. Total time should be about 4.5 min.
4. Rinse the water-stain off the slide in gently running water
and stand the slide against an inverted glass to dry - with smear down.
[If at home, DO ALL staining, rinsing and drying on aluminum foil. The
dye will stain Formica surfaces. Removal requires another email.] When
completely dry, a coverglass can be applied using appropriate care with
a permanent mountant.
5. You can also view the smear directly with an oil immersion
lens (that's the way it is done in pathology labs). Oil is placed
directly on the smear and then differential counting is performed.
Count 100 white blood cells, identifying each, and record the
distributions. A normal smear will show something like the following:
1 basophil, 2 eosinophils, 38 neutrophils (each of the previous
identified by cytoplasmic granules that are dark blue, bright red and
the latter pink with a segmented nucleus respectively), and 59
lymphocytes (small cells with a round nucleus and a thin rim of
cytoplasm). All red blood cells should be orange and without nuclei.

The theory is this.
Methylene blue (base) and eosin (acid) are mixed in water (1:1) and
combine to form a precipitate. The precipitate is dried and then
dissolved(?) in methanol. After the dye thoroughly penetrates the cells
in the smear, the water causes the precipitate to dissociate (based on
mass action). The methylene blue and eosin are then simultaneously
accessible to cellular constituents and are attracted according to their
individual affinities. The rinse in excess water then removes all
unbound dye. Applying the dyes separately requires much more work and
gives much less satisfactory results. The above dyes belong to a group
of blood dyes called "Romanovsky Stains".

Coverslipping.
If you do not have an oil immersion lens, you can do the following
so that you can view cells with a 40X dry objective. This will work
though you will have to remove the coverslip and the oil to store the
smear. To keep an oiled smear, absorb the excess oil with the tip of a
piece of paper towel.

Try this site:

http://www.mcl.tulane.edu/classware/pathology/Krause/Blood/Blood.html

DO NOT use alcohol (will leach dyes!) to remove the rest. Wrap the
slide once with good quality paper and NO Scotch tape!

DO NOT try to look at the cells when dry. The image will be saturated
with diffraction rings that arise through the interaction of the
microscope light and the curved surfaces of the cells - which are whole
in a smear (remember?).

Hope this helps,

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone/FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI Page and Scheduling
http://darwin.wcupa.edu/CASI/


-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of Ask-A-Microscopist [mailto:letitsnow-at-antelecom.net]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2004 5:38 PM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

------------------------------------------------------------------------
--

Email: letitsnow-at-antelecom.net
Name: Elizabeth Colvin

Organization: Homeschool

Education: 9-12th Grade High School

Location: Pearblossom, CA-L.A. county

Question: I have obtained several unstained blood smears. I have
Wright's stain and methylene blue available. Can you please tell me
how long to leave the stain on the slide before rinsing. And do I
rinse with distilled water. Thank you.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 11:58:33 2004



From: Michael O'Keefe :      MAOKeefe-at-lbl.gov
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 10:01:32 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Psuedo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

All right! I can't TAKE it anymore!

Please, PLEASE, can the next person to add to this thread spell PSEUDO correctly!
..please...
(if it's not too much to ask...)
(whimper)
:-)

Mike O'Keefe

Bruce Girrell wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} } The next day the students found a coffee mug full of
} } Sharpie color markers next to the glass CRT screen and
} } a note welcoming them to "Sharpie Color Technology."
}
} Ah, yes... Interactive computer graphics.
}
} Bruce Girrell



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 12:12:03 2004



From: Dr. Catherine Powell :      POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 14:14:35 -0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film
which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .

We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
Although
we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
"mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
the previous formulation.

These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
"New
Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our

digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
lines.
We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
positions on
our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
negative.

Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Catherine Powell



Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
Division of Surgical Pathology
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 12:55:28 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 12:58:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi,

We've been through the ringer with this film and have finally come to
terms with it. However, during the last three changes of D-19 developer
we have gotten significantly darker negatives (including the data bar,
which is added by the scope independently of negative exposure in our
JEOL 1200EX), for some reason we don't yet understand. We didn't change
anything in the way we mixed our developer or exposed our films, and we
have no reason to think the developer has been changed. We solved this
in the meantime by diluting the developer, since the first batch of
negatives had already been exposed and it's not a good idea to shorten
already short developing times---four minutes in our case. We added
about 25% more water (i.e., another quart per gallon of developer), ran
a couple test negatives, then proceeded normally with regard to
time/temperature/agitation. This worked well for us. Of course,
changing developer dilutions can affect the tonal response of films, but
in this case the results were fine. If you try this, always run your
own tests, of course.

We've had no problems with "scan lines". That's puzzling. They must be
coming from the scanner, itself, which maybe indicates that some of the
scanning elements (sorry, I forget the terminology---are they called
pixels?) aren't doing their thing and are causing lines in the digitized
image.

Good luck.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/





-----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 12:15 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:19:33 2004



From: Gib Ahlstrand :      ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 13:24:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re:TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Catherine,

Regarding the denser negs, anytime you change film in any camera system you
usually need to re-calibrate camera exposure and film development. Sounds
like you have done that and are getting a less dense neg that can be nicely
digitized.

Regarding the scan lines flaw, you didn't mention if you are using an actual
negative scanner, or a flatbed scanner to digitize the negs. But in either
case, you may just need to lubricate the moving parts. In my case, I use a
UMAX Vista-S8 and about once a year I need to pull the glass surfaces off to
get inside and lubricate the metal bar that the scanner heads move on. They
just get dry, so then they don't slide smoothly and "skip" a line here and
there. Use a clean lint-free cloth with a dab of a fine oil on it, or 3-in-1
oil is what I use. In fact, I just did this lube job yesterday, and it
worked!

Good luck!

Gib
--
Gib Ahlstrand, Scientist
Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, CBS Imaging Center,
35 Snyder Hall, St. Paul, MN. USA. 55108 (612)624-3454
(612)624-2785 FAX, ahlst007-at-tc.umn.edu
http://www.cbs.umn.edu/ic/

"You can learn a lot by observation - just by lookin'!" - Yogi Berra

} Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
} Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
} film which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .
}
} We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
} Although
} we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
} "mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
} the previous formulation.
}
} These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
} However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
} "New Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our
} digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
} lines.
} We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
} positions on
} our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
} time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
} negative.
}
} Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
} negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?
}
} Thank you in advance for your assistance.
}
} Catherine Powell
} Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
} Division of Surgical Pathology
} Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
} P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
} phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
} email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:32:52 2004



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:35:44 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I haven't had any issues scanning in the darker negatives. We have an
Agfa Duoscan T2500 that works well enough with these newer negatives at
1000 and 2500 ppi (the two resolutions I've tried). Before the holiday
break I put together a group of images (digitally scanned ones) that had
both new and old negatives included with no discernable differences
between them. Other than having the scanner support discontinued its
been a great and reliable scanner for lecture slides and TEM negatives
(if anyone has a driver for it that works with the latest Mac OS 10.3 I
would be very interested in hearing about it). As you have mentioned,
it would probably be worth trying a emulsion setting series to see if
that improves your results. But alas I cannot say that I've tried this
yet to attempt to get the old and new density similar on the negatives.

HTH,

Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor

Central Michigan University Biology Department Microscopy Facility
http://www.cst.cmich.edu/centers/microscopy/

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 1:15 PM
} To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489
}
}
}
}
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
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} -----
}
} Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
} Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
} film
} which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .
}
} We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
} Although
} we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
} "mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
} the previous formulation.
}
} These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
} However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
} "New
} Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in
our
}
} digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
} lines.
} We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
} positions on
} our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
} time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
} negative.
}
} Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
} negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?
}
} Thank you in advance for your assistance.
}
} Catherine Powell
}
}
}
} Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
} Division of Surgical Pathology
} Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
} P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
} phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
} email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:34:03 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:36:41 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Pseudo color

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks, Mike, for pointing out the proper spelling. The correct pronunciation
of ‘psuedo’ is as in ‘blue psuedo shoes.’ And there’s nothing all that
astonishing about using colored markers on the screen. When we first introduced a
computer (one of the original upright Macs) in the department office a couple
of decades ago, to a secretary firmly set in the old ways, we had to take
turns each night cleaning the whiteout correction fluid off the screen. {;-)

Anyway, to the use and abuse of pseudo color;...

It is certainly true that human vision can only distinguish a few dozen
shades of grey brightness on a display screen, as compared to a few hundred colors.
Note that both of these values are far less than the 256 shades of brightness
or “millions” of colors that the hardware typically controls. It is also
true that trying to direct someone’s attention to the “kind of darkish grey
spot” is a lot less helpful than “the yellow-orange spot” in an image (but of
course, human words for colors aren’t terribly consistent or widely agreed,
either - look at any set of paint chips in the turquoise-teal-seagreen-etc.
family). Pseudo- or false-color certainly has some valid uses. But it is also easily
misunderstood, widely abused, and often hides more in the image than it
reveals. And if the viewer is one of the 5-10% of men (or the very tiny percentage
of women) who have defective color vision, it is inappropriate in any case.

Firstly, of course, the table must be shown along with a numerical scale that
translates it. But even then, simple spectrum lookup table is rarely if ever
a good choice. The problem is that the table is typically constructed with
uniform steps in hue, going around the color wheel. But human vision is notably
insensitive to changes in hue in the green part of the spectrum, and much more
so at the red and blue ends and through the red-to-blue purples. A
perceptually uniform hue scale (which I have never seen used) would stretch these out and
compress the greens and could probably produce more than a hundred
discernible colors.

More colors could be seen if they were NOT fully saturated. Changing
saturation and hue in a spiral pattern, or also altering brightness along with hue and
saturation, can produce color tables that varied in a gradual way and
produced greater ability to distinguish changes. The gradual part is important - if
the colors jump around too much in discontinuous ways, the image is badly
broken up (camouflaged, in effect) and the overall sense of structure, the gestalt
of the image, is hidden. To some extent this happens even with a good, gradual
table. The use of the “heat” or “thermo” scale is an example of a gradual
and visually attractive scale, which does not break up the content of the
image. But it does not actually add very much to the ability to visually
distinguish small changes - perhaps a 20-40% improvement over straight grey scale (which
is why color tints are also used in photographic printing, to gain the same
increase). Note that the brightness increases monotonically in this scale, and
that it is by contributing more steps at the dark end that the increase is
obtained.

For selected purposes, carefully constructed color scales can be useful to
help the viewer perceive subtle differences or make comparisons from one part of
an image to another. But they need to be documented, and in most cases it is
also important to show the original data as well in case the color scale can
produce misinterpretation or hide other information.

It has been my experience that people are not generally assisted very much by
pseudo color scales, as compared to other ways to reveal subtle detail. One
of the best of these is to render the surface with elevation representing the
original grey scale value. We have millions of years of evolution in our brain
wiring that knows how to interpret surface images, in terms of shape and
roughness. Using computer graphics to generate properly rendered images with
correct perspective, and adjustable viewpoints, surface characteristics, and
illumination is easy with current technology and communicates very effectively. The
AFM folks use this trick too, along with color scales, although in most cases
in only limited ways.

John Russ
(see www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming workshops on image
analysis)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 13:50:49 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 14:53:36 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Seeing Things...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The recent thread about the use and abuse of pseudo color is only one of many
issues that have to do with an important topic that underlies just about
everything that we as microscopists do - namely, we LOOK AT images. But while we
are typically very concerned with the performance and specifications of our
microscopes, we take for granted the performance of our visual systems, to our
peril.

Over the past 5 years or so I have been invited several times to give a talk
on human vision and how it impacts what microscopists see (and fail to see) in
images. At the repeated urging of many people, I’ve prepared the lecture in
written form. Anyone who wants to read it can download the "Seeing the
Scientific Image" pdf file from my website (www.DrJohnRuss.com). If someone thinks
there is a logical place to publish it (too long for Microscopy Today, and not a
research paper for Microscopy and Microanalysis) please let me know.

John Russ




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 14:12:58 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 15:22:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: chiller for Zeiss EM 10CA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tina-

Silly me, in all my crabbing about this chiller, I didn't give the
model? The model # is SE-075W CZ. I got some diagrams from Eckhart
Dorneich, and a manual is on the way from Joel McClintock (thank you
both!), but I'll take yours too, if they match my chiller. I figure you
can never have too much information, and it's always good, in this lab,
to have extra copies. :o)

Thank you very much-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Tina Carvalho wrote:

} Hi-
}
} What model chiller do you have? I might have the wiring and plumbing
} diagrams.
}
} I have a 10/A and have struggled to keep the chiller going. The scope was
} down for a couple of years - oil and then water in the column! - while we
} used our new LEO 912 EFTEM. The expensive new instrument can be very
} frustrating, and was down once for nearly 5 months! So we got the 10/A
} going again, including the chiller. We all had forgotten what a gem it is,
} and right now I'd sell the new one and keep the old if I had a
} choice.
}
} We have Hakris chillers on our other two instruments, and they are
} fine. We got the very first one that Haskris built for Zeiss/LEO, and they
} had a fit trying to include both a pressure and flow gauge plus that
} interlock that keeps it going to cool down the diff pump after you turn
} off the scope, but they are quite used to it, now. They're pretty reliable
} and, fortunately, not prone to that temperature sensor screwing up like
} the Coolwell.
}
} Over the years I've found out there are a whole lot of closet Zeiss 10s
} out there - the most reliable backup even if you have a fancy new
} instrument! Keep it going. My next trick is to outfit it with a digital
} camera.
}
} Aloha,
} Tina
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 15:03:50 2004



From: Bob Grassucci :      bobg-at-wadsworth.org
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 16:08:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Catherine,
I found the new formulation film was more sensitive and adjusted my auto
settings in the TEM to compensate.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Dr. Catherine Powell" {POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 10:14 AM

Scanning very dense negatives can cause problems related to the scanner if
your scanner is using a CCD rather than a PMT. With a CCD you can not
crank up the current to boost the signal like you can with a PMT. The
result is that there is not enough light i.e. signal getting to the camera
array. If that is the case then you must either slow down the scan speed
so that the camera can collect enough signal or if this is impossible make
your negatives less dense. Our ZI Photoscan 2000 has problems with
negatives above an OD of 2.3 or so. Above this lines like what you
described appear. I hope this helps. Good luck.

Bob Grassucci

At 02:14 PM 1/6/04 -0400, Dr. Catherine Powell wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Robert Grassucci
Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Wadsworth Center
Empire State Plaza
Albany, NY 12201-0509
Phone: (518)474-5821
Fax: (518)486-2191
E-Mail: bobg-at-wadsworth.org


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 17:31:44 2004



From: alchung-at-ucla.edu (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 17:34:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: silicon monoxide film tearing in the TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (alchung-at-ucla.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
January 6, 2004 at 16:51:57
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: alchung-at-ucla.edu
Name: Albert Chung

Organization: UCLA

Education: Graduate College

Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

Question: I am having issues with the silicon monoxide film tearing
in the TEM. I have called Ted Pella about this problem and they are
making a new batch as we speak, but I have about 50 silicon monoxide
films on copper grids for which I cannot use. Any suggestions on how
to approach this problem is greatly appreciated. I am operating the
JEOL 100CX and the typical current saturation is about 80 mA.

If you need additional information, please let me know.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 18:13:31 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 16:16:31 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: re:holey carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is another one:
you may bombard thin nylon film by some heavy ions (argon may be good) in
the accelerator. It will produce very uniform holes. The size of holes
strictly dependent from the energy and type of particle used. But, still:
you need to eveporate carbon over and dissolve nylon (have no idea how to
do so). As a matter of fact this technology widely used to produce filters
for ultrafiltration.

Sergey

At 07:03 AM 1/6/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 6 19:20:48 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Tue, 06 Jan 04 20:23:37 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SiO/SiO2 films tearing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1a ] --

Albert Chung wrote:
========================================================================
Question: I am having issues with the silicon monoxide film tearing in the
TEM. I have called Ted Pella about this problem and they are making a new
batch as we speak, but I have about 50 silicon monoxide films on copper
grids for which I cannot use. Any suggestions on how to approach this
problem is greatly appreciated. I am operating the JEOL 100CX and the
typical current saturation is about 80 mA.
========================================================================
Support films of SiOx can be too thick or too thin or could have other
features about them that render them unstable in the electron beam. This is
of course exactly the same for carbon coated grids. That is why it is
imperative to have in-house, as part of the grid coating process, a TEM for
batch inspection purposes so that the customer does not end up being
responsible for their own QC. And does not end up preparing a large number
of grids only to find them unusable.

In the case of carbon replica films that were prepared but which are too
thin, we have in the past, been able to resurrect them by applying another
coating of carbon to strengthen them and to make grids that were once
unstable, now stable. We have never done this with SiOx filmed grids but in
theory, it might work the same way.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies produces SiOx firmed grids as a part of our
business and to our knowledge, we have not had any problems with film
stability in the electron beam. On occasion, we do make a batch that
flunks our own in-house TEM inspection process but those grids never make it
into the hands of customers.

Chuck

PS: Remember that we are 100% paperless and the only way we can keep track
of this kind of correspondence is if you reply using the reply feature of
your e-mail software. That way the entire string of correspondence will be
in one place.

============================================
Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 00:09:32 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 22:12:22 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM -Need help with scanning EM film 4489

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Catherine;
One of my favorite web sites, Imaging Resources http://www.imaging-resource.com
has reviewed numerous film scanners. Scanning extremely dense film has always been an acid test for a scanner. The following link is to a negative scanned with a Minolta Dimage Scan Elite II Film & Slide Scanner that failed the acid test in some dark regions, and the effect there seems similar to what you describe. The site tests many other scanners with the same negatives, and many do not exhibit this artifact.
http://www.imaging-resource.com/SCAN/DSEII/DSETRAA602PS.HTM

John Mardinly
Intel


-----Original Message-----
} From: Dr. Catherine Powell [mailto:POWCA-at-reg2.health.nb.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2004 10:15 AM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Our lab recently began using the "New Formulation" Kodak Electron
Microscope Film 4489 and employed a number of tips for developing this
film
which we retrieved from the Listserver archive commencing Jan 2003 .

We use a manual processing method (no nitrogen-burst agitation).
Although
we have now managed to essentially eliminate the background fog and
"mottled" appearance, the negatives appear darker (denser) than with
the previous formulation.

These darker negatives can be printed satisfactorily in the darkroom.
However, we digitize our images and archive them on-line. With the
"New
Formulation" film and denser negative we have noticed scan lines in our

digitized images. The darker the negative, the more apparent the scan
lines.
We are currently investigating the plate camera emulsion selector
positions on
our TEM with the hope that concurrent adjustments of exposure
time/emulsion setting/darkroom technique will result in a 'less dense'
negative.

Has anyone else run in to this problem when digitizing their "denser"
negatives? Does anyone have any thoughts beyond what we are trying?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Catherine Powell



Catherine Powell, Ph.D.
Division of Surgical Pathology
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital
P.O. Box 2100, Saint John, NB Canada E2K 4G9
phone (506) 648-7183 FAX (506) 648-6514
email powca-at-reg2.health.nb.ca




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 06:34:24 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 07:37:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] available EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Posting this for a friend.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




Hi All,

I am doing some housecleaning & have the following EDS Systems free to
anyone:

Kevex 8000
Kevex Delta
PGT System 4
Tracor 5500

Happy New Year All.


Earl Weltmer
eweltmer1-at-cox.net
Scanservice Corp.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 08:12:53 2004



From: Faerber Jacques :      Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 15:14:06 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] EDS avaible too

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all

We have too 2 Kevex Delta avavaible, one complete, with detector (10mm2,
138 eV, warm, but was working in July)), the other only the electronic,
for spares, with 8" and 5"1/4 Bernouilli.

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 08:23:57 2004



From: Ron L'Herault :      lherault-at-bu.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 09:29:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] available EDS systems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If anyone has a mechanical lab balance they would like to dispose of, I
could use one. I collect/repair antique phonographs as a hobby and would
like to be able to true up governor weights from time to time. I've looked
at E-bay but I am leery since, if a balance moves up and down, the general
public thinks it works. Some units offered are missing parts. etc.

Thanks,

Ron

-----Original Message-----
} From: qualityimages [mailto:qualityimages-at-netrax.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 7:37 AM
To: Microscopy

Posting this for a friend.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




Hi All,

I am doing some housecleaning & have the following EDS Systems free to
anyone:

Kevex 8000
Kevex Delta
PGT System 4
Tracor 5500

Happy New Year All.


Earl Weltmer
eweltmer1-at-cox.net
Scanservice Corp.








From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 09:29:29 2004



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 14:42:09 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers

As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our paper
last year would know?

Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and finding
examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
demonstrates poor quality control!

To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
surface detail.

First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught that
by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance surface
features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)

Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping back
again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?

As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream of
our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
not about time that we woke up to these facts?

There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
think?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
www.emcourses.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 10:49:04 2004



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 11:51:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: kV, metal coat vs sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve,
Your post (whose spirit I agree with totally) prompted a
question. If I have a biological sample sputter coated with metal,
isn't all the contrast coming from the metal? Does the underlying
carbon based material scatter anything much? If the carbon isn't
scattering much then wouldn't the problem you used for illustration
matter only at high mags where distances on the order of the coat
thickness are being resolved?

As ever,
Tobias



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 12:39:30 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 13:42:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve,
I agree entirely with you in that training (perhaps educating is a
better word) is key to good and reliable results. The example you sited
happens constantly. I take great pains to not only lecture about, but prove
through lab exercises, the effects that varying microscope parameters have
on the final image.

Unfortunately many "trained" people ask to use our facility and are denied
because their training was inadequate. They are either retrained so they
have the theory to go along with twiddling the knobs or rely on our
"service" option (trained staff does the actual imaging). The reputation of
our facility is very important.

We cannot guarantee to get perfect results with every research system on the
first try but we do our best and learn from our mistakes. At least if we
understand our instruments we can concentrate on sample prep to get the best
possible final results...not what the investigator thinks is there but what
is ACTUALLY there.

Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy


On 1/7/04 9:42 AM, "Steve Chapman" {protrain-at-emcourses.com} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
} Hi Listers
}
} As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
} wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
} interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our paper
} last year would know?
}
} Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and finding
} examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
} demonstrates poor quality control!
}
} To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
} described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
} But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
} information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
} surface detail.
}
} First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught that
} by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance surface
} features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
} sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
} null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
} 5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)
}
} Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
} should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
} paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
} problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
} back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
} did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping back
} again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
} Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
} problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
} not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?
}
} As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream of
} our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
} following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
} will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
} not about time that we woke up to these facts?
}
} There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
} think?
}
} Steve Chapman
} Senior Consultant Protrain
} Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
} Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
} www.emcourses.com
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 14:28:28 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 20:27:30 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: silicon monoxide film tearing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Put into TEM at low mag but still with an objective aperture in
place, and 100 kV. Really spread the beam and turn up slowly. You may
find that by gradually increasing the electron dose, you'll "harden"
the film. This approach certainly works with formvar films and
biological resin sections but I've never tried it with silicon
monoxide, so I can't guarantee it'll work.
--
Larry Stoter
NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:12:05 2004



From: Ritchie Sims :      r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:16:57 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Leitz lamp supply circuit please

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year

Does anyone have a circuit diagram for an oldish Leitz microscope lamp power supply
Type 301-314.001?

It's a beige box with an analog voltmeter, a mains switch, and a brighness adjust knob
on the front panel.

cheers

rtch

--
Ritchie Sims Ph D Phone : 64 9 3737599 ext 87713
Microanalyst Fax : 64 9 3737435
Department of Geology email : r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland
New Zealand



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:24:34 2004



From: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 15:10:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com
Name: jamie lange

Organization: university of wisconsin

Education: Graduate College

Location: milwaukee, wi. usa

Question: we used a spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes,
after staining and heat-fixing the sections, we see dark ribbon-like
structures on several specimens. Are these artifacts caused by air
bubbles and can they be avoided? thank you,
jamie

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 15:59:17 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 17:20:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Re: Silicon monoxide film

We believe the problem may have been caused by weak film. Silicon monoxide
film should be as fresh as possible. Some of our customers have requested
thicker coatings but this doesn't help. We make our film up the day it is
requested by the customer to insure this problem doesn't occur. We suggest
you purchase the minimum amount required at one time because new batches can
be made up in a day or so.

John Arnott
Disclaimer: Ladd Research produces a wide variety of EM supplies including
substrates, such as silicon monoxide.

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Larry Stoter" {larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk}
To: "by way of Ask-A-Microscopist" {alchung-at-ucla.edu} ;
{Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 3:27 PM

Steve, et al.:

I agree there is a definte problem in terms of (some of) the microscopy
work being used and published. Steve hits a very good case where failure to
understand the technique can easy lead to poor data. (by microscopy I mean
in the broadest sense: SEM, TEM, LM, SPM, etc. . . Anyone dealing with
molecular biolgists labling molecules and wanting to use a confocal
microscope already knowing exactly what kind of "picture" they want to get
knows what I mean)

One of the really frightening aspects is that very very few people wish to
learn microscopy - become microscopists - today. I have been watching this
trend for several years now where users (students and faculty in my case)
simple want images. They want to push a button out comes an image - that's
all. If they could have the microscope automatically load the sample that
would be even better. Now granted there are times when a simple click image
will sufice - but more and more often researchers are failing to realize how far
they are trying to push the capabilities of a microscopy technique. I have
been told specifically they do NOT want to learn the microscope they want an
image. And then you try and turn around and tell them the data they are
collecting is bad science?

} Next back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the
} scientist; did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit?
} Stepping back again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they
} receive help? Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome
} this type of problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators
} produce are not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?
}

There is a time you can attempt to argue with the "users" over scienfic
quality, but running and EM Lab you can not dictate it - certainly not in
academia, and not even in industry - yes, you can be asked for an evaluation
of the data (and that is what peer review also does) but no one can really
control what the data is used for after it leaves the lab.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 16:48:19 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 16:49:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are having one of those debates that we microscopists seem to obsess
about. The question is whether to store our saturated uranyl acetate
solution (in dH2O) at room temp or at 4 C. Opinions, especially those
backed by data, would be welcome. Happy New Year. Tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:36:49 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 15:39:40 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Richard

With huge headache I've established procedure in my Lab that everyone, who
uses equipment in the Lab should go through mandatory training. Without
this training, person just could not enter the facility (digital lock). My
training course includes intense training on data collection,
interpretation and sample preparation. So, it does not insure from the
"bad science", but at least I felt people knows what they doing. It means,
if they will present "bad data" I know, they did it on purpose... My
course is about week long (2h/day) and people's reaction are very
different. Nevertheless, I noticed that majority of the users finally
enjoyed "good electron microscopy", because it save them time and the
quality of their images is good (and confidence is great). In general, I
do agree: people becomes more and more "lazy" - they want to have results
doing nothing (best scenario - machine will do). It's very pity and made
me very skeptical on quality of many data published. Sergey

P.S. Knowledge is power.

At 02:20 PM 1/7/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:48:07 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 15:50:59 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

More important - to store in the dark! At +4oC you will have lower
concentration because of solubility. I prefer to store most of the
chemical solutions at cold temperature.
Sergey

At 02:49 PM 1/7/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:54:43 2004



From: John W. Raffensperger, Jr. :      johnr-at-helwigcp.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2004 17:52:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
important than ever.

Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"

The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
thinks the thing is broken...

If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
the world, because the problem is pretty universal.

John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 03:26:44 2004



From: Sousan Abolhassani :      sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:28:51 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
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} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 04:32:18 2004



From: Antonio Molina :      ifrm111-at-if.csic.es
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 23:33:25 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] LM - Webcams for video recording directly from a microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Our old camera has to be replaced and I am offered a new one for 1200 euros.
This may not be too expensive but I wonder if I can get the same results
with a cheaper webcam attached to the microscope. I understand it is just a
question of removing the camera objective lense or to make it focus
infinity.

My question is: can I expect a really better performance from a more
expensive, purpose-built camera? Quite likely the camera will not be the
limiting factor in the quality of micrographs, but other factors in the
microscope and the preparation...

And, which factors should I cosider in the camera? I am thinking of
sensitivity to poor light, gain, and so.

Thanks for all your comments,

Antonio D. Molina-García
Inst. del Frio (CSIC) Madrid, Spain

PD. My main purpose for video recording from a microscope is to study ice
crystal evolution during growth and recrystallization. Image is so, not too
sharp ever, as the contrast between ice crystals is small. Also the sample
thickness is larger than when using other sample types and, when the size
of
crystals is small, it is even difficult to get any light through...




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 04:54:16 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 11:23:07 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Practical and Intensive School on Confocal, Genoa, February 9-11, 2004

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Second Announcement
From Microscopy to Nanoscopy, Genoa, 9-11 February 2004.
The 5th Practical and Intensive Workshop on 3D Confocal Microscopy will
be held in Genoa, at LAMBS, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33,
16146 Genoa.
The aim of the workshop, as usual, is to introduce researchers to
Confocal Microscopy and related methods. This year we would like to
show how it is possible to move from Microscopy to Nanoscopy, according
to a Stefan Hell’s recent paper (Natur.Biotech., 21 (11), 2003, p.1347).
2004 Program includes: lessons on basic aspects of fluorescence and
confocal microscopy (February 9th, 10 a.m.- 1 p.m.), lectures on
applications of confocal microscopy and related methods (February 9th,
2 p.m.-7 p.m. with coffe break), experimental sessions on confocal and
multiphoton architectures, experimental sessions with image analysis,
processing, visualization and deconvolution software, roundtables with
speakers (February 10th-11th, 8,30 a.m. - 7 p.m., including lunch
break). Lecturers: Tony Wilson, Erik Manders, Alberto Diaspro, Mario
Faretta, Cesare Usai.
The workshop is limited to 20 students served on first-in-first-out
basis. Only Monday afternoon lectures are open.
The workshop fee is 250 Euros. Some grants will be available on the
basis of real need.
Please register or request information sending an e-mail to
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it using "confocal 5 - genoa" as subject. Please,
specify if you want to attend the Workshop or only Monday afternoon
lectures. Logistic help can be provided upon request. Poster can be
sent upon request in pdf format.
Main sponsor of the Workshop is Nikon Italia, SpA, Firenze. News on the
workshop can be found at www.lambs.it, from January 13th 2004.
Further sponsorship can be proposed to diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it using as
subject "confocal 5 - sponsor".
All my best
Alberto Diaspro
.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 06:43:27 2004



From: Dr. Richard Knight :      knightr-at-cbis.ece.drexel.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 07:46:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Electron Microscopist/Laboratory Manager Position

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Electron Microscopist/Laboratory Manager Position
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19010

We are seeking a candidate to supervise a microscopy laboratory,
which includes an FEI/Phillips XL30 field emission environmental
scanning electron microscope with an EDAX-EDS and TSL-OIM, an Amray
1830/D4, and a basic TEM (we outsource most TEM work), optical
microscopes, sample preparation facilities, two X-ray
diffractometers, etc. We are moving towards a centralized facilities
model for the entire university and anticipate the move of many of
our laboratories to a new research building by 2005. In addition to
instrument maintenance, user scheduling, supervising and training
users, the person in this position is expected to participate in the
planning and execution of tasks related to the centralized materials
testing and characterization facilities and the relocation of the
labs to the new building. Candidates should have demonstrated
experience with electron microscopy and preferably a degree in
Materials, Physics or Biology. Salary will be commensurate with
qualifications and experience.

The successful candidate will join a technical staff of three within
the department. Detailed information about the department can be
found at http://www.materials.drexel.edu, a copy of our recent
newsletter can be found at
http://www.materials.drexel.edu/Newsletter/fall_03.pdf and our last
annual report at
http://www.materials.drexel.edu/annualreports/Annual%20Report%202002.pdf.
Candidates interested in this position should please submit a CV and
a short career plan to: Microscopy Hiring Committee, Drexel
University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 3141
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104.



Dr. Richard Knight
--
"And the men who hold high places, must be the ones to start..."

Richard Knight, Ph.D., FASM, Auxiliary Professor,
Center for the Plasma Processing of Materials [CPPM],
Drexel University, Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering,
3141 Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19104

"A Ben Franklin Center of Engineering Excellence"

Tel: [215] 895-1844; FAX: [215] 895-2332;
E-mail: knightr-at-drexel.edu [Slow]; knightr-at-coe.drexel.edu [More Reliable]
Web: http://www.materials.drexel.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 06:54:50 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 07:57:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A most interesting thread, and one that is near and dear to my heart.......

I frequently get people new to SEMs, either through personnel changes at
a customer's site or through someone's acquisition of a "new" (used)
SEM. Half of my business is still servicing ETEC Autoscans and as the
new systems get more and more automated, I get more and more comments on
how user unfriendly the Autoscan is. My standard reply is that it is
not at all unfriendly if you understand how an SEM works.

I always start a new user out by building an SEM on paper and guess
what? A scanning electron microscope is not a microscope at all! The
only image formed in its optics is a DEmagnified image of the tip of the
filament! So, what is it? It's a signal generator with one or more
signal processors attached. What I really love about SEMs, especially
with an EDS attached, is that you can tell me what you want to see and I
can probably show it to you. Then we have to sit down and have a long
talk about what is real. Don't tell me, "the computer said...". The
computer doesn't know squat. And I haven't even gotten to specimen
preparation!

The problem goes beyond the need for instant gratification, but may be
related to the definition of success. People aren't interested in
becoming microscopists because organizations no longer hire
microscopists. One must pay too much for the knowledge and experience.
Most are looking for "machine operators" that can be transferred
between different pieces of equipment at will or they simply equate a
microscope with a copier or personal computer. It's merely another tool
to be used in getting the job done. We no longer have someone
designated as the "copier specialist" in the office and having a degree
in computer science is not a prerequisite for operating a computer on
your desktop.

In part, there is simply so much more to know about any piece of
equipment or area of interest, and the areas of interest and expertise
are so intertwined, that one cannot be an expert in all areas, and in
part it is the "Walmartization" of the world. The dive to the bottom,
the least common denominator, the lowest cost, the lowest price. Of
course, if everyone worked for Walmart, no one could afford to do much
shopping............

I don't have any answers. I've always liked to understand any equipment
that I use, whether it's a microscope or an automobile or a dishwasher,
but then, I repair things for a living. I make a living this way
because other people have different interests and drives (and that often
does NOT include an interest or ability to repair things). A hundred
years ago, most people who owned an automobile also had a mechanic in
their employ, and the mechanic often traveled with, or even drove, the
car.

I believe our problem in science will also get worked out. It's
probably going to take some disaster related to bad science to get
people's attention, but in the end, some kind of accommodation will be
worked out. It will be interesting to watch it unfold.

In the mean time, we can all keep trying to spread our knowledge and our
concerns. We subscribe to this listserver because we care. Keep caring!

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 07:15:40 2004



From: Sven Terclavers :      Sven.Terclavers-at-med.kuleuven.ac.be
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 14:18:29 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LM - Webcams for video recording directly from a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Antonio,

I would be careful with using a webcam for professional microscopy. Indeed,
you can adjust a webcam this way that it can be attached to a microscope
(remove the lens and put the ccd in the focuspoint of the lightbeam), but
most webcams are very limited. Limited in shutterspeed, colorrange and fo
sure in pixelresolution. Webcams are often used for amateur-microscopy and
astronomy and give nice results, but if you really want to start analysing
the (live) images or use them for publication, I'm afraid you might get
dissapointed. Also: more expensive, professional camera's will last longer
,give you nicer resultes and a better support after sale will be offered.
Best regards,

Sven Terclavers



On 08-01-2004 23:33, "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------}
-
}
} Our old camera has to be replaced and I am offered a new one for 1200 euros.
} This may not be too expensive but I wonder if I can get the same results
} with a cheaper webcam attached to the microscope. I understand it is just a
} question of removing the camera objective lense or to make it focus
} infinity.
}
} My question is: can I expect a really better performance from a more
} expensive, purpose-built camera? Quite likely the camera will not be the
} limiting factor in the quality of micrographs, but other factors in the
} microscope and the preparation...
}
} And, which factors should I cosider in the camera? I am thinking of
} sensitivity to poor light, gain, and so.
}
} Thanks for all your comments,
}
} Antonio D. Molina-García
} Inst. del Frio (CSIC) Madrid, Spain
}
} PD. My main purpose for video recording from a microscope is to study ice
} crystal evolution during growth and recrystallization. Image is so, not too
} sharp ever, as the contrast between ice crystals is small. Also the sample
} thickness is larger than when using other sample types and, when the size
} of
} crystals is small, it is even difficult to get any light through...
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 07:31:01 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 08:33:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I very much agree with Sousan about what drives students and their reward systems. However, consider the fact that universities often reflect what is going on in private industry. I would bet that many researchers, scientists and engineers report to people that have scant knowledge of the science they ostensibly oversee. I call this the "MBA Phenomenon." I've observed this trend not only in microscopy. How often must someone in the lab. explain to their "management" exactly what an image is telling them? Quality should start with quality management and that means the management ought to know what they are managing.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

Disclaimer: I am happy to report that the above conditions do not apply to me at the moment.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Sousan Abolhassani [mailto:sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 4:29 AM
To: John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
Cc: microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:13:05 2004



From: Alwyn Eades :      jae5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 09:25:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



----- Original Message -----
} From: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com (by way of
MicroscopyListServer)

The power of semantics

I am convinced that one of the reasons for a decline in the quality of
microscopy, especially in industry, is semantic. Over the last few
years it has become fashionable for managers to refer to instruments as
"tools". They no longer distinguish between different kinds of
equipment - they are all tools. Tools include: lathes, electron
microscopes, fork lift trucks, x-ray diffraction units,.....

When a person using a tool leaves or is promoted, you need another
person to operate the tool. So you take a person from this tool and put
them on to that tool. Give them a couple of hours to read the manual
and away you go.

I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

--
..........
Alwyn Eades
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University
5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem
Pennsylvania 18015-3195
Phone 610 758 4231
Fax 610 758 4244
jae5-at-lehigh.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:39:34 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:42:15 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:

} I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
}
} the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten "smarter"
in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it possible
for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD programs
(which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the machining
process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just keep watch
over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
material. As the microscopes have evolved, they have for the most part not become
easier to operate. Oh sure, some "little" things like adjusting astigmatism,
saturating filaments, even focusing, have been automated. But not the "big" things
like taking a meaningful picture. In fact, it has arguably become more
complicated to use the modern microscopes because they offer a much broader range of
possibilities than the old ones did. More imaging modes, more types of
detectors, etc., create a greater demand for insight and knowledge on the part of
the operator.

John Russ
(visit www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming image analysis workshops
and other information)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 08:50:32 2004



From: Blackwood, Andrew :      ablackwood-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:53:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Holey Carbon Support Films

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

8 January 2004

Mike Delannoy asked whether there is an easier way to make holey carbon
films than Formvar, steam, create the holes in the damaged Formvar film,
carbon coat the holey Formvar and dissolve the Formvar away to leave the
holey carbon film. If there is, we'd like to know about it! This is the
easiest method about which we know.

I must stress, however, that making holey and lacey carbon coated grids is
pure art. People who have decades of experience making support films still
have difficulty at times with the reproducibility of the method, and the
details are entirely a matter of getting the "feel" of the method. Details
of our methods are described on

http://www.2spi.com/catalog/grids/cusctgrd.html

and the pages linked to it.

An easier way to obtain holey carbon support films with a known and precise
distribution of holes is the Quantifoil Micromachined Holey Carbon Grids,
described on

http://www.2spi.com/catalog/grids/quantifoil-carbon-films.html

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies has a very active business making coated grids for
customers throughout the world. We also sell grids and other supplies for
customers who prefer to coat their own grids, and we sell the Quantifoil
Holey Carbon Grids.

Andy

Andrew W. Blackwood, Ph.D.
Vice President, Technical
SPI Supplies
P.O. Box 656
West Chester, PA 19381-0656
Ph: 1 610 436 5400 X108
FAX: 1 610 436 5755
e-mail: ablackwood-at-2spi.com
WWW: http://www.2spi.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:25:16 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 09:27:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


John,

While I see your point, it is much easier to at produce something with
today's "tools", even your "tools". We can now use PhotoShop or some other
application, load up some Image Tool filters and away you go with image
analysis. My first IA package was very cumbersone and it took some major
training just to load the images and navigate through the software.
Presumably, you would pick some understanding of the subject matter through
osmosis, solid state diffusion or entropy while learning how to operate the
software. Now the software is so easy, anyone can sit down and after a few
minutes start cranking out numbers.... for as meaningful or meaningless as
they may be.

With SEMs, my first one filled a room and producing a photo was a real
chore. You had to have an intimate knowledge of the controls and operating
conditions to get even a poor quality photo. Now you can train a chipmunk
(borrowed from one of my associates) to run an SEM. We have seen PhD's
operate the SEM as a machine and have absolutely zero fundamental knowledge
of the images or EDS data. I am thankful that I can sit down at my SEM and
get a great photo in 5 minutes, but that means anyone else can too.

Al Stone
ASTON

ps. no offense to anyone with a PhD, the point is that just because you can
drive a car doesn't mean you understand the rules of the road or know how
to travel cross country





At 08:42 AM 1/8/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:25:52 2004



From: Geoff Williams :      willi1gl-at-cmich.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 10:28:39 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My favorite quote fits well in this discussion:
"It is not enough to believe what you see. You must also understand
what you see.
- Leonardo da Vinci"

I think it has to do a bit with what John just brought up in regards to
the evolution of the microscopes. They have become "easier" to operate,
and in doing so (computer control, mouse operated saturation...) there
is a great disconnect with how the 'system' works. Users learning on an
old EM300 for example have more interactions with the parameters on the
microscope and thus are in a better position to 'understand' what they
are doing in the process of collecting an image.

It is difficult to stress integrity, understanding when teaching. Even
harder is the problem educators have in providing evaluation of the
process, esp when there is a definitive end product (a lab report with
images for example). I would much prefer to be able to grade students
on their process than on the end results, and to provide an objective
progress evaluation that translates onto a final grade. The biggest
problem is that each student is different, has different learning
speeds, different ways of coming to the same end point. So many
variables to deal with. I find that the most effective and simple
question I can present to students and faculty using the facility is
"How do you know [ That ] is what you are looking at?" And sometimes it
becomes a significant frustration level when the individual cannot
convince me. But when they CAN convince me they wind up becoming much
more confident and it forces them to find supporting evidence that they
were too lazy or busy to look for earlier, and then they (more often
than not) are much better at looking (literature sourcing) BEFORE
starting their next project.

Well it is a new year and for some of us a new Semester. Time to start
doing what ever we can do to reverse the trend!

Geoff Williams
Microscopy Facility Supervisor

Central Michigan University Biology Department Microscopy Facility
http://www.cst.cmich.edu/centers/microscopy/

} -----Original Message-----
} From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
} Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 9:42 AM
} To: jae5-at-lehigh.edu; microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} ----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
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--
} -----
}
}
} In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:
}
} } I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline
in
} }
} } the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} } must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.
}
} Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
} "smarter"
} in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it
} possible
} for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD
} programs
} (which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the
} machining
} process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just
keep
} watch
} over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
} material. As the microscopes have evolved, they have for the most part
not
} become
} easier to operate. Oh sure, some "little" things like adjusting
} astigmatism,
} saturating filaments, even focusing, have been automated. But not the
} "big" things
} like taking a meaningful picture. In fact, it has arguably become more
} complicated to use the modern microscopes because they offer a much
} broader range of
} possibilities than the old ones did. More imaging modes, more types of
} detectors, etc., create a greater demand for insight and knowledge on
the
} part of
} the operator.
}
} John Russ
} (visit www.DrJohnRuss.com for a schedule of upcoming image analysis
} workshops
} and other information)



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:28:16 2004



From: John W. Raffensperger, Jr. :      johnr-at-helwigcp.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:25:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-----Original Message-----
} From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com [mailto:DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 8:42 AM

In a message dated 1/8/04 9:28:40 AM, jae5-at-lehigh.edu writes:

} I can only assume that machinists are complaining about the decline in
}
} the quality of work done in machine shops. All the ex-SEM operators
} must be doing a lousy job of operating the milling machines.

Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
"smarter"
in recent years.

-Reply:

I agree with Alwyn. This is the exact phenomenon I was referring to,
and Machine Tools are one of the specific examples I had in mind with my
original comments to this thread.

As you stated, there are shops where those involved truly understand
what's going on, and things work very well.

In other shops, while these "tools" have indeed become "smarter", the
quality of the output has decreased. This is because, as another post
stated, these newer machines are viewed as a "tool", and an "operator"
is assigned. Because of the intelligence of the machine, the "operator"
who is no longer a "machinist" can get a result. It is often not an
optimal result, either in terms of quality, and/or in terms of
production rate. But a result was obtained. Compounding this,
management has seen this situation "evolve" gradually, so they don't
realize how much the "lower priced" help is actually costing them vs. a
"real" machinist.

Add CAM instructions coming from an engineer who has never even operated
a machine, and things get even more fun. Ask me about the $100,000+
damage one of these "wonder kids" did when they crashed a brand new
machining center. The simulation ran perfectly. Too bad the engineer
forgot that something had to hold the work piece, and this something was
2" think...


John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:36:59 2004



From: Owen, T. Page (Botany) :      tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 10:39:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have a Zeiss 109 TEM available. Scope includes the unique SEM attachment (gives SEM capability with two SEM stages that fit standard Zeiss pin mounts). Turbo pumped; extra gun assembly, filaments, water chiller, manuals, and original orange paint on column included. Has been under full Zeiss/Leo service contract and in use until last month.

Needs to be removed as soon as possible to make room for a new scope.

Preference given to academic institutions. If you want it, you need to make arrangements for shipping, or pick it up in New London, CT. Contact me offline for further information.

Page Owen


************************
T. Page Owen, Jr., Chair
Department of Botany
Connecticut College
New London, CT 06320
860-439-2147
tpowe-at-conncoll.edu
************************




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:46:30 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 10:49:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: spurr's resin prep on a sample of

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Jamie:

Without a picture of what you are seeing advice is difficult. My
guess is that the section is not flat on the slide and water/stain is
getting underneath a wrinkle in the section and the result is the
"ribbon" you are seeing. Suggestions to solve the problem:

1. A sharp knife. If you are using glass knives use only knives made
"fresh". Glass, being a super-cooled liquid, flows and older knives are
less sharp. Try it!
2. De-wrinkle the sections with 1,2 dicholorethane or chloroform.
3. Float the sections on a larger drop of water on a hot plate. The
larger drop will take longer to evaporate and give the section more time
to be expanded/dewrinkled by heat.
4 Thinner sections? I don't know how thick your sections are but 1-2
microns is the range to shot for.

Geoff

by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:

} Email: jamielange-at-wi.rr.com
} Name: jamie lange
}
} Organization: university of wisconsin
}
} Education: Graduate College
}
} Location: milwaukee, wi. usa
}
} Question: we used a spurr's resin prep on a sample of nematodes, after
} staining and heat-fixing the sections, we see dark ribbon-like
} structures on several specimens. Are these artifacts caused by air
} bubbles and can they be avoided? thank you,
} jamie
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 09:52:27 2004



From: John :      jmontara-at-earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 23:40:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

This certainly is a f.a.q.!

First of all EVERYONE must realise that the image that they see (even though
they pressed the SE or SEI button) is a mixed SE+BSE image. This means
surface detail from the SE and sub surface detail from the BSE. As you put
the kV up the BSE dominates more and of course as you take the kV down the
BSE are reduced allowing the SE to dominate. I should point out that you
will often see BSE information even at 2kV or less; this being the result of
the SE3 contribution.

Place a thin coating on the surface of a specimen and you increase the
coefficient of emission, the metal being the SE emitter rather than the
original biological material. You do image the specimen surface as that
topography has been followed by the coating procedure. However the BSE come
from a far greater depth below the surface and at any kV, under the wrong
circumstances of WD and spot size, these electrons will contribute to the
image. Should there be structure of differing density, by way of the BSE,
this will show as "shadows" in the background or may even dominate the
image.

In a field emission instrument, of the type where the above lens detector is
available, it is possible to screen out the BSE contribution and display a
pretty pure SE image. I have to say in my 40 years in the business we have
more often gone for "information" rather than "resolution" therefore I do
try to include a degree of BSE to add contrast to the image.

Hope this helps?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Tobias Baskin" {baskin-at-bio.umass.edu}
To: "Steve Chapman" {protrain-at-emcourses.com} ;
{microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 4:51 PM

It appears we have a change in how quality is monitored over the years of
SEM evolution. As may be the case where older SEMs require understanding of
how a SEM works to get an image, to the extent that newer SEMs do not
require this, those operating newer SEMs may not require the prior extent of
knowledge to produce images. Where once the decision to take images were
made by those who knew enough to understand and self monitor quality, that
appears not to be the case anymore. Advances in technology have allowed
images to be taken by operators who do not understand what they are looking
at; one can not expect an unknowing individual to monitor quality.

We can address the quality issue with education or attitude (as proposed by
others on this board). This is a head on approach; a less direct method
would be to change the decision rights or incentives. For example, operators
should not be given the decision right of what to take an image of. For
example, operators should not be rewarded simply on the number of images
taken.

The point is that monitoring of quality has changed, so we should consider
changing decision rights and incentives/rewards. If these three components
of organizational architecture are not in balance, results will be
unsatisfactory.

Sincerely,
John Moore
Montara Industries
919-434-8457

Disclaimers:
1) This framework is described in a book titled "Managerial Economics and
Organizational Architecture", a text that I studied while obtaining my MBA
at the University of Rochester, Class of 2000.

2) In defense of my education and this technique, I cite first that the
poster from Agere on this topic reported not suffering certain difficulties,
and second that in my recent job search I found Agere to be hiring MBA's
(see monster.com directemployers.com, hotjobs.com or flipdog.com).

3) I am not a SEM expert, nor do I have direct experience in this field. I
began following this message board in the interest of selling a defect
review tool that I made a speculative investment in: a SEMVision by Applied
Materials.

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Sousan Abolhassani" {sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch}
To: "John W. Raffensperger, Jr." {johnr-at-helwigcp.com}
Cc: {microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 4:28 AM


I fully agree with this fact that the problem is universal,
and it is not only limited to microscopy. However, before one
finds the "cure for this phenomenon", one should look for the cause
of this problem.

If the new generation, i.e. the younger students and others, "are just
wanting results", is it not the consequence of the ATTITUDE OF THE
LARGE MAJORITY of those who trained them?

Those who trained the last two generations are now collecting the
results of what they have done.
The biggest reference for this generation is having rapid success,
which means gaining large amounts of money and if possible a quick fame.

No university professor considers the students for their interest for
science and their will to do something for the sake of humanity.
They rank them on their good marks, without worrying about how they
obtained it. And even if they do so, it is to REPRIMAND the student and
not for TEACHING them the importance of honesty.
A large percentage of students learn just to obtain a good mark, without
thinking about why's and how's. And those few who do, are not
appreciated
by the professors, may be since they need more time that is not
available.

A professorship is the art of teaching many things including highest
human values to the students, I can not name many who have done that, or
even
have thought to do it. If they do not reflect such thoughts, at least
they
should avoid to discourage the very few who do have such values (and
have truly come to learn something that can be helpful for the society)
by treating them as naives and dealing with irony with them.

Some students tell me that the science professors are so arrogant that
the students have no more appeal for scientific branches.
} From my discussions with some undergraduate science students, their
feeling is
that if they go for science in their graduate school they could ruin
their future and they will loose the chances of success!

I agree that the danger is real and from my understanding the solution
to the problem is to reverse the trend from now on by changing the
teaching philosophy. However, one should have the certitude of the
importance of such a training to be able to have an impact on one's
student.




Sousan Abolhassani, Ph.D.
Laboratory for Materials Behaviour
Paul Scherrer Institut
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland

Tel.: + 41 56 310 2191
Fax.: + 41 56 310 2205
E-mail: sousan.abolhassani-at-psi.ch




"John W. Raffensperger, Jr." wrote:
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
}
} If it makes all of you feel any better, the phenomenon of users not
} wanting to learn how to use something, just wanting the results, is not
} limited to microscopy, and is a dangerous trend. This trend is
} ironically aided by the very advancing technologies that make truly
} understanding the theories and principles of what is happening more
} important than ever.
}
} Too many devices, instruments and other systems have become "too easy to
} use". The advances in human interfaces, automation, computer controls,
} etc. have made it very easy for just about anyone to get results. The
} danger is that there is no way for someone who doesn't truly understand
} what's going on to know if the results are meaningful or not. "I got
} the answer, and it's what I was expecting, so it must be right!"
}
} The problem is also not limited to "sophisticated" technology. We have
} users who no longer know that there is a darkness adjustment on a copy
} machine, much less how to use it. Not that long ago, you couldn't get
} two copies in a row to turn out without tweaking the adjustment. If
} someone does take the thing off "auto" and sets it dark, everyone else
} thinks the thing is broken...
}
} If someone finds a "real" cure for this phenomenon, please share it with
} the world, because the problem is pretty universal.
}
} John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
} IS Manager
} Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 10:39:09 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 11:48:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-

OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller, and
here is what I have.

I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the column:
about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no gauge for the
chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on the front of the
chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading did not change through
the entire test, and neither did the EM flowmeter.

Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It needs
to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the "Cool" light
was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light, were off.

I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second time....still
no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor light turned on, and
the temperature started to drop, finally. The temperature went all the
way down to 53 degrees F, at which point the "Lo Temp" light went on,
the "Compressor" light went off, and the "Heat" light went on. I turned
up the temp screw a little bit.

At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and the
"Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light never turned
off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to rise. I let it get
to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never turned back on. I tried
turning the screw back to the left to drop the temp setting...it never
went back on.

At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the flow
rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The temperature
gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after turning the 'scope
off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I left to come write all of
you.

Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally came
on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light is on, and
the "Compressor" light is off.

So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I have
no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did circuits in
Physics class...). What do you all think?

Thank you all so much for your help-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 12:23:55 2004



From: Owen P. Mills :      opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 13:26:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me that it
would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test the
chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a diffusion
pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell if the Coolwell
has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on another heat load (the carbon
evaporator) then your problem is in the TEM.

Owen

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills

At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Owen P. Mills
Electron Optics Engineer
Materials Science & Engineering
Michigan Technological University
Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
Houghton, MI 49931
PH 906-369-1875
FAX 906-487-2934
mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 13:00:36 2004



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 18:58:50 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers

Well some interesting stuff, I was particularly taken by Peter Tomic's
comments

"Quality should start with quality management and that means the management
ought to know what they are managing."

