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From: zaluzec-at-microscopy.com
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2009 00:00:00 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Administrivia: Listserver Archives for 2008

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Happy New Year Colleagues;

Welcome to yet another year of operation of the Microscopy Listserver.
It was another productive year for all of you, during 2008, the listserver
delivered 2238 messages (} 230 Gb of Email) to ~ 3000 subscribers
around the world, with only minimal hassels (that I know about).

The complete Microscopy Listserver Archives for 2008-1993 are on-line
at http://www.microscopy.com. Those of you that use the archive facility will
notice I have decided to no longer produce monthly snap shots of the posting
for the search engines. Instead you will only be able to search a full year
at a time. I no longer believe these smaller monthly snapshots are important
with the ubiquitous access to high speed network connections.


Cheers,

Nestor
Your Friendly Neighborhood SysOp

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From: rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2009 02:28:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Stains for proteins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Mark,

One stain is tannic acid/ferric chloride, it's a good alternative to osmium.
I've usually used this for membranes, but it does stain things like
cytoskeletal proteins and ribosomes pretty well too - it probably binds to
certain charged surfaces or groups, like most fixatives.

You can do this a number of ways, the two commonest ones are to either fix
first in aldehyde (glutaraldehyde or formaldehyde) in appropriate buffer,
rinse well, then stain in 1% tannic acid, rinse well, then stain in 1%
ferric chloride. The tissue will go black, just as if it has been
osmicated. Then continue as usual - dehydrate, embed.

The alternative is to add the tannic acid in with the aldehyde fixative,
which is the way I've usually used it for plant tissues.

The ferric chloride is just made up in distilled water, and you can vary the
concentration of either TA or FeCl3, and vary the time, etc.

I imagine you are fixing animal/human tissue (I work on plants only), so
just go with whatever is the standard TEM protocol and add the TA/FeCl3 as
above. It used to be the case that for reliable results you had to use
Mallinkrodt tannic acid, but the manufacturing process used by other
companies may be better now.

There are a couple of older references to this which I can dig out - the
paper we cite them in is pre-web.....

cheers,
from 2009 already downunder...
Rosemary White

Dr Rosemary White
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

ph 61 2 6246 5475
fx 61 2 6246 5334





On 1/01/09 7:46 AM, "twigg-at-estd.nrl.navy.mil" {twigg-at-estd.nrl.navy.mil}
wrote:

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} Title-Subject: [Filtered] Stains for proteins
}
} Question: I have a new project which may entail staining proteins so
} that there is more contrast for TEM imaging. One collaborator
} recommended osmium tetroxide, but I read on the web that it is rather
} poisonous and requires special handling. I have not done this sort
} of biological TEM before and I would appreciate any tips or
} references.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Mark
}
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} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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} 8, 11 -- From: twigg-at-estd.nrl.navy.mil (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
} 8, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: Stains for proteins
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From: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2009 10:23:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Developing EM class for undergrads + going digital

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Kristin,

Developing a new class is always difficult but more so when you are still in
the process of setting up the lab. Regarding your digital question, we are
a major research facility that still uses primarily film. Our users come
from all areas of the university and have a very wide range of sample types
requiring an equally wide range of preparation techniques and original
magnifications. I have two equivalent TEMs with one having a 4k digital
camera. The camera is rarely used. Why?

For a number of reasons. One is that TEM is a very poor sampling technique.
We look at extremely small samples and then extrapolate to the whole. A
digital camera, especially a high-resolution bottom mounted one, captures a
very small area of the total screen. This makes sampling worse. Yes you
can reduce primary magnification to capture a larger area but then the
camera is doing the magnification rather than the TEM lenses. This is fine
for very low magnification but is not as desirable for higher mag. You can
take more digital images but this is time consuming and may not be as
informative as a single larger area.

Also, especially when dealing with samples that have a very wide grayscale
range, such as negatively stained samples where you often have intense dark
areas along with quite light ones, it is often much more difficult to
prevent oversaturation with a digital camera due to the enhanced contrast.
It often takes longer to get a good digital image as you try to find correct
camera settings than to take a negative. You have a hardcopy of your data
with a negative that then allows you to scan the negative at whatever
resolution value is desirable to get the enlargement you need without being
limited to the pixel size of the initial digital image.

Yes there are advantaged to going totally digital. Not having to deal with
expense of film and the time for the developing (~20min for 30-40negatives
plus some wash time) is preferable to some. You can check focus on the
screen and toss any image that is not just right. You need to be able to
accurately focus when using film to minimize loss (but I consider this a
part of learning to be a good microscopist). You need less beam exposure so
this can help with fragile samples. It is easier to work with low contrast
samples due to increased camera-provided contrast. I am sure there are many
other advantages as well, providing you can afford the initial significant
expense of purchasing the camera in the first place.

Our compromise is to teach students to recognize focus and learn to stigmate
at high magnification on the screen. Once they "get" this, they can then
focus and stigmate whenever and where ever needed with minimal time and
effort and get a very high percentage of usable negatives. Time on the scope
is normally less than when taking digital images so actual cost (scope time
+ negatives) is about equal. Students then scan their negatives at
resolution desired and have their digital images. We haven't printed at all
in about 4 years and only rarely for about 4 years previously to that.
Consumer scanners with transmitted light (under $700) do fine for this
purpose as do inkjet printers although students prefer to look at images on
screen and rarely print them.

There is certainly a place for digital cameras, especially when you are
taking low mag images and need to get results in a hurry such as in a
diagnostic situation. It is very helpful for the occasional user who has
problems focusing well and can be quite adequate/desirable for other needs,
such as electron diffraction, as you can get a good dynamic range. Just do
not feel that this is a must purchase for an undergraduate course when the
$$ can perhaps better go to other preparation equipment or supplies.

Regarding use of nitrogen...I admit that I am old school. Lots of samples
are very stable under the beam and contamination is not a hugh problem with
modern pumping systems...especially at low magnifications where reductions
in resolution due to contamination are not easily visible. But as soon as
we say that, someone will come along with a sample that is not stable and
you end up with a lot of contamination released into the column and adverse
effects as a result. Part of keeping a common facility up and running is to
train all users to do things in the same methodical manner. This greatly
reduces user error. I would rather err on the side of caution and require
everyone to use nitrogen than hope that students will recognize when it is
desirable. THAT WON"T HAPPEN!

My recommendation is to get two 25L dewars so that one can be off getting
filled while the other is available as needed. You will probably only have
to fill once every few weeks or so and hopefully there is a larger tank some
where on campus to make this possible.

Debby


---
Debby Sherman, Director Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy




On 12/31/08 7:32 PM, "kamlennon-at-yahoo.com" {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com} wrote:

}
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} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} Hi All,
}
} It's been a few years since I've been on the list server - doing those
} recommended postdocs to "broaden my horizons" beyond microscopy (I'm wondering
} if I should have followed that advice!).
}
} I'm gearing up to teach an EM class for biologists to undergrads. The class
} hasn't been taught at my university in eons, so I'm basically starting from
} scratch with a great set of brand new JEOL scopes and a lab full of virgin
} equipment. It would be a dream come true if not for the fact that I've got to
} learn how to use all of this brand new equipment in short order!
}
} I'm sure that I'll be in touch throughout the upcoming semester, but for now,
} I have a few questions on which I'd like your learned advice:
}
} 1. Does anyone have experience with a JEOL JEM1011 TEM? Thoughts on it? Do
} you have an abbreviated user's protocol that you would be willing to share? No
} one here has ever used this brand new (though 5 year old scope), and, though
} JEOL will graciously come and do a training session with me, I'd love any
} input you may have.
}
} 2. Going digital. We are looking at getting a digital image capture system.
} I'm old enough to have been trained in the darkroom long ago. Should I teach
} these students darkroom technique or just assume that they're in the digital
} age and go with either digital capture or digital image manipulation (scanning
} in EM negatives and printing)? Vote and let me know. And, if you've got a
} camera system, scanner or printer that you would recommend, that would be
} great.
}
} 3. Lastly, and this may show the old workhorse microscopes I was weaned on -
} LN2. I've been advised to just forget about using LN2 with this TEM for
} biological applications. Really? Granted, I'll talk to the JEOL rep about
} this, but if you've got thoughts on it, please share. I hear that getting LN2
} into our lab may be a problem, but my gut tells me that I should make ripples
} with this one.
}
} 4. Okay, one more, but it's an easy one. Does anyone have a recommendation for
} a quick and easy animal tissue to use for teaching? I'm a die hard plant
} person (perfusion - ahh!), but I think that not having experience handling and
} looking at animal tissue has been a handicap for me. I don't want that for my
} students. Can I just go pick up some chicken livers or something and not have
} to find something to sacrifice?
}
} That's it for now. I know that there will be more.
}
} Many thanks,
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu
}
}
}
}
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} 13, 20 -- Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 16:30:30 -0800 (PST)
} 13, 20 -- From: Kristen Lennon {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com}
} 13, 20 -- Reply-To: kamlennon-at-yahoo.com
} 13, 20 -- Subject: Developing EM class for undergrads + going digital advice?
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18, 32 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Developing EM class for undergrads + going digital
18, 32 -- advice?
18, 32 -- From: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
18, 32 -- To: {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com} , "message to: MSA list" {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
18, 32 -- Message-ID: {C58257FA.2535C%dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
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From: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 06:12:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Stains for proteins

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm sure the government was regulations and requirements which make using
osmium tetroxide difficult, but like most chemical, osmium tetroxide can be
safely used. At rubber company in Akron we used a water dilution of osmium
tetroxide both as vapor phase to stain thin sections of unsaturated rubber
and added it to latex rubber has a hardener. We worked in a chemical hood,
wore thin nitrile rubber gloves used normal chemical practices and never
experienced a problem.

The vials crystal osmium were scored, broken and dropped into distilled
water (we used a taped wrapped bottle to protect the solution from light)
and small amounts were removed from the bottle with clean pasture pipets.
The used solutions were decanted into a open wide mouth bottle stored in
the back of the hood. The water evaporated, the osmium reacted with dust
and organic material in the air and once a year we properly discarded the
sludge. We also placed the used TEM grids, used vials and latex solutions
in that bottle.

If you get the results you want from other stains that's great. But don't
let scary internet precautions and many of the warnings we read persuade
you from using chemicals.

Too often, people with limited chemical experience and education make
difficult rules not to protect you, but to protect the organization from
imagined legal complications. These people are not charged with solving
the problems your are responsible for and have limited if any sympathy if
you are unable to achieve these goals due to their restrictions.



twigg-at-estd.nrl.na
vy.mil
To
12/31/2008 03:48 frank_karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
PM cc

Subject
Please respond to [Microscopy] viaWWW: Stains for
twigg-at-estd.nrl.na proteins
vy.mil












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Email: twigg-at-estd.nrl.navy.mil
Name: Mark Twigg

Organization: Naval Research Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Stains for proteins

Question: I have a new project which may entail staining proteins so
that there is more contrast for TEM imaging. One collaborator
recommended osmium tetroxide, but I read on the web that it is rather
poisonous and requires special handling. I have not done this sort
of biological TEM before and I would appreciate any tips or
references.

Thanks,

Mark

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8, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Wed Dec 31 14:38:46 2008
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From: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 06:37:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Developing EM class for undergrads + going digital advice?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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2. Going digital. We are looking at getting a digital image capture system.
I'm old enough to have been trained in the darkroom long ago. Should I
teach these students darkroom technique or just assume that they're in the
digital age and go with either digital capture or digital image
manipulation (scanning in EM negatives and printing)? Vote and let me know.
And, if you've got a camera system, scanner or printer that you would
recommend, that would be great.

Hi Kristen,
I've used glass plates, cut film and digital imaging. I love the darkroom
work as well as the incredible images one gets from printing negatives with
the right "hardness" of paper, developer time and chemistry. With true
dedication you could take 20 images with the TEM, drop the vacuum, remove
the cassette, replace the cassette with a pre-pumped one (to lower the
water content and make your TEM pump down faster). If the negative
chemistry was at the proper temperature and not used up, you could develop,
dry the negative, then calibrate the enlarger, make sure the paper
chemistry was hot and not used up, determine the correct exposure, (it
always seemed to vary from negative to negative), print, develop, then
repeat with dodging or burning the image to bring out the details you need,
dry the paper, (used RC paper so you don't need a print dryer) and in eight
hours you could have two or three exceptional copies of each of the 20
negatives. (OH! I forgot make sure you record and identify the negatives
and store them so in twenty years someone will have several 100 pounds of
polyester film to dispose of.)

Or you could focus the microscope, move a lever or two, capture the image,
print it on a quality printer, decide if you want the image, correct the
exposure and composition and take another images. Yes, they are not as
nice as "photographs". But with the right paper, and a quality camera
(that means lots of bucks, pounds or yen) you can get an images 99% as good
and all in less then 3 minutes.

Digital, I dislike it, but it is the way to go........,

Stay safe........
Frank Karl.......
microscopist and former darkroom junkie

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The Lincoln Electric Company
**************************************************************


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From: Rod-at-RJAndA.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 09:25:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: JEOL top reference holders

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Email: Rod-at-RJAndA.com
Name: Rod Johnson

Organization: Rod Johnson & Associates, Inc.

Title-Subject: [Filtered] JEOL top reference holders

Question: Happy New Year!

We purchased a used JEOL 840 this year. We are looking for 1 1/4
inch top reference holders. If you have holders you are no longer
using we would be pleased to pay for them and their shipping.

Regards,

Rod



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From: randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 16:20:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] January 2009 Microscopy Today Table of Contents

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers,

Here is the January 2009 Microscopy Today table of contents. We will
close the subscription list for this issue on Wednesday, January 7, 2009.
Microscopists in North America and MSA members anywhere qualify for free
subscriptions. Anyone else may subscribe for US$60 per year (to
PARTIALLY cover postage). All subscriptions at
http://www.microscopy-today.com .

Thank you,
Ron Anderson, Technical Editor
=====================
Tiny Bubbles
Stephen W. Carmichael, Mayo Clinic

New Large Area Silicon Drift Detectors - Fast Analysis without Compromise
Clair Collins, Neil Rowlands, Peter Statham, and James Holland, Oxford
Instruments, High Wycombe, Bucks, England

Microscopy Today New Publication Directions
Ron Anderson and Charles Lyman,*Microscopy Today, Largo, FL and *Lehigh
University Bethlehem, PA

Manufacturer Training of Electron Microscopy and Analysis Techniques
Neil Rowlands, Oxford Instruments, Concord, MA

Remote Microscopy for Education and Outreach
S. Seraphin, S. Hernandez, G. Chandler, D. Bentley*, K. Dorame, M.
Sellers,** Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, * ** N. Arizona Univ.,
Flagstaff, AZ

The Electron Microscopy Database: an Online Resource for Teaching and
Learning Quantitative Transmission Electron Microscopy
Paul M. Voyles, Department of Materials Science and Engineering,
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI

SEM Short Courses for Industry: the Lehigh Microscopy School as an example
Charles E. Lyman, Department of Materials Science and Engineering,
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

Direct Visualisation, Sizing and Counting of Virus and Phage Particles
in Liquids
Bob Carr, and Duncan Griffiths,* NanoSight Ltd., Salisbury, UK,
*NanoSight USA, Costa Mesa, CA

Pioneers in Optics: Ernst Abbe (1840-1905)
Michael W. Davidson, The Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL

Single-Molecule DNA Stretching Using Optical Tweezers
Joost van Mameren, Anna Wozniak, and Sid Ragona,* JPK Instruments,
Berlin, Germany, *Ragona Scientific, Pittsford, NY

Event Streamed Spectrum Imaging using Programmed Beam Acquisition in
Biological Microprobe Analysis
P. Ingram,* S. D. Davilla,** & A. LeFurgey*, *Duke Univ. and Veterans
Affairs Med. Ctr, Durham, NC, **4pi Analysis Inc., Durham, NC

RGB-Splitting and Multi-Shot Techniques in Digital
Photomicrography–Utilization of Astronomic RGB-Filters in True Color
Imaging
Jörg Piper, Clinic “Meduna,” Bad Bertrich, Germany

Preventing the Sale of Fraudulent Gemstones using Non-Destructive X-Ray
Fluoresence Spectroscopy
Mary S. Goldman, Dan L. Davis, Robert H. Clifford, Shimadzu Scientific
Instruments Inc., Columbia, MD

Industry News

NetNotes
SPECIMEN PREPARATION - glutaraldehyde shelf life
SPECIMEN PREPARATION – Spurr’s resin
SPECIMEN PREPARATION – processing paraffin specimens for TEM
MICROTOMY – flattening sections
MICROTOMY – wetting the knife
MICROTOMY - coated grids
IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY - fluorescence quenching
IMAGE PROCESSING - reference image subtraction
TEM – image distortion
TEM – comparison with STEM
SEM – backscattering detector image formation
SEM – backscatter detector
SEM - Coating for focused ion beam (FIB) SEM
SEM – active and passive acquisition
EM - SF6 detector
EM - CTF function
EM – pump speed vs. ultimate pressure
EM - plasma cleaner
SEM – oil shale rock sample preparation
SEM - of paper

Dear Abbe

Advertiser's Index


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From: Hobie-at-technicalsalessolutions.com
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 13:21:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Extra Lab Items

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Fellow Microscopy Listers,

We have the following equipment that we would like to find new homes for:
Lynx EL Tissue Processor and supplies
Digital Dryer (brand new, table top)
Arkay CD ­20 dryer
2-Codonics NP 1600 printers (brand new with supplies)

Photos are available upon request.

Priced as a donation to Valley Catholic High School EM Lab and shipping
costs, take one or all!

Thank you,

Hobie

Hobie Richards
Partner, and COO
Technical Sales Solutions, LLC
Portland, OR USA
www.TechnicalSalesSolutions.com
503 781 0428

Skype Hobie-TSS





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From: as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 14:52:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Cleaning House......Tracor Northern Parts

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Tracor Northern:
PAC Control Console Joystick/Keypad
MicroScan Trackball/Slide Controller
2) Programmable Auto Controllers (steel boxes with boards)
Connector Box


We came across the above surplus items we acquired and never used. Not
wanting to throw these out if anyone can use them, we will happily box them
up for you. They will be yours for the cost of shipping.

Alan Stone
ASTON Metallurgical Services Co., Inc.
Wheeling, IL


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From: opmills-at-mtu.edu
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:51:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: wanted - 4pi SE II electronics

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Email: opmills-at-mtu.edu
Name: Owen Mills

Organization: Michigan Technological University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] wanted - 4pi SE II electronics

Question: We'd like to buy (a donation would not hurt my feelings :} )
a 4pi SE II x-ray system. I really only need the control box, PCI
slot card and cables since we have a working detector and HV power
supply. Please contact me off-line at opmills-at-mtu.edu.

Thanks,

Owen Mills
Mich Tech Univ


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From: hubner-at-iod.krakow.pl
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 05:48:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] conference Thermec 2009 Berlin

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International Conference on PROCESSING & MANUFACTURING OF ADVANCED MATERIALS
Processing, Fabrication, Properties, Applications
August 25-29, 2009, Technical University-Berlin, Germany
www.thermec.uow.edu.au

best regards
KJ Hübner


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From: oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 10:12:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Developing EM class for undergrads + going

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Kristen,

Hope this isn't too late - CMU shuts down over Christmas.

Good luck with the new class. Undergrads can be much better at things
like EM than people give them credit for (from experience with our EM
classes).
I can't help you with the JEOL, we have a Philips, but more generally:

2. Do both. Shoot film negatives and digital. Debby Sherman has
already provided excellent reasons for keeping the film negatives, so
I won't repeat those. I think it's worthwhile doing digital imaging
in addition because first, many labs are going that way, and you have
an opportunity to train students in the proper use of a digital
system, second, as Debby mentioned, it's cheaper to operate (no
chemicals, etc.) and so a useful system for teaching focus and
stigmation, and for quick checks of sections. If this is an either-or
decision, keep the film. The digital system can be learned whereever
the students go.

4. Crickets. We use cricket tissues in our TEM class. The femur
provides plenty of muscle, which has lots of interesting and easily
identifiable structures. Plus, it allows some basic study of
structure/ function, something that is missing from many microscopy
classes and shouldn't be. Fix the tissue in contracted and stretched
conditions, for example.
Further, there are lots of other interesting tissues: midgut, ventral
nerve cord, brain, Malphigian tubules, and so on. Also, since many
sections will contain tracheoles, there is another chance to discuss
physiology and microanatomy.

Phil

} Hi All,
}
} It's been a few years since I've been on the list server - doing
} those recommended postdocs to "broaden my horizons" beyond
} microscopy (I'm wondering if I should have followed that advice!).
}
} I'm gearing up to teach an EM class for biologists to undergrads.
} The class hasn't been taught at my university in eons, so I'm
} basically starting from scratch with a great set of brand new JEOL
} scopes and a lab full of virgin equipment. It would be a dream come
} true if not for the fact that I've got to learn how to use all of
} this brand new equipment in short order!
}
} I'm sure that I'll be in touch throughout the upcoming semester, but
} for now, I have a few questions on which I'd like your learned
} advice:
}
} 1. Does anyone have experience with a JEOL JEM1011 TEM? Thoughts on
} it? Do you have an abbreviated user's protocol that you would be
} willing to share? No one here has ever used this brand new (though 5
} year old scope), and, though JEOL will graciously come and do a
} training session with me, I'd love any input you may have.
}
} 2. Going digital. We are looking at getting a digital image capture
} system. I'm old enough to have been trained in the darkroom long
} ago. Should I teach these students darkroom technique or just assume
} that they're in the digital age and go with either digital capture
} or digital image manipulation (scanning in EM negatives and
} printing)? Vote and let me know. And, if you've got a camera system,
} scanner or printer that you would recommend, that would be great.
}
} 3. Lastly, and this may show the old workhorse microscopes I was
} weaned on - LN2. I've been advised to just forget about using LN2
} with this TEM for biological applications. Really? Granted, I'll
} talk to the JEOL rep about this, but if you've got thoughts on it,
} please share. I hear that getting LN2 into our lab may be a problem,
} but my gut tells me that I should make ripples with this one.
}
} 4. Okay, one more, but it's an easy one. Does anyone have a
} recommendation for a quick and easy animal tissue to use for
} teaching? I'm a die hard plant person (perfusion - ahh!), but I
} think that not having experience handling and looking at animal
} tissue has been a handicap for me. I don't want that for my
} students. Can I just go pick up some chicken livers or something and
} not have to find something to sacrifice?
}
} That's it for now. I know that there will be more.
}
} Many thanks,
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu

--
Philip Oshel
Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Biology Department
024C Brooks Hall
Central Michigan University
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859
(989) 774-3576

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: matsumot-at-lifesci.ucsb.edu
Date: Mon, 5 Jan 2009 12:56:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Course announcement

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There is an introductory digital microscopy workshop at UCSB (February
-13, 2009). If interested, please check the web site below:

https://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/mcdb/events/imaging_workshop/index.php

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: meulia.1-at-osu.edu
Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2009 09:54:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] antibodies for BiFC

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are doing BiFC to study interaction of two nucleoporins in vivo
first and then at the em level using immunogold labeling. Does anyone
know, if there is a GFP antibody available that would only recognize
the two halves when assembled?
Thanks for your help.

Tea
--
***************************************
Tea Meulia, PhD
Research Scientists and Director
Molecular and Cellular Imaging Center
Ohio State University/OARDC
1680 Madison Ave.
Wooster OH 44691

tel.: 330-263-3836 or -3828
fax: 330-202-3563

http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/mcic

*****************************************

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From: bfoster-at-mme1.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 13:35:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Dr. Doug Benson -may he rest in peace

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have just received this message from Ash Prabala, President and CEO of DVC company:

"It is with profound regret that I inform you that Doug Benson, a dear friend and colleague, passed away early this morning at the age of 56. It is very difficult to find a silver lining in this news, but given the tough odds that he faced, at least he was spared a prolonged battle with cancer. Also, several generations of his family were close by and I know that he was greatly comforted by their proximity, and by their warmth and love.

Prior to his pivotal role as Chief Scientist and Director at DVC, Doug was the founder of Inovision Corporation - a highly regarded industry leader in the development of image analysis software. Before that, he was a National Cancer Institute Fellow at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Douglas obtained a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from North Carolina State University.

I know that there are many in the Life Sciences, Microscopy & Imaging communities who knew Doug well, either personally or through his academic, research and/or business affiliations. Please keep Doug, his wife Louise, and their family members in your thoughts. I feel a deep sense of personal loss and sorrow, but will always remember Doug as a warm, generous, funny, brilliant, caring friend and colleague. I will miss his sense of humor and the twinkle in his eyes when he would recount a joke or a personal anecdote.

Rest In Peace, Doug. You will be missed by all those who had the privilege of knowing you."

Sincerely,

Ash Prabala
President & CEO, DVC Company
10200 Highway 290 West, Austin, TX 78736
Ph: 512-301-9564 x306; Fax: 512-288-2961
E-mail: {mailto:ash-at-dvcco.com} ash-at-dvcco.com
www.dvcco.com




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4, 18 -- Subject: Dr. Doug Benson -may he rest in peace
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From: bfostermme-at-sbcglobal.net
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 13:45:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Dr. Doug Benson -may he rest in peace

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We have just received this message from Ash Prabala, President and CEO of DVC company:

"It is with profound regret that I inform you that Doug Benson, a dear friend and colleague, passed away early this morning at the age of 56. It is very difficult to find a silver lining in this news, but given the tough odds that he faced, at least he was spared a prolonged battle with cancer. Also, several generations of his family were close by and I know that he was greatly comforted by their proximity, and by their warmth and love.

Prior to his pivotal role as Chief Scientist and Director at DVC, Doug was the founder of Inovision Corporation - a highly regarded industry leader in the development of image analysis software. Before that, he was a National Cancer Institute Fellow at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Douglas obtained a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from North Carolina State University.

I know that there are many in the Life Sciences, Microscopy & Imaging communities who knew Doug well, either personally or through his academic, research and/or business affiliations. Please keep Doug, his wife Louise, and their family members in your thoughts. I feel a deep sense of personal loss and sorrow, but will always remember Doug as a warm, generous, funny, brilliant, caring friend and colleague. I will miss his sense of humor and the twinkle in his eyes when he would recount a joke or a personal anecdote.

Rest In Peace, Doug. You will be missed by all those who had the privilege of knowing you."

Sincerely,

Ash Prabala
President & CEO, DVC Company
10200 Highway 290 West, Austin, TX 78736
Ph: 512-301-9564 x306; Fax: 512-288-2961
E-mail: {mailto:ash-at-dvcco.com} ash-at-dvcco.com
www.dvcco.com




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From: hale0007-at-mc.duke.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 15:15:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Electron Microscopy Job Available

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


NOTE: DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL. SEE BELOW FOR APPLICATION INFORMATION.

Electron Microscopy Position Available
Official Title: Molecular Technologist II, III, or IV--depending on
qualifications and work experience

Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

Requirements: Training and experience in running and maintaining electron
microscopes, proficiency in cutting ultrathin sections and performing
negative
staining. Knowledge of scientific laboratory operation (making solutions,
ordering, typing results, keeping records, etc.). Clinical laboratory and
research experience are a plus.

Laboratory description: The work force consists of the director and 6 EM
technologists who perform pathology (~500 samples/year), virology (~1000
samples/year), and research work; 3 TEMs; 1 SEM; 7 ultramicrotomes?2 with
cryo attachments; plus ancillary specimen preparation equipment.

Job descriptions available at:
https://www.hr.duke.edu/
Click ?Jobs?
Under ?Job Descriptions? click ?Duke University Health System?
Under ?Browse by Job Title? click ?M?
At the bottom click ?Molecular Tech II, III, or IV? (Alternatively, to get
to here, copy and paste:
https://www.hr.duke.edu/jobs/descr_duhs/job_title.php?ID=M

These descriptions are generic, and not all jobs described within (e.g.,
histology) are required of the EM position.

EM Laboratory web site:
http://pathology.mc.duke.edu/website/WebForm.aspx?id=ElectronMicroMain

Send resume to:
Sara E. Miller, Ph. D.
Professor, Department of Pathology
Director, Electron Microscopy Laboratory
P. O. Box 3712
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 27710

Phone: 919 684-3452
Fax: 919 684-3265
Email: saram-at-duke.edu


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From: dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 15:31:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Uranyl Acetate handling, storage, and disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear List,

A relatively new person in our EHS dept has informed us that UA is a
strong gamma emitter and should be stored and disposed of in a stainless
steel containersAND used in a stainless steel hood (or with other proper
protection measures). This was a surprise to us as all former EHS staff
have told us that though it DOES need to be disposed of with other
radioactive waste, it can be used in a normal hood. We obviously want
to be as safe as possible.

Can you advise on any special handling procedures used for UA?

Many thanks in advance!

danielle

Buck Institute for Age Research



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3, 22 -- References: {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5E-at-inverness.buckcenter.org} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5F-at-inverness.buckcenter.org} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD60-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
3, 22 -- From: "Danielle Crippen" {dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org}
3, 22 -- To: {Microscopy-at-Microscopy.Com}
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From: thoward-at-unm.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:14:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl Acetate handling, storage, and

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I'm curious - has this new EHS person done actual
measurements (comparing distance from source, shielding,
etc.) on the UA that is commonly used in EM labs, or are
they assuming that you have undepleted UA? Maybe I'm
mistaken, but I thought the UA we buy from the EM supply
companies is not as radioactive as "plain" UA. I know I've
tried to get counts off of it (with a gamma detector) & it
isn't very hot.

Tamara


On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 15:32:23 -0600
dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org wrote:
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} Dear List,
}
} A relatively new person in our EHS dept has informed us
} that UA is a
} strong gamma emitter and should be stored and disposed
} of in a stainless
} steel containersAND used in a stainless steel hood (or
} with other proper
} protection measures). This was a surprise to us as all
} former EHS staff
} have told us that though it DOES need to be disposed of
} with other
} radioactive waste, it can be used in a normal hood. We
} obviously want
} to be as safe as possible.
}
} Can you advise on any special handling procedures used
} for UA?
}
} Many thanks in advance!
}
} danielle
}
} Buck Institute for Age Research
}
}
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
} 3, 22 -- From dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org Wed Jan 7
} 15:31:35 2009
} 3, 22 -- Received: from inverness.buckcenter.org
} (webmail.buckinstitute.org [64.84.58.24])
} 3, 22 -- by ns.microscopy.com (8.12.11.20060308/8.12.8)
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} 3, 22 -- Subject: RE: Uranyl Acetate handling, storage,
} and disposal
} 3, 22 -- Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 13:31:34 -0800
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} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD61-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
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} and disposal
} 3, 22 -- Thread-Index:
} AclxDrE0qGF/HDu+TY2cyGuAAHfcOgAABlUgAAAIS2AAABVbgA==
} 3, 22 -- References:
} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5E-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5F-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD60-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
} 3, 22 -- From: "Danielle Crippen"
} {dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org}
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} Headers==============================

***************************
Tamara Howard
Cell Biology & Physiology
UNM-HSC
Albuquerque, NM
***************************

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From: reganhll-at-gmail.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:23:15 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: EM TOMOGRAPHY

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: reganhll-at-gmail.com
Name: JOhnson

Organization: URI

Title-Subject: [Filtered] EM TOMOGRAPHY

Question: I am looking for a book on basics of EM tomograpyh.
Though i am into EM since last 5yrs ...Need to know about EM tomography.

Any suggestions



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==============================Original Headers==============================
9, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Wed Jan 7 17:23:14 2009
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From: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:24:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Uranyl Acetate a Alpha Emitter

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Name: Alex Besenyo PhD

Organization: President

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Uranyl Acetate a Alpha Emitter

Question: There is a posting that needs clarification.

As the sole world wide manufacturer of Uranyl Acetate and other
uranium compounds let me assure everyone that Uranyl Acetate is a
alpha emitter and not a gamma emmiter.

As for storage good house keeping rules apply.

If any one has any direct questions regarding this they can post or
contact me directly.

Alex Besenyo PhD




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From: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 17:51:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Uranyl Acetate handling, storage, and disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I worked with Uranium at ICN Pharmaceuticals and Isotope Products Labs
making standards. Uranium is an alpha emitter, which is far more deadly
internally. Also, Uranium is chemically toxic. So, keep it safe.

I doubt you'll find much dose coming off a small vial of U salt. Secondary
x-rays may be produced from the alpha-particles fluorescing the surrounding
matrix. Minimal shielding should suffice.



Don Kloos
VP Sales, Marketing, Business Development
Parallax Research, Inc.

Sales & Marketing
16478 Beach Blvd. #330
Westminster, California, 92683-7860 USA

TOLL FREE 1 866 581-XRAY (9729)
Telephone 1 714 897-9779
Email: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
SKYPE: don.kloos
Website: http://www.parallaxray.com



-----Original Message-----
X-from: dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org [mailto:dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 1:37 PM
To: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com

Dear List,

A relatively new person in our EHS dept has informed us that UA is a
strong gamma emitter and should be stored and disposed of in a stainless
steel containersAND used in a stainless steel hood (or with other proper
protection measures). This was a surprise to us as all former EHS staff
have told us that though it DOES need to be disposed of with other
radioactive waste, it can be used in a normal hood. We obviously want
to be as safe as possible.

Can you advise on any special handling procedures used for UA?

Many thanks in advance!

danielle

Buck Institute for Age Research



==============================Original Headers==============================
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[64.84.58.24])
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From: gantz-at-bu.edu
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2009 18:10:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Defective Electron Image Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,
Today we have encountered what appears to be defective Kodak SO-163
electron image film, 3 1/4 x 4 inch, catalog #8010100. Those of you who
use this film will know that when loading the film into cassettes, if the
notch in the film is at the upper right-hand corner, then the emulsion side
of the film is up. The suspected defective film has the emulsion side down
with the notch at the upper right.

In addition, normally these packets of film have a slight upward curl
(concave) with the emulsion side up and notch to the upper right. This
potentially defective film has a downward curl (convex) with the notch to
the upper right.

On the box of film which is a multipak of 250 sheets, the following
numbers are found on the label:

Emul No. 239 002 07
2010-08
00277396

We do not know how widespread this problem is but we recommend not to use
film of this lot number until more information from Kodak is available.

Mr. Donald Gantz
Research Histologist/Electron Microscopist
Dept. Physiology and Biophysics
Center for Advanced Biomedical Research
Boston University School of Medicine
700 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
email: gantz-at-bu.edu
phone: 617-638-4017


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 03:42:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Uranyl Acetate handling, storage, and disposal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Danielle,

Uranium is a natural radioactive element which is "mainly" alpha
emitter. Uranium isotopes also have a very small probablity of
"spontaneous fission", as well (this is not the main concern here of
course).

Since, the decay product of Uranium is also radioactive, you will need
to follow the decay tree to get a better feeling of what kinds of
other elements/particles might be present in Uranyl Acetate.

You may be able to construct the decay tree using the information from

http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html

It will be a tedious calculation to assess the health risk from
handling Uranyl Acetate. It is always best to opt on the side of more
shielding. Go with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable)
principles.


Hope this helps,
Ayten.

--
===========================
Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
Ankara University
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Ankara, Turkey
===========================


On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 11:36 PM, {dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org} wrote:
}
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} Dear List,
}
} A relatively new person in our EHS dept has informed us that UA is a
} strong gamma emitter and should be stored and disposed of in a stainless
} steel containersAND used in a stainless steel hood (or with other proper
} protection measures). This was a surprise to us as all former EHS staff
} have told us that though it DOES need to be disposed of with other
} radioactive waste, it can be used in a normal hood. We obviously want
} to be as safe as possible.
}
} Can you advise on any special handling procedures used for UA?
}
} Many thanks in advance!
}
} danielle
}
} Buck Institute for Age Research
}
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
} 3, 22 -- From dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org Wed Jan 7 15:31:35 2009
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} 3, 22 -- References: {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5E-at-inverness.buckcenter.org} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD5F-at-inverness.buckcenter.org} {69142A827D247F45877B305E991DB61F18DD60-at-inverness.buckcenter.org}
} 3, 22 -- From: "Danielle Crippen" {dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org}
} 3, 22 -- To: {Microscopy-at-Microscopy.Com}
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From: Bruce.Ingber-at-ARS.USDA.GOV
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 09:50:59 -0600
Subject: Re: Uranyl Acetate radiation

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



I've included a group of emails (not all) from September, 1998 on this
same discussion. We did measure beta and gamma emissions greater than
background levels from the uranyl acetate stock reagent bottles, not
from solutions.

It's still wise to use proper PPE methods especially when weighing and
preparing solutions. Store the reagent bottles inside/behind shielding
in a relatively secluded area and treat old solutions as heavy metal
waste. Don't pour down sinks!

Bruce F. Ingber
USDA-ARS, SRRC
Biologist/Electron Microscopy
1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70124
Bruce.Ingber-at-ars.usda.gov

ph. 504-286-4270
fax 504-286-4217
cel 504-782-6323

-----Original Message-----
X-from: thoward-at-unm.edu [mailto:thoward-at-unm.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 5:21 PM
To: Ingber, Bruce

I'm curious - has this new EHS person done actual
measurements (comparing distance from source, shielding,
etc.) on the UA that is commonly used in EM labs, or are
they assuming that you have undepleted UA? Maybe I'm
mistaken, but I thought the UA we buy from the EM supply
companies is not as radioactive as "plain" UA. I know I've
tried to get counts off of it (with a gamma detector) & it
isn't very hot.

Tamara


On Wed, 7 Jan 2009 15:32:23 -0600
dcrippen-at-buckinstitute.org wrote:
}
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}
} Dear List,
}
} A relatively new person in our EHS dept has informed us
} that UA is a
} strong gamma emitter and should be stored and disposed
} of in a stainless
} steel containersAND used in a stainless steel hood (or
} with other proper
} protection measures). This was a surprise to us as all
} former EHS staff
} have told us that though it DOES need to be disposed of
} with other
} radioactive waste, it can be used in a normal hood. We
} obviously want
} to be as safe as possible.
}
} Can you advise on any special handling procedures used
} for UA?
}
} Many thanks in advance!
}
} danielle
}
} Buck Institute for Age Research
-----Original Message-----
X-from: Warren E Straszheim [mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 1998 4:13 PM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


FWIW

Some years ago I heard an account of a radiation safety inspection as
part
of a larger safety review at a large lab. The lab was involved in coal
research, as were we, and had a fair amount of coal samples stored in
glass
jars. An inspection team came thru and happened to check the jars for
radiation, found some, and instructed the researchers that they would
need
to start following radiation safety procedures.

Now coal can contain minute amounts of uranium in its mineral matter,
but
not enough that should set off a detector. Besides the detectors were
setup
to measure alpha particles, and there was no way that alpha particles
emitted from the contents of a glass jar should be detected on the
outside.

A little digging revealed that there was in fact a little radiation
present, but it was a slight residue left on the jar surface after
washing.
Apparently the jars went through the same washer as did other jars which
had held radioactive materials. I think the radiation safety folks may
have
received additional training after the incident.

You can draw your own moral from the story.

Warren

} From: "Ingber, Bruce F." {bingber-at-commserver.srrc.usda.gov}
} Date: Tue, 22 Sep 1998 10:51:45 -0500

{snip}

} Anyway, while gathering all uranium compounds, our radiation safety
officer checked the compounds using a dosimeter that recorded alpha,
beta,
and gamma radiation. Levels of radiation were found that were just below
OSHA guidelines for maximum daily exposure when the powder was checked
from
several inches away from the dosimeter. Thus, we decided to store the
compounds in an acrylic box behind a beta shield in an isolated
location.
Whenever the actual Uranyl acetate is weighed to prepare dilute
solutions
proper safety precautions are recommended, i.e. use a beta shield, wear
gloves and dust mask, weigh in a low occupancy room, etc.
}
} We repeated our dosimeter readings last month with two different alpha,
beta, and gamma dosimeters taking readings several feet from the
bottles,
removing the two acrylic shields one by one, and then with the cover of
the
UAc exposed (always moving closer to the chemical source). I won't enter
the millirem/rad discussion; suffice to say it's an interesting little
experiment for your support staff especially with the dosimeters left on
audio signal.

{snip}

----------------------------------------------------
Warren E. Straszheim
23 Town Engineering
Iowa State University
Ames IA, 50011-3232

Ph: 515-294-8187
FAX: 515-294-4563

E-Mail: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
http://www.marl.iastate.edu

electron microscopy, x-ray analysis, image analysis, computer
applications

-----Original Message-----
X-from: "Woody.N.White-at-mcdermott.com"-at-Sparc5.Microscopy.Com
[mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 1998 9:28 PM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


This bounced once, I shall try again...
(Nestor ignore the (not spam) email if this makes it to the
listserver ok)
----------------------------------------------------------------

Well....