Via MSA and mostly privately I have had mail from, judging by the mailers
enthusiasm, pretty good EM units. However I have probably visited more EM
units in the world than most of you and I have to say in very many cases
they are just not up to the standards that I would set. Here Peter's
comment hits home to me! You see, as an example, in most units people were
trained when the SEM, TEM or EDS system first arrived in the lab. Now they
have new equipment and I bet they have rarely been trained to operate using
the techniques opened up by the new SEM or TEM? Once trained you know how
to use them is what I see. Guess what, a customer born on a Cambridge 100
SEM still used their new sexy Field Emission SEM in just the same way. A
thick gold coating and 20kV plus was the way to do it, quote "we have
always done it this way". We produced amazing results uncoated at 150,000X
at 1.5kV! Do I make my point? This was a very highly rated government
research laboratory that by perception would be rated as in the top 5 in a
country very well respected for its EM work!

We all believe we run a good unit, my point would be "how do you know?" Do
you have management procedures that are up to date, do you routinely check
the performance of your staff, do you look at the output your users produce,
etc etc? Take a look at www.iaaem.com/mppa1 here you will find a quality
procedure that has been proposed by a group of scientists and Quality
experts from across the world. Answer the questions and total up the points
for your laboratory and lets see how far you area away from Total Quality
Management. What would you suggest is included and maybe together we will
be able to develop procedures that would help sort out what you all, almost,
seem to agree is a bit of a mess!

I am working overseas (Egypt) for the next week so have fun on your own for
a little while.

Regards

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com










From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 13:44:05 2004



From: gary.m.brown-at-exxonmobil.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:46:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Film processing racks & tanks available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers,

I want to give away the following to a university or non-profit lab or
group:

Plexiglass racks for holding 3.25" x 4" (TEM) and 4" x 5" (Polaroid)
negative film; and
hard rubber tanks for processing negatives.

Interested parties should contact me off-line. Commercial/industrial users
need not respond.

Thanks,

"The statements and opinions expressed here by Gary M. Brown represent
neither those of ExxonMobil Corporation nor its affiliates."

Gary M. Brown
ExxonMobil Chemical Company
Baytown Technology & Engineering - West
5200 Bayway Drive
Baytown, Texas 77520-2101
phone: (281) 834-2387
fax: (281) 834-2395
e-mail: Gary.M.Brown-at-ExxonMobil.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:04:04 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 15:13:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Owen-

Good idea, except that I don't have a carbon evaporator. :o)

Thanks anyway,
Kathleen
Neurotox Labs
Rutgers University

Owen P. Mills wrote:

} I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me
} that it would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test
} the chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a
} diffusion pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell
} if the Coolwell has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on another
} heat load (the carbon evaporator) then your problem is in the TEM.
}
} Owen
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}
} At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-
} }
} } OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller,
} } and here is what I have.
} }
} } I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the column:
} } about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no gauge for
} } the chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on the front of
} } the chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading did not change
} } through the entire test, and neither did the EM flowmeter.
} } Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It
} } needs to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the
} } "Cool" light was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light,
} } were off.
} }
} } I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
} } No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second
} } time....still no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor
} } light turned on, and the temperature started to drop, finally. The
} } temperature went all the way down to 53 degrees F, at which point the
} } "Lo Temp" light went on, the "Compressor" light went off, and the
} } "Heat" light went on. I turned up the temp screw a little bit.
} }
} } At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and
} } the "Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light never
} } turned off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to rise. I
} } let it get to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never turned
} } back on. I tried turning the screw back to the left to drop the temp
} } setting...it never went back on.
} }
} } At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the flow
} } rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The temperature
} } gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after turning the 'scope
} } off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I left to come write all
} } of you.
} }
} } Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally
} } came on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light is
} } on, and the "Compressor" light is off.
} } So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
} } both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
} } connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I
} } have no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did circuits
} } in Physics class...). What do you all think?
} }
} } Thank you all so much for your help-
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }
} }
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:12:46 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 14:30:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Uranyl - store at 4 C or room temp

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In my experience, CCTV cameras as used in security applications work better than
webcams, but the resolution of both is not that great and you may spend considerable
time on the mechanical aspects of the interfacing and be disappointed with the result.

1200 euros may be well worth it for something that you can just unpack from the box
and be using in a few minutes.

cheers

rtch



Send reply to: "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es}
} From: "Antonio Molina" {ifrm111-at-if.csic.es}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}

Most people store UA in the refrigerator perhaps without
understanding why. UA is photosensitive and degraded by light
(especially fluorescent lighting that contains UV). If you store
aqueous solutions in the light they will eventually precipitate
--first long the sides of the container and then on the bottom. I
have no data, just based on observation.


} We are having one of those debates that we microscopists seem to
} obsess about. The question is whether to store our saturated uranyl
} acetate solution (in dH2O) at room temp or at 4 C. Opinions,
} especially those backed by data, would be welcome. Happy New Year.
} Tom
}
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu


--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:31:49 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:34:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve;

Thank you for the honorable mention. If my boss is on this listserver I'll have to polish up the old resume. It's so much fun to be quoted. I feel like Hemingway.

Once again, I don't have ANY of these issues HERE.

I needed a good laugh today.

Peter Tomic
Unknown Corporation, Inc.
Anytown, USA

-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Chapman [mailto:protrain-at-emcourses.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 1:59 PM
To: MSA

Hi Listers

Well some interesting stuff, I was particularly taken by Peter Tomic's
comments

"Quality should start with quality management and that means the management
ought to know what they are managing."

Via MSA and mostly privately I have had mail from, judging by the mailers
enthusiasm, pretty good EM units. However I have probably visited more EM
units in the world than most of you and I have to say in very many cases
they are just not up to the standards that I would set. Here Peter's
comment hits home to me! You see, as an example, in most units people were
trained when the SEM, TEM or EDS system first arrived in the lab. Now they
have new equipment and I bet they have rarely been trained to operate using
the techniques opened up by the new SEM or TEM? Once trained you know how
to use them is what I see. Guess what, a customer born on a Cambridge 100
SEM still used their new sexy Field Emission SEM in just the same way. A
thick gold coating and 20kV plus was the way to do it, quote "we have
always done it this way". We produced amazing results uncoated at 150,000X
at 1.5kV! Do I make my point? This was a very highly rated government
research laboratory that by perception would be rated as in the top 5 in a
country very well respected for its EM work!

We all believe we run a good unit, my point would be "how do you know?" Do
you have management procedures that are up to date, do you routinely check
the performance of your staff, do you look at the output your users produce,
etc etc? Take a look at www.iaaem.com/mppa1 here you will find a quality
procedure that has been proposed by a group of scientists and Quality
experts from across the world. Answer the questions and total up the points
for your laboratory and lets see how far you area away from Total Quality
Management. What would you suggest is included and maybe together we will
be able to develop procedures that would help sort out what you all, almost,
seem to agree is a bit of a mess!

I am working overseas (Egypt) for the next week so have fun on your own for
a little while.

Regards

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com












From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 14:48:50 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 14:19:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes, alas, we have also seen the "take the picture and run" mentality
here as well.

Like most microscopists who came up through the system, most of us
eagerly learned everything related to microscopy (specimen prep,
knife making, ultramicrotomy, alignment, optimization of the scope,
darkroom, image interpretation, etc). It was fun and we enjoyed
learning and making discoveries. Now, it seems the thrill is gone and
the object is to get into the job market and make big bucks....

MONEY is the motivator and it can be used to influence people. For
example, I point out that microscopy is a marketable skill and I
prove it by giving the names of our former students (in biological
and physical sciences) who got jobs in their discipline since they
could do microscopy. An employer will generally hire the individual
with the better set of skills. Unless they are incredibly naive or
just plain stupid (in which case you wouldn't want them using your
equipment anyway) they will realize the value in learning the
discipline.

More immediately, I point out that it is CHEAPER for them to do their
own microscopy than to hire it out.

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Web: http://www.siu.edu/~image/
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:10:24 2004



From: Fatima Merchant :      merchant-at-adires.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:13:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Microphotometry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello:

I was wondering if someone knows where I can find an
monochromator for spectral scanning 400-700 nm
that can be attached to a Zeiss microscope (Axioskop) for
transmitted light imaging ( scanning microphotometry).

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Fatima


{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}

Fatima Merchant, Ph.D.
Lead Research Engineer
Advanced Digital Imaging Research, LLC (Formerly PSI, Inc.)

2450 South Shore Blvd., Suite 305
League City, Texas 77573

Telephone: (281) 535-1889 Ext. 425

Facsimile: (281) 538-7596
Email: merchant-at-adires.com

{} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {} {}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:14:05 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:32:53 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 8, 2004, at 6:42 AM, DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com wrote:

} Alwyn, I don't think the analogy holds. Machine tools have gotten
} "smarter"
} in recent years. Numerical control and feedback devices have made it
} possible
} for information to flow directly from the design computers and CAD
} programs
} (which in turn have replaced the traditional draftsman) to control the
} machining
} process. In some cases the "operators" aren't even present, or just
} keep watch
} over a large array of machines in case of malfunctions or to load raw
} material.
Dear John,
So now the machine tools are capable of performing as well as the
automated tomography packages we use? In our case, we have to watch
the progress of the program carefully to see that the auto-tracking,
auto-focussing, etc. is working properly, and lately we have also found
that the file made from the tilt series has values that do not match
the exposure we set (to the extent that some of the images were blank).
The take-home lesson is that there still must be knowledgeable
oversight, especially with regard to automated processes, to assure the
quality of the results.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:14:33 2004



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 13:11:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A lab user has asked me to find some place he can get freeze fracture work
done. Close to San Francisco bay area would be best. Reply to me and I will
pass on the contact info.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 15:34:44 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 17:07:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Kathleen,
I have had good luck getting a local HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air
conditioning) or Air Conditioning repair shop to fix my Haskris water chillers.
Haskris are good but they do occasionally break down. Sounds like one of your
sensors or accuators is stuck.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Kathleen Roberts" {kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2004 8:48 AM

Thank you for the advice...I figure $10 isn't too much to spend to try
and fix this thing....if the repair cost starts to escalate, we'll junk
it and call Haskris. :o)

Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Webster, Paul wrote:

} Hi Kathleen,
}
} A word of warning if you plan to try to fix the chiller. We spent nearly $7,000 in a year of repairing our Coolwell chiller before it finally failed for good and we had to buy a new machine. When the second one started giving problems, we used the repair money to buy a new one immediately.
}
} The first one started by developing a leak in the compressor, then the pump failed and finally the thermostat switch. Getting a similar thermostat switch to the one that failed was impossible. We searched through Grainger, talked with refrigeration engineers and could only come up with a close approximation of what we needed.
}
} We had to suffer as the less sensitive thermostat switch attempted to hold the water temperature steady but with much less control. In the end it was when some other part of the machine failed that we decided to replace it. Looking back, the time and expense needed to repair the machine was not worth it.
}
} If you do find your chiller has only a small problem then try fixing it and hope the costs don't escalate.
}
} Regards,
}
} Paul Webster.
}
}
}
}
} Paul Webster, Ph.D.
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles
} CA 90057
} phone (213) 273 8026
} fax (213) 413 6739
} email: pwebster-at-hei.org
}
}
}
}
} } ----------
} } From: Kathleen Roberts
} } Sent: Thursday, January 8, 2004 12:13 PM
} } To: Owen P. Mills
} } Cc: Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 16:00:34 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2004 17:09:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Coolwell chiller testing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Owen-

Nope, no SEM and no BIG waterbath. I'm going to call Facilities here at
RU-they may be able to devise something to test it.

Thanks-
Kathleen
Neurotoxicology Labs
Rutgers University

Owen P. Mills wrote:

} Kathleen,
}
} Any heat source that can be water cooled will work, anything with a a
} diffusion pump. SEM? Got a BIG hot water bath? Coil copper tubing
} in the bath, turn the bath heat way up, connect the chiller lines to
} the ends of the coil of copper tubing. Should be a low tech test of
} the chiller.
}
} Owen
}
} At 03:13 PM 1/8/2004 -0500, you wrote:
}
} } Owen-
} }
} } Good idea, except that I don't have a carbon evaporator. :o)
} } Thanks anyway,
} } Kathleen
} } Neurotox Labs
} } Rutgers University
} }
} } Owen P. Mills wrote:
} }
} } } I've been reading the iterations on this thread and it seems to me
} } } that it would be useful to separate the chiller from the TEM to test
} } } the chiller. Kathleen, if you have a carbon evaporator that has a
} } } diffusion pump you can cool it with the Coolwell long enough to tell
} } } if the Coolwell has a problem. If the Coolwell tests okay on
} } } another heat load (the carbon evaporator) then your problem is in
} } } the TEM.
} } }
} } } Owen
} } }
} } } Owen P. Mills
} } } Electron Optics Engineer
} } } Materials Science & Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } PH 906-369-1875
} } } FAX 906-487-2934
} } } mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} } } http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
} } }
} } } At 11:48 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, Kathleen Roberts wrote:
} } }
} } }
} } } } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } }
} } } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } } America
} } } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } } On-Line Help
} } } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } }
} } } }
} } } } To Joel, Eckhart, Kenneth, Peter, and anyone else who gave me advice-
} } } }
} } } } OK, I finally had a chance to sit down and fiddle with the chiller,
} } } } and here is what I have.
} } } }
} } } } I turned on my Zeiss EM 10CA and checked the flowmeter in the
} } } } column: about 2.2 L/min, if I am reading it right. There was no
} } } } gauge for the chiller flow rate, but there is a pressure gauge on
} } } } the front of the chiller, and it read about 39 psi. This reading
} } } } did not change through the entire test, and neither did the EM
} } } } flowmeter.
} } } } Chiller temperature reading was about 75 degrees F at start. It
} } } } needs to be 68 degrees F, according to the EM's manual. Only the
} } } } "Cool" light was on...all others, including the "Compressor" light,
} } } } were off.
} } } }
} } } } I turned the temperature screw to the left to lower the temp setting.
} } } } No response from the compressor. Turned it down a second
} } } } time....still no response. After about 5 minutes the Compressor
} } } } light turned on, and the temperature started to drop, finally. The
} } } } temperature went all the way down to 53 degrees F, at which point
} } } } the "Lo Temp" light went on, the "Compressor" light went off, and
} } } } the "Heat" light went on. I turned up the temp screw a little bit.
} } } }
} } } } At about 60 degrees F, the "Heat" and "Lo Temp" lights went off and
} } } } the "Cool" and "Pump" lights are on (actually the "Pump" light
} } } } never turned off). It rose to 68 degrees F....and continued to
} } } } rise. I let it get to about 79 degrees F, and the compressor never
} } } } turned back on. I tried turning the screw back to the left to drop
} } } } the temp setting...it never went back on.
} } } }
} } } } At this point, I decided to turn the EM 'scope off....though the
} } } } flow rate never dropped, and the buzzer never went off. The
} } } } temperature gauge on the chiller continued to rise, even after
} } } } turning the 'scope off. It was reading about 90 degrees F when I
} } } } left to come write all of you.
} } } }
} } } } Just now went back in to check the thing...the compressor finally
} } } } came on...it's reading about 53 degrees F and the "Lo Temp" light
} } } } is on, and the "Compressor" light is off.
} } } } So I think it's the switch....or perhaps the "Hi Temp" sensor? Or
} } } } both? I have no idea how all the sensors and switches are
} } } } connected...even with the diagrams and manual that were sent, as I
} } } } have no idea how to read such things (been eons since I did
} } } } circuits in Physics class...). What do you all think?
} } } }
} } } } Thank you all so much for your help-
} } } } Kathleen
} } } } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } } } Rutgers University
} } } }
} } }
} } } Owen P. Mills
} } } Electron Optics Engineer
} } } Materials Science & Engineering
} } } Michigan Technological University
} } } Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} } } Houghton, MI 49931
} } } PH 906-369-1875
} } } FAX 906-487-2934
} } } mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} } } http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
} }
} }
}
} Owen P. Mills
} Electron Optics Engineer
} Materials Science & Engineering
} Michigan Technological University
} Rm 512 M&M Bldg.
} Houghton, MI 49931
} PH 906-369-1875
} FAX 906-487-2934
} mailto:opmills-at-mtu.edu
} http://www.mm.mtu.edu/~opmills
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 16:02:07 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 17:04:41 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


In a message dated 1/8/04 4:44:05 PM, tivol-at-caltech.edu writes:

} The take-home lesson is that there still must be knowledgeable
} oversight, especially with regard to automated processes, to assure the
} quality of the results

You'll get no argument from me about that! The point I was trying to make is
that as the tools have become more complex, many of the tasks that we once
dealt with manually (I learned electron microscopy on a Siemens 1A, right on the
Caltech campus, back in the '50's - and as a result I really know what
alignment means, not just how to push a button) are now so automated that they are
hard to control. We may (but may not) be able to spot problems, but the casual
user (shudder) will not know how to correct them.

I think this thread has been interesting primarily in that everyone who has
commented has been in basic agreement that far too many people who use
microscopes understand them, or the ancillary techniques of specimen preparation,
image analysis, etc., well enough to keep out of trouble or get really optimum
results. Clearly they have other priorities than learning all that stuff. I've
taught image analysis courses now to something approaching 3500 people. Even
assuming they all learned everything I wanted them to, that is a drop in the
bucket. And the people who really need it most don't come - at best they send a
technician whom they can subsequently tell to do the work. But that's another
rant.

John Russ


John Russ




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 8 17:36:30 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 15:55:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 8, 2004, at 1:11 PM, Jon Krupp wrote:

} A lab user has asked me to find some place he can get freeze fracture
} work
} done. Close to San Francisco bay area would be best. Reply to me and I
} will
} pass on the contact info.
}
Dear Jon,
If Kent McDonald does not have freeze-fracture, he probably knows
someone in or near Berkeley who does. I don't have his email address
immediately at hand.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 03:06:04 2004



From: Frank Eggert :      Eggert-at-mikroanalytik.de
Date: Fri, 09 Jan 2004 10:03:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve and to all other Listers

The same is with EPMA (Electron Probe Microanalysis) with EDS.
Unfortunately m o s t manufacturers moved their goals and tried to
develop calculation machines as 'black box'. Because of the giant
improvements in calculation speed of our computers (in last decades),
only one button hit is necessary to display the complete analysis result
(in most cases computer needs a tiny part of a second). The unskilled or
less skilled operators believe in these results, without any concern.
Even element concentration result errors of 0.1% and less are taken from
the computer display as the truth. But such a very high 'accuracy' must
be only the statistical part! The computer speed and modern easy to use
software interfaces cover the very complex and not linear relations
between measured signal and element concentration in specimen. The
iteration process to get result convergence and the systematic and
statistic errors with their error propagation during computing process
are not visible.

I think for future, a more open software is going to be a trend. There
must be a possibility to interact between the knowledge of the
microanalyst and the computer program. A visible and easy
understandable feedback for all computing steps is necessary. Of course,
a higher skilled level of the operator is then necessary. This makes
sense only, if the software give the possibility to share the knowledge
with the operator, which is then really become a microanalyst.

A couple of years ago, I found in a very old German book of C. Remigius
Fresenius "Anleitung zur Qualitativen Chemischen Analyse" ("Guidance to
the Qualitative Chemical Analysis") - Braunschweig 1874:

"Es muss daher ein Halbwissen, wie überall
so ganz besonders hier, für schlimmer als ein Nichtwissen erachtet
und vor oberflächlicher Beschäftigung mit der chemischen Analyse
ganz vorzüglich gewarnt werden."

Translation (I hope the feeling is transfered):
Therefore a partial knowledge, like everywhere so particularly here,
must be worse than even ignorance. It should be warned before
superficial concern with the chemical analysis completely and
excellently here.

These words are still valid and can be used nowadays for EPMA and
Electron Microscopy including image interpretation, as well.

Frank Eggert

Steve Chapman wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 05:35:11 2004



From: Allen R. Sampson :      ars-at-sem.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 05:36:39 -0800
Subject: Knowledge and Quality

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

My two cents worth on a subject that has quite a few here tossing their own
around.

Having spent 25 years in this area, I've had the opportunity to see the
initial investigations of this practical application of sub-atomic particle
physics in basic research labs as well as its resultant spread to a wide
variety of industries. The use of SEM analysis has become a commodity
because it is so successful in so many areas. Decades ago, many were
researching the potential applications, and in virtually each case, they
found the usefulness.

I can't begin to tell you the variety of areas where my customers have
found the SEM useful. From missle guidance systems to electron beam
lithography. Particulate analysis of howitzer oils to particulate
contaminant analysis of sausage casings. The taxonomical classification of
emerging bacterial species to process control for the laser produced
hologram labels used for software copyright and federal IDs.

The fact is that the SEM has perhaps been too successful. We still hold in
reverence the atomic physicists who can design an atomic bomb or understand
the results from particle accelerators. But the SEM is a child of these
processes that has found wide spread use and the demands for its
application greatly exceed the number of those who really understand the
underlying processes, much less the proper application of the various
subtleties of its application.

I've had to deal with this over the years as the operators I deal with have
changed from those individuals who first brought an SEM into a lab to the
'checklist' operators who know nothing about the instruments other than the
written sequence of actions to turn it on and get an image. One of the
challenges in my work is to try to encourage the SEM operators to learn and
think more about the consequences of each turn of a knob or click of a
mouse. As a maintenance provider, it certainly helps me if my customers
have some understanding of their machines - but more importantly, it helps
them do better work. SEMs aren't the only problems here - x-ray
spectroscopy in fluorescence or the SEM based microanalysis is another area
where operators are often fooled into thinking that results are a simple
matter of a set routine.

The computerization of the instruments is furthering the problem. While
the manufacturers are seeking only to play to the market, how many
operators really understand what's happening when they tell their computer
to bring up an FE gun? It really started with simple improvements such as
electronic gun adjustments. When an operator had to physically move the
gun assembly around, it made some sense that the position of the gun was
important to aim the beam down the column. How many really understand the
use of magnetic fields in the gun to tilt and shift the beam to alignment?
Most that I see at first only know that they have to tweak these knobs and
watch for an improvement in the signal.

Like it or not, this trend will continue. But it is not selective to SEMs
- I see similar trends in every analytical instrument. As these
instruments become more 'user friendly', they are actually lulling users
into thinking that all that is needed is a brief glimpse at the user
manual, which usually only describes how to push the buttons. IR, GC, LC,
MS, ICP and many other techniques that involve complex physics have been
reduced to a simplicity that masks their proper use primarily because those
using them and buying them want simple answers. A material scientist
investigating ceramics doesn't want to have to learn the sub-atomic
particle interactions involved, he just wants pretty pictures that explain
a manufacturing fault and justify the expense of the SEM, not to mention
his job.

'Ease of use' is a marketing tool, and as such, it is a primary goal of
manufacturers. I don't mean to focus on them, because it is a vicious
circle - the customers are demanding it, the manufacturers simply provide
it. In this process, though, what gets lost is that the proper use and
interpretation of these instruments requires more than the customers are
wanting to afford and more than the manufacturers are wanting to admit to.

Now Steve's attention is a little more esoteric - the quality control of a
reviewed paper. But doesn't that just follow from the above? The results,
rather than the process, are what matter most now. More and more we see
examples in studies that are published, only to be later refuted. NASA's
claim a couple of years ago about evidence of ancient bacteria in Mars
based rock found in the Antarctic has, last I knew, been lost in dispute.
Pons and Fleischman, and Gallo, are of course extremes, but how much of
what is accepted as reputable science has later fallen as poor science. A
brief look at medical headlines over the past decade or two can give a good
glimpse. Science itself is supposed to ensure honest and accurate results,
and the assumption of most people, scientists included, is that anything
purporting to be science, promoted by supposed scientists, has some truth.
Innocent until proven guilty, so to say.

Whether authored by lack of knowledge of instrumental techniques, lack of
personal integrity or poor selection of measured variables, many papers get
published that should have been caught by reviewers. That's assuming that
those reviewers are well versed in all aspects of a particular paper. But
given the wide variety of instrumental techniques available today, it can
be a daunting task to find a single person expert in all of the
instrumental techniques presented in a paper, not to mention the basic
field of the paper and mathmatical aspects. If a reviewer isn't well
versed in all aspects and techniques of a particular paper, can he be
expected to catch the kind of cross-discipline problem in your example?
Since much goes unsaid in virtually any paper, should reviewers be
required to request all details of sample provenance - the collection,
preparation and analysis?

By the way, Steve, was there any mention, in the example you cited, whether
the sample was coated or not, or is it an assumption of yours that is
wasn't?



Allen R. Sampson
Advanced Research Systems
317 North 4th. Street
St. Charles, Illinois 60174
ph. (630) 513-7093 fax (630) 513-7092 web http://www.sem.com


-----Original Message-----
} From: Steve Chapman [SMTP:protrain-at-emcourses.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2004 6:42 AM
To: MSA

Hi Listers

As many of you may know I run a training organisation that travels world
wide spreading the word on SEM, TEM and EDS operation. I also have a deep
interest in "Quality in Electron Microscopy"as those who picked up our
paper
last year would know?

Now to the point. Once again I am picking up respected journals and
finding
examples of what I would call poor microscopy, but in truth it also
demonstrates poor quality control!

To bring one image to mind. The micrograph is of a structure which is
described as being an example of a smooth surface on a biological material.
But, the micrograph was taken at 20kV, where the vast majority of the
information will have come from beneath the surface softening the true
surface detail.

First to remove the training aspect . Operators of SEM should be taught
that
by manipulation of kV and working distance one may subdue or enhance
surface
features. To use more than 10kV on most biological samples is asking for
sub surface detail, ignore this and comments on surface irregularities are
null and void in my mind. (I have to say I would probably try to use 2 to
5kV if the microscope used was produced in the last 15 years!)

Now the quality aspect. By the time a paper is published a number of steps
should have been taken. Working backwards, the publisher should have the
paper vetted by knowledgeable scientists who would be able to pick out the
problems that I see and have them corrected prior to going to print. Next
back in the chain is the laboratory that was involved with the scientist;
did they check the quality of the work leaving their EM unit? Stepping
back
again did the scientist take the micrographs or did they receive help?
Either way the training of staff and operators should overcome this type of
problem! But if the results the staff and visiting operators produce are
not assessed how do you know that their training is inadequate?

As the pressure to perform increases and funding decreases only the cream
of
our laboratories will remain. In industry there is no question about
following rigid "Quality" procedures and it is not too far off that this
will hit the world's EM units too! I know that this is my baby but is it
not about time that we woke up to these facts?

There is an area where I believe we have room for discussion; what do you
think?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob +44 (0) 7711 606967
www.emcourses.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 08:38:55 2004



From: Klughammer :      schmaus-at-klughammer.de
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 15:38:56 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: Digital Camera to Light Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Faye,

I cannot help you with your MAC and the software but
if you need an adapter for your Fuji S602Z and a microscope
I can help you. We have adapters for all kind of digital
cameras either for C-Mount or eye-pieces. Let me know if
you want to know more about it.

Unfortunately our web site is not in english yet. However
you can find the list of digital cameras we support here:

www.klughammer.de - enter the german pages, then open
"Kameraadapter" - "für dig. Kameras" - go to the bottom of
this page there you find "Kameraübersicht (PDF)", open it
and then you get an overview of cameras.


mfg / regards

Anneliese Schmaus
Product Manager

klughammer gmbh
Strassbach 9
85229 Markt Indersdorf
Germany
Tel. +49 08136 6011
Fax +49 08136 7098
info-at-klughammer.de
www.klughammer.de



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bwoAAM} Email: faj-at-highway1.com.au
bwoAAM} Name: Faye Taylor

bwoAAM} Organization: Amateur

bwoAAM} Education: Undergraduate College

bwoAAM} Location: Perth, Western Australia

bwoAAM} Question: Hello there,
bwoAAM} I am a starter who wishes to get her grandchildren interested in a
bwoAAM} world beyond TV & computer games. I started using computers when I
bwoAAM} purchased my first 128K Mac back in 1985 . My present Mac is a G3
bwoAAM} 192MB ram & 40 GB hard drive.

bwoAAM} I recently aquired a second hand
bwoAAM} "MOTIC Biological Series B1 223A " but I have found that I cannot
bwoAAM} use my lovely Fuji S602Z digital camera to take photos.

bwoAAM} Do you have any ideas which will enable me to combine the use of the
bwoAAM} hardware that I possess?
bwoAAM} I feel that the hardest part is getting software that will enable me
bwoAAM} to join up to the Macintosh even if I purchased a new camera.

bwoAAM} I would really like to take the photos digitally but is it impossible
bwoAAM} with my present configuration?
bwoAAM} i would appreciate any comments please

bwoAAM} Happy New Year Faye

bwoAAM} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 12:46:37 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 11:05:25 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Re: Freeze fracture near SF bay area?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Jon,
Caroline sent this to me; please pass it along to your colleague.

Begin forwarded message:

} Bill -
}
} Kent gave my old machine to a woman in SF who is running it for hire;
} I don't know anything about her or the quality of her work. Look at
} www.nanoanalytical.netfirms.com .
}
} Caroline
}
} --
} Caroline Schooley
} Project MICRO Coordinator
} Microscopy Society of America
} Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
} Caspar, CA 95420
} Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
} Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
}
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 14:49:55 2004



From: srw6y-at-virginia.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2004 14:52:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Scion Image "Set Scale"

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: srw6y-at-virginia.edu
Name: Steven

Organization: UVA School of Medicine

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Scion Image "Set Scale"

Question: The lab where I currently work uses Scion Image, a freeing
distributed graphical editing program. I have been having a problem
with the "Set Scale" option under the "Analyze" tab. After taking a
snapshot of a known scale under the microscope, I set the scale
accordingly by typing in the known distance and setting the units to
micrometers. When I switch to a different image and wish to use the
same scale, the scale I have just calibrated has been reset to the
default. Also, I have gone under the "file" tab and clicked on
"record preferences," which seems to do nothing. No save box opens,
and I am left with my cursor. In addition, the "revert to save
option," also under the "file tab" is never illuminated.

How can I set the scale so it will be calibrated for all images open
in the editing session?

Thanks and I hope someone out there has some answers.

Steven


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 9 23:48:35 2004



From: Evelyn Kaplan :      ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 09:55:28 +0400
Subject: [Microscopy] plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Good morning,

I am trying to help a plant biology student with some plant histology on
mango saplings. She is interested in looking at paraffin sections of the
woody stems (LM). Does anyone have suggestions for a processing schedule? I
have my processor set up for human tissues but I could easily extend the
programmes to accomodate the cellular nature of the material. Having some
suggestions would greatly cut down my trial and error!

Many thanks,

Evelyn Kaplan,
Dept of Pathology,
College of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Sultan Qaboos University,
Oman



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 10 00:57:39 2004



From: diaspro :      diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 07:59:11 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Italian Master on Microscopy, last call

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear friends,
the Italian Master on Microscopy at University I Level is starting on
February 2nd, 2004. Only few positions are still available due to a
delayed registration on January 19th, 2004.
Details can be found at "Master Universitario di I livello in
Microscopie ed Analisi Microscopiche in Biologia"
http://www.studenti.unige.it/corsi/master.html and at www.lambs.it.
All my best
Alby

p.s. for further information, please e-mail to diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it
using "microscopy master 2004" as subject.



.......................................................................
...................................
.. non basta, resistere, resistere...resistere
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Alberto Diaspro
Department of Physics, University of Genoa
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy
voice: +39-0103536426/480  fax 010314218
diaspro-at-fisica.unige.it, http://www.lambs.it
http://wiley.com/cda/product/0,,0471409200,00.html




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 10:11:10 2004



From: hiswayt-at-earthlink.net (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 10:16:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Electron Microscopy Book-The Cell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} }
} } Does anyone have a copy of the book "The Cell", 2nd Edition, by Don
} } Wayne Fawcett, MD that they are willing to cell. This is a classic book
} } full of electron micrographs. I am a graduate student and I will be
} } taking an electron microscopy lab this semester and I am looking for 1
} } or more copies of this book.
} }
} } Please reply to hiswayt-at-earthlink.net
} }
} } Thank you.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 10:33:04 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 11:38:18 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Evelyn,

We occasionally embed plant samples for LM and make a few changes over
what is customary for animal tissue. First of all plant samples do not get
as brittle if dehydrated in a TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol)/ETOH series
ending with 100% TBA.

Start with 15 min in each of 25 and 50% ETOH.
Dehydrate for ~ 2-4hrs in each of the following percents:
90 ETOH - 10 TBA
80 ETOH - 20 TBA
65 ETOH - 35 TBA
45 ETOH - 55 TBA
25 ETOH -75 TBA
100% TBA - 3 changes for at least 4hrs total time

Infiltration is helped along by the following:
Put samples into an oven set at a sufficiently high temperature to melt your
paraffin. (I put all the cassettes into a beaker large enough to hold them
so they are completely covered by TBA and then add room for the paraffin.
Add solid paraffin (paraplast) to container and allowing it to gradually
melt and mix with TBA. The TBA gradually evaporated. The paraplast is then
changed a total of 3x over a period of a couple of days prior to embedding
tissue in molds.


It is also advisable to use subbed slides or slides coated with poly
L-lysine (100µg/ml in 10mM tris at pH 8.0). Plant cell walls tend to lift
from the slide surface during staining.

Debby


Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy



On 1/10/04 12:55 AM, "Evelyn Kaplan" {ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
}
}
} Good morning,
}
} I am trying to help a plant biology student with some plant histology on
} mango saplings. She is interested in looking at paraffin sections of the
} woody stems (LM). Does anyone have suggestions for a processing schedule? I
} have my processor set up for human tissues but I could easily extend the
} programmes to accomodate the cellular nature of the material. Having some
} suggestions would greatly cut down my trial and error!
}
} Many thanks,
}
} Evelyn Kaplan,
} Dept of Pathology,
} College of Medicine and Health Sciences,
} Sultan Qaboos University,
} Oman
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 11 12:40:08 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 10:45:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Electron Microscopy Book-The Cell

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} }
} } } Does anyone have a copy of the book "The Cell", 2nd Edition, by Don
} } } Wayne Fawcett, MD that they are willing to cell. This is a classic book
} } } full of electron micrographs. I am a graduate student and I will be
} } } taking an electron microscopy lab this semester and I am looking for 1
} } } or more copies of this book.
} } }
} } } Please reply to hiswayt-at-earthlink.net
} } }
} } } Thank you.

If you look at the used book search site www.abebooks.com you'll find
10 copies at prices from $9-$75.
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 09:54:06 2004



From: Kim Rensing :      krensing-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 07:59:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] re: plant histology

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Evelyn,

I have used these old protocols with success on woody materials. Put
plant material always requires greatly extended times compared to
animal tissue. Also, if you have problems with tearing of the embedded
tissue during sectioning you can soften the embedded material in
Gifford's solution (below). The difficulty is trying to get the harder
tissue soft enough so it doesn't tear the softer tissue during
sectioning.

The details we used are as follows:
Fixation for 12 to 48 hours in FAA (you might also try Navashin's
fixative which contains chromic acid)
Infiltrate through TBA series (Johansen series) for 2 hours each step
3 changes of pure TBA over 24 hours
3 changes of Paraplast over 24 hours
Embed

Soften the blocks by soaking overnight to 7 days in water at up to 38°C
If this doesn't work try 2 days to 2 weeks in Gifford's (room temp in
fume hood):
20 ml glacial acetic acid
80 ml 60% ethanol
5 ml glycerine
You will have to try the softening times with your own tissue. If you
leave it too long the soft tissue will become macerated. Let me know if
you need more detail.

Good luck,

Kim



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:00:07 2004



From: Shannan Little :      littlesm-at-agr.gc.ca
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 11:04:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
on this.

Shannan Little
Research Technician/Technicien de recherche
Electron Microscopy and Image Analysis /
Microscopie électronique et Analyse d'images
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 403-317-3446
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 403-382-3156
P.O. Box 3000 / CP 3000
Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 4B1
littlesm-at-em.agr.ca
http://res2.agr.ca/lethbridge/emia/index_e.htm



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:00:47 2004



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:05:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] EBSD systems - Users comments

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,
We would be interested in users comments about EBSD systems. In
particular, we are looking at the systems offered by HKL and by TSL/EDAX.
Please comment on some of the following points:


* Ease of use

* Robustness/reliability of indexing when dealing with low symmetry
structures

* Calculation of GB misorientations and display of crystallographically
equivalent misorientations

* Possibilities for generating different types of map (e.g. orientation,
GB misorientation, phase)

* Correlation with EDXS data or maps / generation of combined maps


I look forward to hearing from you. Please copy all responses to myself
and to Martin Lee {m.lee-at-earthsci.gla.ac.uk}

Thanks and best wishes

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material- und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany
http://www.tu-darmstadt.de/fb/ms/fg/sf/projekte/maclaren-Dateien/maclaren.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:32:46 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 11:17:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 10:46:04 2004



From: Richard Beanland :      richard.beanland-at-bookham.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 16:51:23 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,
I suspect that these variations are in the grating itself, not your
TEM. They can be a bit variable, depending on stretching and buckling from
the preparation process. We have a record of measurements of semiconductor
standard samples going back 8 years on our Jeol 120CX TEM, and find a
reproducibility better than 1% over this time.
There is a change in magnification from the centre to the edge of the
micrographs on our machine of about 1%, but our microscope is now pretty
ancient and I would hope that newer machines are much better than this.
We are about to embark on a full gauge capability test on the machine,
which should be interesting. I can let you know the results of the study if
you like.

Richard

_______________________________
Richard Beanland
Analytical Services
Bookham Technology plc
Caswell,
Towcester,
Northamptonshire NN12 8EQ
UK
Tel: +44 (0) 1327 356362
Fax: +44 (0) 1327 356775
http://www.bookham.com



-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com [mailto:Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com]
Sent: 12 January 2004 16:18
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238





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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:13:40 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:18:34 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists

In my experience, successful microwave fixation
depends mainly upon the size of the specimen.
How big are these insects? Second, if the larvae
are difficult to penetrate (I have no idea),
longer times may be required. You might also
consider Karnofsky's fixative instead of
Glutaraldehyde (I found that it improved results
in many cases over a wide variety of specimen
types, although I didn't try insects). I would
try lengthening the primary fixation time before
adjusting any of the other processing variables.
Fixation temperatures should never exceed 50°C (I
don't know what this translates to in watts on
your Biowave), or you will get "crispy critters".

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

At 11:04 AM -0500 1/12/04, Shannan Little wrote:
} We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} on this.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:46:35 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:52:27 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Kodak Rapid Fixer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

FYI
I just opened a new supply of Kodak Professional Rapid Fixer and
found larger boxes. After the film switch not so very long ago, I
decided to check the ingredients. "Solution A" now has Ammonium
Sulfite, Sodium bisulfite and Sodium acetate added to what was
printed on the old box. The mixing directions are the same 1999
version. "Solution B" and the CAT # 146 4106 appear to be the same.

Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 11:53:21 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.

We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper PCI
card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've poked around
the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.

Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera simultaneously?




____________________________________________________________________________
Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of Med.
Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
(718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 12:01:24 2004



From: Walck, Scott D. :      walck-at-ppg.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 13:06:52 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would recommend the Mag-I-Cal sample for calibrating your TEM. You can do a much larger range of Magnification settings than using a replica. I think that the error is 1 to 2%. In addition, you can do rotation and camera constant calibrations with the same sample.

One thing to minimize the variation in the microscope is to always changed the lenses in the same direction to avoid hysterisis and to make sure that you are at the eucentric point so that the obj lens is the same. Again, you should bring the focus from the same direction.

If the goniometer has not bee removed or the column split, the values that you get from time to time should be very close. We had to run calibration twice a year on the TEM. I can't remember the range specifically, but I think that the variation in mag was less than 0.5% and may have been better than 0.1% when the above criteria was met.

-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
PPG Industries, Inc.
Glass Technology Center
P. O. Box 11472 (letters)
Guys Run Rd. (packages)
Pittsburgh, PA 15238-0472
Walck-at-PPG.com
(412) 820-8651 (office)
(412) 820-8515 (fax)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com [mailto:Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:18 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
where I select my stop and start marks.


How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
voltage and current?


Thanks!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 12:53:50 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 15:15:32 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM mag question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

When we manufacture TEM or SEM gratings we make them from a replica of a
master grating. When you dissolve away the replication material there is
some shrinkage, but it should be very limited. The shrinkage is inherent in
the manufacturing, but we cull any which show problematic shrinkage.
It is very similar to our carbon substrate manufacturing.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research manufactures and sells the gratings, replicating
materials and substrates mentioned in this email.

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com


----- Original Message -----
} From: {Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com}
To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:17 AM

Frank,
If you are using film, a second variation in measurement may come
from the enlarger when you print the picture. If the negative is not
supported on glass, it can bow in the center and distort the
measurement a bit.

It was a surprise to me to find that if I had set my "MAG. ZERO"
early in the morning and then checked it later in the day, there was
frequently a slight change. It was explained to me that in an old
building, when there was a greater draw of electricity, a change
could be expected and for really important work, I should
re-calibrate. Am I just gullable?

My favorite goof has been the result of not adjusting my tilting
specimen holder to read 0 degrees!

Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
}
} When we manufacture TEM or SEM gratings we make them from a replica of a
} master grating. When you dissolve away the replication material there is
} some shrinkage, but it should be very limited. The shrinkage is inherent in
} the manufacturing, but we cull any which show problematic shrinkage.
} It is very similar to our carbon substrate manufacturing.
}
} John Arnott
}
} Disclaimer: Ladd Research manufactures and sells the gratings, replicating
} materials and substrates mentioned in this email.
}
} Ladd Research
} 83 Holly Court
} Williston, VT 05495
} On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com
} tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
} fax: 1-802-660-8859
} e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
}
} ----- Original Message -----
} } From: {Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com}
} To: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 11:17 AM
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM mag question
} -----------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
}
} } I have been calibrating my recently installed Philips TEM with a grating
} } replica and I need some suggestions. At a print magnification of about
} } 80KX I see about a 1% variation in my calculated magnification depending
} } where I select my stop and start marks.
} }
} } How much variation should I expect in magnification due to changes in lens
} } voltage and current?
}
} } Frank Karl



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 15:39:11 2004



From: rahul padmakar panat :      panat-at-students.uiuc.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 15:44:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: [Microscopy] vapor pressure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Dear friends,

I wanted to know the vapor pressure of alumina (Al2O3) at 1200 C.
I know that it will be very low, but an estimate would also
be helpful. I looked at various places (such as CRC handbook of
Physics and Chemistry, Handbook of thermophysical properties of solid
materials, ASM handbook, Vol. 5), but got values above 1950C (e.g.
10^-3 torr at 1950 C).

I want to know the answer to this question since I work at vacuum
levels of 10^-6 to 10^-8 torr and at 1200C. I am interested in knowing
if the aluminum oxide layer on my samples evaporates under these
conditions. One company representative said that it wont, but he did not
have vapor pressure values to support the assertion.

thanks in advance

Rahul Panat
Univ of Illinois
Urbana, IL





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 17:23:47 2004



From: hadden-at-wingate.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:29:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Kodak 4489 EM film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: hadden-at-wingate.edu
Name: Lee Hadden

Organization: Wingate University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Kodak 4489 EM film

Question: Can anyone use some left-over Kodak 4489 electron
microscopy film? I was about to throw out 5 boxes [2 x 10 in. 100
strips per box] during "housecleaning" the other day, but thought
there might be someone who could use it. It has been refrigerated
and unopened for about 12 years. [I used to use it in our old RCA EMU
3G TEM.]
If someone wants it send me your mailing address and I'll ship it out
to you. Otherwise, it will be recycled or trashed.

Lee Hadden
Department of Biology
Wingate University
Wingate, NC 28174

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 17:24:33 2004



From: ryan.davis-at-hydro.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 17:30:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: quantitative analysis training

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: ryan.davis-at-hydro.com
Name: Ryan Davis

Organization: Metallurgical Engineer

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am interested in getting quantitative analysis training
for analyzing aluminum alloys and oxides. In our lab, we have an
Hitachi S-3500N equipped with an Oxford EDS Spectrometer (model#
7021)that has the INCA and ISIS software packages installed on the
computer. I would like to visit an independent laboratory or
university for a week or two for training. If someone could assist me
I would appreciate it.


Regards,

Ryan Davis

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 18:21:33 2004



From: JoAnn Buchanan :      redhair-at-stanford.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 16:26:55 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Microwave fixation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} } Hello Shannan.
}
} I have some experience with microwave fixation of Drosophila larval
} salivary glands for TEM. First, I run my cold spot -at- 15-18 degrees (this
} removes the heating effect) I fix them in Karnovsky's fix power level
} 1(100 watts on my MW) for 1 minute on-1minute off-1 minute on). Then I
} turn the power up to 450 watts (power level 4 on my machine) and pulse for
} 30 seconds on-30 seconds off-30 seconds on 3 times.They should not get
} hot! I let sit on the bench in fixative for 5 minutes. I have also tried
} this protocol on zebrafish larvae (with vacuum) and they are well fixed.
} The insect probably has a cuticle which may hinder the penetration of the
} fixative. If you can find a way to partially remove this, or inject the
} fix then MW, you might have better results.
} For osmium fix, I repeat the above timetable. I dehydrate under vacuum 45
} seconds -at- power level 3(350 watts) 50, 70,95% once each. I do 100%
} ethanol 3 times followed by 100% acetone before infiltration in resin.
} Hope this helps, JoAnn Buchanan
}
}
} } We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} } acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} } of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} } back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} } information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} } adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} } ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} } times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} } results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} } wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} } on this.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305
650-723-5856




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 19:07:09 2004



From: gregor barclay :      gbarclay-at-hotmail.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 01:12:44 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,
Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the same adventure
when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did not
get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did some
card swapping.

Let me know how you get on.

Greg



Dr. G. F. Barclay
Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
University of the West Indies
St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
West Indies
Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
Fax: 868 645 7132





} From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_________________________________________________________________
Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 20:02:39 2004



From: Richard Easingwood :      richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 15:21:11 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Shannan,
Below is a method we have used for a few different insect types, for TEM
not SEM, but the fixing steps we use might provide a useful comparison at
least.

With SEM I assume you won't want to dissect your samples prior to
processing (as we did) so penetration of the solutions may be more of a
problem, but then the requirements for fixation for SEM are also less
stringent. The microwave conditions may be useful guidelines but of course
you'll have to determine the conditions for your own microwave and samples.
If you haven't already got them, I strongly recommend Gary Login's text
(Login, G. R., & Dvorak, A. M. (1994) " The Microwave Toolbook A Practical
Guide for Microscopist" Boston: Beth Israel Hospital) and Kok and Boon's
book "The Microwave Cookbook for Microscopists", Boon and Kok, Coulomb
Press Leiden, 1992.


Method:
Primary fix: 3% glutaraldehyde in 0.1M Na cacodylate, pH 7.4.
Samples dissected out and placed into the primary fix solution (in a small
plastic petri dish).

They were then put into fresh fixative (specimen containers for a Leica AFS
were
used inside the petri dish) and microwave irradiated as follows:

EMS lab microwave oven setup:
-a dummy load of 100ml dw at 20degC in a 250 glass beaker was used (always
in the same place - right rear corner for us)
-temperature limiting off
-100% 'power' (ie magnetron on continuously)
-sample volume for all the fixing steps was 4.0ml
-magnetron was pre-warmed for 2 minutes with a load of 500-600ml water
before each step (unless the oven was used less than 2 minutes earlier).

1) Microwave Primary Fixation:

The sample in 4 ml of primary fix is irradiated for (7s) to give a final
temperature of about 50degC - check the temperature after irradiation (and
obviously before you use your actual samples if you're doing this for the
first time) and alter subsequent run times if necessary. (We use the spot
in the oven we deem to be receiving a steady, high level of radiation).

Allow sample to sit in fume cupboard in fix container for 3 minutes to cool
it to room temp before removing fix.
Replace fix with fresh and repeat the irradiation process twice.
A cool dummy load must used with each run.

Leave samples in fume cupboard for 30 minutes at room temperature.

2) Rinse the samples:

Three X 10 minutes in 0.1M cacodylate buffer.

3) Secondary fixation:

Place 2% OsO4 in 0.1M cacodylate buffer into fix dish with specimens.
Irradiate for 7s
Leave for 40 minutes in the OsO4.

4) Rinse with 0.1M cacodylate buffer

Three X 10 minutes

The remainder of my method is for TEM preparation so you could do your
usual pre-drying and drying steps then.


Regards,

Richard

}
} We have recently acquired a Pelco Biowave and are in the process of
} acquainting ourselves with it. Currently, I am trying to fix two species
} of insects with it for SEM (Colorado potato beetle larvae and Diamond
} back moth larvae). A literature search has not turned up much
} information on microwave processing for insects. I have tried
} adaptations of the standard protocol (2% glut, rinse, 1% osmium, rinse,
} ethanol dehydration, critical point dry) at various microwave wattages,
} times, and with vacuum applied. So far, I have not achieved reproducible
} results for either insect. While I plan on more trial and error, I was
} wondering if anyone has a microwave protocol for insects or any advice
} on this.
}
} Shannan Little

Richard Easingwood
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago
PO Box 913, Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND
Telephone: 0064 3 479 7301
Facsimile: 0064 3 479 7254
GSM: 0064 21 222 4759
mailto:richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Web site: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 21:28:45 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 22:34:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We swapped cards all over the place. The one in the lowest slot gets
recognized, but not the other. Also, the Roper card doesn't seem to
work in the highest slot, even alone. We could get either card to work
with a firewire camera in another slot, but the Retiga we have isn't low
noise enough for this application.
I think we'll have to temporarily get a second computer in the room.
Thanks.

On Tue, 13 Jan 2004, gregor barclay wrote:

} Michael,
} Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the same adventure
} when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did not
} get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did some
} card swapping.
}
} Let me know how you get on.
}
} Greg
}
}
}
} Dr. G. F. Barclay
} Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
} University of the West Indies
} St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
} West Indies
} Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
} Fax: 868 645 7132
}
}
}
}
}
} } From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} } To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} } Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
} }
} }
} }
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.
} }
} } We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper PCI
} } card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've poked around
} } the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.
} }
} } Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera simultaneously?
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } ____________________________________________________________________________
} } Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of
} } Med.
} } Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY 10461
} } (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} }
} }
}
} _________________________________________________________________
} Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
} http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 12 22:57:10 2004



From: Rosemary White :      rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 16:06:42 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] adapters for Leitz M8

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

We have an old Wild M8 dissecting microscope with a 1.0x objective that can
be converted to 0.4x or 1.6x by clipping adapter lenses onto the bottom of
the 1.0x objective. We'd like to get a second set for another M8 because
they get used so much now that they are sometimes needed by both
microscopes. Unfortunately, these are no longer available from Leica,
instead you have to get an adapter and rather more expensive 0.4x and 1.6x
objectives. These new objectives are better quality than the old adapters,
but for our work, the ease of switching with the adapters and low cost
outweighs the marginal increase in quality at the magnifications we're
using.

Anyone willing to part with their adapters, or know of a source? I've
tried ebay and several other used equipment sites with no luck so far.

0.4x adapter lens part no. 367898
1.6x adapter lens part no. 367916

Thanks much,
Rosemary White


Dr Rosemary White rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Microscopy Centre fax 61- 2 6246 5000
CSIRO Plant Industry ph. 61- 2 6246 5475 or
GPO Box 1600 mob. 61- 0402 835 973
Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 07:23:25 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:28:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists

Richard makes some good points here. I second
his reading recommendations, and want to let
everyone know that there is a brand new edition
of Kok and Boon, Microwaves for the Art of
Microscopy, Coulomb Press, Leiden, 2003, which
has some very useful new information.

I believe that the use of a dummy load is not
needed in the Biowave, which has a recirculating
water cooler. In any event, the end temperature
of 50°C is the key, and Richard's 3 x 7 minutes
should give Shannon a good starting point for
time in the fixative. I would be a little
concerned about using such a small volume of
fixative as Richard did (4.0 ml), both because of
a fear of exceeding the temperature set point and
because a greater volume of fixative to specimen
ratio seems prudent based upon my experience with
light microscopy specimens. I generally work
with about 11.0 ml of fixative.

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 07:44:35 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:49:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Question for Microtek 2500F scanner users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

O.k., folks following the various recommendations from the list for flatbed
scanners we got an Microtek AtrixScan 2500f.

So now, anyone out there with a Microtek 2500f what is the part number
and where do you get the bulbs from?

Microtek offical position is "There are no user servicable parts. You have
to ship it back - at your cost - to Microtek in California for repair". Now, I am
not shipping a 100lb scanner back to California for a $20 bulb replacment - let
alone doing it every 6-8 months. Surely someone else out there has already
come across this (especially since the bulbs never power down).

Thank you in advance for any help.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 08:21:32 2004



From: ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 09:26:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: quantitative analysis training

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ryan, Lehigh U. has some excellent courses in this field but they are in
usually in June.

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.
(203) 575-5750




ryan.davis-at-hydro.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
01/12/04 06:30 PM

To
microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
viaWWW: quantitative analysis training








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Email: ryan.davis-at-hydro.com
Name: Ryan Davis

Organization: Metallurgical Engineer

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am interested in getting quantitative analysis training
for analyzing aluminum alloys and oxides. In our lab, we have an
Hitachi S-3500N equipped with an Oxford EDS Spectrometer (model#
7021)that has the INCA and ISIS software packages installed on the
computer. I would like to visit an independent laboratory or
university for a week or two for training. If someone could assist me
I would appreciate it.


Regards,

Ryan Davis

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 08:26:02 2004



From: John J. Friel :      jjf-at-pgt.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 09:31:35 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: vapor pressure question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Rahul,

My tables* go down to 10^-6, and Al2O3 reaches that vapor pressure at
1637C. I expect that the vapor pressure would be well below your vacuum
level at 1200C.

*The Characterization of High Temperature Vapors, J. L. Margrave, Ed.
John Wiley, 1967.

John Friel

--
---------------------------
John J. Friel
Princeton Gamma-Tech
1026 Rte. 518
Rocky Hill, NJ 08553
(609) 924-7310 x232 phone
(609) 924-1729 fax
E-mail: jjf-at-pgt.com
Web page: www.pgt.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 09:51:03 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 08:55:25 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael,

I can't give you definite answer, but a couple of hints that may help you:

1) Some PCs sense the existence of cards in the slots and turn off the slots
if no card is present. Perhaps the higher slots get turned off. Check in the
BIOS if the computer is in some kind of power saving mode.

2) Take it one at a time. Install one card and get it to work. then take
that card out and install the other card in another slot. If you get that to
work, put the first back in and install again.

3) If one card is not recorgnized, check if there are any conflicts in the
device manager.

4) If one card does not work at all, contact the manufacturer and get their
help.

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Michael Cammer [mailto:cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 20:34
To: gregor barclay
Cc: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com

We swapped cards all over the place. The one in the lowest slot gets
recognized, but not the other. Also, the Roper card doesn't seem to
work in the highest slot, even alone. We could get either card to work
with a firewire camera in another slot, but the Retiga we have isn't low
noise enough for this application.
I think we'll have to temporarily get a second computer in the room.
Thanks.

On Tue, 13 Jan 2004, gregor barclay wrote:

} Michael,
} Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the same adventure

} when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did
not
} get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did
some
} card swapping.
}
} Let me know how you get on.
}
} Greg
}
}
}
} Dr. G. F. Barclay
} Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
} University of the West Indies
} St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
} West Indies
} Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
} Fax: 868 645 7132
}
}
}
}
}
} } From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} } To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} } Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
} }
} }
} }
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
} }
} } We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.
} }
} } We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper
PCI
} } card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've poked around
} } the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.
} }
} } Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera simultaneously?
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
} ___________________________________________________________________________
_
} } Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein Coll. of
} } Med.
} } Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY
10461
} } (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL:
http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} }
} }
}
} _________________________________________________________________
} Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
} http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 10:55:59 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 13:31:21 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Mike Bode writes ...

} 3) If one card is not recorgnized, check if there are
} any conflicts in the device manager.

It's difficult for me to add anything to Mike's response, but to note that
many motherboards inherantly share resources amongst pairs of PCI slots.
For example, many mobos share the resources of AGP slot with the next PCI
slot. Another observation of note is that the Windows OS is designed for
sharing resources amongst slots such there should be no conflicts, but my
own experience is how well this works is highly dependent on the
manufacturer's software driver for the card.

Therefore, I'd suggest you may not yet have found the right combination of
slots, or that you beg the manufacturer(s) for their help.

hth & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com


} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Michael Cammer [mailto:cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2004 20:34
} To: gregor barclay
} Cc: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} --
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} ---
}
} We swapped cards all over the place. The one in the lowest slot gets
} recognized, but not the other. Also, the Roper card doesn't seem to
} work in the highest slot, even alone. We could get either card to work
} with a firewire camera in another slot, but the Retiga we have isn't low
} noise enough for this application.
} I think we'll have to temporarily get a second computer in the room.
} Thanks.
}
} On Tue, 13 Jan 2004, gregor barclay wrote:
}
} } Michael,
} } Have you tried rearranging the cards on the Mobo? I had the
} same adventure
}
} } when installing a Pixera camera and Scion system on an XP system. I did
} not
} } get the New Hardware Found announcement for the Pixera card until I did
} some
} } card swapping.
} }
} } Let me know how you get on.
} }
} } Greg
} }
} }
} }
} } Dr. G. F. Barclay
} } Plant Science Unit, Dept of Life Sciences
} } University of the West Indies
} } St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
} } West Indies
} } Phone: 868 645 3232 ext 3112/2045
} } Fax: 868 645 7132
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } } From: Michael Cammer {cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu}
} } } To: microscopy-at-MSA.microscopy.com
} } } Subject: [Microscopy] Sensicam QE & Roper HQ
} } } Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 12:58:55 -0500
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} ---
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------
} ----------
} ----
} } }
} } } We are trying to install two cameras on a Windows XP computer.
} } }
} } } We cannot get XP to recognize both the Sensicam PCI card and the Roper
} PCI
} } } card. It's completely an exclsuive or installation. We've
} poked around
} } } the Device driver menu and downloaded the most recent drivers.
} } }
} } } Has anybody figured out how to install both these camera
} simultaneously?
} } }
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} } _________________________________________________________________
__________
} _
} } } Michael Cammer Analytical Imaging Facility Albert Einstein
} Coll. of
} } } Med.
} } } Jack & Pearl Resnick Campus 1300 Morris Park Ave. Bronx, NY
} 10461
} } } (718) 430-2890 Fax: 430-8996 URL:
} http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
} } }
} } }
} }
} } _________________________________________________________________
} } Help STOP SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*
} } http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail
} }
} }
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 12:17:42 2004



From: Tom Pella :      Tom_pella-at-tedpella.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 10:22:22 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopists,

This discussion on fixation is interesting from a number of aspects. The
reliance on answers based on almost 10 year old literature and technology,
without consideration of current literature, technique and technology (PELCO
BioWave) is curious. In the last three years at the Microscopy and
Microanalysis meetings whole and half day sessions have been devoted to
microwave processing techniques using new and emerging technology. Current
experimental findings do not support the old literature especially when it
comes to fixation and microwave heating. If one chose to stay reasonably
current with both the new technology and techniques they would not propose
50C as an end point temperature for the fixative. I would direct those
curious to a recent paper in Ultrastructural Pathology (2003) 27:187-196,
Microwave and Digital Imaging Technology Reduce Turnaround Times for
Diagnostic Electron Microscopy and as well as Microwave Techniques and
Protocols (2001) from Humana Press, Totowa, NJ and chapter 16 in particular.
I have been around the microwave scene for over 10 years and have worked
diligently to improve the technology (the dreaded vendor) as well as the
science (proof side of the equation). I have difficulty with advice that is
10 years old and ignores recent developments.

Richard T. Giberson
Manager Research and Development
Ted Pella, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 5:28 AM
To: Richard Easingwood
Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Dear fellow microscopists

Richard makes some good points here. I second
his reading recommendations, and want to let
everyone know that there is a brand new edition
of Kok and Boon, Microwaves for the Art of
Microscopy, Coulomb Press, Leiden, 2003, which
has some very useful new information.

I believe that the use of a dummy load is not
needed in the Biowave, which has a recirculating
water cooler. In any event, the end temperature
of 50°C is the key, and Richard's 3 x 7 minutes
should give Shannon a good starting point for
time in the fixative. I would be a little
concerned about using such a small volume of
fixative as Richard did (4.0 ml), both because of
a fear of exceeding the temperature set point and
because a greater volume of fixative to specimen
ratio seems prudent based upon my experience with
light microscopy specimens. I generally work
with about 11.0 ml of fixative.

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 18:13:26 2004



From: fremingt-at-fhcrc.org (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 18:18:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: needed method for labelling tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: fremingt-at-fhcrc.org
Name: F.Remington

Organization: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] immuno scanning electron microscopy

Question:
We would appreciate some help if anyone has knowledge of or has used
a method for labelling tissue of cell walls-stomach or intestine-with
ICam-1 for immuno scanning E.M.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 13 18:14:05 2004



From: Leanne.Armand-at-csiro.au (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2004 18:19:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Seeking Opinions- Image Analysis Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: Leanne.Armand-at-csiro.au
Name: Leanne Armand

Organization: CSIRO-Marine

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Seeking Opinions- Image
Analysis Software

Question: Dear M-Listers,

We are interested in using image analysis software for several purposes:
1. to speed the process of counting and measuring of cells in unialgal cultures
2. to assist in counting cells in simple two species competition
experiments where they are relatively easy to separate by shape.
3. to develop the capacity to identify and count the dominant species
from natural samples

To this end we have been offered some software packages with an
epifluorescent inverted microscope. We would like to know if anyone
has any experience with these software packages trying to achieve
similar goals.

1. Image Pro Discovery (by Media Cybernetics)
2. Softimaging System (SIS) Auto version 3.2
4. Leica QWin Standard software
5. Axiovision 4 (Zeiss)
6. Digital Optics V++ Image analysis software

Comments on your experiences would be most welcome.

Many Thanks and All the best for the coming New Year
Leanne Armand and Peter Thompson

___________________________________________
*Contact Days - Tues., Wed., Fri.*
___________________________________________
Dr Leanne Armand
Joint Personal Assistant to Dr Peter Thompson
Sustainable Marine Ecosystems in the South East
CSIRO Marine Research
GPO Box 1538
Hobart, 7001
Tas. Australia

Ph (03) 6232 5085
Fax (03) 6232 5000



---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 16:51:22 2004



From: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:56:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Name: Cavin Mooers

Organization: Vitreous State Lab

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
and premature failure of the filament while
operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
acceptable, but I find this hard to believe. The
issue we are dealing with is extraordinarily slow
pumping times -- 1 hour to obtain 3x10-5 torr and
a max vacuum of 5x10-6 torr after 3-4 hours. We
are a high volume lab, and so I wish to know what
the minimum vacuum I need without seriously
diminishing filament life, in order to maximize
the workload.

Sincerely,

Cavin T. F. Mooers
EM Facility Manager
Vitreous State Laboratory
The Catholic University of America
Hannan Hall ñ Rm 433
Washington, D.C. 20064
(202) 319-6237 (Office)
(202) 319-5346 (Lab)
(202) 319-4469 (Fax)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 16:52:13 2004



From: ann-at-northwestern.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:57:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Teaching samples for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: ann-at-northwestern.edu
Name: Ann Chiaramonti

Organization: Northwestern University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: Teaching samples for TEM

Question: Hi,
I am teaching a TEM lab class this quarter and am looking for a
material useful for teaching basic imaging and diffraction in the
TEM. We would like a material with lots of dislocations, stacking
faults, grain boundaries, etc. so that it is interesting for the
students. I would like to use stainless steel but do not have any
non-magnetic readily available.
I would like to avoid using perchloric acid if possible in the
preparation. Any suggestions/comments?
Thank you in advance,

Ann Chiaramonti
Northwestern University
ann-at-northwestern.edu

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 17:06:26 2004



From: jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu (Jon Krupp)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 15:06:29 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Glow discharge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings:

What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?

We have an old VE that will glow discharge, but have hardly ever used it.
A new faculty person wants to do more glow discharging and is looking for
info.

Somewhere I have a paper describing a home made glow discharge device,
anybody know about this and if it works?

Also have heard that keeping grids in the refrigerator helps too. What's up
with that?

Her application is carbon films for negatively stained macromolecules.

Thanks

Jonathan Krupp
Microscopy & Imaging Lab
University of California
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
(831) 459-2477
jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 18:24:33 2004



From: Mary Mager :      mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 16:27:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Cavin,
It sounds like the problem is not just that you have a leak, but where the leak
is. The vacuum is usually tested at the top of the diffusion pump, but what
matters for the filament is the vacuum at the gun. If you have a small leak at
the gun, the vacuum near the filament may be quite a bit worse than you are
seeing. I routinely turn on the tungsten filament when the vacuum reads 1X10-4
torr, but I am sure that that vacuum is consistent in the column and that it
will rapidly improve.
I suggest you assume that the leak is near the gun and do some detective work.
You will be much happier, the filament will last longer and your throughput will
better.
Good luck,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
Tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 2:56 PM

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Name: Cavin Mooers

Organization: Vitreous State Lab

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
and premature failure of the filament while
operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
acceptable, but I find this hard to believe. The
issue we are dealing with is extraordinarily slow
pumping times -- 1 hour to obtain 3x10-5 torr and
a max vacuum of 5x10-6 torr after 3-4 hours. We
are a high volume lab, and so I wish to know what
the minimum vacuum I need without seriously
diminishing filament life, in order to maximize
the workload.

Sincerely,

Cavin T. F. Mooers
EM Facility Manager
Vitreous State Laboratory
The Catholic University of America
Hannan Hall ñ Rm 433
Washington, D.C. 20064
(202) 319-6237 (Office)
(202) 319-5346 (Lab)
(202) 319-4469 (Fax)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 18:26:16 2004



From: Richard Easingwood :      richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 13:44:39 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks to Richard Giberson for his comments. As Pelco is not represented in
this part of the world, I was unaware of this advance in microwave
technology and the new Pelco BioWave.

We have a national microscopy conference in February next year (see
http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/Conference_2005/Microscopy_NZ_2005.html) It would
be fantastic if Pelco would bring this technology out to demonstrate it to
us here during the conference!

Regards,


Richard



} Dear Microscopists,
}
} This discussion on fixation is interesting from a number of aspects. The
} reliance on answers based on almost 10 year old literature and technology,
} without consideration of current literature, technique and technology (PELCO
} BioWave) is curious. In the last three years at the Microscopy and
} Microanalysis meetings whole and half day sessions have been devoted to
} microwave processing techniques using new and emerging technology. Current
} experimental findings do not support the old literature especially when it
} comes to fixation and microwave heating. If one chose to stay reasonably
} current with both the new technology and techniques they would not propose
} 50C as an end point temperature for the fixative. I would direct those
} curious to a recent paper in Ultrastructural Pathology (2003) 27:187-196,
} Microwave and Digital Imaging Technology Reduce Turnaround Times for
} Diagnostic Electron Microscopy and as well as Microwave Techniques and
} Protocols (2001) from Humana Press, Totowa, NJ and chapter 16 in particular.
} I have been around the microwave scene for over 10 years and have worked
} diligently to improve the technology (the dreaded vendor) as well as the
} science (proof side of the equation). I have difficulty with advice that is
} 10 years old and ignores recent developments.
}
} Richard T. Giberson
} Manager Research and Development
} Ted Pella, Inc.
}
} -----Original Message-----
} } From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 5:28 AM
} To: Richard Easingwood
} Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects
}
}
}

Richard Easingwood
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago
PO Box 913, Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND
Telephone: 0064 3 479 7301
Facsimile: 0064 3 479 7254
GSM: 0064 21 222 4759
mailto:richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Web site: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 18:28:58 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 17:59:35 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Question for Microtek 2500F scanner users

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Ann,
Brass, annealed or slightly deformed, is easy to thin in a high concentration
nitric acid in methanol electropolishing bath (see Van der Voort). It is
non-magnetic, has lots of twins, dislocations and an easy diffraction pattern.
Regards,
Mary Mager
Electron Microscopist
Metals and Materials Engineering
University of British Columbia
6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
CANADA
tel: 604-822-5648
e-mail: mager-at-interchange.ubc.ca
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListserver" {ann-at-northwestern.edu}
To: {microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, January 14, 2004 2:57 PM


On Jan 13, 2004, at 5:49 AM, Richard Edelmann wrote:

} So now, anyone out there with a Microtek 2500f what is the part number
} and where do you get the bulbs from?
}
Dear Richard,
We have a different model and have yet to need a bulb replaced;
however, we purchased the unit from Calumet photo, and I recommend
talking to Chris Benes, (323)466-1238 x108,
chris.benes-at-calumetphoto.com. (This is in the Pacific Time Zone, so
plan accordingly.) Good luck, and please pass along what you learn.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 14 21:28:06 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2004 22:33:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Glow discharge treatment of grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Jonathan Krupp wrote:
====================================================
What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?

We have an old VE that will glow discharge, but have hardly ever used it. A
new faculty person wants to do more glow discharging and is looking for info

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 08:04:18 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:09:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear fellow microscopists

The Pelco BioWave is not the only new advance in microwave
technology. For something else really new, check out Milestone's REM
microwave for EM processing (http://www.milestonesrl.com). It has a
non-contact infra-red temperature sensor, full computer control by
touch screen and no need for a water load at all. This is another
microwave that you need to have at your conference. Maybe you can
get someone from Milestone (JIm Milius?) to present it.

best regards,
Steven Slap
Microwave Consultant

}
} Thanks to Richard Giberson for his comments. As Pelco is not represented in
} this part of the world, I was unaware of this advance in microwave
} technology and the new Pelco BioWave.
}
} We have a national microscopy conference in February next year (see
} http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/Conference_2005/Microscopy_NZ_2005.html) It would
} be fantastic if Pelco would bring this technology out to demonstrate it to
} us here during the conference!
}
} Regards,
}
}
} Richard
}
}
}
} } Dear Microscopists,
} }
} } This discussion on fixation is interesting from a number of aspects. The
} } reliance on answers based on almost 10 year old literature and technology,
} } without consideration of current literature, technique and technology (PELCO
} } BioWave) is curious. In the last three years at the Microscopy and
} } Microanalysis meetings whole and half day sessions have been devoted to
} } microwave processing techniques using new and emerging technology. Current
} } experimental findings do not support the old literature especially when it
} } comes to fixation and microwave heating. If one chose to stay reasonably
} } current with both the new technology and techniques they would not propose
} } 50C as an end point temperature for the fixative. I would direct those
} } curious to a recent paper in Ultrastructural Pathology (2003) 27:187-196,
} } Microwave and Digital Imaging Technology Reduce Turnaround Times for
} } Diagnostic Electron Microscopy and as well as Microwave Techniques and
} } Protocols (2001) from Humana Press, Totowa, NJ and chapter 16 in particular.
} } I have been around the microwave scene for over 10 years and have worked
} } diligently to improve the technology (the dreaded vendor) as well as the
} } science (proof side of the equation). I have difficulty with advice that is
} } 10 years old and ignores recent developments.
} }
} } Richard T. Giberson
} } Manager Research and Development
} } Ted Pella, Inc.
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } } From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03-at-comcast.net]
} } Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2004 5:28 AM
} } To: Richard Easingwood
} } Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects
} }
} }
} }
}
} Richard Easingwood
} Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
} Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
} School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago
} PO Box 913, Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND
} Telephone: 0064 3 479 7301
} Facsimile: 0064 3 479 7254
} GSM: 0064 21 222 4759
} mailto:richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
} Web site: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 08:54:58 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:00:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Calvin:

Yes, 5x10-4 is a useable vacuum, but it will shorten fialment life. As
previously suggested you may have a vacuum leak in the gun (check the gun
chamber o-ring). But since you are getting down to 5x10-6 it doesn't sound
like a leak is the main problem. Becasue it takes so long to pump down,
sounds more like a pumping problem. Not exactly sure where your starting
from when you say it takes 1 hour to get 3 x10-5. I just vented my JEOL 840
gun and it took ~ 9 mins to get the same with a warmed and running pumping
system.

-- dirty or cracked DP oil or RP oil (Change oils)

-- poor DP backing (clean RP and replace RP exhaust filter).

-- low RP oil level or DP oil level.

-- check cooling temp on DP. (Too high *or* too low)


Good luck.



} Email: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
} Name: Cavin Mooers
}
} Organization: Vitreous State Lab
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament
}
} Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
} issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
} and premature failure of the filament while
} operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
} technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
} acceptable, but I find this hard to believe. The
} issue we are dealing with is extraordinarily slow
} pumping times -- 1 hour to obtain 3x10-5 torr and
} a max vacuum of 5x10-6 torr after 3-4 hours. We
} are a high volume lab, and so I wish to know what
} the minimum vacuum I need without seriously
} diminishing filament life, in order to maximize
} the workload.
}
} Sincerely,
}
} Cavin T. F. Mooers
} EM Facility Manager
} Vitreous State Laboratory
} The Catholic University of America
} Hannan Hall ñ Rm 433
} Washington, D.C. 20064
} (202) 319-6237 (Office)
} (202) 319-5346 (Lab)
} (202) 319-4469 (Fax)
}
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 09:06:37 2004



From: Ellery Frahm :      frah0010-at-umn.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:11:55 CST
Subject: [Microscopy] Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Cavin Mooers wrote:
}
} Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
} issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
} and premature failure of the filament while
} operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
} technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
} acceptable, but I find this hard to believe...

We have a JEOL JXA-8900 electron microprobe, and we never expose a hot
filament to pressures above 1x10-4 torr -- and that is only for a minute or
so during a sample change. When, on occasion, a user has exceeded this
pressure for a few seconds, our filament tends to break within a day or
two. I would consider a pressure of 1x10-5 torr to be minimally
acceptable, and we normally operate at about 2x10-6 torr. Once or twice
we've had vacuum problems, and it has been the fault of degraded rubber
gaskets causing leaks.

Ellery

---------------
Ellery E. Frahm
Research Scientist/Manager
Electron Microprobe Laboratory
Department of Geology & Geophysics
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Lab Website: http://probelab.geo.umn.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 11:05:01 2004



From: Lesley Weston :      lesley-at-vancouverbc.net
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:11:15 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Glow discharge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I used to use a home-made glow-discharge device for grids and a lot more
besides. I can't find the paper so I'm afraid I can't give you the
reference, but I can tell you that the device is cheap and easy to make if
you have access to a workshop, and it does work very well. That's assuming
that you have the same paper that we used, of course. I never tried keeping
grids in the fridge, but before we had the GD thing I used to use an
anti-static pen from Ladd (I think - one of the usual suppliers, anyway) and
that certainly helped. Sorry to be so vague, but I'm at home.

Lesley Weston.



on 14/01/2004 3:06 PM, Jon Krupp at jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--} -
}
} Greetings:
}
} What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?
}
} We have an old VE that will glow discharge, but have hardly ever used it.
} A new faculty person wants to do more glow discharging and is looking for
} info.
}
} Somewhere I have a paper describing a home made glow discharge device,
} anybody know about this and if it works?
}
} Also have heard that keeping grids in the refrigerator helps too. What's up
} with that?
}
} Her application is carbon films for negatively stained macromolecules.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 11:30:39 2004



From: Elaine Humphrey :      ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:35:24 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fwd: Re: microwave fixation procedure for insects

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Shannan
I have followed this theme with interest as we have used a Pelco
Microwave for about four years now. Protocols and equipment have
changed over that time and we have kept up with the changes. They
have certainly improved the timing it takes to either fluoresenctly
label cells for confocal (half an hour instead of 3 hours), or for EM
processing (two hours instead of three days). If it works
conventionally it is likely to work in the microwave. If it doesn't
work conventionally then it is unlikely to work in the microwave.
The results are certainly comparable and for confocal work, the cells
are fresher and there is generally less background.
Researchers can walk in the door at 9 am and go down to the confocal
at 9.30 with labelled cells.

Our protocols have changed somewhat over this time and we are
constantly finding better ways of doing things. Three things are
important in your microwave: 1: a cool spot. This cuts out the
standing waves and the need for load coolers and controls the
temperature together with the temperature probe. 2. a vacuum chamber,
especially for plant material or specimens with a cuticle such as C.
elegans and beetle larvae. 3. Power controller - keep the power below
200 watts and live specimens stay alive.

The present protocol below has been used successfully with a wide
variety of specimens (we are a multiuser facility for the faculty of
medicine and the faculty of science). You may need to tweak the
timings depending on how thick your samples are. You can easily check
the penetration by sacrificing one of the larvae after the osmium
step, though this is probably not a problem for SEM. Our TEM protocol
starts the same way but we use a Spurr-Epon mix for the resin. The
blocks cut better than using either Spurr's or Epon alone. You can of
course use your buffer of choice. Cacodylate buffer is our choice as
we get less chance of precipitates with UA and it is a lot cheaper
than PIPES or HEPES though they have their places too.

Microwave SEM processing for animal tissue

1. Fixation
Fix tissue in 2.5% Glutaraldhyde in 0.1M cacodylate buffer pH 7.3-7.4 at 22 C
Perform under Vacuum
Power level 1 (about 100W)
2 min on, 2 min off, 2 min on
Repeat without changing

2. Cacodylate buffer rinse at 22 C
Do not perform under Vacuum
Power level 2 (about 200W)
40 sec
Repeat three times
If using tannic acid with buffer, rinse in butter once without tannic
before continuing to osmium step.

3. Osmium Tetroxide Fixation at 22 C
1% osmium tetroxide in 0.1M cacodylate buffer
Perform under Vacuum
Power level 1 (about 100W)
2 min on, 2 min off, 2 min on
Repeat without changing

4. Distilled water rinse
Rinse sample in distilled water and change to new water
Do not perform under Vacuum
Power level 2 (about 200W)
40 sec

5. Dehydrate in ethanol at 22 C
50% ETOH
70% ETOH
90% or 95% ETOH
100% ETOH
100% ETOH
100% ETOH
Do not perform under Vacuum
Power level 2 (about 200W)
40 sec

6. Critical Point Dry step
either conventionally in a CPD or in the microwave with
Hexamethyldisilizane (HMDS) at 22 C

Do not perform under Vacuum
Power level 2 (about 200W)
40 sec
Replace with new HMDS
Repeat two more times

Place in 60C oven for 5 mins
Remove excess HMDS
Place back in 60C oven until HMDS has evaporated


No two specimens types are the same. You might have to double the
timings for the larvae depending on how difficult it is to penetrate
the cuticle and how big they are.

A great souce of what is new in the processing of specimens is Rick
Giberson of Pelco. He is working with a number of labs on improving
the technique. I have no doubt that the above is already out of
date, but it usually works for us, so if it ain't broke, don't fix it
eh!

We have been investigating the use of formaldehyde in the microwave.
I had a coop student look at the effect of the microwave on fixation
over 30 mins, 2 hours and 72 hours. The first results have given us
more questions. Hopefully we will be able to present a paper on this
in the future.

Elaine


--
Dr. Elaine Humphrey
Director, BioImaging Facility
President, Microscopy Society of Canada
University of British Columbia
6270 University Blvd, mail-stop Botany
Vancouver, BC
CANADA, V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604-822-3354
FAX: 604-822-6089
e-mail: ech-at-interchange.ubc.ca
website: www.emlab.ubc.ca


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 11:34:21 2004



From: Hiromi Konishi :      konishi-at-geofourpeaks.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:39:48 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Refine lattice dimension

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

HI.
I would like to know how to measure the size of lattice of very local places
in the HRTEM image (not real lattice dimensions, just the size between any
lattice planes).
The images are two two dimensional (nearly structural images), and the
structure is relative simple, composed of two or three different atoms.
Probably slightly tilting affects the measurement, but I want to know the
size of each one or several lattice layers from the interface. I also want
to know the lattice size of very local places (~10 x ~10 lattices). I think
that some programs may find the lowest or highest contrast (1 pixel) on
digital images, although I am not sure if the idea is correct. Please advise
about some papers or programs. I prefer a free software.

Thank you,

Hiromi Konishi
The University of New Mexico



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 11:53:57 2004



From: Ellery Frahm :      frah0010-at-umn.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 11:59:28 CST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ellery Frahm wrote:

} ... we never expose a hot filament to
} pressures above 1x10-4 torr -- and that is
} only for a minute or so during a sample change.


Michael O'Keefe wrote:

} Never = "only for a minute or so"........
} Is that a new definition of "never"?
}
} Mike


Hi Mike,

Let me clarify:

We never deliberately expose a hot filament to pressures above 1x10-4 torr.
We normally operate at about 2x10-6 torr. Only during a sample change
will we reach pressures that *approach* 1x10-4 torr for a minute or so,
often less. I tell our users never to exceed 1x10-4 torr, but sometimes a
user is careless or distracted and will reach higher pressures for a few
seconds, greatly reducing our filament life -- it usually "dies" in a day
or two.

Sorry for the confusion -- I wasn't trying to re-define "never" :)

Ellery

---------------
Ellery E. Frahm
Research Scientist/Manager
Electron Microprobe Laboratory
Department of Geology & Geophysics
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Lab Website: http://probelab.geo.umn.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 11:57:40 2004



From: Doug Keene :      DRK-at-SHCC.ORG
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:58:11 -0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Glow discharge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The paper describing a home made glow-discharge device is
authored by Aebi and Pollard, J Electron Microsc Tech. 1987 Sep; 7(1): 29-33.
We made a similar one (a bit simpler) which we routinely
use to charge grids prior to picking up sections and
also prior to negative staining. It can probably be
made for less than $150.00. I'd be happy to send a .jpg
image of the device to anyone who wants it.

Doug

On Wed, 14 Jan 2004 15:06:29 -0800 Jon Krupp
{jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu} wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line
} Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Greetings:
}
} What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?
}
} We have an old VE that will glow discharge, but have hardly
} ever used it. A new faculty person wants to do more glow
} discharging and is looking for info.
}
} Somewhere I have a paper describing a home made glow
} discharge device, anybody know about this and if it works?
}
} Also have heard that keeping grids in the refrigerator
} helps too. What's up with that?
}
} Her application is carbon films for negatively stained
} macromolecules.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Microscopy & Imaging Lab
} University of California
} Santa Cruz, CA 95064
} (831) 459-2477
} jmkrupp-at-cats.ucsc.edu
}
}
}

----------------------
Douglas R. Keene
Associate Investigator
Micro-Imaging Center
Shriners Hospital for Children
3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239-3009
phone: 503-221-3434
FAX: 503-412-6894



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 12:23:05 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 10:44:33 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Refine lattice dimension

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 15, 2004, at 9:39 AM, Hiromi Konishi wrote:

} I would like to know how to measure the size of lattice of very local
} places
} in the HRTEM image (not real lattice dimensions, just the size between
} any
} lattice planes).
} The images are two two dimensional (nearly structural images), and the
} structure is relative simple, composed of two or three different atoms.
} Probably slightly tilting affects the measurement, but I want to know
} the
} size of each one or several lattice layers from the interface. I also
} want
} to know the lattice size of very local places (~10 x ~10 lattices). I
} think
} that some programs may find the lowest or highest contrast (1 pixel)
} on
} digital images, although I am not sure if the idea is correct. Please
} advise
} about some papers or programs. I prefer a free software.
}
Dear Hiromi,
I would first calibrate the microscope magnification using a
Mag*I*Cal--no affiliation except satisfied user--then record the images
on film, print enlargements, scan, and measure the areas of interest.
This avoids at least some of the aliasing that can come from digital
imaging. If you take digital images, you have to be sure that Nyquist
frequency, equal to twice the pixel dimension, is larger than the
spacing you are trying to determine; i.e., the lattice layers must span
several pixels. If you know that all the layers have the same spacing,
you can measure the spacing between layer 1 and layer N, but your post
indicates that you are trying to measure the difference in spacing of
layers near an interface--a much more difficult problem. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 14:33:28 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 14:38:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Our venerable JEOL 840A valves over to the diffusion pump about 3 minutes
after we start pumping the chamber. 45 seconds later, the high voltage was
re-enabled at a vacuum of 5x10-5 torr measured at the gun. At 30 minutes,
vacuum had reached 1x10-5 torr. At 60 minutes, the vacuum was about 2x10-6.
I think we get down into the high 10-7 range if we leave the scope
overnight. (FYI, it takes less than 60 seconds for us to pump down just the
gun chamber when we vent it and leave the sample chamber under vacuum. I
don't know your model of JEOL. It may not have a valve to isolate the gun
from the sample chamber.)

It definitely sounds like a leak or a pumping problem. I would defer to the
other posters and their suggestions on those subjects.

You did not say what kind of samples you are examining, or whether samples
are loaded when you are having trouble reaching vacuum. I know that can be
a problem. We tried to examine concrete in our 840A and it took forever to
pump down. We did a bit better by limiting sample volume, but it was still
slow. Oily samples can be a problem depending on the vapor pressure of the
liquid.

You were not clear whether your scope is under service contract or not. If
it is, I would suggest you take advantage of the contract. Something is not
right. If you can't find the problem quickly, I would let the boys earn
their keep. I might assume this is a scope you purchased directly from
JEOL, but that might not be the case. Did the scope used to work right in
your lab and this is a new problem, or is this a matter of trying to get a
scope up and running right for the first time?

Good luck and keep the questions coming.
Warren

At 09:00 AM 1/15/2004, Richard Edelmann wrote:

} Calvin:
}
} Yes, 5x10-4 is a useable vacuum, but it will shorten fialment
} life. As
} previously suggested you may have a vacuum leak in the gun (check the gun
} chamber o-ring). But since you are getting down to 5x10-6 it doesn't sound
} like a leak is the main problem. Becasue it takes so long to pump down,
} sounds more like a pumping problem. Not exactly sure where your starting
} from when you say it takes 1 hour to get 3 x10-5. I just vented my JEOL 840
} gun and it took ~ 9 mins to get the same with a warmed and running pumping
} system.
}
} -- dirty or cracked DP oil or RP oil (Change oils)
}
} -- poor DP backing (clean RP and replace RP exhaust filter).
}
} -- low RP oil level or DP oil level.
}
} -- check cooling temp on DP. (Too high *or* too low)
}
}
} Good luck.
}
} } Email: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
} } Name: Cavin Mooers
} }
} } Organization: Vitreous State Lab
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM: Minimum Vacuum for
} Tungsten Filament
} }
} } Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
} } issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
} } and premature failure of the filament while
} } operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
} } technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
} } acceptable, but I find this hard to believe. The
} } issue we are dealing with is extraordinarily slow
} } pumping times -- 1 hour to obtain 3x10-5 torr and
} } a max vacuum of 5x10-6 torr after 3-4 hours. We
} } are a high volume lab, and so I wish to know what
} } the minimum vacuum I need without seriously
} } diminishing filament life, in order to maximize
} } the workload.
} }
} } Sincerely,
} }
} } Cavin T. F. Mooers
} } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
} 350 Pearson Hall
} Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
} Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
} E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
46 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 16:22:31 2004



From: Philip Oshel :      peoshel-at-wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 16:27:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Sylguard supplier?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Micromavens,

Does anybody know of a current supplier of (preferably small lots) of
Sylguard (Dow-Corning)? I've been searching the web, but don't find
any suppliers.
Sylguard as used for potting electronics, the clear stuff (although
clear isn't required right now). A mold-release compound for this
would be nice, too.
Thanks.

Phil
--
Philip Oshel
Supervisor, BBPIC microscopy facility
Department of Animal Sciences
University of Wisconsin
1675 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706 - 1284
voice: (608) 263-4162
fax: (608) 262-5157 (dept. fax)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 17:00:42 2004



From: Ray D. Twesten :      twesten-at-uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 17:06:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Refine lattice dimension

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hiromi,
If you have access to a Macintosh Version of Gatan's DigitalMicrograph,
you can download from the NCEM web site a powerful plug-in written by Roar
Kilaas and Martin Hytch. Using this plug-in, you can measure the local
change in lattice parameter from an image. The program does a lot more and
is very easy to use. See the link below:


http://ncem.lbl.gov/frames/software.htm
*********************
A new set of routines for creating digital Moire patterns, displacement maps
and strain images can be downloaded by clicking on the link below. These
routines use the concept of the geometric phase to calculate deviations in
local lattice parameters from variations in reciprocal space around chosen
spatial frequencies (Bragg reflections). On-line help on the routines is
available from the menu-bar.

Download Phase-Extension routines.

PhaseManual.pdf

Last updated May 1999.

Users of this package are encouraged to email comments (email: roar-at-lbl.gov)
on the software.
********************


Cheers, Ray

Ray D. Twesten, PhD.
Center for Microanalysis of Materials
Seitz Materials Research Laboratory
104 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801
+1 217 244-6177 (Fax -2278)


-----Original Message-----
} From: Hiromi Konishi [mailto:konishi-at-geofourpeaks.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2004 11:40 AM
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

HI.
I would like to know how to measure the size of lattice of very local places
in the HRTEM image (not real lattice dimensions, just the size between any
lattice planes).
The images are two two dimensional (nearly structural images), and the
structure is relative simple, composed of two or three different atoms.
Probably slightly tilting affects the measurement, but I want to know the
size of each one or several lattice layers from the interface. I also want
to know the lattice size of very local places (~10 x ~10 lattices). I think
that some programs may find the lowest or highest contrast (1 pixel) on
digital images, although I am not sure if the idea is correct. Please advise
about some papers or programs. I prefer a free software.

Thank you,

Hiromi Konishi
The University of New Mexico




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 17:30:30 2004



From: Charles A. Garber :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 18:35:59 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] From Corporate Officers and Key Managers Page

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jonathan Krupp wrote:
====================================================
What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?

We have an old VE that will glow discharge, but have hardly ever used
it. A new faculty person wants to do more glow discharging and is
looking for info.

Somewhere I have a paper describing a home made glow discharge device,
anybody know about this and if it works?

Also have heard that keeping grids in the refrigerator helps too. What's
up with that?

Her application is carbon films for negatively stained macromolecules.
=======================================================
Usually the reason why one would want to glow discharge treat their
(carbon coated) grids is to make them more hydrophilic. The technique
we use is to expose the carbon coated grids to a nitrogen (e.g. air)
plasma for roughly 5-10 seconds in one of our standard configured Plasma
Prep II plasma etcher units. Such a treatment will keep the carbon
coatings hydrophilic for roughly 30 days (or more). More information
can be found on URL
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/instruments/etchers1.shtml

This is a low power unit and I don't know how well it might work for
systems putting out more than 100 watts. I have never heard of
storage under refrigeration to slow down the loss in hydrophilic
character of carbon coated grids.

Disclaimer: SPI Supplies manufactures carbon coated grids for customers
and also manufactures the SPI Plasma Prep™ II plasma etcher.

Chuck
===========================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 19:23:22 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 17:28:56 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A medium 10-6 torr in one hour sounds reasonable for diffusion pump powered
scope. There are two things to consider:
- it may be a leak (perhaps some O-ring);
- it may be pumps (backing or diffusion).

If there is a leak, you need to isolate somehow (depends from the model)
the suspected compartment and measure the leak speed - JEOL guys would tell
you what is the normal for your particular microscope.

The pumps tend to lost their "power" with time if you don't do a
prophylactic. The oil ether in mechanical or diffusion pump should be
changed from time to time. It's more critical for mechanical pump, because
it has moving parts. It's good idea to change oil in mechanical pump at
least ones in a year. You also should keep in mind the possibility of
backstreaming from mechanical pump, if so, diffusion pump may be
affected. If diffusion pump operates in normal condition (not exposed to
air when hot, not much water pumped down etc) the oil may stay good for
years. Still, you need to maintain the level of oil according to the
specification. If you did not manage to look inside of DP for decade, it's
probably time to do so. Look for dark deposits and oil's color. If your DP
has been operated in good conditions, you, perhaps will not find any dark
deposits and oil will be from yellow to light dark (you lucky guy). So,
because you already opened DP, you may need to replace oil for the next few
years. If your DP is contaminated by deposits and oil is dark - it's time
to do good cleaning. Disassemble everything and clean. Everything inside
the DP should be shiny polished -the warranty, it will thankfully works
good for the next decade! Return everything back and check leak speed
again. Personally, I prefer to use Santovac-5 DP oil. It's expensive but
it delivers wonderful results and it's very stable. In my DV502A vacuum
evaporator, it stays for 10 years and I only adjust level from time to
time. It delivers good 10-6 in about 1-2 hours and goes into 10-7
overnight. It's on the "dirty" system. Sergey

At 12:38 PM 1/15/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 20:39:22 2004



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 16:44:49 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Glow discharge of grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jonathan Krupp wrote:

What's the latest word on glow discharge for grids?


Another way to make coated grids more hydrophilic is to expose them to UV
light. I know of one lab that stored Formvar-coated grids on racks under a
UV light (did not specify wavelength), and used the oldest ones first. I
personally just make grids on a dry day and let them age naturally -
probably enough UV here to do the job.

But more specifically, a student here at UH tried a lot of different
methods of treating her grids, and found that if she put them in their
Stratolinker UV Crosslinker (for crosslinking DNA), set it for 30 sec, and
pushed the Auto button, it worked great! I looked it up - it uses 254
nm. I have not yet tried any of our UV sources around here, but it would
be worth trying everything from a party blacklight to a zap with the
confocal. Or even a turn on the front porch (weather permitting).

Aloha,
Tina

Yesterday - rainy, gale force winds
Today - 78F, sunny, surf's up

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 23:50:24 2004



From: m.kral-at-mech.canterbury.ac.nz (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 23:55:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Desktop Microscopist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: m.kral-at-mech.canterbury.ac.nz
Name: Milo Kral

Organization: University of Canterbury

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Desktop Microscopist

Question: I am trying to reach Jim Stanley so I can ask him how to
use DM on Mac OS10.

Could Jim, or someone who knows him, tell me how to get in touch?

Regards
Milo

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 15 23:49:51 2004



From: gt5185d-at-prism.gatech.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 23:55:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: SEM analysis of skin tissue...

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: gt5185d-at-prism.gatech.edu
Name: Jonathan B.

Organization: Georgia Tech

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: SEM analysis of skin tissue...

Question: Hello Microscopy group,

I was hoping to garnish some advice about SEM sample preparation for
my PhD research. I'm investigating a technology to microporate human
skin for transdermal drug delivery, and I want to image the pores
with a SEM. My current plan is to purchase an automated critical
point dryer; currently I'm considering Emitech's 850 and Polaron's
7501. I hope I'm on the right track.

Any comments? Thanks,
Jonathan B.

My biological samples are engineered living tissue 22mm in diameter
and 1mm thick. I'll be using a Hitachi 3500H, with a CVC Products DC
Sputterer at the Georgia Tech MiRC cleanroom.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 08:22:01 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 09:33:55 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [Histonet] Formalin down the sink

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I don't bother with neutralization or anything; I just collect it in a
jug and hand it over to Rutgers Environmental Health & Safety when they
come to pick up hazardous waste.

Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxicology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University

Barbara Murray wrote:

} Greetings,
} We have been using a solidifier for our formalin, putting it into biohazard boxes for pickup by the housekeeping dept. We were told by our Safety Officer that we can now pour it down the drain with lots of running water.
} For the ones of you who are using formalin, how are you disposing of it?
} Thanks for your replies. Have a great day and weekend!
}
} Barbara A. Murray,HT.(ASCP)
} The Alaska Native Medical Center
} Anchorage, Alaska
}
}
} _______________________________________________
} Histonet mailing list
} Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 09:00:59 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 09:06:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Formalin and Uranyl acetate disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Picking up on the thread on disposal of formalin, I have a comment plus a
question. My comment is that many Environmental Health & Safety
departments pick up "hazardous waste" and then pour it down the drain with
lots of water. This includes low level radioisotopes. At my university,
we (lab personnel) can not call anything hazardous waste. We can only have
"unwanted used materials". We can not use the word waste on any label. We
had a box labeled "glass waste" on our microtome bench for our old glass
knives and slides and were cited!

Recently we were told they were going to a policy of users disposing uranyl
acetate ( {1%) by pouring it down the drain with lots of water. I was a
little surprised by this. Do other universities follow this policy?

Thanks, Tom




At 09:33 AM 1/16/2004 -0500, you wrote:



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 10:17:29 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 11:22:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [Histonet] Formalin down the sink

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are not allowed to throw anything down the sink--including water wash
from stains and alcohol! The MWRA (Massachusetts Water Resource Assoc.) has
very strict guidelines re: mercury, etc. entering Boston Harbor. As we are
a pathology lab for a research group, we do a lot of staining, so all washes
must be collected in a large container and it is then picked up by an
outside waste management company on a weekely basis. This waste is analyzed
for mercury levels. You would be surprised the number of chemicals that
contain mercury. All our other waste (i.e. formalin, EM fixes, etc.) are
collected in containers and picked up weekly as well. I'm surprised that,
being in Alaska, where there have been problems with major spills in the
waters, that they allow formalin to go down the drain. Are you allowed to
throw other chemicals down as well?

Peggy


Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2004 9:34 AM
To: Barbara Murray; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

I don't bother with neutralization or anything; I just collect it in a
jug and hand it over to Rutgers Environmental Health & Safety when they
come to pick up hazardous waste.

Kathleen Roberts
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxicology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University

Barbara Murray wrote:

} Greetings,
} We have been using a solidifier for our formalin, putting it into
biohazard boxes for pickup by the housekeeping dept. We were told by our
Safety Officer that we can now pour it down the drain with lots of running
water.
} For the ones of you who are using formalin, how are you disposing of it?
} Thanks for your replies. Have a great day and weekend!
}
} Barbara A. Murray,HT.(ASCP)
} The Alaska Native Medical Center
} Anchorage, Alaska
}
}
} _______________________________________________
} Histonet mailing list
} Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 10:27:19 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 11:32:47 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Formalin and Uranyl acetate disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom,

I refer you to my general email that I just sent to the group--we cannot
throw anything down the sink. But, especially, uranly acetate, which has a
low level of radioactivity. This is picked up by the radiation safety dept.
I believe they are just storing it until decisions are made as to what waste
site it can be shipped.

Peggy


Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Tom Phillips [mailto:phillipst-at-missouri.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2004 10:06 AM
To: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Picking up on the thread on disposal of formalin, I have a comment plus a
question. My comment is that many Environmental Health & Safety
departments pick up "hazardous waste" and then pour it down the drain with
lots of water. This includes low level radioisotopes. At my university,
we (lab personnel) can not call anything hazardous waste. We can only have
"unwanted used materials". We can not use the word waste on any label. We
had a box labeled "glass waste" on our microtome bench for our old glass
knives and slides and were cited!

Recently we were told they were going to a policy of users disposing uranyl
acetate ( {1%) by pouring it down the drain with lots of water. I was a
little surprised by this. Do other universities follow this policy?

Thanks, Tom




At 09:33 AM 1/16/2004 -0500, you wrote:



} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
---
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 10:40:33 2004



From: Garry Burgess :      GBurgess-at-exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 10:45:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] sperm preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We would like to prepare sperm for examination under EM of cross sections of
the tail to investigate integrity of the cilia, and I have never done this
before. Does anyone have a good simple method that would give a good
result?

Garry Burgess
Charge Technologist
Health Sciences Centre
Winnipeg, Canada


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 12:22:01 2004



From: Leona Cohen-Gould :      lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 13:24:15 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sperm preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary,
I just finished doing a sperm prep. I had the investigator pellet
them (very gently to minimize head-tail separation) and fix the
resultant pellet in my "standard" EM fix (2.5% glut, 4% pfa, 0.02%
picric acid [good for membranes] in 0.1M Na-cacodylate). I processed
the pellet as usual with an osmium postifx, ethanol dehydrations and
i embedded in Spurr's. Very straight forward and we got some lovely
images. You do need to hunt around for good cross sections, but
there are usually so many sperm in the pellet its not too hard.
Lee
--
Leona Cohen-Gould, M.S.
Sr. Staff Associate
Director, Electron Microscopy Core Facility
Manager, Optical Microscopy Core Facility
Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical College
of Cornell University
voice (212)746-6146
fax (212)746-8175


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 12:59:24 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 14:05:11 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: sperm preparation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} We would like to prepare sperm for examination under EM of cross sections of
} the tail to investigate integrity of the cilia, and I have never done this
} before. Does anyone have a good simple method that would give a good
} result?
}
} Garry Burgess
} Charge Technologist
} Health Sciences Centre
} Winnipeg, Canada
Garry,
I have worked with marine animal sperm in the past. An important
piece of information was that we used artificial sea water as the
carrier for the glutaraldehyde instead of a buffer and as the wash
after that. The best pelleted samples were obtained if the tubes were
centrifuged as soon as possible after the primary fixative was added
to the tube.
If the pellet falls apart, centrifuge during each change of solution.
At the time, the top speed of a table top centrifuge was used but a
microfuge should work better. Care should be taken that the pellet is
not thick.
Acetone (Mallinckrodt #2440) was chosen over ethanol because we were
interested in the cytoskeletin and membranes, and wanted to remove a
lot of background substances.

Procedure:
1% glutaraldehyde in sea water [1 part 8% glut from Electron
Microscopy Sciences + 7 parts sea water], room temp. 30 min.
sea water rinse
1% osmium tetroxide in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, on ice + dark, 30 min.
Cold Water rinse X3, 5 min. each
1% UA in water, refrigerator, overnight
Acetone dehydration - 50% to 100% X2, 15 min. each
Propylene Oxide X2, 15 min. each
1:1::Prop.Ox.:Epon 30 min.
Epon 30 min.
Embed in Epon and polymerize.

All times may be extended except the osmium fixation, especially if
actin is of importance.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 13:27:34 2004



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 09:32:54 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Glow discharge of grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

On Fri, 16 Jan 2004, Garber, Charles A. wrote:

} Any idea how long the effect lasts? For us it seemed like the effect did
} not last very long at all. But then again, maybe we did not study the
} phenomenon to the extent you did.


A very good question. I know they are using their grids immediately. The
people who kept their grids on racks under a UV light left the light on
all the time, and used the grids soon after taking them out.

Another client of ours has used bacitracin and protein A (not together) to
help his viruses stick and to increase wettability of Formvar coated grids
with great success. He is no longer here, so I don't have his protocols.

When in desparation (a chronic state around here) I have tried a number of
techniques for making coated grids more hydrophilic. The more successful
ones include dipping a grid in 70-80% ethanol, shaking off the excess, and
then using the grid just as the fluid appears to dry, and I have used a
very dilute solution of PhotoFlo, which worked surprisingly well for the
application at hand and did not leave a visible residue. I have not yet
been desparate enough to try spit!

Caroline Schooley, when at Berkeley, used to have a homemade (I
think) Tesla coil kind of thing that she applied to the outside (I
think) of the bell jar of a vacuum evaporator. I don't remember well
because I was terrified of the thing and usually ran out of the room. I
was very young.

In general, however, I coat a lot of grids on our rare dry day, then keep
them in covered Petri dishes. For Formvar-coated grids, I like them best
at about 2 years old, and for carbon films at 6 months or more. I don't
know why the become more hydrophilic as they age, and I'm guessing it's
some kind of contamination, but I haven't seen anything weird, and they
work well for me.

This is all to keep from having to repair my vacuum evaporator, of
course, but glow discharge is probably the most reliable. My new sputter
coater works, however. Chuck, how about plasma mode? What does that do?

Aloha,
Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 14:56:43 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 16:08:41 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Formalin and Uranyl acetate disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Nope, uranyl acetate is treated as radioactive waste here. I don't know
what they do with it after it leaves here, however.

Kathleen Roberts
Rutgers University

Tom Phillips wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Picking up on the thread on disposal of formalin, I have a comment
} plus a question. My comment is that many Environmental Health &
} Safety departments pick up "hazardous waste" and then pour it down the
} drain with lots of water. This includes low level radioisotopes. At
} my university, we (lab personnel) can not call anything hazardous
} waste. We can only have "unwanted used materials". We can not use
} the word waste on any label. We had a box labeled "glass waste" on
} our microtome bench for our old glass knives and slides and were cited!
}
} Recently we were told they were going to a policy of users disposing
} uranyl acetate ( {1%) by pouring it down the drain with lots of water.
} I was a little surprised by this. Do other universities follow this
} policy?
}
} Thanks, Tom
}
}
}
}
} At 09:33 AM 1/16/2004 -0500, you wrote:
}
}
}
} } ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} }
} } I don't bother with neutralization or anything; I just collect it in
} } a jug and hand it over to Rutgers Environmental Health & Safety when
} } they come to pick up hazardous waste.
} }
} } Kathleen Roberts
} } Principal Lab Technician
} } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } Dept of Pharmacology and Toxicology
} } Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} } Rutgers University
} }
} } Barbara Murray wrote:
} }
} } } Greetings,
} } } We have been using a solidifier for our formalin, putting it into
} } } biohazard boxes for pickup by the housekeeping dept. We were told
} } } by our Safety Officer that we can now pour it down the drain with
} } } lots of running water. For the ones of you who are using formalin,
} } } how are you disposing of it?
} } } Thanks for your replies. Have a great day and weekend!
} } }
} } } Barbara A. Murray,HT.(ASCP)
} } } The Alaska Native Medical Center
} } } Anchorage, Alaska
} } }
} } }
} } } _______________________________________________
} } } Histonet mailing list
} } } Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} } } http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
} } }
} }
} }
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 16:01:28 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 14:06:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Glow discharge of grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tina Carvalho wrote about glow discharge:
}
} Caroline Schooley, when at Berkeley, used to have a homemade (I
} think) Tesla coil kind of thing that she applied to the outside (I
} think) of the bell jar of a vacuum evaporator. I don't remember well
} because I was terrified of the thing and usually ran out of the room. I
} was very young.

Before someone yells at me, let me correct Tina's memory. I used a
physics demonstration-type Tesla coil in firm contact (to avoid ozone
production in the room) with a current feedthrough that led from
below the baseplate into the bell jar. Ran the discharge during the
rough pump part of the automatic pumpdown cycle, about a minute,
until the purple glow inside the bell jar faded. Worked fine; I used
it for years.

Young and terrified? By then you could completely rebuild a
Volkswagen, Tina....!
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 16:33:57 2004



From: Pat Connelly :      psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 17:39:45 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Formalin and Uranyl acetate disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The regulations here have changed many times for UA disposal. It
went to sink, then to Chemical waste, then it was too hot for them,
so it was to go to Radiation safety, but it was not hot enough...
Right now I have given up and have an old, covered, tri-pour beaker
in the corner of my hood with a combination of evaporated UA and
uranyl phosphate (UA+PO4 Buffer)!
Maybe I'll have them put it into my coffin when my time comes!

Pat Connelly
The University of Pennsylvania
Department of Biology
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018
215-898-7145
psconnel-at-sas.upenn.edu


} Nope, uranyl acetate is treated as radioactive waste here. I don't
} know what they do with it after it leaves here, however.
}
} Kathleen Roberts
} Rutgers University
}
} } Picking up on the thread on disposal of formalin, I have a comment
} } plus a question. My comment is that many Environmental Health &
} } Safety departments pick up "hazardous waste" and then pour it down
} } the drain with lots of water. This includes low level
} } radioisotopes. At my university, we (lab personnel) can not call
} } anything hazardous waste. We can only have "unwanted used
} } materials". We can not use the word waste on any label. We had a
} } box labeled "glass waste" on our microtome bench for our old glass
} } knives and slides and were cited!
} }
} } Recently we were told they were going to a policy of users
} } disposing uranyl acetate ( {1%) by pouring it down the drain with
} } lots of water. I was a little surprised by this. Do other
} } universities follow this policy?
} }
} } Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} } Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } 573-882-4712 (office)
} } 573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu

} } } I don't bother with neutralization or anything; I just collect it
} } } in a jug and hand it over to Rutgers Environmental Health & Safety
} } } when they come to pick up hazardous waste.
} } }
} } } Kathleen Roberts
} } } Principal Lab Technician
} } } Neurotoxicology Labs
} } } Dept of Pharmacology and Toxicology
} } } Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
} } } Rutgers University
} } }
} } } Barbara Murray wrote:
} } }
} } } } Greetings,
} } } } We have been using a solidifier for our formalin, putting it into
} } } } biohazard boxes for pickup by the housekeeping dept. We were
} } } } told by our Safety Officer that we can now pour it down the drain
} } } } with lots of running water. For the ones of you who are using
} } } } formalin, how are you disposing of it?
} } } } Thanks for your replies. Have a great day and weekend!
} } } }
} } } } Barbara A. Murray,HT.(ASCP)
} } } } The Alaska Native Medical Center
} } } } Anchorage, Alaska
} } } } _______________________________________________
} } } } Histonet mailing list
} } } } Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} } http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 18:31:28 2004



From: echeung-at-eyetk.com (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 18:36:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: nanogold labeling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (echeung-at-eyetk.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Friday, January 16, 2004 at 13:40:06
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: echeung-at-eyetk.com
Name: Eunice Cheung

Organization: Eyetech

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Has anyone had success with using nanogold labeling in
whole-mount preparations? What did you use to improve contrast of
cellular structure without using osium tetraoxide?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 16 18:37:42 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 16:44:13 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Formalin and Uranyl acetate disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 16, 2004, at 7:06 AM, Tom Phillips wrote:

} Recently we were told they were going to a policy of users disposing
} uranyl acetate ( {1%) by pouring it down the drain with lots of water.
} I was a little surprised by this. Do other universities follow this
} policy?
}
Dear Tom,
There are different laws in different states, so where you live
determines what is possible. Within those limits, your safety office
may impose more stringent conditions. Disposal of low-level
radioactive waste--oops, spent materials--is expensive, so many
institutions allow only the least costly option.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 17 19:01:42 2004



From: gbarclay-at-fans.uwi.tt (by way of Ask-A-Microscopist)
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2004 19:07:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist:replacement for Permount

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (gbarclay-at-fans.uwi.tt) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Saturday,
January 17, 2004 at 11:26:01
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: gbarclay-at-fans.uwi.tt
Name: Greg Barclay

Organization: University of the West Indies

Education: Graduate College

Location: St. Augustine, Trinidad, West Indies

Question: Permount is what we have been using forever and we are now
looking for a slide mountant that dries faster. I would appreciate
any suggestions.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 18 19:49:07 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2004 17:57:29 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Osmium specimen coater options

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all:

I am considering trying to budget for an
Osmium-based specimen coater to augment (not replace)
my Denton Desk II Au/Pd and Pt coater. There
are some specimens that are going to be taken
at high mag (250KX-450KX) and should not show
coating artifacts (major or minor). The Os
coater looks like a good option. Cr is out
due to short life span based on rapid oxidation.
Is the same true for Os?