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits of skin & extremity
(hands, feet) is 50 Rem per year. ...Not something to "shoot" for,

since the dose is also limited to "As Low As Reasonably
Achievable".

The (damage) conversion coefficient from mR from this source (no
alpha if not ingested) to mRem is ~1. 50 Rem = 50,000 mRem. At a

dose rate of 0.6 mR/hr, one would have to hold the container for
many years to receive a one year maximum dose (50,000 / 0.6 per hr
= max hours exposure). At 5 mR/hr, it would be 50,000 / 5. At that

one would have to hold the container for 10,000 hours before
exceeding NRC dose limits. Exposure will also decrease as a
function of the square of the distance from the source.

For medical tests to discover any changes in body chemistry, it
would take about 50 Rem acute whole body exposure.

Less dose is always better, but in realistic terms the dose from
the UA should not be of any concern. If this level is of concern,
do not fly in airplanes, live at high elevations, avoid all medical

radiation, avoid certain beaches, beware of granite buildings, run
from radium dial watches, etc. :)

The real danger is if the UA enters the body where the alpha source

is in direct contact with livings tissue. Radiological bio-assay
(urine/fecal) would be required to detect this.

Woody White
McDermott Technology

-----Original Message-----
X-from: William Tivol [mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 1998 9:58 PM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


Dear David,

} Using Bill's number's, you would
} still be well under the limits for occupational exposure if you were
in
} constant contact with .6 millirem/hr for a 2000 hr work year, (correct
me,
} but my references place the limits at 1.25 rem/quarter, 5 rem/year
whole
} body

These limits are for radiation workers. Because we get paid, we
can be exposed to a greater risk. The limit for the general population
is
0.5 rem/year whole body, and I think this limit also applies to women
who
are or may be pregnant. I do not know the status of graduate students;
I'd be inclined to err on the side of caution--especially since it is
fairly
easy to keep exposure to UA low.
Yours,
Bill Tivol
-----Original Message-----
X-from: David Bentley [mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 1998 8:09 PM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


Responding with tidbits regarding this thread.

We make up a saturated stock bottle which we draw from, and
replenish
with UA and water (8-10g UA/100 ml) from time to time. The insoluble
material is described in the Merck Index as being due to insoluble basic
salts. It describes Uranyl Acetate as being "freely soluble in water
acidulated with acetic acid" For years, we have followed a modification
of
a procedure from Millonig's 1976 book Laboratory Manual of Biological
Electron Microscopy (pg 53) and added a few drops of acetic acid per
100mls
of stock saturated UA (stored in a brown bottle). This seems to push
the
ppt reaction the other way and give a clear solution. There seems to be
little difference in staining as long as only a few drops of acetic acid
are used. Changing the pH of the stain by much, is risky though as
there
are numerous papers and procedures which modify the effects of UA stain
by
doing so. We have raised the pH to the 4.5-5.5 (any higher and the UA
will
ppt) and gotten improved staining but with unacceptable amounts of ppt
on
the sections.

When compared with the other chemicals in the EM lab, UA would
seem to be
relatively safe when used carefully. Ingestion and inhalation (exposure
to
dust) are our major concern due to heavy metal toxicity as well as the
radiation hazards. Making sure that surfaces are not contaminated, and
cleaning any spillage immediately from bottles and tables before it
dries
are important steps. Wearing gloves, and hand washing after glove
removal
are also important safeguards.

The radiation exposure hazard under most operating conditions
seems
minimal. The least exposure possible is desirable (ALARA), when you
don't
need to handle it, don't be near it. Using Bill's number's, you would
still be well under the limits for occupational exposure if you were in
constant contact with .6 millirem/hr for a 2000 hr work year, (correct
me,
but my references place the limits at 1.25 rem/quarter, 5 rem/year whole
body and 18.75 rem/quarter, 75 rem/year for extremities (Rayburn)) The
other factor to keep in mind is that we are not talking about a whole
body
exposure, but just exposure to the hands. All in all, the amount of
exposure while making up and staining grids seems miniscule.
-----Original Message-----
X-from: ROBIN CROSS [mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 1998 7:10 AM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


The concentration quoted is far higher (btw at what
concentration in water does UA become a saturated solution?)
than normally would be used for EM staining.

} A solution of 10g UA in 15mls H2O was measured with a Geiger counter.

I have been using UA for many years and I recall that whenever I
questioned and investigated its possible radiation implications
I have been assured that it is not dangerous at the
concentrations and quantities we use, provided that it is not
ingested.
Robin H Cross
Director : EM Unit, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
eurc-at-giraffe.ru.ac.za - tel: +27 46 603 8168 - fax: +27 46 622 4377
http://www.ru.ac.za/affiliates/emu/em.htm

As an aside, the pretty flowered dinnerware from the 50's, the
vivid
oranges and yellows are from uranium. If you have any, run a Geiger
counter over them, you'll be surprised the number of counts. Also the
mantles from gas and propane lanterns contain radioactive thorium. In
the
past health physicist have suggested using them(sealed in their bags)
for
check sources for counters.

Regardless, because of the toxicity, radiation hazard, as well
as expenses
to purchase(well over $1.00/gm) and dispose of UA, minimizing the amount
needed to be discarded and wasted seems desirable. To the extents
possible, use of minimal amounts, and if considerable staining is done,
making stock saturated solutions which can be diluted to the desired
concentration as needed, are good ways to conserve UA, minimize
radiation
exposure, and inhalation and ingestion hazards.

Now, if we are starting a poll for the chemicals in the EM Lab
that make
us the most anxious, my vote is for cacodylate.
-----Original Message-----
X-from: William Tivol [mailto:bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM]
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 1998 4:34 PM
To: bingber.BAYOU.SRRCDOM


Dear Josephine,
}
} A solution of 10g UA in 15mls H2O was measured with a Geiger counter.
} 500
} counts/sec was generated.
} A supplier had measured 100g UA :-
} 1 Alpha - {2 counts/sec, using a 540 scintillation meter with AP-2
Probe
} 2 Beta - } 500 counts/sec, using a 540 E1 probe coupled to a GM Meter
(this
} determines beta events and some low energy gamma events)
} 3 Gamma dose Rate (energy field) - two measurements done:
} using Mini monitor type R with GM Probe - 0.6mR/hr (mainly gamma)
} and Ionization chamber DMM 95/0500 - 5 mR/hr (Beta and Gamma
energy
} field).
} 4 Specific Activity (U approx. 55%) = 1.04 x 10 { {...} } Bq { {...} } gm

} { {...} } .
}
I calculated approximately the expected activity from 30 g UA
(about 0.1 mole, or 6*10^22 atoms). T_1/2 is 4.4*10^9 y and there are
3.1*10^7 s/y, so the decay rate is 5*10^-18 s^-1, and the activity is
3*10^5 Bq.
The build-up of daughter products with shorter half-lives will
reach steady state at which point the activities of the daughters will
be
the same as that of the parent. Pa 234 has a gamma transition, and
there
are several betas in the chain. The longer-lived isotopes in the chain
have lives of 10^4 to 10^5 y, and these will not be at steady state
(unless
your UA is *very* old ;-) ). 0.6 mR/hr is a significant amount of
exposure,
and, if one were to hold the jars for some minutes, a sizable fraction
of
the allowed annual dose would be attained.

} Can UA be used openly without protection in laboratory?
}
Small amounts can be used, but be sure to wash hands before
eating.
One area of the lab should be used for UA. A quiet area with little
traffic
is best. UA, while not nearly the most dangerous EM reagent, should
still
be treated with respect.
Yours,
Bill Tivol


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From: maryflet-at-interchange.ubc.ca
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 12:41:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Defective Electron Image Film

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Mr. Gantz,
I have received boxes of Kodak 4489 film in the past that were marked wrong.
It is obvious in the darkroom when you are loading the film in the holders
that the emulsion was on the wrong side (or, alternatively, that they put
the notch in the wrong place). The emulsion is the brighter side, the back
is the dark side. This happened with two or three boxes, several years ago,
and I informed the Kodak company with their reply card that comes with the
film. I received no reply.
I used the film, with the emulsion side up, as usual and it was just fine.
The emulsion makes the plastic curl slightly towards it, but it usually
flattens out after processing. I don't think the film is faulty, just marked
wrong. Maybe test a few sheets first, then use as usual.
Regards,

Mary Fletcher
Electron Microscopist
Materials Eng. UBC
#309 - 6350 Stores Road
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4
Canada
Tel: 604-822-5648
Fax: 604-822-3619
email: maryflet-at-interchange.ubc.ca


-----Original Message-----
X-from: gantz-at-bu.edu [mailto:gantz-at-bu.edu]
Sent: January 7, 2009 4:14 PM
To: maryflet-at-interchange.ubc.ca

Dear Listers,
Today we have encountered what appears to be defective Kodak SO-163
electron image film, 3 1/4 x 4 inch, catalog #8010100. Those of you who
use this film will know that when loading the film into cassettes, if the
notch in the film is at the upper right-hand corner, then the emulsion side
of the film is up. The suspected defective film has the emulsion side down
with the notch at the upper right.

In addition, normally these packets of film have a slight upward curl
(concave) with the emulsion side up and notch to the upper right. This
potentially defective film has a downward curl (convex) with the notch to
the upper right.

On the box of film which is a multipak of 250 sheets, the following
numbers are found on the label:

Emul No. 239 002 07
2010-08
00277396

We do not know how widespread this problem is but we recommend not to use
film of this lot number until more information from Kodak is available.

Mr. Donald Gantz
Research Histologist/Electron Microscopist
Dept. Physiology and Biophysics
Center for Advanced Biomedical Research
Boston University School of Medicine
700 Albany Street
Boston, MA 02118
email: gantz-at-bu.edu
phone: 617-638-4017


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From: dhitrys-at-qimaging.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 16:44:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] PC or Mac preference for Digital Microscopy (4-question survey)

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We are doing a very quick survey about preferences for computer platforms
used for digital imaging microscopy.  There are only 4 questions (none of
them nasty multi-part!) so will take less than a minute to click on your
choices. 

Your input will help us provide the camera systems you need to take your
work to the next level, so thank you!!

http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/?p=WEB228P5UWUTCB


--David Hitrys



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From: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 18:19:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

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Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Name: Alex Besenyo PhD

Organization: ibilabs

Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Question: Question:

Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!

Reply:

When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
here. We do not use natural uranium.

This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.

The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.

If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
is detected.

I hope this answers everybodies concerns.

Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
all of them have been instructed on this information.

I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
before it got out of control.

Sincerely
Alex Besenyo PhD


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From: alerch-at-mcw.edu
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2009 18:20:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: How to find companies that buy/salvage older equipment

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Email: alerch-at-mcw.edu
Name: Alexandra Lerch-Gaggl

Organization: Medical College of Wisconsin

Title-Subject: [Filtered] How to find companies that buy/salvage
older equipment

Question: We have a Biorad MRC 600 confocal microscope, where we had
the galvanos replaced a while ago. Now it seems that the scanner has
the same problem again. Is there a way that I could find companies or
institutions that salvage such equipment?
Thank you.

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From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 01:38:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Alex,

Did you have a chance to check the information from

http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html

Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
the list.

Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.

1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay

2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay

3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay

4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay

5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay

6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay

7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay

8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay

9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay

10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay

11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay

12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay

13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay

14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay

Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
of U-238 radioactive decay.

I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).

I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?

By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.

One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...

Best,
Ayten.

--
===========================
Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
Ankara University
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Ankara, Turkey
===========================


On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 2:27 AM, {abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com} wrote:
}
} Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
} Name: Alex Besenyo PhD
}
} Organization: ibilabs
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
}
} Question: Question:
}
} Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
} depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
} salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!
}
} Reply:
}
} When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
} depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
} here. We do not use natural uranium.
}
} This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
} The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.
}
} The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.
}
} If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
} alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
} is detected.
}
} I hope this answers everybodies concerns.
}
} Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
} all of them have been instructed on this information.
}
} I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
} before it got out of control.
}
} Sincerely
} Alex Besenyo PhD
}
}
}

==============================Original Headers==============================
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28, 37 -- Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 09:38:45 +0200
28, 37 -- From: "Ayten Celik-Aktas" {celikaktas-at-gmail.com}
28, 37 -- To: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com, microscopy {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
28, 37 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 08:36:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Ayten,

Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
positive and collegial way.

Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that
the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since
my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
danger of this.

Thanks,

Dale


celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Alex,
}
} Did you have a chance to check the information from
}
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
}
} Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} the list.
}
} Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
}
} 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
}
} 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
}
} 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
}
} 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
}
} 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
}
} 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
}
} 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
}
} 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
}
} 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
}
} 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
}
} 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
}
} 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
}
} 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
}
} 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
}
} Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} of U-238 radioactive decay.
}
} I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
}
} I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
}
} By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
}
} One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
}
} Best,
} Ayten.
}

==============================Original Headers==============================
7, 23 -- From dac-at-research.umass.edu Fri Jan 9 08:36:22 2009
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From: jinsong-wu-at-northwestern.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 09:37:02 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: cryo-TEM positions at Northwestern Univ

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Email: jinsong-wu-at-northwestern.edu
Name: jinsong wu

Organization: northwestern university

Title-Subject: [Filtered] cryo-TEM positions at Northwestern Univ.

Question: Two Open Positions
Research Associate or Research Faculty
Cryo-Electron Microscopy of Soft and Biological Structures
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Two research associate/research faculty positions are immediately available at
Northwestern University in the area of analytical
cryo- electron microscopy of soft and
biological structures.
Supported by the Keck Foundation, Chicago Biomedical Consortium and other
federally funded research programs, the two positions are created to advance
specimen preparation of biological structures for
electron microscopy, especially
oocytes, and the use of analytical TEM/STEM techniques to monitor bioelemental
distribution across sub-cellular compartments at nanoscale spatial resolution.
The research will principally employ a unique dual-EDS dedicated Hitachi cryo-
STEM (based on HD-2300A platform) to be installed
at Northwestern in summer 2009.
In addition, the Northwestern University Atomic and Nanoscale Characterization
Experimental (NUANCE) Center (www.nuance.northwestern.edu) and Quantitative
Bioelement Imaging Center (QBIC) in the in the
Chemistry of Life Processes Institute
(http://www.clp.northwestern.edu/) have several SEMs/S/TEMs and complementary
confocal, optical, scanning probe and
laser-ablation mass spectrometry capabilities.
The candidates are expected to develop cryo-specimen preparation protocols for
oocytes and conduct analytical studies of
elemental distribution in complex biological
structures using STEM imaging and EDS analysis.
The project is a part of extensive
interdisciplinary collaborative initiatives among
Professors Vinayak P. Dravid (www.northwestern.edu/vpdgroup), Tom OíHalloran
(http://chemgroups.northwestern.edu/ohalloran/), Teresa Woodruff
(http://www.northwestern.edu/neurobiology/faculty/Woodruff2/) and Jonathan
Silverstein (http://home.uchicago.edu/~jcs/) to
unravel the mysteries of nanoscale
chemical architecture of Oocyte at various stages
of fertilization. As a result, there are
ample opportunities for personal and professional
growth at the intersection of life and
physical sciences, medicine and advanced instrumentation.
The positions require a PhD in physical/biological sciences/engineering.
Considerable experience in analytical and cryo-S/TEM is required and hands-on
training in cryo-preparation techniques is highly
desirable. Prior knowledge of imaging
filter/spectral imaging and EELS is desirable but
not mandatory. The positions are
available immediately for at least two years,
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From: cervantes-at-bendres.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 12:37:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I work in a place that does not permit the use of Uranyl salts for EM
use because of the radiation dangers (and a healthy respect for ALARA),
and am always trying to educate people about what these dangers are with
facts. Thus I was very interested in this thread.

I did have a question on the post by Ayten that I hope someone will
answer: I am not a nuclear engineer, so I readily acknowledge that I am
far from an expert on the subject. But the website Ayten provided gives
the branch ratio for decay of U-238 to Th-234 as 0.00005% (along with
the half-life given in Dale's response). Would that not also make the
amount of beta radiation small?

It was interesting to read in Alex's post about how the presence of
U-235 causes alarms to go off. Commercially available (United States,
Electron Microscopy Sciences, technical data sheet for Uranyl Acetate,
available at www.emsdiasum.com) is listed as 0.1% U235, so there is
*some* U235 present, at least for this supplier (Ted Pella lists the
composition as 0.3-0.4% U235). EMS also gives a reading for Alpha and
Beta radiation for a 100 g sample, and gives a value of .51 uCi/g for
the specific activity (they state a material with a value of } 0.002
uCi/g is considered radioactive).

I would also like to agree with Dale on his remarks on the tone of
Ayten's response. This should be a place that, even though we may
disagree, our mutual respect for one another allows us to be civil and
polite, and fosters healthy debates in cases of contention.

Thank you,
Jessica


____________________
Jessica Cervantes, MS



-----Original Message-----
X-from: dac-at-research.umass.edu [mailto:dac-at-research.umass.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 6:42 AM
To: Cervantes, Jessica

Dear Ayten,

Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
positive and collegial way.

Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that

the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since

my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
danger of this.

Thanks,

Dale


celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
}
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}
} Dear Alex,
}
} Did you have a chance to check the information from
}
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
}
} Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} the list.
}
} Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
}
} 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
}
} 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
}
} 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
}
} 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
}
} 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
}
} 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
}
} 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
}
} 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
}
} 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
}
} 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
}
} 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
}
} 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
}
} 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
}
} 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
}
} Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} of U-238 radioactive decay.
}
} I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
}
} I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
}
} By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
}
} One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
}
} Best,
} Ayten.
}

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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 13:38:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 9, 2009, at 10:37 AM, cervantes-at-bendres.com wrote:

} I did have a question on the post by Ayten that I hope someone will
} answer: I am not a nuclear engineer, so I readily acknowledge that I
} am
} far from an expert on the subject. But the website Ayten provided
} gives
} the branch ratio for decay of U-238 to Th-234 as 0.00005% (along with
} the half-life given in Dale's response). Would that not also make the
} amount of beta radiation small?


Dear Jessica,
The amount of Th234 is, indeed, small, but the branching ratio for
U238 -} Th234 is close to 100%--the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics
also lists SF (spontaneous fission), but this is very rare. Assuming
that the process of depleting the U will also get rid of any Th
originally mixed in with the natural U, the long half life of U238
means that the amount of Th234 will be small for the first few billion
years or so. In any case, the ranges of both alpha and beta particles
in glass are smaller than the thickness of the bottle, so a jar of UA
will not have either alpha or beta particles traveling to the outside
world. The Handbook does also list 3 particle energies for U238 alpha
particles, which arise due to the possibility of decay into 3 states
of Th234--the ground state and two excited states. These excited
states will decay to the ground state, usually by emitting a gamma
ray, which will penetrate the jar, a good distance through the air,
and your hand (if you are holding the jar). It is these gammas that
pose the greatest risk from a sealed jar of UA. For the nit-pickers,
the gammas can scatter off atoms in the jar to produce secondary
electrons, some of which may be produced close enough to the outer
surface of the jar to penetrate into the air, so it is not entirely
accurate to say no beta radiation could ever be detected outside the
jar. As previously stated by several listers, the major danger from
UA is ingestion or inhalation. The same properties of alpha radiation
that prevent it from penetrating the dead layer of the skin also
dictate that the entire energy of the alpha decay will be deposited in
a small volume either on the inner surface of the lung or in the
digestive tract and other parts of the body that the U can be
transported to or deposited in. This large amount of energy will
produce many ion pairs, since one ion pair is produced for every ~30
eV of energy deposited, and the decay energy is 4.268 MeV. The damage
done to a cell in which these ions are produced is usually fatal to
the cell, but can also be severe without killing the cell, in which
case, the cell can become cancerous. Therefore, such activities as
weighing UA to make solutions, pipetting UA, which can produce very
small droplets that evaporate leaving a small particle of UA, and
other handling of UA, especially the solid from the jar, should always
be performed with the knowledge that there is risk. ALARA dictates
that these procedures be performed in a hood (into which there is a
substantial flow of air), and that they are only performed in a
limited area, which should be frequently monitored for spilled UA (and
any other radioactive materials that might be used) by measuring with
a detector and by taking swabs in and around the area that will also
be tested for the presence of radiation. Different states and
countries have different laws that determine the minimum amount of
monitoring, and different institutions have more restrictive policies,
so there is no single procedure that is universally followed, but it
is very important that each person follow the procedures EHS sets up
in one's lab, and even more important that everyone takes safety
seriously.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 13:44:24 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Jessica:

I used to work as a 'radiochemist' making radioactive isotope products and
standards, including Uranium. FYI, you can calculate the specific activity,
A, from the data you cited:

A = yN, (y should be a 'lambda', sorry!), and A is disintigrations per time
(usually sec or min)

y = ln2 / T, where T is half life of isotope. (Convert half-life to seconds
to give disintegrations per second.)

N = number of atoms of that isotope (per gram for specific activity).

There are daughter products from the decay, and as you mentioned, there
might be U-235 as well, though the manufacturer stated it was clean of this.


By the way, after working as a radio / nuclear chemist, I don't subscribe
totally to the ALARA principle. We take about 360mrem/yr background just
living in USA. Also, a long roundtrip plane flight will give you up to
10mrem. The risks are negligible.

Hope that helps.

Don

Don Kloos
VP Sales, Marketing, Business Development
Parallax Research, Inc.


Sales & Marketing
16478 Beach Blvd. #330
Westminster, California, 92683-7860 USA

TOLL FREE 1 866 581-XRAY (9729)
Telephone 1 714 897-9779
Fax 1 714 897-1421
Email: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
SKYPE: don.kloos
Website: http://www.parallaxray.com


-----Original Message-----
X-from: cervantes-at-bendres.com [mailto:cervantes-at-bendres.com]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 10:47 AM
To: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com

I work in a place that does not permit the use of Uranyl salts for EM
use because of the radiation dangers (and a healthy respect for ALARA),
and am always trying to educate people about what these dangers are with
facts. Thus I was very interested in this thread.

I did have a question on the post by Ayten that I hope someone will
answer: I am not a nuclear engineer, so I readily acknowledge that I am
far from an expert on the subject. But the website Ayten provided gives
the branch ratio for decay of U-238 to Th-234 as 0.00005% (along with
the half-life given in Dale's response). Would that not also make the
amount of beta radiation small?

It was interesting to read in Alex's post about how the presence of
U-235 causes alarms to go off. Commercially available (United States,
Electron Microscopy Sciences, technical data sheet for Uranyl Acetate,
available at www.emsdiasum.com) is listed as 0.1% U235, so there is
*some* U235 present, at least for this supplier (Ted Pella lists the
composition as 0.3-0.4% U235). EMS also gives a reading for Alpha and
Beta radiation for a 100 g sample, and gives a value of .51 uCi/g for
the specific activity (they state a material with a value of } 0.002
uCi/g is considered radioactive).

I would also like to agree with Dale on his remarks on the tone of
Ayten's response. This should be a place that, even though we may
disagree, our mutual respect for one another allows us to be civil and
polite, and fosters healthy debates in cases of contention.

Thank you,
Jessica


____________________
Jessica Cervantes, MS



-----Original Message-----
X-from: dac-at-research.umass.edu [mailto:dac-at-research.umass.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 6:42 AM
To: Cervantes, Jessica

Dear Ayten,

Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
positive and collegial way.

Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that

the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since

my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
danger of this.

Thanks,

Dale


celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
}
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}
} Dear Alex,
}
} Did you have a chance to check the information from
}
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
}
} Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} the list.
}
} Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
}
} 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
}
} 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
}
} 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
}
} 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
}
} 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
}
} 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
}
} 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
}
} 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
}
} 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
}
} 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
}
} 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
}
} 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
}
} 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
}
} 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
}
} Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} of U-238 radioactive decay.
}
} I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
}
} I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
}
} By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
}
} One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
}
} Best,
} Ayten.
}

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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 13:56:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 9, 2009, at 11:44 AM, dkloos-at-parallaxray.com wrote:

} By the way, after working as a radio / nuclear chemist, I don't
} subscribe
} totally to the ALARA principle. We take about 360mrem/yr background
} just
} living in USA. Also, a long roundtrip plane flight will give you up
} to
} 10mrem. The risks are negligible.


Dear Don,
It is very true that there is background radiation, and it is still
not known whether any increases over background cause a proportional
increase in risk, but since the R stands for "reasonably", ALARA
should be followed.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: kamlennon-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 13:57:15 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Again Listers,

Thanks to all of you who have responded to my recent query. I'm sure that I will have more as time passes, and I appreciate the fantastic response that I've had from the list.

Since we are on the topic of the dangers of EM work (the uranyl acetate thread), I have a question about cacodylate buffer. I'm getting set to teach an introductory EM course for biologists to undergraduates. Having interviewed two of my three students during the previous semester, I know that I will be starting very much at zero. They had no to little knowledge of what "EM" is or can be used for before I spoke with them - they are exploring this new class. My plan is to take them through the preparation of plant, animal, and some sort of micro sample via traditional chemical fixation methods and keep it as simple as possible. I am inclined to steer clear of cacodylate buffer due to its toxicity and because they have enough to deal with already, and stick with phosphate buffer. However, I have noticed that most if not all of the animal tissue protocols I've been perusing use cac buffer. Is there any reason why I should keep it in the protocol?

Thanks for your advice.
Kristen

Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of Biology
202 Compton Science Center
Frostburg State University
101 Braddock Road
Frostburg, MD 21532

k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu




==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 14:13:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kristen,

There are 2 ways of looking at this: first, phosphate and other
buffers work as well as cacodylate, the difference between cac and
PO4, e.g., is mostly preference and what one is used to seeing. So
why use a toxin that can be avoided? Especially since some people
(like me) are sensitive to the arsenic.
The other way is: sometimes cacodylate is needed, and the students
will have to be using other toxic materials in microscopy and
chemistry and biotechnology and ... in other words, they need to
learn how to properly handle such materials, and the sooner they
learn the better, so use it.

There, microambiguity. In our EM courses, I avoid cacodylate (because
I'm sensitive), but we do make it available if needed, or if a
student wants to use it for a project.

Generally, though, when you're teaching about buffers, there are a
lot more to discuss than just PO4 or cacodylate. If the class is
doing aquatic critters (algae, protistans, tiny inverts, and
suchlike), then the best buffer is 0.02 micron filtered water from
where the crittere were collected.

Phil

} Hello Again Listers,
}
} Thanks to all of you who have responded to my recent query. I'm sure
} that I will have more as time passes, and I appreciate the fantastic
} response that I've had from the list.
}
} Since we are on the topic of the dangers of EM work (the uranyl
} acetate thread), I have a question about cacodylate buffer. I'm
} getting set to teach an introductory EM course for biologists to
} undergraduates. Having interviewed two of my three students during
} the previous semester, I know that I will be starting very much at
} zero. They had no to little knowledge of what "EM" is or can be used
} for before I spoke with them - they are exploring this new class. My
} plan is to take them through the preparation of plant, animal, and
} some sort of micro sample via traditional chemical fixation methods
} and keep it as simple as possible. I am inclined to steer clear of
} cacodylate buffer due to its toxicity and because they have enough
} to deal with already, and stick with phosphate buffer. However, I
} have noticed that most if not all of the animal tissue protocols
} I've been perusing use cac buffer. Is there any reason why I should
} keep it in the protocol?
}
} Thanks for your advice.
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
}
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu
--
Philip Oshel
Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Biology Department
024C Brooks Hall
Central Michigan University
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859
(989) 774-3576

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 14:13:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Ayten,

As a nuclear engineer you should know better about dangers of radioactivity (by the way, by training I am a physicist.)

Decay tree says us nothing about these dangers. We should know real levels of radiation. What can you say about them? Is level of radiation at 5 inches from open bottle with 25 g of uranil acetate much greater then the one from granite countertop in someone kitchen? I do not know. Since I do not know, I will be cautious, but just cautious, not paranoid.

Let’s see what World Health Association says:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs257/en/

“DEPLETED URANIUM
• On average, approximately 90 µg (micrograms) of uranium exists in the human body from normal intakes of water, food and air. About 66% is found in the skeleton, 16% in the liver, 8% in the kidneys and 10% in other tissues. {90 micrograms of uranium, not depleted uranium}
• The uranium remaining after removal of the enriched fraction contains about 99.8% 238U, 0.2% 235U and 0.001% 234U by mass; this is referred to as depleted uranium or DU.
• Under most circumstances, use of DU will make a negligible contribution to the overall natural background levels of uranium in the environment. Probably the greatest potential for DU exposure will follow conflict where DU munitions are used.
• Average annual intakes of uranium by adults are estimated to be about 0.5mg (500 μg) from ingestion of food and water and 0.6 μg from breathing air.”

So, uranium is everywhere. We should not bother ourselves with decay tree. If in doubt, we should measure radiation. And, of course, we should remember about toxicity of uranium. Gloves, fume hoods, proper treatment of spillage, etc. And when required, we should collect and dispose used chemicals in proper way.

I beg your pardon if you find my reply a bit harsh. I just followed your style.

Regards,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com [mailto:celikaktas-at-gmail.com]
} Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 1:39 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha
} emitters only
}
}
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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}
} Dear Alex,
}
} Did you have a chance to check the information from
}
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
}
} Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this
} list can do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds
} are alpha emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the
} job and post in to the list.
}
} Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
}
} 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
}
} 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
}
} 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
}
} 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
}
} 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
}
} 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
}
} 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
}
} 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
}
} 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
}
} 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
}
} 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
}
} 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
}
} 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
}
} 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
}
} Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as
} a result of U-238 radioactive decay.
}
} I have constructed the above decay tree using the information
} from http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} While constructing the above decay tree I have used the
} branch which has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
}
} I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
}
} By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
}
} One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand
} this. Even in high school science classes people learn about
} radioactive decay series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
}
} Best,
} Ayten.
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================
}
}
} On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 2:27 AM, {abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com} wrote:
} }
} } Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
} } Name: Alex Besenyo PhD
} }
} } Organization: ibilabs
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
} }
} } Question: Question:
} }
} } Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
} } depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
} } salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!
} }
} } Reply:
} }
} } When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
} } depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
} } here. We do not use natural uranium.
} }
} } This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
} } The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.
} }
} } The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.
} }
} } If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
} } alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
} } is detected.
} }
} } I hope this answers everybodies concerns.
} }
} } Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
} } all of them have been instructed on this information.
} }
} } I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
} } before it got out of control.
} }
} } Sincerely
} } Alex Besenyo PhD
} }
} }
} }
}
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} 28, 37 -- To: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com, microscopy
} {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} 28, 37 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds
} are alpha emitters only
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From: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 14:31:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello everyone,

I have found this conversation both enlightening and interesting. One
of the things I found interesting is to guess at the location of the
submitter. This gives me a measure of my bias. I will say that we have
flogged this horse to death, but I want to share a bit of my bias.

The total elimination of risk, no matter if you perceive it as
reasonable or not, seems to be a major pre-occupation of our society.
This seems to be driven by people whose livelihood is derived from
telling us about these dangers. One might expect a bias from them.
After all if they are not making you safer, they are not doing their
job.

It is difficult to argue against safety precautions and still seem
rational, it appears to me that we are taking safety to unreasonable
heights. We need to be reminded that nobody gets out of this world
alive. You can stay hidden under your bed covers your entire life and
bad things will still happen to good people.

At one company I am familiar with, the chemists are not allowed to use
toluene. It seems the company believes it just too dangerous to be used
by trained professionals.

I suggest you weight the potential dangers from UA against all the
dangers from that glass of red wine. I suspect the alcohol is more
dangerous.

Having said my 2cents, I’m heading home for grilled meat and a beer.


Living on the edge……
Frank Karl



DusevichV-at-umkc.ed
u
To
01/09/2009 03:21 frank_karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
PM cc

Subject
Please respond to [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl
DusevichV-at-umkc.ed compounds are alpha emitters only
u












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Dear Ayten,

As a nuclear engineer you should know better about dangers of radioactivity
(by the way, by training I am a physicist.)

Decay tree says us nothing about these dangers. We should know real levels
of radiation. What can you say about them? Is level of radiation at 5
inches from open bottle with 25 g of uranil acetate much greater then the
one from granite countertop in someone kitchen? I do not know. Since I do
not know, I will be cautious, but just cautious, not paranoid.

Let’s see what World Health Association says:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs257/en/

“DEPLETED URANIUM
• On average, approximately 90 µg (micrograms) of uranium
exists in the human body from normal intakes of water, food and air. About
66% is found in the skeleton, 16% in the liver, 8% in the kidneys and 10%
in other tissues. {90 micrograms of uranium, not depleted uranium}
• The uranium remaining after removal of the enriched fraction
contains about 99.8% 238U, 0.2% 235U and 0.001% 234U by mass; this is
referred to as depleted uranium or DU.
• Under most circumstances, use of DU will make a negligible
contribution to the overall natural background levels of uranium in the
environment. Probably the greatest potential for DU exposure will follow
conflict where DU munitions are used.
• Average annual intakes of uranium by adults are estimated to
be about 0.5mg (500 μg) from ingestion of food and water and 0.6 μg from
breathing air.”

So, uranium is everywhere. We should not bother ourselves with decay tree.
If in doubt, we should measure radiation. And, of course, we should
remember about toxicity of uranium. Gloves, fume hoods, proper treatment of
spillage, etc. And when required, we should collect and dispose used
chemicals in proper way.

I beg your pardon if you find my reply a bit harsh. I just followed your
style.

Regards,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com [mailto:celikaktas-at-gmail.com]
} Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 1:39 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha
} emitters only
}
}
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
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}
} Dear Alex,
}
} Did you have a chance to check the information from
}
} http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
}
} Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this
} list can do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds
} are alpha emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the
} job and post in to the list.
}
} Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
}
} 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
}
} 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
}
} 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
}
} 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
}
} 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
}
} 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
}
} 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
}
} 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
}
} 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
}
} 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
}
} 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
}
} 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
}
} 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
}
} 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
}
} Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as
} a result of U-238 radioactive decay.
}
} I have constructed the above decay tree using the information
} from http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html.
} While constructing the above decay tree I have used the
} branch which has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
}
} I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
}
} By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
}
} One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand
} this. Even in high school science classes people learn about
} radioactive decay series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
}
} Best,
} Ayten.
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================
}
}
} On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 2:27 AM, {abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com} wrote:
} }
} } Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
} } Name: Alex Besenyo PhD
} }
} } Organization: ibilabs
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
} }
} } Question: Question:
} }
} } Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
} } depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
} } salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!
} }
} } Reply:
} }
} } When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
} } depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
} } here. We do not use natural uranium.
} }
} } This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
} } The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.
} }
} } The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.
} }
} } If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
} } alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
} } is detected.
} }
} } I hope this answers everybodies concerns.
} }
} } Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
} } all of them have been instructed on this information.
} }
} } I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
} } before it got out of control.
} }
} } Sincerely
} } Alex Besenyo PhD
} }
} }
} }
}
} ==============================Original
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} 28, 37 -- To: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com, microscopy
} {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} 28, 37 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds
} are alpha emitters only
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From: mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 14:32:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Kristen

There is no compelling reason to use cacodylate buffers for an
introductory class. If you need to add calcium to the fix you can use
HEPES or PIPES, plenty of literature on these.
Cacodylate was very convenient because it was a one salt buffer and Ca
ions did not precipitate. Hazardous waste disposal concerns have made
its use difficult to justify.

Geoff

kamlennon-at-yahoo.com wrote:
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} Hello Again Listers,
}
} Thanks to all of you who have responded to my recent query. I'm sure that I will have more as time passes, and I appreciate the fantastic response that I've had from the list.
}
} Since we are on the topic of the dangers of EM work (the uranyl acetate thread), I have a question about cacodylate buffer. I'm getting set to teach an introductory EM course for biologists to undergraduates. Having interviewed two of my three students during the previous semester, I know that I will be starting very much at zero. They had no to little knowledge of what "EM" is or can be used for before I spoke with them - they are exploring this new class. My plan is to take them through the preparation of plant, animal, and some sort of micro sample via traditional chemical fixation methods and keep it as simple as possible. I am inclined to steer clear of cacodylate buffer due to its toxicity and because they have enough to deal with already, and stick with phosphate buffer. However, I have noticed that most if not all of the animal tissue protocols I've been perusing use cac buffer. Is there any reason why I should keep it in the protocol?
}
} Thanks for your advice.
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
}
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu
}
}
}
}
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9, 28 -- Date: Fri, 09 Jan 2009 15:21:29 -0500
9, 28 -- From: Geoff McAuliffe {mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu}
9, 28 -- User-Agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.19 (Windows/20081209)
9, 28 -- To: kamlennon-at-yahoo.com, microscopy-at-microscopy.com
9, 28 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
9, 28 -- References: {200901091958.n09Jw4H3015451-at-ns.microscopy.com}
9, 28 -- In-reply-to: {200901091958.n09Jw4H3015451-at-ns.microscopy.com}
==============================End of - Headers==============================




From: PWebster-at-hei.org
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 14:45:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,

I have always found it strange that there is so much concern about the use
of cacodylate in the EM laboratory. I concede that it is dangerous when
handled incorrectly. However, I would think that phosphate buffer containing
2.5% glutaraldehyde is more dangerous, or even a 2% aqueous solution of
osmium tetroxide. At what point should students start taking responsibility
for handling chemicals safely and when do the trainers bite the bullet and
make sure the training is adequate?

During my training I remember very clearly how I was taught how to handle
pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The instructions were very clear and very
strict, and followed the same basic rules of how I was trained to handle
radioactive material. Basically the instructions were that these agents can
make you sick and even kill you if you don't follow my instructions, so you
have to handle them as follows....

When I moved into electron microscopy, the training I was given to prepare
biological specimens consisted of being given access to a fridge full of
chemicals and a written protocol. The brown spots on my hands appeared after
a couple of hours but my corneas clouded over in about 30 min of my using
the osmium tetroxide. I had been left completely unsupervised to handle
these chemicals without any prior warning of their dangers. Interestingly,
when my supervisor found out about my use of the osmium tetroxide, and what
it had done to me, he blamed me!

With proper training, the chemicals we use in the EM lab are basically very
safe. We use small amounts of them and store them in closed cabinets so they
should not affect our health in any way.

Part of a good laboratory training course is teaching users how to handle
toxic chemicals and how to pipette solutions without creating aerosols.
Making sure that protective gloves are used correctly is another important
aspect of this training.

If we train correctly, then it should be sufficient to warn students that
they are handling materials designed to chemically alter biological
material. At this point, I usually remind them that they are made of
biological material too.

Happy New Year
(My New Years Resolution is very high!)

Best regards,

Paul Webster.

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
(213) 273 8026
pwebster-at-hei.org







==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:18:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I naturally agree with Paul that with proper training that all the
chemicals used in an EM are safe but that doesn't make it a good idea to
use them indiscriminately. The comparison to bacteria and viruses is a
red herring since those are typically the subject of interest as opposed
to the selection of a buffer which is discretionary. Microscopists and
other scientists inevitably generate hazardous waste but it is incumbent
on us not to do so unless there is a scientific reason that it is the
only way to do the experiment.

It is true that glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer is dangerous. But
glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer is more dangerous. Accidental
exposure would mean exposure to two dangerous chemicals. In addition,
adding acid to glutaraldehyde in phosphate will change the pH but not
release arsenic gas. Many studies have shown the Good buffers to be
suitable for LM and EM studies. I see no reason for any microscopist to
cling to the use of cacodylate.

Paul's own horror story of poor training and supervision is further
evidence of why one should minimize all unnecessary risks. I doubt any
trained scientist would any chemical they don't fully understand outside
of the hood and without gloves - that's a beginner's mistake. Unless one
can guarantee being present at every step of a new student's processing,
it would only be prudent to use the least toxic formulations. With
experience, those students will be able to judge the risks they wish to
take.


Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
Professor of Biological Sciences
Chair, MU Faculty Council
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
phillipst-at-missouri.edu

http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/

-----Original Message-----
X-from: PWebster-at-hei.org [mailto:PWebster-at-hei.org]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 2:46 PM
To: Phillips, Thomas E.

Dear All,

I have always found it strange that there is so much concern about the
use
of cacodylate in the EM laboratory. I concede that it is dangerous when
handled incorrectly. However, I would think that phosphate buffer
containing
2.5% glutaraldehyde is more dangerous, or even a 2% aqueous solution of
osmium tetroxide. At what point should students start taking
responsibility
for handling chemicals safely and when do the trainers bite the bullet
and
make sure the training is adequate?