I would appreciate feedback from Os coater users
and suppliers. Off-list of course.

tnx,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 18 23:03:46 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 00:12:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM Prep: Stability of osmium coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gary Gaugler wrote:
=======================================================
I am considering trying to budget for an Osmium-based specimen coater to
augment (not replace) my Denton Desk II Au/Pd and Pt coater. There are some
specimens that are going to be taken at high mag (250KX-450KX) and should
not show coating artifacts (major or minor). The Os coater looks like a
good option. Cr is out due to short life span based on rapid oxidation. Is
the same true for Os?

I would appreciate feedback from Os coater users and suppliers. Off-list of
course.
=========================================================
Osmium is a precious group metal and therefore it has essentially the
intertness of gold, platinum, etc. It is a pretty permanent coating, and
could be expected to have a life time comparable to what one would expect
for gold.

We are often times asked if there is any danger that it could convert to the
tetroxide (and then sublime and disappear). From a practical standpoint,
absolutely not. Of course, if you exposed the coating to a strong oxidizer,
perhaps sodium iodide, the metallic osmium could be oxidized back up to the
dioxide and then the tetroxide and then there would be a dangerous condition
but most of us don't expose our coated SEM samples to strong oxidizers......

From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 18 23:26:04 2004



From: Garber, Charles A. :      cgarber-at-2spi.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 00:34:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM Prep: Stability of osmium coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

-- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --

Gary Gaugler wrote:
=======================================================
I am considering trying to budget for an Osmium-based specimen coater to
augment (not replace) my Denton Desk II Au/Pd and Pt coater. There are some
specimens that are going to be taken at high mag (250KX-450KX) and should
not show coating artifacts (major or minor). The Os coater looks like a
good option. Cr is out due to short life span based on rapid oxidation. Is
the same true for Os?

I would appreciate feedback from Os coater users and suppliers. Off-list of
course.
=========================================================
Osmium is a precious group metal and therefore it has essentially the
intertness of gold, platinum, etc. It is a pretty permanent coating, and
could be expected to have a life time comparable to what one would expect
for gold.

We are often times asked if there is any danger that it could convert to the
tetroxide (and then sublime and disappear). From a practical standpoint,
absolutely not. Of course, if you exposed the coating to a strong oxidizer,
perhaps sodium iodide, the metallic osmium could be oxidized back up to the
dioxide and then the tetroxide and then there would be a dangerous condition
but most of us don't expose our coated SEM samples to strong oxidizers!

Chuck

============================================

Charles A. Garber, Ph. D. Ph: 1-610-436-5400
President 1-800-2424-SPI
SPI SUPPLIES FAX: 1-610-436-5755
PO BOX 656 e-mail:cgarber-at-2spi.com
West Chester, PA 19381-0656 USA
Cust.Service: spi2spi-at-2spi.com

Look for us!
########################
WWW: http://www.2spi.com
########################
============================================




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 18 23:54:39 2004



From: Lyn Waterhouse :      lyn.waterhouse-at-adelaide.edu.au
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:32:59 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM preparation of coral samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all,
We are currently working with a student who is interested in corals and
possible virus associations within them. Fo course, problems arise when
trying to process and section the samples, which contain both normal
soft biological tissue and the hard calcified material. Could anyone
please suggest a method to decalcify them without doing too much damage
to the ultrastructure? Should a decalcification step be done on fresh or
fixed tissue? The samples we have to work with now are fixed. Any
suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks.

Lyn Waterhouse
Adelaide Microscopy
University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA 5005
Ph: (08) 8303 4074 or 8303 5855
Fax: (08) 8303 4356
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/microscopy


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 01:22:17 2004



From: Evelyn Kaplan :      ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 11:34:51 +0400
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM preparation of coral samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

hello,

The best decalcifier to use on biological samples is actually a chelating
agent; EDTA ethylene-diaminetetracetic acid. It does not act like a normal
acid but binds metallic ions, especially calcium and magnesium. It works
better at at pH 7-8 and can be used as an aqueous solution or mixed with
formaldehyde.It takes longer than the usual decalcifiers such as acids but
the results are very good. Dense cortical bone takes about 6-8 weeks to
decalcify. If you have x-ray facilities you can monitor the process well.
Decalcification must be done on well fixed material otherwise the
decalcifier will macerate the biological matter, particularly the nucleic
acids.

Regards,
Evelyn Kaplan,
Dept of Pathology,
College of Medicine and Health Sciences,
Sultan Qaboos University,
Oman

-----Original Message-----
} From: Lyn Waterhouse [mailto:lyn.waterhouse-at-adelaide.edu.au]
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2004 10:03 AM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Hello all,
We are currently working with a student who is interested in corals and
possible virus associations within them. Fo course, problems arise when
trying to process and section the samples, which contain both normal
soft biological tissue and the hard calcified material. Could anyone
please suggest a method to decalcify them without doing too much damage
to the ultrastructure? Should a decalcification step be done on fresh or
fixed tissue? The samples we have to work with now are fixed. Any
suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks.

Lyn Waterhouse
Adelaide Microscopy
University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA 5005
Ph: (08) 8303 4074 or 8303 5855
Fax: (08) 8303 4356
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/microscopy




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 02:21:36 2004



From: Peter Van Osta :      pvosta-at-unionbio-eu.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 10:29:54 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: nanogold labeling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Eunice,

Marc Moeremans, who recently joined us, was one of the scientists
involved in the development of the Nanovid microscopy technique at
Janssen Pharmaceutics (Beerse, Belgium), which involved immunogold staining.

I forward your question to him, maybe he can help ?

Best regards,

Peter Van Osta

Union Biometrica N.V./S.A.
European Scientific Operations (ESO)
Cipalstraat 3
B-2440 Geel
Belgium
Tel.: +32 (0)14 570 620
Fax.: +32 (0)14 570 621

http://www.unionbio-eu.com/

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/pvosta/cvwww.htm

===========================================
by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (echeung-at-eyetk.com) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
} Friday, January 16, 2004 at 13:40:06
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Email: echeung-at-eyetk.com
} Name: Eunice Cheung
}
} Organization: Eyetech
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Has anyone had success with using nanogold labeling in
} whole-mount preparations? What did you use to improve contrast of
} cellular structure without using osium tetraoxide?
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 05:15:26 2004



From: Peter van de Plas :      p.vandeplas-at-aurion.nl
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 12:21:43 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: nanogold labeling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Eunice,

Wonderful results on pre-embedding labeling vibratome sections of brain
tissue have been described by Yi et al., (2001) J. Histochem. Cytochem.
49(3), 279-283. F(ab')2 and single Fab fragments coupled to ultra-small
gold particles were used to immunolabel different intra cellular
antigens. The detection of MGP-160, a golgi marker localized within the
lumen demonstrates the potential of these ultra-small gold conjugates.
Hong Yi uses osmium tetroxide to reveal morphological detail. She uses
osmium after silver enhancing the ultra-small gold particles.

Similar protocols are used for whole mount preparations. A few examples:
Briane et al; (2002) J. Histochem. Cytochem. 50(7), 983-991
Verbeek et al; (2002) J. Histochem. Cytochem. 50(5), 681-690.

More pre-embedding labeling protocols you can find in Aurion newsletter
nr.5
Please contact me in case you need additional technical information.

Kind regards,

Peter

On Saturday, January 17, 2004, at 01:36 AM, by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec
wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (echeung-at-eyetk.com) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
} Friday, January 16, 2004 at 13:40:06
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
} Email: echeung-at-eyetk.com
} Name: Eunice Cheung
}
} Organization: Eyetech
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Has anyone had success with using nanogold labeling in
} whole-mount preparations? What did you use to improve contrast of
} cellular structure without using osium tetraoxide?
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
}
}
-----------
Peter van de Plas
Aurion
Costerweg 5
6702 AA Wageningen
The Netherlands
Phone: +31 317 497676
Fax: +31 317 415955



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 07:01:46 2004



From: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 08:09:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 07:27:39 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 08:14:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


It seems to me.....
Sandstone is an agglomeration of chiefly quartz in a matrix of carbonates
and iron oxides. Concrete can have sand and small rocks or pebbles, but
the assuming the concrete has reacted or set, it should be loaded with a
variety of high refractive index (greater than 1.660 - which tells you
where I got my training) particles. It the material is not cured or set
up, you should be able to find high refractive index particles of calcium
oxide which isn't found in sandstone.

Best wishes..............

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 08:05:00 2004



From: ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 09:13:17 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 09:10:26 2004



From: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 10:18:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also present.

A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.

Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles in
the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.

I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
neither sample is sandstone.





ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
rmid.com To: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs.
AM sandstone








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Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








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One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 09:33:16 2004



From: Chris Salter :      chris.salter-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:49:38 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ed and Chris,

The difference between sandstones and concretes is usually fairly
obvious in a polished thin section viewed under plain and crossed
polars. The Atlas of sedimentary rocks under the microscope (Adams,
MacKenzie and Guilford, 1984, Longmans) gives examples of the commonest
types of sedimentary rock.
A sandstone is composed of two components the clasts (sand/rock) and the
cement (sorry that is the term the geologists use). Either of these
components may contain calcium bearing minerals, so the simple presence
of a signficiant calcium peak in an EDX spectra may not necessarily
prove that the material is a concrete. However, the cement of concrete
will not normally show visible crystallinity in the optical microscope
whereas many sandstones will. It also allows you to identify the clasts
and their size so distinguish between mortar and concrete (if samples is
large enough to include representative clasts).

ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
} have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
} start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
} with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
} your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
} higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
} cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
} want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
} positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
} analyze their products. Hope this helps.
}
} The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
} three materials. ED
}
} Ed Komarnicki
} Sr. Analytical Chemist
} MacDermid Inc.
}
}
}
}
}
} holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
} 01/19/04 08:09 AM
}
} To
} Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} cc
}
} Subject
} SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} One and all,
}
} I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
} concrete,
} sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
} mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
} and
} contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
} test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
} gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.
}
} Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
} with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
} based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
} what to read or how to make this kind of determination.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Chris Holp
} FirstEnergy Corp.
} Beta Labs
} HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} The information contained in this message is intended only for the
} personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
} reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
} responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
} notified that you have received this document in error and that any
} review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
} strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
} please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.
}
}
}
}
}
}


--
Chris Salter,
Oxford Materials Characterisation Service,
Oxford University Begbroke Science Park,
Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Oxford, OX5 1PF
Tel 01865 283722, EPMA 283741, Mobile 07776031608



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 10:05:44 2004



From: ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 11:14:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

"Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. ..." Well
that doesn't narrow it down any. According to my limited resource; cement
would have } 3x more Ca than Si; and in sandstone the ratio of Si to Ca is
expected to be much greater than double (what you have). I would guess
that neither sample is sandstone.

Perhaps a geologist could guide you further. ED



holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 10:18 AM

To
ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
cc
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
Subject
Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








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You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also
present.

A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.

Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles
in
the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.

I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
neither sample is sandstone.





ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
rmid.com To: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete
vs.
AM sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.










-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
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strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 12:21:16 2004



From: Gary Laevsky :      laevsky-at-scripps.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 10:28:00 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] virus from me, sorry

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

you are all probably getting a virus from me. it is spreading through
scripps. don't open it. delete it.

have a nice day!

gary








Gary S. Laevsky, Ph.D.
Research Associate
The Scripps Research Institute
10550 N. Torrey Pines Road/IMM-24
La Jolla, CA 92037
(858) 784-9372




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 14:30:26 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:38:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM preparation of coral samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopists

EDTA decalcification can be carried out on well-fixed specimens,
including corals, in a laboratory (tempreature-controlled) microwave
in a fraction of the time needed on the bench at room temperature.
Stirring during the process is important to keep fresh decalcifying
agent at the specimen at all times.

best regards,
Steven Slap


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 15:23:41 2004



From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconn.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:31:43 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] mounting media

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Two questions:
1. I was looking up the density of glycerol on the web and several sites gave it as 1.26 and several as 1.476. I had presumed the higher number but what is the other referring to?
2. In making a Mowiol mounting media as described in previous posts, I noted that the final glycerol concentration is only about 20% which is much lower than I am used to doing and seems a poor match in refractive index for oil. Does the Mowiol raise the refractive index to nearer the desired level? Thanks-Dave
--

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
91 N. Eagleville Rd. U-3125
Storrs, CT 06269-3125
knecht-at-uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 15:49:51 2004



From: William J Mushock :      wim5-at-lehigh.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:58:11 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

JEOL vacuum systems are normally set to allow the filament to be turned
on at 5X10-4 torr but, I personally don't recommend turning the gun on
at this point, unless you are in a real hurry to get something done.
Waiting 10-15 minutes after achieving a vacuum ready condition should
get you in the high 10-5 torr range which would be more acceptable and
extend filament life. Running at poor vacuum will also contaminate your
column and apertures sooner which may contribute to your down time.

Taking several hours to get to 5X10-6 torr is pretty normal. Using a
nitrogen back fill and a LN trap on the DP might help speed things up.

Good Luck,
Bill

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-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cavinm-at-vsl.cua.edu
Name: Cavin Mooers

Organization: Vitreous State Lab

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten
Filament

Question: We are currently experiencing vacuum
issues which are causing tungsten oxide growth
and premature failure of the filament while
operating our JEOL 5900. One of the JEOL
technicians has suggested that 5x10-4 torr is
acceptable, but I find this hard to believe. The
issue we are dealing with is extraordinarily slow
pumping times -- 1 hour to obtain 3x10-5 torr and
a max vacuum of 5x10-6 torr after 3-4 hours. We
are a high volume lab, and so I wish to know what
the minimum vacuum I need without seriously
diminishing filament life, in order to maximize
the workload.

Sincerely,

Cavin T. F. Mooers
EM Facility Manager
Vitreous State Laboratory
The Catholic University of America
Hannan Hall ñ Rm 433
Washington, D.C. 20064
(202) 319-6237 (Office)
(202) 319-5346 (Lab)
(202) 319-4469 (Fax)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 17:00:26 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:08:48 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Osmium specimen coater options

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks for the reply.

No, I had not considered Ir. My basic problem is
that I am getting more specimens that have Pt, W,
Ta, Si, O, N, Mo, and C (not necessarily all of these
elements at the same time!). A typical problem is
a Au/Pd coated specimen that has large or small amounts
of Pt. Sputter coating with Pt would not be smart,
so I use Au/Pd. However, the Pt, when trace or thin,
is right next to Au Z-wise. And my 50-70A Au/Pd coating
shows up about the height in EDS as does the Pt.

The EDAX Genesis "knows" that it is there via the HPD
sanity check. I was thinking of using Os to get further
Z distance from the Pt and also from W. The pile up
convolution is at the M alpha series for Pt and Au.
This can be overcome by increasing KV to 20KV rather
than the 10-15KV I usually use. But the specimens
sometimes don't like the higher KV and volumetric
interaction also can be an issue. So I figured that
if I could keep in the M alpha region and put more
Z distance between elements, that would be a good move.

I looked at the Emitech you suggested. It is a monster
unit! All I need is a small desktop unit for pin stubs.
That drew me to the Os unit. But, are you indicating that
Os coated specimens will oxidize similar to Cr coating?
Not good. perhaps there is no one good answer.

gary g.


At 12:31 PM 1/19/2004, you wrote:
} Gary: have you considered Iridium coating? Ir is a noble metal so no
} oxidation
} will happen. It's also less worrisome than Os tetroxide if you're not used to
} using it. One of my labs uses it and has found no noticeable artifacts at
} 500KX
} SEM. They use Ir foil in an ion-beam sputtering unit and also have an Ir
} target in
} an Emitech sputter coater (http://www.empdirect.com/k675.html). I think
} Ted Pella
} also has an Ir option.
}
} Gary Gaugler wrote:
}
} } --
} }
} } Hello all:
} }
} } I am considering trying to budget for an
} } Osmium-based specimen coater to augment (not replace)
} } my Denton Desk II Au/Pd and Pt coater. There
} } are some specimens that are going to be taken
} } at high mag (250KX-450KX) and should not show
} } coating artifacts (major or minor). The Os
} } coater looks like a good option. Cr is out
} } due to short life span based on rapid oxidation.
} } Is the same true for Os?
} }
} } I would appreciate feedback from Os coater users
} } and suppliers. Off-list of course.
} }
} } tnx,
} } gary g.
}
} --
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
} 972-995-2360
} 972-648-8743 (pager)
} SC Packaging FA Development
} Texas Instruments, Inc.
} Dallas, TX
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 18:30:38 2004



From: JOSE SANCLEMENT :      jsanclement-at-yahoo.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:38:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: Ruthenium red stain

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
I would like to stain Biofilm polysaccharide on human
specimens with Ruthenium red. How should I get my
specimens ready for SEM? dehydration process before or
after the stain? 0.05% Ruthenium red in gluteraldehyde
or Formalin? what should I expect to look for under
SEM? any interferences or false positives with human
substances? Appreciate any input. Thanks, Jose

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes
http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 19 19:55:52 2004



From: Microscopy Book Series :      micro-at-formatex.org
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 03:01:20 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] CALL FOR CHAPTERS for Multidisciplinary Microscopy book

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleague,

Formatex, a Spanish Research Center, in association with Kluwer Academic
Publishers, is now preparing the Second number of the Formatex Microscopy
book series, with the preliminary title of "Current Issues in
Multidisciplinary Microscopy Research and Education". You can see the
contents of the first number published in 2003 in
http://www.formatex.org/micro2002/callforpaper.htm

Website of the 2004 edition is
http://www.formatex.org/micro2003/callforpaper2.htm

This second number of the series is committed to giving an overview of the
state of the art as well as upcoming trends, and to promoting discussion
about scientific, technological and educational aspects of Microscopy in
both the biological/biomedical and physical/chemical sciences. Although all
types of papers are a priori accepted (research articles, reviews, case
studies, etc.), priority will be given to those which clearly emphasize the
scientific/technological/pedagogical results, as well as those making
comparative discussions of two or more microscopy techniques or showing the
complementarity of microscopy techniques with other techniques. For this
second number, "educationally-oriented" and mini-review papers are
specially welcome, although also "regular" research papers are accepted.

If you are interested in participating in this edition submitting a
(technical, scientific, educational, introductory...) chapter related to
microscopy, please see the website for details.

As you may see from the Call for Papers' website, the deadline for chapter
submission is MARCH 15TH. Early submission of a short abstract of your
chapter proposal is appreciated in order to allow potencial authors to know
what other authors will write about for the book and avoid contents
duplications.

We hope that you find this new approach to microscopy issues interesting
and we hope to hear from you/your team for this and/or future editions.

If you any enquiry or suggestion about this volume, please contact us.

Best wishes from Spain.

José Antonio Mesa Gonzalez
Editorial Assistant
Formatex Research Center
C / Encarnacion, 3 1ºE
06001 Badajoz
SPAIN
Phone/Fax: +34 924258615
Email: micro-at-formatex.org



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 02:10:27 2004



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-INMAT.PW.EDU.PL
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 09:18:48 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello:

Many month ago I have asked for advise regarding a problem with
LaB6 filament. Well, finally we decided to switch for W filament.
So, the W filament is working in vacuum proper for LaB6 one (ion
pump). Now is almost one year (maybe 10 month) and still is working.

Talking about LaB6 problem, during this time we have been observing
behaviour of our microscope and it seems that the problem with LaB6
was caused be emergancy shut down of high voltage which was caused
probably by wrong signal from dirty Penning gauge. This shut
down caused a deposition of a layer (prabably LaB6) on the outside
surface of Whenelt cup and this was our problem.

Best regards,

Witold Zielinski







* Date sent: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 16:58:11 -0500
*From: William J Mushock {wim5-at-lehigh.edu}
*Organization: Lehigh University
*To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
*Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM: Minimum Vacuum for Tungsten Filament

*
*
*------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Witold Zielinski, Ph.D.
Warsaw University of Technology
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
02-507 Warszawa, Woloska 141
POLAND

phone #: /48 22/ 660 87 07
660 87 36
fax #: /48 22/ 848 48 75

email: wiziel-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 05:09:59 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 07:48:08 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Chris Holp write ...

} I have been given two samples and asked to determine
} if they are concrete, sandstone, or some mix.
} One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
} mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight
} rust/red hue and contains appreciably more calcium.
} ...

Natural and sedimentary sandstone is likely to run a gamut in composition of
clasts and cement (the glue between the grains). One the other hand, I
should think concrete would be predominantly calcium sulphate (Portland
Cement), but containing clasts from a natural source.

hth & cheerios ... shAf :o)
Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
www.micro-investigations.com (in progress)




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 08:05:49 2004



From: Amy Ross :      aross-at-lanl.gov
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 07:16:44 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM - diffraction analysis and image simulation programs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear all,

I not been working with TEM diffraction or image simulations programs for a
few years now and am wondering what programs are now available and widely
used. I do not know which operating system I will be using for the
analysis, so any advice will be appreciated.

Thank you for your help.
Amy

Amy R. Ross
Los Alamos National Laboratory



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 09:44:12 2004



From: michael shaffer :      michael-at-shaffer.net
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 12:22:20 -0330
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: RE: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I stand corrected! ... {g} ...

} -----Original Message-----
} From: Chris Salter
} Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2004 11:11 AM
} To: michael shaffer
}
} No. The mechanism the setting of hydraulic cements (those based on
} Portland cement) have nothing to do with Calicum Sulphate. They work on
} the hydration of CaAlSilicates - fine tubules grow out from each cement
} grain and mesh with those from surrounding grains to give the initial
} set, thereafter various other chemical changes occur strengthen the
} bonds. The aluminium is essential for thise mechanism to work.
} Plasters work by the mechanism you are thinking of, but
} plaster is far
} weaker than cement or lime mortarand plaster is water soluble.
}
} } Thanx for the clarification ... but isn't the primary process for the
} } hardening of cement the cystallization of CaSO4, i.e.:
} }
} } CaSO4 (powder) + water =} CaSO4(H2O)n (??)
} }
} } cheerios ... shAf :o)
} } Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland
} } www.micro-investigations.com
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
}
} --
} Chris Salter,
} Oxford Materials Characterisation Service,
} Oxford University Begbroke Science Park,
} Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Oxford, OX5 1PF
} Tel 01865 283722, EPMA 283741, Mobile 07776031608
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 10:28:34 2004



From: Stefan Gunnarsson :      Stefan.Gunnarsson-at-ebc.uu.se
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 17:38:36 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM with STEM-detector on FEG-SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

We are just in the process of buying a FEG-SEM and have been tempted
by the vendors to add a STEM-detector to use for TEM imaging of normal
tissue sections up to around 40 - 50 kX. This would mean that we could
skip our old (17 years) TEM, which would save us money and trouble.
I would be very happy for some input from the list on a few issues
around this.
Is it a good idea to replace a 'proper' TEM with a STEM-detector? What
are the limitations with such a setup?
The FEG-SEM will run at max 30kV, which will obviously put a limitation
to the resolution, but the images we have seen (of our own samples) do
not seem to suffer as much as we had expected. Indeed, one of the
companies even did the test images at 10 kV, saying that it was the
'best' setting for that kind of images. How is the imaging actually
done?

thanks for any views,
Stefan
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dr Stefan Gunnarsson
Evolutionsbiologiskt Centrum Evolutionary Biology Centre
Enheten för biologisk strukturanalys Microscopy and Imaging Unit
Norbyvägen 18A
SE75236 Uppsala, Sweden Tel & Fax: +46 - 18471 2638
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 11:31:14 2004



From: James Talbot :      james-at-ktgeo.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 12:12:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Stefan,

I am also very interested in the development of this area and seeking to
broaden my knowledge. I believe there are some interesting opportunities
for SEM-Based STEM in biological applications. However, the utility is yet
to be proven (at least I am not aware of a large number of results). So, I
would strongly suggest you obtain results on your samples. I don't believe
you can say the 30kV SEM-based STEM will replace a quality cryo TEM. But I
believe there are some interesting possibilities that need to be explored.

Currently, biological EM imaging does not present challenges in terms of
resolution, but rather in terms of contrast and beam induced damage. A low
voltage SEM-based STEM image will provide relatively high contrast due to
the low voltage. I am aware of some very promising results on biological
materials that even challenge zero loss imaging in terms of contrast. A
sufficiently high angle STEM will also eliminate diffaction contrast, which
is more ideal for tomographic applications (may not be an issue for your
samples).

STEM mode on a SEM-based STEM also provides the best resolution mode on the
tool. You should be able to achieve subnanometer resolution. The effect of
beam broadening, etc., on your particular sample may degrade that ideal
performance specification.

The question remaining (to me) is what exactly can be achieved with a 30kV
system and what is the beam damage? I assume you'd have a cryo transfer
type system. Again, I believe the best option is to see some results on
your samples.

I'd be very intersted in your final assessment. Good luck.

Regards,
Ed


----- Original Message -----
} From: "Stefan Gunnarsson" {Stefan.Gunnarsson-at-ebc.uu.se}
To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2004 8:38 AM

Chris-

Based on your chemical data neither sample looks like a sandstone to me. A
sandstone typically contains a lot of quartz (SiO2), and also contains
other minerals such as feldspar, calcite, pyrite and clay minerals. I
would expect a lot more aluminum to combine with the Ca and Si to make
feldspar and/or clay minerals. Calcite (CaCO3) is a typical mineral that
binds the particles in a sandstone (we geologists call this a "cement") and
I do not see any Carbon in either analysis. Can you detect carbon with
your instrument or not?

Another method you can use to determine the mineralogy of your samples is
XRD (X-ray Diffraction). Yes, this is what I do but you need to use the
right tool for the job. It does not matter to me if you use me or another
lab. XRD will help you get the answer a lot quicker and with a lot more
certainty.

Contact me off list if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
James Talbot

K/T GeoServices, Inc.
Bulk and Clay Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction
www.ktgeo.com
(940) 597-9076

At 10:18 AM 1/19/04 -0500, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 12:34:17 2004



From: Larry Ackerman :      ackerman-at-msg.ucsf.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 10:42:52 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Sylguard supplier?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You can find distributors for Dow Corning products on
their website.
http://www.dowcorning.com

Choose youre product and that page will have an option to
search for local suppliers. We use Sylgard 184 to make
dissecting surfaces for biological samples.

On Thu, 15 Jan 2004 16:27:37 -0600
Philip Oshel {peoshel-at-wisc.edu} wrote:
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America

Larry Ackerman
Keck Advanced Microscopy Lab
Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics
University of California San Francisco
600-16th Street, Room S101, Box 2140
San Francisco, CA 94158 (for postal mail use 94143)

415-476-4441 FAX 415-514-4142


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 16:18:39 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 16:26:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I agree with James Talbot's opinion that X-ray diffraction would probably
give a definitive answer quite quickly. I think you might be able to get a
pretty good idea by taking spot analyses or an x-ray map of your two
samples. (It is what I do - on concrete.) Concrete or mortar is such a
heterogeneous mess that I would not get much out of an overall analysis.
However, if I can probe the cement paste and find Ca and Si and O, I can
suppose it to be Portland cement. There might also be unreacted cement
grains. You should also find substantial amounts of fine aggregate (i.e.,
sand) used to make the mortar. Those could be of most any composition, and
often are. I see calcite, quartz, feldspars and more. Because cement and
concrete are such hodge-podge mixtures, I often choose to do an x-ray map
rather than to probe every point in the image by hand.

But back to x-ray diffraction, even if you can get chemistry from the SEM,
you may still want to use XRD for a more definitive answer about the phases
present. I use an SEM to solve a lot of problems, but it has its
limitations. There is no substitute for diffraction or thermal analysis or
FTIR if the samples require it.

Warren

At 09:18 AM 1/19/2004, you wrote:

} You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
} I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
} the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
} Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
} Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also present.
}
} A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
} fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.
}
} Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
} contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
} light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles in
} the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
} be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.
}
} I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
} neither sample is sandstone.

-------------------------------------------
No files should be attached to this message
-------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
Materials Analysis and Research Lab
Iowa State University
46 Town Engineering
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Web: www.marl.iastate.edu

Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of materials
Computer applications and networking



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 17:18:54 2004



From: ekomarnicki-at-macdermid.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 11:14:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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"Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. ..." Well
that doesn't narrow it down any. According to my limited resource; cement
would have } 3x more Ca than Si; and in sandstone the ratio of Si to Ca is
expected to be much greater than double (what you have). I would guess
that neither sample is sandstone.

Perhaps a geologist could guide you further. ED



holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 10:18 AM

To
ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com
cc
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
Subject
Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also
present.

A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.

Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles
in
the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.

I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
neither sample is sandstone.





ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
rmid.com To: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete
vs.
AM sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



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-----------------------------------------
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 19:19:47 2004



From: hitesh.jain-at-brocku.ca (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 19:28:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Applications for a wide field of view confocal microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: hitesh.jain-at-brocku.ca
Name: Hitesh Jain

Organization: Brock University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Applications for a wide
field of view confocal microscope

Question: Hello All,

We are assessing applications for a new type of
confocal microscope. The microscope is like a
confocal scanning laser microscope, but with ten
times the field of view (at the same resolution).

The instrument can be used to image large
samples, with a field of view of 1cm at submicron
resolution. The instrument can be used in room
light and can be highly automated. One of the
applications for this microscope is to image
tissue samples. In this application, some
advantages include:

Images entire biopsy specimens in a single scan (no tiling)
Fast scanning ñ scans 10mmX10mm -at- 2 micron in 2 minutes
Simultaneous acquisition of 2-fluorophores
Scan area is 70mm x 22mm

We are compiling a list of potential applications
for this technology (in any sector). Can you
think of any specific applications for this
technology where the large field of view and
submicron resolution would be of particular use?


Thank you very much for your time and help,
Best wishes

Hitesh Jain, B.Sc., M.F.C
Senior Research Analyst
VISTA - The Canadian Centre for Science and Technology Solutions
Brock University



---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 19:52:39 2004



From: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 10:18:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also present.

A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.

Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles in
the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.

I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
neither sample is sandstone.





ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
rmid.com To: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs.
AM sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.










-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 20 21:17:50 2004



From: Gordon Nord :      gnord-at-mindspring.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 22:26:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am intrigued by the similarity between your problem and a similar
problem confronting the Mars Rover scientists.
They are hoping that the landing site is a lake bed and are looking for
textures indicative of a sedimentary rock type, such as sandstone. All
they have is an optical microscope, an alpha-particle x-ray
spectrometer and an extraterrestrial grinder to make a flat surface
similar to your tools but significantly more expensive.

Sandstone is defined by texture: grain size, shape and sorting, not
chemistry.
Probably the last instrument a sedimentary petrologist would use is EDS
to define the rock type.
Look for rounded grains of quartz in a size range from 0.06 mm to 2.0
mm comprising most of the sample.
Larger than that is gravel, smaller is mud.

If you can't see the grains in a hand lens or binocular microscope you
may have a sediment with smaller grain size
such as a siltstone or mudstone or perhaps cement but not sandstone.

Your best bet is examining the texture in a petrographic thin section -
are these still made or am I too old.

Dr. Gordon Nord
Senior Scientist
Center for Applied Studies of the Environment
The Graduate School and University Center
City University of New York
365 Fifth Avenue
NY NY 10016-4309


On Monday, January 19, 2004, at 10:18 AM, holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
wrote:

}
}
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} America
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} America
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} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
}
} You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job.
} While
} I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary
} of
} the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
} Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also
} present.
} Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also
} present.
}
} A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to
} get a
} fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.
}
} Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither
} sample
} contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
} light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the
} particles in
} the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which
} could
} be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.
}
} I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
} neither sample is sandstone.
}
}
}
}
}
} ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
} rmid.com To:
} holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
} cc:
} Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} 01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy]
} Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs.
} AM sandstone
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
}
} Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
} have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably
} should
} start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
} with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having
} EDS at
} your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would
} expect
} higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
} cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may
} also
} want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples
} for
} positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how
} they
} analyze their products. Hope this helps.
}
} The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
} three materials. ED
}
} Ed Komarnicki
} Sr. Analytical Chemist
} MacDermid Inc.
}
}
}
}
}
} holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
} 01/19/04 08:09 AM
}
} To
} Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} cc
}
} Subject
} SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
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}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
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} One and all,
}
} I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
} concrete,
} sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
} mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
} and
} contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and
} both
} test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the
} light
} gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.
}
} Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete,
} coupled
} with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a
} conclusion
} based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions
} about
} what to read or how to make this kind of determination.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Chris Holp
} FirstEnergy Corp.
} Beta Labs
} HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} The information contained in this message is intended only for the
} personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
} reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
} responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
} notified that you have received this document in error and that any
} review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
} strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
} please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} The information contained in this message is intended only for the
} personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
} reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
} responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are
} hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that
} any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
} strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
} please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 04:53:33 2004



From: Evelyn Kaplan :      ekaplan-at-squ.edu.om
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 15:57:13 +0400
Subject: [Microscopy] invitation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Stefan

I think you would really need to compare pictures from the same or similar samples. Ideally you would also need to see the process of producing images on the STEM because I suspect time and convenience for routine specimens would also be important.

I use a fairly old (} 10 years) Hitachi H7000 TEM with STEM and SEM facilities and it always takes longer to achieve a good STEM image than a TEM image. The STEM is useful for thick, low contrast specimens or x-ray analysis but for routine specimens the TEM will always be quicker and more convenient. Other issues may include whether it will take longer to train other users or more supervision would be needed with the STEM than with a TEM.

It may well be that modern SEM/STEM combinations are much improved (certainly resolution for a FEG should be much better) but it's worth considering how practical the STEM will be for routine TEM specimens. This will be greatly affected by the number and type of routine TEM specimens you handle.

I hope this helps.

Malcolm


Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
Chemispec
School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences
Fleming Building
University of Sunderland
Tyne & Wear
SR1 3SD
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk



----- Original Message -----
} From: principe {eprincipe01-at-hotmail.com}




INVITATION

(1st Announcement)



College of Medicine & Health Sciences

Pathology Department

Electron Microscopy Unit



In collaboration with

Center for Community Service & Continuing Education



Invites you to attend



“OMAN FIRST ELECTRON MICROSCOPY WORKSHOP”

March 6 – 9, 2004



Venue: Lecture Theater 1, Sultan Qaboos University



Opening Ceremony: Saturday March 6 2004 at 9:00 a.m.





Tentative Program Schedule:



Day (1) Saturday, 6 March 2004



8:00-9:00 Registration, Coffee

9:00-9:45 Opening Ceremony

9:45-10:00 Break

10:00-11:00 Lecture

11:00-12:00 Lecture

12:00-12:30 Tour around EM Lab

12:30-14:00 Lunch

13:00-17:30 Sample preparation for TEM



Day (2) Sunday, 7 March 2004



8:30-9:30 Lecture

9:30-10:30 Lecture

10:30-11:00 Break / Exhibition

11:00-12:00 Lecture

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-17:00 Sample preparation for SEM



19:00- 21:00 Workshop Dinner



Day (3) Monday, 8 March 2004



8:30-9:30 Lecture

9:30-10:30 Lecture

10:30-11:00 Break / Exhibition

11:00-12:00 Lecture

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-17:00 Operation & Maintenance of Electron Microscopes



Day (4) Tuesday, 9 March 2004



8:30-9:30 Lecture

9:30-10:30 Lecture

10:30-11:00 Break / Exhibition

11:00-14:00 Operation & Maintenance of Electron Microscopes

14:00-15:00 Lunch

17:00-21:00 Tour - Muscat area





For registration and full details about the workshop please visit our web
site address:



http://www.squ.edu.om/med/NEWS/med/index.htm







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 08:03:34 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:38:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM preparation of coral samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Microscopists

EDTA decalcification can be carried out on well-fixed specimens,
including corals, in a laboratory (tempreature-controlled) microwave
in a fraction of the time needed on the bench at room temperature.
Stirring during the process is important to keep fresh decalcifying
agent at the specimen at all times.

best regards,
Steven Slap



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 08:03:22 2004



From: Steven E. Slap :      siksik03-at-comcast.net
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:38:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM preparation of coral samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear Microscopists

EDTA decalcification can be carried out on well-fixed specimens,
including corals, in a laboratory (tempreature-controlled) microwave
in a fraction of the time needed on the bench at room temperature.
Stirring during the process is important to keep fresh decalcifying
agent at the specimen at all times.

best regards,
Steven Slap



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 08:39:48 2004



From: Bryan :      bbandli-at-mvainc.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 09:45:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


The simplest technique is to have petrographic thin sections made
(there are several labs that specialize in this service at very reasonable
rates and turn-around times) and to use polarized light microscopy
(PLM). There
are several texts available for both sedimentary petrography (107 listed at
Amazon) or cement petrography (101 listed at Amazon). My background is in
geology, but I haven't looked at any rocks for a couple of years now, and I
have never compared a sandstone to a cement. However, if a client
brought a similar problem to my facility, PLM is the technique I would use.

Not to discredit any of the previous techniques (XRD, SEM/EDS, etc.) but
PLM
is the best way to go with this problem (in my opinion). Especially if you
aren't sure if you are looking at sandstone or cement or a third type of
rock/cement-like material, a few minutes with a PLM, and a couple of good
references one can provide a definite answer.

Bryan Bandli

----- Original Message -----
} From: "Warren E Straszheim" {wesaia-at-iastate.edu}
To: {Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2004 5:26 PM
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone


}
}
}
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}
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-----
}
} I agree with James Talbot's opinion that X-ray diffraction would
probably
} give a definitive answer quite quickly. I think you might be able to
get a
} pretty good idea by taking spot analyses or an x-ray map of your two
} samples. (It is what I do - on concrete.) Concrete or mortar is such a
} heterogeneous mess that I would not get much out of an overall analysis.
} However, if I can probe the cement paste and find Ca and Si and O, I can
} suppose it to be Portland cement. There might also be unreacted cement
} grains. You should also find substantial amounts of fine aggregate
(i.e.,
} sand) used to make the mortar. Those could be of most any
composition, and
} often are. I see calcite, quartz, feldspars and more. Because cement and
} concrete are such hodge-podge mixtures, I often choose to do an x-ray
map
} rather than to probe every point in the image by hand.
}
} But back to x-ray diffraction, even if you can get chemistry from the
SEM,
} you may still want to use XRD for a more definitive answer about the
phases
} present. I use an SEM to solve a lot of problems, but it has its
} limitations. There is no substitute for diffraction or thermal
analysis or
} FTIR if the samples require it.
}
} Warren
}
} At 09:18 AM 1/19/2004, you wrote:
}
} } You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job.
While
} } I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a
summary of
} } the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
} } Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also
present.
} } Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also
present.
} }
} } A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to
get a
} } fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.
} }
} } Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither
sample
} } contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
} } light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the
particles
in
} } the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which
could
} } be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.
} }
} } I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
} } neither sample is sandstone.
}
} -------------------------------------------
} No files should be attached to this message
} -------------------------------------------
} Warren E. Straszheim, Ph.D.
} Materials Analysis and Research Lab
} Iowa State University
} 46 Town Engineering
} Ames IA, 50011-3232
}
} Ph: 515-294-8187
} FAX: 515-294-4563
}
} E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
} Web: www.marl.iastate.edu
}
} Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, and image analysis of
materials
} Computer applications and networking
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 09:31:46 2004



From: ekomarnicki-at-macdermid.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 09:13:17 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 13:23:19 2004



From: Mark Floyd :      msf-at-forensica.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 11:31:35 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EDX Kevex--bad monitor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi to all:
Attached to our HItachi H600 TEM, we have a Kevex Delta EDX system that has gone out. Specifically, smoke was seen coming out of the monitor shortly before it was last shut off with no image. The system was working fine until this event. We got a replacement monitor that has 5 inputs (RGBHV), but we still get no image. Is there a special type of monitor needed for these old systems, or should we be looking deeper into the system for other problems? The old monitor was an Electrohome ECM 1311U, Model 38-D051MA-UU.
Off-list replies OK.
thx
Mark Floyd
Forensic Analytical
Hayward, CA
msf-at-forensica.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 13:45:55 2004



From: David Hall :      hall-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 14:54:04 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Agfa scanner manual

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Does anyone happen to have the error codes for the Agfa scanners? We
are having problems in scanning negatives, although the scans of
reflective materials are working fine.

We get back an error code saying the "scanner has a problem"
referencing code : F0000400:5

The Duoscan HiD model is hooked up to a Mac, and was working
faithfully for years. Reloading the software from the original CD
has helped us to get the error code rather than a freeze of the
machine, but has not solved the problem.

The Agfa machines are now out of production. I looked online and
found part of the manual available, but it doesn't include the pages
detailing troubleshooting. Thanks for any help in advance.

DHH
--
David H. Hall, Ph.D.
Center for C. elegans Anatomy
Department of Neuroscience
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
1410 Pelham Parkway
Bronx, NY 10461

www.wormatlas.org
www.aecom.yu.edu/wormem

phone 718 430-2195
fax 718 430-8821


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 14:21:51 2004



From: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 10:18:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


You raise questions on some of the perplexing results from this job. While
I am well aware of the heterogeneous nature of the samples, a summary of
the "bulk" analysis results yielded (approx.):
Lt. gray sample; O 38%, Si 40%, Ca 20%, with Mg, Al, and S also present.
Rust/Red sample; O 48%, Si 4%, Ca 47%, with Mg, Al, S, and Fe also present.

A small piece from each sample was sanded through 320 grit paper to get a
fresh, flat surface for the EDS analyses.

Now, neither sample is known to be concrete nor sandstone. Neither sample
contains any aggregate material. The discrete particles present in the
light gray sample are more populous and twice the size of the particles in
the red material. There is no color banding in either sample, which could
be indicative of the stratified layers in a sandstone.

I may be making this harder than it has to be, but I am suspecting that
neither sample is sandstone.





ekomarnicki-at-MacDe
rmid.com To: holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
cc: Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
01/19/2004 09:13 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs.
AM sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
analyze their products. Hope this helps.

The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
three materials. ED

Ed Komarnicki
Sr. Analytical Chemist
MacDermid Inc.





holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
01/19/04 08:09 AM

To
Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
cc

Subject
SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone








------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


One and all,

I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
concrete,
sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
and
contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.

Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
what to read or how to make this kind of determination.

Thanks,

Chris Holp
FirstEnergy Corp.
Beta Labs
HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com



-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the
personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that you have received this document in error and that any
review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.










-----------------------------------------
The information contained in this message is intended only for the personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you have received this document in error and that any review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 14:32:48 2004



From: Chris Salter :      chris.salter-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:49:38 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Ed and Chris,

The difference between sandstones and concretes is usually fairly
obvious in a polished thin section viewed under plain and crossed
polars. The Atlas of sedimentary rocks under the microscope (Adams,
MacKenzie and Guilford, 1984, Longmans) gives examples of the commonest
types of sedimentary rock.
A sandstone is composed of two components the clasts (sand/rock) and the
cement (sorry that is the term the geologists use). Either of these
components may contain calcium bearing minerals, so the simple presence
of a signficiant calcium peak in an EDX spectra may not necessarily
prove that the material is a concrete. However, the cement of concrete
will not normally show visible crystallinity in the optical microscope
whereas many sandstones will. It also allows you to identify the clasts
and their size so distinguish between mortar and concrete (if samples is
large enough to include representative clasts).

ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
} have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
} start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
} with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
} your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
} higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
} cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
} want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
} positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
} analyze their products. Hope this helps.
}
} The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
} three materials. ED
}
} Ed Komarnicki
} Sr. Analytical Chemist
} MacDermid Inc.
}
}
}
}
}
} holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
} 01/19/04 08:09 AM
}
} To
} Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} cc
}
} Subject
} SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} One and all,
}
} I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
} concrete,
} sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
} mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
} and
} contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
} test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
} gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.
}
} Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
} with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
} based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
} what to read or how to make this kind of determination.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Chris Holp
} FirstEnergy Corp.
} Beta Labs
} HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} The information contained in this message is intended only for the
} personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
} reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
} responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
} notified that you have received this document in error and that any
} review, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this message is
} strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
} please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.
}
}
}
}
}
}


--
Chris Salter,
Oxford Materials Characterisation Service,
Oxford University Begbroke Science Park,
Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Oxford, OX5 1PF
Tel 01865 283722, EPMA 283741, Mobile 07776031608




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 15:11:25 2004



From: Scott D. Davilla :      davilla-at-4pi.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:19:42 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Carbon tab question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A quick question, does anyone known the thermal
conductivity/properties of carbon adhesive tabs used to mount SEM
samples? The various vendors talk about electrical conductivity but
not thermal.

Thanks
Scott
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Scott D. Davilla Phone: 919 489-1757 ext 13 (tel)
4pi Analysis, Inc. Fax: 919 489-1487 (fax)
3500 Westgate Drive, Suite 403 email: davilla-at-4pi.com
Durham, North Carolina 27707-2534 web: http://www.4pi.com



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 15:14:28 2004



From: Judy Trogadis :      TrogadisJ-at-smh.toronto.on.ca
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:21:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] motion tracking

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Fellow Microscopists,

We are studying cell migration, as a result, I am interested in
opinions/suggestions on various motion tracking software solutions for
the analysis of cell movement. In my limited experience, I found that
following fluorescently labelled cells is easier than brighfield cells -
simpler to find fiducial points - so any suggestions for both types of
studies would be highly appreciated.

Thank you
Judy

Judy Trogadis
Bio-Imaging Coordinator
St. Michael's Hospital, 7Queen
30 Bond St.
Toronto, ON M5B 1W8
Canada
ph: 416-864-6060 x6337
pager: 416-685-9219
fax: 416-864-6043
trogadisj-at-smh.toronto.on.ca



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 21 15:14:27 2004



From: Chris Salter :      chris.salter-at-materials.oxford.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2004 15:49:38 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Ed and Chris,

The difference between sandstones and concretes is usually fairly
obvious in a polished thin section viewed under plain and crossed
polars. The Atlas of sedimentary rocks under the microscope (Adams,
MacKenzie and Guilford, 1984, Longmans) gives examples of the commonest
types of sedimentary rock.
A sandstone is composed of two components the clasts (sand/rock) and the
cement (sorry that is the term the geologists use). Either of these
components may contain calcium bearing minerals, so the simple presence
of a signficiant calcium peak in an EDX spectra may not necessarily
prove that the material is a concrete. However, the cement of concrete
will not normally show visible crystallinity in the optical microscope
whereas many sandstones will. It also allows you to identify the clasts
and their size so distinguish between mortar and concrete (if samples is
large enough to include representative clasts).

ekomarnicki-at-MacDermid.com wrote:

}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Chris, I'm not a geologist or a cement expert, but concrete and mortar
} have cement as part of their make-up (ingredient). So you probably should
} start out comparing sandstone and cement. Commonly, concrete is cement
} with crushed stones (aggregates) in it. You don't mention having EDS at
} your disposal. Having EDS spectra obtained on your sample, I would expect
} higher Si concentration in the sandstone. and higher Ca conc. in the
} cement. Drop/spots tests may not reveal conc. differences. You may also
} want to run standards (i. e. Portland Cement, etc.) with your samples for
} positive confimation. Or even call a cement company and find out how they
} analyze their products. Hope this helps.
}
} The Materials Handbook, 13th ed. has some basic (starting) info on all
} three materials. ED
}
} Ed Komarnicki
} Sr. Analytical Chemist
} MacDermid Inc.
}
}
}
}
}
} holpc-at-firstenergycorp.com
} 01/19/04 08:09 AM
}
} To
} Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} cc
}
} Subject
} SEM/LM of concrete vs. sandstone
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
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} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} One and all,
}
} I have been given two samples and asked to determine if they are
} concrete,
} sandstone, or some mix. One sample is light gray, and I suspect may be
} mortar rather than concrete. The other sample has a slight rust/red hue
} and
} contains appreciably more calcium. Both samples contain silica, and both
} test positive for calcium carbonate by the acid drop test, with the light
} gray sample showing a yellow residue from this test.
}
} Hours of reading test procedures for Portland cement and concrete, coupled
} with internet searches have left me wondering if I can draw a conclusion
} based on a few grams of sample. I would appreciate any suggestions about
} what to read or how to make this kind of determination.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Chris Holp
} FirstEnergy Corp.
} Beta Labs
} HolpC-at-firstenergycorp.com
}
}
}
} -----------------------------------------
} The information contained in this message is intended only for the
} personal and confidential use of the recipient(s) named above. If the
} reader of this message is not the intended recipient or an agent
} responsible for delivering it to the intended recipient, you are hereby
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} strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
} please notify us immediately, and delete the original message.
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--
Chris Salter,
Oxford Materials Characterisation Service,
Oxford University Begbroke Science Park,
Sandy Lane, Yarnton, Oxford, OX5 1PF
Tel 01865 283722, EPMA 283741, Mobile 07776031608




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 00:45:58 2004



From: Lyn Waterhouse :      lyn.waterhouse-at-adelaide.edu.au
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 17:24:13 +1030
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM Of coral - thanks

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,
Thank you to everyone who answered my query about TEM processing of
coral. We now have several methods to try, and the samples won't be
wasted.

Cheers,

Lyn Waterhouse
Adelaide Microscopy
University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA 5005
Ph: (08) 8303 4074 or 8303 5855
Fax: (08) 8303 4356
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/microscopy


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 08:20:29 2004



From: Didier GOUX :      didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 15:28:22 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] SMI (Scientific Manufacturing Industries),

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

I can't find the web site of this society?
SMI (Scientific Manufacturing Industries), 1399 Sixty-fourth Street
EMERYVILLE, CAL. 94608

perhaps it has moved?

I am surching for this product
micro-re/pettor : 1055A type D

Thank you all



Didier Goux -CENTRE DE MICROSCOPIE ELECTRONIQUE
Université de CAEN BASSE NORMANDIE- Campus I - Esplanade de la Paix
14032 CAEN cedex FRANCE
Tel : (33) 02.31.56.58.13 - Fax : (33) 02.31.56.56.00
} e-mail: didier.goux-at-unicaen.fr
visit our Web page : http://www.microscopie.unicaen.fr/microscopie/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 09:29:48 2004



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 16:36:31 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] CCD Cameras and Kikuchi patterns

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,
I am trying to get a first rough idea of the cost of an above-screen CCD
camera for a TEM, suitable for recording Kikuchi patterns, together with
other diffraction patterns and images. I am looking at an above-screen
solution as my application requires a largish field of view. It would
need to fit in the ports available on a new TEM (yet to be ordered) to be
installed at the University of Glasgow (where I shall move to shortly).

If someone wishes to quote for a complete system including software for
the indexing of Kikuchi patterns, then I would also find that useful.

Also, generally I would be interested in any software for, or recent work
on, the automatic indexing of TEM Kikuchi patterns.

I need this information to help in making suitable estimates for the
equipment costings in a research proposal. Since the equipment is for the
UK, please give all estimates in British Pounds, where possible.

All the best

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material- und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany
http://www.tu-darmstadt.de/fb/ms/fg/sf/projekte/maclaren-Dateien/maclaren.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 12:20:49 2004



From: Debby Sherman :      dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 13:29:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Fix for neonatal mouse

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

We have a rare mouse coming in and don't want to goof on this one so I
wanted some advise.

Does anyone have any recommendations for fixation of neonatal (3 day)
mouse cardiac muscle for immuno? I had planned to use 0.5% glutaraldehyde
+ 3% PAF in 0.1M cacodylate buffer pH 7.4 containing 2mM MgCl, 1mMCaCl2, and
0.25% NaCl (final concentrations).

Do you fix neonatal and adult tissue similarly? If not, what modifications
do you make for the adult?

Many thanks,
Debby

Debby Sherman, Manager Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www3.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 14:51:45 2004



From: Tom Murray :      murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 13:00:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a couple of students who need to look at thin films in cross
section in the TEM. Is there a classic reference for preparing cross
section samples?

Thanks,

Tom

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
Thomas M Murray email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Electron Microscopy Center manager Phone: (206)543-2836
Materials Science & Engineering Fax: (206)543-3100
Box 352120 302 Roberts Hall Cell: (425)345-0083
University of Washington Home: (425)742-6819
Seattle, WA 98195



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 15:54:16 2004



From: Paul Voyles :      voyles-at-engr.wisc.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 16:02:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

At 01:00 PM 1/22/2004 -0800, you wrote:
} I have a couple of students who need to look at thin films in cross
} section in the TEM. Is there a classic reference for preparing cross
} section samples?

It's probably bad form to reply to a message asking for "classic
references" with a citation to one of my own papers, but I did write
something recently on preparing thin film cross sections by tripod
polishing. The paper is

{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3991(03)00092-5} "Imaging Individual Atoms
Inside Crystals with ADF-STEM" P. M. Voyles, J. L. Grazul, and D. A.
Muller, Ultramicroscopy 96, 251 (2003),

one the web at {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3991(03)00092-5} . It
contains a complete recipe for tripod polishing modified for HRTEM on
blanket thin film samples.

For devices or to achieve very large electron transparent but slightly
thicker areas, the original tripod polishing technique described in:

S. J. Klepeis, J. P. Benedict and R. M. Anderson, in: J. C. Bravman (Ed),
Materials Research Society Vol. 115, Pittsburgh Pa., 1988, p. 179.

J. Benedict, R. Anderson and S. J. Klepeis, in: R. Anderson, B. Tracy and
J. Bravman (Ed), Materials Research Society, Vol. 254, Boston, 1992, p. 121

is better.


Best wishes,
Paul Voyles

Paul Voyles
Assistant Professor
Materials Science and Engineering Department
University of Wisconsin - Madison
1509 University Ave.
Madison, WI 53706-1595
Voice: (608) 265-6740
Fax: (608) 262-8353
voyles-at-engr.wisc.edu
www.engr.wisc.edu/mse/faculty/voyles_paul.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 17:41:09 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 02:32:22 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom:

There are several excellent references for doing TEM cross sections
depending on the method you would like to use. I have listed a few of
them below.