During my training I remember very clearly how I was taught how to
handle
pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The instructions were very clear and
very
strict, and followed the same basic rules of how I was trained to handle
radioactive material. Basically the instructions were that these agents
can
make you sick and even kill you if you don't follow my instructions, so
you
have to handle them as follows....

When I moved into electron microscopy, the training I was given to
prepare
biological specimens consisted of being given access to a fridge full of
chemicals and a written protocol. The brown spots on my hands appeared
after
a couple of hours but my corneas clouded over in about 30 min of my
using
the osmium tetroxide. I had been left completely unsupervised to handle
these chemicals without any prior warning of their dangers.
Interestingly,
when my supervisor found out about my use of the osmium tetroxide, and
what
it had done to me, he blamed me!

With proper training, the chemicals we use in the EM lab are basically
very
safe. We use small amounts of them and store them in closed cabinets so
they
should not affect our health in any way.

Part of a good laboratory training course is teaching users how to
handle
toxic chemicals and how to pipette solutions without creating aerosols.
Making sure that protective gloves are used correctly is another
important
aspect of this training.

If we train correctly, then it should be sufficient to warn students
that
they are handling materials designed to chemically alter biological
material. At this point, I usually remind them that they are made of
biological material too.

Happy New Year
(My New Years Resolution is very high!)

Best regards,

Paul Webster.

Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
(213) 273 8026
pwebster-at-hei.org







==============================Original
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16, 18 -- Subject: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
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29, 29 -- From PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu Fri Jan 9 15:18:40 2009
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From: beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:27:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I disagree with the assumption that depleted uranium (DU) is not
radioactive and the implication by the word "depleted" that all the
radioactivity has been removed. Here's why.

I had 12 pounds of depleted UAc and a calibrated and certified "pancake"
Geiger counter detector. It had no problem detecting background cosmic
radiation and it had an up to date certification sticker on it. That
amount of DUAc in those containers pegged my Geiger counter from three feet
away. The one pound bottles were brown glass bottles, inside a plastic
bag, inside a "tin" shipping can, and had labels that said, "(depleted
uranium)" on them. So the counted radiation had to be gamma but U does not
emit gamma radiation.

It is the impurities from the decay of U that generate the gamma emitters.
I have no doubt that some of the posters think their materials are not
radioactive and their supplier's material may not be. So we now have two
schools of thought. It's not radioactive and there is radioactivity
present. The only way to know for sure what you have and get a hint of the
history of the manufacturing, is to take a reading on the purchased DUAc
salt with a good quality Geiger counter and see what you get for a reading.
My EH&S and safety people were totally shocked at the DUAc readings and
said, "But this was made from depleted uranium. It's not radioactive." I
relied, "Looks pretty radioactive to me." Like me, they believed the
Geiger counter readings and not the MSDS sheets that didn't address the
gamma emitting impurities, i.e. the amount of impurities from decay.

IMO, the phrase 'depleted uranium' is misleading. There is a shipping
exemption on this radioactive material, I was told. If the amount is one
ounce or less, you don't have to label it or ship it as radioactive. My
shipping clerk refused to ship any amount. So just because the bottle or
packaging you received does not say "radioactive material", that does not
mean small amounts are not radioactive. I think that's where the EM myth
of not being radioactive might comes in. How do you know every last U-235
atom was removed and the uranium was zone refined and/or chemically
purified? You don't. It doesn't say any of that on the bottle(s). Just
measure the gamma radiation.

Paul Beauregard
Senior Research Associate



At 06:20 PM 1/8/09 -0600, you wrote:
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From: kleopullin-at-pacbell.net
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:52:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In our introductory and advanced courses we used phosphate buffers for animal tissue. My classmates and I all got knock-you-dead micrographs, better than the ones in our textbooks, of liver, kidney, muscle, brain, gills, lung, and etc., using phosphate buffers, so I think they can be used with animal tissue to obtain good results.

We're required to read the MSDS before using a chemical, and we're tested throughout both semesters on the safe handling of all EM chemicals, on ALL tests, even chemicals we don't used, from day one in lab.

On our first project, first semester, advanced students handled the OsO4 for us, and we made only the buffers and resins. Later in that semester we were handling and even preparing OsO4, and other chemicals, when we needed more or different concentrations, and if our teacher thought we could do so safely.

For our individual projects, later on, we can use the chemical fixation protocol of our choice--we write these up and submit them weeks before the project.

I used cacodylate buffer for my final project for my advanced biological EM course, and it had to be made from scratch. I worked with a partner, and we used a lab area when other students were absent, and had proper changes of gloves, fume hoods and scale arrangements that would not aerosolize anything, clean tools ready to limit handling time, etc., etc. We figured out the logistics and safe handling by ourselves from experience, questions, and the MSDS's.

We also had a great teacher who watched us like hawks before allowing us to mix our own chemicals and told us right away if we handled something incorrectly. Also, we watch and correct each other before our teacher gets the chance. Lab accidents caused by carelessness are a huge waste of time.

Kleo Pullin






--- On Fri, 1/9/09, kamlennon-at-yahoo.com {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com} wrote:

} From: kamlennon-at-yahoo.com {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
} To: KLeoPullin-at-pacbell.net
} Date: Friday, January 9, 2009, 12:01 PM
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
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} Hello Again Listers,
}
} Thanks to all of you who have responded to my recent query.
} I'm sure that I will have more as time passes, and I
} appreciate the fantastic response that I've had from the
} list.
}
} Since we are on the topic of the dangers of EM work (the
} uranyl acetate thread), I have a question about cacodylate
} buffer. I'm getting set to teach an introductory EM
} course for biologists to undergraduates. Having interviewed
} two of my three students during the previous semester, I
} know that I will be starting very much at zero. They had no
} to little knowledge of what "EM" is or can be used
} for before I spoke with them - they are exploring this new
} class. My plan is to take them through the preparation of
} plant, animal, and some sort of micro sample via traditional
} chemical fixation methods and keep it as simple as possible.
} I am inclined to steer clear of cacodylate buffer due to its
} toxicity and because they have enough to deal with already,
} and stick with phosphate buffer. However, I have noticed
} that most if not all of the animal tissue protocols I've
} been perusing use cac buffer. Is there any reason why I
} should keep it in the protocol?
}
} Thanks for your advice.
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
}
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu
}
}
}
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14, 20 -- From: Kleo Pullin {kleopullin-at-pacbell.net}
14, 20 -- Reply-To: kleopullin-at-pacbell.net
14, 20 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 16:14:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 9, 2009, at 1:27 PM, beaurega-at-westol.com wrote:

} I disagree with the assumption that depleted uranium (DU) is not
} radioactive and the implication by the word "depleted" that all the
} radioactivity has been removed.


Dear Paul,
Depleted U is natural U from which almost all U235 has been removed.
Just because U238 does not sustain a fission chain reaction does not
mean that it is not radioactive. I would refer anyone who believes
that U238 is not radioactive to any book or web site where
radioactivity is discussed, or, as you say "Just measure the gamma
radiation."
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: PWebster-at-hei.org
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 17:15:17 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi All,

My message about cacodylate was aimed at stimulating a continuation of this
discussion, not to advocate the use of cacodylate buffer. However, the
toxicity of the compound should not be the only reason for not choosing to
use it. The choice of buffer will also depend on the end result needed.

My point in the first message was to point out that with proper training it
is possible to handle almost any of the chemicals we encounter in a safe
way.

One important caveat that I would add about using phosphate buffer in the
primary fixative is that when mixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide
it can form a fine precipitate in the cells.

If using phosphate buffer, and there are plenty of historical references
where it was used successfully for TEM, make sure the cells or tissues are
washed well after glutaraldehyde fixation and before immersion in osmium
tetroxide.

The choice of buffers for EM is another subject that deserves a long
discussion thread. Tom Phillips suggests the use of Good buffers as an
alternative to cacodylate. However, PIPES and HEPES will preserve tissues
and cells in very different ways when compared with each other, as well as
with cacodylate or phosphate buffers. This is partially due to the amount of
extraction that occurs. In addition, PIPES buffer is often used at a pH
where it has almost no buffering capacity, HEPES can preserve tissues so
well that there is almost no extraction of cellular material, which results
in virtually no specimen contrast and TRIS buffer may not work at all due to
its ability to react with the aldehyde. In the end, fixation recipe changes
should be approached with some caution.

Best regards,

Paul.


Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
(213) 273 8026
pwebster-at-hei.org


} From: "Phillips, Thomas E." {PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu}
} Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:18:37 -0600
} To: Paul Webster {PWebster-at-hei.org} , {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} Subject: RE: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
}
} I naturally agree with Paul that with proper training that all the
} chemicals used in an EM are safe but that doesn't make it a good idea to
} use them indiscriminately. The comparison to bacteria and viruses is a
} red herring since those are typically the subject of interest as opposed
} to the selection of a buffer which is discretionary. Microscopists and
} other scientists inevitably generate hazardous waste but it is incumbent
} on us not to do so unless there is a scientific reason that it is the
} only way to do the experiment.
}
} It is true that glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer is dangerous. But
} glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer is more dangerous. Accidental
} exposure would mean exposure to two dangerous chemicals. In addition,
} adding acid to glutaraldehyde in phosphate will change the pH but not
} release arsenic gas. Many studies have shown the Good buffers to be
} suitable for LM and EM studies. I see no reason for any microscopist to
} cling to the use of cacodylate.
}
} Paul's own horror story of poor training and supervision is further
} evidence of why one should minimize all unnecessary risks. I doubt any
} trained scientist would any chemical they don't fully understand outside
} of the hood and without gloves - that's a beginner's mistake. Unless one
} can guarantee being present at every step of a new student's processing,
} it would only be prudent to use the least toxic formulations. With
} experience, those students will be able to judge the risks they wish to
} take.
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Chair, MU Faculty Council
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 2 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} phillipst-at-missouri.edu
}
} http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
} http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: PWebster-at-hei.org [mailto:PWebster-at-hei.org]
} Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 2:46 PM
} To: Phillips, Thomas E.
} Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
}
} Dear All,
}
} I have always found it strange that there is so much concern about the
} use
} of cacodylate in the EM laboratory. I concede that it is dangerous when
} handled incorrectly. However, I would think that phosphate buffer
} containing
} 2.5% glutaraldehyde is more dangerous, or even a 2% aqueous solution of
} osmium tetroxide. At what point should students start taking
} responsibility
} for handling chemicals safely and when do the trainers bite the bullet
} and
} make sure the training is adequate?
}
} During my training I remember very clearly how I was taught how to
} handle
} pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The instructions were very clear and
} very
} strict, and followed the same basic rules of how I was trained to handle
} radioactive material. Basically the instructions were that these agents
} can
} make you sick and even kill you if you don't follow my instructions, so
} you
} have to handle them as follows....
}
} When I moved into electron microscopy, the training I was given to
} prepare
} biological specimens consisted of being given access to a fridge full of
} chemicals and a written protocol. The brown spots on my hands appeared
} after
} a couple of hours but my corneas clouded over in about 30 min of my
} using
} the osmium tetroxide. I had been left completely unsupervised to handle
} these chemicals without any prior warning of their dangers.
} Interestingly,
} when my supervisor found out about my use of the osmium tetroxide, and
} what
} it had done to me, he blamed me!
}
} With proper training, the chemicals we use in the EM lab are basically
} very
} safe. We use small amounts of them and store them in closed cabinets so
} they
} should not affect our health in any way.
}
} Part of a good laboratory training course is teaching users how to
} handle
} toxic chemicals and how to pipette solutions without creating aerosols.
} Making sure that protective gloves are used correctly is another
} important
} aspect of this training.
}
} If we train correctly, then it should be sufficient to warn students
} that
} they are handling materials designed to chemically alter biological
} material. At this point, I usually remind them that they are made of
} biological material too.
}
} Happy New Year
} (My New Years Resolution is very high!)
}
} Best regards,
}
} Paul Webster.
}
} Paul Webster, Ph.D
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles, CA 90057
} (213) 273 8026
} pwebster-at-hei.org
}
}
}
}
}
}
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
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} 16, 18 -- Subject: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
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} 16, 18 -- To: {Microscopy-at-Microscopy.Com}
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12, 20 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
12, 20 -- From: "Webster, Paul" {PWebster-at-hei.org}
12, 20 -- To: "Phillips, Thomas E." {PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu} ,
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From: rp_seifi-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 17:30:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: FISH

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

PIPES has a pKa of 6.8 which would make it a suitable buffer for 6.3 -
7.3 (and since aldehydes fixation tends to acidify the solution, it
would be good at 7.4 also!). Cacodylate has a pKa of 6.2. I guess it
depends on what pH you are using for your aldehydes fix but most people
use something closer to 7 so I don't see how PIPES pKa is inferior to
cacodylate.



Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
Professor of Biological Sciences
Chair, MU Faculty Council
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
phillipst-at-missouri.edu

http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/


-----Original Message-----
X-from: Webster, Paul [mailto:PWebster-at-hei.org]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 5:15 PM
To: Phillips, Thomas E.; Microscopy-at-microscopy.com

This Question/Comment was submitted to the Microscopy Listserver
using the WWW based Form at
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Email: rp_seifi-at-yahoo.com
Name: Reza Pourseify

Organization: Mehr Inst.

Title-Subject: [Filtered] FISH

Question: Hello everybody
I have a problem in my microscope setting.
The line of light is biased to lefthand side in it for some zoom degrees.
How can i correct it.
It is a Nikon, E600 (fluorescence microscope with visible light
harware and a condenser)
Thank you for attention...


Login Host: 79.127.31.226
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From: PWebster-at-hei.org
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 17:38:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi again,

One last time - I am not advocating the use of cacodylate and I do agree
that cacodylate as generally used in EM has less buffering capacity than
PIPES. I don't think I ever said that one buffer was inferior to another,
just that choices should be made on the end result, not on whether a
compound was toxic or not.

Regards,

Paul Webster.


Paul Webster, Ph.D
House Ear Institute
2100 West Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
(213) 273 8026
pwebster-at-hei.org


} From: "Phillips, Thomas E." {PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu}
} Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 17:22:17 -0600
} To: Paul Webster {PWebster-at-hei.org} , {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} Subject: RE: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
}
} PIPES has a pKa of 6.8 which would make it a suitable buffer for 6.3 -
} 7.3 (and since aldehydes fixation tends to acidify the solution, it
} would be good at 7.4 also!). Cacodylate has a pKa of 6.2. I guess it
} depends on what pH you are using for your aldehydes fix but most people
} use something closer to 7 so I don't see how PIPES pKa is inferior to
} cacodylate.
}
}
}
} Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
} Professor of Biological Sciences
} Chair, MU Faculty Council
} Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} 2 Tucker Hall
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} 573-882-4712 (office)
} 573-882-0123 (fax)
} phillipst-at-missouri.edu
}
} http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
} http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: Webster, Paul [mailto:PWebster-at-hei.org]
} Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 5:15 PM
} To: Phillips, Thomas E.; Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
}
} Hi All,
}
} My message about cacodylate was aimed at stimulating a continuation of
} this
} discussion, not to advocate the use of cacodylate buffer. However, the
} toxicity of the compound should not be the only reason for not choosing
} to
} use it. The choice of buffer will also depend on the end result needed.
}
} My point in the first message was to point out that with proper training
} it
} is possible to handle almost any of the chemicals we encounter in a safe
} way.
}
} One important caveat that I would add about using phosphate buffer in
} the
} primary fixative is that when mixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium
} tetroxide
} it can form a fine precipitate in the cells.
}
} If using phosphate buffer, and there are plenty of historical references
} where it was used successfully for TEM, make sure the cells or tissues
} are
} washed well after glutaraldehyde fixation and before immersion in osmium
} tetroxide.
}
} The choice of buffers for EM is another subject that deserves a long
} discussion thread. Tom Phillips suggests the use of Good buffers as an
} alternative to cacodylate. However, PIPES and HEPES will preserve
} tissues
} and cells in very different ways when compared with each other, as well
} as
} with cacodylate or phosphate buffers. This is partially due to the
} amount of
} extraction that occurs. In addition, PIPES buffer is often used at a pH
} where it has almost no buffering capacity, HEPES can preserve tissues so
} well that there is almost no extraction of cellular material, which
} results
} in virtually no specimen contrast and TRIS buffer may not work at all
} due to
} its ability to react with the aldehyde. In the end, fixation recipe
} changes
} should be approached with some caution.
}
} Best regards,
}
} Paul.
}
}
} Paul Webster, Ph.D
} House Ear Institute
} 2100 West Third Street
} Los Angeles, CA 90057
} (213) 273 8026
} pwebster-at-hei.org
}
}
} } From: "Phillips, Thomas E." {PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu}
} } Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:18:37 -0600
} } To: Paul Webster {PWebster-at-hei.org} , {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} } Subject: RE: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
} }
} } I naturally agree with Paul that with proper training that all the
} } chemicals used in an EM are safe but that doesn't make it a good idea
} to
} } use them indiscriminately. The comparison to bacteria and viruses is a
} } red herring since those are typically the subject of interest as
} opposed
} } to the selection of a buffer which is discretionary. Microscopists and
} } other scientists inevitably generate hazardous waste but it is
} incumbent
} } on us not to do so unless there is a scientific reason that it is the
} } only way to do the experiment.
} }
} } It is true that glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer is dangerous. But
} } glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer is more dangerous. Accidental
} } exposure would mean exposure to two dangerous chemicals. In addition,
} } adding acid to glutaraldehyde in phosphate will change the pH but not
} } release arsenic gas. Many studies have shown the Good buffers to be
} } suitable for LM and EM studies. I see no reason for any microscopist
} to
} } cling to the use of cacodylate.
} }
} } Paul's own horror story of poor training and supervision is further
} } evidence of why one should minimize all unnecessary risks. I doubt any
} } trained scientist would any chemical they don't fully understand
} outside
} } of the hood and without gloves - that's a beginner's mistake. Unless
} one
} } can guarantee being present at every step of a new student's
} processing,
} } it would only be prudent to use the least toxic formulations. With
} } experience, those students will be able to judge the risks they wish
} to
} } take.
} }
} }
} } Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
} } Professor of Biological Sciences
} } Chair, MU Faculty Council
} } Director, Molecular Cytology Core
} } 2 Tucker Hall
} } University of Missouri
} } Columbia, MO 65211-7400
} } 573-882-4712 (office)
} } 573-882-0123 (fax)
} } phillipst-at-missouri.edu
} }
} } http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
} } http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } From: PWebster-at-hei.org [mailto:PWebster-at-hei.org]
} } Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 2:46 PM
} } To: Phillips, Thomas E.
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?
} }
} }
} }
} }
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } ----
} }
} } Dear All,
} }
} } I have always found it strange that there is so much concern about the
} } use
} } of cacodylate in the EM laboratory. I concede that it is dangerous
} when
} } handled incorrectly. However, I would think that phosphate buffer
} } containing
} } 2.5% glutaraldehyde is more dangerous, or even a 2% aqueous solution
} of
} } osmium tetroxide. At what point should students start taking
} } responsibility
} } for handling chemicals safely and when do the trainers bite the bullet
} } and
} } make sure the training is adequate?
} }
} } During my training I remember very clearly how I was taught how to
} } handle
} } pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The instructions were very clear and
} } very
} } strict, and followed the same basic rules of how I was trained to
} handle
} } radioactive material. Basically the instructions were that these
} agents
} } can
} } make you sick and even kill you if you don't follow my instructions,
} so
} } you
} } have to handle them as follows....
} }
} } When I moved into electron microscopy, the training I was given to
} } prepare
} } biological specimens consisted of being given access to a fridge full
} of
} } chemicals and a written protocol. The brown spots on my hands appeared
} } after
} } a couple of hours but my corneas clouded over in about 30 min of my
} } using
} } the osmium tetroxide. I had been left completely unsupervised to
} handle
} } these chemicals without any prior warning of their dangers.
} } Interestingly,
} } when my supervisor found out about my use of the osmium tetroxide, and
} } what
} } it had done to me, he blamed me!
} }
} } With proper training, the chemicals we use in the EM lab are basically
} } very
} } safe. We use small amounts of them and store them in closed cabinets
} so
} } they
} } should not affect our health in any way.
} }
} } Part of a good laboratory training course is teaching users how to
} } handle
} } toxic chemicals and how to pipette solutions without creating
} aerosols.
} } Making sure that protective gloves are used correctly is another
} } important
} } aspect of this training.
} }
} } If we train correctly, then it should be sufficient to warn students
} } that
} } they are handling materials designed to chemically alter biological
} } material. At this point, I usually remind them that they are made of
} } biological material too.
} }
} } Happy New Year
} } (My New Years Resolution is very high!)
} }
} } Best regards,
} }
} } Paul Webster.
} }
} } Paul Webster, Ph.D
} } House Ear Institute
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From: beaurega-at-westol.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 18:07:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Bill,

Yes, I remember all this being discussed by a few of us, including you,
back a few years ago. One guy essentially called my certified Geiger
counter a liar. Like I saw in the past, I keep seeing web pages (EPA and
Health Canada, for example) that say that DU is still 0.2-0.4 % U-235
versus the original 0.7%. I always remember that it is roughly only half
to 70% depleted. My observation of the phenomena.

Someone strongly pointed out that U is an alpha emitter, not a gamma
emitter, and I was not reading gamma radiation (but I was). You pointed
out that it was the decay impurities that were the gamma emitters and that
was what I was reading on my counter. I agree that U-238 and DU are still
radioactive.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/radiation/uranium-eng.php
"It (uranium) consists of three isotopes: uranium-234, uranium-235 and
uranium-238 which are present in amounts of 0.005%, 0.7%, and 99.3%, by
weight, respectively."
"The amounts of uranium-234 and uranium-235 remaining in depleted uranium
metal are about 0.002% and 0.2%, respectively."
Here's my favorite. "depleted uranium is 40% less radioactive than natural
uranium." That means 60% of the radioactivity is still there. I am not
sure that includes gamma but probably.

My main point this time around was that 'whatever was in all my bottles of
DUAc', it was also a gamma emitter. Also, it is impossible to know the
history of the manufacturing of the material and so one should take their
own Geiger counter readings to see what gamma radiation is actually there.
That's the final referee on the raw salt, IMO. It's also a measure of the
impurities, I guess. Of course the dilution level makes the gamma levels
less in the final solutions used in EM.

JMO,

Paul

At 04:14 PM 1/9/09 -0600, you wrote:
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From: tiger3g3-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2009 22:27:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

One more consideration is the logistics of it all: are the students
early college and new to science or advanced and already well on a
science path? I say, save the hazardous stuff for the latter group,
generally. Let them get hooked before you trot out the dangers! ;-)
Also: class size matters a lot, and how much other stuff you have to
fit into the class session (hazardous stuff needs a bit of time).
I've found that most students will be fine, but there's always
someone who wasn't paying attention and isn't careful, so you need a
small class and a good lab setup (dangerous stuff not too close to
other stuff). In one class (intro level) we were doing blood draws
(for blood typing) and I was very surprised at how careless they were
(especially when they were distracted by results), so I'd call them
up in small groups, but this took a while and some of them still
managed to get blood where it shouldn't have been. (Nothing serious,
but it kept me on my toes a bit too much for comfort.)

In training my students in microscopy, I try to impart good habits,
figuring, better they should start at the "taking extreme care level"
then when their habits inevitably decay, they'll still have decent
enough habits. It's funny when I forget myself to follow the rules
(always koehler, no food near scopes, start on low power). Just the
other day my own tech glared at me when I walked into the scope room,
and it took me a sec, but i realized that i was holding (and eating)
very crumbly food.

On the other extreme, we once had a stockroom tech here who was very
afraid of all chemicals, despite her degree in biology. She told me
(I have this in email, so I wasn't hallucinating it) that she
couldn't prepare a NaCl solution for me because she hadn't had safety
training yet. Really!

Gisele



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From: heckman-at-buckeye-express.com
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 00:50:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] polishing stainless steel and silver metal surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Listers - I have samples to prepare for inspection by SEM, and the client wants to know about the grain size. We have never polished metals before. Is there anyone who can advise me what to do, or does this take a metallurgist? Carol Heckman, Bowling Green State University

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: jeff-at-metallography.com
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 07:13:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] polishing stainless steel and silver metal surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Carol,

You might be better off delegating this one to somebody in the materials
science department, but if you want to try it yourself, I can help you with
the silver. You didn't mention what silver alloy you're attempting to
prepare, or it's form, but here's a method that works well for preparing
fine and sterling silver, yellow and white gold alloys, nickel, copper
alloys, and silver solders on rotating wheels at 400 rpm. The type of
lubricant, cloth selection, and pressure are important.

1) Grind through a succession of SiC papers from 240 through 600 grit using
moderate pressure with running water lubricant. Rinse or ultrasonically
clean after each paper. Dry.
2) Coarse polish on a napless cotton cloth with 6 micron diamond (I use a
suspension), and moderate pressure with a commercial diamond extender.
Ultrasonically clean and dry.
3) Fine polish on a short-napped synthetic velvet cloth with 1 micron
diamond (I use a suspension) and deionized water lubricant using moderate to
light pressure. Ultrasonically clean and dry.

You'll have to etch the silver to reveal the grain size after polishing.
Without knowing what silver alloy you're working with, try a 50/50 mixture
of ammonium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration). The etch
works very fast. It can be diluted with DI water to slow the attack. Apply
by swabbing. Do not store.

Good luck,

Jeff Stewart
Metallographic Lab Manager
Stern-Leach Company
Cookson Precious Metals
49 Pearl Street
Attleboro, MA 02703
508-222-7400 x1329

-----Original Message-----
X-from: heckman-at-buckeye-express.com [mailto:heckman-at-buckeye-express.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 1:58 AM
To: jeff-at-metallography.com

Listers - I have samples to prepare for inspection by SEM, and the client
wants to know about the grain size. We have never polished metals before.
Is there anyone who can advise me what to do, or does this take a
metallurgist? Carol Heckman, Bowling Green State University

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From: as-at-astonmet.com
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 09:26:01 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: polishing stainless steel and silver metal

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


If you are looking to measure the grain size of the stainless steel,
refer to ASTM E112 for the measurement procedure. You will need to
properly polish and etch first. The alloy will dictate the proper
etchant to use. Try Viella's for 400 series. For 300 series, try
Kalling's II, Glyceregia or electrolytic 10% oxalic.

Do not store glyceregia!

Alan Stone
ASTON


At 12:51 AM 1/10/2009, heckman-at-buckeye-express.com wrote:



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From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 10:50:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

I'm sorry about sounding a bit negative in my previous post. I did not
mean to school anybody.

I just wanted to clarify that the radioactive decay process of U-238
continues via further decay of daughter nuclei with different modes of
decay. And people can do their own calculations, as well.

Regards,
Ayten.


--
===========================
Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
Ankara University
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Ankara, Turkey
===========================

On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 4:44 PM, {dac-at-research.umass.edu} wrote:
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Ayten,
}
} Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
} bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
} really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
} positive and collegial way.
}
} Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that
} the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since
} my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
} associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
} like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
} long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
} danger of this.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dale
}
}
} celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } Dear Alex,
} }
} } Did you have a chance to check the information from
} }
} } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} }
} } Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} } do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} } emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} } the list.
} }
} } Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
} }
} } 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
} }
} } 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
} }
} } 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
} }
} } 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
} }
} } 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
} }
} } 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
} }
} } 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
} }
} } Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} } of U-238 radioactive decay.
} }
} } I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} } While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} } has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
} }
} } I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
} }
} } By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
} }
} } One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} } in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} } series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
} }
} } Best,
} } Ayten.
} }
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================

==============================Original Headers==============================
7, 34 -- From celikaktas-at-gmail.com Sat Jan 10 10:50:09 2009
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7, 34 -- Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 18:50:07 +0200
7, 34 -- Message-ID: {1075c5c10901100850u20dcb242nd050b7702a79e92d-at-mail.gmail.com}
7, 34 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters
7, 34 -- From: Ayten Celik-Aktas {celikaktas-at-gmail.com}
7, 34 -- To: microscopy {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
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From: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 14:35:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Based on Dale's reported half life for U238, the specific activity for U238
would be 1.2x10exp4 DPS, or about 0.3 uCi/g. This is very small activity
and they're alpha particles, which can be shielded best by plastic to avoid
Bremstrahlung and secondary x-ray production. The daughter products will
accumulate and decay according to their schemes and half-lives, which makes
it more difficult to calculate. (See "Nuclear and Radiochemistry", by
Friedlander, Kennedy, Miller, for a treatise on the differential equations
to calculate activity from multiple decay pathways.)

The best is to just measure it with a survey meter and see what the external
total dose rate in mr/hr is. Don't be afraid if your meter 'pegs' on the
lowest (most sensitive setting). A sample with a field over several mr/hr
over background should be handled according to practices used for handling
radioactive materials.

Hope that helps a bit.

Don Kloos
VP Sales, Marketing, Business Development
Parallax Research

(Ex-Radiochemist)


Sales & Marketing
16478 Beach Blvd. #330
Westminster, California, 92683-7860 USA

TOLL FREE 1 866 581-XRAY (9729)
Telephone 1 714 897-9779
Fax 1 714 897-1421
Email: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
SKYPE: don.kloos
Website: http://www.parallaxray.com


-----Original Message-----
X-from: celikaktas-at-gmail.com [mailto:celikaktas-at-gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 8:59 AM
To: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com

Dear Listers,

I'm sorry about sounding a bit negative in my previous post. I did not
mean to school anybody.

I just wanted to clarify that the radioactive decay process of U-238
continues via further decay of daughter nuclei with different modes of
decay. And people can do their own calculations, as well.

Regards,
Ayten.


--
===========================
Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
Ankara University
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Ankara, Turkey
===========================

On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 4:44 PM, {dac-at-research.umass.edu} wrote:
}
}
}
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
}
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Ayten,
}
} Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
} bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
} really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
} positive and collegial way.
}
} Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that
} the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since
} my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
} associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
} like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
} long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
} danger of this.
}
} Thanks,
}
} Dale
}
}
} celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
} }
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} }
} } Dear Alex,
} }
} } Did you have a chance to check the information from
} }
} } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} }
} } Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} } do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} } emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} } the list.
} }
} } Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
} }
} } 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
} }
} } 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
} }
} } 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
} }
} } 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
} }
} } 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
} }
} } 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
} }
} } 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
} }
} } 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
} }
} } Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} } of U-238 radioactive decay.
} }
} } I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} } While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} } has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
} }
} } I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
} }
} } By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
} }
} } One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} } in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} } series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
} }
} } Best,
} } Ayten.
} }
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================

==============================Original Headers==============================
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7, 34 -- Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 18:50:07 +0200
7, 34 -- Message-ID:
{1075c5c10901100850u20dcb242nd050b7702a79e92d-at-mail.gmail.com}
7, 34 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha
emitters
7, 34 -- From: Ayten Celik-Aktas {celikaktas-at-gmail.com}
7, 34 -- To: microscopy {Microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
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==============================Original Headers==============================
18, 30 -- From dkloos-at-parallaxray.com Sat Jan 10 14:35:05 2009
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18, 30 -- Subject: RE: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters
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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2009 17:06:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I'm definitely not an expert in this field but from a bit of reading it
seems that it is anything but a clear and simple story and measurement
is clearly the way to go. In my poking around and reading I did run into
a mention of U-238 giving off gamma rays as a result of alpha emission.
Maybe this explains the gamma ray emission that Paul Beauregard
reported. For what it's worth.......

===============================================
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_particles

Alpha particles (named after and denoted by the first letter in the
Greek alphabet, α) consist of two protons and two neutrons bound
together into a particle identical to a helium nucleus; hence, it can be
written as He2+ or 42He2+. They are a highly ionizing form of particle
radiation, and have low penetration.

Alpha particles are emitted by radioactive nuclei such as uranium,
thorium, actinium, or radium in a process known as alpha decay. This
sometimes leaves the nucleus in an excited state, with the emission of a
gamma ray removing the excess energy.

==================================================

Cheers!

Dale

dkloos-at-parallaxray.com wrote:
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Based on Dale's reported half life for U238, the specific activity for U238
} would be 1.2x10exp4 DPS, or about 0.3 uCi/g. This is very small activity
} and they're alpha particles, which can be shielded best by plastic to avoid
} Bremstrahlung and secondary x-ray production. The daughter products will
} accumulate and decay according to their schemes and half-lives, which makes
} it more difficult to calculate. (See "Nuclear and Radiochemistry", by
} Friedlander, Kennedy, Miller, for a treatise on the differential equations
} to calculate activity from multiple decay pathways.)
}
} The best is to just measure it with a survey meter and see what the external
} total dose rate in mr/hr is. Don't be afraid if your meter 'pegs' on the
} lowest (most sensitive setting). A sample with a field over several mr/hr
} over background should be handled according to practices used for handling
} radioactive materials.
}
} Hope that helps a bit.
}
} Don Kloos
} VP Sales, Marketing, Business Development
} Parallax Research
}
} (Ex-Radiochemist)
}
}
} Sales & Marketing
} 16478 Beach Blvd. #330
} Westminster, California, 92683-7860 USA
}
} TOLL FREE 1 866 581-XRAY (9729)
} Telephone 1 714 897-9779
} Fax 1 714 897-1421
} Email: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
} SKYPE: don.kloos
} Website: http://www.parallaxray.com
}
}
} -----Original Message-----
} X-from: celikaktas-at-gmail.com [mailto:celikaktas-at-gmail.com]
} Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2009 8:59 AM
} To: dkloos-at-parallaxray.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear Listers,
}
} I'm sorry about sounding a bit negative in my previous post. I did not
} mean to school anybody.
}
} I just wanted to clarify that the radioactive decay process of U-238
} continues via further decay of daughter nuclei with different modes of
} decay. And people can do their own calculations, as well.
}
} Regards,
} Ayten.
}
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================
}
} On Fri, Jan 9, 2009 at 4:44 PM, {dac-at-research.umass.edu} wrote:
} }
} }
} }
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } Dear Ayten,
} }
} } Your comments are informative but, to my personal taste, definitely a
} } bit negative in tone for this list. Your "schooling" of Alex isn't
} } really necessary and I think we could get your information in a more
} } positive and collegial way.
} }
} } Regarding the decay tree, I note from the provided link information that
} } the half-life of U-238 is { {4.468E+9 years} } . It has been a while since
} } my high school chemistry but I'm wondering how much Th-234 and
} } associated beta emission danger we are really dealing with here; seems
} } like there must be a very small amount of Th-234 produced with such a
} } long half-life of the original U-238. Maybe you could comment on the
} } danger of this.
} }
} } Thanks,
} }
} } Dale
} }
} }
} } celikaktas-at-gmail.com wrote:
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} } } Dear Alex,
} } }
} } } Did you have a chance to check the information from
} } }
} } } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} } }
} } } Let me construct the decay tree. I'm sure everybody in this list can
} } } do it but, you keep insisting that "uranyl compounds are alpha
} } } emitters only" so, I will take the time to do the job and post in to
} } } the list.
} } }
} } } Let's start with U-238 which is the starting element in your compound.
} } }
} } } 1) U-238 decays into Th-234 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 2) Th-234 decays into Pa-234 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 3) Pa-234 decays into U-234 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 4) U-234 decays into Th-230 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 5) Th-230 decays into Ra-226 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 6) Ra-226 decays into Rn-222 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 7) Rn-222 decays into Po-218 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 8) Po-218 decays into Pb-214 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 9) Pb-214 decays into Bi-214 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 10) Bi-214 decays into Po-214 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 11) Po-214 decays into Pb-210 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } 12) Pb-210 decays into Bi-210 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 13) Bi-210 decays into Po-210 by Beta decay
} } }
} } } 14) Po-210 decays into Pb-206 by Alpha decay
} } }
} } } Pb-206 is STABLE so, it is the last element to be produced as a result
} } } of U-238 radioactive decay.
} } }
} } } I have constructed the above decay tree using the information from
} } } http://atom.kaeri.re.kr/ton/nuc7.html
} } } While constructing the above decay tree I have used the branch which
} } } has the highest branch ratio (above 99% in each case).
} } }
} } } I do not understand why you are trying to keep things "under control"?
} } }
} } } By the way, I'm a Nuclear Engineer.
} } }
} } } One does not even need to be nuclear engineer to understand this. Even
} } } in high school science classes people learn about radioactive decay
} } } series e.g. A decays into B and B decays into C...
} } }
} } } Best,
} } } Ayten.
} } }
} } --
} } ===========================
} } Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} } Ankara University
} } Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} } Ankara, Turkey
} } ===========================
}
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9, 20 -- From dac-at-research.umass.edu Sat Jan 10 17:06:10 2009
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From: przybylowicz-at-tlabs.ac.za
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 08:10:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Post-doctoral fellow (NMP) - two years contract with

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Email: przybylowicz-at-tlabs.ac.za
Name: Wojciech Przybylowicz

Organization: iThemba LABS, South Africa

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Post-doctoral fellow (NMP) - two years
contract with extension possibility

Question: Post-doctoral fellow (NMP) - two years contract with
extension possibility

Position: Nuclear microprobe analysis of thin frozen-hydrated
biological specimens

Applications are invited for this position in our Materials Research
Group (MRG) of iThemba LABS, situated ca. 30 km from Cape Town, South
Africa.

Responsibilities will include:
- Adapting the cryo-stage coupled to the MRG nuclear microprobe
for measurements of thin specimens in frozen-hydrated state
- Active involvement in research projects related to biological
applications of ion beam techniques and generating new applications.

Minimum requirements:

- PhD in Biology/Chemistry/Physics with strong emphasis on
cryo-preparation of biological specimens and low temperature electron
microscopy
- Experience in operating SEM/TEM and knowledge of EDS
technique as well as cryo-ultramicrotomy
- Experience in operating a nuclear microprobe and familiarity
with PIXE as an advantage
- Relevant conference presentations and publications as well as
international exposure
- Knowledge of statistical methods
- Computer literacy (Word, Excel, Corel, etc.)

We offer a competitive remuneration package, which includes normal
company benefits.

Forward your detailed CV, accompanied by a covering letter and
supporting documents, to the Human Resource Department; iThemba LABS,
P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, or fax (+27-21-8433756), or via
e-mail to:
mirencia-at-tlabs.ac.za with copy to przybylowicz-at-tlabs.ac.za
For some information of the laboratory, visit our website: www.tlabs.ac.za

I suggest that you contact me for any details of this position.
E-mail: przybylowicz-at-tlabs.ac.za
You may want to read the following publication on earlier work done
by our team in this direction:

Grzegorz Tylko, Jolanta Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz and Wojciech J.
Przybyłowicz. X-ray microanalysis of biological material in the
frozen-hydrated state by PIXE. Microscopy Research and Technique
(2007) 70: 55-68.

Applications close on 28 February 2009


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From: tbargar-at-unmc.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 10:58:03 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

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Listers,

I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their monolayer
cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This situation
is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods may
be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.

Tom Bargar
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
986395 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-6395
402-559-7347
tbargar-at-unmc.edu


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: PhillipsT-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 11:06:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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The obvious question would seem to be "How do the extracellular calcium
crystals survive in aqueous tissue culture medium?" Are you sure they
are dissolving or simply being washed away.

Thomas E. Phillips, Ph.D
Professor of Biological Sciences
Chair, MU Faculty Council
Director, Molecular Cytology Core
2 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211-7400
573-882-4712 (office)
573-882-0123 (fax)
phillipst-at-missouri.edu

http://www.biology.missouri.edu/faculty/phillips.html
http://www.biotech.missouri.edu/mcc/

-----Original Message-----
X-from: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
To: Phillips, Thomas E.


Listers,

I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their
monolayer
cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This
situation
is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods
may
be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.

Tom Bargar
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
986395 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-6395
402-559-7347
tbargar-at-unmc.edu


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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 11:20:46 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters

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On Jan 9, 2009, at 4:07 PM, beaurega-at-westol.com wrote:

} Someone strongly pointed out that U is an alpha emitter, not a gamma
} emitter, and I was not reading gamma radiation (but I was). You
} pointed
} out that it was the decay impurities that were the gamma emitters
} and that
} was what I was reading on my counter. I agree that U-238 and DU are
} still
} radioactive.

} Here's my favorite. "depleted uranium is 40% less radioactive than
} natural
} uranium." That means 60% of the radioactivity is still there. I am
} not
} sure that includes gamma but probably.


Dear Paul,
Since the activities of the U isotopes are inversely proportional to
their half-lives, and since the half lives of U235 and U234 are about
7 and 20,000 times shorter respectively than U238's, the amount of
radiation from U234 is about equal to that from U238, and that from
U235 is about 5% of that from the others, so your quote that DU has
only 60% the activity of natural U checks out. I pointed out that
~1/4 of the U238 decays are to an excited state of Th234, which is ~50
keV above the ground state, so pure U238 will produce some low-energy
gammas, as will many of the daughters. The bottom line is that direct
measurements performed correctly don't lie, so they are the best way
to settle this issue once and for all.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: k.sader-at-leeds.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 11:56:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Nanoplast resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi,

I have been searching around for some time and I have not been able to find
a supplier with any Nanoplast (melamine) resin. Does anyone know what
company actually produced Nanoplast, if they are still operating, or if
there is a supplier who still has some?

Thanks,

Kasim Sader



----------------------
Dr Kasim Sader
SuperSTEM
Daresbury Laboratory
Warrington
WA4 4AD




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From: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 11:57:58 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom,

Ca products will either dissolve or wash away, but will disappear from the
external and internal areas of the cells during aqueous sample
preparation.You really can't avoid this happening. The only way to minimize
the amount of dissolving (but not necessarily washing away if external) of
the Ca product is using HPF and FS.

I say this based on personal experience with internal calcium carbonate
inclusions in cells.

Debby

--
Debby Sherman, Director Phone: 765-494-6666
Life Science Microscopy Facility FAX: 765-494-5896
Purdue University E-mail: dsherman-at-purdue.edu
S-052 Whistler Building
170 S. University Street
West Lafayette, IN 47907
http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/microscopy/


} From: {tbargar-at-unmc.edu}
} Reply-To: {tbargar-at-unmc.edu}
} Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 11:00:03 -0600
} To: Debby Sherman {dsherman-at-purdue.edu}
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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}
}
} Listers,
}
} I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their monolayer
} cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
} produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
} The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This situation
} is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
} working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods may
} be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.
}
} Tom Bargar
} University of Nebraska Medical Center
} Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
} 986395 Nebraska Medical Center
} Omaha, NE 68198-6395
} 402-559-7347
} tbargar-at-unmc.edu
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 12:52:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom,

It's a long shot, but there are non-aqueous fixation techniques that
were originally developed to preserve biofilms that are usually removed
during conventional processing methods. These use a perfluorocarbon
solvent, such as the 3M company's FC-72, with osmium tetroxide to do the
fixation. If the calcium crystals will survive ethanol dehydration, it
may work. If not, it may be possible to experiment with ways of getting
the cells into resin directly from the solvent. Depends on how much
fuss you want to go through on a long-shot protocol!

One reference is: "Heterogeneity of the Composition and Thickness of
Tracheal Mucus in Rats", 1997, David Sims and Margaret Horne, Am J
Phys--Lung Cell & Mol Phsiol 17:L1036-L1041.

I can come up with more if you want to pursue this. 3M used to sell
this solvent in small quantities, although it's normally sold in drums
for electrical transformers, etc. Don't know if they still have the
smaller units.

For what it's worth...

Good luck,
Randy

Randy Tindall
Senior EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W125 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-2227
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
On-line calendar:
http://biotech.rnet.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/Calcium310.pl?Op=Splash&Amount=
Week&NavType=Both&Type=TimePlan
Sons of Norway: http://www.sofn.com








-----Original Message-----
X-from: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
To: Tindall, Randy D.


Listers,

I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their
monolayer
cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This
situation
is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods
may
be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.

Tom Bargar
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
986395 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-6395
402-559-7347
tbargar-at-unmc.edu


==============================Original
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From: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 13:11:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Sounds like rapid freezing followed by freeze substitution is
probably the way to go (as Debby Sherman suggested).

If you do not have access to such equipment, another possibility
would be to grow the cells directly on a TEM grid (with a Formvar
film, of course). Cu grids may be toxic to some cells but Ni should
be OK. We've grown cells on grids in the past and it works well once
you work out the concentration of cells (so as not to obliterate the
view).

In our situation, we rinsed to remove culture fluids but you could
plunge freeze the grid and freeze dry it. We made a freeze dryer (of
sorts) by having a copper block machined to accommodate specimens. It
had a lid (to prevent condensation). We loaded the specimens into the
LN2-chilled block and then put it in a vacuum evaporator. In your
case, 8 hr should dry the grid.

JB

} I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their monolayer
} cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
} produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
} The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This situation
} is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
} working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods may
} be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.
}
} Tom Bargar
} University of Nebraska Medical Center
}

--
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise (IMAGE)
Southern Illinois University
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Carbondale, IL 62901
Telephone: 618-453-3730

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

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From: cervantes-at-bendres.com
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 13:35:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Tom -
Just FYI: I used the non-aqueous method mentioned by Randy several years
ago, and it worked well for preserving the mucous layer on murine
intestinal tissue. The reference he suggested is a good start. Also,
if you call 3M, they may send you a sample bottle of Fluorinert FC-72,
which may be enough for your needs (and was enough for me to do a trial
run to ensure that the fixation worked).

Jessica

Jessica Cervantes
Bend Research, Inc
Bend, OR


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Tom,

It's a long shot, but there are non-aqueous fixation techniques that
were originally developed to preserve biofilms that are usually removed
during conventional processing methods. These use a perfluorocarbon
solvent, such as the 3M company's FC-72, with osmium tetroxide to do the
fixation. If the calcium crystals will survive ethanol dehydration, it
may work. If not, it may be possible to experiment with ways of getting
the cells into resin directly from the solvent. Depends on how much
fuss you want to go through on a long-shot protocol!

One reference is: "Heterogeneity of the Composition and Thickness of
Tracheal Mucus in Rats", 1997, David Sims and Margaret Horne, Am J
Phys--Lung Cell & Mol Phsiol 17:L1036-L1041.

I can come up with more if you want to pursue this. 3M used to sell
this solvent in small quantities, although it's normally sold in drums
for electrical transformers, etc. Don't know if they still have the
smaller units.

For what it's worth...

Good luck,
Randy

Randy Tindall
Senior EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W125 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-2227
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
On-line calendar:
http://biotech.rnet.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/Calcium310.pl?Op=Splash&Amount=
Week&NavType=Both&Type=TimePlan
Sons of Norway: http://www.sofn.com








-----Original Message-----
X-from: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
To: Tindall, Randy D.


Listers,

I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their
monolayer
cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those cells. The cells
produce extracellular calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work . This
situation
is unlike anything I have dealt with before, including all my years of
working with marine invertebrates. I am speculating that cryo methods
may
be the only answer. As always thanks in advance for any help possible.

Tom Bargar
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
986395 Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198-6395
402-559-7347
tbargar-at-unmc.edu



==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 14:15:44 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There was an old paper about anhydrous specimen preparation for TEM:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/66323

Method used ethylene glycol, cellosolve and propylene oxide. Embedded in
Epon specimens were cut with knife filled with ethylene glycol. A while
ago I used this method and got some results.

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium
}
}
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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}
}
} Listers,
}
} I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe
} their monolayer cell culture and the calcium crystals
} produced by those cells. The cells produce extracellular
} calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
} The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work .
} This situation is unlike anything I have dealt with before,
} including all my years of working with marine invertebrates.
} I am speculating that cryo methods may be the only answer.
} As always thanks in advance for any help possible.
}
} Tom Bargar
} University of Nebraska Medical Center
} Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
} 986395 Nebraska Medical Center
} Omaha, NE 68198-6395
} 402-559-7347
} tbargar-at-unmc.edu
}
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
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From: gnadamson-at-ucdavis.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 15:26:04 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Nanoplast resin

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

My ancient files have yielded a manufacturer for NANOPLAST FB 101. Google Rolf Bachhuber and a 2002 paper comes up with manufacturer in Germany. I'd type it out but my typing isn't to be trusted.

A publication from 'Agar Scientific' in May 1990 has references about melamine resins. That company was in the U.K. at the time.

I have an old Nanoplast kit from Polyscience in the U.S. I know they don't do any manufacturing and I have no idea if they still carry it.

Good luck,

Grete Adamson
EM Med Path
U.C. Davis

-----Original Message-----
X-from: k.sader-at-leeds.ac.uk [mailto:k.sader-at-leeds.ac.uk]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:05 AM
To: Adamson, Grete

Hi,

I have been searching around for some time and I have not been able to find
a supplier with any Nanoplast (melamine) resin. Does anyone know what
company actually produced Nanoplast, if they are still operating, or if
there is a supplier who still has some?

Thanks,

Kasim Sader



----------------------
Dr Kasim Sader
SuperSTEM
Daresbury Laboratory
Warrington
WA4 4AD




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23, 25 -- From gnadamson-at-ucdavis.edu Mon Jan 12 15:26:03 2009
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From: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 15:59:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Old film etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings

This is a message I never thought I would be sending.

We are getting out of the film and paper photo business, and have a
lot of 'stuff' to give away or send to the landfill. Anyone with
questions about whether digital imaging for EM is for real, let this
be your wake-up call.

Most of what we have is old, probably not worth the cost to ship,
unless you are desperate, or curious.

We have a bunch of old Polaroid stuff - 52, 53, 55, 331, 72, 554, 572.
I don't even know what some of this was used for, if it rings your
bell, let me know and I can tell you more.

We have lots of old photo paper. Polycontrast, Velox, etc. 8 x10 and 4
x5 sizes.

A little 4463 and a ton of SO-163. The SO-163 is old.

Bunch of misc. 35 mm rolls, B&W and color. Some 120 Tech Pan.

Most of this junk has been in a freezer. Some is pretty old and past
its expiration date, but if you are interested, let me know and we can
try to work something out. If I don't hear anything in the next week
or so, its outa here.

Jon

Jonathan Krupp
Delta College
5151Pacific Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu




==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: celikaktas-at-gmail.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 01:21:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Updating Label?... viaWWW: uranyl compounds are

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello,

It turned out that we have a material which emits alpha, beta and
gamma rays. I think the original labeling for uranyl compounds which
said "alpha emitter" should be changed. Especially, for the reason
that there might be microscopists who are using uranyl compounds in
their labs but, do not follow the Microscopy List.

Is there anybody in this group who is in a position and willing to
contact Nuclear Regulatory Commission on this subject?

Regards,
Ayten.


--
===========================
Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
Ankara University
Electron Microscopy Laboratory
Ankara, Turkey
===========================


On Mon, Jan 12, 2009 at 8:26 PM, {tivol-at-caltech.edu} wrote:
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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}
} On Jan 9, 2009, at 4:07 PM, beaurega-at-westol.com wrote:
}
} } Someone strongly pointed out that U is an alpha emitter, not a gamma
} } emitter, and I was not reading gamma radiation (but I was). You
} } pointed
} } out that it was the decay impurities that were the gamma emitters
} } and that
} } was what I was reading on my counter. I agree that U-238 and DU are
} } still
} } radioactive.
}
} } Here's my favorite. "depleted uranium is 40% less radioactive than
} } natural
} } uranium." That means 60% of the radioactivity is still there. I am
} } not
} } sure that includes gamma but probably.
}
}
} Dear Paul,
} Since the activities of the U isotopes are inversely proportional to
} their half-lives, and since the half lives of U235 and U234 are about
} 7 and 20,000 times shorter respectively than U238's, the amount of
} radiation from U234 is about equal to that from U238, and that from
} U235 is about 5% of that from the others, so your quote that DU has
} only 60% the activity of natural U checks out. I pointed out that
} ~1/4 of the U238 decays are to an excited state of Th234, which is ~50
} keV above the ground state, so pure U238 will produce some low-energy
} gammas, as will many of the daughters. The bottom line is that direct
} measurements performed correctly don't lie, so they are the best way
} to settle this issue once and for all.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol, PhD
} EM Scientist
} Ultrafast EM Facility
} Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
} California Institute of Technology
} Pasadena CA 91125
} (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}

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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 03:38:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi!

How did you then dry your grids without leaving crystals?

Stéphane



----- Original Message ----
X-from: "DusevichV-at-umkc.edu" {DusevichV-at-umkc.edu}
To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 9:19:38 PM

There was an old paper about anhydrous specimen preparation for TEM:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/66323

Method used ethylene glycol, cellosolve and propylene oxide. Embedded in
Epon specimens were cut with knife filled with ethylene glycol. A while
ago I used this method and got some results.

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax:  (816) 235-5524
Web:    http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium
}
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} Listers,
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} I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe
} their monolayer cell culture and the calcium crystals
} produced by those cells. The cells produce extracellular
} calcium crystals which dissolve readily in water.
} The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work .
} This situation is unlike anything I have dealt with before,
} including all my years of working with marine invertebrates.
} I am speculating that cryo methods may be the only answer. 
} As always thanks in advance for any help possible.
}
} Tom Bargar
} University of Nebraska Medical Center
} Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
} 986395 Nebraska Medical Center
} Omaha, NE 68198-6395
} 402-559-7347
} tbargar-at-unmc.edu
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From: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 04:05:07 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

Uranium isotopes emit both alpha particles, beta-rays and gamma-rays, the
former being the most significant in terms of biological hazard [assuming
it's internalised]. However even natural uranium is weakly radioactive:
fissile Uranium-235 has a half life of 704 million years, U-238 4.5 billion
years, and 'nasty' U-234 has a modest one of 240,000 years. When uranium is
enriched for bomb production or for use as reactor fuel, it's the fissile
U-235* that’s wanted. However during enrichment U-234, being somewhat
similar in atomic mass, gets in with the U-235 fraction, so the left over
depleted uranium [DU, used in munitions casing and EM stains] is less
radioactive than even natural uranium. Uranyl salts used for EM staining are
now made from depleted uranium [which offers the lowest radioactivity], but
compared to enriched uranium both are relatively low in radioactivity in any
case, as natural uranium is 99.3% U-238 and only 0.0055% U-234.

Depleted Uranium is about 0.6 to 0.7 times as radioactive as natural uranium
as it has even more U-238 and even less of the more radioactive isotopes
[i.e. the small U-234 fraction accounts for about half the radioactivity of
natural uranium]. U decay emits both alpha particles and beta+gamma rays.
The gamma dose will be quite small [depending on the mass of the uranyl
salts in your keep], but you should be able to detect it above background
with a crackle-crackle type Geiger counter. As gamma dose is a function of
mass & distance, keeping the small uranyl stock bottle well away from where
you sit will probably suffice [perhaps with a ubiquitous 'do not eat' label,
as internal exposure after ingestion/inhalation is it's main toxicological
hazard]. The critical mass of U-233/U-235 [before a runaway nuclear fission
reaction occurs and things get scary] is apparently around 15 to 52kg [10 to
17cm diameter volume] - never tried it personally, but that’s a lot of U and
not something a microscopist need be concerned with.

In comparison plutonium-239 has a half-life of 24,000 years [ten times
faster than U-234 and 187,500 faster than U238]. Thus 1g of Pu-239 is
187,500 more radioactive than 1g of U-238. There are long range gamma-rays
emitted from uranium as well as alpha-particles [the latter are only of
biological concern if the U is ingested]. Weapons grade enriched uranium has
an alpha-particle activity of 1.91 Bq ug-1 whereas natural uranium is 100
times lower at 0.02 Bq ug-1 [and depleted uranium will be below even this].
The gamma-ray activity will be about 40% of this [for enriched uranium]. Out
of interest, enriched uranium is around 93% U-235 and 0.8% U-234 [well it
was in the stuff I used], thus it is significantly more radioactive compared
to natural [and depleted] uranium.

However for all practical purposes the radiation effects of depleted [and
even natural] uranium can generally be ignored when compared to background
radiation. This is largely the case for uranium, as being a heavy metal
analogue of lead, it is very toxic to life simply as a chemical. Like lead,
mercury and arsenic, uranium serves 'no useful biological function' and all
life-time studies find that kidney damage from uranium ingestion probably
occurs long before any radiation mutagenic effects would be seen [you only
die once, and as the natural U body burden increases the heavy metal
toxicity is likely to get you first].

It is generally considered that lead is far more chemically cyto-toxic than
uranium [largely due to U's far lower solubility and it's quick excretion
rate - although this leads to deposition in the kidney tubules that can
cause kidney damage]. Like lead, it is also excreted via the hair. Lead can
severely affect the nervous system and other biological pathways, but this
isn't seen with uranium [it's damage to kidneys being it's main toxic
effect, although authors of recent DU studies have suggested links to birth
defects and there's the long running controversy over gulf war syndrome]. It
seems that humans have to ingest 10s of grams of natural uranium before
adverse effects are seen in the short term. Animal studies suggest far lower
limits are a wise precaution though with this toxic heavy metal, as damage
has been seen in other organs [e.g. in the lung after inhalation of
'insoluble' enriched UO2 particles]. Natural uranium can deposit on the
bone, but the weak alpha-radiation dose is far too low to induce things like
leukaemia [in all probability]. So it is probably safer to be shot with a
depleted uranium bullet than a lead bullet [but both are best avoided].
Likewise lead shielding is probably potentially more toxic than the uranyl
salts it would be shielding. That's not to say uranium isn't very toxic,
just that soluble lead is even more toxic [hence it's ability to destroy the
Roman Empire from within].

Pelco [who supply the uranyl EM stain] state in there safety sheet that a
material must have a specific activity greater than 74 Becquerel per gram
(Bq/g) in order to be regarded as a radioactive material. One bequeral is
one disintegration per gram [a very low rate]. Uranyl Acetate sold by Ted
Pella, Inc. has an activity of 10,400 disintegrations sec-1 g. Thus uranyl
acetate stain it is clearly also radioactive [at 0.20 - 0.51 µCi/g],
although the biological hazard from far lower gamma/beta emission rate can
often be considered negligible compared to background or the alpha particle
emission should it become internalised in someone.

So I'd treat uranium with caution as a toxic heavy metal chemical rather
than a radioactive one [as that’s probably its greatest hazard]. Either way
it's hazard is by ingestion or inhalation, so handle with care as outlined
on the supplied safety sheet. External irradiation by the gamma & beta rays
if fairly insignificant from depleted uranium EM stains, and generally most
recommend simply storing in a metal can. It's daughter decay product: Radon
gas, can cause problems in enclosed areas where uranium is abundant in the
soil though.

Regards

Keith J Morris

*U-235 is an interesting isotope and as well as being fissile it can be
measured in extremely minute [trace] quantities using a technique known as
delayed neutron analysis.

http://www.cstl.nist.gov/projects/fy06/fhls0683903.pdf


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr Keith J. Morris,
Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy Core,
Laboratory 00/069 and 00/070,
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics,
Roosevelt Drive,
Oxford OX3 7BN,
United Kingdom.

Telephone: +44 (0)1865 287568
Email: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Web-pages: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cytogenetics/

-----Original Message-----
X-from: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com [mailto:abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com]
Sent: 09 January 2009 00:27
To: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk

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Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Name: Alex Besenyo PhD

Organization: ibilabs

Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Question: Question:

Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!

Reply:

When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
here. We do not use natural uranium.

This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.

The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.

If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
is detected.

I hope this answers everybodies concerns.

Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
all of them have been instructed on this information.

I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
before it got out of control.

Sincerely
Alex Besenyo PhD


Login Host: 74.173.69.139
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39, 23 -- From kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk Tue Jan 13 04:05:07 2009
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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 07:11:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear all!

Really, I have the feeling that we are making an elephant out of a mouse.
How many times do you have to handle how much of depleted U?
2 times a year? 10 milligrams?
How do you weight your uranium salt? Do you pour all the content of the box on the bench, then take what you need? :-)
As someone said, I am more concerned about the chemical toxicity following ingestion (although even in this case it is probably fewer than few) than the radiations, except if you leave the box of U salt in one pocket of your blue jeans, which I wouldn't recommend (especially if you want children later).

Alternatively, I was infinitely more concerned about the election of Bush as a president than about the radiation of depleted U. Obviously I was right :-D
And there is no Bush-Hazard-Security-Agency, no rules to dispose of Bush in an environment-friendly way and no ALARE rules (as long as reasonably eligible).
Well it is never too late to start.
Oh, is it? :-D

Stéphane



----- Original Message ----
X-from: "kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk" {kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk}
To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 11:12:29 AM

Hi all,

Uranium isotopes emit both alpha particles, beta-rays and gamma-rays, the
former being the most significant in terms of biological hazard [assuming
it's internalised]. However even natural uranium is weakly radioactive:
fissile Uranium-235 has a half life of 704 million years, U-238 4.5 billion
years, and 'nasty' U-234 has a modest one of 240,000 years. When uranium is
enriched for bomb production or for use as reactor fuel, it's the fissile
U-235* that’s wanted. However during enrichment U-234, being somewhat
similar in atomic mass, gets in with the U-235 fraction, so the left over
depleted uranium [DU, used in munitions casing and EM stains] is less
radioactive than even natural uranium. Uranyl salts used for EM staining are
now made from depleted uranium [which offers the lowest radioactivity], but
compared to enriched uranium both are relatively low in radioactivity in any
case, as natural uranium is 99.3% U-238 and only 0.0055% U-234.

Depleted Uranium is about 0.6 to 0.7 times as radioactive as natural uranium
as it has even more U-238 and even less of the more radioactive isotopes
[i.e. the small U-234 fraction accounts for about half the radioactivity of
natural uranium]. U decay emits both alpha particles and beta+gamma rays.
The gamma dose will be quite small [depending on the mass of the uranyl
salts in your keep], but you should be able to detect it above background
with a crackle-crackle type Geiger counter. As gamma dose is a function of
mass & distance, keeping the small uranyl stock bottle well away from where
you sit will probably suffice [perhaps with a ubiquitous 'do not eat' label,
as internal exposure after ingestion/inhalation is it's main toxicological
hazard]. The critical mass of U-233/U-235 [before a runaway nuclear fission
reaction occurs and things get scary] is apparently around 15 to 52kg [10 to
17cm diameter volume] - never tried it personally, but that’s a lot of U and
not something a microscopist need be concerned with. 

In comparison plutonium-239 has a half-life of 24,000 years [ten times
faster than U-234 and 187,500 faster than U238]. Thus 1g of Pu-239 is
187,500 more radioactive than 1g of U-238. There are long range gamma-rays
emitted from uranium as well as alpha-particles [the latter are only of
biological concern if the U is ingested]. Weapons grade enriched uranium has
an alpha-particle activity of 1.91 Bq ug-1 whereas natural uranium is 100
times lower at 0.02 Bq ug-1 [and depleted uranium will be below even this].
The gamma-ray activity will be about 40% of this [for enriched uranium]. Out
of interest, enriched uranium is around 93% U-235 and 0.8% U-234 [well it
was in the stuff I used], thus it is significantly more radioactive compared
to natural [and depleted] uranium.

However for all practical purposes the radiation effects of depleted [and
even natural] uranium can generally be ignored when compared to background
radiation. This is largely the case for uranium, as being a heavy metal
analogue of lead, it is very toxic to life simply as a chemical. Like lead,
mercury and arsenic, uranium serves 'no useful biological function' and all
life-time studies find that kidney damage from uranium ingestion probably
occurs long before any radiation mutagenic effects would be seen [you only
die once, and as the natural U body burden increases the heavy metal
toxicity is likely to get you first].

It is generally considered that lead is far more chemically cyto-toxic than
uranium [largely due to U's far lower solubility and it's quick excretion
rate - although this leads to deposition in the kidney tubules that can
cause kidney damage]. Like lead, it is also excreted via the hair. Lead can
severely affect the nervous system and other biological pathways, but this
isn't seen with uranium [it's damage to kidneys being it's main toxic
effect, although authors of recent DU studies have suggested links to birth
defects and there's the long running controversy over gulf war syndrome]. It
seems that humans have to ingest 10s of grams of natural uranium before
adverse effects are seen in the short term. Animal studies suggest far lower
limits are a wise precaution though with this toxic heavy metal, as damage
has been seen in other organs [e.g. in the lung after inhalation of
'insoluble' enriched UO2 particles]. Natural uranium can deposit on the
bone, but the weak alpha-radiation dose is far too low to induce things like
leukaemia [in all probability]. So it is probably safer to be shot with a
depleted uranium bullet than a lead bullet [but both are best avoided].
Likewise lead shielding is probably potentially more toxic than the uranyl
salts it would be shielding. That's not to say uranium isn't very toxic,
just that soluble lead is even more toxic [hence it's ability to destroy the
Roman Empire from within].

Pelco [who supply the uranyl EM stain] state in there safety sheet that a
material must have a specific activity greater than 74 Becquerel per gram
(Bq/g) in order to be regarded as a radioactive material. One bequeral is
one disintegration per gram [a very low rate]. Uranyl Acetate sold by Ted
Pella, Inc. has an activity of 10,400 disintegrations sec-1 g. Thus uranyl
acetate stain it is clearly also radioactive [at 0.20 - 0.51 µCi/g],
although the biological hazard from far lower gamma/beta emission rate can
often be considered negligible compared to background or the alpha particle
emission should it become internalised in someone.

So I'd treat uranium with caution as a toxic heavy metal chemical rather
than a radioactive one [as that’s probably its greatest hazard]. Either way
it's hazard is by ingestion or inhalation, so handle with care as outlined
on the supplied safety sheet. External irradiation by the gamma & beta rays
if fairly insignificant from depleted uranium EM stains, and generally most
recommend simply storing in a metal can. It's daughter decay product: Radon
gas, can cause problems in enclosed areas where uranium is abundant in the
soil though.

Regards

Keith J Morris

*U-235 is an interesting isotope and as well as being fissile it can be
measured in extremely minute [trace] quantities using a technique known as
delayed neutron analysis.

http://www.cstl.nist.gov/projects/fy06/fhls0683903.pdf


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr Keith J. Morris,
Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy Core,
Laboratory 00/069 and 00/070,
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics,
Roosevelt Drive,
Oxford  OX3 7BN,
United Kingdom.

Telephone:  +44 (0)1865 287568
Email:  kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Web-pages: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cytogenetics/

-----Original Message-----
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To: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk

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Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Name: Alex Besenyo PhD

Organization: ibilabs

Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Question: Question:

Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!

Reply:

When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
here. We do not use natural uranium.

This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.

The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.

If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
is detected.

I hope this answers everybodies concerns.

Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
all of them have been instructed on this information.

I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
before it got out of control.

Sincerely
Alex Besenyo PhD


  Login Host: 74.173.69.139
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From: WAHeeschen-at-dow.com
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 08:36:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Old film etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Folks:
Old photo/darkroom supplies, etc., may find a happy home in art schools.
I have a young artist friend who is taking a photography class and the
instructor is insisting that she start with film in order to understand
the fundamentals of photography - particularly for B/W. Without getting
into arguments about log/linear behavior, benefits of one over the
other, etc., the point is that these folks may be able to utilize film
supplies and are likely to be very appreciative of a cheap/free source.
They may not have much use for the Type xxx film, but some of the other
supplies could be valuable.
Best Regards,
Bill
William A. Heeschen
Microscopy, Digital Imaging
1897 Bldg, E-84
Dow Chemical
Midland, MI 48667
mailto:waheeschen-at-dow.com

-----Original Message-----
X-from: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu [mailto:jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 5:04 PM
To: Heeschen, Bill (WA)

Greetings

This is a message I never thought I would be sending.

We are getting out of the film and paper photo business, and have a
lot of 'stuff' to give away or send to the landfill. Anyone with
questions about whether digital imaging for EM is for real, let this
be your wake-up call.

Most of what we have is old, probably not worth the cost to ship,
unless you are desperate, or curious.

We have a bunch of old Polaroid stuff - 52, 53, 55, 331, 72, 554, 572.
I don't even know what some of this was used for, if it rings your
bell, let me know and I can tell you more.

We have lots of old photo paper. Polycontrast, Velox, etc. 8 x10 and 4
x5 sizes.

A little 4463 and a ton of SO-163. The SO-163 is old.

Bunch of misc. 35 mm rolls, B&W and color. Some 120 Tech Pan.

Most of this junk has been in a freezer. Some is pretty old and past
its expiration date, but if you are interested, let me know and we can
try to work something out. If I don't hear anything in the next week
or so, its outa here.

Jon

Jonathan Krupp
Delta College
5151Pacific Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu




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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 08:54:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ethylene glycol evaporates without leaving crystals. Just like water, but slower.

Vladimir


} Hi!
}
} How did you then dry your grids without leaving crystals?
}
} Stéphane
}
}
}
} ----- Original Message ----
} From: "DusevichV-at-umkc.edu" {DusevichV-at-umkc.edu}
} To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 9:19:38 PM
} Subject: [Microscopy] RE: TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium
}
}
}
}
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor:  The Microscopy
} Society of America To  Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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}
} There was an old paper about anhydrous specimen preparation for TEM:
} http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/66323
}
} Method used ethylene glycol, cellosolve and propylene oxide.
} Embedded in Epon specimens were cut with knife filled with
} ethylene glycol. A while ago I used this method and got some results.
}
} Vladimir
}
} Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
} Electron Microscope Lab Manager
} 371 School of Dentistry
} 650 E. 25th Street
} Kansas City, MO 64108-2784
}
} Phone: (816) 235-2072
} Fax:  (816) 235-5524
} Web:    http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy
}
}
}
} } -----Original Message-----
} } From: tbargar-at-unmc.edu [mailto:tbargar-at-unmc.edu]
} } Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 10:59 AM
} } To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} } Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:cell culture with extracellular calcium
} }
} }
} }
} }
} } --------------------------------------------------------------
} } --------------
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} }
} }
} } Listers,
} }
} } I have a TEM project, where the researcher wants to observe their
} } monolayer cell culture and the calcium crystals produced by those
} } cells. The cells produce extracellular calcium crystals
} which dissolve
} } readily in water.
} } The usual fixation, post-fix, dehydration steps won't work .
} } This situation is unlike anything I have dealt with before,
} including
} } all my years of working with marine invertebrates.
} } I am speculating that cryo methods may be the only answer.
} As always
} } thanks in advance for any help possible.
} }
} } Tom Bargar
} } University of Nebraska Medical Center
} } Core Electron Microscopy Research Facility
} } 986395 Nebraska Medical Center
} } Omaha, NE 68198-6395
} } 402-559-7347
} } tbargar-at-unmc.edu
} }
} }  
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} calcium 5, 20 --
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} } Lotus Notes Release 7.0.1 January 17, 2006 5, 20 --
} } Message-ID:
} } {OF54FCB24C.7A37982B-ON8625753C.005CDA02-8625753C.005D334C-at-unmc.edu}
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From: oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 08:59:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Old film etc

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Good point, although not necessarily the case. The Art and journalism
deparments here have gone completely digital. Even strictly art
photography, the kind that uses high silver content paper and so
forth. They didn't even want a Durst enlarger.
Anybody on the list looking for a Durst Laborator enlarger in
excellent condition? With printing easel, extra lenses, etc.?

Phil

}
} Folks:
} Old photo/darkroom supplies, etc., may find a happy home in art schools.
} I have a young artist friend who is taking a photography class and the
} instructor is insisting that she start with film in order to understand
} the fundamentals of photography - particularly for B/W. Without getting
} into arguments about log/linear behavior, benefits of one over the
} other, etc., the point is that these folks may be able to utilize film
} supplies and are likely to be very appreciative of a cheap/free source.
} They may not have much use for the Type xxx film, but some of the other
} supplies could be valuable.
} Best Regards,
} Bill
} William A. Heeschen
} Microscopy, Digital Imaging
} 1897 Bldg, E-84
} Dow Chemical
} Midland, MI 48667
} mailto:waheeschen-at-dow.com
}
} -----Original Message-----
} X-from: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu [mailto:jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu]
} Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 5:04 PM
} To: Heeschen, Bill (WA)
} Subject: [Microscopy] Old film etc
}
---
}
} Greetings
}
} This is a message I never thought I would be sending.
}
} We are getting out of the film and paper photo business, and have a
} lot of 'stuff' to give away or send to the landfill. Anyone with
} questions about whether digital imaging for EM is for real, let this
} be your wake-up call.
}
} Most of what we have is old, probably not worth the cost to ship,
} unless you are desperate, or curious.
}
} We have a bunch of old Polaroid stuff - 52, 53, 55, 331, 72, 554, 572.
} I don't even know what some of this was used for, if it rings your
} bell, let me know and I can tell you more.
}
} We have lots of old photo paper. Polycontrast, Velox, etc. 8 x10 and 4
} x5 sizes.
}
} A little 4463 and a ton of SO-163. The SO-163 is old.
}
} Bunch of misc. 35 mm rolls, B&W and color. Some 120 Tech Pan.
}
} Most of this junk has been in a freezer. Some is pretty old and past
} its expiration date, but if you are interested, let me know and we can
} try to work something out. If I don't hear anything in the next week
} or so, its outa here.
}
} Jon
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Delta College
} 5151Pacific Ave.
} Stockton, CA 95207
} 209-954-5284
} jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu

--
Philip Oshel
Microscopy Facility Supervisor
Biology Department
024C Brooks Hall
Central Michigan University
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859
(989) 774-3576

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 11:40:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Hello,
}
} It turned out

No, it does not. Can you read other, more meaningful postings?

Vladimir


that we have a material which emits alpha, beta
} and gamma rays. I think the original labeling for uranyl
} compounds which said "alpha emitter" should be changed.
} Especially, for the reason that there might be microscopists
} who are using uranyl compounds in their labs but, do not
} follow the Microscopy List.
}
} Is there anybody in this group who is in a position and
} willing to contact Nuclear Regulatory Commission on this subject?
}
} Regards,
} Ayten.
}
}
} --
} ===========================
} Ayten Celik-Aktas, PhD
} Ankara University
} Electron Microscopy Laboratory
} Ankara, Turkey
} ===========================
}
}
} On Mon, Jan 12, 2009 at 8:26 PM, {tivol-at-caltech.edu} wrote:
} }
} }
} }
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy
} Society of America
} } To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} } On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} --------------
} }
} }
} } On Jan 9, 2009, at 4:07 PM, beaurega-at-westol.com wrote:
} }
} } } Someone strongly pointed out that U is an alpha emitter,
} not a gamma
} } } emitter, and I was not reading gamma radiation (but I was). You
} } } pointed
} } } out that it was the decay impurities that were the gamma emitters
} } } and that
} } } was what I was reading on my counter. I agree that U-238
} and DU are
} } } still
} } } radioactive.
} }
} } } Here's my favorite. "depleted uranium is 40% less radioactive than
} } } natural
} } } uranium." That means 60% of the radioactivity is still
} there. I am
} } } not
} } } sure that includes gamma but probably.
} }
} }
} } Dear Paul,
} } Since the activities of the U isotopes are inversely
} proportional to
} } their half-lives, and since the half lives of U235 and U234
} are about
} } 7 and 20,000 times shorter respectively than U238's, the amount of
} } radiation from U234 is about equal to that from U238, and that from
} } U235 is about 5% of that from the others, so your quote that DU has
} } only 60% the activity of natural U checks out. I pointed out that
} } ~1/4 of the U238 decays are to an excited state of Th234,
} which is ~50
} } keV above the ground state, so pure U238 will produce some
} low-energy
} } gammas, as will many of the daughters. The bottom line is
} that direct
} } measurements performed correctly don't lie, so they are the best way
} } to settle this issue once and for all.
} } Yours,
} } Bill Tivol, PhD
} } EM Scientist
} } Ultrafast EM Facility
} } Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
} } California Institute of Technology
} } Pasadena CA 91125
} } (626) 395-8833
} } tivol-at-caltech.edu
} }
} }
}
} ==============================Original
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} 8, 32 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Updating Label?... viaWWW:
} uranyl compounds are
} 8, 32 -- alpha emitters
} 8, 32 -- From: Ayten Celik-Aktas {celikaktas-at-gmail.com}
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7, 25 -- From DusevichV-at-umkc.edu Tue Jan 13 09:12:59 2009
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From mathewokon-at-sify.com Tue Jan 13 10:44:28 2009
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Reply-To: {mathew_okon1-at-yahoo.es}

Indeed, from Pelco's measurements of their solution I estimate that if you held a 25g bottle of their uranyl acetate against your skin for an entire year you would receive about 3.5 times the annual dose* you would get from background radiation sources [over the same year] - about 1,300 mRem. This would largely be from the gamma radiation [as you can assume the beta-rays and alpha particles are blocked by the glass jar, i.e. you kept the lid on, and your skin surface].

Keith

*Annual dose assumed to be 360 mRem [18% man made + 82% natural]. A radiation worker is allowed 5,000 mRem maximum occupational exposure.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr Keith J. Morris,
Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy Core,
Laboratory 00/069 and 00/070,
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics,
Roosevelt Drive,
Oxford OX3 7BN,
United Kingdom.

Telephone: +44 (0)1865 287568
Email: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Web-pages: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cytogenetics/


-----Original Message-----
X-from: nizets2-at-yahoo.com [mailto:nizets2-at-yahoo.com]
Sent: 13 January 2009 13:19
To: kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk

Dear all!

Really, I have the feeling that we are making an elephant out of a mouse.
How many times do you have to handle how much of depleted U?
2 times a year? 10 milligrams?
How do you weight your uranium salt? Do you pour all the content of the box on the bench, then take what you need? :-)
As someone said, I am more concerned about the chemical toxicity following ingestion (although even in this case it is probably fewer than few) than the radiations, except if you leave the box of U salt in one pocket of your blue jeans, which I wouldn't recommend (especially if you want children later).

Alternatively, I was infinitely more concerned about the election of Bush as a president than about the radiation of depleted U. Obviously I was right :-D
And there is no Bush-Hazard-Security-Agency, no rules to dispose of Bush in an environment-friendly way and no ALARE rules (as long as reasonably eligible).
Well it is never too late to start.
Oh, is it? :-D

Stéphane



----- Original Message ----
X-from: "kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk" {kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk}
To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 11:12:29 AM

Hi all,

Uranium isotopes emit both alpha particles, beta-rays and gamma-rays, the
former being the most significant in terms of biological hazard [assuming
it's internalised]. However even natural uranium is weakly radioactive:
fissile Uranium-235 has a half life of 704 million years, U-238 4.5 billion
years, and 'nasty' U-234 has a modest one of 240,000 years. When uranium is
enriched for bomb production or for use as reactor fuel, it's the fissile
U-235* that’s wanted. However during enrichment U-234, being somewhat
similar in atomic mass, gets in with the U-235 fraction, so the left over
depleted uranium [DU, used in munitions casing and EM stains] is less
radioactive than even natural uranium. Uranyl salts used for EM staining are
now made from depleted uranium [which offers the lowest radioactivity], but
compared to enriched uranium both are relatively low in radioactivity in any
case, as natural uranium is 99.3% U-238 and only 0.0055% U-234.

Depleted Uranium is about 0.6 to 0.7 times as radioactive as natural uranium
as it has even more U-238 and even less of the more radioactive isotopes
[i.e. the small U-234 fraction accounts for about half the radioactivity of
natural uranium]. U decay emits both alpha particles and beta+gamma rays.
The gamma dose will be quite small [depending on the mass of the uranyl
salts in your keep], but you should be able to detect it above background
with a crackle-crackle type Geiger counter. As gamma dose is a function of
mass & distance, keeping the small uranyl stock bottle well away from where
you sit will probably suffice [perhaps with a ubiquitous 'do not eat' label,
as internal exposure after ingestion/inhalation is it's main toxicological
hazard]. The critical mass of U-233/U-235 [before a runaway nuclear fission
reaction occurs and things get scary] is apparently around 15 to 52kg [10 to
17cm diameter volume] - never tried it personally, but that’s a lot of U and
not something a microscopist need be concerned with.Â

In comparison plutonium-239 has a half-life of 24,000 years [ten times
faster than U-234 and 187,500 faster than U238]. Thus 1g of Pu-239 is
187,500 more radioactive than 1g of U-238. There are long range gamma-rays
emitted from uranium as well as alpha-particles [the latter are only of
biological concern if the U is ingested]. Weapons grade enriched uranium has
an alpha-particle activity of 1.91 Bq ug-1 whereas natural uranium is 100
times lower at 0.02 Bq ug-1 [and depleted uranium will be below even this].
The gamma-ray activity will be about 40% of this [for enriched uranium]. Out
of interest, enriched uranium is around 93% U-235 and 0.8% U-234 [well it
was in the stuff I used], thus it is significantly more radioactive compared
to natural [and depleted] uranium.

However for all practical purposes the radiation effects of depleted [and
even natural] uranium can generally be ignored when compared to background
radiation. This is largely the case for uranium, as being a heavy metal
analogue of lead, it is very toxic to life simply as a chemical. Like lead,
mercury and arsenic, uranium serves 'no useful biological function' and all
life-time studies find that kidney damage from uranium ingestion probably
occurs long before any radiation mutagenic effects would be seen [you only
die once, and as the natural U body burden increases the heavy metal
toxicity is likely to get you first].