Dimpling/Ion Milling
Bravman and Sinclair, "The Preparation of Cross Section Specimens for
Transmission ELectron Microscopy, Journal of Electron Microscopy
Technique 1:53-61 (1984)

McCaffrey and Barna, "Preparation of Cross Sectional TEM Samples for Low
Angle Ion Milling, Microscpoy Reasearch and Technique 36:362-367 (1997)

MicroCleaving
McCaffrey, "TEM Samples of Semiconductors Prepared by a Small-Angle
Cleavage Technique", Materials Research Society Symposium Volume 254 pp
109-120

S.D. Walck, H. Colijn, G. Thompson, "Pre-thinning for FIB TEM Specimen
Preparation Using the Small Angle Cleavage Technique", Microscopy and
Microanalysis, Vol. 7(2001).


Tripod Polishing
J. Benedict, R. Anderson, S. Klepeis, M. Chaker, A Procedure for Cross
Sectioning Specific Semiconductor Devices for both SEM and TEM Analysis,
ed. R. Anderson, Mat. Res. Soc. Proc. vol 199, Pittsburgh, PA USA. Pp.
189, 1990.


We have a very thorough bibliography on our website which you can also
take a look at. If you find anything of interest there, let me know and
I will send you a copy. We also have numerous applcaition notes that
can be downloaded from the site.

There is also an excellent book you may want to look at titled:

"Progress in Transmission Eelctron Microscopy 1 - Concepts and
Techniques". The ISBN number is 3-540-67680-5 and it is available from
Springer (http://www.springer.de). The book is also available from
South Bay Technology, Inc. at a reduced price.

Chapter 10 in the book it titled "Advanced Techniques in TEM Specimen
Preparation". The chapter is edited by Shane Roberts who is the
Director of our Applications Laboratory and includes sections written by
Dr. John McCaffrey, Dr. Lucille Giannuzzi and Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec.

Also Volumes 254 and 480 Of the Materials Research Society Proceedings
would be a great addition to your library.

I would be pleased to provide other references or advice at any time.
Please feel free to contact me or visit our website at
www.southbaytech.com and navigate to "Applications Support".

Best regards-

David

DISCLAIMER: As one of the world's leading suppliers of sample
preparation equipment and supplies for electron microscopy, South Bay
Technology, Inc. has a vested interest in promoting all of these
techniques as well as their use.

Tom Murray wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I have a couple of students who need to look at thin films in cross
} section in the TEM. Is there a classic reference for preparing cross
} section samples?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Tom
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------------------------------------------
} Thomas M Murray email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
} Electron Microscopy Center manager Phone: (206)543-2836
} Materials Science ? Engineering Fax: (206)543-3100
} Box 352120 302 Roberts Hall Cell: (425)345-0083
} University of Washington Home: (425)742-6819
} Seattle, WA 98195

--
David Henriks
Vice President

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 40 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for
Metallogaphy,
Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is
privileged and
confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity
addressed.
If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or
disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling
+1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 18:25:12 2004



From: Tom Murray :      murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 13:00:01 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I have a couple of students who need to look at thin films in cross
section in the TEM. Is there a classic reference for preparing cross
section samples?

Thanks,

Tom

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
Thomas M Murray email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Electron Microscopy Center manager Phone: (206)543-2836
Materials Science & Engineering Fax: (206)543-3100
Box 352120 302 Roberts Hall Cell: (425)345-0083
University of Washington Home: (425)742-6819
Seattle, WA 98195




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 22 19:06:33 2004



From: Malis, Tom :      malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 20:14:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Just to make this interesting thread a little more complete, let me add two
wildly different techniques that produce remarkably similar TEM specimens
(i.e. uniform, controlled thickness):

1. Diamond knife ultramicrotomy - I list some 20 thin film examples in a
slide I use to illustrate the versatility of UM, though some are coatings
rather than thin films. (How about diamond on cubic born nitride on single
crystal silicon!). The main advantage here is that almost every campus will
have ultramicrotomes in various life science departments (Medicine, Biology,
etc). Learning the technique for 'hard' materials is a challenge, however,
so your films better be fairly soft if you wish immediate results from the
life science campus practitioners.

2. Focused ion beam (FIB) - though David noted Lucille Gianuzzi's
contribution to the textbook he mentioned, there is still a fair bit of
unawareness concerning the versatility of FIB for cross-sections. We have a
collaboration with a small FIB company up here in the Great White North, and
if you visit their website (www.fibics.com), you will see interesting images
of cross-sections through Kodak film and a beverage can label, both of which
many might have prejudged to likley have unacceptable levels of ion damage.
That might still hold true for high resolution TEM, but these SED images
suggest that a lot can still be observed in 'soft' films sectioned via FIB.
However, the cost of a FIB is non-trivial, and there are still not that many
on campuses.

Tom

Dr. Tom Malis
Scientist Advisor
Natural Resources Canada
Govt. of Canada
Phone: 613-995-7358
cell: 613-371-4577
FAX: 613-947-6606
malis-at-nrcan.gc.ca


-----Original Message-----
} From: David Henriks
To: Tom Murray
Cc: Microscopy Listerver
Sent: 1/22/2004 5:32 AM

Tom:

There are several excellent references for doing TEM cross sections
depending on the method you would like to use. I have listed a few of
them below.

Dimpling/Ion Milling
Bravman and Sinclair, "The Preparation of Cross Section Specimens for
Transmission ELectron Microscopy, Journal of Electron Microscopy
Technique 1:53-61 (1984)

McCaffrey and Barna, "Preparation of Cross Sectional TEM Samples for Low
Angle Ion Milling, Microscpoy Reasearch and Technique 36:362-367 (1997)

MicroCleaving
McCaffrey, "TEM Samples of Semiconductors Prepared by a Small-Angle
Cleavage Technique", Materials Research Society Symposium Volume 254 pp
109-120

S.D. Walck, H. Colijn, G. Thompson, "Pre-thinning for FIB TEM Specimen
Preparation Using the Small Angle Cleavage Technique", Microscopy and
Microanalysis, Vol. 7(2001).


Tripod Polishing
J. Benedict, R. Anderson, S. Klepeis, M. Chaker, A Procedure for Cross
Sectioning Specific Semiconductor Devices for both SEM and TEM Analysis,
ed. R. Anderson, Mat. Res. Soc. Proc. vol 199, Pittsburgh, PA USA. Pp.
189, 1990.


We have a very thorough bibliography on our website which you can also
take a look at. If you find anything of interest there, let me know and
I will send you a copy. We also have numerous applcaition notes that
can be downloaded from the site.

There is also an excellent book you may want to look at titled:

"Progress in Transmission Eelctron Microscopy 1 - Concepts and
Techniques". The ISBN number is 3-540-67680-5 and it is available from
Springer (http://www.springer.de). The book is also available from
South Bay Technology, Inc. at a reduced price.

Chapter 10 in the book it titled "Advanced Techniques in TEM Specimen
Preparation". The chapter is edited by Shane Roberts who is the
Director of our Applications Laboratory and includes sections written by
Dr. John McCaffrey, Dr. Lucille Giannuzzi and Dr. Nestor J. Zaluzec.

Also Volumes 254 and 480 Of the Materials Research Society Proceedings
would be a great addition to your library.

I would be pleased to provide other references or advice at any time.
Please feel free to contact me or visit our website at
www.southbaytech.com and navigate to "Applications Support".

Best regards-

David

DISCLAIMER: As one of the world's leading suppliers of sample
preparation equipment and supplies for electron microscopy, South Bay
Technology, Inc. has a vested interest in promoting all of these
techniques as well as their use.

Tom Murray wrote:

}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
}
} I have a couple of students who need to look at thin films in cross
} section in the TEM. Is there a classic reference for preparing cross
} section samples?
}
} Thanks,
}
} Tom
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ---------------------------------------------
} Thomas M Murray email:
murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
} Electron Microscopy Center manager Phone: (206)543-2836
} Materials Science ? Engineering Fax:
(206)543-3100
} Box 352120 302 Roberts Hall Cell:
(425)345-0083
} University of Washington Home:
(425)742-6819
} Seattle, WA 98195

--
David Henriks
Vice President

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 40 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for
Metallogaphy,
Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is
privileged and
confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity
addressed.
If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or
disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling
+1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 03:16:51 2004



From: Anne-Mette Heie =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Kj=E6r?= :      ahk-at-topsoe.dk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:24:55 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html






----- Forwarded by ahk/RES/RVN/Haldor Topsoe on 23-01-04 10:24 -----

"Anne-Mette Heie
Kjær" To: Tom Murray {murraytm-at-u.washington.edu}
{ahk-at-topsoe.dk} cc:
bcc:
23-01-04 09:23 Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep(Document link: ahk)





Hi!

If you have to prepare the cross-section "by hand in the oldfashioned way"
- without ultramicrotome or FIB, I would strongly advise you to buy a Gatan
cross-sectional kit. It saves you a lot of time.

Best regards
Anne-Mette Heie Kjaer




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 05:45:55 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 06:54:08 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Image Analysis Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A few openings are still available for the course on Quantitative Image
Analysis that will be taught in Orlando, Florida, March 11 - 12 by John Russ. The
course emphasizes practical solutions to imaging problems and includes 2 days
of intensive training in current techniques, including an evening open
laboratory where participants are encouraged to bring and work with their own images.
The course is taught using the Fovea Pro software
{http://www.reindeergraphics.com/foveapro} , which participants receive as well as a copy of "The Image
Processing Handbook" 4th Edition (CRC Press).

The course syllabus and registration information are available at the
Reindeer Graphics website. {http://www.reindeergraphics.com/courses} Further
information may be obtained from the website or by contacting Reindeer Graphics
directly at courses-at-reindeergraphics.com or by telephone at 828.252.7515. The
deadline for registration is February 1st, so act now.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 06:51:32 2004



From: petra.rosner-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 08:34:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: bromide specimen for TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Ian,

An early paper on automatic indexing of Kikuchi line patterns was

N. C. Krieger Lassen:
"Computerized analysis of Kikuchi patterns"
In: Proceedings of the 16th Risoe International Symposium on Materials Science,
"Microstructural and Crystallographic Aspects of Recrystallization"
Edited by N. Hansen et al.
Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark 1995
ISBN 87-550-2088-7
ISSN o907-0079

Best regards,
Jorgen.
{:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::}

Joergen B. Bilde-Soerensen
Senior Research Scientist, Ph. D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 4677 5802 (direct)
phone: +45 4677 4677 (switchboard)
fax: +45 4677 5758
website: http://www.risoe.dk/afm/Personal/jqbi/jqbi.htm



-----Original Message-----
} From: Ian MacLaren [mailto:maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de]
Sent: 22. januar 2004 16:37
To: Microscopy Listserver

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (petra.rosner-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 23, 2004 at 06:31:59
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Email: petra.rosner-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de
Name: Petra Rosner

Organization: Universit”t Erlangen N¸rnberg

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question:
Hi,
has anyone experience in preparing bulkmaterial of bromide specimen for TEM?

Petra

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 08:25:52 2004



From: rgrebe-at-jhmi.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 08:34:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: auto-fluorescence of melanin in fetal human eye

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: rgrebe-at-jhmi.edu
Name: Rhonda R. Grebe

Organization: The Johns Hopkins University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: auto-fluorescence of melanin in fetal human eye

Question: Will the melanin contained in the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid of the fetal human eye absorb the light and prevent visualization of fluorescently labeled endothelial cells, etc. in the choriodal vessels of unbleached whole mount choroidal tissue? If it is possible to visualize the choroidal vessels, what would be the most efficient excitation wave lenght to use? And finally, would a conventional inverted fluorescent scope with a UV and a super high pressure mercury lamp power supply be sufficient for this purpose or is a confocal required?

Thank you,

Rhonda Grebe

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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 08:36:46 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 08:45:00 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Old EMU TEM manuals and parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

We are surplusing a cabinet full of old RCA EMU TEM manuals and parts
(we've announced this before, but it's for real this time), and wanted
to check if anybody has any use for them. We have lots a vacuum tubes,
both new and used, miscellaneous parts, like lead glass, a film holder,
a lot of new and used filaments, and others, as well as a stack of
hardbound manuals. The old kind, with decent binding and illustrations
and glossy paper.

If this interests anyone, we will send them for shipping costs. We need
the cabinet space for our overflowing supply of researchers' grids.

Thanks,

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 08:37:41 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 08:45:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: UA and other "waste" disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I have also experienced the constantly changing guidelines for UA
disposal brought up by Tom Phillips. We have gone full circle here from
"dilute and pour down the drain", to collecting it with other fixatives
for pickup, to collecting it separately for pickup and disposal by the
radiation people (along with any pipettes, syringes, etc. that have
touched it), and back to dilute and pour. In my experience a major rule
change happens about every six months. The problem seems to be that the
extremely low level of radioactivity apparently doesn't justify the very
high cost of the specialized disposal methods used for "hot" wastes (er,
used materials---sorry), and there doesn't seem to be any consensus
about how dangerous small amounts of the material actually are. The odd
thing to me is that I have heard for many years, rightly or wrongly,
that UA is only dangerous when allowed to accumulate in larger
quantities or when it is in powder form and can be inhaled. It seems
strange then that rules for pickup either seem to require its
accumulation or, more rarely, the evaporation of the solvent liquid to
return UA to powder form and reduce the collection volume (although I
haven't seen that particularly approach required any place where I have
worked---so far).

My favorite UA tale comes from another lab I worked in, when we were
told by the safety people that we could use UA, but we could not pour it
down the sink, we were not allowed to accumulate it, and the safety
folks would no longer pick it up because they didn't know what to do
with it. What did we do? We kept it large bottles out of sight until
the inevitable rule change happened.

Maybe the microscopy community could come up with a consensus
recommendation on how to handle this problematic substance in an effort
to bring some standardization to its handling. The web of federal,
state, and local regulations on hazardous waste probably make this
difficult, but we need to try to seal up the crack that UA appears to
keep falling through.


Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 09:28:19 2004



From: Tobias Baskin :      baskin-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:36:33 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: UA and other "waste" disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings,
Two comments on the UA situation.

My favorite story: Where I was in graduate school was a small
research institute, started around 1900. Over the years, a large set
of shelves where chemicals were stored went from communal necessity
to historical relic as labs maintained their own supplies. By the
time I was there, these shelves were fascinating, containing bottles
of colored powder with handwritten labels from Germany or murky
gray-black solids labeld odd things like 'hairy tin'. One day,
someone looking at the more neglected shelves covering last part of
the alphabet, way down near the floor, found a bottle of UA.
Handwritten label, radiation detectable with a Geiger counter
through the bottle (probably not so pure as today's stuff). Ignored,
this stuff for years had led an untroubled existence, but
discovered--something had to be done. But what? The institute was
attached to a University which was right then being hammered by the
NRC for alleged abuses of radiation safety, so they wanted to play by
the rules. But the trouble was that the rules demanded that all
radioactive compounds be inventoried as soon as they arrived on
campus, and fines were levied based on the number of days the
compound was on campus but off inventory. There were a lot of days
between then and say 1907! The solution was simple but not elegant.
It involved some shovels, a bag or two of ready mix, and a big hole
in the back of the compound. You can imagine the rest.

The other comment is to point out why UA causes such a
regulatory problem. Danger from low doses of anything is hard to
study because the sample sizes are too huge. So danger from low doses
is extrapolated from high doses. This is obviously uncertain and
leads to lots of models, and with the uncertainty, a lot of argument.
A useful benchmark for UA is the radiation in the rocks all around
us. Probably the diluted UA we use to stain grids has on that order
of radiation and adding it the drain poses no more risk than posed by
our surroundings. Likewise the small amount of heavy metal in the
solution can probably be reduced to the usual ambient levels in tap
water by modest dilution. But agreeing to this in a regulatory
sense means taking a stand on the low dose end and this is difficult.
Though probably wise.

My few decays,
Tobias
}
}
} Hi all,
}
} I have also experienced the constantly changing guidelines for UA
} disposal brought up by Tom Phillips. We have gone full circle here from
} "dilute and pour down the drain", to collecting it with other fixatives
} for pickup, to collecting it separately for pickup and disposal by the
} radiation people (along with any pipettes, syringes, etc. that have
} touched it), and back to dilute and pour. In my experience a major rule
} change happens about every six months. The problem seems to be that the
} extremely low level of radioactivity apparently doesn't justify the very
} high cost of the specialized disposal methods used for "hot" wastes (er,
} used materials---sorry), and there doesn't seem to be any consensus
} about how dangerous small amounts of the material actually are. The odd
} thing to me is that I have heard for many years, rightly or wrongly,
} that UA is only dangerous when allowed to accumulate in larger
} quantities or when it is in powder form and can be inhaled. It seems
} strange then that rules for pickup either seem to require its
} accumulation or, more rarely, the evaporation of the solvent liquid to
} return UA to powder form and reduce the collection volume (although I
} haven't seen that particularly approach required any place where I have
} worked---so far).
}
} My favorite UA tale comes from another lab I worked in, when we were
} told by the safety people that we could use UA, but we could not pour it
} down the sink, we were not allowed to accumulate it, and the safety
} folks would no longer pick it up because they didn't know what to do
} with it. What did we do? We kept it large bottles out of sight until
} the inevitable rule change happened.
}
} Maybe the microscopy community could come up with a consensus
} recommendation on how to handle this problematic substance in an effort
} to bring some standardization to its handling. The web of federal,
} state, and local regulations on hazardous waste probably make this
} difficult, but we need to try to seal up the crack that UA appears to
} keep falling through.
}
}
} Randy Tindall
} EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
} W122 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-5414
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/


--
_ ____ __ ____
/ \ / / \ / \ \ Tobias I. Baskin
/ / / / \ \ \ Biology Department
/_ / __ /__ \ \ \__ 611 N. Pleasant St.
/ / / \ \ \
University of Massachusetts
/ / / \ \ \
Amherst, MA, 01003
/ / ___ / \ \__/ \ ____ Voice: 413 - 545 - 1533
Fax: 413 - 545 - 3243
http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/baskin/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 10:36:14 2004



From: Anthony_McCormick-at-brown.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:44:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: :HPGe x-ray detector

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (Anthony_McCormick-at-brown.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 23, 2004 at 09:01:03
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: Anthony_McCormick-at-brown.edu
Name: Anthony McCormick

Organization: Brown University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:HPGe x-ray detector

Question: We have recently had a window failure on a HPGe x-ray detector for the JEOL 2010 TEM. Upon asking the manufacturer of this detector about repairing the window, their reply was "We can only repair the HPGe detector only if it is converted to a SiLi detector...". Are HPGe detectors no longer available? Are there companies that repair/replace windows on x-ray detectors on equipment that they did not manufacture?

Anthony McCormick
Electron Microscope Facility
014 Barus & Holley
Brown University
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-3909


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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 11:40:05 2004



From: swwatkins-at-pitt.edu (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 11:48:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy 2k04

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by (swwatkins-at-pitt.edu) from http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday, January 23, 2004 at 11:30:40
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: swwatkins-at-pitt.edu
Name: Simon watkins

Organization: University of Pittsburgh

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] QFM 2k04

Question: Folks,

We would like to announce that enrollment for Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy 2k04 at the Mount Desert Island Marine Laboratory in Maine is now open. The tremendous success of the course over the last several years has encouraged us to run it again next year, and as it is January it is time to start our enrollment. This is an intensive lab/lecture course, focusing on fluorescence microscopy in all its forms, including widefield, Confocal, Multiphoton, Decon, TIRF, FRET etc, though with an emphasis on live cell methods. We also encourage students to provide their own specimens such that the hands on components of the course are as enriching as possible. Enrollment is highly competitive, so if you think that you or your colleagues would benefit from the course please enroll as soon as possible. The url for the course is http://www.cbi.pitt.edu/qfm/index.html

If you have any specific questions about the course feel free to contact me directly I look forward to hearing from interested applicants soon
Thanks
Simon


By the way; I am sorry if this is a repost, but I still have not seen my original mailing to the group. Nestor, could you let me know if this has been posted so I avoid future duplications.




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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 12:19:12 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:28:44 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,
I have lost track of Doug Dorset's contact info, and the MSA directory
did not reveal it. Could someone--preferably Doug--please reply
off-list with his email address? TIA.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 13:52:51 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 12:02:20 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Strange FEG IGP problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Lists,
We have been experiencing an unusual problem on the F30H. At
intervals of a few weeks the vacuum measured by the IGP at the top of
the FEG (IGP3 for those who know the scope) deteriorates and the FEG is
shut off by the computer. Examination of a record of the vacuum shows
that IGP3 has a vacuum too good to show above baseline for the first
few days--the reading is constant at 10^-12 Pa--then the pressure rises
into the range of ~10^-7 Pa, often will briefly get slightly better,
then will rather quickly get worse and the FEG will shut off. The
boards containing the power supply and the electronics for measuring
the vacuum have been replaced, but that did not solve the problem.
Both the FEG and IGP are pretty simple devices, and it is hard to think
of what could be going wrong. A vacuum leak would not show the
observed time course of vacuum readings, and the SF6 that surrounds the
outside of the FEG apparatus would give different symptoms.
Has anyone seen anything similar? TIA for any help.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 16:04:52 2004



From: Tom Murray :      murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 14:13:04 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Reference for TEM cross-section Sample Prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,

Thanks for the replies. I now have much reading to do, but I feel I
will have the knowledge at the end to make successful samples.

There were a couple of questions on the system I'm looking at. The
samples are cobalt oxide deposited onto a lanthanum oxide substrate.

Once I get into the actual hands on portion of sample prep I may be
back for some pointers.

Thanks for the swift and copious relies.

Tom

------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
Thomas M Murray email: murraytm-at-u.washington.edu
Electron Microscopy Center manager Phone: (206)543-2836
Materials Science & Engineering Fax: (206)543-3100
Box 352120 302 Roberts Hall Cell: (425)345-0083
University of Washington Home: (425)742-6819
Seattle, WA 98195



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 23 16:36:41 2004



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 17:44:46 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Strange FEG IGP problem

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Bill,
I have maintained both the Coates and Welter and Zeiss (LEO) DSM982 Gemini
FESEMs in this lab. Although a frequent bake out routine is performed,
after several thousand hours of operation (~2 years), my SEM gun ion pumps
sometimes began to 'burp' intermittently. Without going into all of the
possible reasons I guess that most likely the pumps are growing titanium
whiskers. Some of those whiskers are shorting out the pump power supply for
a fraction of a second until they burn away. Of course the vacuum appears
very bad for a split second during that short circuit and the gun power
supply kicks off (just when I'm about to leave on vacation). For about 24
years the fix that works for me is to whack the ion pump with the palm of
my hand several times before and after a bake (cooled first). (NEVER DO
THIS WITH THE FEG ON OR ION PUMP HOT). This causes the vacuum readout to
jump several orders of magnitude (into the poorer direction) but after
about 30 minutes, the vacuum recovers and remains stable. [I usually whack
until the readout begins to drop toward recovery (~2-3 seconds) and a
second try for good measure). Firm but cautious taps is the best way I can
describe the force of these 'whacks'.]

Caution: If your ion pumps are very used, whacking them may cause titanium
flakes to come loose and short the grids permanently. I have been lucky and
not lost a pump yet. Depending on the tightness of the vacuum system my ion
pumps have worked very well for about 6-10 years each. Before computer
interfaces I use to 'hi pot' an ion pump by sending the output of a high
voltage spark generator into it for a few seconds (FE emitter grounded to
anode, SEM ion pump power supply disconnected and all circuits off and
disconnected from the column). That is another way to get rid of whiskers
but not recommended as it obviously risks damage to the microscope computer
control circuits (and the technician).

Good luck,
Jim

Disclaimer:
I am not responsible for any damage incurred to you or your equipment if
the above methods are used. I am not familiar with an F30H microscope and
the vibrations from this method could damage or loosen the emitter or other
components in the area of the ion pump. Shock hazard is always present when
working with these devices. Refer to qualified personal only.



} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 3242
91 North Eagleville Road
BSP Building, Room G06
Storrs, CT 06269-3242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 24 10:07:12 2004



From: rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2004 10:15:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: nanogold labeling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Email: rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com
Name: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes

Organization: Nanoprobes, Incorporated

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] Re: WWW: nanogold labeling

Question: Hello Eunice:

I assume that you are planning to use gold-labeled antibodies for your experiment (our product, Nanogold, can be used tolabel other types of probes of different sizes; if you are planning to Nanogold-label a much smaller or larger protein and use this to stain your preparation, or if you plan to use a Nanogold labeling reagent to mark a specific chemical group in your specimen, it will likely make a difference to your staining procedure)...in any case, labeling procedures similar to those used for pre-embedding labeling should work well. We have an article on our web site that gives some procedures:

http://www.nanoprobes.com/App3.html

References:

(1) Tanner, V. A., Ploug, T., and Tao-Cheng, J.-H. Subcellular localization of SV2 and other secretory vesicle components in PC12 cells by an efficient method of preembedding EM Immunocytochemistry for cell cultures. J. Histochem. Cytochem., 44, 1481-1488 (1996).
(2) Du, J.; Tao-Cheng, J.-H.; Zerfas, P., and McBain, C. J. The K+ channel, Kv2.1, is apposed to astrocytic processes and is associated with inhibitory postsynaptic membranes in hippocampal and cortical principal neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Neuroscience, 84, 37-48 (1998).

If you mean the Nanoprobes product, Nanogold, then we also maintain a comprehensive list of references sorted by application, which includes a section on pre-embedding labeling:

http://www.nanoprobes.com/RefTopNG.html#Npre

Lin et al's paper may also be helpful (Lin, M., Sistina, Y., and Rodger, J. C.: Electron-microscopic localisation of thiol and disulphide groups by direct monomaleimido-Nanogold labeling in the spermatozoa of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii); Cell Tisue Res., 282, 291-296 (1995)).

If negative staining is an option, we offer NanoVan, a negative stain based on vanadium; since vanadium has lower Z than uranium, NanoVan gives a lighter stain that uranyl acetate and allows easier visualization of small gold particles, and can be mixed with our tungsten-based negative stain, Nano-W, to increase density (http://www.nanoprobes.com/Nstain.html). The vast majority of publications by our users describe the use of osmium tetroxide, most frequently after silver enhancement of the gold. A few papers describe the use of uranyl acetate withour osmium tetroxide. Hebert et al used postfixation in 1% osmium tetroxide, 1% potassium ferrocyanide (Hebert, S. S.; Daviau, A.; Grondin, G.; Latreille, M.; Aubin, R. A.; and Blouin, R.: The mixed lineage kinase DLK is oligomerized by tissue transglutaminase during apoptosis. J. Biol. Chem., 275, 32482-90 (2000)).

Hope this helps,

Rick Powell
Nanoprobes, Inc.

*****************************************************************************************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax: (631) 980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
*****************************************************************************************


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Jan 25 12:45:16 2004



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-URMC.Rochester.edu
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 13:56:23 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers:

I have a question regarding morphometric analysis, specifically how many
individual measurements should be done for a cardiac muscle research
project?

The investigators have 4 groups of muscle tissue. Group one, the control
has 3 specimens, experimental groups contain 5, 6 & 6 specimens
respectively. So that equals 20 specimens total.

I have been asked to measure the width of 20 muscle fibers for each specimen
and the diameter of 20 individual fibers on cross section in each group.
That adds up to 800 measurements! This seems like overkill. Wouldn't ten
do? Does anyone have a reference for how one would measure and what numbers
of samples are necessary to provide a statistically appropriate sampling
when using a transmission electron microscope.?

Thanks for any advice!

Karen Bentley

Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 03:16:08 2004



From: Ian MacLaren :      maclaren-at-tu-darmstadt.de
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 11:57:20 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] European specimen preparation courses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Petra,

I don't have any experience with bromide material, but I will just make you aware that most halides are very difficult to work with in TEM because the specimens are very rapidly filled with radiation-induced defects unless they are cooled to very low temperatures.

Best regards,
Jorgen.

{:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::} --- {:::}

Joergen B. Bilde-Soerensen
Senior Research Scientist, Ph. D.
Materials Research Department
Risoe National Laboratory
DK-4000 Roskilde
Denmark

e-mail: j.bilde-at-risoe.dk
phone: +45 4677 5802 (direct)
phone: +45 4677 4677 (switchboard)
fax: +45 4677 5758
website: http://www.risoe.dk/afm/Personal/jqbi/jqbi.htm



-----Original Message-----
} From: by way of MicroscopyListserver [mailto:petra.rosner-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de]
Sent: 23. januar 2004 15:35
To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com

Dear all in Western/Central Europe,
Are there likely to be any courses/workshops on specimen preparation in
the near future in western or central Europe? In particular it would be
lovely for my colleagues if they are held in German somewhere in one of
the German speaking countries. Alternatively, they could be held in
English in somewhere reasonably easily reached from the western side of
Germany.
I can train people to some extent in specimen prep, but it would be nice
if they could learn further through courses, hands-on training or such
like.

Best wishes

--
Ian MacLaren
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Material- und Geowissenschaften
Petersenstr. 23
64287 Darmstadt
Germany
http://www.tu-darmstadt.de/fb/ms/fg/sf/projekte/maclaren-Dateien/maclaren.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 06:32:31 2004



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 13:48:24 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

Your question is a little like "how long is a piece of string"! The number
of readings you need will depend mostly on the variation within and between
the different samples.

You could try a test within your control group - take the readings and plot
a cumulative mean. Eventually the curve will become 'flat' indicating that
you have reached a point where there is 'no point' in continuing - the
statistical equivalent of empty magnification.

I am a little confused about your use of the words 'width' and 'diameter' -
in a cylindrical object, are they not the same thing?

All the best

Gareth
Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

***Come to Stockholm in 2004 to the 26th IFBLS congress*** Take a look at
http://www.vardforbundet.se/ifbls2004

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institute,
Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 08:40:58 2004



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 09:52:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Karen,

I don't agree this is overkill.
I have done this type of quantitation before, and ended
up doing close to 100 measurements per sample! Since
these measurements can be done at low magnification,
you should be able to measure several fibers from each
micrograph, therefore greatly reducing the number of
micrographs you need to take. 800 measurements might
seem like a lot, but in fact it wouldn't take that long if you
are using an appropriate sampling and measurement
technique. The fact is you need to sample a lot because
of the huge variations you are going to observe, especially
if you are measuring fiber width from longitudinal sections
as in this case you have no way of knowing if the plane
of section is going through the center of the fiber or not.
Even when measuring diameters from cross-sections,
you expect some variation as sections through the ends
of fibers are likely to be smaller than those through the
center.
Good luck!

Marc


On Sunday, January 25, 2004, at 01:56 PM, Jensen, Karen wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Hello Listers:
}
} I have a question regarding morphometric analysis, specifically how
} many
} individual measurements should be done for a cardiac muscle research
} project?
}
} The investigators have 4 groups of muscle tissue. Group one, the
} control
} has 3 specimens, experimental groups contain 5, 6 & 6 specimens
} respectively. So that equals 20 specimens total.
}
} I have been asked to measure the width of 20 muscle fibers for each
} specimen
} and the diameter of 20 individual fibers on cross section in each
} group.
} That adds up to 800 measurements! This seems like overkill. Wouldn't
} ten
} do? Does anyone have a reference for how one would measure and what
} numbers
} of samples are necessary to provide a statistically appropriate
} sampling
} when using a transmission electron microscope.?
}
} Thanks for any advice!
}
} Karen Bentley
}
} Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
} Associate Scientist & Project Manager
} Electron Microscope Research Core
} University of Rochester Medical Center
} Rochester, NY 14642
} 585-275-1954
}
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 09:26:21 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:35:29 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Karen:

Have a look at "Unbiased Stereology" by C.V Howard and M.G. Reed,
BIOS Scientific Publishers in the UK, Springer in the USA, 1998. In
order to determine if a sample size is "big enough", you will have to do
the trial measuerements suggested by Gareth Morgan. Too large a sample
wastes your time, too small risks having the paper retuned for more data
at a much later time (when details and technique have been forgotten).
In my experience measuring things always sounds like more work than it
turns out to be. Once you get rolling it is not that bad.

Geoff

Jensen, Karen wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 09:59:15 2004



From: Warren E Straszheim :      wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:09:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Your question is fairly basic, and that is good, because if it was much
more than that, it would be beyond me. {G}

Similar to what Gareth wrote, the measured mean value will stabilize with
increased measurements. After multiple measurements, you will be able to
determine a mean and standard variation for the population. Both values
SHOULD be stable no matter how many measurements you take, but of course it
isn't - you have only taken a finite sampling of the entire population. But
for multiple random samplings of a population, you will find that the
standard deviation in the multiple mean values is equal to the standard
deviation of the population divided by the square root of the number of
measurements in each sampling.

So consider this example. You take 16 measurements and calculate a mean of
40 um with a standard deviation of 4 um. That 4 um refers to the deviation
in any one measurement in the population. How good is your average
measurement? It's standard deviation would be 1 um. But suppose you have a
different population for which 16 measurements gives you a mean value of 41
also with a standard deviation of 4 um. Are the two populations
significantly different? The means are only one standard deviation apart;
it is not very certain. But suppose you took 64 measurements per population
and obtained the same means and standard deviations. Now the expected
deviation in the mean is now 0.5 um due to the increased measurements and
the means are now 2 standard deviations apart. That increases the certainty
markedly. I haven't dug out my stat tables to verify the exact numbers, but
I think the chance of the populations having the same mean dropped from
around 37% to around 5% due to the larger sampling. I believe it is the
T-test that is used to determine the certainty of such differences.

In your case, cutting the number of measurements from 20 to 10 will lead to
a 41% increase in the standard deviation of the mean (SD-10 = SD/Sqrt(10)
and SD-20 = SD/Sqrt(20), so SD-10 = Sqrt(2)*SD-20). That may or may not be
allowed for the magnitude of the differences between your groups. Indeed, I
don't believe it is possible to determine the required sample size without
some knowledge of the standard deviations of the populations. Once that is
known, you can theoretically set the number of measurements to achieve the
desired level of precision, no matter how small; however, you will be
constrained by reality. For example, if SD=0.5 units and you wish to detect
differences of 0.02 units, you probably want the standard deviation of the
mean to be 0.01 units. But that means 0.01=0.5/Sqrt(N), so N=2500
measurements. That is probably not practical. You would probably pick a
realistic number of measurements then calculate and report your minimum
detectable difference for those conditions. Since you have to quadruple the
number of measurements to improve the precision by a factor of 2, you
quickly run into practical limits.

It is also probably worth a trip to a statistics book or a stat consultant
at that stage. Even as I write, I am remembering principles such as the
standard deviation in the difference of means of two populations is the
root of the sum of the squares of the deviations of the means of the
populations involved. You are testing to see if |Mean(A)-Mean(B)| } 0. It
may not be possible to explain such issues succinctly and concisely through
e-mail. A book or consultant would probably do better, but I hope this
helps some.

Warren

At 12:56 PM 1/25/2004, you wrote:

} Hello Listers:
}
} I have a question regarding morphometric analysis, specifically how many
} individual measurements should be done for a cardiac muscle research
} project?
}
} The investigators have 4 groups of muscle tissue. Group one, the control
} has 3 specimens, experimental groups contain 5, 6 & 6 specimens
} respectively. So that equals 20 specimens total.
}
} I have been asked to measure the width of 20 muscle fibers for each specimen
} and the diameter of 20 individual fibers on cross section in each group.
} That adds up to 800 measurements! This seems like overkill. Wouldn't ten
} do? Does anyone have a reference for how one would measure and what numbers
} of samples are necessary to provide a statistically appropriate sampling
} when using a transmission electron microscope.?
}
} Thanks for any advice!
}
} Karen Bentley
}
} Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
} Associate Scientist & Project Manager
} Electron Microscope Research Core
} University of Rochester Medical Center
} Rochester, NY 14642
} 585-275-1954



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 10:12:40 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 10:23:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Old TEM manuals and parts

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have found a home for the RCA manuals and parts. I'll be responding
individually to everyone who answered my query shortly. Thanks to all.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 10:24:39 2004



From: David Henriks :      henriks-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 08:35:51 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: European specimen preparation courses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ian:

South Bay Technology regularly conducts specimen preparation workshops around the
world as well as in our own facility here in San Clemente, CA. We also do
cutomized workshops for customers that we can do at your facility. We cover any
topic in specimen preparation: Tripod Polishing, Dimpling, Low Energy Ion Milling,
Jet Polishing, Plasma Cleaning, Plasma Trimming, Pre-FIB preparation, MicroCLeaving
etc. Please contact me off-line and I will let you know what we have planned and
what we can arrange to meet your needs.

Best regards-

David

Ian MacLaren wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear all in Western/Central Europe,
} Are there likely to be any courses/workshops on specimen preparation in
} the near future in western or central Europe? In particular it would be
} lovely for my colleagues if they are held in German somewhere in one of
} the German speaking countries. Alternatively, they could be held in
} English in somewhere reasonably easily reached from the western side of
} Germany.
} I can train people to some extent in specimen prep, but it would be nice
} if they could learn further through courses, hands-on training or such
} like.
}
} Best wishes
}
} --
} Ian MacLaren
} Technische Universit?t Darmstadt
} Material- und Geowissenschaften
} Petersenstr. 23
} 64287 Darmstadt
} Germany
} http://www.tu-darmstadt.de/fb/ms/fg/sf/projekte/maclaren-Dateien/maclaren.html

--
David Henriks
Vice President

South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673 USA

TEL: +1-949-492-2600
Toll-free in the USA: +1-800-728-2233
FAX: +1-949-492-1499

email: henriks-at-southbaytech.com

Celebrating 40 years of providing Materials Processing Solutions for Metallogaphy,
Crystallography and Electron Microscopy.

Please visit us online at www.southbaytech.com.

The information contained in this message and any attachments is privileged and
confidential. This message is intended for the individual or entity addressed.
If you are not the intended recipient, please do not read, copy or disclose this
communication. Notify the sender of the mistake by calling +1-949-492-2600 and
delete this message from your system.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 13:28:25 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 14:39:26 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM: LAB6 vs Tungsten for EBSD?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Listers:

Looking for opinions, comments, pros & cons, etc. in comparing a Low
Vacuum-SEM with a tungsten gun vs a Lab6 gun.

Details: One of the primary applications presently is EBSD and XEDS of
geologic samples, of these one of the primary sample types is very fine
(nano) crystals ranging 10-100nm in size. And it is for these types of
samples we are strongly considering LAB6. Our thoughts are smaller spot
size and increased beam current, which will improve our diffraction signal, as
well improving our ability to locate the particles. Secondly, the scope will
primarily be operated by neophyte SEM users, users who are primarily
concerned with generating good EBSD and XEDS data not SEI/BEI imaging
(yeah, yeah but I don’t wish to open that discussion again).

So I am seeking comments: are the advantages of LAB6 real under these
conditions? How do these LAB6 advantages compare to the costs of
purchase and operation? And would a better recommendation be to spend
funds for other items like an “after-market” BSE detector (i.e. Robinson, etc.).


Thank you!


Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 14:03:42 2004



From: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student) :      mperez-at-umr.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 14:14:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Need help: EBSP sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear MSA members,

I need some tips on EBSP sample prepration for a Zn alloy with additions on Bi and In that have concentrations of {0.3 wt.%. I wish to characterize these phases, which are {1 micron in size. TEM has not worked for me. The material is in powder form, but I have managed to compact them into disks for handling. I tried electropolishing with phosphoric acid and ethanol, and got good results for the Zn matrix (even got a Kikuchi pattern), but I was unable to get a pattern for the Bi-In phases. I believe that these are tarnishing. Can somebody recommend an EBSP sample prep method using mechanical polishing or ion etch? I have a Buehler Vibromet and a PIP tool that may help me. I am still open to electropolishing if anybody has any ideas. All prepared samples will be placed on an FESEM. All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank you! :o)

Martin Perez
Ph D student
University of Missouri-Rolla



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 14:23:48 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 15:34:49 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Clarification: SEM LaB6 vs W-

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Yes, folks I realize that across the board microscope vendors have moved
to concentrate on both W- or FEG scopes, with LaB6 left by the way side or
in the middle. And yes, FEG is the way to go - but with two caveats: (1) FEG
is $120-190K more than W- for every thing else the same, and (2) service
contracts are $17-20K more per year. So these are two BIG reasons to look
at LaB6.




Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 15:11:21 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 21:13:49 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Coming from a physical sciences background, this is something that
has often puzzled me - apologies if I have missed something obvious.

When making measurements on regular biological structures, such as
muscle fibres, why not use diffraction?

The big advantage, it would seem to me, is that a single diffraction
pattern immediately and automatically gives average spacings over a
large number of individual fibres, something that would require
several images and a great deal of tedious measurement (almost
guaranteed to lead to errors).

In this case, couldn't 20 diffraction patterns (one from each sample)
give statistically better data than the 800 measurements from images?

Of course, there are disadvantages - you need a TEM capable of
operating at long camera lengths (although most, as far as I am
aware, can) and you need to calibrate the TEM for operation at such
camera lengths. Even so, I still think you would take less time and
the results would be statistically better.
--
Larry Stoter

NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 18:27:36 2004



From: Ralph Common :      Ralph.Common-at-ht.msu.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 19:37:48 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] morphometry question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Most of the previous responders have made valid points, but many important
issues have been neglected. First you stated

"I have been asked to measure the width of 20 muscle fibers for each
specimen
and the diameter of 20 individual fibers on cross section in each group."

Do you mean that you need to measure the diameter of individual myofibrils
in addition to the diameter of the myofibers? And how do you intend to
measure the "diameter" or "width"? of these structures? Traditionally,
muscle fibers (in cross section) are measured by their "least diameter",
which can be defined as the distance between the closest parallel lines that
can be drawn around the fiber. This measurement is used because it is less
sensitive to error caused by poor orientation than other values, such as
area, circumference, or maximum diameter.

It will be much quicker and cost effective to measure the myofibers by light
microscopy. If myofibrils must also be measured, TEM will obviously be
required for those measurements. But for both types of measurements,
careful thought must be given to the sampling procedure as well as the total
number of structures measured. Because muscle fibers are more like
irregular polyhedrons than cylinders, even the least diameter statistic is
affected to some extent by orientation. Heart tissue is particularly
problematic because the fibers are not all parallel, and fascicles will be
seen in different orientation in the same section. When a muscle fiber
contracts, it's diameter increases. During fixation of muscle it is common
for some areas to become hyper contracted and other areas to become hyper
extended. Skeletal muscle is "stretched" during fixation with some kind of
clamping device to minimize this, but this is rarely done with heart. The
diameters of the fibers and fibrils will also be affected by the quality of
the fixation and the osmolarity of the fixative. You may well see variation
between areas on the surface of the sample versus those deeper in.

The upshot of this is that even if large numbers of fibers are measured from
each sample, the results will be meaningless unless the sampling procedure
is appropriate. There may well be greater variations between areas within
each sample than between the samples as a whole. You may need to do an
analysis of variance (ANOVA) looking at variation within an area of a
sample, between different areas of a sample, between samples with the same
treatment, and between treatments, in order to determine if there is a real
difference between the treatments. If you are trying to find subtle
differences, 800 measurements may not be nearly enough. Also, your
investigators may be interested in the distribution of fiber diameters (the
results are usually displayed as histograms), not just the means, and that
would require even larger numbers. If the samples are not well prepared and
handled identically, the project may be hopeless.

The good news is that the least diameter measurements are not difficult or
time consuming if you have an appropriate morphometry program. I routinely
measure 400-800 fibers per case for muscle biopsies, and that takes less
than 2 hours. If you do not have a morphometry package, NIH Image (for Mac)
and SCION Image (for Windows) are available as free downloads.


Ralph Common
Electron Microscopist
Michigan State University
Division of Human Pathology
A608 East Fee Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824
517-355-7558; fax 517-432-1053
ralph.common-at-ht.msu.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 22:49:34 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 21:00:40 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello all:

I have two separate issues regarding 16-bit TIFF
files that I cannot get resolved. Perhaps someone
has run into one or both of these issues.

EDAX: The direct active image capture will go up
to 4096 or in my case, 8192 pixels at 1.33 aspect
ratio. However, the images are 8-bit. Well, the
image capture ADC is 12-bits...4096 shades. There
does not seem a way to capture an image as 16-bit
TIFF. Very frustrating. Is there some way around this?

LEO: The LEO32 GUI will save TIFF files as 16-bit
but the files are not readable on any system other
than the LEO SEM. The 8-bit files are standard TIFF.
The LEO ADC is also 12-bit. So why can't the 16-bit
TIFF be read by some other app? Photoshop will not
read it. ImageJ will not read it. Nothing I have will.

Any ideas?


tnx,
gary g.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 00:00:13 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 22:10:57 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Need help: EBSP sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If you are compressing the powders in to a pellet, there is a high risk
of plastically deforming phases enough to blur any pattern. In that
case, no prep technique will yield patterns.

John Mardinly
408-765-2346
877-277-1182


-----Original Message-----
} From: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student) [mailto:mperez-at-umr.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 12:15 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Dear MSA members,

I need some tips on EBSP sample prepration for a Zn alloy with additions
on Bi and In that have concentrations of {0.3 wt.%. I wish to
characterize these phases, which are {1 micron in size. TEM has not
worked for me. The material is in powder form, but I have managed to
compact them into disks for handling. I tried electropolishing with
phosphoric acid and ethanol, and got good results for the Zn matrix
(even got a Kikuchi pattern), but I was unable to get a pattern for the
Bi-In phases. I believe that these are tarnishing. Can somebody
recommend an EBSP sample prep method using mechanical polishing or ion
etch? I have a Buehler Vibromet and a PIP tool that may help me. I am
still open to electropolishing if anybody has any ideas. All prepared
samples will be placed on an FESEM. All responses are greatly
appreciated. Thank you! :o)

Martin Perez
Ph D student
University of Missouri-Rolla






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 02:18:25 2004



From: Witold Zielinski :      WIZIEL-at-INMAT.PW.EDU.PL
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 09:29:37 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Need help: EBSP sample prep

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

*Subject: [Microscopy] Need help: EBSP sample prep
*Date sent: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 14:14:40 -0600
*From: "Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student)" {mperez-at-umr.edu}
*To: {Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com}

*
*
*------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello:

Maybe it would be goog idea to check www.hkltechnology.com page.
There is a lot of useful information and papers too.

Good luck.

Best regards,

Witold Zielinski


*Dear MSA members,
*
*I need some tips on EBSP sample prepration for a Zn alloy with additions on Bi and In that have concentrations of {0.3 wt.%. I wish to characterize these phases, which are {1 micron in size. TEM ha

* not worked for me. The material is in powder form, but I have managed to compact them into disks for handling. I tried electropolishing with phosphoric acid and ethanol, and got good results for

*he Zn matrix (even got a Kikuchi pattern), but I was unable to get a pattern for the Bi-In phases. I believe that these are tarnishing. Can somebody recommend an EBSP sample prep method using mech

*nical polishing or ion etch? I have a Buehler Vibromet and a PIP tool that may help me. I am still open to electropolishing if anybody has any ideas. All prepared samples will be placed on an FESE

*. All responses are greatly appreciated. Thank you! :o)
*
*Martin Perez
*Ph D student
*University of Missouri-Rolla
*
*
*
:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) ;)

Witold Zielinski, Ph.D.
Warsaw University of Technology
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
02-507 Warszawa, Woloska 141
POLAND

phone #: /48 22/ 660 87 07
660 87 36
fax #: /48 22/ 848 48 75

email: wiziel-at-inmat.pw.edu.pl


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 04:02:39 2004



From: Steve Chapman :      protrain-at-emcourses.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 09:57:18 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Quality Challenge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

Back in sand free civilisation again after my trip to Egypt I note that not
one person took up my challenge to take a look at their laboratories
performance by way of www.iaaem.com/mppa1 .

We all seem to agree that the standards of EM output that we see in journals
have dropped. You may not agree with what the quality people have
developed, but you do
have to admit that we do not have, anywhere in the world, a standard by
which
EM units may be judged. Country by country the ISO/Quality procedures are
moving in. In time everyone will have to conform to some form of quality
standard, why not get ahead of the game?

In Australia the Quality movement is being spread country wide fast and
furious. Building on their theme of inter laboratory co-operation on
instrumentation they seem to be tackling the future of electron microscopy
with a very positive attitude Not all will survive, so they are making sure
everything is being done working together to set a very firm foundation for
their future.

On my travels it frightens me when I see how good some laboratories are and
how poor are some others. It is not the actual standard that really
concerns me, it is the perceived position of these laboratories within a
specific region. Are the perceived top laboratories really putting out the
best work, or do they just rely upon their reputation?

I hope this is worth a thought?

Steve Chapman
Senior Consultant Protrain
Electron Microscopy Training and Consultancy World Wide
Tel +44 (0)1280 816512 Fax +44 (0)1280 814007 Mob 07711 606967
www.emcourses.com






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 04:56:45 2004



From: Raivo Raid :      rraid-at-ut.ee
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 13:07:00 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] Diagrams of Zeiss CEM902

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers:

We got used Zeiss CEM902. After installation and initial switch on a
resistor in the Lens Current Unit(?) and a wired connection between resistor
and condenser in the Power Supply were burned out. To find out the reason(s)
we need Circuit Diagrams. I would be very pleased if anyone could send
theses about appropriate units.


Dr.Raivo Raid, PhD

Institute of Zoology&Hydrobiology
University of Tartu
Vanemuise 46
51014 Tartu
Estonia
Tel. +372 7 375840
Fax +372 7 375830




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 07:55:46 2004



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 08:35:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Martin,

It might be worthwhile to take a look at the following papers from a group
at the University in Saarbrucken in Germany. Both papers provide extensive
information on the optimal polishing of a wide range of materials.

1.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part I: Metals
Prakt. Metallogr. 38, 10, pp.547-565

2.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part II:
Ceramics Prakt. Metallogr. 39, 12, pp.644-662

Rene de Kloe
EDAX-TSL



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 27 January, 2004 07:11
To: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student); Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com


Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Prof. Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Pennsylvania State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Question: The Materials Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a Transmission Electron Microscopist to oversee its TEM facilities. The facility supports a wide variety of materials research programs at Penn State. The Facility Manager will have primary responsibility for management and operation of the JEOL 2010F, JEOL 2010 LaB6 and Philips CM20 TEMs and auxiliary equipment, which reside in the facility. The Facility Manager will oversee training of PSU students, faculty and staff on TEM-related equipment and software and assist users with performing advanced microscopy techniques.

A MS is required with a PhD preferred in Materials, Physical Sciences or Engineering. The prospective candidate must have a strong background in the theory and practice of TEM microcharacterizaton with a minimum of 5 years post-graduate experience. The candidate should also have experience with vacuum technology, electronics, and computers. Strong interpersonal and communications skills are essential.

Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Prof. Elizabeth Dickey, The Pennsylvania State University, 223 MRL Building, University Park, PA 16802. In addition, candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the above address.

Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 09:07:35 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 10:18:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gary;

Does the TIFF images that are saved in 16 bit format have a "TIF" extension or are they similar to a "composite" image as would be saved by PCI Quartz for example? I ask because PCI Quartz saves both the TIF image and the data that has annotations on it and can only be opened in that form by the PCI application.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

Peter
-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 12:01 AM
To: MSA listserver

Hello all:

I have two separate issues regarding 16-bit TIFF
files that I cannot get resolved. Perhaps someone
has run into one or both of these issues.

EDAX: The direct active image capture will go up
to 4096 or in my case, 8192 pixels at 1.33 aspect
ratio. However, the images are 8-bit. Well, the
image capture ADC is 12-bits...4096 shades. There
does not seem a way to capture an image as 16-bit
TIFF. Very frustrating. Is there some way around this?

LEO: The LEO32 GUI will save TIFF files as 16-bit
but the files are not readable on any system other
than the LEO SEM. The 8-bit files are standard TIFF.
The LEO ADC is also 12-bit. So why can't the 16-bit
TIFF be read by some other app? Photoshop will not
read it. ImageJ will not read it. Nothing I have will.

Any ideas?


tnx,
gary g.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 09:42:11 2004



From: Rick Mott :      rickmott-at-alumni.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 10:53:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Quality Challenge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Steve Chapman wrote:

} Country by country the ISO/Quality procedures are
} moving in. In time everyone will have to conform to some form of quality
} standard ...

Yes, but my problem with ISO9000 and its ilk is that it is
much more concerned with documentation and reproducibility
than with what you and I would call quality. Reproducible
mediocrity, generated by a well-defined procedure, is just fine.
In fact, I might argue that your perceived decline in average
quality is CAUSED by the assumption that as long as it's ISO
compliant, it's good enough, so there's no point in investing
additional time to optimize. Cut-and-dried canned procedures
allow managers to use lower-level personnel.

Additionally, IMO, the documentation burden inhibits innovation
by encasing whatever you do now in concrete. That is certainly
true for small US manufacturers in conforming to CE requirements.
The cost of change is insignificant for a large consumer electronics
firm, but quite large for the smaller companies that largely serve
the microscopy field.

And who's to say that's not what the majority of the customer
base actually wants? Predictability over excellence or innovation?

Rick Mott




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 09:45:44 2004



From: Eric The Desert Rat :      biology-at-ucla.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 07:56:42 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Durst Enlarger

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,

I have a Durst Enlarger with all accessories and a Ilford light source now.
I have a interested party, but have no idea as to what or how to price the
instrument?

Any suggestions would be helpful..

Eric
UCLA Medical Center
Electron Microscopy Lab





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 11:01:39 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 09:12:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I put the same image as 8-bit and 16-bit
here:

www.microtechnics.com/leo_td_08.tif

www.microtechnics.com/leo_td_16.tif

These are as they came off of a Supra 55.
They are named tif by the system. Windows
TIFF reader does not like the 8-bit files
but Photoshop does. The 16-bit files come
out as grey snow--all garbaged bits. ImageJ
correctly reads the image frame size (1024x768)
and has a offset but it too can't read the image
file.

For 16-bit analySIS files, save as 16-bits and
do Image/Auto Level in Photoshop.

gary g.


At 07:18 AM 1/27/2004, you wrote:
} Gary;
}
} Does the TIFF images that are saved in 16 bit format have a "TIF"
} extension or are they similar to a "composite" image as would be saved by
} PCI Quartz for example? I ask because PCI Quartz saves both the TIF image
} and the data that has annotations on it and can only be opened in that
} form by the PCI application.
}
} Peter Tomic
} Agere Systems
}
} Peter
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 12:01 AM
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX and LEO 16-bit files
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 13:07:28 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 14:22:36 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Martin,

It might be worthwhile to take a look at the following papers from a group
at the University in Saarbrucken in Germany. Both papers provide extensive
information on the optimal polishing of a wide range of materials.

1.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part I: Metals
Prakt. Metallogr. 38, 10, pp.547-565

2.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part II:
Ceramics Prakt. Metallogr. 39, 12, pp.644-662

Rene de Kloe
EDAX-TSL



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 27 January, 2004 07:11
To: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student); Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Gary:

The 16 bit image you posted does open correctly in Graphics Converter if you
tell it to swap the order of the bytes. When opened in Photoshop, what you are
apparently seeing is the low byte (essentially random values) first. That
suggests that the Leo folks set one of the (many) flags in the tif format wrong.
Tif is really a collection of possibilities rather than a well defined format.
There are so many combinations that not even Adobe, who is the caretaker of
the standard, opens all of the legal variants in programs like Photoshop. I've
seen someone's estimate that there are at least 160 combinations of legal
settings. If in addition to that, someone gets one of the flags wrong, there is no
limit to the confusion that can result. this time it looks like the fault is
Leo's but in general many companies use and abuse the tif format. Still, it's
better than something that is purely proprietary and undocumented.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 13:18:15 2004



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 08:35:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Prof. Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Pennsylvania State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Question: The Materials Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a Transmission Electron Microscopist to oversee its TEM facilities. The facility supports a wide variety of materials research programs at Penn State. The Facility Manager will have primary responsibility for management and operation of the JEOL 2010F, JEOL 2010 LaB6 and Philips CM20 TEMs and auxiliary equipment, which reside in the facility. The Facility Manager will oversee training of PSU students, faculty and staff on TEM-related equipment and software and assist users with performing advanced microscopy techniques.

A MS is required with a PhD preferred in Materials, Physical Sciences or Engineering. The prospective candidate must have a strong background in the theory and practice of TEM microcharacterizaton with a minimum of 5 years post-graduate experience. The candidate should also have experience with vacuum technology, electronics, and computers. Strong interpersonal and communications skills are essential.

Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Prof. Elizabeth Dickey, The Pennsylvania State University, 223 MRL Building, University Park, PA 16802. In addition, candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the above address.

Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 13:34:56 2004



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 08:35:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Prof. Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Pennsylvania State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Question: The Materials Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a Transmission Electron Microscopist to oversee its TEM facilities. The facility supports a wide variety of materials research programs at Penn State. The Facility Manager will have primary responsibility for management and operation of the JEOL 2010F, JEOL 2010 LaB6 and Philips CM20 TEMs and auxiliary equipment, which reside in the facility. The Facility Manager will oversee training of PSU students, faculty and staff on TEM-related equipment and software and assist users with performing advanced microscopy techniques.

A MS is required with a PhD preferred in Materials, Physical Sciences or Engineering. The prospective candidate must have a strong background in the theory and practice of TEM microcharacterizaton with a minimum of 5 years post-graduate experience. The candidate should also have experience with vacuum technology, electronics, and computers. Strong interpersonal and communications skills are essential.

Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Prof. Elizabeth Dickey, The Pennsylvania State University, 223 MRL Building, University Park, PA 16802. In addition, candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the above address.

Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 13:42:30 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 10:18:28 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Gary;

Does the TIFF images that are saved in 16 bit format have a "TIF" extension or are they similar to a "composite" image as would be saved by PCI Quartz for example? I ask because PCI Quartz saves both the TIF image and the data that has annotations on it and can only be opened in that form by the PCI application.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

Peter
-----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 12:01 AM
To: MSA listserver

Hello all:

I have two separate issues regarding 16-bit TIFF
files that I cannot get resolved. Perhaps someone
has run into one or both of these issues.

EDAX: The direct active image capture will go up
to 4096 or in my case, 8192 pixels at 1.33 aspect
ratio. However, the images are 8-bit. Well, the
image capture ADC is 12-bits...4096 shades. There
does not seem a way to capture an image as 16-bit
TIFF. Very frustrating. Is there some way around this?

LEO: The LEO32 GUI will save TIFF files as 16-bit
but the files are not readable on any system other
than the LEO SEM. The 8-bit files are standard TIFF.
The LEO ADC is also 12-bit. So why can't the 16-bit
TIFF be read by some other app? Photoshop will not
read it. ImageJ will not read it. Nothing I have will.

Any ideas?


tnx,
gary g.







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:09:10 2004



From: marc.walton-at-lacma.org (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 15:20:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: firm to service a Stereoscan 200 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Email: marc.walton-at-lacma.org
Name: Marc Walton

Organization: Los Angeles County Museum

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for a firm to service the Los Angeles County Museum's Cambridge Stereoscan 200 SEM. We are looking for a someone to assess the health of the instrument, to provide recommendations for upgrades, and then to possibly provide ongoing emergency service. Could anyone recommend such a company?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:39:10 2004



From: Raivo Raid :      rraid-at-ut.ee
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 13:07:00 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] Diagrams of Zeiss CEM902

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hello Listers:

We got used Zeiss CEM902. After installation and initial switch on a
resistor in the Lens Current Unit(?) and a wired connection between resistor
and condenser in the Power Supply were burned out. To find out the reason(s)
we need Circuit Diagrams. I would be very pleased if anyone could send
theses about appropriate units.


Dr.Raivo Raid, PhD

Institute of Zoology&Hydrobiology
University of Tartu
Vanemuise 46
51014 Tartu
Estonia
Tel. +372 7 375840
Fax +372 7 375830





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:59:17 2004



From: Rick Mott :      rickmott-at-alumni.princeton.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 10:53:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Quality Challenge

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Steve Chapman wrote:

} Country by country the ISO/Quality procedures are
} moving in. In time everyone will have to conform to some form of quality
} standard ...

Yes, but my problem with ISO9000 and its ilk is that it is
much more concerned with documentation and reproducibility
than with what you and I would call quality. Reproducible
mediocrity, generated by a well-defined procedure, is just fine.
In fact, I might argue that your perceived decline in average
quality is CAUSED by the assumption that as long as it's ISO
compliant, it's good enough, so there's no point in investing
additional time to optimize. Cut-and-dried canned procedures
allow managers to use lower-level personnel.

Additionally, IMO, the documentation burden inhibits innovation
by encasing whatever you do now in concrete. That is certainly
true for small US manufacturers in conforming to CE requirements.
The cost of change is insignificant for a large consumer electronics
firm, but quite large for the smaller companies that largely serve
the microscopy field.

And who's to say that's not what the majority of the customer
base actually wants? Predictability over excellence or innovation?

Rick Mott





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 16:32:58 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 16:44:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] HRP damage to membranes in vivo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have used horseradish peroxidase as a tracer in vivo in the past and am
aware that it can damage cells and cross membranes with prolonged
exposure. I am now trying to find a reference that demonstrates this
fact. A literature search using Medline is difficult on this topic since
it is hard to come up with a good Boolean logic search of keywords (this is
one of two problems that I am posting that I am having a difficult time
searching the literature for). Any citations would be greatly
appreciated. TIA, tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 16:35:05 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 16:47:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM & TEM on same sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I know this is a longshot but has anyone ever seen a paper where someone
looked at a sample by SEM and then embedded the sample and looked at the
exact same cells by TEM? A literature search using Medline is difficult
on this topic since it is hard to come up with a good Boolean logic search
of keywords that doesn't pull up 1000's of non-relevant TEM & SEM
papers. (this is one of two problems that I am posting that I am having a
difficult time searching the literature for). Any citations would be
greatly appreciated. TIA, tom

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 20:04:06 2004



From: Allan Mitchell :      allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:15:02 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM & TEM on same sample

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Thomas

I did quite a bit of this sort of work many years ago. Works quite
well although the organelle ultrastructure does suffer a little.
Don't expect the same clarity of membranes as a specimen processed
directly for TEM.

The text 'Principles and Techniques of Scanning Electron Microscopy'
by Hayat, has a chapter outlining the method. Chapter 5 written by
M.Gary Wickham and David M. Worthen.

Also Chaptr 11 written by Willis K. Paul.

In our library this text had the code QH 212.53. If you wish I could
check whether our library still has this book for an ISBN number. We
are talking 1974 edition.

Other references at the time,

Anat Rec (1973) Vol 176, pp 245-252. Samuel M. Meller, et al.
Transmission electron microscopy of critical point dried tissue after
observation in the scanning electron microscope.

Cell Tissue Research Vol 162 pp 61-73 (1975) D.E. Scott, et al. The
Primate Median Eminence. Correlative scanning transmission electron
microscopy.

Cell Tissue Research Vol 190 pp 317-336 (1978) D.E. Scott, et al.
Coorelative Scanning-Transmission EM Examination of the Perinatal rat
brain.


Human Reproduction (1991), Vol 6 pp 645-660, and Human Reproduction
(1992), Vol 7, pp 446 - 452. W.R. Gillet et al, Both to do with
human ovary, examined in SEM then same sample examined in TEM.


At the time we played around with doing SEM on blocks that had
ultrathins cut from them. Worked really well also.

Hope this gets you started

Allan







}
} I know this is a longshot but has anyone ever seen a paper where
} someone looked at a sample by SEM and then embedded the sample and
} looked at the exact same cells by TEM? A literature search using
} Medline is difficult on this topic since it is hard to come up with
} a good Boolean logic search of keywords that doesn't pull up 1000's
} of non-relevant TEM & SEM papers. (this is one of two problems that
} I am posting that I am having a difficult time searching the
} literature for). Any citations would be greatly appreciated. TIA,
} tom
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
--
-------------------------------------------------
Allan Mitchell
Technical Manager
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
C/-Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

-----------------------------------------------------------------
2005 Microscopy Conference in Dunedin:
http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/Conference_2005/Microscopy_NZ_2005.html

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 7254

EM Centre: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/
Confocal Centre: http://occm.otago.ac.nz/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 00:39:45 2004



From: Spehner Daniele :      daniele.spehner-at-efs-alsace.fr
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 10:34:56 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: HRP damage to membranes in vivo

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Martin,

It might be worthwhile to take a look at the following papers from a group
at the University in Saarbrucken in Germany. Both papers provide extensive
information on the optimal polishing of a wide range of materials.

1.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part I: Metals
Prakt. Metallogr. 38, 10, pp.547-565

2.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part II:
Ceramics Prakt. Metallogr. 39, 12, pp.644-662

Rene de Kloe
EDAX-TSL



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 27 January, 2004 07:11
To: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student); Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Search for Gareth Griffiths, he has done a lot of HRP experiments as I know
Good luck
danièle


--------------------------------------------
Danièle Spehner, INSERM EPI 99-08 - EFS-Alsace
10 rue Spielmann - 67065 STRASBOURG
tel : 03 88 21 25 25 - fax : 03 88 21 25 44
e-mail : daniele.spehner-at-efs-alsace.fr
------------------------------------


-----Message d'origine-----
De : Tom Phillips [mailto:phillipst-at-missouri.edu]
Envoyé : mardi 27 janvier 2004 23:45
À : Microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
Objet : HRP damage to membranes in vivo




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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I have used horseradish peroxidase as a tracer in vivo in the past and am
aware that it can damage cells and cross membranes with prolonged
exposure. I am now trying to find a reference that demonstrates this
fact. A literature search using Medline is difficult on this topic since
it is hard to come up with a good Boolean logic search of keywords (this is
one of two problems that I am posting that I am having a difficult time
searching the literature for). Any citations would be greatly
appreciated. TIA, tom



Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 04:28:22 2004



From: Cristina Almansa :      Almansa-at-ua.es
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:34:39 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] ion milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi everybody!
My University have received some money to buy an ion milling (with a
dimple grinder, a disc puncher, a disc grinder etc) to prepare samples
for TEM. I have to decide between Gatan and Fischione. I would
appreciate very much any opinion about these two companies because I
have to make a decision as soon as possible.
Thank you very much
Cristina Almansa
University of Alicante, Spain




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 04:38:41 2004



From: Cristina Almansa :      Almansa-at-ua.es
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:45:28 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] ion milling

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi everybody!
My University have received some money to buy an ion milling (with a
dimple grinder, a disc puncher, a disc grinder etc) to prepare samples
for TEM. I have to decide between Gatan and Fischione. I would
appreciate very much any opinion about these two companies because I
have to make a decision as soon as possible.
Thank you very much
Cristina Almansa
University of Alicante, Spain



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 05:35:15 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:56:53 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] re: LEO 16 bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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Martin,

It might be worthwhile to take a look at the following papers from a group
at the University in Saarbrucken in Germany. Both papers provide extensive
information on the optimal polishing of a wide range of materials.

1.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part I: Metals
Prakt. Metallogr. 38, 10, pp.547-565

2.
Katrakova, D., Mücklich, F.(2001)
Specimen Preparation for Electron Backscatter Diffraction - Part II:
Ceramics Prakt. Metallogr. 39, 12, pp.644-662

Rene de Kloe
EDAX-TSL



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 27 January, 2004 07:11
To: Perez, Martin Gerardo (UMR-Student); Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

I sent the image that Gary posted to Chris Cox at Adobe. Adobe is the
caretaker of the TIFF standard and Chris is the person who is directly in charge of
the Photoshop code that reads and writes files. His reply is below. Somebody
needs to tell LEO to correct their file writing routine!

} From: Chris Cox {ccox-at-adobe.com}
} Date: January 27, 2004 10:18:56 PM EST
}
} The file in question is little endian, 16 bit/sample, 1 sample,
} uncompressed, black is zero photometric interpretation.
}
} As far as I can tell, Photoshop is reading the image 100% correctly.
}
} BUT - the file is written incorrectly.
} They handled the byte order on the tags, but failed to handle the byte
} order on the image data.
} If I change the byte order info halfway through the decode process in
} Photoshop, we read the image correctly (SEM image of what looks like a
} semiconductor wafer surface showing one trace and one partial trace
} plus some pits).
}
} So, it's up to whomever wrote this file to fix their TIFF writing code.
} I can't believe they'd make such a novice mistake.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 06:51:40 2004



From: Gary Gaugler :      gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 09:12:43 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: EDAX and LEO 16-bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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I put the same image as 8-bit and 16-bit
here:

www.microtechnics.com/leo_td_08.tif

www.microtechnics.com/leo_td_16.tif

These are as they came off of a Supra 55.
They are named tif by the system. Windows
TIFF reader does not like the 8-bit files
but Photoshop does. The 16-bit files come
out as grey snow--all garbaged bits. ImageJ
correctly reads the image frame size (1024x768)
and has a offset but it too can't read the image
file.

For 16-bit analySIS files, save as 16-bits and
do Image/Auto Level in Photoshop.

gary g.


At 07:18 AM 1/27/2004, you wrote:
} Gary;
}
} Does the TIFF images that are saved in 16 bit format have a "TIF"
} extension or are they similar to a "composite" image as would be saved by
} PCI Quartz for example? I ask because PCI Quartz saves both the TIF image
} and the data that has annotations on it and can only be opened in that
} form by the PCI application.
}
} Peter Tomic
} Agere Systems
}
} Peter
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Gary Gaugler [mailto:gary-at-gaugler.com]
} Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 12:01 AM
} To: MSA listserver
} Subject: [Microscopy] EDAX and LEO 16-bit files
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 06:53:30 2004



From: marc.walton-at-lacma.org (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 15:20:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: firm to service a Stereoscan 200 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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Email: marc.walton-at-lacma.org
Name: Marc Walton

Organization: Los Angeles County Museum

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for a firm to service the Los Angeles County Museum's Cambridge Stereoscan 200 SEM. We are looking for a someone to assess the health of the instrument, to provide recommendations for upgrades, and then to possibly provide ongoing emergency service. Could anyone recommend such a company?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 07:06:56 2004



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 08:35:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Prof. Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Pennsylvania State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Question: The Materials Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a Transmission Electron Microscopist to oversee its TEM facilities. The facility supports a wide variety of materials research programs at Penn State. The Facility Manager will have primary responsibility for management and operation of the JEOL 2010F, JEOL 2010 LaB6 and Philips CM20 TEMs and auxiliary equipment, which reside in the facility. The Facility Manager will oversee training of PSU students, faculty and staff on TEM-related equipment and software and assist users with performing advanced microscopy techniques.

A MS is required with a PhD preferred in Materials, Physical Sciences or Engineering. The prospective candidate must have a strong background in the theory and practice of TEM microcharacterizaton with a minimum of 5 years post-graduate experience. The candidate should also have experience with vacuum technology, electronics, and computers. Strong interpersonal and communications skills are essential.

Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Prof. Elizabeth Dickey, The Pennsylvania State University, 223 MRL Building, University Park, PA 16802. In addition, candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the above address.

Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 07:37:13 2004



From: ecd10-at-psu.edu (by way of Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 08:35:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



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The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Email: ecd10-at-psu.edu
Name: Prof. Elizabeth Dickey

Organization: Pennsylvania State University

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: TEM Facility Manager Opening

Question: The Materials Research Institute at the Pennsylvania State University invites applications for a Transmission Electron Microscopist to oversee its TEM facilities. The facility supports a wide variety of materials research programs at Penn State. The Facility Manager will have primary responsibility for management and operation of the JEOL 2010F, JEOL 2010 LaB6 and Philips CM20 TEMs and auxiliary equipment, which reside in the facility. The Facility Manager will oversee training of PSU students, faculty and staff on TEM-related equipment and software and assist users with performing advanced microscopy techniques.

A MS is required with a PhD preferred in Materials, Physical Sciences or Engineering. The prospective candidate must have a strong background in the theory and practice of TEM microcharacterizaton with a minimum of 5 years post-graduate experience. The candidate should also have experience with vacuum technology, electronics, and computers. Strong interpersonal and communications skills are essential.

Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to Prof. Elizabeth Dickey, The Pennsylvania State University, 223 MRL Building, University Park, PA 16802. In addition, candidates should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the above address.

Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity and the diversity of its workforce.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 08:08:10 2004



From: Kuusisto, Ari :      Ari.Kuusisto-at-perkinelmer.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:18:36 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Microscopists,

I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
words

dye
stain
label
marker

The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two opinion
about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has always
to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other school
states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc that
makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Thank you.


Regards
Ari Kuusisto
Research physicist

PerkinElmer Life and Analytical Sciences
tel. +358-2-2678 508
fax. +358-2-2578 357
E-mail: Ari.Kuusisto-at-PerkinElmer.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 08:30:14 2004



From: marc.walton-at-lacma.org (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 15:20:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: firm to service a Stereoscan 200 SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Email: marc.walton-at-lacma.org
Name: Marc Walton

Organization: Los Angeles County Museum

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I am looking for a firm to service the Los Angeles County Museum's Cambridge Stereoscan 200 SEM. We are looking for a someone to assess the health of the instrument, to provide recommendations for upgrades, and then to possibly provide ongoing emergency service. Could anyone recommend such a company?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 08:56:06 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 07:56:53 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] re: LEO 16 bit files

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

I sent the image that Gary posted to Chris Cox at Adobe. Adobe is the
caretaker of the TIFF standard and Chris is the person who is directly in charge of
the Photoshop code that reads and writes files. His reply is below. Somebody
needs to tell LEO to correct their file writing routine!

} From: Chris Cox {ccox-at-adobe.com}
} Date: January 27, 2004 10:18:56 PM EST
}
} The file in question is little endian, 16 bit/sample, 1 sample,
} uncompressed, black is zero photometric interpretation.
}
} As far as I can tell, Photoshop is reading the image 100% correctly.
}
} BUT - the file is written incorrectly.
} They handled the byte order on the tags, but failed to handle the byte
} order on the image data.
} If I change the byte order info halfway through the decode process in
} Photoshop, we read the image correctly (SEM image of what looks like a
} semiconductor wafer surface showing one trace and one partial trace
} plus some pits).
}
} So, it's up to whomever wrote this file to fix their TIFF writing code.
} I can't believe they'd make such a novice mistake.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 12:52:43 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:05:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 28, 2004, at 6:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Dear Ari,
I would define a dye as a substance that imparts color to a substrate.
It need not be specific, so the color could be uniform, such as hair
or cloth dyes. A stain is a substance that imparts visibility to a
substrate, and in the context of microscopy a stain has some
specificity. For LM a stain generally imparts color (i.e., is a type
of dye), and for EM a stain is a stronger scatterer of electrons than
is the substrate. A marker is a substance that adds a recognizable
feature to a substrate. Finally, a label is a marker that is
associated with a particular component of the substrate. Thus, there
are fluorescent dyes that are lipophyllic, so these can be used as
labels for membranes, there are molecules that bind very specifically,
including biotin-avidin, so including but not restricted to
antibody-antigen pairs. These can be bound to markers, such as green
fluorescent protein or colloidal gold, and I call these labels.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 13:20:24 2004



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 13:35:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Duplicate Messages

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

Yes, I see the duplicate messages I am attempting to sort out why it started
it may have to do with the virus attack which is going on in the USA right now.

Unfortunately, I am on the road on the way to the Australian meeting. This
may take me some time to fix as my connectivity will be intermittent.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 13:27:03 2004



From: Kuusisto, Ari :      Ari.Kuusisto-at-perkinelmer.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:18:36 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear Microscopists,

I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
words

dye
stain
label
marker

The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two opinion
about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has always
to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other school
states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc that
makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Thank you.


Regards
Ari Kuusisto
Research physicist

PerkinElmer Life and Analytical Sciences
tel. +358-2-2678 508
fax. +358-2-2578 357
E-mail: Ari.Kuusisto-at-PerkinElmer.com





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 14:12:26 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:37:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

From ESL point of view:
marker is something which left "mark". So, it's tool to make "marks".
Labels usually used to "label" something. So, you may "label" something to
make it recognizable from something else... I would think that label is
something, which someone used to mark some particular stuff. Therefore,
antibody may be a label. Gold particle or fluorochrome may be a label. In
general, I like second definition better. Sergey

At 06:18 AM 1/28/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 14:35:27 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:46:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Nice definition, Bill.

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Bill Tivol [mailto:tivol-at-caltech.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2004 2:05 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


On Jan 28, 2004, at 6:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Dear Ari,
I would define a dye as a substance that imparts color to a substrate.
It need not be specific, so the color could be uniform, such as hair
or cloth dyes. A stain is a substance that imparts visibility to a
substrate, and in the context of microscopy a stain has some
specificity. For LM a stain generally imparts color (i.e., is a type
of dye), and for EM a stain is a stronger scatterer of electrons than
is the substrate. A marker is a substance that adds a recognizable
feature to a substrate. Finally, a label is a marker that is
associated with a particular component of the substrate. Thus, there
are fluorescent dyes that are lipophyllic, so these can be used as
labels for membranes, there are molecules that bind very specifically,
including biotin-avidin, so including but not restricted to
antibody-antigen pairs. These can be bound to markers, such as green
fluorescent protein or colloidal gold, and I call these labels.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 15:00:10 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:37:46 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

From ESL point of view:
marker is something which left "mark". So, it's tool to make "marks".
Labels usually used to "label" something. So, you may "label" something to
make it recognizable from something else... I would think that label is
something, which someone used to mark some particular stuff. Therefore,
antibody may be a label. Gold particle or fluorochrome may be a label. In
general, I like second definition better. Sergey

At 06:18 AM 1/28/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 16:39:20 2004



From: Monson, Frederick :      fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 17:50:22 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Oxford INCA with Feature

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking for some colleagues who are using:

Oxford INCA energy 400 w/Feature

To start up a users group.

Please respond off the list to me personally, and I will share a list
with all respondents, who wish to be shared, within the next two weeks.

Thanks all,

Fred Monson

Frederick C. Monson, PhD
Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
Mail to Geology
West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Schmucker II Science Center, Room SS024
South Church Street and Rosedale Avenue
West Chester, PA, 19383
Phone/FAX: 610-738-0437
eMail: fmonson-at-wcupa.edu
CASI Page and Scheduling
http://darwin.wcupa.edu/CASI/
Directions
http://www.wcupa.edu/_admissions/sch_adm/directs.htm
West Chester Boro
http://www.west-chester.com/
Places to stay
http://www.hotels-motels-n-more.com/PA/West-Chester.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 17:08:52 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:46:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Nice definition, Bill.

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Bill Tivol [mailto:tivol-at-caltech.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2004 2:05 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com


On Jan 28, 2004, at 6:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Dear Ari,
I would define a dye as a substance that imparts color to a substrate.
It need not be specific, so the color could be uniform, such as hair
or cloth dyes. A stain is a substance that imparts visibility to a
substrate, and in the context of microscopy a stain has some
specificity. For LM a stain generally imparts color (i.e., is a type
of dye), and for EM a stain is a stronger scatterer of electrons than
is the substrate. A marker is a substance that adds a recognizable
feature to a substrate. Finally, a label is a marker that is
associated with a particular component of the substrate. Thus, there
are fluorescent dyes that are lipophyllic, so these can be used as
labels for membranes, there are molecules that bind very specifically,
including biotin-avidin, so including but not restricted to
antibody-antigen pairs. These can be bound to markers, such as green
fluorescent protein or colloidal gold, and I call these labels.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 17:33:15 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 11:05:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


On Jan 28, 2004, at 6:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Dear Ari,
I would define a dye as a substance that imparts color to a substrate.
It need not be specific, so the color could be uniform, such as hair
or cloth dyes. A stain is a substance that imparts visibility to a
substrate, and in the context of microscopy a stain has some
specificity. For LM a stain generally imparts color (i.e., is a type
of dye), and for EM a stain is a stronger scatterer of electrons than
is the substrate. A marker is a substance that adds a recognizable
feature to a substrate. Finally, a label is a marker that is
associated with a particular component of the substrate. Thus, there
are fluorescent dyes that are lipophyllic, so these can be used as
labels for membranes, there are molecules that bind very specifically,
including biotin-avidin, so including but not restricted to
antibody-antigen pairs. These can be bound to markers, such as green
fluorescent protein or colloidal gold, and I call these labels.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 17:47:00 2004



From: Kuusisto, Ari :      Ari.Kuusisto-at-perkinelmer.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:18:36 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Dear Microscopists,

I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
words

dye
stain
label
marker

The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two opinion
about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has always
to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other school
states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc that
makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?

Thank you.


Regards
Ari Kuusisto
Research physicist

PerkinElmer Life and Analytical Sciences
tel. +358-2-2678 508
fax. +358-2-2578 357
E-mail: Ari.Kuusisto-at-PerkinElmer.com





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Jan 28 22:59:11 2004



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 23:14:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Duplicate Message Update

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues...

I see that the messages look like they are
being replicated by an EMail pickup service based in Europe.

I'm trying to block this, but I will be offline for the next ~ 24+ hours
so I'll not be able to do anything to track success or failure until
I surface.

If the block does not cure the duplicates please bear with it until I can
get back on-line and investigate further.

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 00:50:57 2004



From: Gareth Morgan :      Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 08:06:55 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi

I would use the word label as being that which allows us to see the
substance that we have probed the tissue for. In
immunohisto/cytochemistry/fluorescence it would be the fluorochrome (eg
FITC), enzyme (eg peroxidase) or a gold particle in immuno-EM.

For me 'marker' is a marker of disease - that is the antigen we are looking
for that tells us the lineage of the cells we see etc.
Med vänliga hälsningar/With best regards

Gareth

***Come to Stockholm in 2004 to the 26th IFBLS congress*** Take a look at
http://www.vardforbundet.se/ifbls2004

http://www.ki.se/biomedlab
e-mail Gareth.Morgan-at-labmed.ki.se

Tel +46 8 5858 1038
Fax +46 8 5858 7730

Gareth Morgan MPhil MSc FIBMS,
Department of Laboratory Medicine (Labmed),
Karolinska Institute,
Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, F46
SE 141 86 Stockholm
Sweden

OBS! Besöksadress: F-Huset, Forskningsgatan 2 F52, Rum 2.10. Laboratoriet
för klinisk patologi och cytologi.

NB! Visiting address: Building F, Research Corridor 2 F52, Room 2.10.
Clinical Histo- and Cytopathology Laboratory.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 05:20:24 2004



From: JUDE Dmello :      j_dmello-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 03:31:26 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Feedback for LM Sample preparation m/c

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To,
MSA LIST Members,
Would like to get performance feedback, from any of
the list members, on the following L.Microscopy sample
preparation Machines of diffrent make,for a technical
review.

1)Precision Diamond sectioning m/c.
Models:-
ISOMET(Buehlers)
VC-50 (Leco)
Metacut-DCM (Metatech)
Diamiond Saw(Geologist Syndicate)
2)Heavy duty abrasive Saw.
Models:-
Lapro Slab Saw(Buehlers)
MSX-250A dual sectioning m/C(Leco)
Metacut 50 (Metatech)
Speciment cut off M/c(Geologist Syndicate)
Thanks 7Regards,
J.J.D'Mello.
ACC LTD,
RCD,Thane India.

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!
http://webhosting.yahoo.com/ps/sb/


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 09:18:57 2004



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 10:29:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Here's how we, cell biologists, usually define these terms:
- Dye: substance that adds color at light microscopy level.
- Stain: substance that adds contrast for the EM. Has some
specificity for some cellular components, but is overall
non-specific as it does not differentiate between different
protein species, for example.
- Label: something used to localize specific cell components
(proteins usually, but also lipids and carbohydrates). Usually
antibodies followed by fluorescent probes or gold conjugates,
but can also refer to histo-cytochemistry.
- Marker: labels that are known to be specific for a given
organelle/cell. For example: catalase is used as a
peroxysome marker, calnexin as an ER marker, etc...

As you can see, each discipline uses its own definitions,
so it would be very hard to normalize these and come up
with a set of definitions that work for everyone. The important
thing is to use the terminology that is generally accepted
within your own discipline, so that other people understand
your work and you can understand theirs!!
Best

Marc

On Wednesday, January 28, 2004, at 09:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Dear Microscopists,
}
} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?
}
} Thank you.
}
}
} Regards
} Ari Kuusisto
} Research physicist
}
} PerkinElmer Life and Analytical Sciences
} tel. +358-2-2678 508
} fax. +358-2-2578 357
} E-mail: Ari.Kuusisto-at-PerkinElmer.com
}
}
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 09:46:13 2004



From: Kathleen Roberts :      kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 11:03:36 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [Histonet] Hematoxylin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We use Gill's.

Kathleen
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxicology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854

mark.lewis-at-thermo.com wrote:

} Hello everyone !
}
} I'm taking a survey to find out which type of Hematoxylin is most commonly
} used in Histology and Cytology labs.
}
} Thanks !
}
} Best regards,
}
} Mark
}
} Mark Lewis
} Product Specialist
} Anatomical Pathology
} Clinical Diagnostics
} Thermo Electron Corporation
} (412) 747-4013
} (412) 788-1097
} E-mail: mark.lewis-at-thermo.com
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________
} Histonet mailing list
} Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 10:52:44 2004



From: Dunlap, Jonathan C. :      Jonathan.Dunlap-at-sylvania.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 12:03:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Tracor Northern EDS Computer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Good Afternoon Everyone,

Free to a good home:
An original Tracor Northern 5500 EDS Computer System Console (without the EDS detector). It was fully functional and working when taken out of service in 2000. You may find it useful for parts or for use if matched up to a detector. The recipient has to arrange for pickup or shipping, but we would be able to get it onto a pallet for you.

Please contact me off-list if you are interested,

Best Regards,
~Jon Dunlap





Jonathan Dunlap
Analytical Laboratory Manager
Osram Sylvania Products Inc.
Precision Materials and Components
816 Lexington Avenue
Warren, PA 16365
Ph: 814-726-6991
Fax: 814-726-6942




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 11:00:31 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 09:12:52 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 29, 2004, at 7:29 AM, Marc Pypaert wrote:

Dear Mark,

} Here's how we, cell biologists, usually define these terms:
} - Dye: substance that adds color at light microscopy level.
} - Stain: substance that adds contrast for the EM. Has some
} specificity for some cellular components, but is overall
} non-specific as it does not differentiate between different
} protein species, for example.

There are also the classics, such as Gram stain, etc., that are LM
stains.

} - Label: something used to localize specific cell components
} (proteins usually, but also lipids and carbohydrates). Usually
} antibodies followed by fluorescent probes or gold conjugates,
} but can also refer to histo-cytochemistry.
} - Marker: labels that are known to be specific for a given
} organelle/cell. For example: catalase is used as a
} peroxysome marker, calnexin as an ER marker, etc...

Also colloidal gold used as a fiducial marker in tomography.
}
} As you can see, each discipline uses its own definitions,
} so it would be very hard to normalize these and come up
} with a set of definitions that work for everyone. The important
} thing is to use the terminology that is generally accepted
} within your own discipline, so that other people understand
} your work and you can understand theirs!!
}
Agreed.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 11:02:07 2004



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 10:29:40 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Proper use of words label, stain, dye, marker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

hello, everyone,
who has Nanoscope IV Controller manual (Revision B, Software Version
5.12r3)?
Can you send me a PDF format of this manual?
I have a manual for Nanoscope IIIa and cannot get a surface potential
imaging according to its instructions.
Since the controller has been upgraded to IV, I want to have a look at the
new manual to see what's the differences.

Thanks.

Minjun

Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Univ. of Notre Dame
574-631-4916



----- Original Message -----
} From: "JUDE Dmello" {j_dmello-at-yahoo.com}
To: "MicroscopyListserver" {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2004 6:31 AM



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Here's how we, cell biologists, usually define these terms:
- Dye: substance that adds color at light microscopy level.
- Stain: substance that adds contrast for the EM. Has some
specificity for some cellular components, but is overall
non-specific as it does not differentiate between different
protein species, for example.
- Label: something used to localize specific cell components
(proteins usually, but also lipids and carbohydrates). Usually
antibodies followed by fluorescent probes or gold conjugates,
but can also refer to histo-cytochemistry.
- Marker: labels that are known to be specific for a given
organelle/cell. For example: catalase is used as a
peroxysome marker, calnexin as an ER marker, etc...

As you can see, each discipline uses its own definitions,
so it would be very hard to normalize these and come up
with a set of definitions that work for everyone. The important
thing is to use the terminology that is generally accepted
within your own discipline, so that other people understand
your work and you can understand theirs!!
Best

Marc

On Wednesday, January 28, 2004, at 09:18 AM, Kuusisto, Ari wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Dear Microscopists,
}
} I have been discussing with various people the the use of the following
} words
}
} dye
} stain
} label
} marker
}
} The problem has been the use of the word "label". There exists two
} opinion
} about the proper use of it. The one states strictly that a label has
} always
} to be coupled to the target with antibody-antigen reaction. The other
} school
} states that a label is generally a molecule or an atom or a bead etc
} that
} makes the target visible in an instrument (eg. a microscope). So plese
} someone, give me an explanation what exactly is a "label" ?
}
} Thank you.
}
}
} Regards
} Ari Kuusisto
} Research physicist
}
} PerkinElmer Life and Analytical Sciences
} tel. +358-2-2678 508
} fax. +358-2-2578 357
} E-mail: Ari.Kuusisto-at-PerkinElmer.com
}
}
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 15:55:16 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 17:03:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [Histonet] Hematoxylin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are a pathology lab for a research group and use Hematoxylin 2 (Richard-Allan
Scientific)for routine H & E's. We also use Gill's III.

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Kathleen Roberts [mailto:kgrobert-at-rci.rutgers.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2004 11:04 AM
To: mark.lewis-at-thermo.com; Microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

We use Gill's.

Kathleen
Principal Lab Technician
Neurotoxicology Labs
Dept of Pharmacology & Toxicology
Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy
Rutgers University
41 B Gordon Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854

mark.lewis-at-thermo.com wrote:

} Hello everyone !
}
} I'm taking a survey to find out which type of Hematoxylin is most commonly
} used in Histology and Cytology labs.
}
} Thanks !
}
} Best regards,
}
} Mark
}
} Mark Lewis
} Product Specialist
} Anatomical Pathology
} Clinical Diagnostics
} Thermo Electron Corporation
} (412) 747-4013
} (412) 788-1097
} E-mail: mark.lewis-at-thermo.com
}
}
}
}
} _______________________________________________
} Histonet mailing list
} Histonet-at-lists.utsouthwestern.edu
} http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 16:13:31 2004



From: kbovard-at-creighton.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 16:24:28 -0600 (CST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: [Histonet] Hematoxylin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} } I'm taking a survey to find out which type of Hematoxylin is most commonly
} } used in Histology and Cytology labs.

Gill's 3.

Karen Bovard
Dept. of Pathology
Creighton University
Omaha, NE


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 16:36:42 2004



From: Mardinly, John :      john.mardinly-at-intel.com
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 14:47:23 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Optical microscopy software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are interested in software for a CCD camera on an optical microscope
that we use for sample screening and documentation, and experiment
design, in the course of doing TEM on microelectronic devices. We
already have the Sony ProScan CCD camera on an Olympus MX-50, but we
want software to drive the camera and rapidly facilitate measurement and
annotation of features seen in the microscope. Any suggestions would be
appreciated. Thanks.

John Mardinly
Intel





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Jan 29 18:26:06 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2004 19:18:01 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: firm to service a

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Marc,
My reply to you got bounced, so I'll try it on the server.
Ken

-------- Original Message --------






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 30 12:05:39 2004



From: John Grazul :      grazul-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2004 13:16:30 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Surplus equipment BLOWOUT!!!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

If someone doesn't take this stuff its going to wind up as an artificial
reef in Lake Cayuga!

Two Gatan Duo Mills, one working, one for your imagination!

One Gatan PIPS system, it works to the best of my knowledge!

One Gatan PIMS system, what can I say! I don't know, just enjoy it for
what it is!

Two vintage VCR dimplers...they are unique!

No reasonable offer will be refused!

Will TRADE for an LKB glass knife maker!

Remember, these items are a heartbeat away from a watery grave in Lake
Cayuga.....


If you are interested please e-mail or call

John Grazul
Cornell University
607 255 6421
grazul-at-ccmr.cornell.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 30 12:33:37 2004



From: Hiromi Konishi :      konishi-at-geofourpeaks.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2004 10:44:23 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Sale for C nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Recently, I bought C nanotube samples from Nanostructured & Amorphous
Materials,Inc. However, it was not good for my experiments. If someone want
to buy this sample, please contact me.

I have 5 g, and I will keep it ~0.3 g. Please look at the following site.
The sample number is MWNT (95+%, OD 40-70 nm), and Stock #: 1242XH.
http://www.nanoamor.com/inc/pdetail?v=1&pid=220

I can provide some TEM images upon request next week. According to their
sample description, it is more than 95% quality. I do not promise this
quality, but there is no contamination I made. The price was 70 dollars plus
tax. My asking price is 45 dollars plus shipping cost. .

Thank you,
Hiromi Konishi, Ph.D.
The University of New Mexico



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 30 15:01:53 2004



From: Xinran Liu :      xinran.liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2004 15:14:16 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Perfusion pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear colleagues:

I am looking for a compact pump for perfusion fixation of mouse brain, the
liquid flow of the pump needs to be controlled by pressure, unfortunately
the most products around are only gauged by the flow rate.

Can anyone help me out? Thanks in advance.

Xinran

Xinran Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
Center for Basic Neuroscience
UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas
Phone: 214-648-1830
Fax: 214-648-1801
E-mail: Xinran.Liu-at-utsouthwestern.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Jan 30 18:52:43 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2004 17:03:45 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Perfusion pump

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Do it with gravity. 1 meter is perfectly fine for mouse brain
perfusion. You could not measure pressure in peristaltic pump commonly
used for such purpose because of pulsation. If you will see liquid coming
from the nose - it actually means the pressure is to high. Meantime it's
vary from mouse to mouse.You also could measure the flow rate. It seems to
me that 1 ml/min is optimal for perfusion. Sergey

At 01:14 PM 1/30/2004, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_____________________________________

Sergey Ryazantsev Ph. D.
Electron Microscopy
UCLA School of Medicine
Department of Biological Chemistry
10833 Le Conte Ave, Room 33-089
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Phone: (310) 825-1144 (office)
(310) 206-1029 (Lab)
FAX (departmental): (310) 206-5272
mailto:sryazant-at-ucla.edu





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 31 12:57:32 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2004 18:33:21 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} I think the short answer will be that such materials don't diffract.
} The spacings are in a whole other realm of size. You would need a
} much longer wavelength to get diffraction. Also, the spacings are
} not so regular as to be able to generate anything like planes of
} atoms. "Peaks" would likely be poorly defined, but variation in
} their shape as well as position might lend some usable information.
}
} Warren
}

I hate to disagree but not only can you do electron diffraction in a
TEM from such structures, I have done it myself. It is even possible
to get a diffraction pattern from the bars of a grid.

As an alternative to electron diffraction, you can do light
diffraction from the negative or do an FFT from a digital image.

In all cases, you very quickly get information on the average spacing
of regular structures and avoid a lot of tedious measurements.

Regards,
--
Larry Stoter
NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Jan 31 14:40:09 2004



From: rburke-at-uvic.ca (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2004 06:59:44 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] WWW: fluorescence source for a Nikon TMD

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (rburke-at-uvic.ca) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Friday, January 30, 2004 at 13:53:06
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: rburke-at-uvic.ca
Name: Robert D. Burke

Organization: University of Victoria

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: I would like to obtain a fluorescence source for a Nikon
TMD inverted microscope. I require a lamphouse, powersupply and
parts to attach it to the microscope. I have the nosepiece and filter
cube assembly. Nikon no longer supports this equipment, but there
companies that make fluorescence units and adaptors. Is there anyone
who has experience with this or knows of a supplier that may help?

Robert Burke

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 2 09:20:03 2004



From: John Grazul :      grazul-at-ccmr.cornell.edu
Date: Mon, 02 Feb 2004 12:06:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] IMPORTANT UPDATE ON: Surplus equipment BLOWOUT!!!!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

John,

I can't find any information about a Sony Proscan camera. Is there another
model name or number that is used for this camera?

mike


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2004 15:47
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I had no idea that I would get such a great response for my precious tools
of the trade. Thanks to everyone who called and e-mailed. The bad news is
that someone in our microscope community has made me an offer I couldn't
refuse (the cast comes off in two months). I'm really sorry that I couldn't
help everyone out, but the deal is done.





} Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2004 13:16:30 -0500
} To: microscopy-at-ns.microscopy.com
} From: John Grazul {grazul-at-ccmr.cornell.edu}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Surplus equipment BLOWOUT!!!!
}
} If someone doesn't take this stuff its going to wind up as an artificial
} reef in Lake Cayuga!
}
} Two Gatan Duo Mills, one working, one for your imagination!
}
} One Gatan PIPS system, it works to the best of my knowledge!
}
} One Gatan PIMS system, what can I say! I don't know, just enjoy it for
} what it is!
}
} Two vintage VCR dimplers...they are unique!
}
} No reasonable offer will be refused!
}
} Will TRADE for an LKB glass knife maker!
}
} Remember, these items are a heartbeat away from a watery grave in Lake
} Cayuga.....
}
}
} If you are interested please e-mail or call
}
} John Grazul
} Cornell University
} 607 255 6421
} grazul-at-ccmr.cornell.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 2 13:08:14 2004



From: Jon Mulholland :      jwm-at-stanford.edu
Date: Mon, 02 Feb 2004 16:18:34 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EM Technical position CA Bay Area

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year

I recently received the email below from Evex.

This isn't for real, is it?

...........down to B?
...........750,000 cps?????
............"excellent" (whatever that means) resolution??

reply off-list if you prefer

cheers

rtch




------- Forwarded message follows -------
Organization: Evex - Nanoanalysis
} From: "Evex - Nanoanalysis.com" {sales-at-nanoanalysis.com}
To: r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz

750,000 cps would mean it would have to have an extraordinary detector and amplifier, not to mention a very short time constant. Shave off two zeros. Evex or someone made a typo. If this is true they should advertise.

"Excellent"? Is that a scalar or vector quantity?

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems

-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 2:22 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Happy New Year

I recently received the email below from Evex.

This isn't for real, is it?

..........down to B?
..........750,000 cps?????
..........."excellent" (whatever that means) resolution??

reply off-list if you prefer

cheers

rtch




------- Forwarded message follows -------
Organization: Evex - Nanoanalysis
} From: "Evex - Nanoanalysis.com" {sales-at-nanoanalysis.com}
To: r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz

Some of the new detector "chips" have gotten pretty fast. I have forgotten
the exact values claimed by the makers of some newly announced detector
chips so cannot comment directly. But...

1) Be sure that is *system* throughput, not just the detector spec.
2) Ask about the FWHM values at low/medium/high energy.
3) Ask about the peak/background ratio.
4) Think of other questions... Often, what the manufacturers *don't* tell
you are the really important things ;)

Woody

\
Woody White
BWXT Services:
http://www.bwxt.com/bwxt.html
My Site:
http://woody.white.home.att.net


-----Original Message-----
} From: Ritchie Sims [mailto:r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz]
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 2:22 PM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Happy New Year

I recently received the email below from Evex.

This isn't for real, is it?

..........down to B?
..........750,000 cps?????
..........."excellent" (whatever that means) resolution??

reply off-list if you prefer

cheers

rtch




------- Forwarded message follows -------
Organization: Evex - Nanoanalysis
} From: "Evex - Nanoanalysis.com" {sales-at-nanoanalysis.com}
To: r.sims-at-auckland.ac.nz

Dear Colleagues,
Please refer this to interested microscopists. Thank-you.

The Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF) at Stanford University's Medical
School is seeking a qualified electron microscopy technician. The position
is a Life Sciences Research Assistant I (LSRAI). At least one year of
experience working in an electron microscopy lab is desired and a minimum
of an Associate Degree in the sciences is required for this
position. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in
biological electron microscopy. The position is currently listed as a 30
hours/week position but is being re-listed as a full time (40 hours/week)
position. There is no money available for relocation. Stanford salary
range is 2P1; actual salary is dependent upon experience and
qualifications. Interested applicants can find more information at
http://hrweb.stanford.edu/jobs/openings/display.cgi?Job_Req=004273&JFam=NIL&JOBCODE=5588
Please apply directly to:

Jon Mulholland, Director
Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
Beckman Center, B050
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305-5301

fax 650-725-4951

jwm-at-stanford.edu
http://taltos.stanford.edu


Jon Mulholland, Director
Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
Beckman Center, B050
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305-5301



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 2 21:26:23 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Mon, 02 Feb 2004 22:37:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Question re Evex

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ritchie,
Actually the numbers fit with the new detectors Rontec (I believe) has
brought out. They made a presentation at NESM's May meeting in Woods
Hole, MA. If I recall correctly, the resolution wasn't bad (140-160 eV
maybe?) and the count rates are simply mind boggling. They also
operate at considerably higher temperatures.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

Ritchie Sims wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 10:52:45 2004



From: Jon Mulholland :      jwm-at-stanford.edu
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2004 09:03:28 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] EM: Updated technical position CA Bay Area

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,
I am re-posting this because Stanford HR has changed the job # and
URL.
Please refer this to interested microscopists. Thank-you.

The Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF) at Stanford University's Medical
School is seeking a qualified electron microscopy technician. The position
is a Life Sciences Research Assistant I (LSRAI). At least one year of
experience working in an electron microscopy lab is desired and a minimum
of an Associate Degree in the sciences is required for this
position. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in
biological electron microscopy. The position is a full time (40
hours/week) position. There is no money available for relocation. Stanford
salary range is 2P1; actual salary is dependent upon experience and
qualifications. Interested applicants can find more information at
http://hrweb.stanford.edu/jobs/openings/display.cgi?Job_Req=004773&JFam=NIL&JOBCODE=5588
Please apply directly to:

Jon Mulholland, Director
Cell Sciences Imaging Facility
Beckman Center, B050
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA 94305-5301

fax 650-725-4951

jwm-at-stanford.edu
http://taltos.stanford.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 11:11:36 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2004 11:22:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolpix Compact Flash Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



We have been using a Nikon Coolpix 990 for several years now and
subsequently added Coolpix 4500. Other than issues with chromatic
aberration, the micrographs are quite usable.

We occasionally experience problems with being unable to retrieve our
images off of the compact flash cards. Files are written to the compact
flash cards as verified by looking at the properties (unused/used space),
however, there are no identifiable files present. Consequently, we reformat
the card and have to reshoot our photos. This is not only inconvenient, but
sometimes the samples have to be re-prepared or an unruly crowd has to sit
and wait.

This occurs with both the 990 and 4500 cameras as well as various brands of
cards and card readers (Lexar and SanDisk). It is not isolated to a
particular computer nor a particular user. Nikon tech support has never
heard of anyone else having this problem.

Anyone out there with similar experiences?

Thanks.

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 12:19:27 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2004 15:24:06 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Coolpix Compact Flash Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alan;
I had a similar problem with a Sony camera using Memory Stick:
If I used the computer to manage the memory, i.e. clearing the memory of
old photos or formatting the card with the computer, the card would
become corrupted. If I use the CAMERA to reformat the card, I never have
any problems.

John Mardinly
Intel

-----Original Message-----
} From: Alan Stone [mailto:as-at-astonmet.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2004 9:22 AM
To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

I've used a Coolpix for some time now, as well as several other cameras from
Canon, Pentax and Sony that use CF, memory stick and SD flash memory. With all
of them I've found that formatting the memory in the camera is the best
solution. In my case, I sometimes read the memory in a Mac and sometimes in a PC.
If I format the memory in the camera, both operating systems will read the
files without difficulty. If the memory is formatted in the computer, the camera
usually sees it OK but the other computer system sometimes has difficulties.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 14:20:48 2004



From: Jim Romanow :      bsgphy3-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2004 16:03:20 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Coolpix Compact Flash Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Sorry, but I can't resist asking:

Has anyone reported this to NASA and JPL ? :-)

Thank you;

John W. Raffensperger, Jr.
IS Manager
Helwig Carbon Products, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
} From: Mardinly, John [mailto:john.mardinly-at-intel.com]
Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2004 12:30 PM
To: Alan Stone; microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Alan,

Two questions.
1) Can you see the 'missing' images using the camera's playback function
('defective' CF card in camera)?
2) If so, can you download those images from the camera to your computer
via the USB cable?

If the answer to above questions is yes than you may have an intermittent
computer/CF card management problem. I always format my cards in the
camera. CF cards do fail of course but I have taken over 1000 pix using
Lexar and Transcend cards on a Canon G3. No lost images yet.
Good luck,
Jim





} Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2004 11:22:24 -0600
} To: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
} From: Alan Stone {as-at-astonmet.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Coolpix Compact Flash Problems

}
}
} We have been using a Nikon Coolpix 990 for several years now and
} subsequently added Coolpix 4500. Other than issues with chromatic
} aberration, the micrographs are quite usable.
}
} We occasionally experience problems with being unable to retrieve our
} images off of the compact flash cards. Files are written to the compact
} flash cards as verified by looking at the properties (unused/used space),
} however, there are no identifiable files present. Consequently, we reformat
} the card and have to reshoot our photos. This is not only inconvenient, but
} sometimes the samples have to be re-prepared or an unruly crowd has to sit
} and wait.
}
} This occurs with both the 990 and 4500 cameras as well as various brands of
} cards and card readers (Lexar and SanDisk). It is not isolated to a
} particular computer nor a particular user. Nikon tech support has never
} heard of anyone else having this problem.
}
} Anyone out there with similar experiences?
}
} Thanks.
}
} Alan Stone
} ASTON Metallurgical Services
}

James S. Romanow
The University of Connecticut
Physiology and Neurobiology Department
Electron Microscopy Facility
Unit 3242
91 North Eagleville Road
BSP Building, Room G06
Storrs, CT 06269-3242

860 486-2914 voice
860 486-6369 fax
james.romanow-at-uconn.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 15:03:19 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Tue, 03 Feb 2004 15:14:02 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Follow Up to Coolpix Compact Flash Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I want to clarify that all of the formatting and re-formatting has been
done directly in the Coolpix cameras and never in the computers.

This is such an erratic problem that we don't see any patterns. It appears
to be some type of index writing problem, maybe the sessions are not
properly closing out. We added time between turning off the camera and
removing the chip to ensure that we give the camera enough time. It did not
help. It also is unrelated to how many pictures have been taken, whether
the card is new, used or old.

We will be doing a trial to keep the cards from being mixed between the
different cameras. I don't believe that is an issue as we have had failures
shortly after re-formatting.

If you do had similar problems, then please contact Nikon's tech support.
Again, they tell me I am the only one reporting this.

Regards,

Alan Stone
ASTON





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 15:47:20 2004



From: George Laing :      scisales-at-ngscorp.com
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2004 16:58:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Coolpix Compact Flash Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Formatting in camera is generally a good idea. If you must format
in a PC with Windows XP or 2000, make sure you format the card using "FAT"
and not "FAT 32". With the exception of a few new high end models, most
cameras will not recognize media formatted FAT 32.

George

George Laing
National Graphic Supply
800.223.7130 x3109
scisales-at-ngscorp.com




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 3 18:16:32 2004



From: kemmons-at-wrfseattle.org (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 07:53:03 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: installed base of scanning and/or transmission electron

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (kemmons-at-wrfseattle.org) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, February 3, 2004 at 13:19:57
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: kemmons-at-wrfseattle.org
Name: Kim Emmons

Organization: Washington Research Foundation

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Can anyone tell me what the installed base of scanning
and/or transmission electron microscopes is in the U.S. or worldwide,
or otherwise point me to a resource which can do so?

I am also intersted in statistics on the number of samples processed
for a given period of time on the average machine, but I suspect it
varies widely from one user to the next. If anyone would like to
volunteer information from their own experience, it would be helpful.

Thank you,
Kim Emmons

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 03:19:17 2004



From: G.J. Brakenhoff :      brakenhoff-at-science.uva.nl
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 11:21:42 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] FOM2004 Extension abstract deadline.

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alan

the only other suggestion that I can make is that maybe the camera has still been powered up when you have removed the card for reading, because I know that there have been reports that this can cause problems.

Malcolm

Malcolm Haswell
e.m. unit
University of Sunderland
UK
e-mail: malcolm.haswell-at-sunderland.ac.uk


----- Original Message -----
} From: Alan Stone {as-at-astonmet.com}


Focus on Microscopy 2004 Philadelphia, USA, April 4 to April 7, 2004

Dear Colleagues,

we have received a number of inquiries whether if it would still be
possible to submit abstracts to FOM2004. To accommodate these
requests we have extended the deadline to Friday, February 13.
However, this deadline will be strictly observed since we aim to have
the program ready and inform you about acceptance at the end of the
week after that.

Please use for submission our electronic system at
http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org/2004/abstracts.html
and submit until February 13.

Contributions will be selected for either key note presentation,
regular contribution or poster.

For further information see http://www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org

On behalf of the organizers FOM2004

Andres Kriete
Drexel University & Coriell Institute
Philadelphia, USA
G.J. (Fred) Brakenhoff
Univ. of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

E-mail: info2004-at-FocusOnMicroscopy.org
Web: www.FocusOnMicroscopy.org





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 07:59:25 2004



From: Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 09:10:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fw: Follow Up to Coolpix Compact Flash Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Yes Alan I have experienced this problem. Unfortunately for me this
occurred in the middle of a failure analysis while cross sectioning a
defective capacitor. I lost some irreplaceable pictures.

Anyway I as usual turned the camera off and waited 15 seconds and removed
the card from the camera inserted into the card reader connected to the
computer. At this point I move the images to the hard drive on my computer.
After this I manipulate the images from the hard drive. The problem
encountered is removing the card from the reader. If removed too soon it
will cause either the next card inserted to be corrupt or the card removed
will be corrupt (no images). Now do not get the impression I am removing
the card while the data is transferring but some 15 to 30 seconds after the
transfer. So the solution I have come up with is to keep 2 cards on hand so
that I can insert and leave one in the reader for some time, at least a few
minutes to avoid this drastic situation. Hope this helps with your
situation.