It is generally considered that lead is far more chemically cyto-toxic than
uranium [largely due to U's far lower solubility and it's quick excretion
rate - although this leads to deposition in the kidney tubules that can
cause kidney damage]. Like lead, it is also excreted via the hair. Lead can
severely affect the nervous system and other biological pathways, but this
isn't seen with uranium [it's damage to kidneys being it's main toxic
effect, although authors of recent DU studies have suggested links to birth
defects and there's the long running controversy over gulf war syndrome]. It
seems that humans have to ingest 10s of grams of natural uranium before
adverse effects are seen in the short term. Animal studies suggest far lower
limits are a wise precaution though with this toxic heavy metal, as damage
has been seen in other organs [e.g. in the lung after inhalation of
'insoluble' enriched UO2 particles]. Natural uranium can deposit on the
bone, but the weak alpha-radiation dose is far too low to induce things like
leukaemia [in all probability]. So it is probably safer to be shot with a
depleted uranium bullet than a lead bullet [but both are best avoided].
Likewise lead shielding is probably potentially more toxic than the uranyl
salts it would be shielding. That's not to say uranium isn't very toxic,
just that soluble lead is even more toxic [hence it's ability to destroy the
Roman Empire from within].

Pelco [who supply the uranyl EM stain] state in there safety sheet that a
material must have a specific activity greater than 74 Becquerel per gram
(Bq/g) in order to be regarded as a radioactive material. One bequeral is
one disintegration per gram [a very low rate]. Uranyl Acetate sold by Ted
Pella, Inc. has an activity of 10,400 disintegrations sec-1 g. Thus uranyl
acetate stain it is clearly also radioactive [at 0.20 - 0.51 µCi/g],
although the biological hazard from far lower gamma/beta emission rate can
often be considered negligible compared to background or the alpha particle
emission should it become internalised in someone.

So I'd treat uranium with caution as a toxic heavy metal chemical rather
than a radioactive one [as that’s probably its greatest hazard]. Either way
it's hazard is by ingestion or inhalation, so handle with care as outlined
on the supplied safety sheet. External irradiation by the gamma & beta rays
if fairly insignificant from depleted uranium EM stains, and generally most
recommend simply storing in a metal can. It's daughter decay product: Radon
gas, can cause problems in enclosed areas where uranium is abundant in the
soil though.

Regards

Keith J Morris

*U-235 is an interesting isotope and as well as being fissile it can be
measured in extremely minute [trace] quantities using a technique known as
delayed neutron analysis.

http://www.cstl.nist.gov/projects/fy06/fhls0683903.pdf


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dr Keith J. Morris,
Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy Core,
Laboratory 00/069 and 00/070,
The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics,
Roosevelt Drive,
Oxford OX3 7BN,
United Kingdom.

Telephone:Â +44 (0)1865 287568
Email:Â kjmorris-at-well.ox.ac.uk
Web-pages: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cytogenetics/

-----Original Message-----
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Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
Name: Alex Besenyo PhD

Organization: ibilabs

Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Question: Question:

Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!

Reply:

When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
here. We do not use natural uranium.

This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.

The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.

If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
is detected.

I hope this answers everybodies concerns.

Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
all of them have been instructed on this information.

I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
before it got out of control.

Sincerely
Alex Besenyo PhD


 Login Host: 74.173.69.139
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From: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2009 13:11:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM: sectioning sand

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello Stephane,

They tried examination by SEM but needed better
resolution than we could achieve with our
conventional, older SEMs. I considered using HF
to digest the sand grain but they nixed the idea
since they wanted to show orientation of tubules
relative to the surface. Oh, well.

We did get sections using a diamond knife but the
nanotubes appeared to be round globes rather than
tubes. I'm uncertain if the embedding somehow
messed them up or, more probably, nanotubes had
not formed and we were looking at sphreoidal
materials instead.

John

} Hi John! Sorry for the very late reply but I was
} in well-earned holidays (and yes this year they
} were long). I often cut hard particles under 1
} µm in size with little problem to the knife. It
} is true though that the particles move in the
} resin, leaving holes. I suppose that from a
} given size the damage to the knife becomes a
} real problem. Your particles are probably much
} bigger, which may be a big deal to cut. Now my
} personal opinion: I wonder why TEM would be more
} appropriate than SEM to study the distribution
} of nanotubes at the surface of sand particles.
} And finally, my usual crazy idea: why not try to
} "digest" the sand, leaving only the nanotubes?
} You cannot analyse the interface between
} nanotubes and sand anymore, but if the nanotubes
} are dense enough their organization may be
} conserved. It is better than nothing! Let's
} suppose that the nanotubes are made of carbon,
} they are probably inert to any treatment.
} Following my fellow colleagues (chemists and
} geologists), digesting sand is not an easy task
} though. They suggest something like concentrated
} NaOH. Just my 2 cents, not a lot worth. Stéphane
} ----- Original Message ---- From:
} "bozzola-at-siu.edu" {bozzola-at-siu.edu} To:
} nizets2-at-yahoo.com Sent: Saturday, December 20,
} 2008 12:22:53 AM Subject: [Microscopy] TEM:
} sectioning sand
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} I've cut some hard specimens over the years but
} never sand. We have a researcher who wishes to
} look at a section of a sand grain to study the
} distribution of nanotubes on the surface. Any
} suggestions on sectioning a grain of sand?
} Here's what I am planning: embedding in hard
} Spurr resin old, 50 degree diamond knife 2
} mm/sec cutting speed Thanks, JB --
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director Integrated
} Microscopy & Graphics Expertise (IMAGE) Southern
} Illinois University 750 Communications Drive -
} MC 4402 Carbondale, IL 62901 Telephone:
} 618-453-3730
} +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
} ==============================Original
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--
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise (IMAGE)
Southern Illinois University
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Carbondale, IL 62901
Telephone: 618-453-3730

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2009 03:23:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Cac buffer and undergrads - chancy?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

As already said, we have the possibility to use different buffers, and it is a chance!
Because each one has its advantages and drawbacks and is more suited for one application or the other.
I think that for a class this fact is important to teach.
Cacodylate is dangerous and must be manipulated accordingly, but in the end it must be manipulated just like any other hazardous substance! There is no specific manipulation just for cacodylate alone!
In my opinion (just my opinion), cacodylate is mostly used because of inertia force ;-)
In some labs, there is not way, no argumentation which can change the opinion of the boss: he always used cacodylate and always will.
In my opinion (just my opinion), it would be good if we could forget about cacodylate as a "classical" buffer, especially for students. This way the next generation will be more prompt to use other buffers and perhaps keeps the cacodylate buffer just for special application, but not as part of a "classical" protocol.
In the end, teaching is less about perpetuating the same things forever than about learning the basics to allow improvements (I hope this sentence is grammatically correct).

Stéphane





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From: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2009 08:39:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Looking for SEM With Cryo-stage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have a user who needs to use an SEM with a cryo-stage. Should be a
short project needing say a single afternoon (freezing, prep,
imaging). Unfortunately we do not have a cryo-stage on our SEM's.

Does anyone have or know of one for use - hopefully within a day's
drive of Oxford Ohio (Think Cincinnati).

Thanks
Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
EXPO Editor, Microscopy and Microanalysis Supplement
Electron Microscopy Facility Director
364 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu


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From: larry.ackerman-at-ucsf.edu
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2009 16:58:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: RE: Old film etc

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Phil,
There are still some analog ancients in our world. I found buyers for a
Durst 1200 4 X 5 but not for a floor model !38. Post the equipment on
Craigslist or equivalent.
Larry

oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu wrote:
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} Good point, although not necessarily the case. The Art and journalism
} deparments here have gone completely digital. Even strictly art
} photography, the kind that uses high silver content paper and so
} forth. They didn't even want a Durst enlarger.
} Anybody on the list looking for a Durst Laborator enlarger in
} excellent condition? With printing easel, extra lenses, etc.?
}
} Phil
}
} } Folks:
} } Old photo/darkroom supplies, etc., may find a happy home in art schools.
} } I have a young artist friend who is taking a photography class and the
} } instructor is insisting that she start with film in order to understand
} } the fundamentals of photography - particularly for B/W. Without getting
} } into arguments about log/linear behavior, benefits of one over the
} } other, etc., the point is that these folks may be able to utilize film
} } supplies and are likely to be very appreciative of a cheap/free source.
} } They may not have much use for the Type xxx film, but some of the other
} } supplies could be valuable.
} } Best Regards,
} } Bill
} } William A. Heeschen
} } Microscopy, Digital Imaging
} } 1897 Bldg, E-84
} } Dow Chemical
} } Midland, MI 48667
} } mailto:waheeschen-at-dow.com
} }
} } -----Original Message-----
} } X-from: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu [mailto:jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu]
} } Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 5:04 PM
} } To: Heeschen, Bill (WA)
} } Subject: [Microscopy] Old film etc
} }
} ---
} } Greetings
} }
} } This is a message I never thought I would be sending.
} }
} } We are getting out of the film and paper photo business, and have a
} } lot of 'stuff' to give away or send to the landfill. Anyone with
} } questions about whether digital imaging for EM is for real, let this
} } be your wake-up call.
} }
} } Most of what we have is old, probably not worth the cost to ship,
} } unless you are desperate, or curious.
} }
} } We have a bunch of old Polaroid stuff - 52, 53, 55, 331, 72, 554, 572.
} } I don't even know what some of this was used for, if it rings your
} } bell, let me know and I can tell you more.
} }
} } We have lots of old photo paper. Polycontrast, Velox, etc. 8 x10 and 4
} } x5 sizes.
} }
} } A little 4463 and a ton of SO-163. The SO-163 is old.
} }
} } Bunch of misc. 35 mm rolls, B&W and color. Some 120 Tech Pan.
} }
} } Most of this junk has been in a freezer. Some is pretty old and past
} } its expiration date, but if you are interested, let me know and we can
} } try to work something out. If I don't hear anything in the next week
} } or so, its outa here.
} }
} } Jon
} }
} } Jonathan Krupp
} } Delta College
} } 5151Pacific Ave.
} } Stockton, CA 95207
} } 209-954-5284
} } jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu
}

--
Larry Ackerman, Specialist
UCSF, Dept. of Anatomy, Rm S1347
513 Parnassus Ave., Box 0452
San Francisco, CA 94143

larry.ackerman-at-ucsf.edu

415-476-4400


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From: sam.telford-at-tufts.edu
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2009 18:32:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: infinity dk series digital camera

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Email: sam.telford-at-tufts.edu
Name: sam telford

Organization: tufts university

Title-Subject: [Filtered] infinity dk series digital camera

Question:
Does anyone have any experience with the Infinity DK Series -- Meiji
makes this, I think -- digital setup (particularly the new 5.1 MP
camera) for capturing images from a compound scope? I am
particularly interested in reliability, ease of use, and quality of
images. Are there other setups I should think about for the same
price ($3400)? This would be used for publication quality
documentation of blood smears (X250-X1000) or of histopathology
material.

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From: radhika_aaryan-at-yahoo.co.in
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2009 18:33:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: regarding scanning electron microscopic imaging of

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Email: radhika_aaryan-at-yahoo.co.in
Name: radhika gupta

Organization: Vokkaligarh Sangha Dental College

Title-Subject: [Filtered] regarding scanning electron microscopic
imaging of extracted human teeth

Question: how do i differentiate between the cementum and dentine of
extracted human teeth in the micrographs obtained from scanning
electron microscope? is the cementodentinal structure clearly
demarcated? does cementum have any characteristic apperance when seen
under scanning electro microscope?

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From: idrucker-at-semitool.com
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2009 18:33:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: SE/Everhart-Thornley Detectors

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Email: idrucker-at-semitool.com
Name: Ian Drucker

Organization: Semitool Inc.

Title-Subject: [Filtered] SE/Everhart-Thornley Detectors

Question: We're currently using a CDEM detector on an FEI FIB820. We
use this detector for both our Ion and SEM images. It's one of the
older FEI systems and still uses Windows 3.1 with an outdated PC.

Does anyone know of a company that has a SE detector that would be
compatible with our system or possibly be a standalone detector that
would only need a support PC to run it?

Thanks




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From: pveril-at-med.uth.gr
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 08:06:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Looking for a used TEM or SEM

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Email: pveril-at-med.uth.gr
Name: Panagiotis Berillis

Organization: University of Thessaly, Greece

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for a used TEM or SEM

Question: Hi,my department is looking to buy a used but working SEM
or TEM. Please contact me for any information. Thank you.

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From: jsiegmund-at-7thwavelabs.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 08:50:21 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: infinity dk series digital camera

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi All,
We have mostly Spot cameras and Olympus cameras in our setups.
Our Pathologists really like the easy to use Spot cameras.
Very intuitive software and wonderful images.




-----Original Message-----
X-from: sam.telford-at-tufts.edu [mailto:sam.telford-at-tufts.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2009 6:50 PM
To: Joachim Siegmund

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Email: sam.telford-at-tufts.edu
Name: sam telford

Organization: tufts university

Title-Subject: [Filtered] infinity dk series digital camera

Question:
Does anyone have any experience with the Infinity DK Series -- Meiji
makes this, I think -- digital setup (particularly the new 5.1 MP
camera) for capturing images from a compound scope? I am
particularly interested in reliability, ease of use, and quality of
images. Are there other setups I should think about for the same
price ($3400)? This would be used for publication quality
documentation of blood smears (X250-X1000) or of histopathology
material.

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From: waldenzz-at-gmail.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 13:47:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Mount a dslr on BX51

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Email: waldenzz-at-gmail.com
Name: Jonathan Zhang

Organization: University of Washington

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Mount a dslr on BX51

Question:

We are users of an Olympus BX51 Microscope and trying to find a
simple solution to take microscopic pictures. Since the microscope
has a C mount, could we just mount a C-mount adapter and connect it
to a 35 mm SLR camera (like a Nikon D40)?

Thank you very much for your help,

Jonathan


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From: qxing-at-ameslab.gov
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 15:34:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: X-ray Back Laue collimation system

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Email: qxing-at-ameslab.gov
Name: Qingfeng Xing

Organization: Ames Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Filtered] X-ray Back Laue collimation system

Question: Dear colleagues:

Does anyone know the requirements for designing a collimation system
for higher accuracy in back Laue X-ray diffraction?

It seems that the geometry is simple. Are there any tricks?

Thank you
Qingfeng

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From: Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 16:48:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Camera and Software Suggestion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am looking for a suggestion for a video camera to attach to a C
mount on a disecting microscope, that can be used to make AVI or MPEG
movies. Also for some simple movie making software, along the lines of
iMovie but for a PC. The idea being to create Avi movies of lab
protocols
Thanks in advance
Lloyd Williams

Sent from my iPhone


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From: hanke-at-mee-inc.com
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2009 17:07:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: polishing stainless steel and silver metal surfaces

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Previous advice on this topic from Alan and Jeff was excellent. I have a
couple of other caveats that you may want to consider.

One other note is that grain size measurement for these materials in
most forms will be much easier with light microscopy than with SEM.
Subtle topography created by the etching is often difficult to image by
SEM, but readily observed by LM. You will probably not need
magnification greater than about 500X unless you have something like
very fine wire or thin sheet materials. We do grain size with SEM on
stainless steels with very fine grains, but sample preparation and
imaging are critical for accurate results.

Secondly, if the material is in a cold worked condition, it will be very
difficult to see the individual grains. If you are not familiar with the
techniques and structures, you could spend days working on cold-worked
stainless steel thinking that your technique was bad when the actual
microstructure just does not have distinctly delineated grains.
Likewise, some stainless steels have a martensitic structure that may
not exhibit distinct grain boundaries or the grain boundaries may be
difficult to recognize without experience.

Sorry to chime in late on this topic, but thought that this might be
helpful if you haven't got it all figured out already.

--
Larry D. Hanke, P.E.
Materials Evaluation and Engineering, Inc.
Practical Solutions Through Technology and Innovation
http://www.mee-inc.com (763) 449-8870

} Listers - I have samples to prepare for inspection by SEM, and the client
} wants to know about the grain size. We have never polished metals before.
} Is there anyone who can advise me what to do, or does this take a
} metallurgist? Carol Heckman, Bowling Green State University


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From: arnec-at-bio.umass.edu
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2009 14:42:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Methods to deglycosylate fixed tissue sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

For a really inexpensive approach, I used a Qsee digital surveillance
camera, model QSPSC, that I bought from Fry's electronics that cost about
$70. I took the lens off and it was a C-mount and hooked it up to the
microscope. I took the video out and put it into my video camera and
recorded the image. I then could make a DVD from it. I did this for
essentially the same reason that you are trying to do. The quality good
enough for showing people what you are trying to do under the microscope.
I've hooked this up to a DVD player and a monitor with surprising results.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
Technical Director
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

US Toll Free: 1-800-728-2233
Tel: (949) 492-2600
Fax: (949) 492-1499

www.southbaytech.com
walck-at-southbaytech.com

-----Original Message-----
X-from: Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU
[mailto:Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2009 2:52 PM
To: Walck-at-SouthBayTech.com

I am looking for a suggestion for a video camera to attach to a C mount on a
disecting microscope, that can be used to make AVI or MPEG movies. Also for
some simple movie making software, along the lines of iMovie but for a PC.
The idea being to create Avi movies of lab protocols Thanks in advance Lloyd
Williams

Sent from my iPhone


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Email: arnec-at-bio.umass.edu
Name: Arne

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Methods to deglycosylate fixed tissue sections

Question: I've been having trouble with an antibody directed against
an epitope with a putative gycosylation site. I'm wondering if
anybody can recommend a preferred method for deglycosylating
(N-linked) proteins in fixed tissue sections. I'm particularly
interested in enzymatic deglycosylation with PNGase F.

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From: Hobie-at-technicalsalessolutions.com
Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2009 20:23:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Boekel Digital Incubator ~ Free!

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Listers,

We still have a Boekel table top digital incubator that needs to find a
home. ~ It is a brand new unit in its original shipping box.

Please contact me for pictures and specs. It will only cost you the
shipping. If you want to make a donation for it to Valley Catholic HS EM
Lab that's ok too.

Thank you,

Hobie

Hobie Richards
Partner, and COO
Technical Sales Solutions, LLC
Portland, OR USA
www.TechnicalSalesSolutions.com
503 781 0428

Skype Hobie-TSS




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From: eschumacher-at-mccrone.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 10:24:36 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Short Course Announcement: SEM and TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings Fellow Microscopists,

The College of Microscopy, located in Westmont, IL, is offering the following electron microscopy short courses:

March 16 to 20, 2009 - Scanning Electron Microscopy

March 24 to 26, 2009 - Transmission Electron Microscopy

In addition to lectures, these courses emphasize hands-on training using state of the art equipment. For further details and registration information, please follow the link below.

www.collegeofmicroscopy.com

Regards,

Elaine

********************************************************************* 
Elaine F. Schumacher
Senior Research Scientist
McCrone Associates, Inc.
850 Pasquinelli Drive
Westmont, IL  60559-5539 USA
630-887-7100 (tel)
630-887-7417 (fax)
E-mail:      eschumacher-at-mccrone.com
Web Site:  www.mccrone.com




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From: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 13:42:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: Camera and Software Suggestion

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Lloyd:

Scott's camera suggestion may be a good one. But rather than the
runnin through another video camera, I would suggest one of the
simple USB video capture devices. I got a "fancy" Diamond
multimedia VC500 a couple of months ago to do similar (Already had
older c-mount video cameras), and it works great. "Fancy" means it
does both composite and s-video, NTSC, PAL, Etc. It cost $35 at
amazon.

Since your at CUNY you might just hit some of the camera stores in
The City and see what they may have in c-mount video camera's.





On 16 Jan 2009 at 22:19, walck-at-southbaytech.com wrote:

}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} For a really inexpensive approach, I used a Qsee digital surveillance
} camera, model QSPSC, that I bought from Fry's electronics that cost about
} $70. I took the lens off and it was a C-mount and hooked it up to the
} microscope. I took the video out and put it into my video camera and
} recorded the image. I then could make a DVD from it. I did this for
} essentially the same reason that you are trying to do. The quality good
} enough for showing people what you are trying to do under the microscope.
} I've hooked this up to a DVD player and a monitor with surprising results.
}
}
} -Scott
}
} Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
} Technical Director
} South Bay Technology, Inc.
} 1120 Via Callejon
} San Clemente, CA 92673
}
} US Toll Free: 1-800-728-2233
} Tel: (949) 492-2600
} Fax: (949) 492-1499
}
} www.southbaytech.com
} walck-at-southbaytech.com
}
} -----Original Message-----
} X-from: Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU
} [mailto:Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU]
} Sent: Friday, January 16, 2009 2:52 PM
} To: Walck-at-SouthBayTech.com
} Subject: [Microscopy] Camera and Software Suggestion
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I am looking for a suggestion for a video camera to attach to a C mount on a
} disecting microscope, that can be used to make AVI or MPEG movies. Also for
} some simple movie making software, along the lines of iMovie but for a PC.
} The idea being to create Avi movies of lab protocols Thanks in advance Lloyd
} Williams
}
} Sent from my iPhone
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Director
364 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


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From: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 18:13:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Calling all former Delta College students

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Greetings to all:

I am a new instructor at Delta College in Stockton, California.

I would like to make contact with anyone reading the list who has some
affiliation with Delta.

If you attended Delta in the past, graduated or not, or know someone
who did, could you send me some contact info. I want to make a list of
folks who have left here and are now in the work force. Lots of the
current students are curious about your experience, the kinds of jobs
available, even specifics like hours and pay.

Even if you're not a Delta type, any info about realistic expectations
for our students thinking about jobs, their plans and their future
would be great. What are the skills and qualities that we need to
instill in our students?

As I collect info, I'll put it together in a simple directory for us
to share.

Thanks

Jon


Jonathan Krupp
Delta College
5151Pacific Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu




==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: kamlennon-at-yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2009 13:35:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Good fix for bacteria/microorganisms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Listers,

I'm searching for a good chemical fixation protocol for bacteria/microorganisms for an EM class that I'm developing for undergrads. Since the class hasn't been taught at my university for several years (8), it seems that most/all of the microscopy journals have been dropped from the libary. So, if you would share your protocol, I would be ever-grateful.

Many thanks,
Kristen

Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.

Lecturer, Department of Biology

202 Compton Science Center

Frostburg State University

101 Braddock Road

Frostburg, MD 21532

301-687-4697

k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu





==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: connellyps-at-nhlbi.nih.gov
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2009 14:03:55 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Good fix for bacteria/microorganisms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kristen,

Will your bacteria be negatively stained or will they be fixed inside cells,
like macrophages?

Pat

Patricia Stranen Connelly
Research Assistant
NHLBI Electron Microscopy Core
National Institutes of Health
14 Service Road West
Bldg. 14E ­ Rm. 111B MSC 5570
Bethesda, MD 20892-5570
Phone 301-496-3491
connellyps-at-mail.nih.gov
======
} From: {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com}
} Reply-To: {kamlennon-at-yahoo.com}
} Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2009 13:55:56 -0600
} To: {connellyps-at-nhlbi.nih.gov}
} Subject: [Microscopy] Good fix for bacteria/microorganisms?
}
} Hi Listers,
}
} I'm searching for a good chemical fixation protocol for
} bacteria/microorganisms for an EM class that I'm developing for undergrads.
} Since the class hasn't been taught at my university for several years (8), it
} seems that most/all of the microscopy journals have been dropped from the
} libary. So, if you would share your protocol, I would be ever-grateful.
}
} Many thanks,
} Kristen
}
} Kristen A. Lennon, Ph.D.
} Lecturer, Department of Biology
} 202 Compton Science Center
} Frostburg State University
} 101 Braddock Road
} Frostburg, MD 21532
}
} 301-687-4697
}
} k.lennon-at-frostburg.edu



==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2009 07:03:14 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Labeling Bacteria for SEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear listers,
I am asking the following on behalf of a colleague:
He wants to label bacteria in order to better see them in microscopy (both fluorescence and SEM). Apparently the morphology is not sufficient to clearly identify them.
In fluorescence, labeling with DAPI worked really well, although the fluorescence bleaches pretty fast.
 
For SEM I thought about staining them with either Osmium, lead or uranyle, which are easy to find in a EM lab. This way there is a good chance to recognize them immediately based on the BSE contrast. If needed an EDX analysis would clear all doubts.
Of course there is a risk that the labeling modifies the interaction with the substrate/material (I thought about labeling them before the binding, otherwise the support may be stained too).
Labeling with antibodies is not an option because it would require to order the antibodies just for this purpose

May I ask your opinion on the question?
Best regards,
Stephane





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From: oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2009 07:36:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Good fix for bacteria/microorganisms?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Kristen,

We use Bacillus subtilus or E. coli in our classes, and fix with
standard Karnovsky's in pH 7.2 buffer, 5 min. steps in EtOH, 30%, 50,
70, 80, 90, 95, 3x100 then CPD or embed. No Prop Ox.
(Or air dry or HMDS for SEM).
Note, for negative stains, we don't fix, except for what fixing the
stain itself does. If you're not planning on doing negative stain in
the class, I would suggest you add that. It's important for clinical
work, and is a good way to get students started on the TEM.
Bozzola and Dysktra both have good negative stain sections, and
Maunsbach & Aufzelius has good comparisons for most TEM methods. If
you don't have that last book, you want it.

Phil

} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2009 09:16:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Labeling Bacteria for SEM

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Stéphane (without an ie)

Actually, your question is potentially loaded. What does the colleague
mean by identify microorganisms by microscopy, using fluorescence and
SEM. Simply visualizing by SEM is not a problem. Standard procedures
should work. Striking micrographs of different m.o.s have been published
over the years. I’m not sure what has been done with the projects of
mine over the years - the SEM was all previous to going back to school
and the EM unit was treated in a very cavalier fashion when it came to
recognition. However, at least one resulted in a scanning image of a
Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion body releasing and bursting being placed
on the cover of a book (Sexually transmitted diseases : methods and
protocols, Peeling, RW & Sparling, PF (eds.)). The key in all of this is
not visualizing the m.o., it is identifying it. How do you tell it is
what you see.

Specific antisera should work quite effectively for both
immunofluorescent microscopy, and immunogold labeling with both negative
stain TEM and for SEM. The keys are the quality of the antibody and
accessibility of the target epitope. The epitopes must be on the
external surface if you wish to label them for SEM or NS-TEM and they
will have the greatest chance of success with immunofluorescent
microscopy. I have never done this for SEM, but have for NS-TEM. It has
been over 20 years ago since I did this with N. gonorrhea for negative
stain processing, so I don’t have the notes handy, however, all I did
was give a light fixation (0.1% Glutaraldehyde in PBS), and then react
with gold labeled with an antibody to a major outer protein epitope
using standard protocols, with heavy blocking!!. My memory is that the
target was a porin structure. Also, this was before readily available
commercial gold tagged antibodies, and so I had to make the gold and
label it myself, so it was a very involved process from start to end. In
this case, labeling was not wildly successful, but there was sufficient
specific labeling to clearly identify the external location of the
epitope. At the same time, a monoclonal Ab to C. trachomatis failed
totally using the same protocol. It should be noted that the
investigator never accepted that just because the monoclonal antibody
worked in western blotting of transblotted gels did not mean it would
work in identify targets in a ‘natural’ situation. There was never a
straight answer on whether it worked in IF or EIA of whole m.o.s. The
key here is that you really must stress that success is dependent upon
the ability of the antibodies present to identify the target in its
native state. While that may appear to be a statement of the obvious, it
must be reiterated to all colleagues, collaborators, clients etc that
come in the door, and frequently to ourselves so that we don’t forget it.

Saponin permeablization has worked well for pre-embedding DAB immuno
electron microscopic visualization in my hands. The antibody was good,
and worked well in both IF and TEM. That allowed targeting epitopes of
m.o.s inside cells. At the same time, neither Triton X nor saponin
permeablization allowed immunogold labeling of nucleocapsid proteins of
Lassavirus. Because the antisera to the Z protein was oligopeptide
monospecific (to a 9aa oligopeptide), and I could never get antisera to
the whole protein from that group of collaborators, I do not know if the
failure was due to an ineffective permeablization protocol or
inappropriate antibody. I won’t re-state the obvious from above.

Immunofluorescence is not really the same as pre-embedding immunogold
TEM, even though they may seem to be identical, and my immuno DAB
protocol for labeling was essentially the same as the IF protocol used
in that particular study. This is especially true if your colleague
wants to try targeting internal proteins by IF. It may be a bit more
difficult to access the epitopes. Penetrating the dense, hydrophobic
outer structures of mycobacteria, or of mycoplasm would be a challenge.
Having said that, I have used standard TEM preparative procedures to fix
and embed both for sectioning, and have done immunogold labelling for
internal proteins successfully with other m.o.s (although we did not
realize the protein was internal when they collaborator gave me the
material, and it took a little work to define what was happening when we
saw the results. They were crystal clear once it was established that
the epitope was on the internal face of the membrane.) Because many
others have also had good success with both pre and post embedding
immunogold labeling of m.o.s for internal epitopes, I would suggest that
standard IF fixation and labeling would work. Again, to restate the
obvious, provided the antibodies will recognize the target.

I have to restate the obvious to many people who walk in the door
wanting to discuss either EM or gastroenteric virology. Sorry about
repeating it, but it seems to be an occupational hazard here.

I can dig through the archives and find protocols if you want. Most of
those in the lit should work, that’s where mine came from.

Paul

--
Paul R. Hazelton, PhD
Viral Gastroenteritis Study Group
University of Manitoba
Department of Medical Microbiology
511 Basic Medical Sciences Building
745 William Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3E 0J9
e-mail: paul_hazelton-at-umanitoba.ca
paulhazelton-at-mts.net
Phone: 204-789-3313 (w);
204-489-6924 (h)
Cell: 204-781-6982
Fax: 204-789-3926



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From: pavig-at-asu.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2009 15:54:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Quantitating virus particles in cells following TEM

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Email: pavig-at-asu.edu
Name: Pavithra Venkatagopalan

Organization: Arizona State University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Quantitating virus particles in cells following TEM

Question: Hello,
I have to compare the number of intracellular virus particles in
infected cells using TEM. I would like to know if there is precedent
for such a calculation and if so, what is an unbiased method to
obtain this data.

Thanks

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From: hyi-at-emory.edu
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2009 23:30:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All:

We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there with exper=
ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
me. Thank you in advance.

Hong
Emory EM


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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 02:41:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Hong!

We have a histo knife, however we don't cut thicker than 500nm and not on a routine basis.
I have been said that like an ultraknife, its lifetime mainly depends on what you cut. Cut butter and it will survive you.
Cut nanoparticles and quantum dots and it will probably not survive your grant. Cutting soft tissue in resin does probably not significantly affect it.
Personally I couldn't imagine regularly semi-thin sectionning without histoknife, it is so comfortable. Maybe I am a luxus freak :-) 

Regards,
Stephane



----- Original Message ----
X-from: "hyi-at-emory.edu" {hyi-at-emory.edu}
To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 6:34:37 AM

Dear All:

    We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning.  Can someone out there with exper=
ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
ond knife to last?  I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
me.  Thank you in advance.

Hong
Emory EM


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From: lamiller-at-illinois.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 07:54:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I love our histo knife.

I use an old diamond knife to face the block, then switch out to the
histo knife. Sectioning is done at 0.33 µm.

Life span varies with usage, type of sample ( ie bone or cell culture
phosphate crystals, etc are harder on the knife)

I once had a histo knife that I had cut about , say 500-600 blocks /
year, and I cut big blocks often, it lasted for 7 years!

However , get glass, silicone, bone etc, and you could ruin a knife in
a day.

The time saved is really huge, the quality is very good, especially if
you have to section some to get to "just the right depth".


Well worth the money, and yes when I switched I did have a little bit
of prideful.... I can do glass well and it's an art... thing, that
goes to the wayside quick after the pleasure of working with a diamond
histo knife.

So save old knives, use them to rough cut the already trimmed block,
and you will get even longer life out of your knife.



Lou Ann


{ { { { { { { { {} } } } } } } } } } } } } }
Lou Ann Miller, Service Supervisor
Center for Microscopic Imaging
College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Illinois MC=002

Room 1204 VMBSBld
2001 S Lincoln Ave
Urbana, IL 61821

217-244-1567




On Jan 21, 2009, at 11:37 PM, hyi-at-emory.edu wrote:

}
}
} Dear All:
}
} We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo
} diamond knif=
} e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there
} with exper=
} ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a
} Histo diam=
} ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-
} thin sect=
} ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us
} some ti=
} me. Thank you in advance.
}
} Hong
} Emory EM
}


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From: allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 08:11:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

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Email: allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Name: Allan Mitchell

Organization: University of otago

Title-Subject: [Filtered] TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Question: Hi all

I have been working with a researcher here looking at some TiO2
Nanotubes in the TEM. The researcher wants to see if his nanotubes
are hollow or not. We are looking for a core of around 5 nm.

Being a biology lab we do not have any experience with such samples.
I have tried dusting the fragments (provided in powder form from
scrappings off a Ti plate) onto carbon/formvar grids and I have
tried drying them onto a grid from a suspension in ethanol. The
solvent method proved more successful at getting particles onto the
film than the dusting method however in both cases they tend to be
clumped.

The problem I have is the clumps must be heating up in the beam. I
as soon as I start to increase the magnification to explore the edges
the sample disappears and I am left with a hole in the film.

I am pushing a 100kV instrument so I suspect this may have something
to with it also.

A search of the literature indicates that a lot of people are
investigating TiO2 nanotubes in the TEM but nothing I have found so
far talks about how the nanotubes are got onto a grid in a usable
form to image. lots of info about making nanotubes.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

Regards

Allan


Allan Mitchell
Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology
School of Medical Sciences
P.O. Box 913
Dunedin
New Zealand

Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
Fax (03) 479 5086 or 479 7254

EM Centre: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/
Confocal Centre: http://occm.otago.ac.nz/
Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/

Login Host: 139.80.40.92
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From: beth-at-plantbio.uga.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 09:14:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Hong,
Don't contemplate - spend the money, get the knife - make yourself
happy. You will not regret it nor will you go back to using glass.
Consider it a necessary luxury item - you will feel so spoiled every
time you use it. Work productivity will increase tenfold. Everyone
here uses them for 1um thick sections (plant material).

It's the best investment you will make in 2009;-)
Beth


On Jan 22, 2009, at 12:30 AM, hyi-at-emory.edu wrote:

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} Dear All:
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} We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo
} diamond knif=
} e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there
} with exper=
} ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a
} Histo diam=
} ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-
} thin sect=
} ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us
} some ti=
} me. Thank you in advance.
}
} Hong
} Emory EM
}
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From: greggps-at-umich.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 12:28:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Hong,
I agree with Beth. Do yourself a favor, get the knife! It will save you alot
of time.
We use diamond knives for all of our thicks. The only time we have to make
glass knives is when we cut something that may have bone or hard material
and then we also use glass to cut thins. If you take care of the knife as
you probably do the ultra-knives, you will get alot of sections off of it.
Pat Kysar
University of California, Davis
Medical School, Pathology
EM Lab

----- Original Message -----
X-from: {beth-at-plantbio.uga.edu}
To: {pekysar-at-ucdavis.edu}
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 7:21 AM

We purchased two for serial sectioning of fish embryos at 2 microns and
are very pleased with them. For serial sections re-aligning for each
fresh glass knife is out
of the question. When one knife develops nicks (after many thousands of
sections) and is being resharpened we use the second knife.

Geoff

hyi-at-emory.edu wrote:
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} Dear All:
}
} We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
} e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there with exper=
} ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
} ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
} ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
} me. Thank you in advance.
}
} Hong
} Emory EM
}
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--
--
**********************************************
Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
Neuroscience and Cell Biology
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
voice: (732)-235-4583
mcauliff-at-umdnj.edu
**********************************************



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From stimulus-at-vodafone.net Thu Jan 22 11:41:54 2009
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I recommend the Histo diamond knife. At my previous job, we didn't have any complaints sectioning tissues and cell pellets at a half micron thick. By removing the chance of glass dust getting on the ultrathin diamond knife, I believe it lasted longer without nicks as well. When we used glass knives, we would face the block between glass and ultrathin diamind knife work (to remove any rare glass bits) using an old sapphire knife. I was glad to skip that step after switching to the diamond histo knife.

For one project, I sectioned a 4-5mm wide tissue section with the histo knife. I wouldn't have wanted to try that with glass!

~Gregg

Gregg Sobocinski
Imaging Specialist/Microscopist
University of Michigan, MCDB Dept.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA



-----Original Message-----
X-from: hyi-at-emory.edu [mailto:hyi-at-emory.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 12:38 AM
To: Sobocinski, Gregg

Dear All:

We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there with exper=
ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
me. Thank you in advance.

Hong
Emory EM


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: vapatpxs-at-yahoo.com
Date: Thursday, January 22, 2009, 6:36 PM
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I also recommend a histo diamond. I even used one to cut thin sections of intact squid tentacle tip which were several mm wide.

Does any one out there have any experience with the Pella histo diamond? I have a user who is interested in it because it comes in a 10mm edge. I've only used an 8mm Diatome.

Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

You can reply offline if you prefer.

Paula :-)

Paula Sicurello

VA Medical Center San Diego

Veterans Medical Research Foundation (VMRF)

Core Microscope Facility, room B141

3350 La Jolla Village Dr., MC151

San Diego, CA 92161

858-552-8585 x2397

--- On Thu, 1/22/09, greggps-at-umich.edu {greggps-at-umich.edu} wrote:
X-from: greggps-at-umich.edu {greggps-at-umich.edu}

I recommend the Histo diamond knife. At my previous job, we didn't have any
complaints sectioning tissues and cell pellets at a half micron thick. By
removing the chance of glass dust getting on the ultrathin diamond knife, I
believe it lasted longer without nicks as well. When we used glass knives, we
would face the block between glass and ultrathin diamind knife work (to remove
any rare glass bits) using an old sapphire knife. I was glad to skip that step
after switching to the diamond histo knife.

For one project, I sectioned a 4-5mm wide tissue section with the histo knife.
I wouldn't have wanted to try that with glass!

~Gregg

Gregg Sobocinski
Imaging Specialist/Microscopist
University of Michigan, MCDB Dept.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
USA



-----Original Message-----
X-from: hyi-at-emory.edu [mailto:hyi-at-emory.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 12:38 AM
To: Sobocinski, Gregg

Dear All:

We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning. Can someone out there with exper=
ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
ond knife to last? I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
me. Thank you in advance.

Hong
Emory EM


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: stefan.diller-at-t-online.de
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 13:26:00 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LaB6 problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,
since some weeks I am trying to bring a new Kimball LaB6 cathode type
423E90 up to performance.
I am using the cathode in a Philips 525 SEM.
My experience with the cathodes before had been that the heating current
had been with the old cathodes at 11 to 13 max. The new cathode needs to
have 14 to 16 max.
I am using the LaB6 wehnelt cap and set the height (with a 0.5mm wehnelt
aperture) at ca. 0,25mm down from the surface of the aperture disc.

Please have a look at the images:
www.elektronenmikroskopie.info/lab6

With heating current at position 11 I am still getting double contours
in the image (LaB6_3.jpg), which is getting better when I am using a
smaller spotsize (LaB6_2.jpg).
With heating current at position 14 I still have some "feeling" of
double contours in the image (see LaB6_4.jpg), which disapears at
smaller spotsize (LaB6_5.jpg).
Best image so far is LaB6_8.jpg at 10nm spotsize and heating current
position of 16 (which seems for me to be too far up the scale).

...I put the cathode in my EM420 TEM and looked at the cathode image (I
am not able to do this in the SEM...).
At high beam current and at heating current position ca. 12 (which is 2
steps more than on older cathodes) the flat tip of the cathode showed up
nicely, resembling a "cross" and comes to an even illumination at
position 14.

My question is:
Is anybody out there giving me some tips if heating values might be
correct? Is there a problem with the wehnelt distance?
I never experienced such a behavior before...
Is there a chance of cathode charging or an inappropriate value of the
wehnelt voltage? I changed wehnelt values, with no better imaging.