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com



Alan Stone
{as-at-astonmet.com}
To
02/04/2004 08:47 AM Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
cc

Subject
Re: Fw: Follow Up to
Coolpix Compact Flash Posting











Robert,

We initially format the cards in the cameras or re-format after a card
failure. Our routine is to
take our pictures, turn off the cameras & wait a minimum of 15 seconds. We
then remove the cards, bring them over to our desktop computers and insert
the cards into the card readers. Occasionally, the images are not
retrievable. After not having a problem for several months, I had three
failures last week while hosting a legal project and then twice again
yesterday and on Monday. We cannot pin this down to a particular card,
camera, computer, user nor card reader.

Alan



At 07:26 AM 2/4/2004, you wrote:

} Alan are you using a card reader on the computer? If this is the case I
} will send a response to the listserver.
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.component.tdk.com
} ----- Forwarded by Robert Fowler/TCU/TDK-US on 02/04/2004 08:24 AM -----
}
} Alan Stone
} {as-at-astonmet.com}
}
To
} 02/03/2004 04:14 PM microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
}
cc
}
}
Subject
} Follow Up to Coolpix
} Compact Flash Posting
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

}
}
}
}
} I want to clarify that all of the formatting and re-formatting has been
} done directly in the Coolpix cameras and never in the computers.
}
} This is such an erratic problem that we don't see any patterns. It appears
} to be some type of index writing problem, maybe the sessions are not
} properly closing out. We added time between turning off the camera and
} removing the chip to ensure that we give the camera enough time. It did
not
} help. It also is unrelated to how many pictures have been taken, whether
} the card is new, used or old.
}
} We will be doing a trial to keep the cards from being mixed between the
} different cameras. I don't believe that is an issue as we have had
failures
} shortly after re-formatting.
}
} If you do had similar problems, then please contact Nikon's tech support.
} Again, they tell me I am the only one reporting this.
}
} Regards,
}
} Alan Stone
} ASTON
}
}
}
}
}
}
} THIS TRANSMISSION IS INTENDED FOR THE SOLE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND
ENTITY
} TO WHOM IT IS ADDRESSED AND MAY CONTAIN PRIVILEGED AND/OR CONFIDENTIAL
} INFORMATION.
}
} If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that any
use,
} dissemination, distribution or duplication of this transmission is
strictly
} prohibited. If you received this transmission in error, please notify
the
} sender immediately by electronic reply to this transmission or by
phone
} (847-803-6100). Thank you.





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 08:51:57 2004



From: Haixin Xu :      xu-at-umbc.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 10:05:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] searching for antibody to chitin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers,
I am interested in measuring quantitatively the chitin
(N-acetylglucosamin) in fungal cell wall (Aspergillus spp.). We are
looking for antibody(ies)(monoclonal or polyclonal) against chitin. I
would very much appreciate any clue.

Haixin Xu (PhD)
Dept of Biological Sciences
University of Maryland Baltimore County
Baltimore, MD 21228




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 09:11:49 2004



From: Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 09:10:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fw: Follow Up to Coolpix Compact Flash Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Yes Alan I have experienced this problem. Unfortunately for me this
occurred in the middle of a failure analysis while cross sectioning a
defective capacitor. I lost some irreplaceable pictures.

Anyway I as usual turned the camera off and waited 15 seconds and removed
the card from the camera inserted into the card reader connected to the
computer. At this point I move the images to the hard drive on my computer.
After this I manipulate the images from the hard drive. The problem
encountered is removing the card from the reader. If removed too soon it
will cause either the next card inserted to be corrupt or the card removed
will be corrupt (no images). Now do not get the impression I am removing
the card while the data is transferring but some 15 to 30 seconds after the
transfer. So the solution I have come up with is to keep 2 cards on hand so
that I can insert and leave one in the reader for some time, at least a few
minutes to avoid this drastic situation. Hope this helps with your
situation.

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com



Alan Stone
{as-at-astonmet.com}
To
02/04/2004 08:47 AM Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
cc

Subject
Re: Fw: Follow Up to
Coolpix Compact Flash Posting











Robert,

We initially format the cards in the cameras or re-format after a card
failure. Our routine is to
take our pictures, turn off the cameras & wait a minimum of 15 seconds. We
then remove the cards, bring them over to our desktop computers and insert
the cards into the card readers. Occasionally, the images are not
retrievable. After not having a problem for several months, I had three
failures last week while hosting a legal project and then twice again
yesterday and on Monday. We cannot pin this down to a particular card,
camera, computer, user nor card reader.

Alan



At 07:26 AM 2/4/2004, you wrote:

} Alan are you using a card reader on the computer? If this is the case I
} will send a response to the listserver.
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.component.tdk.com
} ----- Forwarded by Robert Fowler/TCU/TDK-US on 02/04/2004 08:24 AM -----
}
} Alan Stone
} {as-at-astonmet.com}
}
To
} 02/03/2004 04:14 PM microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
}
cc
}
}
Subject
} Follow Up to Coolpix
} Compact Flash Posting
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

}
}
}
}
} I want to clarify that all of the formatting and re-formatting has been
} done directly in the Coolpix cameras and never in the computers.
}
} This is such an erratic problem that we don't see any patterns. It appears
} to be some type of index writing problem, maybe the sessions are not
} properly closing out. We added time between turning off the camera and
} removing the chip to ensure that we give the camera enough time. It did
not
} help. It also is unrelated to how many pictures have been taken, whether
} the card is new, used or old.
}
} We will be doing a trial to keep the cards from being mixed between the
} different cameras. I don't believe that is an issue as we have had
failures
} shortly after re-formatting.
}
} If you do had similar problems, then please contact Nikon's tech support.
} Again, they tell me I am the only one reporting this.
}
} Regards,
}
} Alan Stone
} ASTON
}
}
}
}
}
}
} THIS TRANSMISSION IS INTENDED FOR THE SOLE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND
ENTITY
} TO WHOM IT IS ADDRESSED AND MAY CONTAIN PRIVILEGED AND/OR CONFIDENTIAL
} INFORMATION.
}
} If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that any
use,
} dissemination, distribution or duplication of this transmission is
strictly
} prohibited. If you received this transmission in error, please notify
the
} sender immediately by electronic reply to this transmission or by
phone
} (847-803-6100). Thank you.






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 13:01:05 2004



From: Richard Edelmann :      edelmare-at-MUOHIO.EDU
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 14:11:24 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Seeking user comments on FEI- Quanta (ESEM) FEG's

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are in the final stages of acquiring a new scope. I am looking for
comments, feedback, etc. - the good, the bad and the ugly - from
users/owners/managers of FEI Quanta (ESEM) FEG scopes.

Best done with direct emailings to me rather than back to the list. Or if
you would like I would be happy to call anyone wishing to talk rather than
email.



Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Supervisor
350 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 13:03:27 2004



From: Bill Tivol :      tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 11:15:50 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [3DEM] Pumping cryo holders

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Feb 4, 2004, at 9:44 AM, Christopher Gilpin wrote:

} I was wondering what people were using to pump the dewars of TEM cryo
} holders. I have been using a line to a standard Denton coating unit but
} this is becoming impractical. I am aware of dedicated solutions as
} produced by Gatan but would be interested in how creative users have
} been.
}
Dear Chris,
We had a set-up on the HVEM with lines from the airlock mechanical
pump and the column high-vacuum pump that was used to pump out the
dewars of the cryo holder and the GATAN anticontaminator. We did not
experience any microscope vacuum problems as a result of using this
system, although the column vacuum was not as high as that in many
more-modern TEMs.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist and Manager
Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility
Broad Center, Mail Code 114-96
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 13:40:21 2004



From: Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 09:10:07 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Fw: Follow Up to Coolpix Compact Flash Posting

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America


Yes Alan I have experienced this problem. Unfortunately for me this
occurred in the middle of a failure analysis while cross sectioning a
defective capacitor. I lost some irreplaceable pictures.

Anyway I as usual turned the camera off and waited 15 seconds and removed
the card from the camera inserted into the card reader connected to the
computer. At this point I move the images to the hard drive on my computer.
After this I manipulate the images from the hard drive. The problem
encountered is removing the card from the reader. If removed too soon it
will cause either the next card inserted to be corrupt or the card removed
will be corrupt (no images). Now do not get the impression I am removing
the card while the data is transferring but some 15 to 30 seconds after the
transfer. So the solution I have come up with is to keep 2 cards on hand so
that I can insert and leave one in the reader for some time, at least a few
minutes to avoid this drastic situation. Hope this helps with your
situation.

Robert Fowler
Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
TDK Components USA, Inc.
Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
1 TDK Boulevard
Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
Fax: (770) 487-1460
email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
www.component.tdk.com



Alan Stone
{as-at-astonmet.com}
To
02/04/2004 08:47 AM Robert.Fowler-at-tdktca.com
cc

Subject
Re: Fw: Follow Up to
Coolpix Compact Flash Posting











Robert,

We initially format the cards in the cameras or re-format after a card
failure. Our routine is to
take our pictures, turn off the cameras & wait a minimum of 15 seconds. We
then remove the cards, bring them over to our desktop computers and insert
the cards into the card readers. Occasionally, the images are not
retrievable. After not having a problem for several months, I had three
failures last week while hosting a legal project and then twice again
yesterday and on Monday. We cannot pin this down to a particular card,
camera, computer, user nor card reader.

Alan



At 07:26 AM 2/4/2004, you wrote:

} Alan are you using a card reader on the computer? If this is the case I
} will send a response to the listserver.
}
} Robert Fowler
} Quality Assurance Failure Analysis Technician
} TDK Components USA, Inc.
} Multilayer Ceramic Capacitor Division
} 1 TDK Boulevard
} Peachtree City GA 30269-2051
} Telephone: (770) 631-0410 Ext.249
} Fax: (770) 487-1460
} email: robert.fowler-at-tdktca.com
} www.component.tdk.com
} ----- Forwarded by Robert Fowler/TCU/TDK-US on 02/04/2004 08:24 AM -----
}
} Alan Stone
} {as-at-astonmet.com}
}
To
} 02/03/2004 04:14 PM microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com
}
cc
}
}
Subject
} Follow Up to Coolpix
} Compact Flash Posting
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

}
}
}
}
} I want to clarify that all of the formatting and re-formatting has been
} done directly in the Coolpix cameras and never in the computers.
}
} This is such an erratic problem that we don't see any patterns. It appears
} to be some type of index writing problem, maybe the sessions are not
} properly closing out. We added time between turning off the camera and
} removing the chip to ensure that we give the camera enough time. It did
not
} help. It also is unrelated to how many pictures have been taken, whether
} the card is new, used or old.
}
} We will be doing a trial to keep the cards from being mixed between the
} different cameras. I don't believe that is an issue as we have had
failures
} shortly after re-formatting.
}
} If you do had similar problems, then please contact Nikon's tech support.
} Again, they tell me I am the only one reporting this.
}
} Regards,
}
} Alan Stone
} ASTON
}
}
}
}
}
}
} THIS TRANSMISSION IS INTENDED FOR THE SOLE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND
ENTITY
} TO WHOM IT IS ADDRESSED AND MAY CONTAIN PRIVILEGED AND/OR CONFIDENTIAL
} INFORMATION.
}
} If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that any
use,
} dissemination, distribution or duplication of this transmission is
strictly
} prohibited. If you received this transmission in error, please notify
the
} sender immediately by electronic reply to this transmission or by
phone
} (847-803-6100). Thank you.







From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 14:04:27 2004



From: Paulette Brunner :      pbrunner-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 12:15:09 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] microtome repair

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I've inherited an MT-5000 ultramicrotome that hasn't been used in a number of years. RMC/Boeckler won't offer service on this model. Some parts are still available.

Does anyone know who does microtome repair in the Seattle, Washington area?

Thanks,

Paulette Brunner
Center for Cell Dynamics
Friday Harbor Labs, University of Washington

(206) 616-0895
(206) 616-6804 (fax)
pbrunner-at-u.washington.edu
http://raven.zoology.washington.edu/celldynamics/











From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 14:07:26 2004



From: Haixin Xu :      xu-at-umbc.edu
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 10:05:13 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] searching for antibody to chitin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Hi Listers,
I am interested in measuring quantitatively the chitin
(N-acetylglucosamin) in fungal cell wall (Aspergillus spp.). We are
looking for antibody(ies)(monoclonal or polyclonal) against chitin. I
would very much appreciate any clue.

Haixin Xu (PhD)
Dept of Biological Sciences
University of Maryland Baltimore County
Baltimore, MD 21228





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 14:41:42 2004



From: Jacqui Ross :      jacqui.ross-at-auckland.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2004 09:53:51 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: searching for antibody to chitin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Haixin,

Did you try searching through abcam? This is the link: http://www.abcam.com/

Cheers,

Jacqui.

Haixin Xu wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi Listers,
} I am interested in measuring quantitatively the chitin
} (N-acetylglucosamin) in fungal cell wall (Aspergillus spp.). We are
} looking for antibody(ies)(monoclonal or polyclonal) against chitin. I
} would very much appreciate any clue.
}
} Haixin Xu (PhD)
} Dept of Biological Sciences
} University of Maryland Baltimore County
} Baltimore, MD 21228

Jacqueline Ross
Biomedical Imaging Research Unit
Division of Anatomy with Radiology
Faculty of Medical & Health Sciences
The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland, NEW ZEALAND

Tel: 64 9 373 7599 Ext 7438
Fax: 64 9 373 7484

http://www.health.auckland.ac.nz/biru/




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 15:16:21 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 2004 15:27:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] need manual for Mag. Field Canceling System

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers: I've got a Spicer Consulting SC12 Magnetic Field
Canceling System, but no manual to go with it. If anybody
on the list has one they will loan me or copy for me? I
will be glad to pay postage and/or copy costs. Please reply
off-list.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 15:59:43 2004



From: Caroline Schooley :      schooley-at-mcn.org
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2004 14:05:58 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] LM calendar

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

A friend has sent me a really nice calendar as a late Christmas
present. It's got photos of old light microscopes, micrographs (all
pathology), microscopes on postage stamps, and microscopy-related
quotations (some are from the Project MICRO collection). The price
is right - it's free. Here's the description:

The National Museum of Health and Medicine of the Armed Forces
Institute of Pathology in Washington, D.C. is offering the 2004
American Registry of Pathology/Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
calendar on a first-come, first-served basis. The calendar features
photographs of the microscopes in the museum's Billings Microscope
Collection. For a free copy, send your name, address, and affiliation
by e-mail only to nmhminfo-at-afip.osd.mil. Requests for multiple copies
cannot be accommodated.
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.msa.microscopy.com/ProjectMicro/
Intertidal invertebrates: http://www.fortbragg.k12.ca.us/AG/marinelab.html


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 16:31:55 2004



From: CJOHNMICRO-at-aol.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 08:26:16 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] The MSA TF Professional Technical Staff Awards

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm sorry if someone has already suggested this, but why don't you just take the
camera to the computer, or vice-versa, and download off the camera with the Nikon
USB cable?

Maybe not everyone's setup allows this, but we've been running a Coolpix 4500 for
some months now, we never remove the card from the camera, and we've never had
any problems at all. The nikon download s/w kicks in automatically and works a treat.

cheers

rtch







Tech Forum Professional Technical Staff Awards (PTSA)

Are you an MSA member and planning to submit an abstract for M & M
2004 in Savannah? If so, consider submitting an application for the
Tech Forum's PTSA. This award consists of complimentary full meeting
registration and travel reimbursement up to $600.00. The
requirements are simple: 1. submit a paper/poster abstract at the
meeting website, 2. send a copy of the abstract to the TF Chair at
the address below, and 3. send a support letter from your
manager/supervisor confirming your position as full-time technical
support staff. Deadline is February 16, 2004. Either hardcopy or
electronic copy of abstract & support letter will be accepted.

Submit Applications to:

Cathy Johnson
TF Chair
cjohnmicro-at-aol.com
6422 Simms St. #66
Arvada, CO 80004
(303) 420-6373


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 4 17:28:32 2004



From: rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 08:19:12 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: searching for antibody to chitin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, February 4, 2004 at 12:09:24
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com
Name: Rick Powell at Nanoprobes

Organization: Nanoprobes, Incorporated

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] searching for antibody to chitin

Question: Hello Haixin:

Can't recommend any specific antibodies, but the best place to look
is Linscott's Directory of Immunological and Biological Reagents:

http://www.linscottsdirectory.com/

USA:
4877 Grange Road
Santa Rosa, CA 95404
Tel: (707) 763-7098
Fax: (707) 763-8372

Europe:
Stalkvarn
S-54017 Lerdala SWEDEN
Tel: +46 511-80081
Fax: +46 511-80081

You could also try Abcam (may need to register first):

http://www.abcam.com/

Hope this helps,

Rick Powell

*****************************************************************************************
Richard D. Powell * rpowell-at-nanoprobes.com * www.nanoprobes.com
NANOPROBES, Incorporated
95 Horse Block Road, Yaphank, NY 11980-9710, USA

US Toll-free: (877) 447-6266 * Tel: (919) 845-6324 * Fax:
(631) 980-3608

Sign up for our newsletter: http://www.nanoprobes.com/Newsletter.html
*****************************************************************************************


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 09:42:59 2004



From: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 10:31:41 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] I don't remember formvar grids like this

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I must be wacky.... I remember prepping chloroform suspensions on carbon
coated formvar copper grids without any problems 5 years ago. Now my films
are dissolving and my particles left behind. Has the polymer structure of
"formvar" changed? I prefer to use chloroform for my suspensions, so does
this means I must resign myself to the more fragile (I can be pretty
ham-handed at times) carbon film grids?

Suggestion and advice are welcome!!!

Frank Karl
Degussa Corporation
Akron Technical Center
3500 Embassy Parkway
Suite 100
Akron, Ohio 44333


330-668-2235 Ext. 238



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 13:40:57 2004



From: Judy Murphy :      jmurphy-at-deltacollege.org
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2004 11:53:56 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: I don't remember formvar grids like this

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,
We use formvar in diethylene chloride all the time and have no problem.
We use them for students because it is so durable. Generally for
standard 80 or 100 kV we use 0.25% formvar in diethylene chloride.
Good luck,
Judy



Judy Murphy, PhD
San Joaquin Delta College
Microscopy Technology
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
FAX 209-954-5600
jmurphy-at-deltacollege.edu
http://www.sjdccd.cc.ca.us/dept/electmicro/index.html




Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I must be wacky.... I remember prepping chloroform suspensions on carbon
} coated formvar copper grids without any problems 5 years ago. Now my films
} are dissolving and my particles left behind. Has the polymer structure of
} "formvar" changed? I prefer to use chloroform for my suspensions, so does
} this means I must resign myself to the more fragile (I can be pretty
} ham-handed at times) carbon film grids?
}
} Suggestion and advice are welcome!!!
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
}
} 330-668-2235 Ext. 238


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 14:15:02 2004



From: Sherwood, Margaret :      MSHERWOOD-at-PARTNERS.ORG
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 15:25:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: I don't remember formvar grids like this

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I haven't done formvar grids in a long time, but when I did, I also made them up
in diethylene chloride.

Peggy Sherwood
Lab Associate, Photopathology
Wellman Laboratories of Photomedicine (W224)
Massachusetts General Hospital
55 Fruit Street
Boston, MA 02114
617-724-4839 (voice mail)
617-726-6983 (lab)
617-726-3192 (fax)
msherwood-at-partners.org


-----Original Message-----
} From: Judy Murphy [mailto:jmurphy-at-deltacollege.org]
Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2004 2:54 PM
To: Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com
Cc: microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com

Hi,
We use formvar in diethylene chloride all the time and have no problem.
We use them for students because it is so durable. Generally for
standard 80 or 100 kV we use 0.25% formvar in diethylene chloride.
Good luck,
Judy



Judy Murphy, PhD
San Joaquin Delta College
Microscopy Technology
5151 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
FAX 209-954-5600
jmurphy-at-deltacollege.edu
http://www.sjdccd.cc.ca.us/dept/electmicro/index.html




Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com wrote:
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I must be wacky.... I remember prepping chloroform suspensions on carbon
} coated formvar copper grids without any problems 5 years ago. Now my films
} are dissolving and my particles left behind. Has the polymer structure of
} "formvar" changed? I prefer to use chloroform for my suspensions, so does
} this means I must resign myself to the more fragile (I can be pretty
} ham-handed at times) carbon film grids?
}
} Suggestion and advice are welcome!!!
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation
} Akron Technical Center
} 3500 Embassy Parkway
} Suite 100
} Akron, Ohio 44333
}
} 330-668-2235 Ext. 238


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 14:43:40 2004



From: Tina Carvalho :      tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 10:54:09 -1000 (HST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: I don't remember formvar grids like this

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Long ago we did use chloroform as a solvent for Formvar, so I'm not
surprised that when you apply your suspensions in chloroform the Formvar
breaks or dissolves. I'm betting that 1) you've forgotten that you had to
switch to something other than chloroform, 2) you had thicker Formvar
and a smaller volume of chloroform that you left on for less time, or
3) most likely, you used carbon-stabilized Formvar coated grids and the
chloroform did not get to the Formvar. Try the latter, making sure you put
your suspensions on the carbon side.

Good luck!

Tina

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 14:56:20 2004



From: Larry Stoter :      larry-at-cymru.freewire.co.uk
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 21:00:27 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} At 12:33 PM 1/31/2004, you wrote:
} } } I think the short answer will be that such materials don't
} } } diffract. The spacings are in a whole other realm of size. You
} } } would need a much longer wavelength to get diffraction. Also, the
} } } spacings are not so regular as to be able to generate anything
} } } like planes of atoms. "Peaks" would likely be poorly defined, but
} } } variation in their shape as well as position might lend some
} } } usable information.
} } }
} } } Warren
} }
} } I hate to disagree but not only can you do electron diffraction in
} } a TEM from such structures, I have done it myself. It is even
} } possible to get a diffraction pattern from the bars of a grid.
} }
} } As an alternative to electron diffraction, you can do light
} } diffraction from the negative or do an FFT from a digital image.
} }
} } In all cases, you very quickly get information on the average
} } spacing of regular structures and avoid a lot of tedious
} } measurements.
} }
} } Regards,
} } --
} } Larry Stoter
} Point taken. I was thinking x-ray diffraction more than other
} methods. I would still wonder how well diffraction works with only
} semi-regular arrangement, but I suppose some diffraction pattern
} should result with any periodicity. The challenge is finding a beam
} of the right wavelength.
}
} I have not played around with FFTs on images yet. Most of our
} samples are not near that regular, but I may have to look into it.
}
} Warren
}
I must say, I don't understand the physics but, in a TEM, you really
can get electron diffraction from periodic structures which are many
order of magnitude larger than any wavelength involved (although,
atomic spacings are quite abit larger than the electron wavelength
anyway). And the regularity doesn't need to be that good - muscle can
give some very nice diffraction patterns.

Going back to the orginal question, why isn't electron diffraction
used to measure spacings in periodic biological structures - muscle
and myelin being the two most obvious.

regards,
--
Larry Stoter
NOTE - any message other than plain text will be automatically deleted :-)


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 15:01:18 2004



From: Qian-Chun Yu, MB, Ph.D. :      qcyu-at-mail.med.upenn.edu
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2004 16:12:02 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] test

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

this is a test since all my messages in the last few months have been
returned. I am sorry for any inconvenience. QC Yu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 15:18:01 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2004 15:29:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] [Fwd: need manual for Mag. Field Canceling System]

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers: One of our colleagues was nice enough to fax me a copy of his manual, so
I'm all set. Thanks for the replies. This list is a great asset. Way to go,
Nestor!


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Listers: I've got a Spicer Consulting SC12 Magnetic Field
} Canceling System, but no manual to go with it. If anybody
} on the list has one they will loan me or copy for me? I
} will be glad to pay postage and/or copy costs. Please reply
} off-list.
}
} --
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
} Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
} 972-995-2360
} 972-648-8743 (pager)
} SC Packaging FA Development
} Texas Instruments, Inc.
} Dallas, TX
} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (r-holdford-at-ti.com)
972-995-2360
972-648-8743 (pager)
SC Packaging FA Development
Texas Instruments, Inc.
Dallas, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 15:42:19 2004



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Thu, 05 Feb 2004 17:03:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: Morphometric Question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We would recommend a pure carbon coated grid where all the traces of plastic
are removed. We produce them for non-aqueous solutions so solvents will not
harm the carbon support film.
This would eliminate the dissolving of the formvar by the solvent.

John Arnott

Disclaimer: Ladd Research sell carbon coated grids that are described in
this e-mail

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "Judy Murphy" {jmurphy-at-deltacollege.org}
To: {Frank.Karl-at-degussa.com}
Cc: {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2004 2:53 PM

Hi, all

A word from a light microscopist:
Diffraction happens all the time. You can even do a neat diffraction
experiment with your hand. If you hold your hand between your eye and a
distant light source (palm toward you seems to work best, looking at, for
instance, the ceiling light) and leave just a small space between your
fingers, you will see the bright/dark/bright fringes which result from the
interference of light diffracting around your fingers.

Using diffraction patterns to measure periodic structures is well known in
interferometry. I have measured structures below the limit of resolution
by calibrating a special eyepiece micrometer (ex: a "Wright" eyepiece) and
viewing the diffraction pattern of a slightly sheared image in the back
focal plane of the objective (many many years ago, now).

I also used X-ray diffraction to measure spacing in liquid crystals (also
many years ago).

The challenge is to get enough of the periodic structure so that its
diffraction pattern is not washed out by the overlaying of the diffraction
patterns from other, non-periodic structures.

All of this is based in fundamental physics (Young's far-field diffraction
experiment, and Bragg's Law).

For anyone interested in trying... let me know how the experiment comes out!

Best regards,
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^
Don't forget: the American Chem Society's Applied Optical Microscopy
Course, March 5-7, Chicago, Ill.
Visit our website for details and registration. NOT JUST FOR CHEMISTS!!!!
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^

At 09:00 PM 2/5/04 +0000, Larry Stoter wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 16:07:58 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 16:18:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: I don't remember formvar grids like this

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Although most people use ethylene dichloride for Formvar, chloroform
will also dissolve Butvar and Formvar. Some companies, in fact,
provide various concentrations of the plastic dissolved in
chloroform. We use 0.25% Butvar in chloroform.

I believe that what you are experiencing is, indeed, the dissolution
of the underlying Formvar layer leaving a very fragile carbon layer
that breaks upon drying of your particulate suspension. So, either
change the liquid you are suspending the particles in (try methanol,
acentone) or put a heavier layer of carbon on the Formvar.



} I must be wacky.... I remember prepping chloroform suspensions on carbon
} coated formvar copper grids without any problems 5 years ago. Now my films
} are dissolving and my particles left behind. Has the polymer structure of
} "formvar" changed? I prefer to use chloroform for my suspensions, so does
} this means I must resign myself to the more fragile (I can be pretty
} ham-handed at times) carbon film grids?
}
} Suggestion and advice are welcome!!!
}
} Frank Karl
} Degussa Corporation

--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 5 17:29:48 2004



From: jcervantes-at-bendres.com
Date: Thu, 5 Feb 2004 15:37:05 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM Embedding with Epofix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers:
I recently ordered Epofix as an alternative to LR White, since it supposedly
cures at RT and is purported not to infiltrate samples. After polymerizing
in various molds, at low pressure, waiting for days, I do not get blocks
hard enough for ultramicrotomy. After numerous emails to the manufacturer,
the gist is that it DOES require some heat to get a hard block (one that a
fingernail doesn't go through). I found a post from about a year ago
mentioning Epofix; I am wondering if anyone does get this resin to harden at
room temp?
Thanks,
Jessica

Bend Research, Inc
64550 Research Rd
Bend, OR 97701
(541) 382-4100 page
(541) 382-0212 x240




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 01:22:48 2004



From: Cristina Almansa :      Almansa-at-ua.es
Date: Fri, 06 Feb 2004 08:29:56 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM Embedding with Epofix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi Jessica, I have been using Epofix resin without problems. It hardens at 22ºC in
about 24 hours. You have to control carefully the proportion of resin and hardener.
I mix 15 parts by volume of resin with 2 parts by volume of hardener and I get
blocks hard enough for ultramicrotomy. I buy Epofix to EMS (Electron Microscopy
Science).
Cristina Almansa
University of Alicante
SPAIN
jcervantes-at-bendres.com ha escrito:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Listers:
} I recently ordered Epofix as an alternative to LR White, since it supposedly
} cures at RT and is purported not to infiltrate samples. After polymerizing
} in various molds, at low pressure, waiting for days, I do not get blocks
} hard enough for ultramicrotomy. After numerous emails to the manufacturer,
} the gist is that it DOES require some heat to get a hard block (one that a
} fingernail doesn't go through). I found a post from about a year ago
} mentioning Epofix; I am wondering if anyone does get this resin to harden at
} room temp?
} Thanks,
} Jessica
}
} Bend Research, Inc
} 64550 Research Rd
} Bend, OR 97701
} (541) 382-4100 page
} (541) 382-0212 x240



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 02:02:15 2004



From: McGovern, Gillian :      g.mcgovern-at-vla.defra.gsi.gov.uk
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2004 08:10:47 -0000
Subject: [Microscopy] EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I'm having serious problems achieving adequate development of the new Kodak
4489 EM film. We have no facilities to carry out development on site and
have to send film packages to another lab, subsequently, the quality of
development is at the discretion of the other (non-commercial) lab.
Basically its a hit or miss even using new development protocols.
Its got to the stage Id be willing to send our film anywhere in the UK
(maybe Europe) to be developed commercially if consistently good quality can
be achieved.
Does anyone know of somewhere which offers this service?

Thanks.


Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA)

This email and any attachments is intended for the named recipient only. Its
unauthorised use, disclosure, storage or copying is not permitted. If you have
received it in error, please destroy all copies and inform the sender. Whilst this
email and associated attachments will have been checked for known viruses
whilst within VLA systems we can accept no responsibility once it has left our
systems. Communications on VLA's computer systems may be monitored
and/or recorded to secure the effective operation of the system and for other
lawful purposes.



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 05:32:48 2004



From: Orkun Ersoy :      oersoy-at-hacettepe.edu.tr
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2004 13:43:23 +0200
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM carbon coating

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

We use a Cameca SU-30 as SEM and need to coat some fresh fruits with carbon.
Can anyone send me an information about coating and sample preparation
instructions for organic materials? Thanks.



Orkun ERSOY

Hacettepe University

Geological Engineering





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 10:06:02 2004



From: jcervantes-at-bendres.com
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2004 08:13:10 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM Embedding with Epofix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Thanks to all the replies on Epofix. It is definitely true that I am using
a much smaller volume than the plugs or mounts mentioned by some of you, so
the temperature of the resin never rises above RT (I did measure this,
looking for an exotherm). I will try larger molds and heating slightly as
suggested; thanks to everyone again for being a good resource.

Jessica Cervantes
Bend Research, Inc
64550 Research Rd
Bend, OR 97701
(541) 382-4100 page


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 12:42:10 2004



From: jcervantes-at-bendres.com
Date: Fri, 6 Feb 2004 08:13:10 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM Embedding with Epofix

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thanks to all the replies on Epofix. It is definitely true that I am using
a much smaller volume than the plugs or mounts mentioned by some of you, so
the temperature of the resin never rises above RT (I did measure this,
looking for an exotherm). I will try larger molds and heating slightly as
suggested; thanks to everyone again for being a good resource.

Jessica Cervantes
Bend Research, Inc
64550 Research Rd
Bend, OR 97701
(541) 382-4100 page



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 6 13:37:22 2004



From: Becky Holdford :      r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Fri, 06 Feb 2004 13:48:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Texas Society for Microscopy Spring meeting--Call for Papers!--

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

**FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS**

The 2004 Spring Meeting of
THE TEXAS SOCIETY FOR MICROSCOPY
“Embracing All Forms of Microscopy”

April 22, 23, 24, 2004

ABSTRACTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY: MARCH 11, 2004
Mail abstracts to: Camelia G.-A. Maier, Ph.D.
Department of Biology
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX 76204-5799
Tel.: 940-898-2358 (office)
E-mail: cmaier-at-twu.edu

The Doubletree Hotel - Post Oak
2001 Post Oak Blvd.
Houston, TX 77056
(713)961-9300
(800)245-7299

RATES: $85.00 Single, Double, Triple and Quad
Mention that you are with the Texas Society for Microscopy
when making your reservations.

HOTEL RESERVATION DEADLINE: MARCH 25, 2004
After this date reservations will be accepted on a space
available basis,
convention rates not guaranteed.

THURSDAY WORKSHOP
Spectrum Imaging for Materials Characterization
Presented by John J. Friel
Princeton Gamma - Tech

Please see our website (http://www.texasmicroscopy.org) for
registration forms and author's instructions.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Becky Holdford (webmaster-at-texasmicroscopy.org)
TSM Webmaster
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 7 20:47:47 2004



From: Advanced Materials :      micro-at-formatex.org
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2004 03:59:53 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Microsc for Cell adhesion studies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

our group is studying interaction of microbial cells (yeast and bacteria) to
several kinds of biomaterials. We conduct physico/chemical analysis of the
involved surfaces (mainly throgh surface thermodynamical analysis: contact
angles with several liquids) and have also an atomic force microscopy for
high resolution mapping of the surface topography and force measurements.

At this moment, we are interested in seeing what is happening with the
contact side of the cell with the substratum. For this reason, we are now
interested in applying optical methods to analyse cell deposition/adhesion,
in order to complete a set of experiments already performed with other
techniques with Candida, Enterococcus and Staphyloccocus strains.

I am planning now to acquire such a type of instrument, and I am specially
interested in

1. Total internal reflection microscopy
2. Confocal Laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

I would very much appreciate your advice on which of these two techniques
have been proven to be more useful for this kind of experiments, and also
advice on some good and cost-effective equipment (model).

Of course if some of you have already experience in this kind of experiments
and are open to a collaboration to get more insight into these adhesion
phenomena, I will be mostly grateful if you contact me to discuss it
further.

Best wishes,

Antonio Méndez Vilas
Interfacial Phenomena and Biosurfaces Group
Department of Physics
Universidad de Extremadura
Avda de Elvas s/n
06001 Badajoz
SPAIN
E-mail: amvilas-at-unex.es





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 7 22:33:37 2004



From: Sergey Ryazantsev :      sryazant-at-ucla.edu
Date: Sat, 07 Feb 2004 20:48:48 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I miss that orange paint! I used to work on it when was in Germany! I
hope you'll find good home for it. Sergey

At 10:39 AM 1/8/2004 -0500, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 8 20:11:24 2004



From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2004 21:22:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Microscopes in Cell adhesion studies

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The simplest IRM is with a confocal in refelction mode. We do both
widefield and confocal (BioRad Radiance 2000 and Leica AOBS); the latter
method is simpler even taking into account the possibility of regular
reflectance muddying the interpretation.

Confocal may be fine for thick samples. With thin samples the resolution
in the Z axis is insufficent to know whether you really are at the
substrate.

If the substrate materials are thin, transparent, uniform and the index of
refraction different enough from the sample, maybe fluorescence with TIRF
could be a way to go.

-Michael Cammer

___________________________________
WORK: http://www.aecom.yu.edu/aif/
PERSONAL: http://www.art-studio.us/


On Sun, 8 Feb 2004, Advanced Materials wrote:

} Search the CONFOCAL archive at
} http://listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu/cgi-bin/wa?S1=confocal
}
} Hi,
}
} our group is studying interaction of microbial cells (yeast and bacteria) to
} several kinds of biomaterials. We conduct physico/chemical analysis of the
} involved surfaces (mainly throgh surface thermodynamical analysis: contact
} angles with several liquids) and have also an atomic force microscopy for
} high resolution mapping of the surface topography and force measurements.
}
} At this moment, we are interested in seeing what is happening with the
} contact side of the cell with the substratum. For this reason, we are now
} interested in applying optical methods to analyse cell deposition/adhesion,
} in order to complete a set of experiments already performed with other
} techniques with Candida, Enterococcus and Staphyloccocus strains.
}
} I am planning now to acquire such a type of instrument, and I am specially
} interested in
}
} 1. Total internal reflection microscopy
} 2. Confocal Laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)
}
} I would very much appreciate your advice on which of these two techniques
} have been proven to be more useful for this kind of experiments, and also
} advice on some good and cost-effective equipment (model).
}
} Of course if some of you have already experience in this kind of experiments
} and are open to a collaboration to get more insight into these adhesion
} phenomena, I will be mostly grateful if you contact me to discuss it
} further.
}
} Best wishes,
}
} Antonio Méndez Vilas
} Interfacial Phenomena and Biosurfaces Group
} Department of Physics
} Universidad de Extremadura
} Avda de Elvas s/n
} 06001 Badajoz
} SPAIN
} E-mail: amvilas-at-unex.es
}
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 06:57:25 2004



From: DANIEL EBERHARD :      daniel.eberhard-at-uni-bielefeld.de
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 14:07:34 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] difficulties sectioning a collagen scaffold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,
I would like to ask you for advice regarding the following problem:
We are trying to section (preferentially cryo section) a highly porous
collagen
scaffold (sponge like) soaked with water.
Problem 1: We have tried to make 8-12 µm cryo sections, but
unfortunately the section always collapses. Sectioning pFA fixed
collagene scaffold

was also not successful.
Problem 2: Apart from this it is not possible to keep it fixed on

a slide during antibody staining procedures.

Does anybody have experience with such a “difficult” object?

Which other fixation method could be used to make the sponge stiffer to
improve integrity of the sections?

Any suggestions would be helpful,

thanks in advance

Daniel.

--
(-)-(-)
--------------------------- \"/ ---
Dr. Daniel Eberhard =V=

Developmental Biology
& Molecular Pathology

Graduate Programe on Pattern Formation

University of Bielefeld
D 33501 Bielefeld/Germany

FAX: xx49(0)521-106-5654 (-)-(-)
--------------------------- \"/ ---
=V=




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 08:42:17 2004



From: paul r hazelton :      paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 08:52:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: difficulties sectioning a collagen scaffold

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Daniel

about 15 years ago i did thin cross sections of cells grown on filter
inserts coated with collagen. there was no end of trouble, especially
at the interface of the filter and cells. after investigation i
discovered that the species of collagen used, type IV, was actually
quite hydrophilic. i ascribed my problems to interference with the
whole processing system. no matter how hard i tried, it looked like i
could not infiltrate through and across the barrier. i never did try
any water based resins, though. i have durcupan around and it would
have been easy to confirm.

i do not know if the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the collagen type
you are using could be a factor in your preparation methods, but you
might want to check it out.

paul


Paul R. Hazelton, PhD
Electron Microscope Unit
University of Manitoba
Department of Medical Microbiology
531 Basic Medical Sciences Building
730 William Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3E 0W3
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Phone:204-789-3313
Pager:204-931-954
Cell:204-781-1502
Fax:204-789-3926



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 09:54:54 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 11:04:38 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You need a professional photo lab that will develop the the film the
way you want it done, not with whatever film developer they have on
hand. Custom black and white services might cost more than you expect,
shop around. Select a few labs (if you can't find a lab go to a photo
shop that caters to professionals, Jessops or Robert White, and ask
them) and show them what you have and what you want. You may find it is
faster, easier, cheaper and more consistant to learn to process the film
yourself. Fancy equipment with nitrogen burst agitation is not
necessary, fresh chemicals, film racks, several tanks and a light-tight
room with a sink is all you need.

Geoff

McGovern, Gillian wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 10:34:04 2004



From: Tindall, Randy D. :      TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2004 10:44:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

You might also consider sending your negatives to an EM lab that would
agree to process them for you. First, the lab should have all the
proper sized holders, etc. Second, they are probably already familiar
with this #$&%^$!!! film. Third, they may very well charge
substantially less than a custom black and white processor would.

Just a thought.

Randy

Randy Tindall
EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---Nano's R'Us!
W122 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-5414
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/emc/



-----Original Message-----
} From: Geoff McAuliffe [mailto:mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 09, 2004 1:05 PM
To: McGovern, Gillian
Cc: 'Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com'

You need a professional photo lab that will develop the the film the

way you want it done, not with whatever film developer they have on
hand. Custom black and white services might cost more than you expect,
shop around. Select a few labs (if you can't find a lab go to a photo
shop that caters to professionals, Jessops or Robert White, and ask
them) and show them what you have and what you want. You may find it is
faster, easier, cheaper and more consistant to learn to process the film

yourself. Fancy equipment with nitrogen burst agitation is not
necessary, fresh chemicals, film racks, several tanks and a light-tight
room with a sink is all you need.

Geoff

McGovern, Gillian wrote:

} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 10:58:57 2004



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 12:09:31 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Cryoultramicrotomy Mini-Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Fellow List Members,

Members in the Greater New York City area are cordially invited to "Cryoultramicrotomy Techniques for The Biomedical and Biological Sciences."

When:
Thursday, Feb. 26, 9:30am - 5:00pm
Friday, Feb. 27, 9:30am - 2:00pm

Where:
Forcheimer Building, 3rd Floor Lecture Hall
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University
1300 Morris Park Avenue
Bronx, NY

What:
A two-day "mini-workshop" with lectures, guest speakers, presentations, demonstrations and hands-on sessions for cryoultramicrotomy and associated techniques (cryo tool making, glass knife making, evaluation of glass knives, care and cleaning of diamond knives, operation of the ultramicrotome and immunoelectronmicroscopy).

Important Info:
Attendance is open for all of the presentations and demonstrations on Thursday, February 26th. However, attendance is limited for the cryoultramicrotomy hands-on sessions on Friday, February 27th.

Contacts:
For additional details, to RSVP or to reserve a spot for the hands-on sessions, please contact either Gloria Stephney at Albert Einstein College of Medicine ( {stephney-at-aecom.yu.edu} , 718.430.4027) or Kim Megaw at Boeckeler Instruments, Inc. ( {Kim-at-boeckeler.com} , 800.552.2262).

Sponsors and Organizers:
RMC Products Group, Boeckeler Instruments, Inc.,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine and
The New York Society of Experimental Microscopists (NYSEM).

Hope to see you there!

Bob Chiovetti
Boeckeler Instruments, Inc.




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 11:55:37 2004



From: Marc Pypaert :      marc.pypaert-at-yale.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 13:06:05 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sorry, but I have to disagree with Geoff about the last part of his
message:
with the new formulation of the 4489 film, a nitrogen burst system seems
to be necessary. We have discussed problems with the 4489 film before
on this listserver, and the main conclusion seemed to be that proper
agitation during development was crucial to get good results. If I
recall well, all the people who use appropriate agitation system (like
we do in our lab) seemed to avoid the problems that have been reported
with the 4489 films. When it comes to quality of development, I don't
agree
that we should go for the cheapest or easiest option, but instead look
for reproducibility and quality.

Marc


On Monday, February 9, 2004, at 02:04 PM, Geoff McAuliffe wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} You need a professional photo lab that will develop the the film
} the way you want it done, not with whatever film developer they have
} on hand. Custom black and white services might cost more than you
} expect, shop around. Select a few labs (if you can't find a lab go to
} a photo shop that caters to professionals, Jessops or Robert White,
} and ask them) and show them what you have and what you want. You may
} find it is faster, easier, cheaper and more consistant to learn to
} process the film yourself. Fancy equipment with nitrogen burst
} agitation is not necessary, fresh chemicals, film racks, several tanks
} and a light-tight room with a sink is all you need.
}
} Geoff
}
} McGovern, Gillian wrote:
}
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ---------
} }
} }
} } I'm having serious problems achieving adequate development of the new
} } Kodak
} } 4489 EM film. We have no facilities to carry out development on site
} } and
} } have to send film packages to another lab, subsequently, the quality
} } of
} } development is at the discretion of the other (non-commercial) lab.
} } Basically its a hit or miss even using new development protocols. Its
} } got to the stage Id be willing to send our film anywhere in the UK
} } (maybe Europe) to be developed commercially if consistently good
} } quality can
} } be achieved. Does anyone know of somewhere which offers this service?
} }
} } Thanks.
} }
} } Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA)
} }
} } This email and any attachments is intended for the named recipient
} } only. Its
} } unauthorised use, disclosure, storage or copying is not permitted. If
} } you have
} } received it in error, please destroy all copies and inform the
} } sender. Whilst this
} } email and associated attachments will have been checked for known
} } viruses
} } whilst within VLA systems we can accept no responsibility once it has
} } left our
} } systems. Communications on VLA's computer systems may be monitored
} } and/or recorded to secure the effective operation of the system and
} } for other
} } lawful purposes.
} }
} }
} }
}
}
}
}

--
Marc Pypaert
Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
Yale University School of Medicine
333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
New Haven, CT 06520-8002
TEL 203-785 3681
FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 12:28:10 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 13:38:56 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Marc:

In my hands, nitrogen burst is not needed to get good results with
the new 4489 film. I use fresh chemicals (mixed in distilled water),
proper temperature, and agitation by hand. I agree that quality and
consistancy is the top priority which is why I suggested she learn to do
it at her facility.
I know that problems with processing the new 4489 have been
discussed on this forum before, I just have not had any.

Geoff

Marc Pypaert wrote:

} Sorry, but I have to disagree with Geoff about the last part of his
} message:
} with the new formulation of the 4489 film, a nitrogen burst system seems
} to be necessary. We have discussed problems with the 4489 film before
} on this listserver, and the main conclusion seemed to be that proper
} agitation during development was crucial to get good results. If I
} recall well, all the people who use appropriate agitation system (like
} we do in our lab) seemed to avoid the problems that have been reported
} with the 4489 films. When it comes to quality of development, I don't
} agree
} that we should go for the cheapest or easiest option, but instead look
} for reproducibility and quality.
}
} Marc
}
}
} On Monday, February 9, 2004, at 02:04 PM, Geoff McAuliffe wrote:
}
} }
} }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} }
} } You need a professional photo lab that will develop the the film
} } the way you want it done, not with whatever film developer they have
} } on hand. Custom black and white services might cost more than you
} } expect, shop around. Select a few labs (if you can't find a lab go
} } to a photo shop that caters to professionals, Jessops or Robert
} } White, and ask them) and show them what you have and what you want.
} } You may find it is faster, easier, cheaper and more consistant to
} } learn to process the film yourself. Fancy equipment with nitrogen
} } burst agitation is not necessary, fresh chemicals, film racks,
} } several tanks and a light-tight room with a sink is all you need.
} }
} } Geoff
} }
} } McGovern, Gillian wrote:
} }
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } --------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---------
} } }
} } }
} } } I'm having serious problems achieving adequate development of the
} } } new Kodak
} } } 4489 EM film. We have no facilities to carry out development on
} } } site and
} } } have to send film packages to another lab, subsequently, the
} } } quality of
} } } development is at the discretion of the other (non-commercial) lab.
} } } Basically its a hit or miss even using new development protocols.
} } } Its got to the stage Id be willing to send our film anywhere in the UK
} } } (maybe Europe) to be developed commercially if consistently good
} } } quality can
} } } be achieved. Does anyone know of somewhere which offers this service?
} } }
} } } Thanks.
} } }
} } } Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA)
} } }
} } } This email and any attachments is intended for the named recipient
} } } only. Its
} } } unauthorised use, disclosure, storage or copying is not permitted.
} } } If you have
} } } received it in error, please destroy all copies and inform the
} } } sender. Whilst this
} } } email and associated attachments will have been checked for known
} } } viruses
} } } whilst within VLA systems we can accept no responsibility once it
} } } has left our
} } } systems. Communications on VLA's computer systems may be monitored
} } } and/or recorded to secure the effective operation of the system and
} } } for other
} } } lawful purposes.
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} Marc Pypaert
} Department of Cell Biology
} Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
} Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
} Yale University School of Medicine
} 333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
} New Haven, CT 06520-8002
} TEL 203-785 3681
} FAX 203-785 7446
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 12:51:37 2004



From: Stanley E Hansen :      stanley.hansen-at-bms.com
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 13:02:18 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: Re: EM 4489 film development

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have been manually agitating our films since we started and have had good luck.
We do a "lift-tilt rigt-tilt then tap down" about every 10 sec for the four minutes
of developing to get good negatives.
We also discovered (with help through the list-server) that using "Indicator
Stop-Bath" caused some streaking. Once we stopped using that and started washing
in running tap-water for 1 minute after developing and before "Rapid Fix", the
streaking went away.
My advise - make sure you agitate well - on a regular schedule.
Stan

Marc Pypaert wrote:

} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Sorry, but I have to disagree with Geoff about the last part of his
} message:
} with the new formulation of the 4489 film, a nitrogen burst system seems
} to be necessary. We have discussed problems with the 4489 film before
} on this listserver, and the main conclusion seemed to be that proper
} agitation during development was crucial to get good results. If I
} recall well, all the people who use appropriate agitation system (like
} we do in our lab) seemed to avoid the problems that have been reported
} with the 4489 films. When it comes to quality of development, I don't
} agree
} that we should go for the cheapest or easiest option, but instead look
} for reproducibility and quality.
}
} Marc
}
} On Monday, February 9, 2004, at 02:04 PM, Geoff McAuliffe wrote:
}
} }
} }
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } -------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help
} } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------
} }
} } You need a professional photo lab that will develop the the film
} } the way you want it done, not with whatever film developer they have
} } on hand. Custom black and white services might cost more than you
} } expect, shop around. Select a few labs (if you can't find a lab go to
} } a photo shop that caters to professionals, Jessops or Robert White,
} } and ask them) and show them what you have and what you want. You may
} } find it is faster, easier, cheaper and more consistant to learn to
} } process the film yourself. Fancy equipment with nitrogen burst
} } agitation is not necessary, fresh chemicals, film racks, several tanks
} } and a light-tight room with a sink is all you need.
} }
} } Geoff
} }
} } McGovern, Gillian wrote:
} }
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } --------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } } America
} } } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } } On-Line Help
} } } http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } ---------
} } }
} } }
} } } I'm having serious problems achieving adequate development of the new
} } } Kodak
} } } 4489 EM film. We have no facilities to carry out development on site
} } } and
} } } have to send film packages to another lab, subsequently, the quality
} } } of
} } } development is at the discretion of the other (non-commercial) lab.
} } } Basically its a hit or miss even using new development protocols. Its
} } } got to the stage Id be willing to send our film anywhere in the UK
} } } (maybe Europe) to be developed commercially if consistently good
} } } quality can
} } } be achieved. Does anyone know of somewhere which offers this service?
} } }
} } } Thanks.
} } }
} } } Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA)
} } }
} } } This email and any attachments is intended for the named recipient
} } } only. Its
} } } unauthorised use, disclosure, storage or copying is not permitted. If
} } } you have
} } } received it in error, please destroy all copies and inform the
} } } sender. Whilst this
} } } email and associated attachments will have been checked for known
} } } viruses
} } } whilst within VLA systems we can accept no responsibility once it has
} } } left our
} } } systems. Communications on VLA's computer systems may be monitored
} } } and/or recorded to secure the effective operation of the system and
} } } for other
} } } lawful purposes.
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} Marc Pypaert
} Department of Cell Biology
} Center for Cell and Molecular Imaging
} Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research
} Yale University School of Medicine
} 333 Cedar Street, PO Box 208002
} New Haven, CT 06520-8002
} TEL 203-785 3681
} FAX 203-785 7446



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 14:14:22 2004



From: lee4502us-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 07:11:58 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: external lighting source for LM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (lee4502us-at-yahoo.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Monday,
February 9, 2004 at 11:05:16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: lee4502us-at-yahoo.com
Name: Sridhar Srinivasan

Organization: Anna University

Education: Graduate College

Location: Chennai, Tamilnadu, India

Question:
Our group is currently using an Optiphot 200 C microscope that is
fitted for episcopic investigation. I would like to include an
external lighting source (fiber optic maybe) to enable tranmitted
light microscopy. What are the issues (like lenses and apertures) I
need to be mindful of in order to set up a diascopic illumination
system? I look forward to your response. Thank you.
Sridhar

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 17:44:21 2004



From: David Knecht :      knecht-at-uconn.edu
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2004 18:01:51 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] 12 to 8 bit conversion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am curious how other software handles 12 to 8 bit conversion of
data. Improvision apparently scales directly from 4096 to 255 and 0
to 0 regardless of the image data. It seems to me that you should
take the maximum value in 12 bits and scale that to 255 and the
minimum value and scale that to 0. Does other software do this
differently, or allow you control of the conversion process? I
thought that if you needed to highlight low and high values, it would
be nice to be able to do this interactively in the conversion process.
--

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
91 N. Eagleville Rd. U-3125
Storrs, CT 06269-3125
knecht-at-uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 18:31:51 2004



From: DrJohnRuss-at-aol.com
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2004 19:42:25 EST
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: 12 to 8 bit conversion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There are several different issues here, and hence different answers.
Autoscaling the image into an 8 bit space will give you the maximum contrast, but it
means that each picture will have a different relationship between the
original pixel value and the final result, which would make densitometry or anything
related to pixel value impossible to calibrate, so absolute conversion by
simple division would be preferred in that case. Also, of course, it is much
faster, taking only a single pass through the data and that just being a bit shift
instead of subtraction and division.

Further, there is no good reason to restrict the scaling process to linear.
You should perform any gamma correction, equalization, etc. on the full 12 bits
before truncating to 8, in order to lose as little of the precision as
possible.

But why do you want to go to 8 bits anyway? If you have a software package
that does not handle 12 bits directly, you would do better to multiply the data
up to a 16 bit range and preserve all of the information present. Most modern
programs, even the newest version of Photoshop, provide pretty full
capabilities for processing and measuring 16 bit per channel images.

====

In a message dated 2/9/04 6:59:35 PM, knecht-at-uconn.edu writes:

} I am curious how other software handles 12 to 8 bit conversion of
} data. Improvision apparently scales directly from 4096 to 255 and 0
} to 0 regardless of the image data. It seems to me that you should
} take the maximum value in 12 bits and scale that to 255 and the
} minimum value and scale that to 0. Does other software do this
} differently, or allow you control of the conversion process? I
} thought that if you needed to highlight low and high values, it would
} be nice to be able to do this interactively in the conversion process.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 19:09:11 2004



From: Juan-Carlos Idrobo :      jidrobo-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 17:19:47 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-DAVIS

A postdoctoral position is available in the Electron Microscopy Facility
at the University of California-Davis (UCD). This position is tied to
the recent purchase of a 200kV Field-Emission JEOL 2500SE equipped with
Noran EDS and Gatan Imaging Filter, which will be installed at UCD in
May 2004. This microscope will support varied research programs within
the Nanophases in the Environment, Agriculture and Technology (NEAT)
initiative at UCD, with the successful postdoctoral candidate expected
to establish collaborative research efforts with both expert and novice
users of advanced electron microscopes. Successful candidates will be
recent Ph.D. graduates in physics, metallurgy, or materials science with
a sound background in the relevant materials issues and an ambition to
be part of a developing microscopy facility. Please send a resume and
publication list to Professor Nigel D. Browning at the address below.
Prior experience with the many analytical and imaging methods used in
both STEM and TEM is essential, and experience with the expectations of
multi-user facilities in the US is desirable. The position is for one
year initially, with possibilities existing for further years. It is
also expected that UCD will hire a full-time staff member to perform
similar duties in the very near future. Salary is commensurate with
experience.