Best regards,
Stefan



--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stefan Diller - Scientific Photography
Arndtstrasse 22
D - 97072 Wuerzburg Germany
++49 - 931 - 7848700 Phone
++49 - 931 - 7848701 Fax
++49 - 175 - 717 70 51 Cell-Phone

Websites:
www.stefan-diller.com
www.elektronenmikroskopie.info
www.assisi.de
www.zwillingsprojekt.de
Anfahrt: http://mail.map24.com/stefan.diller
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

==============================Original Headers==============================
10, 20 -- From stefan.diller-at-t-online.de Thu Jan 22 13:26:00 2009
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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 13:54:13 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LaB6 problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


On Jan 22, 2009, at 11:26 AM, stefan.diller-at-t-online.de wrote:

} since some weeks I am trying to bring a new Kimball LaB6 cathode type
} 423E90 up to performance.
} I am using the cathode in a Philips 525 SEM.
} My experience with the cathodes before had been that the heating
} current
} had been with the old cathodes at 11 to 13 max. The new cathode
} needs to
} have 14 to 16 max.
} I am using the LaB6 wehnelt cap and set the height (with a 0.5mm
} wehnelt
} aperture) at ca. 0,25mm down from the surface of the aperture disc.
}
} Please have a look at the images:
} www.elektronenmikroskopie.info/lab6
}
} With heating current at position 11 I am still getting double contours
} in the image (LaB6_3.jpg), which is getting better when I am using a
} smaller spotsize (LaB6_2.jpg).
} With heating current at position 14 I still have some "feeling" of
} double contours in the image (see LaB6_4.jpg), which disapears at
} smaller spotsize (LaB6_5.jpg).
} Best image so far is LaB6_8.jpg at 10nm spotsize and heating current
} position of 16 (which seems for me to be too far up the scale).
}
} ...I put the cathode in my EM420 TEM and looked at the cathode image
} (I
} am not able to do this in the SEM...).
} At high beam current and at heating current position ca. 12 (which
} is 2
} steps more than on older cathodes) the flat tip of the cathode
} showed up
} nicely, resembling a "cross" and comes to an even illumination at
} position 14.
}
} My question is:
} Is anybody out there giving me some tips if heating values might be
} correct? Is there a problem with the wehnelt distance?
} I never experienced such a behavior before...
} Is there a chance of cathode charging or an inappropriate value of the
} wehnelt voltage? I changed wehnelt values, with no better imaging.


Dear Stefan,
If you are comparing the Kimball LaB6 to another brand, then it is
not too surprising that the heating currents are different. Kimball
mounts the LaB6 crystal in a cup, which is heated and transfers the
heat to the filament; whereas, some other brands allow the current to
go through the LaB6 directly. There may well be differences in heat
transfer that require a higher current for the Kimball. In any event,
it is best to operate with the filament saturated (assuming that you
are not interested in operating in tip mode, where only the flat of
the filament emits electrons). If the higher current required makes
the life of the tip too short, then you may want to use a different
brand of tip; however, our experience with Kimball LaB6 tips has been
quite good. Our experience may not be too good a guide, since we have
only TEMs, but I think the requirements for good performance are
pretty much the same--high brightness and good coherence.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 14:53:53 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Hong,
We have four large histoknives, usually one for trimming, two for everyday
use, and one in perfect shape for when one of the others has to go away for
resharpening. They are used to cut sections up to 2 microns thick, of quite
large blockfaces - up to 3 mm across. They get resharpened at least once a
year. Like Stephane, I'll never go back to routine glass knife use, the
diamond knives save so much time. We only go back to glass for training and
if the tissue might damage the diamond (chunks of rock in soil around roots,
for example...).

cheers,
Roseamry


On 22/01/09 7:47 PM, "nizets2-at-yahoo.com" {nizets2-at-yahoo.com} wrote:

}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
} On-Line Help http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Hi Hong!
}
} We have a histo knife, however we don't cut thicker than 500nm and not on a
} routine basis.
} I have been said that like an ultraknife, its lifetime mainly depends on what
} you cut. Cut butter and it will survive you.
} Cut nanoparticles and quantum dots and it will probably not survive your
} grant. Cutting soft tissue in resin does probably not significantly affect it.
} Personally I couldn't imagine regularly semi-thin sectionning without
} histoknife, it is so comfortable. Maybe I am a luxus freak :-) 
}
} Regards,
} Stephane
}
}
}
} ----- Original Message ----
} X-from: "hyi-at-emory.edu" {hyi-at-emory.edu}
} To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
} Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 6:34:37 AM
} Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} To  Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} Dear All:
}
}     We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond knif=
} e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning.  Can someone out there with exper=
} ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should expect a Histo diam=
} ond knife to last?  I have no problem producing high quality semi-thin sect=
} ions with glass knives, but am hoping a diamond knife would save us some ti=
} me.  Thank you in advance.
}
} Hong
} Emory EM
}
}
} This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
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8, 45 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Re: Histo diamond knife
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From: lemon-at-email.arizona.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 15:25:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Sapphire and Zirconia cover slips

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

Does anyone know where I can buy zirconia or sapphire (alumina) coverslips
(~0.15mm thick)? I have been unable to find a vendor for these items.

Thank you,

John Lemon
Graduate Student
The University of Arizona
Department of Chemistry


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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 17:00:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

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On Jan 22, 2009, at 6:11 AM, allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz wrote:

} I have been working with a researcher here looking at some TiO2
} Nanotubes in the TEM. The researcher wants to see if his nanotubes
} are hollow or not. We are looking for a core of around 5 nm.
}
} Being a biology lab we do not have any experience with such samples.
} I have tried dusting the fragments (provided in powder form from
} scrappings off a Ti plate) onto carbon/formvar grids and I have
} tried drying them onto a grid from a suspension in ethanol. The
} solvent method proved more successful at getting particles onto the
} film than the dusting method however in both cases they tend to be
} clumped.
}
} The problem I have is the clumps must be heating up in the beam. I
} as soon as I start to increase the magnification to explore the edges
} the sample disappears and I am left with a hole in the film.
}
} I am pushing a 100kV instrument so I suspect this may have something
} to with it also.
}
} A search of the literature indicates that a lot of people are
} investigating TiO2 nanotubes in the TEM but nothing I have found so
} far talks about how the nanotubes are got onto a grid in a usable
} form to image. lots of info about making nanotubes.
}
} Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.


Dear Allan,
I have not had experience with TiO2 nanotubes, but I do have a couple
of suggestions. Since the EtOH suspension method seems to work better
than dusting, but still results in clumping, you might try a more
volatile solvent, or applying the suspension in a higher-temperature
environment, such as a warm room. Faster evaporation of the solvent
should reduce clumping. I suspect that it is charging of the
nanotubes, rather than heating, that is causing problems. Especially
if you are using a slot grid, charge buildup on the film can cause it
to break. I suggest evaporating a layer of carbon onto the grid
before trying to look it, and be sure that the objective aperture is
inserted--backscattering from the aperture can neutralize some of the
built-up charge. Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: r-holdford-at-ti.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 18:03:06 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LaB6 problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Stefan: Bill is correct. It's been years since I ran a Kimball LaB6 in
an SEM (or any other thermionic tip having gone the FE route) but
Kimball tips need higher saturation currents than other manufacturers.
I don't remember if I even had numbers on my saturation knob, but as
Bill says, run it up to saturation and use it there.

tivol-at-caltech.edu wrote:
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}
} On Jan 22, 2009, at 11:26 AM, stefan.diller-at-t-online.de wrote:
}
}
} } since some weeks I am trying to bring a new Kimball LaB6 cathode type
} } 423E90 up to performance.
} } I am using the cathode in a Philips 525 SEM.
} } My experience with the cathodes before had been that the heating
} } current
} } had been with the old cathodes at 11 to 13 max. The new cathode
} } needs to
} } have 14 to 16 max.
} } I am using the LaB6 wehnelt cap and set the height (with a 0.5mm
} } wehnelt
} } aperture) at ca. 0,25mm down from the surface of the aperture disc.
} }
} } Please have a look at the images:
} } www.elektronenmikroskopie.info/lab6
} }
} } With heating current at position 11 I am still getting double contours
} } in the image (LaB6_3.jpg), which is getting better when I am using a
} } smaller spotsize (LaB6_2.jpg).
} } With heating current at position 14 I still have some "feeling" of
} } double contours in the image (see LaB6_4.jpg), which disapears at
} } smaller spotsize (LaB6_5.jpg).
} } Best image so far is LaB6_8.jpg at 10nm spotsize and heating current
} } position of 16 (which seems for me to be too far up the scale).
} }
} } ...I put the cathode in my EM420 TEM and looked at the cathode image
} } (I
} } am not able to do this in the SEM...).
} } At high beam current and at heating current position ca. 12 (which
} } is 2
} } steps more than on older cathodes) the flat tip of the cathode
} } showed up
} } nicely, resembling a "cross" and comes to an even illumination at
} } position 14.
} }
} } My question is:
} } Is anybody out there giving me some tips if heating values might be
} } correct? Is there a problem with the wehnelt distance?
} } I never experienced such a behavior before...
} } Is there a chance of cathode charging or an inappropriate value of the
} } wehnelt voltage? I changed wehnelt values, with no better imaging.
} }
}
}
} Dear Stefan,
} If you are comparing the Kimball LaB6 to another brand, then it is
} not too surprising that the heating currents are different. Kimball
} mounts the LaB6 crystal in a cup, which is heated and transfers the
} heat to the filament; whereas, some other brands allow the current to
} go through the LaB6 directly. There may well be differences in heat
} transfer that require a higher current for the Kimball. In any event,
} it is best to operate with the filament saturated (assuming that you
} are not interested in operating in tip mode, where only the flat of
} the filament emits electrons). If the higher current required makes
} the life of the tip too short, then you may want to use a different
} brand of tip; however, our experience with Kimball LaB6 tips has been
} quite good. Our experience may not be too good a guide, since we have
} only TEMs, but I think the requirements for good performance are
} pretty much the same--high brightness and good coherence.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol, PhD
} EM Scientist
} Ultrafast EM Facility
} Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
} California Institute of Technology
} Pasadena CA 91125
} (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 18:51:18 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

The method below was sent to the list as a method to solve the same type
of problem in the context of SEM, but it should also work for TEM
samples on a carbon film. Echoes of the ethernet - old friends come back
to visit.

Dale

Sent by } Henk Colijn
} colijn.1-at-osu.edu
}
} -- [ From: Garber, Charles A. * EMC.Ver #3.1 ] --
}
} Oldrich Benada wrote:
} =====================================================
} I need some advice. I was asked to do some analysis of silica particles
} (size distribution) for chemist in our institute. Particle size should be in
} the range of 3 to 6 um. I do not have any experiences with such sample.
} Could someone give me a tip how to prepare sample for TEM (or SEM)?
} ======================================================
}
} The problem is that those pesky silica particles don't know that they are
} supposed to separate and stay away from each other when dispersed in a
} liquid followed by a droplet of this liquid suspension being placed on a
} solid surface. They tend to agglomerate very quickly leading to a difficult-
} to-analyze situation, especially using automated means of analysis. You are
} correct in that the size range expected could be on the order of 3-6 nm.
}
} This is the ideal application for the camphor/naphthalene method which I
} described several years ago. Credit for the technique, or at least the one
} who taught it to me was an innovative microscopist then working at the
} DuPont Experimental Station in Wilmington, DE by the name of Robert P.
} Schatz, in about 1968, now deceased. Take a 60% camphor/40% naphthalene
} mixture and heat it to twenty or so degrees above room temperature on a hot
} plate in a small beaker or flask, the two organics are miscible in each
} other and this is the eutectic composition.
}
} Once a clear liquid, add a small amount of the silica (not more than 0.1%),
} which disperses quite readily. Then, using a pipette, take out some liquid
} and put a drop onto a carbon coated glass slide, at which time the drop is
} instantly frozen solid (it is at room temperature). Put the slide into your
} vacuum evaporator to pump out all night, and the "magic" is that the solid
} eutectic sublimes at room temperature at a rate that by morning, it is
} completely gone, leaving the silica particles uniformly dispersed on the
} carbon film!
}
} The rest is obvious. You can pick this up on a grid, as is, or in order to
} bring out more contrast, Pt/C shadow, probably using an angle not more than
} 30 degrees. You can float the "replica" off of the slide directly onto a
} grid and viola! you have particles completely dispersed, virtually no
} doublets or triplets, and a field quite amenable for automated image
} analysis (as a bonus).
}
} One important further suggestion: Some times these silica particles tend to
} fuse together as little "chains". If you suspect this is happening, be sure
} to take the micrographs as stereo pairs because you can in fact capture this
} three dimensional spatial information.
}
} Disclaimer: We do not sell either the camphor or naphthalene so have no
} vested interest in whether people use this method or not. It is just a
} really neat method for the preparation of fine particle samples in this size
} range. We are obviously set up to use this method as a service for others,
} however.
}
} Chuck




tivol-at-caltech.edu wrote:
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} On Jan 22, 2009, at 6:11 AM, allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz wrote:
}
} } I have been working with a researcher here looking at some TiO2
} } Nanotubes in the TEM. The researcher wants to see if his nanotubes
} } are hollow or not. We are looking for a core of around 5 nm.
} }
} } Being a biology lab we do not have any experience with such samples.
} } I have tried dusting the fragments (provided in powder form from
} } scrappings off a Ti plate) onto carbon/formvar grids and I have
} } tried drying them onto a grid from a suspension in ethanol. The
} } solvent method proved more successful at getting particles onto the
} } film than the dusting method however in both cases they tend to be
} } clumped.
} }
} } The problem I have is the clumps must be heating up in the beam. I
} } as soon as I start to increase the magnification to explore the edges
} } the sample disappears and I am left with a hole in the film.
} }
} } I am pushing a 100kV instrument so I suspect this may have something
} } to with it also.
} }
} } A search of the literature indicates that a lot of people are
} } investigating TiO2 nanotubes in the TEM but nothing I have found so
} } far talks about how the nanotubes are got onto a grid in a usable
} } form to image. lots of info about making nanotubes.
} }
} } Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
}
}
} Dear Allan,
} I have not had experience with TiO2 nanotubes, but I do have a couple
} of suggestions. Since the EtOH suspension method seems to work better
} than dusting, but still results in clumping, you might try a more
} volatile solvent, or applying the suspension in a higher-temperature
} environment, such as a warm room. Faster evaporation of the solvent
} should reduce clumping. I suspect that it is charging of the
} nanotubes, rather than heating, that is causing problems. Especially
} if you are using a slot grid, charge buildup on the film can cause it
} to break. I suggest evaporating a layer of carbon onto the grid
} before trying to look it, and be sure that the objective aperture is
} inserted--backscattering from the aperture can neutralize some of the
} built-up charge. Good luck.
} Yours,
} Bill Tivol, PhD
} EM Scientist
} Ultrafast EM Facility
} Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
} California Institute of Technology
} Pasadena CA 91125
} (626) 395-8833
} tivol-at-caltech.edu
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 02:51:15 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Allan!

I second all the suggestions of Bill, which you really should try.
I would like to add some suggestions.
Take carbon-coated grids (without formvar, or dissolve formvar from your grids). Heat the grids themselves and deposit a drop of your suspension (in methanol f.ex) on the grid, the solvent will evaporate immediately.
Now one possility is that the nanotubes are already clumped in solution. In this case perhaps you can ultrasonicate them. I don't know if the treatment may be deleterious to the structure, but if try you'll know.
Perhaps you start with agglomerated nanotubes. If you just want to see the internal core, I suppose you don't mind about breaking the tubes. In this case you may want to crush them in a mill or in a mortar to obtain a fine powder.
And, last but not least: just sort the powder yourself! By centrifuging the suspension, you'll pellet the bigger agglomerates and keep the finest powder in suspension. You can do it in ethanol. You'll just have to adjust the parameters to reach the optimal sorting for your needs.  I suspect that centrifuging at 200g for 30 min would keep particulates of approx. 500 nm in suspension.

Best regards,

Stephane

PS: not sure about it, but in case post-coating with carbon does not suffice, I wouldn't be surprised if thin coating with gold would prevent charging without much disturbing the primary electrons.

 


----- Original Message ----
X-from: "tivol-at-caltech.edu" {tivol-at-caltech.edu}
To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 12:06:18 AM


On Jan 22, 2009, at 6:11 AM, allan.mitchell-at-stonebow.otago.ac.nz wrote:

} I have been working with a researcher here looking at some TiO2
} Nanotubes in the TEM.  The researcher wants to see if his nanotubes
} are hollow or not.  We are looking for a core of around 5 nm.
}
} Being a biology lab we do not have any experience with such samples.
} I have tried dusting the fragments (provided in powder form from
} scrappings off a Ti plate) onto  carbon/formvar grids and I have
} tried drying them onto a grid from a suspension in ethanol.  The
} solvent method proved more successful at getting particles onto the
} film than the dusting method however in both cases they tend to be
} clumped.
}
} The problem I have is the clumps must be heating up in the beam.  I
} as soon as I start to increase the magnification to explore the edges
} the sample disappears and I am left with a hole in the film.
}
} I am pushing a 100kV instrument so I suspect this may have something
} to with it also.
}
} A search of the literature indicates that a lot of people are
} investigating  TiO2 nanotubes in the TEM but nothing I have found so
} far talks about how the nanotubes are got onto a grid in a usable
} form to image.  lots of info about making nanotubes.
}
} Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.


Dear Allan,
    I have not had experience with TiO2 nanotubes, but I do have a couple 
of suggestions.  Since the EtOH suspension method seems to work better 
than dusting, but still results in clumping, you might try a more 
volatile solvent, or applying the suspension in a higher-temperature 
environment, such as a warm room.  Faster evaporation of the solvent 
should reduce clumping.  I suspect that it is charging of the 
nanotubes, rather than heating, that is causing problems.  Especially 
if you are using a slot grid, charge buildup on the film can cause it 
to break.  I suggest evaporating a layer of carbon onto the grid 
before trying to look it, and be sure that the objective aperture is 
inserted--backscattering from the aperture can neutralize some of the 
built-up charge.  Good luck.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: elena.belluso-at-unito.it
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 03:58:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] ICC asbestos session

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit an abstract to session HE1 at the
14th International Clay Conference scheduled in June 14th-20th 2009 in
Castellaneta Marina, near Bari, in Southeast Italy =
(http://www.14icc.org/ ).

The abstract deadline has been extended to January 31.


Please note that contributions to 14th International Clay Conference may =
be submitted for publication in a special issue of Applied Clay Science. =
They will pass the usual peer review process and the issue is expected to
be published before the end of 2010.

With ours best wishes for the New Year, the convenors Elena Belluso
(elena.belluso-at-unito.it) and Mickey Gunter(mgunter-at-uidaho.edu)


Session HE1 "Asbestos Monitoring & Analytical Methods"

Monitoring, identification, and quantification of asbestos are essential
aspects of dealing with these minerals. These investigations are very
important to the regulatory community because special precautions must =
be taken when asbestos is found in significant amounts.

Different techniques of monitoring and analysis are necessary depending =
on where the asbestos occurs: air, water, soils, rocks, biological =
materials, asbestos-containing materials and their transformation
products.

Besides, for asbestos use in health-based studies it is important to =
apply several complementary analytical methods.

This session will: 1) present the state of the art in monitoring and
techniques actually considered the most suitable for the different =
asbestos containing materials; 2) compare various investigation protocols;
3) exchange information about the advances in this topic; and 4) develop
interdisciplinary collaborations.

Convenors: Elena Belluso (elena.belluso-at-unito.it) and Mickey Gunter
(mgunter-at-uidaho.edu)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Prof. Elena BELLUSO - Ph.D. Mineralogy and Crystallography
Dipartimento di Scienze Mineralogiche e Petrologiche
Universita' degli Studi di Torino
Via Valperga Caluso, 35
I-10125 TORINO - ITALIA
tel: (39) 011 670 51 35 - fax: (39) 011 670 51 28
e-mail: elena.belluso-at-unito.it
http://www.dsmp.unito.it
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"I've... seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams... glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate.
All those... moments will be lost... in time...,
like... tears... in... rain."
Blade Runner




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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 06:15:39 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Allan,
I've had a number of users in the past looking at nanotubes here in
my lab, and one of them was interested in the internal microstructure. We
ended up embedding the nanotubes in resin and thin-sectioning them. It
worked pretty well, but the structure they were looking at was a little
grosser than your's. If you think it's worth a shot, let me know and I'll
dig out my files and find out exactly how we did it.
Cheers,
Jules

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG
Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
int 7585

URLs:
(home)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
(lab)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
(research)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 09:16:45 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Re: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Dear Allan (and All),
Apologies, but I should have clarified that the nanotubes that I
embedded previously for thin-sectioning were carbon, not TiO2 (it's Friday
and am a bit tired - should have read the subject header more carefully!).
I have no experience of dealing with the latter, so could not say whether
the embedding route would work or not.
Cheers,
Jules

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG
Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
int 7585

URLs:
(home)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
(lab)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
(research)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm

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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 09:54:30 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] TEM: TAAB Low Viscosity Resin Post-Staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,
I've recently been using TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin (since the
sad demise of Spurr resin!) for embedding standard double-fixed cells and
tissues and sometimes have problems achieving good contrast with routine
uranyl acetate (UA) and Pb citrate post-staining. Has anyone else
experienced the same problem and found a way to get over it? I guess
alcoholic UA might be the way to go, but not sure how you rinse the grids
after this.
Thanks in advance for any advice,
Julian

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG
Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
int 7585

URLs:
(home)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
(lab)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
(research)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm

==============================Original Headers==============================
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3, 23 -- To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
3, 23 -- Subject: TEM: TAAB Low Viscosity Resin Post-Staining
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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 09:57:50 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Biological TEM: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin-embedded specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear All,
I've recently been using TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin (since the
sad demise of Spurr resin!) for embedding standard double-fixed cells and
tissues and sometimes have problems achieving good contrast with routine
uranyl acetate (UA) and Pb citrate post-staining. Has anyone else
experienced the same problem and found a way to get over it? I guess
alcoholic UA might be the way to go, but not sure how you rinse the grids
after this.
Thanks in advance for any advice,
Julian

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG
Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
int 7585

URLs:
(home)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
(lab)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
(research)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm

==============================Original Headers==============================
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==============================End of - Headers==============================




From: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 10:06:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dr. Besenyo:

Thank you! Thank you very very much! For explaining where the
terminology "Depleted" comes from - I know that a number of us have
been wondering that for a long time.

As well as taking the time to explain the general process for the
manufacture of our Uranyl acetate.


On 8 Jan 2009 at 19:20, abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com wrote:

}
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}
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} Email: abesenyo-at-ibilabs.com
} Name: Alex Besenyo PhD
}
} Organization: ibilabs
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
}
} Question: Question:
}
} Is it true that the stuff we use has been somehow
} depleted, so that it isn't as radioactive as "real" uranyl
} salts? Or is this yet another old wive's tale of EM?!
}
} Reply:
}
} When we manufacture these compounds we purchase the raw uranium in a
} depleted state from the government. There is no chance for error
} here. We do not use natural uranium.
}
} This means that the enrichable uranium U-235 has been removed.
} The then U-238 which only emitts alpha radiation is procesed.
}
} The term "depleted" means that U-235 has been removed.
}
} If even by the slightest chance that U235 were present then every
} alarm would go off in our facility because Beta and Gamma radiation
} is detected.
}
} I hope this answers everybodies concerns.
}
} Our products are sold exclusively through a distributor network and
} all of them have been instructed on this information.
}
} I only responded when I saw the original post and I had to respond
} before it got out of control.
}
} Sincerely
} Alex Besenyo PhD
}
}
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} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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} 17, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: uranyl compounds are alpha emitters only
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} ==============================End of - Headers==============================


Richard E. Edelmann, Ph.D.
Electron Microscopy Facility Director
364 Pearson Hall
Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056
Ph: 513.529.5712 Fax: 513.529.4243
E-mail: edelmare-at-muohio.edu
http://www.emf.muohio.edu

"RAM disk is NOT an installation procedure."


==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: vladislav_speransky-at-nih.gov
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 11:51:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Fwd: Biological TEM: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin-embedded specimen

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Julian,

I haven't used TAAB but have experience with Spurr and the recent low
viscosity epoxy sold in the US by Electron Microscopy Sciences. Both
are harder to stain than either "normal", Epon/Araldite like epoxies
or acrylics. The reason is the higher degree of cross-linking.

(Not something you are asking, but do you really need to use a low
viscosity resin? Besides the staining issues, they are also more of a
health hazard.)

Yes, alcoholic UA will stain better, and you are correct, some caution
is needed when rinsing afterwards. My favorite UA procedure for such
cases is to use the stock of saturated UA in water and dilute it
before each staining 1:1 with methanol. This way you don't need to
worry about precipitate and still have high enough concentration of UA
in 50% methanol, fresh each time. Stain for 5-10 minutes. I rinse
first on a drop of 50% methanol, then 25% methanol, then a few
droplets of water gently flowing from a disposable 3 ml pipette. It is
a good general practice to avoid overwashing, both with UA and Pb
staining. Too much washing won't get rid of the precipitate formed on
sections but will destain.

Whenever I have such contrast issues, I also use Venable-Coggeshall
[spelling?] recipe for the lead stain. I keep pre-weighed amounts in
15 ml Falcon tubes and make it fresh every such time (1-2 hours ahead
of staining). Making it fresh is important - a stronger stain than
"average" Reynolds, it does not store well. It really helps.

Finally, it helps to include en bloc UA treatment before embedding -
either 2% UA in water before dehydration or 1.5% at the 70% ethanol
step.

This topic has been covered quite a few times on this list. A good
place to search the archives is http://www.biotech.ufl.edu/EM/tips/
You'll find more discussion there.

Vlad
________________________________________________
Vlad Speransky, Staff Scientist
Supramolecular Structure and Function Resource
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH
13 South Dr, Rm. 3N17 MSC 5766
Bethesda, MD 20892
301 496-3989
vladislav_speransky-at-nih.gov

Opinions and experiences related are those of Vlad Speransky and not
his employer. These opinions and experiences do not represent a
consensus of the NIH scientific community.
On the good side, this message is not confidential and can be freely
shared and reproduced.



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} Dear All,
} I've recently been using TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin
} (since the
} sad demise of Spurr resin!) for embedding standard double-fixed
} cells and
} tissues and sometimes have problems achieving good contrast with
} routine
} uranyl acetate (UA) and Pb citrate post-staining. Has anyone else
} experienced the same problem and found a way to get over it? I guess
} alcoholic UA might be the way to go, but not sure how you rinse the
} grids
} after this.
} Thanks in advance for any advice,
} Julian
}
} Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
} (Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
} Electron Microscope Division,
} The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
} John Maynard-Smith Building,
} School of Life Sciences,
} University of Sussex,
} Falmer,
} Brighton BN1 9QG
} Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
} int 7585
}
} URLs:
} (home)
} http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
} (lab)
} http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
} (research)
} http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
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} 15:58:52 +0000
} 3, 24 -- Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 15:57:47 -0000
} 3, 24 -- To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} 3, 24 -- Subject: Biological TEM: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin-
} embedded specimen
} 3, 24 -- section post-staining
} 3, 24 -- Message-ID: {70653603.1232726267-at-ls0130.lifesci.susx.ac.uk}
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} +B5y6lB3zJ7INklsER1U+4+u0Xk8qg7dVXk;
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==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 12:04:37 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I am hoping someone on the list can help me
I need to record video from a microscope plus a simultaneous audio commentary, and output both to a AVI/MPG/MOV file. The camera must fit on a microscope C-mount.
I have posted on this before and got recommendations of cameras that produce AVI files via  USB connection, but incorporating live audio so far, is an unresolved problem.
It would seem there is a lot of software that will add a  sound track later but not live.

I can think of two approaches
 1 software: Take a fairly inexpensive camera (Lumenera for instance) interface to a computer, + a standard microphone, and have some software create the AVI  file from both inputs. - So far I haven't found software that will do this at least in real time.

2 Hardware: Take a camera that has built in sound, basically a camcorder, and mount it on a microscope via a C-mount. - I don't know of any camcorders that have c-mount adapters, also I'm not sure if they can be connected to a computer via USB and produce AVI files.

I would rather not go the route of outputting a TV signal to the computer and the adding a digital frame grabbing card to convert the video signal to digital.

Suggestions would be really appreciated

Thanks
Lloyd






Dr. Lloyd Williams
Dept of Biology
Hunter College
695 Park Ave
New York, NY 10021
ph (212) 650 3872
fx (212) 650 3656



==============================Original Headers==============================
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14, 26 -- To: "microscopy-at-microscopy.com" {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
14, 26 -- Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 13:04:54 -0500
14, 26 -- Subject: Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope
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From: joelsheffield-at-gmail.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 13:35:52 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I have been thinking.....I have a jvc digital movie camera/recorder with a firewire output that I can
connect directly to my computer, and record the results with Windows Media Maker (I think).
This includes both the video and the audio.

As another, inexpensive alternative, what about the "Flip Camera"? It has a usb connector, and
might work. The trick is to interface it with the microscope, but I would imagine that you could
mount it on the eyepiece and adjust focus to match.

Joel





On 23 Jan 2009 at 12:11, Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU wrote:

}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
} To Subscribe/Unsubscribe -- http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} I am hoping someone on the list can help me
} I need to record video from a microscope plus a simultaneous audio commentary, and output both to a AVI/MPG/MOV file. The camera must fit on a microscope C-mount.
} I have posted on this before and got recommendations of cameras that produce AVI files via  USB connection, but incorporating live audio so far, is an unresolved problem.
} It would seem there is a lot of software that will add a  sound track later but not live.
}
} I can think of two approaches
}  1 software: Take a fairly inexpensive camera (Lumenera for instance) interface to a computer, + a standard microphone, and have some software create the AVI  file from both inputs. - So far I haven't found software that will do this at least in real time.
}
} 2 Hardware: Take a camera that has built in sound, basically a camcorder, and mount it on a microscope via a C-mount. - I don't know of any camcorders that have c-mount adapters, also I'm not sure if they can be connected to a computer via USB and produce AVI files.
}
} I would rather not go the route of outputting a TV signal to the computer and the adding a digital frame grabbing card to convert the video signal to digital.
}
} Suggestions would be really appreciated
}
} Thanks
} Lloyd
}
}
}
}
}
}
} Dr. Lloyd Williams
} Dept of Biology
} Hunter College
} 695 Park Ave
} New York, NY 10021
} ph (212) 650 3872
} fx (212) 650 3656
}
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
} 14, 26 -- From Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU Fri Jan 23 12:04:35 2009
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} 14, 26 -- From: Lloyd Williams {Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU}
} 14, 26 -- To: "microscopy-at-microscopy.com" {microscopy-at-microscopy.com}
} 14, 26 -- Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 13:04:54 -0500
} 14, 26 -- Subject: Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope
} 14, 26 -- Thread-Topic: Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope
} 14, 26 -- Thread-Index: Acl9gio1II/B79NXTe+PQqYZ6YQzbA==
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--
Joel B. Sheffield, Ph.D.
Biology Department, Temple University
1900 North 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
jbs-at-temple.edu
(215) 204 8839, fax (215) 204 0486
http://astro.temple.edu/~jbs



==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: rosemary.white-at-csiro.au
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2009 03:01:53 +1100
Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


------ Forwarded Message
X-from: "Malis, Tom" {Tom.Malis-at-NRCan-RNCan.gc.ca}


Hi Hong,
We have four large histoknives, usually one for trimming, two for everyday
use, and one in perfect shape for when one of the others has to go away for
resharpening. They are used to cut sections up to 2 microns thick, of quite
large blockfaces - up to 3 mm across. They get resharpened at least once a
year. Like Stephane, I'll never go back to routine glass knife use, the
diamond knives save so much time. We only go back to glass for training and
if the tissue might damage the diamond (chunks of rock in soil around roots,
for example...).

cheers,
Roseamry


On 22/01/09 7:47 PM, "nizets2-at-yahoo.com" {nizets2-at-yahoo.com} wrote:

}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------ The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society
} of America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
{http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver}
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{http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------
}
} Hi Hong!
}
} We have a histo knife, however we don't cut thicker than 500nm and not
} on a routine basis.
} I have been said that like an ultraknife, its lifetime mainly depends
} on what you cut. Cut butter and it will survive you.
} Cut nanoparticles and quantum dots and it will probably not survive
} your grant. Cutting soft tissue in resin does probably not significantly
affect it.
} Personally I couldn't imagine regularly semi-thin sectionning without
} histoknife, it is so comfortable. Maybe I am a luxus freak :-)
}
} Regards,
} Stephane
}
}
}
} ----- Original Message ----
} X-from: "hyi-at-emory.edu" {hyi-at-emory.edu}
} To: nizets2-at-yahoo.com
} Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 6:34:37 AM
} Subject: [Microscopy] Histo diamond knife
}
}
}
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------
} ------ The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor:  The Microscopy Society
} of America To  Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
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}
} Dear All:
}
}     We have been contemplating about purchasing a 8.0 mm Histo diamond
} knif= e for semi-thin (0.5-0.7=B5m) sectioning.  Can someone out there
} with exper= ience comment on how long (or how many blocks) I should
} expect a Histo diam= ond knife to last?  I have no problem producing
} high quality semi-thin sect= ions with glass knives, but am hoping a
} diamond knife would save us some ti= me.  Thank you in advance.
}
} Hong
} Emory EM
}
}
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From: walck-at-southbaytech.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 14:16:40 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Realtime Audio and Vieo For a C-mount Microscope

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I replied to a similar question last week where I used a Q-see camera that I
hooked up to my video camera. I can then either record it on the video
camera or route it to the computer or a digital recorder. What I didn't say
is that I also hooked up audio with it. The camera that I am using is a
Canon Elura 85. I use the same cord that came with the camera to hook to
the camera and audio with RCA plugs on one end and the three connector
mini-plug that goes into the camera. I set the camera on VCR mode and
there's no problem. I can talk in my gravelly voice and can be heard while
viewing the recorded show. That is a problem.


-Scott

Scott D. Walck, Ph.D.
Technical Director
South Bay Technology, Inc.
1120 Via Callejon
San Clemente, CA 92673

US Toll Free: 1-800-728-2233
Tel: (949) 492-2600
Fax: (949) 492-1499

www.southbaytech.com
walck-at-southbaytech.com

-----Original Message-----
X-from: Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU
[mailto:Williams-at-GENECTR.HUNTER.CUNY.EDU]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 10:07 AM
To: Walck-at-SouthBayTech.com

I am hoping someone on the list can help me I need to record video from a
microscope plus a simultaneous audio commentary, and output both to a
AVI/MPG/MOV file. The camera must fit on a microscope C-mount.
I have posted on this before and got recommendations of cameras that produce
AVI files via  USB connection, but incorporating live audio so far, is an
unresolved problem.
It would seem there is a lot of software that will add a  sound track later
but not live.

I can think of two approaches
 1 software: Take a fairly inexpensive camera (Lumenera for instance)
interface to a computer, + a standard microphone, and have some software
create the AVI  file from both inputs. - So far I haven't found software
that will do this at least in real time.

2 Hardware: Take a camera that has built in sound, basically a camcorder,
and mount it on a microscope via a C-mount. - I don't know of any camcorders
that have c-mount adapters, also I'm not sure if they can be connected to a
computer via USB and produce AVI files.

I would rather not go the route of outputting a TV signal to the computer
and the adding a digital frame grabbing card to convert the video signal to
digital.

Suggestions would be really appreciated

Thanks
Lloyd






Dr. Lloyd Williams
Dept of Biology
Hunter College
695 Park Ave
New York, NY 10021
ph (212) 650 3872
fx (212) 650 3656



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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 14:21:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Nematode permeabilization for fixation and embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all,

I have seen some mentions here of methods to enhance fixation and
embedding of nematodes. I just watched my vinegar eels (T. acetii) swim
happily for } 1hr in the [2% glutaraldehyde + 4% paraformaldhyde + 0.2M
cacodylate, pH 7.4] fixative that was reportedly used in some work with
beautiful results - that work reported a 1hr fixation; surely something
is wrong here. I have seen mention of slicing with a razor blade (can it
really be done? How? These vinegar eels are tiny and very wiggly);
penetrating with a pulled micropipette; cryo fixation; enzymatic
digestion of the cuticle (is this done after fixation?); and finally,
laser beams - what type of laser is required - can this be done with a
confocal or does it need a higher power or other wavelengths? I have
some early/mid-1970's papers that have beautiful ultrastructure with no
special methods mentioned at all - maybe not complete disclosure of the
details?

I am wondering if electroporation might be any use to allow quicker
permeabilization of a bulk sample. Does anyone know if electroporation
has ever been used - is this a terrible idea?

I would greatly appreciate any protocols, or references to books or
papers dealing with the nitty-gritty details of such tiny impermeable
preparations.

Thanks!

Dale Callaham

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From: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 14:51:11 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Searching for beryllium in all the wrong places.....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I've been working with a polished copper bar and found some inclusions.
EDS shows nothing but copper and of course it can't detect beryllium. It
occurred to me that beryllium has such a low backscatter coefficient as
compared to copper and areas enriched in berllium should appear dark in
compo mode.

Would it be reasonable to say that any dark areas in BS imaging what show
only copper could have beryllium enrichment? And while I'm on the subject,
does any one have a copy of the condensed micro-chemical test for beryllium
that Dr. McCone published years ago in the Microscope? If so could I get a
copy?

Thanks,
Frank Karl
Lincoln Electric

--
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 14:56:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: viaWWW: TEM of TiO2 nanotubes

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would suggest using alcohol (better adhesion) for deposition of
nanotubes on carbon film (only carbon, to decrease charging). Usually
you can find a lot of nanotubes poking out of edges of clamps, so good
dispersion of specimens in not a mandatory thing. You can also try to
deposit (with alcohol) clamps of nanotubes directly on Cu grid without
any film. Sometimes it can give better results (if you can find these
clamps tracing outline of grid) - contrast and resolution are better
without film.

Good luck,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy


}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] TEM of TiO2 nanotubes
}
} Question: Hi all
}
} I have been working with a researcher here looking at some
} TiO2 Nanotubes in the TEM. The researcher wants to see if
} his nanotubes are hollow or not. We are looking for a core
} of around 5 nm.
}
} Being a biology lab we do not have any experience with such samples.
} I have tried dusting the fragments (provided in powder form
} from scrappings off a Ti plate) onto carbon/formvar grids
} and I have tried drying them onto a grid from a suspension in
} ethanol. The solvent method proved more successful at
} getting particles onto the film than the dusting method
} however in both cases they tend to be clumped.
}
} The problem I have is the clumps must be heating up in the
} beam. I as soon as I start to increase the magnification to
} explore the edges the sample disappears and I am left with a
} hole in the film.
}
} I am pushing a 100kV instrument so I suspect this may have
} something to with it also.
}
} A search of the literature indicates that a lot of people are
} investigating TiO2 nanotubes in the TEM but nothing I have
} found so far talks about how the nanotubes are got onto a
} grid in a usable form to image. lots of info about making nanotubes.
}
} Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.
}
} Regards
}
} Allan
}
}
} Allan Mitchell
} Otago Centre for Electron Microscopy
} Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology School of
} Medical Sciences P.O. Box 913 Dunedin New Zealand
}
} Phone (03) 479 5642 or 479 7301
} Fax (03) 479 5086 or 479 7254
}
} EM Centre: http://ocem.otago.ac.nz/
} Confocal Centre: http://occm.otago.ac.nz/
} Department: http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/
}
} Login Host: 139.80.40.92
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}
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From: lcgould-at-med.cornell.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 14:58:00 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Nematode permeabilization for fixation and embedding

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Dale-
I've never worked with your beasties, but have been doing both EM and
confocal on sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) larvae with one of the
PIs here. She uses electroporation to get her GFP constructs into
the very young larvae then lets them mature to the stage she is
interested in studying...so that method along does not kill them
(usually), but does "open them up" to things.
For the EM studies, we used 2.5% glut, 4% pfa in buffer at 4 degrees
overnight, then proceeded pretty much as normal, except that we did 2
changes at each alcohol level and prolonged the infiltration (over 2
days). We used Spurr's at the time.
The C. elegans people love high pressure freezing followed by freeze
substitution. When it works, it is gorgeous.
Lee








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From: Joseph_Oparowski-at-bose.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 15:13:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Searching for beryllium in all the wrong places.....

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,

Yes, beryllium rich phases should exhibit lower atomic number contrast via BSe. If you have a beryllium-copper alloy that has been precipitation hardened, the CuBe phase should be dispersed evenly throughout the matrix as numerous spherical precipitates. They should also appear gray in optical brightfield and full wave polarized light if I recall.

If you are seeing isolated inclusions, they may be oxides, which will appear ruby red in full wave polarized light.

Care to provide a link to an image?


Joseph M. Oparowski
Research Engineer
Transducer Research
The Mountain M/S 470
Framingham, MA 01701-9168

Phone: (508) 766-1371
Fax: (508) 518-6515
email: joseph_oparowski-at-bose.com

-----Original Message-----
X-from: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com [mailto:Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 3:59 PM
To: Oparowski, Joseph


I've been working with a polished copper bar and found some inclusions.
EDS shows nothing but copper and of course it can't detect beryllium. It
occurred to me that beryllium has such a low backscatter coefficient as
compared to copper and areas enriched in berllium should appear dark in
compo mode.

Would it be reasonable to say that any dark areas in BS imaging what show
only copper could have beryllium enrichment? And while I'm on the subject,
does any one have a copy of the condensed micro-chemical test for beryllium
that Dr. McCone published years ago in the Microscope? If so could I get a
copy?

Thanks,
Frank Karl
Lincoln Electric

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From: p.ingram-at-voice.cellbio.duke.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 15:54:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Searching for beryllium in all the wrong

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank,

Most assuredly it is possible to detect Be with EDS - which
obviously must have a UTW detector. Although we were using biological
materials that are mostly carbon, it is absolutely no problem with
higher Z materials such as Al. I haven't tried Cu but as long as
there are no other overlapping peaks around 0.11 Kev it should not be
a problem. One caveat: you do have to be careful to tweak the
"threshold" for the pulse processor to minimize the potential
detector "noise" that can creep in! Here is a reference of ours from
a few years ago:

Butnor KJ, Sporn TA, Ingram P, Gunasegaram S, Pinto JF, Roggli VL.
Beryllium detection in human lung tissue using electron probe X-ray
microanalysis, Mod Pathol. 2003 Nov;16(11):1171-7

Feel free to contact me off-line if you would like to discuss further.

Peter




}
}
} I've been working with a polished copper bar and found some inclusions.
} EDS shows nothing but copper and of course it can't detect beryllium. It
} occurred to me that beryllium has such a low backscatter coefficient as
} compared to copper and areas enriched in berllium should appear dark in
} compo mode.
}
} Would it be reasonable to say that any dark areas in BS imaging what show
} only copper could have beryllium enrichment? And while I'm on the subject,
} does any one have a copy of the condensed micro-chemical test for beryllium
} that Dr. McCone published years ago in the Microscope? If so could I get a
} copy?
}
} Thanks,
} Frank Karl
} Lincoln Electric
}
}


--
Peter Ingram
Sr. Physicist
Adj. Professor of Pathology,
Duke University Medical Center
Box 90319
LaSalle Street Extension
DURHAM NC USA 27708-0319

Tel: (919) 660-2695
Fax: (919) 660-2671
e-mail: p.ingram-at-cellbio.duke.edu
http://152.3.54.111/AEM_LAB.html

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From: A.MARDINLY-at-numonyx.com
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 15:59:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Searching for beryllium in all the wrong

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Frank;
It would be a big surprise to me to see beryllium in a bar, as
it is normally used to precipitation harden copper for springs. Also,
the precipitates would be expected to be very small and well dispersed,
not in inclusions.

John Mardinly,
Numonyx

-----Original Message-----
X-from: Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com
[mailto:Frank_Karl-at-lincolnelectric.com]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2009 12:58 PM
To: MARDINLY, A


I've been working with a polished copper bar and found some inclusions.
EDS shows nothing but copper and of course it can't detect beryllium.
It
occurred to me that beryllium has such a low backscatter coefficient as
compared to copper and areas enriched in berllium should appear dark in
compo mode.

Would it be reasonable to say that any dark areas in BS imaging what
show
only copper could have beryllium enrichment? And while I'm on the
subject,
does any one have a copy of the condensed micro-chemical test for
beryllium
that Dr. McCone published years ago in the Microscope? If so could I
get a
copy?

Thanks,
Frank Karl
Lincoln Electric

--
*************************************************************
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to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any
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communication in error, please notify us immediately by
replying to the message and deleting it from your computer.
Thank you,
The Lincoln Electric Company
**************************************************************


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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 17:17:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) Resin Post-Staining

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Email: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Name: Julian Thorpe

Organization: University of Sussex

Title-Subject: [Filtered] TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) Resin Post-Staining

Question: Dear All,
I've recently been using TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) resin (since
Spurr resin became unavailable, sadly!). Anyway, I've had some
problems with some specimens in achieving good contrast with routine
uranyl acetate (UA) and Pb citrate post-staining. Has anyone else
found this to be the case? If so, and you've managed to get around
this problem, I'd be happy to hear from you. I guess alcoholic UA
might be the way to go, but I've often had problems rinsing this off
properly.
Thanks for any advice in advance,
Julian

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
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University of Sussex,
Falmer,
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Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
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URLs:
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8, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) Resin Post-Staining
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From: kmaclellan-at-nibsc.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 17:18:25 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: First announcement: Workshop on Structural &

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Email: kmaclellan-at-nibsc.ac.uk
Name: Kirsty MacLellan

Organization: nibsc

Title-Subject: [Filtered] First announcement:
Workshop on Structural & Computational Biomedical
Informatics and Cryo-EM

Question: Professor Wah Chiu Baylor College of
Medicine, JEOL (UK) Ltd and The National
Institute for Biological Standards and Control
are holding the Workshop on Structural &
Computational Biomedical Informatics and Cryo-EM.
The workshop is a 5 day residential course on
June 8th ñJune 12th 2009. Topics to be covered
include: Specimen preparation, electron optics
involved, configuration of the TEM and
understanding specimen beam interaction, Data
size ñ Assessment and Data Processing, Automated
Data Collection for Single Particle, Auto-data
collection for Tomography, JADAS and EMAN 2 with
hands on practical experience in the microscopy
suite and the computer lab.

Further details and registration forms can be
found at
http://ncmi.bcm.edu/ncmi/events/workshops/workshops_97.
Early registration is essential as places are
limited.


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From: chyun-at-uark.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 17:19:03 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Convert EELS data from text file format to 'Gatan DM

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Email: chyun-at-uark.edu
Name: Changbae Hyun

Organization: University of Arkansas

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Convert EELS data from
text file format to 'Gatan DM imageDocument3í

Question:
Is there a way to convert a EELS data from text
file to Gatan DM imageDocument3 file format? I
have electron counts vs. energy and I want to use
Gatan's Digital Micrograph program to analyze
EELS data. If anyone knows the way to convert,
please let me know.

Thanks,
Changbae Hyun
PostDoc fellow
University of Arkansas
800 W Dickson St, RM226
Fayetteville, AR 72701
e-mail:chyun-at-uark.edu
tel:479-575-8764

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From: rao.karavadi-at-rutgers.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 17:19:35 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Multiple EELS acquisition

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Email: rao.karavadi-at-rutgers.edu
Name: Rao Karavadi

Organization: Rutgers University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Multiple EELS acquisition

Question: Hi all

I am looking for a Digital Micrograph script file, where we can
acquire Multiple EELS spectrum with regular intervals of time. I am
interested to study radiation damage by Electron beam on different
materials which requires collections of EELS spectra with regular
intervals of time.

I truly appreciate your response

Thanks
Rao Karavadi
Rutgers: The State University of New Jersey
607 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854
USA


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From: larry.ackerman-at-ucsf.edu
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2009 18:10:38 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Nematode permeabilization for fixation and

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dale,
The standard method for fixing drosophila embryos which have an
impermeable cuticle is to use fix with heptane, a partition method.
Briefly, put 5ml of your fix and 5ml of heptane in a 20ml vial. Add your
sample, screw the cap on very well and agitate vigorously for 20--30
minutes. As the embryos fix they swell and usually break the cuticle.
The cuticle free embryos will sink to the bottom in the fix once you
stop shaking the vial. Those fixed embryos can be pipetted into another
clean vial and fixed longer or rinsed in buffer followed by the standard
EM preparation protocols. If this doesn't work--it doesn't work for
drosophila larvae, then cool the samples on ice until they stop wiggling
and then slice off one end with a razor blade. I like to use a piece of
dental wax or polyethylene plastic for the slicing surface. The scoop
the samples into fix usually for overnight.
Best wishes
Larry

dac-at-research.umass.edu wrote:
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} Hi all,
}
} I have seen some mentions here of methods to enhance fixation and
} embedding of nematodes. I just watched my vinegar eels (T. acetii) swim
} happily for } 1hr in the [2% glutaraldehyde + 4% paraformaldhyde + 0.2M
} cacodylate, pH 7.4] fixative that was reportedly used in some work with
} beautiful results - that work reported a 1hr fixation; surely something
} is wrong here. I have seen mention of slicing with a razor blade (can it
} really be done? How? These vinegar eels are tiny and very wiggly);
} penetrating with a pulled micropipette; cryo fixation; enzymatic
} digestion of the cuticle (is this done after fixation?); and finally,
} laser beams - what type of laser is required - can this be done with a
} confocal or does it need a higher power or other wavelengths? I have
} some early/mid-1970's papers that have beautiful ultrastructure with no
} special methods mentioned at all - maybe not complete disclosure of the
} details?
}
} I am wondering if electroporation might be any use to allow quicker
} permeabilization of a bulk sample. Does anyone know if electroporation
} has ever been used - is this a terrible idea?
}
} I would greatly appreciate any protocols, or references to books or
} papers dealing with the nitty-gritty details of such tiny impermeable
} preparations.
}
} Thanks!
}
} Dale Callaham
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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}

--
Larry Ackerman, Specialist
UCSF, Dept. of Anatomy, Rm S1347
513 Parnassus Ave., Box 0452
San Francisco, CA 94143

larry.ackerman-at-ucsf.edu

415-476-4400


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From: Aleksandr.Mironov-at-manchester.ac.uk
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2009 06:57:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TAAB Low Viscosity (TLV) Resin Post-Staining

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

We are using TAAB LV for several years since Spurr's became
unavailble. We had never any problems with staining or infiltraton if
propylen oxide is used as intermediate. Only once 2-3 years ago there
was a batch that was not possible to cut with glass knives but only
with diamond ones. Just another happy customer - no any commercial
interest.
Both aqueous and alcohol solution of UA work well. Reynolds Pb citrate
gives very good contrast.

Sincerely,
Alex

--
Dr. Aleksandr Mironov MD, PhD
Experimental Officer
D.1527, M.Smith Building
EM Core Facility, Faculty of Life Sciences
University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PT
UK

Tel. +44-(0)161-275-5645
Fax. +44-(0)161-275-5171
E-mail: Aleksandr.Mironov-at-manchester.ac.uk
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 12:24:16 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Dear All:

Thank you all very much for so many advices on Histo diamond knife. I
must have become one of those people I used to laugh at who live on the old
time glory. ;-)

Hong
Emory EM
(404) 712-8491


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The DVD recordings of the Tutorials presented at M&M 2008
are now available. They are $15.00 plus shipping. I can accept
checks, credit cards and institutional PO's. I prefer orders by
email or snail mail. Telephone orders are also accepted, but they
make me cranky and prone to errors.
The full instructions for ordering are at this web address
http://microscopy.org/MSAUnits/Education/VideoCatalogue.html.

Please request Priority Mail if you are in a hurry. Otherwise
they go by Media Mail or First Class mail, whichever is lowest.


The following are the new titles:

307 - Cryo-Fluorescence: A Tool for Correlative Cryo-Light and
Cryo-Electron Microscopy, Presented by Cindi L. Schwartz

308 - Live Cell Imaging Limitations. Presented by Simon Watkins

309 - Electron Backscatter Diffraction: Operation and
Applications. Presented by: David Field

310 Electron-Probe Microanalysis (EPMA): An Overview for
Beginners
and a Status Report for Experts. Presented by: Paul Carpenter

311- Lorentz Microscopy -- A Versatile Technique for Studying
Magnetic Multilayers, Elements and Nanowires Presented by : John
Chapman

312-Stereological Characterization of the Geometry of Three
Dimensional Microstructures. Presented by: Robert. T. DeHoff

313 ???Image J, A Useful Tool for Image Processing and Analysis.
Presented by : Joel B. Sheffield

314 Job Hunting for Scientific Professionals. Presented by : Bev
Maleeff

Greg Erdos
5410 SE 185th Ave
Micanopy FL 32667
gwe-at-ufl.edu
--
Greg Erdos
Assistant Director Emeritus
Biotechnology Program, UF
Micanopy FL


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Email: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie
Name: Emer Ryan

Organization: CREST DIT DUBLIN

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for carbon

Question: Hello all,

I have been given a sample to analyse. The sample is non conducting
and are sputtered with gold. I've run an EDX and found various
elements,nothing too interesting, but the spectrum includes carbon. I
have explained to the requester that although carbon is present, I
cannot discount that the EPMA (Jeol JXA 8600 Superprobe) is
depositing carbon during analysis. I note that folk are growing
carbon whiskers on AFM tips to produce sharper tips but putting the
tip in a SEM for a few minutes; the older the SEM, the better i.e.
the SEM deposits carbon.....
What is the general opinion regarding detecting carbon using EDX?
Appreciated,
Emer.




Login Host: 147.252.66.48
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Reply-To: Tansy Keilbach {1239boler.reene-at-gmail.com}



Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie [mailto:emer.ryan-at-dit.ie]
} Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 7:59 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Looking for carbon
}
}
}
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} Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for carbon
}
} Question: Hello all,
}
} I have been given a sample to analyse. The sample is non
} conducting and are sputtered with gold. I've run an EDX and
} found various elements,nothing too interesting, but the
} spectrum includes carbon. I have explained to the requester
} that although carbon is present, I cannot discount that the
} EPMA (Jeol JXA 8600 Superprobe) is depositing carbon during
} analysis. I note that folk are growing carbon whiskers on AFM
} tips to produce sharper tips but putting the tip in a SEM for
} a few minutes; the older the SEM, the better i.e.
} the SEM deposits carbon.....
} What is the general opinion regarding detecting carbon using EDX?
} Appreciated,
} Emer.
}
}
}
}
} Login Host: 147.252.66.48
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 12:30:43 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] RE: viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Emer,

Why did you use EDS when you have probe, presumably with WDS? WDS is
much better for detection of carbon. If you suspect you detect deposited
carbon, you can see (with WDS) if carbon peak is growing with time.
Besides, most probes with diffusion pumps are equipped with liquid
nitrogen trap. If you have one, it can decrease rate of carbon
deposition dramatically.

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



} -----Original Message-----
} From: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie [mailto:emer.ryan-at-dit.ie]
} Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 7:59 AM
} To: Dusevich, Vladimir
} Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Looking for carbon
}
}
}
}
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} Email: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie
} Name: Emer Ryan
}
} Organization: CREST DIT DUBLIN
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for carbon
}
} Question: Hello all,
}
} I have been given a sample to analyse. The sample is non
} conducting and are sputtered with gold. I've run an EDX and
} found various elements,nothing too interesting, but the
} spectrum includes carbon. I have explained to the requester
} that although carbon is present, I cannot discount that the
} EPMA (Jeol JXA 8600 Superprobe) is depositing carbon during
} analysis. I note that folk are growing carbon whiskers on AFM
} tips to produce sharper tips but putting the tip in a SEM for
} a few minutes; the older the SEM, the better i.e.
} the SEM deposits carbon.....
} What is the general opinion regarding detecting carbon using EDX?
} Appreciated,
} Emer.
}
}
}
}
} Login Host: 147.252.66.48
} --------------------------------------------------------------
} -------------
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
} 10, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Mon Jan 26 07:57:43
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} microscopy-at-microscopy.com 10, 11 -- From: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie
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From: gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 13:44:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Is the specimen sitting on a Carbon sticky tab?
If so, and your beam gets close or on it, you will
get C.

C is so ubiquitous that I've rarely seen a specta
that does not have some amount of C. Your coater
is probably an oil diaphragm pumped system and will
back flush some amount of hydrocarbon into the chamber
and onto the specimen. Then, taking the specimen out
of the coater and exposing it to atmosphere (again) will
put more C on it. Then, into the SEM chamber. If roughing
pump is oil dual vane mechanical, then likely some back
streaming there.

You can try some experiments to baseline your inherent C.

1. Take a clean, unused Al stub and put in SEM. Run at
5KV and collect a spectra. Save it. Then do this at 10KV
and save, 15KV and save 20KV and save. At this point, you
ought not see polymerization squares/rectangles from the beam.

2. Take another clean, used Al stub and coat it normally.
Do the same runs as in #1.

3. Note if you get polymerization patterns.

4. The C from #1 is arguably your background C and can be
subtracted from specimen spectra readings. Be sure to collect
for the same time, same WD, same DT and same probe conditions.
For simple situations, I collect for 60 seconds. For more
critical applications, I use 120 seconds. At the standard 10eV
per bin, the longer time fills in the peaks and I think improves
overall results. Plus it eliminates the collection time variable
and standardizes the collection by at least that one variable.

5. Get a stainless set of standards and check them at different
KV and see what C you get for each. subtract the background
and check correlation for the standard.

C is all over the place so it is hard to make disappear. Based
on some communications with an MSA lister, I also noted that O
is a joker.

Light element analysis is tricky. Depending on the specimen,
I would analyze at 5KV and collect spectra. Then move up the KV.
As more of the heavier elements' main peaks show up, the quant
will change.

A suggestion. See if it works for you. Sample storage is also
a big issue (though it did not occur to me until a couple of
years ago, sigh). Store samples under vacuum or purge with N2.
A Sample Saver is a great way to do this since you can purge it
or pump it with the stubs in place and then close it down. Or
you can store specimens in a vacuum oven. Sometimes I don't
particularly like the ovens when heated since oxides tend to
form immediately upon removal. This is a killer for EBSD.

Let us know how it goes. C is a constant battle for me. Glad
I'm not alone. I Probably could write more but then it takes
on a short novel!

gary g.




At 05:59 AM 1/26/2009, you wrote:



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From: ray.twesten-at-sbcglobal.net
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 14:03:23 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Multiple EELS acquisition

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Dear Rao,
There is a script that will do what you need in the DM Script Database
maintained by TU-Graz. The URL is:
http://www.felmi-zfe.tugraz.at/dm_scripts/dm_scripts/freeware/programs/Multi
ple-EELS-Acquisition.htm

This script was written by David Mitchell. I have not tried it personally,
but David's scripts tend to be of the highest quality, work out of the box,
and are typically easy to follow and modify if needed. The description of
the script follows:

Multiple EELS Acquisition
script version: 1.4 platform: PC DM version: 3.7.x modified: 2005-02-08
hardware:JEOL 2010F, GIF 2000
contact: David Mitchell (ANSTO Materials)

description / instruction
This script will capture multiple EELS spectra and store them in a 3D EELS
data cube. The EELS data cube is then processed to sum the spectra.
Alignment and summation of spectra can be done with or without energy shift
correction (to compensate for any energy drift). EELS data cubes can also be
processed offline using the script 'EELS Cube Data Extraction', available at
this site. Offline processing permits individual spectra to be extracted and
spectra to be omitted from the summation. To use this script set up the
spectrometer to display an EELS spectrum on the CCD - then run the script -
enter exposure time, number of frames and any delay between frame capture.
To remove X-ray spikes from the data, use the script 'EELS Cube Data
Editor'.


The URL for the TU-Graz database is:
http://www.felmi-zfe.tugraz.at/dm_scripts/welcome.html


This database is not supported or maintained by Gatan. It is provided as a
community service by the kind folks at FELMI-ZFE

Best regards,
Ray


Ray D. Twesten, Ph.D.
Product Manager – Analytical Instruments
  Gatan, Inc.
Tel. +1 (925) 224-7392


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Email: rao.karavadi-at-rutgers.edu
Name: Rao Karavadi

Organization: Rutgers University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Multiple EELS acquisition

Question: Hi all

I am looking for a Digital Micrograph script file, where we can
acquire Multiple EELS spectrum with regular intervals of time. I am
interested to study radiation damage by Electron beam on different
materials which requires collections of EELS spectra with regular
intervals of time.

I truly appreciate your response

Thanks
Rao Karavadi
Rutgers: The State University of New Jersey
607 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854
USA


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From: wesaia-at-iastate.edu
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 14:17:29 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I would run comparative samples to verify or disprove your findings. I
would try to find samples as similar in nature as possible, but even if
you can't match textures you could compare the chemistry.

You could examine graphite as one extreme, polymers such as polyethylene
or polystyrene, and glass or metals as the other extreme.

The peak-to-background ratios are important. I would encourage scaling
the spectra to match the background intensities. You could use the
spectrum from graphite to see what 100% carbon should look like. The
polyethylene might show a little less carbon since it has hydrogen which
you cannot see. Glass or pure metals should not have any carbon, so the
only carbon you see there should be that due to contamination build up.
And build-up will grow with time. You should be able to compare
successive spectra and see growth in the carbon peak.

I would offer those results to your client and see what most resembles
their sample. If they have only low levels of carbon in their spectra,
it may be hard to say much about the source of that carbon. Maybe it was
really present. Maybe it was contamination from the scope. Maybe it was
contamination from the sample. Give it a try and see what happens.

Warren S.

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Email: emer.ryan-at-dit.ie
Name: Emer Ryan

Organization: CREST DIT DUBLIN

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for carbon

Question: Hello all,

I have been given a sample to analyse. The sample is non conducting
and are sputtered with gold. I've run an EDX and found various
elements,nothing too interesting, but the spectrum includes carbon. I
have explained to the requester that although carbon is present, I
cannot discount that the EPMA (Jeol JXA 8600 Superprobe) is
depositing carbon during analysis. I note that folk are growing
carbon whiskers on AFM tips to produce sharper tips but putting the
tip in a SEM for a few minutes; the older the SEM, the better i.e.
the SEM deposits carbon.....
What is the general opinion regarding detecting carbon using EDX?
Appreciated,
Emer.




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From: Don.Becker-at-bruker-axs.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 15:19:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Immediate Sales Opening at Bruker AXS Microanalysis

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http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bruker AXS Inc., a leading global provider of advanced X-ray solutions for the life and advanced materials sciences, is seeking an experienced
Regional Sales Manager - Microanalysis for the Southeast Territory

The Regional Sales Manager secures sales for BAXS Microanalysis Products in the southeast U.S. and act as company rep to existing customer base and prospective customers. Responsibilities include: prospecting for new customers, following up sales leads provided by the company, presenting and demonstrating company products, supplying quotations and technical information, formulating sales strategies, as well as negotiating and securing sales orders. In addition, the Regional Sales Manager will maintain contact with existing customers to assure their satisfaction, develop good working relationships with OEM salespeople, collect and report market information and provide routine sales forecasts.

Territory includes NC, SC, GA, FL, TN, AL, MS, AR, and LA. At least 50% travel is required. Bachelor's degree (B.S.or B.A.) from four-year college or university; or five years experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Three to five years experience in scientific equipment sales is a must. This position requires excellent verbal communication and interaction skills.

Bruker AXS Inc. offers a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package including health and dental insurance, Flexible Spending Account, company sponsored life and disability insurance, 401(k) plan with company matching components, stock option plan, and vacation and sick/personal days.

Qualified applicants should submit resume and salary requirements in confidence to:


Bruker AXS Inc.
Attn: Don Becker, Sales Manager
1239 Parkway Ave. Suite 203
Ewing, NJ 08628
FAX#: 609-771-4411
E-mail: don.becker-at-bruker-axs.com

Equal Opportunity Employer


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Don Becker
U.S. Sales Manager - Microanalysis
Bruker AXS Inc.
1239 Parkway Avenue, Suite 203
Ewing, NJ 08628
Tel: +1 (609) 771-4400
Fax: +1 (609) 771-4411
don.becker-at-bruker-axs.com
www.bruker-axs.com
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From: nicholas.ritchie-at-nist.gov
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 16:01:34 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Announcing the MAS Microanalysis of Particles Topical Conference

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

*************************************************
* MICROBEAM ANALYSIS SOCIETY *
* *
* Microanalysis of Particles 2009 *
* Topical Conference *
* *
* April 21-23, 2009 *
* Westmont, Il *
* *
************************************************

This conference takes a pragmatic approach to a
subtle subject - the microanalysis of particles.
Techniques covered include EDS, WDS, AEM, SIMS,
ESCA, CL, XRD, synchrotron XRF. We have invited
some of the most well known names in the industry
to present extended talks in the morning. In
the afternoon, attendees will be able to select
among various hands-on modules. Both novices
and experienced analysts will benefit.

For additional details:

http://www.microbeamanalysis.org/meetings/topical/Particles2009/program.htm

To sign up:

http://www.microbeamanalysis.org/meetings/topical/Particles2009/registration.htm

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Confirmed Invited Speakers:

Bob Anderhalt, EDAX - Improved quantitative analysis of particles with
topography using multiple EDS detectors

John Armstrong, Carnegie Institution for Science - ZAF corrections for
particle analysis

Paul Carpenter, Washington University of St. Louis - Electron-probe
microanalysis of particles and heterogeneous materials

John Fournelle, University of Wisconsin - Madison - Evaluating
atmospheric particles with combination of EDS, WDS and EBSD techniques

Nicholas Ritchie, NIST - Using DTSA-II to simulate and interpret
energy dispersive spectra from particles

Volker Rose, Argonne National Laboratory - New ways to see a smaller
world: The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at Argonne National Laboratory

Elaine Schumacher, McCrone Associates, Inc. - Transmission electron
microscopy for high resolution single-particle analysis

Craig Schwandt, McCrone Associates, Inc. - Microanalysis of particles:
An overview

Joseph Swider, McCrone Associates, Inc. - Powder micro X-ray
diffraction of particles

Ed Vicenzi, Smithsonian Institution - Microanalysis of inclusions

Robert Winarski, Argonne National Laboratory - The X-ray nanoprobe

Nestor Zaluzec, Argonne National Laboratory - Characterization of
nanoscale particles in the analytical electron microscope: Past, present
and future


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From: gary-at-gaugler.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2009 17:05:48 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Pls change #2 to "... un-used Al stub ..."

gary g.

At 11:45 AM 1/26/2009, you wrote:



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From: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 15:49:22 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples

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Email: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk
Name: Yisong Han

Organization: University of Sheffield

Title-Subject: [Filtered] preparation of plan-view TEM samples

Question: Dear All,

Does anybody know how to protect plan-view TEM samples, which are
thinned from one side only, from contamination during ion beam
milling? Thanks very much in advance.

Yisong

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From: aochalsk-at-uottawa.ca
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 15:49:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Hardware/Software for Olympus Fluoview FVX confocal

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Email: aochalsk-at-uottawa.ca
Name: Andrew Ochalski

Organization: University of Ottawa

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Hardware/Software for Olympus Fluoview FVX confocal

Question: Hi all,

Four years ago, we were given an older confocal microscope for
educational purposes, specifically an Olympus Fluoview FVX. The
software, Fluoview 2.1 as well as the scan/stage controller and scan
head all work together in a Win NT environment. We have none of the
original software disks and the (older) PC on which the whole lot is
running is constantly crashing (blue screen of death)and is probably
not long for this world. Olympus used to sell an upgrade package
compatible with WinXP, but Olympus is out of them and they are not
being made any more. If anyone has an upgraded system that they are
no longer using or, for any reason have a version of the controller,
card and updated software that they would consider selling (or giving
away), we would be thrilled to hear from you.

Andrew Ochalski,
Technical Supervisor,
Carsen Advanced Educational Microscopy Resource Centre
Biology Department
University of Ottawa
30 Marie Curie
Ottawa, ON
CANADA
K1N 6N5



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==============================Original Headers==============================
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10, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: Hardware/Software for Olympus Fluoview FVX confocal
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From: randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 16:26:54 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Evaporate salt (NaCl) on the side you want to protect. Dissolve the salt
in water when you are finished ion milling and the contamination will
flush away.

Ron Anderson

y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk wrote:
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} Email: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk
} Name: Yisong Han
}
} Organization: University of Sheffield
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] preparation of plan-view TEM samples
}
} Question: Dear All,
}
} Does anybody know how to protect plan-view TEM samples, which are
} thinned from one side only, from contamination during ion beam
} milling? Thanks very much in advance.
}
} Yisong
}
} Login Host: 143.167.204.169
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
} 8, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:49:22 2009
} 8, 11 -- Received: from [206.69.208.22] (mac22.zaluzec.com [206.69.208.22])
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} 8, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples
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==============================Original Headers==============================
4, 19 -- From randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com Tue Jan 27 16:26:54 2009
4, 19 -- Received: from hrndva-omtalb.mail.rr.com (hrndva-omtalb.mail.rr.com [71.74.56.125])
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4, 19 -- References: {200901272149.n0RLnXJs018374-at-ns.microscopy.com}
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From: jsiegmund-at-7thwavelabs.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 16:52:57 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Hardware/Software for Olympus Fluoview FVX

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Email: jsiegmund-at-7thwavelabs.com
Name: Joachim Siegmund
Organization: SeventhWave Labs

On the software side, ImageJ with the UCSD plugin might work for you:
http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/plugins/ucsd.html

On the driver side, you can try whether or not the win2000 drivers work
with winXP ... sometimes they do. There is also a compatibility mode in
XP for old software, I think.

Joachim


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Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2009 4:02 PM
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Email: aochalsk-at-uottawa.ca
Name: Andrew Ochalski

Organization: University of Ottawa

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Hardware/Software for Olympus Fluoview FVX
confocal

Question: Hi all,

Four years ago, we were given an older confocal microscope for
educational purposes, specifically an Olympus Fluoview FVX. The
software, Fluoview 2.1 as well as the scan/stage controller and scan
head all work together in a Win NT environment. We have none of the
original software disks and the (older) PC on which the whole lot is
running is constantly crashing (blue screen of death)and is probably
not long for this world. Olympus used to sell an upgrade package
compatible with WinXP, but Olympus is out of them and they are not
being made any more. If anyone has an upgraded system that they are
no longer using or, for any reason have a version of the controller,
card and updated software that they would consider selling (or giving
away), we would be thrilled to hear from you.

Andrew Ochalski,
Technical Supervisor,
Carsen Advanced Educational Microscopy Resource Centre
Biology Department
University of Ottawa
30 Marie Curie
Ottawa, ON
CANADA
K1N 6N5



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confocal
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==============================Original Headers==============================
22, 29 -- From jsiegmund-at-7thwavelabs.com Tue Jan 27 16:52:57 2009
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From: cljohnson33-at-gmail.com
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 17:23:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Here are a couple possibilities:

1. Paint the side you want to protect with a layer of clear fingernail
polish and dissolve in acetone after ion milling is finished.

2. I used to cut out a 3mm disk of a very thin sheet of mica and place
that under the specimen. Any redeposited material will stick to the
mica disk.

Craig.

-------------------------------
Craig L. Johnson
TEM Scientist
Centralized Research Facility
Drexel University College of Engineering
-------------------------------

}
} On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 5:31 PM, {randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com} wrote:
} }
} }
} }
} } ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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} }
} } Evaporate salt (NaCl) on the side you want to protect. Dissolve the salt
} } in water when you are finished ion milling and the contamination will
} } flush away.
} }
} } Ron Anderson
} }
} } y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk wrote:
} } } ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } } The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of America
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} } } please copy both y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk as well as the MIcroscopy Listserver
} } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } }
} } } Email: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk
} } } Name: Yisong Han
} } }
} } } Organization: University of Sheffield
} } }
} } } Title-Subject: [Filtered] preparation of plan-view TEM samples
} } }
} } } Question: Dear All,
} } }
} } } Does anybody know how to protect plan-view TEM samples, which are
} } } thinned from one side only, from contamination during ion beam
} } } milling? Thanks very much in advance.
} } }
} } } Yisong
} } }
} } } Login Host: 143.167.204.169
} } } ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
} } }
} } } ==============================Original Headers==============================
} } } 8, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:49:22 2009
} } } 8, 11 -- Received: from [206.69.208.22] (mac22.zaluzec.com [206.69.208.22])
} } } 8, 11 -- by ns.microscopy.com (8.12.11.20060308/8.12.8) with ESMTP id n0RLnLba018216
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} } } 8, 11 -- Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 15:49:20 -0600
} } } 8, 11 -- To: microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} } } 8, 11 -- From: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
} } } 8, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples
} } } 8, 11 -- Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
} } } ==============================End of - Headers==============================
} } }
} } }
} } }
} }
} }
} } ==============================Original Headers==============================
} } 4, 19 -- From randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com Tue Jan 27 16:26:54 2009
} } 4, 19 -- Received: from hrndva-omtalb.mail.rr.com (hrndva-omtalb.mail.rr.com [71.74.56.125])
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} } 4, 19 -- Message-ID: {497F8A24.9020105-at-tampabay.rr.com}
} } 4, 19 -- Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2009 17:26:44 -0500
} } 4, 19 -- From: Ron Anderson {randerson20-at-tampabay.rr.com}
} } 4, 19 -- User-Agent: Thunderbird 2.0.0.19 (Windows/20081209)
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} } 4, 19 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples
} } 4, 19 -- References: {200901272149.n0RLnXJs018374-at-ns.microscopy.com}
} } 4, 19 -- In-Reply-To: {200901272149.n0RLnXJs018374-at-ns.microscopy.com}
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6, 35 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples
6, 35 -- From: Craig Johnson {cljohnson33-at-gmail.com}
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From: contact-at-integrityscientific.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 03:47:08 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: preparation of plan-view TEM samples

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Just to add to Ron Anderson's and Craig Johnson's posts - if you use
glycopthalate wax (which is often sold under a trade name of QuickStick
or something like that), you can put a small amount into a few ml of
acetone and paint it on the surface you want to protect. The wax is
totally soluble in acetone and should leave no residue (okay, I guess a
small amount of amorphous carbon on the atomic scale). I'm not sure
that nail varnish would do the same.

Richard Beanland

y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk wrote:
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} Email: y.han-at-sheffield.ac.uk
} Name: Yisong Han
}
} Organization: University of Sheffield
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] preparation of plan-view TEM samples
}
} Question: Dear All,
}
} Does anybody know how to protect plan-view TEM samples, which are
} thinned from one side only, from contamination during ion beam
} milling? Thanks very much in advance.
}
} Yisong
}
} Login Host: 143.167.204.169
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
} 8, 11 -- From zaluzec-at-microscopy.com Tue Jan 27 15:49:22 2009
} 8, 11 -- Received: from [206.69.208.22] (mac22.zaluzec.com [206.69.208.22])
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==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: jacques.faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 06:44:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Looking for carbon

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi

You wrote "The sample is non conducting and are sputtered with gold. ".
Depending of how thick and how grainy your gold coating is, the C signal
you see will only partially reflect the C present in the sample.
Absorbtion of the carbon line by the gold layer may be strong. A little
peak could reflect a low surface contamiantion as welle as a high carbon
presence in the sample.

An other way to test your sample, would be to do EDS at low voltage
(less then 5 kev, better 3 keV) without coating. It is possible (more or
less easy) to find conditions where one have no or low charging, without
coating. At low energy, one have too a much better emission yield on low
energy x-ray lines.

If contamination occurs, you should see it well at low voltage too, and
better with an in lens SE detector (of coarse not on the JXA).

As other have said, low energy lines are difficulte, C and N in
particular (but Be or B too !).

Hope it helps

J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr



emer.ryan-at-dit.ie a écrit :
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} Title-Subject: [Filtered] Looking for carbon
}
} Question: Hello all,
}
} I have been given a sample to analyse. The sample is non conducting
} and are sputtered with gold. I've run an EDX and found various
} elements,nothing too interesting, but the spectrum includes carbon. I
} have explained to the requester that although carbon is present, I
} cannot discount that the EPMA (Jeol JXA 8600 Superprobe) is
} depositing carbon during analysis. I note that folk are growing
} carbon whiskers on AFM tips to produce sharper tips but putting the
} tip in a SEM for a few minutes; the older the SEM, the better i.e.
} the SEM deposits carbon.....
} What is the general opinion regarding detecting carbon using EDX?
} Appreciated,
} Emer.
}
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From: gary-at-perfendo.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 07:32:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: book request

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Email: gary-at-perfendo.com
Name: Gary B. Carr

Organization: Pacific Endodontic Research Foundation

Title-Subject: [Filtered] book request

Question: Does anyone have a copy of: Biomedical Electron Microscopy:
Illustrated Methods and Interpretations by Maunsbach
that they would like to sell me?

858-558-3636

Thanks in advance,
Gary


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From: jrcastel-at-quim.ucm.es
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 07:32:32 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Sample sensitivity under de e-beam

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Email: jrcastel-at-quim.ucm.es
Name: Julio Ramirez-Castellanos

Organization: Complutense Univ. Madrid

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Sample sensitivity under de e-beam

Question: I am trying to examine a GeO2 sample by HRTEM, however, the
sample is very unstable under de electron beam .... what can I do
.... thanks.

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From: TindallR-at-missouri.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 09:42:28 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Demise of Spurr's?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

There was a recent string on the listserv concerning substitutes for the
late, lamented Spurr's resin. Really? Is Spurr's gone? We just
ordered some from our usual suppliers and I haven't heard anything about
its being discontinued. Have I missed something (not impossible or
even unlikely some days)?

Cheers,
Randy

Randy Tindall
Senior EM Specialist
Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
W125 Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
Tel: (573) 882-8304
Fax: (573) 884-2227
Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
On-line calendar:
http://biotech.rnet.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/Calcium310.pl?Op=Splash&Amount=
Week&NavType=Both&Type=TimePlan
Sons of Norway: http://www.sofn.com




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From: Matt.Laframboise-at-Kraft.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 10:06:33 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Job Opportunity: Scientist/Microscopist

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Scientist/Microscopist (# 932058)

Kraft Foods, Global, Inc. is currently seeking a Scientist/Microscopist
to work in our R&D facility in Glenview,IL.

The candidate will thrive on the opportunity to resolve problems/build
knowledge in the Food R&D arena by the application of advanced
microscopy. The candidate will work in a team with other structural
scientists (light microscopy, Confocal, SEM,TEM) and chemical and
physical scientists.

Utilize expertise in spatial resolution ranging from light microscopy to
electron microscopy combined with spectral imaging in order to resolve
problems and build knowledge in Food/Packaging. PhD or equivalent in
biology/biochemicstry with a proficiency in advanced microscopy
techniques including Energy Filtering TEM, SEM x-ray microanalysis, and
histochemistry are expected along with both solo and team work
capablities. The position requires the ability to work on several
projects simultaneously and communicate finding to other scientists,
product developers and managers.

PhD in Bio/Chem or Equivalent
Minimum 1-3 years of experience in Biology/Life Sciences
Minimum 1-3 years of experience in Chemistry
High skill level in EFTEM & SEM
Experience in EM sample preparation methods for diverse foods
Computer skills in image analysis and digital imaging
Food Sciences

KRAFT Foods is the World's second largest food and Beverage Company. For
more than 100 years we have been dedicated to helping people around the
world eat and live better. Hundreds of millions of times a day in over
150 countries consumers reach for their favorite Kraft Brands. Kraft has
approximately 98,000 employees in 68 countries.

Diversity generates new ideas that yield the innovation we need for
company growth, competitive advantage, and industry leadership. KRAFT
strives to create a rich and stimulating work climate to help you
develop your skills and advance your career- team environments designed
to promote and reward individuality, innovation, leadership, and strong
business results based on a solid understanding of the global
organization.

Kraft Foods offers a competitive compensation and benefits package
including health care coverage, generous 401k match, annual incentive
bonus and paid time off.

Candidates who are interested in applying for this position should do so
via the Kraft Foods applicant tracking system, by cutting and pasting
the following link into their web browser:

Matt LaFramboise
Kraft Foods
R&D Recruiter
847.646.9241
Matt.laframboise-at-kraft.com


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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 10:45:12 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Demise of Spurr's?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

In accordance with "List" protocol, I am copying this to the List. I
sent it to Randy offline with some attachments that can't go to the
list. The essential attachment, the new formulation is included at the
bottom of this message.

Dale
-----------------------

Hi Randy,

I think I was responsible for starting the most recent thread on Spurr's
resin. At the time I had bought a Spurr's Kit from EMS and had problems
with it. I noticed that one of the components had been changed and was
far more viscous than the original component. I checked the included
docs and it gave the same mixture as the original and made no mention of
the viscosity - that was from the bottle.
------------------------------------------------
Note that one of the components of the Spurr's resin (VCD = ERL-4206) is
no longer made and is replaced by a new component (ERL-4221) that is
much more viscous and has a different WPE value. E. Ann Ellis has
published new formulations to use with the new resin components.
---------------------------------------------------
Several people told me of Ann Ellis' work/publications on this, and the
corrected formulation. See attached documents.
----------------------------
Corrected Formulation for Spurr Low Viscosity Embedding Medium Using the
Replacement Epoxide ERL 4221. E. Ann Ellis
Microsc Microanal 12(Supp 2), 2006
Microscopy and Imaging Center, BSBW 119/MS 2257, Texas A&M University,
College Station,
TX 77843-2257
-------------------------------
E. Ann Ellis, Microscopy Today, Vol 14, No 4, July 2006
Microscopy Today, July 2006, E. Ann Ellis "Solutions to the Problem
of Substitution of ERL 4221 for Vinyl Cyclohexene Dioxide in Spurr Low
Viscosity Embedding Formulations"
---------------------------------------------

Eventually Stacie at EMS chimed in and said they had been aware of it
and she produced some data.. that had not been present in the catalog,
nor included with the kits they sold as Spurr's resin.....