Nigel D. Browning

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
University of California-Davis
One Shields Ave
Davis, CA 95616

AND

National Center for Electron Microscopy, MS 72-150
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Berkeley, CA 94720

Tel: 530-754-5358 (Davis)
510-486-4612 (NCEM)
Fax: 530-752-9554 (Davis)
510-486-5888 (NCEM)
e-mail: nbrowning-at-ucdavis.edu
ndbrowning-at-lbl.gov




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 9 19:10:55 2004



From: Juan-Carlos Idrobo :      jidrobo-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2004 17:21:31 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MATERIALS SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-DAVIS

A postdoctoral position is available in the Interface Physics Group at
the University of California-Davis (UCD) to work on novel developments
in ultrafast TEM. This position is linked to the major new program
being initiated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
involving the development of a new dynamic TEM (DTEM) to study materials
with a time resolution in the nano- to femto-second regime. This
position is intended to initially spend 6-9 months in Berlin working on
the existing state-of-the-art instrument at TU-Berlin, before
transferring back to UCD/LLNL to work on a new instrument that will be
installed at LLNL. In addition to becoming expert in the use of the
DTEM, the aim of the first years work is to use the microscope to study
phase transformations. Successful candidates will be recent Ph.D.
graduates in physics, metallurgy, or materials science with a sound
background in the relevant materials issues and an ambition to be part
of a developing program pushing at the frontiers of interface science.
Please send a resume and publication list to Professor Nigel D. Browning
at the address below. Prior experience in STEM or TEM is essential.
However, consideration will be based on the candidates overall potential
for success in the field and applicants with prior experience in related
fields are encouraged to apply. The position is for one year initially,
with possibilities existing for further years. In addition, the dynamic
TEM project is expected to become a major new program at LLNL, offering
the strong possibility of a permanent staff position in the future.
Salary is commensurate with experience.


**********************************************************************************************

Nigel D. Browning, PhD

Professor of Materials Science
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
University of California-Davis
One Shields Ave
Davis, CA 95616

AND

National Center for Electron Microscopy, MS 72-150
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Berkeley, CA 94720



Tel: 530-754-5358 (Davis)
510-486-4612 (NCEM)

Fax: 530-752-9554 (Davis)
510-486-5888 (NCEM)

e-mail: nbrowning-at-ucdavis.edu
ndbrowning-at-lbl.gov

***********************************************************************************************


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 14:25:05 2004



From: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:28:05 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: sections of rat tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 at 12:29:00
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy
Name: alvaro d. olivera

Organization: sciences university

Education: Graduate College

Location: montevideo, montevideo, uruguay

Question: I¥m cutting 61 nm sections of rat nerve
tissue perfussion fixed and post fixed by
immersion in PAF 4% Glutaraldehyde 0,25% Picric
acid 15%.
embbedig media: LRWhite (SPI supplies) medium
grade just for use( include benzoyl peroxide)
whithout accelerator.
mounting: 300 mesh Ni grids whithout film, covered with Coat-Grid Pen.
buffer: PBS 0,1M + BSA 0,1% + Triton x-100 0,05%
The problem is after the immunoreaction whith
gold conjugate antibody...the sections looks too
much dry under the magnifying glass and 80% of
sections disappear. Even when we put the grid
into the T.E.M. the image is horrible, we can¥t
recognize nothing and we see a rare artifact what
i think it¥s a tissue rests stick over the grid.
staining: uranium acetate 2% water(milli-q)diluted.
Please, I need a solution for this problem.
hope for your reply, many thanks...Alvaro.
ATTN: the same tissue mounted over Cu grids and
stained whit uranium acetate and Pb citrate, NO
immunoreaction!!!, are great in T.E.M.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 14:25:08 2004



From: guffey1-at-inter-linc.net (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:29:07 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Imaging question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (guffey1-at-inter-linc.net) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
February 10, 2004 at 12:43:10
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: guffey1-at-inter-linc.net
Name: Jennifer Guffey

Organization: southwest missouri state university

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: springfield, missouri, USA

Question: why is the image dimmer when you switch from a low power to
a high power objective?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 14:25:01 2004



From: zeriena-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:27:37 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: LM question about Lenses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (zeriena-at-yahoo.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
February 10, 2004 at 12:20:12
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: zeriena-at-yahoo.com
Name: rose zareen george

Organization: quens college

Education: Undergraduate College

Location: flushing, NY,USA

Question: 1. in the objective 4x, what does the number .12
indicate(numerical Aparature)
(eg. for 10x this number is .25 and 20 it is .50 and so on..
2.how many micro meter per objective is 43x..

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 14:25:07 2004



From: mparthiban-at-rediffmail.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:28:33 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] MicroscopyListserverviaWWW: pathogenic bacterial samples for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (mparthiban-at-rediffmail.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, February 10, 2004 at 12:41:32
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: mparthiban-at-rediffmail.com
Name: Parthi

Organization: University of Manitoba

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] Bacterial Samples

Question: I need to send some pathogenic bacterial samples for SEM.
So I need to kill the bacteria with either formaldehyde or
gluteraldehyde before sending. Can any one say the concentration I
should use or where can i find the prodedure for sending bacterial
samples for electron microscopy.
Parthi

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 16:31:27 2004



From: Jensen, Karen :      Karen_Jensen-at-URMC.Rochester.edu
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 17:42:08 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: sections of rat tissue

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Alvaro:

When you use uncoated grids the first thing to change is the thickness of
your sections. Cut the sections so they are light-medium gold in color.
Your 61nm sections are too delicate and therefore when you do all of those
different incubations and washes they break(just staining them with UA and
lead doesn't have the same effect). Remember the LR White sections are
extremely hydrophilic and swell up when placed into any aqueous solution.

If you can, try using formvar coated nickel grids. The sections will stay
on and won't disappear or loosen with the formvar. I always use 200 mesh
formvar coated nickel grids for all my ImmunoEM labeling procedures.

One more thing is to be very careful not to let the grids become dry at any
time during the entire labeling procedure.

Good Luck!

Karen Bentley
Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954



-----Original Message-----
} From: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy [mailto:alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy]
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2004 3:28 PM
To: MicroscopyListserver

Below is the result of your feedback form
(NJZFM-ultra-55). It was submitted by
(alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.org/Ask-A-Microscopist.html
on Tuesday, February 10, 2004 at 12:29:00
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: alvarobq-at-fcien.edu.uy
Name: alvaro d. olivera

Organization: sciences university

Education: Graduate College

Location: montevideo, montevideo, uruguay

Question: I¥m cutting 61 nm sections of rat nerve
tissue perfussion fixed and post fixed by
immersion in PAF 4% Glutaraldehyde 0,25% Picric
acid 15%.
embbedig media: LRWhite (SPI supplies) medium
grade just for use( include benzoyl peroxide)
whithout accelerator.
mounting: 300 mesh Ni grids whithout film, covered with Coat-Grid Pen.
buffer: PBS 0,1M + BSA 0,1% + Triton x-100 0,05%
The problem is after the immunoreaction whith
gold conjugate antibody...the sections looks too
much dry under the magnifying glass and 80% of
sections disappear. Even when we put the grid
into the T.E.M. the image is horrible, we can¥t
recognize nothing and we see a rare artifact what
i think it¥s a tissue rests stick over the grid.
staining: uranium acetate 2% water(milli-q)diluted.
Please, I need a solution for this problem.
hope for your reply, many thanks...Alvaro.
ATTN: the same tissue mounted over Cu grids and
stained whit uranium acetate and Pb citrate, NO
immunoreaction!!!, are great in T.E.M.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------




Karen L. Bentley, M.S.(previously Jensen)
Associate Scientist & Project Manager
Electron Microscope Research Core
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY 14642
585-275-1954




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Tue Feb 10 18:26:22 2004



From: Mike Bode :      mb-at-soft-imaging.com
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 17:36:04 -0700
Subject: [Microscopy] 12 to 8 bit conversion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I can't speak for other software, but here is how we do this in analySIS:

Let me first make the observation, that (to my knowledge) there are no
monitors that can actually display more than 8 bit of gray levels. This
alone makes a bit reduction necessary for display purposes.
When we open an image that is more than 8 bit (12-bit or 16-bit, for
example), the software must calculate new values for the display which fall
between 0 and 255. We typically do that by matching the highest pixel value
with 255, the lowest to 0. There are some finer details that have to do with
hot and dead pixels, but I won't go into that. This automatically results in
a contrast maximized image on the screen.
At this point you have several options: 1) You can manipulate the underlying
image data, which are still 12 bit, and keep the way the data is displayed,
or 2) you keep the underlying data and change the way they are displayed.
Both have methods have their justifications.
When it comes to actually create an 8-bit image from the 12-bit original,
you only need to "read" the display data (which are 8-bit), and create a new
image. Done.

The question remains: should you do this conversion? In general, it is
better to keep the 12-bit image until the end of a process, and only convert
it to 8-bit if really necessary. There is definitely data loss during this
process, be it through rounding errors or range compression. My personal
rule of thumb: If you need to further analyze the image, don't change the
bit depth. If the image is only used for display (such as in a paper or on
the web), reducing the bit depth is probably not a big problem.


Michael Bode, Ph.D.
Soft Imaging System Corp.
12596 West Bayaud Avenue
Suite 300
Lakewood, CO 80228
===================================
phone: (888) FIND SIS
(303) 234-9270
fax: (303) 234-9271
email: mailto:info-at-soft-imaging.com
web: http://www.soft-imaging.com
===================================



-----Original Message-----
} From: David Knecht [mailto:knecht-at-uconn.edu]
Sent: Monday, February 09, 2004 16:02
To: microscopy-at-sparc5.microscopy.com

I am curious how other software handles 12 to 8 bit conversion of
data. Improvision apparently scales directly from 4096 to 255 and 0
to 0 regardless of the image data. It seems to me that you should
take the maximum value in 12 bits and scale that to 255 and the
minimum value and scale that to 0. Does other software do this
differently, or allow you control of the conversion process? I
thought that if you needed to highlight low and high values, it would
be nice to be able to do this interactively in the conversion process.
--

Dr. David Knecht
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of Connecticut
91 N. Eagleville Rd. U-3125
Storrs, CT 06269-3125
knecht-at-uconn.edu
860-486-2200 860-486-4331 (fax)
home page: http://www.sp.uconn.edu/~mcbstaff/knecht/knecht.html



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 12:23:29 2004



From: Paula Sicurello :      patpxs-at-gwumc.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 13:31:14 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] 2078 Knife Maker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Listers,

I have just inherited an old LKB 2078 Histo Knifemaker. Not the instruction book, just the machine. It looks similar to a 7800, but very different at the same time.

Does anyone have a copy of the instruction book they can let me copy? Has anyone used one of these for making 45 degree knives with 10mm glass? Does this thing handle just like a 7800?

If you know anything about this 2078 please let me know.

On the "cutting" edge of science,

Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello
George Washington Univ. Medical Center
Electron Microscope Lab
Washington, DC 20037
202-994-2930 phone
202-994-2518 fax



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 13:30:41 2004



From: RCHIOVETTI-at-aol.com
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 14:41:16 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: 2078 Knife Maker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In a message dated 2/11/2004 1:31:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, patpxs-at-gwumc.edu writes:

} I have just inherited an old LKB 2078 Histo Knifemaker. Not the instruction book, just the machine. It looks similar to a 7800, but very different at the same time.
}
} Does anyone have a copy of the instruction book they can let me copy? Has anyone used one of these for making 45 degree knives with 10mm glass? Does this thing handle just like a
} 7800?
}
} If you know anything about this 2078 please let me know.
}
} On the "cutting" edge of science,
}
} Paula :-)

Hi Paula,

Sorry, I can't help on the manual. Maybe someone else can?

Unless I'm mistaken, the 2078 was used to make Ralph knives from rectangles (thus it was called the "2078 Histo" knifemaker).

The stage may not be set up for triangular knives, but I suppose you could get creative and make some homemade guides that might make triangular knives.

As far as glass thickness, most of the LKB vintage instruments had trouble with glass that was thicker than about 6 - 8mm. Don't know if it's going to have enough "oomph" to break 10mm glass. I'd suspect not, though.

Hope the above info isn't completely useless!

Bob Chiovetti


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 14:52:50 2004



From: John J. Bozzola :      bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 15:03:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: 2078 Knife Maker

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Paula,

I have the directions for this instrument and will mail a xerox copy to you.

You should have it in a couple days.

JB

} I have just inherited an old LKB 2078 Histo Knifemaker. Not the
} instruction book, just the machine. It looks similar to a 7800, but
} very different at the same time.
}
} Does anyone have a copy of the instruction book they can let me
} copy? Has anyone used one of these for making 45 degree knives with
} 10mm glass? Does this thing handle just like a 7800?
}
} If you know anything about this 2078 please let me know.
}
} On the "cutting" edge of science,
}
} Paula :-)
}
} Paula Sicurello
} George Washington Univ. Medical Center
} Electron Microscope Lab
} Washington, DC 20037
} 202-994-2930 phone
} 202-994-2518 fax


--
##############################################################
John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
I.M.A.G.E. (Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise)
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901 U.S.A.
Phone: 618-453-3730
Email: bozzola-at-siu.edu
##############################################################


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 15:18:58 2004



From: qualityimages :      qualityimages-at-netrax.net
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:29:21 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Imaging question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jennifer,
Assuming that the light source intensity is held constant, this is one
way to look at it.

1.) At the lower mag you are accepting light from a given circle (the
field of view) and then projecting that light onto a much larger circle
(your retina, or a piece of film). The intensity is reduced by the
ratio of the areas of the 2 circles.

2.) At the higher mag you are accepting light from a smaller circle
but projecting it onto the same size circle as before, hence the further
reduction in brightness at higher magnifications.

In terms of conservation of energy (assuming no losses due to the
optics, and that the aperture is the same size) the amount of light
available from the field of view is equal to the area x intensity. That
same amount of light is then spread over a larger area to give you your
magnified image. The intensity at that circle is the total light/area.
As your magnification increases, the area illuminated decreases in an
inverse square relationship, i.e. if you double your magnification you
will have 1/4 the area and therefore 1/4 the total light available to
spread over your retina or film. That is why things look darker, or
need stronger illumination, at higher magnifications.

Ken Converse
owner
Quality Images
third party SEM service
Delta, PA

by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:

}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
} submitted by (guffey1-at-inter-linc.net) from
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/Ask-A-Microscopist.html on Tuesday,
} February 10, 2004 at 12:43:10
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Email: guffey1-at-inter-linc.net
} Name: Jennifer Guffey
}
} Organization: southwest missouri state university
}
} Education: Undergraduate College
}
} Location: springfield, missouri, USA
}
} Question: why is the image dimmer when you switch from a low power to
} a high power objective?
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
}




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 15:25:56 2004



From: Robert H. Olley :      hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 21:36:36 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: AskAMicroscopist: LM question about Lenses

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


A very good description of numerical aperture can be found on:

http://microscopy.fsu.edu/primer/anatomy/numaperture.html

and the magnification question would be covered by:

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/anatomy/magnification.html

They may seem a bit complicated, but that's the way light microscopes work!
Best is if you can put a graticule on the specimen stage; this graticule
might be marked in divisions of 10 micrometers from 0 to 1 millimeter, and
then compare that with your image in some way. If you're not taking
photographs, one way is to put in an eyepiece with its own graticule inside,
and then count how many divisions in the eyepiece graticule correspond to,
say, 0.1 mm in the specimen graticule.

-----------------------------------
Robert H. Olley
Reply to: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/~spsolley
-----------------------------------

} From: zeriena-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
} To: MicroscopyListserver {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] AskAMicroscopist: LM question about Lenses
} Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:27:37 +1100
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_________________________________________________________________
Sign-up for a FREE BT Broadband connection today!
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From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 16:02:21 2004



From: White, Woody N. :      nwwhite-at-bwxt.com
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:13:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Specimen Storage Vials

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello All,

For years, I have been using Kimble "Opticlear" 5 dram vials with a *closed
bottom* poly stopper to store my 12.5mm pin-style SEM (Etec)
stubs/specimens. The pin can be pushed into the bottom of the closure,
making the stopper hold the stub. Works well - More or less airtight,
cheap, and suspends the specimen out of harm's way. I still use the pin
stubs with an adapter for my Hitachi SEM. I also use a lot of similar stubs
with a 25.4mm diameter.

I have never found a similar vial (closed bottom poly stopper) that is large
enough to accept my 25.4mm stubs. I am aware of commercially available
plastic boxes (w/inserts), but they are very expensive for what you get and
do little to protect specimens.

Any ideas about where to find large vials similar to the small ones (with
closed bottom cap)?

Thanks,
Woody

Woody White
BWXT Services:
http://www.bwxt.com/bwxt.html
My Site:
http://woody.white.home.att.net




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 16:23:05 2004



From: Henry Barwood :      hbarwood-at-troyst.edu
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:24:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Light variation in a PLM fitted with a digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have an older Leitz Pol microscope that has served me well for many years.
I've taken thousands of photographs of mineral thin sections in polarized
light. Recently I fitted the scope with a Coolpix digital camera and noticed
a "spot" in the center of the image that was lighter and had a greenish
cast. After virtually disassembling the scope looking for the source of the
problem, I finally discovered that it is only present when I cross the
polars (Nicol prisms). Examination of the prisms shows a faint pale colored
spot in the center of both the substage polarizer and the swing-in analyzer.
I never detected this problem with film, but it is decidedly evident with
the digital camera. I can remove and replace the polarizer, but still have
the spot because of the analyzer. Can anyone suggest a retrofit for the
analyzer using modern polaroid or some other technique? I love the Nicols,
but can't live with the spot.

Henry Barwood
Associate Professor of Science, Earth Science
Department of Math and Physics
MSCX 312G
Troy State University
Troy, Alabama 36082
hbarwood-at-troyst.edu



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 16:25:21 2004



From: cmeyer911-at-yahoo.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:23:37 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Ti Electropolish

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (cmeyer911-at-yahoo.com) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, February 10, 2004 at 17:51:43
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: cmeyer911-at-yahoo.com
Name: Chris Meyer

Organization: Boeing

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] TEM Electrolyte Procedure Requested

Question: Hello,

I'm looking for a titanium electropolish procedure that does not
include perchloric acid. I have perchloric, and a procedure for it,
but I'm looking for alternatives for safety reasons.

The alloy is Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr and will have alpha and beta phase.
I'm looking for electrolyte recipie, temperature and voltage.

Thank you.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 16:25:24 2004



From: iand-at-clemson.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:23:50 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: trace the general pathway from blood vessels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (iand-at-clemson.edu) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Tuesday, February 10, 2004 at 15:49:23
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: iand-at-clemson.edu
Name: ian davenport

Organization: clemson university

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:

Question: Hi
I would like to trace the general pathway from blood vessels through
the follicle cells and in to the oocyte, though various stages in
oogenesis. I am not looking for any specific protien/molecule, I just
want to prove/show that something travels through the follicle cell,
across the zona pellucida into the egg. it will need to cross at
least one membrane,(into the follicle cell.

I would like to use fluorescence or TEM.
Any suggestions please.
thanks
ian

---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Wed Feb 11 16:25:28 2004



From: ldemp-at-mse.ufl.edu (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:27:46 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SEM-TEM Workshop

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (ldemp-at-mse.ufl.edu) from
http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on
Wednesday, February 11, 2004 at 08:12:08
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: ldemp-at-mse.ufl.edu
Name: Luisa Amelia Dempere

Organization: University of Florida

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: SEM-TEM Workshop

Question: Dear all:
The Latin American School of Electron Microscopy (LASEM), sponsored
by the Committee of Inter American Societies for Electron Microscopy
(CIASEM), will be offering a 3-day workshop at the University of
Central Florida in Orlando from March 10 to March 12. This workshop
is part of the 2004 Joint Symposium of the Florida Chapter of the AVS
Science and Technology Society (FLAVS), the Florida Society for
Microscopy (FSM) and the Florida Section of the American Ceramic
Society (FL-ACerS). The 3-day workshop includes fundamentals and
applications of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission
Electron Microscopy (TEM) and associated techniques. A certificate of
attendance will be given to all participants. For more information
and registration please visit the symposium web-page at www.flavs.org
and go to the LASEM workshop link (www.flavs.org/LASEM.htm).


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 09:42:58 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 09:55:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] cilia and pseudostratified epithelium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

This comes up every year in my histology class:

Are all Pseudostratified columnar epithelial cells ciliated? I think so
but I don't want to say so based on a gut feeling. Does anyone know of a
pseudostratified epithelium that is not ciliated?

The converse is not true (i.e., not all cilia are on pseudostratifed
epithelium since the oviduct has cilia on its simple columnar epithelium).

Thanks, Tom

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 10:26:04 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 11:36:18 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: trace the general pathway from blood vessels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Ian:

Hmmm...... sort of a ...... (searching for the right word here and
not finding it) .... question. Since the oocyte does not exist in a
vacuum it must be nourished somehow. How else if not via the follicular
cells? I think you need to be more specific. Do you want to show that
only certain things go into oocytes? Is this some sort of class project
(design an experiment to demonstrate xyz) or ? TEM and fluorescence are
very different tools with very different capabilities, pick one.

Geoff

by way of MicroscopyListServer wrote:

} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}
} Email: iand-at-clemson.edu
} Name: ian davenport
}
} Organization: clemson university
}
} Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver:
}
} Question: Hi
} I would like to trace the general pathway from blood vessels through
} the follicle cells and in to the oocyte, though various stages in
} oogenesis. I am not looking for any specific protien/molecule, I just
} want to prove/show that something travels through the follicle cell,
} across the zona pellucida into the egg. it will need to cross at least
} one membrane,(into the follicle cell.
}
} I would like to use fluorescence or TEM.
} Any suggestions please.
} thanks
} ian
}
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 10:52:45 2004



From: Geoff McAuliffe :      mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 13:23:11 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: cilia and pseudostratified epithelium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We not sure from your data that this is an application for Mercox, but it
just might be. I'll refer you to a paper by Dr. Fred Hossler at East
Tennessee who's got great experience with Mercox. Read the paper and see if
it is what you are looking for.
See
http://www.laddresearch.com/Key_Products/Mercox/HosslerPaper/hosslerpaper.ht
ml

John Arnott

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: http://www.laddresearch.com

tel: 1-802-658-4961(anywhere) or 1-800-451-3406(US)
fax: 1-802-660-8859
e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com
----- Original Message -----
} From: "by way of MicroscopyListServer" {iand-at-clemson.edu}
To: "MicroscopyListserver" {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2004 5:23 PM

Hi Tom:

I would say yes, all pseudostratified cloumnar epithelia are
ciliated. By that I mean each cell has at least one cilium. I have seen
(via TEM) cilia on many types of epithelia (simple cuboidal and simple
columnar) that are not normally thought of as ciliated. I read something
recently (don't remember where) that the cilium is a polarity signal for
cell orientation and cell division.

Geoff

Tom Phillips wrote:

} This comes up every year in my histology class:
}
} Are all Pseudostratified columnar epithelial cells ciliated? I think
} so but I don't want to say so based on a gut feeling. Does anyone
} know of a pseudostratified epithelium that is not ciliated?
}
} The converse is not true (i.e., not all cilia are on pseudostratifed
} epithelium since the oviduct has cilia on its simple columnar
} epithelium).
}
} Thanks, Tom
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 3 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
}
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
}
}
}

--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 13:13:14 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?B?TWFyaWUtQ2xhdWRlIELpbGFuZ2Vy?= :      mcbelanger6-at-hotmail.com
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 19:23:51 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] LM-mercury burner stability

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all,

I have a couple questions regarding the illumination stability of mercury
burners:

1- When a new burner is installed, is there a period of time (within a few
hours) where the intensity increases to a plateau? With an older lamp,
everytime we turn the lamp on, we have observed that it takes about 40
minutes to reach a plateau. We installed a new burner recently, and images
have been brighter from day to day for the first 3 days and remained stable
afterwards. Is it just a coincidence?

2- To solve the stability problems we have with the mercury burners, we’re
considering the use of xenon lamps. Is there somewhere a comparative
stability study of the 2 types of burners?

Thank you.



Marie-Claude Belanger

_________________________________________________________________
MSN Messenger : discutez en direct avec vos amis !
http://messenger.fr.msn.ca/



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 14:07:28 2004



From: akc-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 15:17:57 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: cilia and pseudostratified epithelium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Since I will be giving the histology lecture on the male reproductive
system to medical students in a couple of weeks, I should mention that one
of the classic pseudostratified columnar epithelia, that of the epididymis,
has abundant long microvilli ("stereocilia" to the old classical
microscopists) at the apical surface but, to my knowledge, no cilia. Of
course, I can't exclude the possibility that a single cilium is hidden away
somewhere among all those microvilli. --Kent

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A. Kent Christensen, Professor Emeritus
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Medical Science II Building
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0616
Tel (work) (734) 763-1287, Fax (work) (734) 763-1166
akc-at-umich.edu http://www.umich.edu/~akc/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--On Thursday, February 12, 2004 1:23 PM -0800 Geoff McAuliffe
{mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu} wrote:

}
} Hi Tom:
}
} I would say yes, all pseudostratified cloumnar epithelia are
} ciliated. By that I mean each cell has at least one cilium. I have seen
} (via TEM) cilia on many types of epithelia (simple cuboidal and simple
} columnar) that are not normally thought of as ciliated. I read something
} recently (don't remember where) that the cilium is a polarity signal for
} cell orientation and cell division.
}
} Geoff
}
} Tom Phillips wrote:
}
} } This comes up every year in my histology class:
} }
} } Are all Pseudostratified columnar epithelial cells ciliated? I think
} } so but I don't want to say so based on a gut feeling. Does anyone
} } know of a pseudostratified epithelium that is not ciliated?
} }
} } The converse is not true (i.e., not all cilia are on pseudostratifed
} } epithelium since the oviduct has cilia on its simple columnar
} } epithelium).
} }
} } Thanks, Tom
} }
} } Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} } Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} }
} } 573-882-4712 (office)
} } 573-882-0123 (fax)
} } PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
} }
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029 mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************






From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Thu Feb 12 14:45:12 2004



From: Richard Easingwood :      richard.easingwood-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 09:55:43 +1300
Subject: [Microscopy] cilia and pseudostratified epithelium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

} Dear Tom and Geoff,
Tom's referring, I think, to the primary cilium, see-
http://www.bowserlab.org/primarycilia/ciliumpage2.htm or
http://www.primary-cilium.co.uk/ - this is web site relating to the
primary cilium (called by some the 'forgotten organelle'), which is
found, as I recently learned, in most mammalian cells.

Regards,

Richard


} Hi Tom:
}
} I would say yes, all pseudostratified cloumnar epithelia are
} ciliated. By that I mean each cell has at least one cilium. I have
} seen (via TEM) cilia on many types of epithelia (simple cuboidal and
} simple columnar) that are not normally thought of as ciliated. I read
} something recently (don't remember where) that the cilium is a
} polarity signal for cell orientation and cell division.
}
} Geoff
}
} Tom Phillips wrote:
}
} } This comes up every year in my histology class:
} }
} } Are all Pseudostratified columnar epithelial cells ciliated? I think
} } so but I don't want to say so based on a gut feeling. Does anyone
} } know of a pseudostratified epithelium that is not ciliated?
} }
} } The converse is not true (i.e., not all cilia are on pseudostratifed
} } epithelium since the oviduct has cilia on its simple columnar
} } epithelium).
} }
} } Thanks, Tom
} }
} } Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} } Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} }
} } 573-882-4712 (office)
} } 573-882-0123 (fax)
} } PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} --
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029 mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************
}
}
}
}
}
Richard Easingwood
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
c/- Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology
University of Otago
ph: 0064 3 479 7301
fax: 0064 3 479 7254
cell: 021 222 4759



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 06:13:03 2004



From: Robert H. Olley :      hinmeigeng-at-hotmail.com
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 12:23:43 +0000
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Imaging question

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Jennifer,

The intensity you see through different objective lenses does not only
depend on the magnification of the lens, but also its numerical aperture,
which, roughly speaking, is how wide is the cone of rays entering the lens.
Here are some values for a set of polarizing lenses we use:

n.a. mag n.a./mag squared
0.08 2.5 0.032 0.001024
0.22 10 0.022 0.000484
0.6 25 0.024 0.000576
0.85 40 0.02125 0.000452

If everything is set up correctly, then the intensity will be roughly
proportional to (n.a./mag)squared as in the last column. Generally, this
factor will decrease a bit with increasing lens power, but note that our 25x
lens is a bit better than the one above and below. This is because it is a
high quality Zeiss Neofluar lens.

However, these factors will only apply if you have a condenser which
delivers an even intensity of rays over the whole numerical aperture. For
example, the 0.63 n.a. condenser we normally use will not deliver a full
cone to the 40x lens, so things do appear noticeably dimmer in that one.

I'm don't know what kind of condenser you are using. One thing you can do
is to dim your light source somewhat, and then take out the eyepiece and
look down the tube. You will see a circle of light corresponding to the
cone of rays going through your lenses. If this is cut down by an aperture,
it may be that your higher power lenses are not getting their full ration in
terms of incoming cone of rays. Then things will appear noticeably dimmer,
and moreover you will not be getting the full resolution that your objective
lens is capable of.

One other thing if you are doing polarized light microscopy. If you have a
wide cone of rays coming through, say, a mineral rock section, then the
colour transmitted through the polarizing system will be different for
different path lengths through the specimen between the centre and outside
of the cone. This is why polarizing colours tend to look much more
wishy-washy through a high-power lens.

-----------------------------------
Robert H. Olley
Reply to: R.H.Olley-at-reading.ac.uk
URL: http://www.rdg.ac.uk/~spsolley
-----------------------------------

} From: guffey1-at-inter-linc.net (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
} To: MicroscopyListserver {microscopy-at-msa.microscopy.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] AskAMicroscopist: Imaging question
} Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:29:07 +1100
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

_________________________________________________________________
Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 06:46:27 2004



From: Alan Stone :      as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 06:57:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Follow Up to Coolpix Image Retrieval Failures

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Thanks to everyone who replied with their suggestions to prevent image
retrieval failures.

There was one particular procedure which we were unaware of and most
Windows users do not seem to know this control feature. I would like to
pass this along to the group.

While the compact flash cards are typically read by USB devices and in
theory, are swappable, we have not had failures since software "ejecting"
the card. Some card readers require physically ejecting the card much like
the camera card eject. We simply pull the cards out of the card
readers. Apparently, Windows does not always know that the card has been
removed and that the files have changed, hence the files are corrupted and
not readable. The solution (hopefully in the long run) is go open My
Computer, right click on the card reader device and eject the card. While I
recalled seeing this previously, I did not think it was relevant. We never
had this problem with our USB jump drives.

I hope this helps everyone else who had similar problems.

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 08:01:34 2004



From: Mark Adelman :      madelman-at-usuhs.mil
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 09:12:19 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Re: cilia and pseudostratified epithelium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

So far as I know, the epithelium of the epididymus is pseudostratified,
with STEROCILIA (which are actually elongate microvilli). I do not
recall any descriptions - on it - of cilia, primary or otherwise. MRA

Mark R. Adelman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anatomy, Physiology & Genetics
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
4301 Jones Bridge Road
Bethesda, MD 20814-4799
USA
Phone: 301-295-3208
FAX: 301-295-1786
Email: madelman-at-usuhs.mil
Website: http://bicmra.usuhs.mil/
On Thursday, February 12, 2004, at 04:23 PM, Geoff McAuliffe wrote:

}
}
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} -------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help
} http://www.msa.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -----------------------------------------------------------------------
} --------
}
} Hi Tom:
}
} I would say yes, all pseudostratified cloumnar epithelia are
} ciliated. By that I mean each cell has at least one cilium. I have
} seen (via TEM) cilia on many types of epithelia (simple cuboidal and
} simple columnar) that are not normally thought of as ciliated. I read
} something recently (don't remember where) that the cilium is a
} polarity signal for cell orientation and cell division.
}
} Geoff
}
} Tom Phillips wrote:
}
} } This comes up every year in my histology class:
} }
} } Are all Pseudostratified columnar epithelial cells ciliated? I think
} } so but I don't want to say so based on a gut feeling. Does anyone
} } know of a pseudostratified epithelium that is not ciliated?
} }
} } The converse is not true (i.e., not all cilia are on pseudostratifed
} } epithelium since the oviduct has cilia on its simple columnar
} } epithelium).
} }
} } Thanks, Tom
} }
} } Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
} } Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} } 3 Tucker Hall
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} }
} } 573-882-4712 (office)
} } 573-882-0123 (fax)
} } PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
} }
} }
} }
}
} --
} --
} **********************************************
} Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
} Neuroscience and Cell Biology
} Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
} 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
} voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029 mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
} **********************************************
}
}
}
}
}



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 09:30:36 2004



From: Heather McDonald :      mcdonald-at-cbse.uab.edu
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 09:45:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] UV fluorescence microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

I am contemplating attempting to assemble a UV fluorescence microscope. I
want Ex ~ 305 nm and Em ~350 to 400. I have found the necessary filters and
plan to assemble a set for ($800+), we have a quartz objective and UV lamp
and camera. My questions are... Is anyone imaging tryptophan fluorescence so
I can go there and try my idea before I spend a lot of money, or has anyone
ever tried to do this and can offer words of wisdom or caution.

thanks,
heather



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 12:40:25 2004



From: Gordon Vrololjak :      gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 10:51:01 -0800 (PST)
Subject: [Microscopy] need to do SEM of a microprocessor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,
I have a request from a science museum to take a few SEM photos of a
microproceessor from a cell phone. I was wondering if anyone has any
recommendations on methods to remove the packaging material to get to the
actual silicon.

It looks like a Texas instruments chip with number MAD2WD1, if that helps.
Any comments appreciated.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 13:02:19 2004



From: Tomic, Peter (Peter) :      ptomic-at-agere.com
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 14:12:53 -0500
Subject: [Microscopy] need to do SEM of a microprocessor

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Gordon;

I can give you very specific information on that. However, I must caution you that this procedure should only be performed in a fume hood, with full protective clothing, eyewear and someone with training in doing this..

The mold compound may be dissolved in a either red fuming nitric acid heated to +80C or a combination of 90% nitric/ 10% sulfuric. The process is by immersion. Bear in mind that this is a very hazardous procedure, so now that I told you some specifics, let me make an alternate suggestion. Simply take a "ceramic" device, one that has a soldered lid on it and grind the lid off. This way you won't have to deal with any of this dangerous material and I assure you that unless your audience are semiconductor engineers, they won't know one circuit from the next.

Let me know if there is something specific about this or if you just want to show the general construction of an IC. I have some archived photos I'd be happy to pass along if you'd simply need something as an example.

Peter Tomic
Agere Systems
Allentown, PA

-----Original Message-----
} From: Gordon Vrololjak [mailto:gvrdolja-at-nature.Berkeley.EDU]
Sent: Friday, February 13, 2004 1:51 PM
To: Microscopy-at-MSA.Microscopy.Com

Hello,
I have a request from a science museum to take a few SEM photos of a
microproceessor from a cell phone. I was wondering if anyone has any
recommendations on methods to remove the packaging material to get to the
actual silicon.

It looks like a Texas instruments chip with number MAD2WD1, if that helps.
Any comments appreciated.
Gordon

\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Gordon Ante Vrdoljak Electron Microscope Lab
ICQ 23243541 http://nature.berkeley.edu/~gvrdolja 26 Giannini Hall
gvrdolja-at-nature.berkeley.edu UC Berkeley
phone (510) 642-2085 Berkeley CA 94720-3330
fax (510) 643-6207 cell (510) 290-6793





From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 17:10:49 2004



From: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2004 07:14:14 +0800
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: neutralization of osmium tetroxide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the result of your feedback form (NJZFM-ultra-55). It was
submitted by (sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov) from
http://microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MLFormMail.html on Friday,
February 13, 2004 at 13:30:11
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Email: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov
Name: Sue Tyler

Organization: Cooperative Oxford Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Microscopy] [Filtered] MListserver: neutralization of osmium tetroxide

Question: I recently submitted a container of neutralized
(2% Osmium in 20ml of corn oil)Osmium Tetroxide to
our waste disposal and safety person and it was rejected.
The reason for the rejection was that we are not licensed to
treat our waste in this facility. Has anyone else run into
this problem? I would think that it would be safer to have
it neutralized in case of a spill etc. Any opinions would
be nice.

Reference: Cooper, K. (1988) Neutralization of
Osmium Tetroxide in case of accidental spillage
and for disposal.
Bulletin of The Microscopical Soxiety of Canada. 8:24-28


---------------------------------------------------------------------------


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Fri Feb 13 17:30:46 2004



From: Tom Phillips :      phillipst-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2004 17:43:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: neutralization of osmium tetroxide

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

we also are not allowed to treat our used materials (we aren't allowed to
call it waste). we can do something as part of an approved
protocol. maybe you need to "test" your osmium is reactive afterwards by
putting it in corn oil and see if it turns black! that makes it part of
the experiment and not part of the disposal. see if that is an approved
reason for doing what you do.


At 07:14 AM 2/14/2004 +0800, you wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

Thomas E. Phillips, PhD
Professor of Biological Sciences
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
3 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400

573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sat Feb 14 18:11:08 2004



From: ldm :      ldm2-at-risc4.numis.nwu.edu
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2004 18:21:46 -0600 (CST)
Subject: [Microscopy] Postdoctoral opening

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A postdoctoral position is available to work on problems
related to surface reconstructions, charge density and electron
crystallography. A strong background in electron microscopy
is necessary. Additional experience in UHV equipment, and
strong computer skills and expertise in density functional
methods would be positive points.

-----------------------------------------------
Laurence Marks
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University
Evanston, IL 60201, USA
Tel: (847) 491-3996 Fax: (847) 491-7820
mailto:ldm2-at-risc4.numis.nwu.edu
http://www.numis.nwu.edu
-----------------------------------------------




From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 15 16:39:53 2004



From: Barbara Foster :      bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2004 17:52:11 -0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: AskAMicroscopist: LM question about Lenses

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Dear Rose,

Yes, the number after the magnification is the magnification is the Numerical Aperture or NA.

Three quick equations which you might find helpful.

1. NA = n sin a
where
n = refractive index of the immersing liquid between the top of the sample and the front element of the lens
a = 1/2 of the collecting angle of the objective

From this equation, you can quickly see that, the larger the collecting angle, the greater the NA.
Also, the refractive index of air is 1.00, so using immersing fluids like water (1.33), glycerin (1.47), or immersion oil (1.5212) has tremendous effect on improving the NA. Reminder: use only the fluid for which the lens is engineered. Trying to use immersion oil with a "dry" (air) objective, is a disaster. Lenses built for immersing liquids are specially sealed so that the liquid does not creep into the internal construction of the lenses.

2. Why is NA important? The reasons are derived from Diffraction Theory. Every object produces a diffraction pattern (see Young's slit experiments in any physics book for details). For simple objects like stage micrometers and diatoms like pleurasigma angulatum, you can see the diffraction pattern by removing the eyepiece and peering deep down the tube into the Back Focal Plane of the objective. (You also need to close down the condernser as far as it will go, to make the source of light a very small opening or, alternatively, remove it and put a pinhole over the light port in the base of your microscope). If the NA is big enough to capture 2 adjacent spots from the diffraction pattern, enough information is present to determine spacing in the original object. The basic equation for resolution summarizes:

Rxy = (1.22x wavelength)/ (NAobjective+NAcondenser).
R = the size (in the XY plane, typically in micrometers) of the smallest resolvable particle
1.22 = a shape function (assuming round apertures in the microscope)
Wavelength = you can use 500 nm or 0.500 micrometers as sort of the center of the visible spectrum
NA = real working NAs (note: just because a lens is engraved with a value, does not mean that that is the working NA. Closing down an iris in the back focal plane of the objective or closing down the condenser aperture iris reduces the real working NA).

If the NA is big enough to capture THREE adjacent diffraction spots (the set of -1/0/+1 only counts as 2), you will begin to get better edge definition. So, the bigger the NA, the smaller the particle that you can resolve and the better the edge quality will be.

3. As for your other question: micrometers
Are you referring to the working distance (distance from the front of the lense to the top of the sample) or Field of View?
If working distance: you can either measure that directly or can look up the specs in the literature from the manufacturer.
If Field of view (the diameter of the territory you see when looking through the eyepieces):
F. O. V = (field number)/Mobjective
The field number is the value written on the EYEPIECE, following the magnification. It refers to the distance across a small ridge or baffle typically mounted about 1/3 of the way up the inside wall from the BOTTOM of the eyepiece and typically ranges from about 18mm to 25 mm (old Reichert Polyvars and some others had ultra wide field of view and went to 32mm). Convert to micrometers by multiplying by 1000.
Mobjective is the Magnification of the OBJECTIVE multiplied by any other auxiliary lenses between the objective and the bottom of the eyepiece.
Ex: If you were working with eyepieces which had field number 22 (22 mm or 22,000 micrometers) and a 10x objective, the size of the field of view is simply 22,000/10 or 2,000micrometers.

Note: the eyepiece going to the camera is often a different magnification than the eyepieces you look through and the chip in the camera has its own equivalent of a "magnification", so what you see in the eyepieces will often be a larger FOV than you can capture with your camera.

You might find my book, "Optimizing Light Microscopy", helpful. A description and ordering information are on our website: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

Good hunting!
Barbara Foster
Microscopy/Microscopy Education
125 Paridon Street, Suite 102
Springfield, MA 01118
PH: 413-746-6931 FX: 413-746-9311 Web: www.MicroscopyEducation.com

^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^
Don't forget: the American Chem Society's Applied Optical Microscopy Course, March 5-7, Chicago, Ill.
Visit our website for details and registration. NOT JUST FOR CHEMISTS!!!!
^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^&^
Best regards

At 07:27 AM 2/11/04 +1100, zeriena-at-yahoo.com wrote:


} ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- Sponsor: The Microscopy Society of America



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 15 17:55:47 2004



From: Hank Beebe :      hbeebe-at-rjlg.com (by way of MicroscopyListServer)
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2004 09:03:59 +0800
Subject: [Microscopy] Ion Pump and PSEMs

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am looking for the make and size of the Ion pump that is on the Philips
CM12.
It seems easier to ask rather than pull the covers off the scope as the EDS
is in the way.

I am also looking for any used PSEM 75's for sale
Please contact me at the below e-mail address.

Thanks in advance
Hank Beebe

Manager Instrument Services
hbeebe-at-rjlg.com
RJLee Group, Inc.
350 Hochberg Rd.
Monroeville, PA 15146
(724) 325-1776 voice
(724) 733-1799 fax


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Sun Feb 15 18:44:43 2004



From: Nestor J. Zaluzec :      zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2004 08:59:29 +0800
Subject: [Microscopy] MM2004 Paper Submission Deadline is upon us

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Colleagues

Just a reminder the deadline for submitting papers to the Microscopy
& Microanalysis 2004
meeting in Savannah is 17:00 PST , Monday Feb 16, 2004.

All the information you need to submit a paper is on-line at

http://mm2004.microscopy.org


Cheers...

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp.


From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 16 02:35:52 2004



From: =?iso-8859-2?Q?KJ_H=FCbner?= :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2004 09:27:48 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Fw: [3dpvt2004] Call for Papers: 3DPVT 2004 Thessaloniki - Greece, September 6 - September 9, 2004

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
} 3DPTV 2004, Thessaloniki - Greece
} http://www.umiacs.umd.edu/conferences/3dpvt04/
}
}
============================================================================
}
} Call for Papers
}
} The second International Symposium on 3DPTV (3D Data Processing,
} Visualization, and
} Transmission) will be held on September 6 to 9, 2004 in the city of
} Thessaloniki, Greece.
}
} The goal of this meeting is to present and discuss new research ideas and
} results related to the capture, representation, compact storage,
} transmission, processing, editing, optimization and visualization or 3D
} data. These topics span a number of research fields from applied
} mathematics, computer science, and engineering: computer vision, computer
} graphics, geometric modeling, signal and image processing, bionformatics,
} and statistics.
}
} This symposium follows the highly successful 1st International Symposium
on
} 3D Data Processing, Visualization, and Transmission
} 3DPVT'02 (http://www.dei.unipd.it/conferences/3DPVT) which took place in
} 2003 in Padova, Italy. The proceedings of the symposium will be published
in
} the IEEE Proceedings Series, in cooperation with Eurographics and ACM
} SIGGRAPH.
}
} A list of topics of interest includes but is not limited to:
}
} - 3D scanning technologies and devices
} - 3D photography algorithms
} - 3D view registration and surface modeling
} - Surface reflectance recovery and modeling
} - 3D texture processing
} - Image-based rendering and modeling
} - Multi-view image and geometry processing
} - Stereo and motion reconstruction
} - Augmented reality
} - Compression, transmission and visualization of 3D data
} - 3D Content-based retrieval and recognition
} - Man/machine interaction with 3D data
} - 3D printing and rapid prototyping
} - Psychophysics of 3D sensing and haptics
} - 3D imaging in biomedicine
} - Structural analysis and pattern discovery in bioinformatics
} - 3D imaging in virtual heritage and virtual archeology
} - 3D imaging in e-commerce.
} - 3D Television
} - Teleimmersion and remote collaboration
}
} Paper submission
}
} Papers submitted for review must follow the IEEE CS Press Proceedings
} two-column format. The papers must be submitted for review in final form.
} The maximum paper length for review as well as for publication is 8 pages,
} including the bibliography and the figures. Electronic manuscripts must
be
} submitted in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. In exceptional circumstances,
} PostScript files will be accepted and converted to PDF: you must contact
the
} conference in advance if you intend to do so.
}
} The paper must have the full author contact information. All accepted
papers
} will be published in the Proceedings of the Symposium (on a CD-ROM).
} The symposium language will be English.
}
} Important Dates
}
} Abstracts : April 2
} Full Papers : April 7
} Reviews due : May 15
} Author notification : May 25
} Deadline for price
} reduced hotel
} booking : June 10
} Camera-ready Papers : June 15
} and Registration of at
} least one author per
} paper
}
} Hotel reservations : May 25 to August 30
} Registration deadline : June 30
} for reduced price
}
} Tutorials : September 6
} Symposium : September 7-9
}
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
} ---
}
} General chairs
}
} - Aloimonos, Yiannis, University of Maryland, USA {yiannis-at-cfar.umd.edu}
} - Taubin, Gabriel, Brown University, USA {taubin-at-brown.edu}
}
} Finance and registration chair
}
} - Duraiswami, Ramani, University of Maryland, {ramani-at-umiacs.umd.edu}
}
} Local arrangements
}
} - Petrou, Maria {M.Petrou-at-ee.surrey.ac.uk}
} - Strintzis, Michael {strintzi-at-eng.auth.gr}
} - Mpountanour, Kalliope {kalm-at-iti.gr}
} - George Triantafyllidis {gatrian-at-iti.gr}
}
} Publication
}
} - Kimia, Ben, Brown University, USA {kimia-at-lems.brown.edu}
}
}
} Publicity
}
} - Niovi Pavlidou, Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki
} {niovi-at-vergina.eng.auth.gr}
}
}
}
} Steering Committee
}
} - Yiannis Aloimonos, University of Maryland, USA
} - Guido Cortelazzo, University of Padova, Italy
} - Concettina Guerra, University of Padova, Italy
} - Avi Kak, Purdue University, USA
} - Jan Koenderink, Utrecht University, Holland
} - Pietro Perona, Caltech, USA
} - Gabriel Taubin, Brown University, USA
} - Luc Van Gool, University of Leuven-ETH Zentrum, Belgium-Switzerland
}
} Keynote speakers:
}
} Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann, Geneva
} Vladimir Brajovic, CMU {brajovic-at-cs.cmu.edu}
} Jan Koenderink, Utrecht {j.j.koenderink-at-phys.uu.nl}
} Markus Gross, ETH Zurich {grossm-at-inf.ethz.ch}
} Craig Gotsman, Harvard {gotsman-at-eecs.harvard.edu}
} Demetri Terzopoulos, Courant {dt-at-cs.nyu.edu}
} George Barbastathis, MIT {gbarb-at-mit.edu}
} Andrew Fitzgibbon, Oxford
} Patrick Cavanagh, Harvard (patrick-at-wjh.harvard.edu)
}
}
} Special session organizers include:
}
} Gotsman, Craig (geometry processing) {gotsman-at-eecs.harvard.edu}
} Pollefeys, Marc (multiple view geometry) {marc-at-cs.unc.edu}
}
} Tutorials include:
}
} Marc Pollefeys, 3D Photography
}
} If you are interested in giving a tutorial, please
} contact the Chairs.
}
} Program committee:
}
} 1 Marc Alexa {alexa-at-informatik.tu-darmstadt.de}
} 2 Nina Amenta {amenta-at-cs.ucdavis.edu}
} 3 Anup Basu {anup-at-cs.ualberta.ca}
} 4 Alexander Belyaev {belyaev-at-mpi-sb.mpg.de}
} 5 Fausto Bernardini {fausto-at-us.ibm.com}
} 6 Jean-Daniel Boissonat {Jean-Daniel.Boissonnat-at-inria.fr}
} 7 Vladimir Brajovic {brajovic-at-cs.cmu.edu}
} 8 Pere Brunet {pere-at-lsi.upc.es}
} 9 Daniel Cohen-Or {dcor-at-tau.ac.il}
} 10 David Cooper {cooper-at-lems.brown.edu}
} 11 Guido Cortelazzo {corte-at-dei.unipd.it}
} 12 Kostas Daniilidis {kostas-at-cis.upenn.edu}
} 13 Larry Davis {lsd-at-umiacs.umd.edu
} 14 Leila DeFloriani {deflo-at-disi.unige.it}
} 15 Tamal Dey {tamaldey-at-cis.ohio-state.edu}
} 16 Craig Gotsman {gotsman-at-eecs.harvard.edu}
} 17 Markus Gross {grossm-at-inf.ethz.ch}
} 18 Concettina Guerra {guerra-at-dei.unipd.it}
} 19 Martial Hebert {hebert-at-ri.cmu.edu}
} 20 David Jacobs {djacobs-at-cs.umd.edu}
} 21 Avi Kak {kak-at-ecn.purdue.edu}
} 22 Myung-Soo Kim {mskim-at-cse.snu.ac.kr
} 23 Leif Kobbelt {kobbelt-at-cs.rwth-aachen.de}
} 24 Jan Koenderink {j.j.koenderink-at-phys.uu.nl}
} 25 Jana Kosecka {kosecka-at-cs.gmu.edu}
} 26 Frederic Leymarie {leymarie-at-lems.brown.edu}
} 27 Yi Ma {yima-at-uiuc.edu}
} 28 Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann {thalmann-at-miralab.unige.ch}
} 29 Roberto Manduchi {manduchi-at-soe.ucsc.edu}
} 30 Dinesh Manocha {dm-at-cs.unc.edu}
} 31 Ioana Martin {ioana-at-us.ibm.com}
} 32 Ralph Martin {ralph-at-cs.cf.ac.uk}
} 33 Takashi Matsuyama {tm-at-i.kyoto-u.ac.jp}
} 34 Randal Nelson {nelson-at-cs.rochester.edu}
} 35 Ko Nishino {kon-at-cs.columbia.edu}
} 36 Valerio Pascucci {pascucci1-at-llnl.gov}
} 37 Yannis Pitas {pitas-at-zeus.csd.auth.gr}
} 38 Marc Pollefeys {marc-at-cs.unc.edu}
} 39 Jean Ponce {ponce-at-cs.uiuc.edu}
} 40 Martin Rumpf {rumpf-at-math.uni-duisburg.de}
} 41 Holly Rushmeier {hertjwr-at-us.ibm.com}
} 42 Szymon Rusinkiewicz {smr-at-cs.princeton.edu}
} 43 Francis Schmitt {schmitt-at-ima.enst.fr}
} 44 Peter Schroeder {ps-at-cs.caltech.edu}
} 45 Hans-Peter Seidel {hpseidel-at-mpi-sb.mpg.de}
} 46 Claudio Silva {csilva-at-cs.utah.edu}
} 47 Yoshishisa Shinagawa {sinagawa-at-uiuc.edu}
} 48 Harry Shum {hshum-at-microsoft.com}
} 49 Stefano Soatto {soatto-at-cs.ucla.edu}
} 50 Carlo Tomasi {tomasi-at-cs.duke.edu}
} 51 Luc VanGool {vangool-at-vision.ee.ethz.ch}
} 52 Luiz Velho {lvelho-at-impa.br}
} 53 Denis Zorin {dzorin-at-mrl.nyu.edu}
} 54 Naokazu Yokoya {yokoya-at-is.aist-nara.ac.jp}
} 55 Peter Belhumeur {belhumeur-at-cs.columbia.edu}
} 56 Brian Curless {curless-at-cs.washington.edu}
} 57 Leonard McMillan {mcmillan-at-cs.unc.edu}
} 58 Davi Geiger {geiger-at-cs.nyu.edu}
} 59 Helder Jesus Araujo, Portugal
} 60 Daniel Cremers, UCLA
} 61 Nikos Paragios, Siemens/France
}
} _______________________________________________
} 3dpvt2004 mailing list
} 3dpvt2004-at-umiacs.umd.edu
} http://lists.umiacs.umd.edu/mailman/listinfo/3dpvt2004



From MicroscopyL-request-at-ns.microscopy.com Mon Feb 16 02:42:20 2004



From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?KJ_H=FCbner?= :      hubner-at-IOd.krakow.pl
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2004 09:34:32 +0100
Subject: [Microscopy] Fw: IASTED Newsletter on Modelling and Simulation - Feb. 2004 (fwd)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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}
} IASTED International Newsletter on Modelling and Simulation
} February 3, 2004
}
} UPCOMING DEADLINES
}
} 2 WEEKS REMAINING TO SUBMIT PAPERS
}
} 1. The IASTED International Conference on Applied Simulation and
Modelling - ASM 2004
} June 28-30, 2004, Rhodes, Greece
}
} Important Deadlines:
} **Submissions Due: Feb. 15, 2004**
} Notification of Acceptance: Apr. 1, 2004
} Registration Deadline: May 1, 2004
}
} To submit a paper, tutorial or special session or for more information
visit our website at http://www.iasted.org/conferences/2004/greece/asm.htm
}
} **Special Session Announcement**
} "Modelling and Simulation of Complex Biomechanical Systems" organized by
Prof. Philippe Gorce, University of Toulon-