Hope this helps.

Dale

------------------------------------------------
Spurr-replacement "New Formulation"

E. Ann Ellis, Microscopy Today, Vol 14, No 4, July 2006
Microscopy Today, July 2006, E. Ann Ellis "Solutions to the Problem
of Substitution of ERL 4221 for Vinyl Cyclohexene Dioxide in
Spurr Low Viscosity Embedding Formulations"



All formulas are for a "10g batch" - with reference to (epoxy + acid
anhydride)

Epoxy Anhyride Catalyst Comments
-------- -------- --------- -------- ------

ERL 4221 NSA DER-736 DMAE weights are in grams

4.10 5.90 0.95 0.10 Hard
4.10 5.90 1.43 0.10 Standard
4.10 5.90 1.90 0.10 Soft


Low Viscosity Formula (Half the viscosity of the "Refomulated Spurr's")
-------------------------
ERL 4221 2.22g
Quetol-651 1.40g
NSA 6.38g
DER-736 1.43g
BDMA 0.2g
Some think BDMA should be less, 0.1g

I (DAC) used 0.09g DMAE (5 drops from a Samco #241 pipet) and it set
nicely in 16h -at- 70C




TindallR-at-missouri.edu wrote:
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}
} There was a recent string on the listserv concerning substitutes for the
} late, lamented Spurr's resin. Really? Is Spurr's gone? We just
} ordered some from our usual suppliers and I haven't heard anything about
} its being discontinued. Have I missed something (not impossible or
} even unlikely some days)?
}
} Cheers,
} Randy
}
} Randy Tindall
} Senior EM Specialist
} Electron Microscopy Core Facility---We Do Small Well!
} W125 Veterinary Medicine
} University of Missouri
} Columbia, MO 65211
} Tel: (573) 882-8304
} Fax: (573) 884-2227
} Email: tindallr-at-missouri.edu
} Web: http://www.emc.missouri.edu
} On-line calendar:
} http://biotech.rnet.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/Calcium310.pl?Op=Splash&Amount=
} Week&NavType=Both&Type=TimePlan
} Sons of Norway: http://www.sofn.com
}
}
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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} 6, 27 -- From: "Tindall, Randy D." {TindallR-at-missouri.edu}
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==============================Original Headers==============================
20, 20 -- From dac-at-research.umass.edu Wed Jan 28 10:45:12 2009
20, 20 -- Received: from race5.oit.umass.edu (race5.oit.umass.edu [128.119.101.41])
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20, 20 -- Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 11:46:09 -0500
20, 20 -- From: Dale Callaham {dac-at-research.umass.edu}
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From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 10:48:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Demise of Spurr's?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

--On 28 January 2009 09:53 -0600 TindallR-at-missouri.edu wrote:
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------
} --- The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} -------------------------------------------------------------------------

} There was a recent string on the listserv concerning substitutes for the
} late, lamented Spurr's resin. Really? Is Spurr's gone? We just
} ordered some from our usual suppliers and I haven't heard anything about
} its being discontinued. Have I missed something (not impossible or
} even unlikely some days)?
}
} Cheers,
} Randy

Hi Randy,
I'd be immensely grateful if you can provide me with a source. It's
not available (it being the VCD - vinylcyclohexene dioxide - component of
the mixture) here in the UK for sure, and the low viscosity resin
substitutes I've tried are nowhere near as good for ease of sectioning and
staining compared with Spurr resin.
I'm almost tempted to ask you to let me know the source
individually and not via the server, because I reckon the stocks will
disappear rapidly....but I won't be that mean!
Regards,
Jules

Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG

==============================Original Headers==============================
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4, 24 -- Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 16:48:53 -0000
4, 24 -- To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
4, 24 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Demise of Spurr's?
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==============================End of - Headers==============================




From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 10:58:09 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Demise of Spurr's?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi Randy,
Yes, I'd love the attachments if they give the corrected formula
for the new resin mix. I did try it before and it wasn't good for me!
Appreciate your (and Dale's) help,
Jules

--On 28 January 2009 10:52 -0600 "Tindall, Randy D."
{TindallR-at-missouri.edu} wrote:

} Hi Jules,
}
} Hopefully the Dale Callahan post clears this up. I think we get the
} same formulation as you, but they still call it "Spurr's". I can send
} you Dale's attachments, if you like.
}
} Good luck,
} Randy
}
} -----Original Message-----
} From: j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk [mailto:j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk]
} Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 10:50 AM
} To: Tindall, Randy D.
} Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Demise of Spurr's?
}
}
}
}
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} ----
} The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} America
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} http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver
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} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} --On 28 January 2009 09:53 -0600 TindallR-at-missouri.edu wrote:
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
} } --- The Microscopy ListServer -- CoSponsor: The Microscopy Society of
} } America To Subscribe/Unsubscribe --
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver On-Line Help
} } http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/FAQ.html
} }
} ------------------------------------------------------------------------
} -
}
} } There was a recent string on the listserv concerning substitutes for
} the
} } late, lamented Spurr's resin. Really? Is Spurr's gone? We just
} } ordered some from our usual suppliers and I haven't heard anything
} about
} } its being discontinued. Have I missed something (not impossible or
} } even unlikely some days)?
} }
} } Cheers,
} } Randy
}
} Hi Randy,
} I'd be immensely grateful if you can provide me with a source.
} It's
} not available (it being the VCD - vinylcyclohexene dioxide - component
} of
} the mixture) here in the UK for sure, and the low viscosity resin
} substitutes I've tried are nowhere near as good for ease of sectioning
} and
} staining compared with Spurr resin.
} I'm almost tempted to ask you to let me know the source
} individually and not via the server, because I reckon the stocks will
} disappear rapidly....but I won't be that mean!
} Regards,
} Jules
}
} Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
} (Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
} Electron Microscope Division,
} The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
} John Maynard-Smith Building,
} School of Life Sciences,
} University of Sussex,
} Falmer,
} Brighton BN1 9QG
}
} ==============================Original
} Headers==============================
} 4, 24 -- From bafg3-at-sussex.ac.uk Wed Jan 28 10:48:56 2009
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} (karpinski.uscs.susx.ac.uk [139.184.14.85])
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} 4, 24 -- Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 16:48:53 -0000
} 4, 24 -- To: Microscopy-at-microscopy.com
} 4, 24 -- Subject: Re: [Microscopy] Demise of Spurr's?
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} 4, 24 -- From: Julian Thorpe {j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk}
} ==============================End of -
} Headers==============================



Dr. Julian R. Thorpe
(Office 2C9/Lab 2C11-13)
Electron Microscope Division,
The Sussex Centre for Advanced Microscopy,
John Maynard-Smith Building,
School of Life Sciences,
University of Sussex,
Falmer,
Brighton BN1 9QG
Tel.: ext +44 (0)1273 877585
int 7585

URLs:
(home)
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/biology/profile2686.html
(lab)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/cover.htm
(research)
http://www.lifesci.susx.ac.uk/Home/Julian_Thorpe/ad_cover.htm

==============================Original Headers==============================
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7, 24 -- Subject: RE: [Microscopy] Re: Demise of Spurr's?
7, 24 -- Message-ID: {506272204.1233161886-at-ls0130.lifesci.susx.ac.uk}
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From: jd-at-laddresearch.com
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 12:45:41 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: Demise of Spurr's?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Here is a link to the information you are looking for on Ann's work:

http://www.laddresearch.com/kitinstr/spurrkitNewformula.pdf

Dr. Charles Duvic
Chief Chemist

Disclaimer: Ladd Research is a supply house for microscopy supplies
including Spurr's Kits.

Ladd Research
83 Holly Court
Williston, VT 05495

On-line Catalog: www.laddresearch.com

Telephone: 1-802-658-4961 (anywhere)
Toll Free 1-800-451-3406 (US)
Fax: 1-802-660-8859

e-mail: sales-at-laddresearch.com



At 12:04 PM 1/28/2009, j.r.thorpe-at-sussex.ac.uk wrote:



} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 13:02:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Pre-embedding staining of embedding media

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi everyone,

I have a question regarding "pre-embedding staining" of 812 or Spurr's
resin.

TEM is a useful tool for study of interaction of dental adhesives with
dentin (which is mostly mineral). Unfortunately for me embedding resin
and dental adhesive resin have about the same electron density, making
it difficult, if not impossible, to tell them apart. It makes difficult
to observe depth of infiltration, porosity, etc. So far for studies like
these I have cut sections from not embedded teeth with mixed results.

I would greatly appreciate any suggestions about changing electron
density of embedding media.

Many thanks in advance,

Vladimir

Vladimir M. Dusevich, Ph.D.
Electron Microscope Lab Manager
371 School of Dentistry
650 E. 25th Street
Kansas City, MO 64108-2784

Phone: (816) 235-2072
Fax: (816) 235-5524
Web: http://www.umkc.edu/dentistry/microscopy



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From: jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 14:30:27 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LKB Knifemaker 7800

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Years ago (1980s), I followed someone else's lead to dope epoxy resin
with iodoform to increase its average atomic number.

I was studying minerals in coal and standard epoxy resins provided
practically no contrast with coal in backscattered electron images. We
ended up dissolving about 15 wt.% iodoform in epoxy resin. We later
added the hardener and the epoxy behaved in much the same way as the
original two-part epoxy. That is, hardness and polymerization were
similar.

The resulting epoxy offered significant contrast with coal and allowed
us to proceed with automated image analyses.

Be advised that iodoform is rather nasty and needs to be handled with
care.

For what it's worth, I began working with iodoform shortly after the
Right-to-know laws were passed. Suppliers had recently started including
MSDSs with all their chemicals. I was still bemused that my
chemical-grade calcium carbonate "should be disposed of in an approved,
chemical-waste landfill" when my iodoform arrived. I had to do some more
of my own research to determine if iodoform was really as nasty as the
MSDS said or not. (It is.) Someone was crying wolf about the calcium
carbonate while a contractor was laying tons of the stuff just outside
our building as a base for the parking lot.

Warren S.

-----Original Message-----
X-from: DusevichV-at-umkc.edu [mailto:DusevichV-at-umkc.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, January 28, 2009 1:03 PM
To: wesaia-at-iastate.edu

Dear friends:

This is a message asking for help adjusting our LKB Knifemaker(s).

I am teaching an ultramicrotomy class to 20 community college students
and we use glass knives. My job is to make sure the instruments are
adjusted so they can make good knives.

We have 6, yes that's six, LKB Knifemakers in various states of
(dis)repair. I need to build at least one good one from all of these.

Most of them were donated, some are better than others, I can probably
figure out what to do, but just wanted to check with any experts on
the list.

In another life, I used an LKB Knifemaker that worked pretty well.
That one was serviced by an LKB tech once and a while and, as usual,
had all the adjustments taped down with notes saying things like 'Do
not adjust'. Since I could at least follow directions, I never tried
to change the adjustments.

Now in my new life, I have 6 things that look like Knifemakers sitting
on the bench and 20 sets of eyes looking at me expecting these things
to work perfectly every time. I have done the expected Googling and
found a few remarks about adjusting Knifemakers, but before I start
tinkering, I wanted to check with the list to see if someone has the
magic formula to insure success. Experience trumps google every time.

Thanks

Jon

Jonathan Krupp
Delta College
5151Pacific Ave.
Stockton, CA 95207
209-954-5284
jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu




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From: oshel1pe-at-cmich.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 15:38:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LKB Knifemaker 7800

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jon,

Another idea, especially since you have 6 of these miserable things.
Rebuild one or two to make knives by the balanced-break method. How
to do this is detailed by Herbert Hagler, Chap. 5, "Ultramicrotomy
for Biological Electron Microscopy" pp67-96 in
Electron MIcroscopy: Methods and Protocols, John Kuo, ed., 2nd
edition. Specifically, Note 1 pg 91 ff.
I only have one knife-maker and it works well enough to torment
students, so I haven't done this. If I had 2, I would've by now.

Phil

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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 15:44:31 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: LKB Knifemaker 7800

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi Jon,

The magic formula is the manual. You didn't mention having one. It goes
over all the features of the knives and adjustments to get good ones. It
is really very simple once you get into it - only about 4 or 5 things to
tweek.

These things are fairly rugged. There is a trick to getting the movable
overhead clamping part off; You position the clamping lever at ~45o to
the front (or back??) and lift and it slides up and off. You may need to
clean the mating faces well with solvent to remove the sticky grease you
may find there. These parts are brass and only need to be clean. The
scoring part that you pull out is the same (clean) but I do use some
silicone lube lightly on it; never anything that would get gummy, and
some very light grease on the cam that the scoring wheel follows (inside
the silver outer tube; again here start with it clean, and use sparingly
a light grease only on the cam face, not the scoring wheel.

Note that the score wheel can be set for cutting squares from strips
(the parallel lines) or scoring squares for knives - the square with a
line symbol; these settings determine where the scoring wheel drops onto
the glass and where it lifts off, very important.

The twiddle knobs at the top and bottom of the glass-position clamping
forks position the glass square so that the { {fixed} } score falls on it
just so. At the top and bottom there are 2 adjustments one is side-side
and one clamps the metal fork that contacts the knife corner to set the
position of the glass for and aft; the front one sets the position and
the rear fork only applies pressure. You can change the angle of the
score relative to the corners, and control where the score lifts off the
square at the near corner by adjusting the clamping forks side-to-side
and fore and aft; the side-side can be done at both top and bottom to
accentuate your frustration but eventually place the score in the
correct position. Adjustment for a score to a position very close to the
near corner is critical for a controlled break; the break should come
out on the right-hand side of the near corner and within 0.5mm of the
corner - and this will be the cutting edge of the good knife. In good
adjustment you will get 2 knives that are fairly symmetrical but not
completely. The other opposite cutting edge will be less controlled and
that knife is rarely as good, but usually just fine for facing up blocks
or semi-thins.

Scoring wheel must be sharp. Easily replaced. I have a source for them
if you need new ones. They are a standard size still available. Google
works too.

Also the scoring pressure must be light - thus the need for the sharp
wheel; too much pressure, too deep and the score is broad and knives
will not break smoothly and be erratic in shape. A gentle breaking
pressure and slow break is preferred for the best knives.

And all glass is not created equal. If you don't have a stock see if
someone can make a recommendation. I have a lot of old LKB glass and it
is still very good. People have brought newer glass and some of it does
not break so well.

Let me know if you need a copy of the instructions w/pictures - the
originals with drawings of the score marks, angles, etc. are very helpful.


Dale

jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu wrote:
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} Dear friends:
}
} This is a message asking for help adjusting our LKB Knifemaker(s).
}
} I am teaching an ultramicrotomy class to 20 community college students
} and we use glass knives. My job is to make sure the instruments are
} adjusted so they can make good knives.
}
} We have 6, yes that's six, LKB Knifemakers in various states of
} (dis)repair. I need to build at least one good one from all of these.
}
} Most of them were donated, some are better than others, I can probably
} figure out what to do, but just wanted to check with any experts on
} the list.
}
} In another life, I used an LKB Knifemaker that worked pretty well.
} That one was serviced by an LKB tech once and a while and, as usual,
} had all the adjustments taped down with notes saying things like 'Do
} not adjust'. Since I could at least follow directions, I never tried
} to change the adjustments.
}
} Now in my new life, I have 6 things that look like Knifemakers sitting
} on the bench and 20 sets of eyes looking at me expecting these things
} to work perfectly every time. I have done the expected Googling and
} found a few remarks about adjusting Knifemakers, but before I start
} tinkering, I wanted to check with the list to see if someone has the
} magic formula to insure success. Experience trumps google every time.
}
} Thanks
}
} Jon
}
} Jonathan Krupp
} Delta College
} 5151Pacific Ave.
} Stockton, CA 95207
} 209-954-5284
} jkrupp-at-deltacollege.edu
}
}
}
}
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==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: guosheng.liu-at-usask.ca
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 18:22:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: looking for "free" parts for Philips 505 SEM

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Email: guosheng.liu-at-usask.ca
Name: Guosheng Liu

Organization: Biology Dept, Univ of Saskatchewan

Title-Subject: [Filtered] looking for "free" parts for Philips 505 SEM

Question: Dear All:

Our old Philips 505 SEM stopped working for a while and I still want
to re-energize it at a low cost if possible.

Due to no immediate budget available for ordering new ones, I am
wondering if there is a similar model SEM sitting around but we can
salvage some parts (see following) from it before it is disposed.
Detailed salvaging /shipping fees could be discussed later.

5322-271-34165 Micro-switch
5322-282-54055 Thermal switch 60C
5322-282-50036 Thermal switch 112C
5322-695-14541 PV10P Valve
5322-695-14542 Heating element
SCA module A2 board TV scan generator.

Thank you!

Guosheng

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From: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 18:23:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Paragon stain TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Email: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov
Name: Sue Tyler

Organization: Cooperative Oxford Laboratory

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Paragon stain TEM

Question: I have checked the listserver for Paragon staining of epoxy
resin and found several very helpful comments. I tried using
Martin's procedure without success. I came across another comment
about etching the slides first... Does anyone have experience with
this?

I have since tried Richardson's stain and it just doesn't give enough
differentiation. I am staining coral tissues that have been
decalcified in 10% EDTA and fixed in 2% Gluteraldehyde, postfixed in
1% Osmium and embedded in Spurr's.

Hope you can help.
Sue

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From: tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2009 22:01:19 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: Paragon stain TEM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi, Sue-

I can't find my (antique) notes on etching at the moment, but I can sort
of remember, and it might get you started while someone else comes up with
something. I was etching epoxy resins with saturated ethanolic NaOH to do
PAS.

Make a solution of saturated ethanolic NaOH by dumping a lot of NaOH
pellets in a bottle of absolute ethanol, like an inch and a half in a pint
bottle. Put it aside for a couple of weeks until it looks like cognac.
Soak slides in this solution in a coplin jar for (and this is where I
can't remember - Two hours? Two days?). Sections used to easily come off
those old, plain slides, so I was careful not to agitate. I think they
would stay on better with Superfrost Plus or treated slides. Go ahead and
start making your cognac .. er.. etching solution and I'll look for my
PAS protocol.

Aloha from chilly Hawaii (OK, so it's 67F)
Tina


} Organization: Cooperative Oxford Laboratory
}
} Title-Subject: [Filtered] Paragon stain TEM
}
} Question: I have checked the listserver for Paragon staining of epoxy
} resin and found several very helpful comments. I tried using
} Martin's procedure without success. I came across another comment
} about etching the slides first... Does anyone have experience with
} this?
}
} I have since tried Richardson's stain and it just doesn't give enough
} differentiation. I am staining coral tissues that have been
} decalcified in 10% EDTA and fixed in 2% Gluteraldehyde, postfixed in
} 1% Osmium and embedded in Spurr's.
}
} Hope you can help.
} Sue
}
} Login Host: 205.156.36.37
} ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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} 8, 11 -- From: sue.tyler-at-noaa.gov (by way of MicroscopyListserver)
} 8, 11 -- Subject: viaWWW: Paragon stain TEM
} 8, 11 -- Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
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****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************


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From: smithj-at-winthrop.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 07:52:47 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: etching epoxy sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

I prefer KOH in MeOH. We use 5' etch, followed by 2 changes of absolute
MeOH. We published a protocol for Iron Hematoxylin/Eosin/Alcian blue
(which gives pretty differentiated staining on marine inverts) a while
back in Microskopie; I can send a .doc file to anyone interested.
If you use PAS after etching, watch for staining artifact--epoxy
embedding generates a bunch of 'em, at least with our invert material.
Julian

tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu wrote:
} ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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}
} Hi, Sue-
}
} I can't find my (antique) notes on etching at the moment, but I can sort
} of remember, and it might get you started while someone else comes up with
} something. I was etching epoxy resins with saturated ethanolic NaOH to do
} PAS.
}
} Make a solution of saturated ethanolic NaOH by dumping a lot of NaOH
} pellets in a bottle of absolute ethanol, like an inch and a half in a pint
} bottle. Put it aside for a couple of weeks until it looks like cognac.
} Soak slides in this solution in a coplin jar for (and this is where I
} can't remember - Two hours? Two days?). Sections used to easily come off
} those old, plain slides, so I was careful not to agitate. I think they
} would stay on better with Superfrost Plus or treated slides. Go ahead and
} start making your cognac .. er.. etching solution and I'll look for my
} PAS protocol.
}
} Aloha from chilly Hawaii (OK, so it's 67F)
} Tina
}
}
}
} } Organization: Cooperative Oxford Laboratory
} }
} } Title-Subject: [Filtered] Paragon stain TEM
} }
} } Question: I have checked the listserver for Paragon staining of epoxy
} } resin and found several very helpful comments. I tried using
} } Martin's procedure without success. I came across another comment
} } about etching the slides first... Does anyone have experience with
} } this?
} }
} } I have since tried Richardson's stain and it just doesn't give enough
} } differentiation. I am staining coral tissues that have been
} } decalcified in 10% EDTA and fixed in 2% Gluteraldehyde, postfixed in
} } 1% Osmium and embedded in Spurr's.
} }
} } Hope you can help.
} } Sue
} }
} } Login Host: 205.156.36.37
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} } ==============================Original Headers==============================
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} }
}
} ****************************************************************************
} * Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
} * Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
} * University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
} ****************************************************************************
}
}
} ==============================Original Headers==============================
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--
Julian P.S. Smith III
Director, Winthrop Microscopy Facility
Dept. of Biology
Winthrop University
520 Cherry Rd.
Rock Hill, SC 29733

803-323-2111 x6427 (vox)
803-323-3448 (fax)
803-524-2347 (cell)


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From: dac-at-research.umass.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 09:54:28 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] LKB Knifemaker 7800 scoring wheels

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Several people have now asked about the scoring wheel source. I have not
bought from this company, but I had found this when I searched a while
back. http://www.glasscuttingwheels.com/cw.html (what else would you
expect?)

I have measured the LKB wheels and they are 5.0mm dia, with a 1.4mm hole
and 1.1mm thick, so the wheels are correct. The edge angle this company
recommends for ~6mm thick glass is 144degrees and this is what the LKB
wheels look like; I can photograph and measure the angle with ImageJ if
anyone requests it. The axles may be more of an issue - the original
ones are 6.5mm long and that size is not avaialble. The mechanism can
only accommodate a 6.5mm length (it is precisely 7.0mm wide); they offer
a 4mm and a 9.25mmlength, but a machinist could easily grind the longer
one to length. The 4mm would just hold the wheel but not well. The old
axles in my box show significant wear so they probably should be
replaced as a pair, the way they were sold by LKB.

I still have a number of original, new, wheels and axles, if we need
them to make measurements.

Hope this helps.

Dale

Taylor, Jeannette wrote:
} Dear Dale, would you please send me your source for new scoring wheels? We have an LKB Knifemaker 7800 and it works fine but the scoring wheel needs to be replaced as it is getting dull.
}
} Thanks, Jeannette
}
} Jeannette Taylor
} Technologist II
} Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core
} Emory University
} 1515 Dickey Drive
} Atlanta, Georgia 30322
}
} jvtaylo-at-emory.edu
} 404-712-8674
}
}
} This e-mail message (including any attachments) is for the sole use of
} the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged
} information. If the reader of this message is not the intended
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} or copying of this message (including any attachments) is strictly
} prohibited.
}
} If you have received this message in error, please contact
} the sender by reply e-mail message and destroy all copies of the
} original message (including attachments).

==============================Original Headers==============================
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From: tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 16:56:05 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: viaWWW: etching epoxy sections

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Ah, I found my old protocol, although I'll bet Julian's is more current,
and may give you the differentiation you're looking for.

Add 100-150g anhydrous NaOH pellets to 250 ml freshly opened bottle of
absolute ethanol. Allow to stand until cognac or deep rust-brown color,
shaking occasionally, for about a week. Keeps 4-5 weeks. Store in plastic
bottle, if possible. To remove resin from sections, immerse slides in
solution for an hour or more, checking to see when resin is etched away (I
remember this being about two hours for 0.5 micrometer thick sections).
Drain well, but don't blot. Immerse slides in 4 changes of absolute
ethanol, the proceed with staining, clearing, and mounting. This was
originally for PAS (Periodic Acid Schiff) on gecko reproductive
tissue. Now I want to try Julian's recipe on coral reproductive tissue...

Aloha,
Tina

} I prefer KOH in MeOH. We use 5' etch, followed by 2 changes of absolute
} MeOH. We published a protocol for Iron Hematoxylin/Eosin/Alcian blue
} (which gives pretty differentiated staining on marine inverts) a while
} back in Microskopie; I can send a .doc file to anyone interested.
} If you use PAS after etching, watch for staining artifact--epoxy
} embedding generates a bunch of 'em, at least with our invert material.
} Julian
}
} --
} Julian P.S. Smith III
} Director, Winthrop Microscopy Facility
} Dept. of Biology
} Winthrop University
} 520 Cherry Rd.
} Rock Hill, SC 29733
}
} 803-323-2111 x6427 (vox)
} 803-323-3448 (fax)
} 803-524-2347 (cell)

****************************************************************************
* Tina (Weatherby) Carvalho * tina-at-pbrc.hawaii.edu *
* Biological Electron Microscope Facility * (808) 956-6251 *
* University of Hawaii at Manoa * http://www.pbrc.hawaii.edu/bemf*
****************************************************************************


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From: ggt-at-phys.uni-sofia.bg
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 18:23:26 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Hitachi S-550 schematics documentation

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Email: ggt-at-phys.uni-sofia.bg
Name: Gichka Georgieva

Organization: Sofia University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Hitachi S-550 schematics documentation

Question: I need the full documentation (schematics especially) of a
SEM Hitachi S550 for upgrading and repair.

Can anyone help me to find it?

Thank you in advance.


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From: eric-at-unquantum.net
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 18:24:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: Genie software

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Email: eric-at-unquantum.net
Name: Eric Reiter

Organization: Unqunatum

Title-Subject: [Filtered] Genie software

Question: I have a Aptec series 5000 x-ray spectroscopy card:
Looking for

Aptec spectroscopy software, or
Canberra Genie software
for older 486-like computers in DOS or up to windows 2000.

Would like to buy this pulse height analysis software.

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From: jacques.faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 10:53:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM holder for TEM grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Hi all

As there is again some demand here for observations of TEM grids by SEM,
I took out of the drawer the home made TEM grids holders I had machined
a while ago. And non of them is really practical to use. The first was
made with an EM300 tip, and works right, but it's a one shot and for
limited to the jeol 840 serie stage. The second is delicate to use, and
I fear to bent the grids each time I take them away from the holder.

So what kind of holder do other use for TEM grids (only SEM
observations, no STEM), which allows very short WD and an easy way to
mount/umount 5-6 grids in a batch ? I've soon looked in some catalogues,
but certainly not at all sources. And users advices are very usfull !

I'm interested in any ideas and/or squetches for home manufacturing in
our workshop, and/or for documentions, users advices and manufacturer
doc and quoting etc.

Thanks in advance, and have a good WE !

--
J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr


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From: jacques.faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 11:03:10 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] SEM holder for TEM grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hi all

As there is again some demand here for observations of TEM grids by SEM,
I took out of the drawer the home made TEM grids holders I had machined
a while ago. And non of them is really practical to use. The first was
made with an EM300 tip, and works right, but it's a one shot and for
limited to the jeol 840 serie stage. The second is delicate to use, and
I fear to bent the grids each time I take them away from the holder.

So what kind of holder do other use for TEM grids (only SEM
observations, no STEM), which allows very short WD and an easy way to
mount/umount 5-6 grids in a batch ? I've soon looked in some catalogues,
but certainly not at all sources. And users advices are very usfull !

I'm interested in any ideas and/or squetches for home manufacturing in
our workshop, and/or for documentions, users advices and manufacturer
doc and quoting etc.

Thanks in advance, and have a good WE !

--
J. Faerber
IPCMS-GSI
(Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
23, rue de Loess ; BP43
67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
France

Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr


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From: tivol-at-caltech.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 12:04:56 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: TEM; diffraction pattern analysis

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hello listers,
I was asked recently about accuracy of measuring electron
diffraction patterns, and seemed to remember something in the MSA
listserver from about 10 years ago, forgetting that I was the one who
asked the question in the first place!

I'm not going for the record of longest running thread on the list, but
I do think it's worth asking the question again, particularly now there
are much better digital cameras (and aberration corrected machines), as
well as about 2^6 times more processing power in the standard computer -
which means 32-bit image processing is feasible, for example.

I don't expect any corrections to previous postings (Jan 1999) on the
basic physics (I hope) but it would be interesting to see how things
have moved on. Also I received 21 answers in 3 days back then, it will
be interesting to see if it's still as lively now.

And are there any other questions which were asked a decade ago which
should be re-visited?


Thanks

Richard Beanland

*Date: Tue, 05 Jan 1999 10:31:53 +0000 (GMT)


On Jan 30, 2009, at 9:06 AM, contact-at-integrityscientific.com wrote:

} I would like to get some information on TEM diffraction pattern
} analysis. Specifically;
}
} 1) What software is available for analysis of diffraction patterns
} (both
} ring patterns and spot patterns)? What kind of accuracy can be
} obtained
} - are we getting close to the accuracy of X-ray diffractometry yet, or
} are there fundamental reasons such as lens aberrations, smaller Bragg
} angles, and accuracy of measurement which mean that we'll never get
} there?
}
} 2) What are the typical procedures people use for, say, measuring
} camera
} length or identifying unknown phases using diffraction?
}
Dear Richard,
I certainly do not know all the existing software, but I do know that
there is the SP operation in SPIDER that can identify lattice points,
find the centers and radii of rings, and determine intensity values.
When I was doing SAED to determine the structure of phthalocyanines, I
wrote a script that performed a background subtraction in two steps.
The first step put boxes around all the spots, replaced the pixels
inside the boxes with values that were the average of the edges of the
boxes, then took a radial average (the center of which was the center
of the lattice). This was then subtracted from the ED pattern, which
got rid of the non-linear background and didn't have to be exact,
since the second step was a bilinear background subtraction. The
resulting intensities were sufficiently accurate to give reliable
structure determinations. I published several articles with Doug
Dorset and Jim Turner about this in the early '90s. Neither lens
aberrations, nor small Bragg angles present practical problems for
structure determinations, but dynamical scattering is a serious issue,
which was overcome in my work by operating at 1200 kV, which reduced
dynamical effects to a manageable level. Although I have never done
any CBED, I have heard reports at M&M detailing the information that
can be obtained, and these said that the low-order spots gave the most
accurate data on such features as the distribution of electrons in
chemical bonds. these data were more accurate than could be obtained
by any other method, including X-ray diffraction. John Spence is the
expert on this, so you may want to contact him.
I evaporated gold onto the phthalocyanines and took SAED patterns
from which the lattice constants of the phthalocyanines were
determined. (This also determines the camera length.) Having both
the gold and the specimen on the same grid controls for changes in
camera length that may occur with variations in specimen height or
other scope parameters. The phases were found by direct methods--in
the case of the phthalocyanines, the Sayre equation and triplet
formulas were sufficient, but either the tangent formula or maximum
entropy methods should work also. I authored a paper in Acta Cryst.
showing that these methods will work for electron diffraction, since
they are a consequence of the unitary nature of scattering processes.
The references in that paper are to work done by several people to
which I added a small amount.
Yours,
Bill Tivol, PhD
EM Scientist
Ultrafast EM Facility
Noyes Laboratory, MC 127-72
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena CA 91125
(626) 395-8833
tivol-at-caltech.edu


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From: bozzola-at-siu.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 18:22:49 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM holder for TEM grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Bonjour Jacques,

You probably already saw these in your search, but how about:

1. Grid holders, used in rotary shadowing might
be useful. Edwards, for example, makes a nice
holder that keeps 11 grids in place on a circular
holder. The holder could be inserted into the
SEM and much like a conventional stub. You can
see this device (E0857 1000 = 3 mm grid holder
used with Rotatilt 3) on page 2 and 3 of the
following brochure:

www.edwards.co.il/catalog/14/140200.pdf

2. The Grid Stick holder. It's a metal strip
designed to hold grids in place for TEM staining.
It does use a glue to tack the grids in place,
however. Otherwise, it looks reasonable. You need
to modify it to suit your needs. You can pursue
this at:

www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/technical/datasheet/71178.aspx

3. Something like the Leica cryo-grid holder
might work. This is a clamp that holds onto the
edge of the grid and is held in place by a
tightened screw. You may be able to make one
using a single-edge razor blade. If the blade is
attached to a large stub by means of a screw
(such that the blade is flat against the stub
surface), the edge of the blade could be used to
hold the grids onto the stub. You can see the
cryo-grid holder here:

www.leica-ag.com/pdfs.nsf/(ALLIDs)/A02F29FF6B35118BC1256D5D001F8B32/$FILE/Leica_EMFCS-Brochure_EN.pdf

Check out the following refrence:

René Haas, Gilbert De Murcia . 1985. A simple
device for accurate and large scale rotary
shadowing of spread biological specimens. Journal
of Electron Microscopy Technique.
Volume 2, Issue 5 , Pages 519 - 520.

Good luck.

John Bozzola


} As there is again some demand here for observations of TEM grids by SEM,
} I took out of the drawer the home made TEM grids holders I had machined
} a while ago. And non of them is really practical to use. The first was
} made with an EM300 tip, and works right, but it's a one shot and for
} limited to the jeol 840 serie stage. The second is delicate to use, and
} I fear to bent the grids each time I take them away from the holder.

--
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

John J. Bozzola, Ph.D., Director
Integrated Microscopy & Graphics Expertise (IMAGE)
Southern Illinois University
750 Communications Drive - MC 4402
Carbondale, IL 62901
Telephone: 618-453-3730

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


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From: blotocka-at-gmail.com
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 19:06:18 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] viaWWW: removing calcium oxalate crystals

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This Question/Comment was submitted to the Microscopy Listserver
using the WWW based Form at
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Email: blotocka-at-gmail.com
Name: Barbara £otocka

Organization: Warsaw Agricultural University

Title-Subject: [Filtered] removing calcium oxalate crystals

Question: Question:
Is there any procedure that allows to remove
(dissolve) calcium oxalate crystals from plant
samples prior to embedding?
I have to cut semi- and ultrathin sections of a
plant organ that is virtually studded with
druses. The hand sections look absolutely
stunning in polarization, but both paraffin and
hard-grade epoxy sections are scratched to shreds.
I considered soaking the osmium-contrasted
samples in some acidic buffer prior to
dehydration - but perhaps someone solved this
problem already?

Will be grateful for comments :-)
Barbara

Login Host: 89.77.150.78
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From: andrewb-at-vsl.cua.edu
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2009 20:23:11 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] Re: SEM holder for TEM grids

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Jacques,
I had a holder made in our shop some years back out of a 10mm dia
cylindrical carbon SEM stub which would accomodates 4 TEM grids. One could
start with a 25mm dia carbon stub and accomodate many more. Fabrication
involved milling 4 equallly spaced 3.1mm dia depressions 0.5-1.0mm deep in the
top of the stubso that the edge of each depression was about 1mm from the edge
of the stub.Then, a smaller diameter (~2.5mm dia) depression was bored about
10mm deep inthe center of each original depression to provide a small flange to
support the TEM grid and to act as as a beam "sink." A small radial notch about 0.5
mm wide was cut from the outer perimeter of the stub into the depression down to
a bit below the flange to allow tweezers to be used to place and remove each
grid. In my JSM-35 the evacuation of the airlock was gentle enough that no
retainers were needed to hold the grids in place. Later, we bored vents from
the side of the stub into the bottom of each inner depression to allow an
alternate path for the air to escape during pumpdown, and some small split
rings (similar to the old Philips circlip which can't be used here because it
is too stiff) were used to retain each grid.The rings were made by tightly wrapping
many turns of #32 tinned copper wire around a 3/32" drill bit and then
slitting the helix while still on the bit with a sharp razor blade along the
bit's length. Some adjustment and flattening was necessary to make the clip
fit snugly into the depression. These latter modifications were necessary
because when the holder was used in microscopes with a more vigorous pump-
down, the grids were sometimes blown out of the holder. If you don't need the
"sink" under the grid depression, you can omit it and possibly avoid the blowout
problem in a much simpler way. Perhaps this is more trouble than you want to go
to, but if you're interested contact me off list, and I can take a picture of the holder
to send to you.


On 30 Jan 2009 at 11:02, jacques.faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr wrote:

}
} Hi all
}
} As there is again some demand here for observations of TEM grids by
} SEM, I took out of the drawer the home made TEM grids holders I had
} machined a while ago. And non of them is really practical to use. The
} first was made with an EM300 tip, and works right, but it's a one
} shot and for limited to the jeol 840 serie stage. The second is
} delicate to use, and I fear to bent the grids each time I take them
} away from the holder.
}
} So what kind of holder do other use for TEM grids (only SEM
} observations, no STEM), which allows very short WD and an easy way to
} mount/umount 5-6 grids in a batch ? I've soon looked in some
} catalogues, but certainly not at all sources. And users advices are
} very usfull !
}
} I'm interested in any ideas and/or squetches for home manufacturing in
} our workshop, and/or for documentions, users advices and manufacturer
} doc and quoting etc.
}
} Thanks in advance, and have a good WE !
}
} --
} J. Faerber
} IPCMS-GSI
} (Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg
} Groupe Surface et Interfaces)
} 23, rue de Loess ; BP43
} 67034 Strasbourg CEDEX 2
} France
}
} Tel 00 33(0)3 88 10 71 01
} Fax 00 33(0)3 88 10 72 48
} E-mail Jacques.Faerber-at-ipcms.u-strasbg.fr
Sincerely yours,
Andy Buechele
Andrew C. Buechele, Ph.D.
The Catholic University of America - VSL
409 Hannan Hall
Washington, D.C. 20064
Phone: 202-319-4995 Fax: 202-319-4469




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From: sekkio-at-mac.com
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2009 03:01:59 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] July 11-15 2009 - Win in Science come to Genoa

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

EBSA 2009 is the 7th Congress of the European Biophysical Societies'
Association (EBSA), formed in 1984, with the objectives to advance and
disseminate knowledge of the principles, recent developments and
applications of biophysics, and to foster the exchange of scientific
information among biophysicists. EBSA2009 provides special incentives
for young investigators. The Congress will also celebrate 25 years of
EBSA.

Have a look to the Pleanry speakers list and Scientific program.
Bursaries for students will be available and Accommodations at 17
Euros per night including breakfast, too.

Visit www.ebsa2009.org.

All the best
Alby
----------------------------------------------------
"Water slowly flowed under the sky" (Cesare Pavese)
-----------------------------------------------------
Alberto Diaspro,
LAMBS IFOM IEO -MicroSCoBio, NBT-IIT, IBF-CNR
Department of Physics, University of Genoa,
Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa, Italy -
fax +39-010314218 - tel +39 0103536426/309;
URLs: www.lambs.it;

----------------------------------------------

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5, 20 -- Subject: July 11-15 2009 - Win in Science come to Genoa
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From: mgengle-at-email.uky.edu
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2009 14:16:42 -0600
Subject: [Microscopy] glutaraldehyde

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

MSA's Project MICRO (Microscopy In Curriculum - Research Outreach)
supports education about the microworld for middle school students.
That means a curriculum manual for teachers, volunteers to help in
classrooms, and advice and support in an extensive web page on MSA's
site: http://www.microscopy.org/ProjectMICRO. That page includes a
reviewed listing of over 150 children's books, other media, and
websites about microscopy and the microworld. Nanotechnology isn't
microscopy, but it certainly is part of the microworld. So MICRO
has just added a new database of all the books for the same age group
that MICRO has been able to find. Please take a look! The same
information will appear in Microscopy Today later this year.
--
Caroline Schooley
Project MICRO Coordinator
Microscopy Society of America
Box 117, 45301 Caspar Point Road
Caspar, CA 95420
Phone/FAX (707)964-9460
Project MICRO: http://www.microscopy.org/ProjectMICRO

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From reginarus-at-shaw.ca.an Mon Feb 2 01:33:17 2009
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by scentedmeat.de; Mon, 2 Feb 2009 08:24:49 +0100

Hi All,

Regarding sources for the scoring wheel for LKB knifebreakers, I
received information that Leica Microsystems can also supply these
parts...................

the usual disclaimer, I have no connection with Leica...... Dale

} You can buy them from Leica.
} The order number is 16 70 52 27, 'scoring wheels for LKB knifemaker'
} Yes the part number is for wheel and axle set, 3 parts each per pack.
...............
} The rubber cushion we suggest not to use as it is not necessry.
} I did not get my email onto the Listserver as it bounced back !
}
} Pleased to be of assistance.
} Best Wishes,
} Ian
}
} Ian Lamswood
} Marketing Manager
} Hernalser Hauptstrasse 219