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From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Fri, 1 Oct 1993 15:18:05 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Open for Business

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The Microscopy Listserver/Mailreflector is
now running you may begin posting messages

Cheers- Nestor




From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Sat, 2 Oct 1993 11:03:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM Gun Brightness

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Since I decided to bit the bullet and try to get this
system working let me post the first real message to
the Microscopy Listserver.

===============================================================

We have been experimentally measuring electron gun brightness
of LaB6 and CeB6 sources in our TEM's here and find that
values are factors of 4-5 times lower than TEM manufacturers claims.

For example, at 400 kV experimentally we determine values of
~ 2-3 x 10**6 A/cm**2/sr while values quoted are more typically
} 1 x 10**7 A/cm**2/sr. Small variances are found when one
adjusts filament temp, bias, wehneldt gap & filament but not
enough to make up the difference.

The brightness (b) is determined by experimental measurements in the
electron microscope using the following equation:

b = 4I/(pi**2d**2a**2)

where I = probe current pi=3.14159, d = beam diameter (FWTM), a =
incident beam divergence half angle. All parameters are quantitatively
measured in the instrument.

We have found no reports of similiar measurements in the literature,
except for the initial studies of source brightness done years ago
which of course everone quotes. None of which were done in TEM's,
but most were rather "bench" measurements. Has anyone else actually measured
the performance of their guns in a TEM (or SEM)?


Nestor J. Zaluzec
ANL EM Center




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1993 11:13:22 -0600
Subject: re: TEM Gun Brightness

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} Since I decided to bit the bullet and try to get this
} system working let me post the first real message to
} the Microscopy Listserver.
}
} ===============================================================
}
} We have been experimentally measuring electron gun brightness
} of LaB6 and CeB6 sources in our TEM's here and find that
} values are factors of 4-5 times lower than TEM manufacturers claims.

** specific stuff deleted **

I don't have any hard data on operating conditions, but we have been
wondering why LaB6 cathodes don't seem significantly brighter than tungsten
in our TEM. We had expected LaB6 to be like looking at the sun, but that's
not the case. Could it be that the setup needs to be tweaked more
critically?

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: Paul Goodwin :      pgood-at-inson.fhcrc.org
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1993 08:30:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Dichroic mirrors

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On Mon, 4 Oct 1993, Franz Keller wrote:

} Hello everybody,
}
} I am looking for dichroic mirrors for epifluorescence, which are able to
} reflect several ranges of wavelengths and allow transmission of light in
} the ranges outside. Does anybody know of companies which are designing such
} mirrors? It would be a great help to me if I know whom to contact.
} Thanks a lot
} Franz Keller
} *--------------------------------------------------------------------*
} | Dr.Franz Keller Tel.:089-8578-3688 |
} | MPI f. Psychiatry Fax 089-8578-3939 |
} | Dept. Neuromorphology |
} | Am Klopferspitz 18a EMail |
} | W-8033 Martinsried keller-at-vms.biochem.mpg.de |
} *--------------------------------------------------------------------*


The most respected source right now is a company called Chroma
Technologies Corp. They are a bunch of techies that left Omega Optical to
pursue the realm of multiple pass dichroic mirrors for biomedical
research. They can be reached at:

Chroma Technologies Corp.
(802)257-1800 (voice)
(802)257-9400 (fax)

I've been told that Paul Nilman is a good person to talk to there.


Paul Goodwin








From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1993 11:43:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Gun Brightness

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John C. replies

} I don't have any hard data on operating conditions, but we have been
} wondering why LaB6 cathodes don't seem significantly brighter than tungsten
} in our TEM. We had expected LaB6 to be like looking at the sun, but that's
} not the case. Could it be that the setup needs to be tweaked more
} critically?

Minor clarification. The LaB6 values we measured are low relative
to calculations and claims however, they are better than
W values! I'll dig up the relative comparisons and post
them later.

Are you running your LaB6 at 1st or 2nd x-ver of the source?

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EM Center






From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1993 11:19:24 -0600
Subject: Re: Gun Brightness

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} John C. replies
}
} } I don't have any hard data on operating conditions, but we have been
} } wondering why LaB6 cathodes don't seem significantly brighter than tungsten
} } in our TEM. We had expected LaB6 to be like looking at the sun, but that's
} } not the case. Could it be that the setup needs to be tweaked more
} } critically?
}
} Minor clarification. The LaB6 values we measured are low relative
} to calculations and claims however, they are better than
} W values! I'll dig up the relative comparisons and post
} them later.
}
} Are you running your LaB6 at 1st or 2nd x-ver of the source?
}
} Nestor Zaluzec
} ANL EM Center

At the moment, we're not running LaB6. But the reasons why are for another
post. :-) I have always run LaB6 at the first maximum brightness I get
to, (1st X-over?) when illumination from the sides of the crystal merge
with that from the tip.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: CSENCSITS-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (ROSEANN CSENCSITS (708) 252-4977, -7902)
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1993 13:50:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: LaB6-TEM-1st and 2nd cross over

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Does anyone with a LaB6 in a JEOL TEM ever see a second cross over?
I see them in Phillips microscopes but not in JEOL microscopes.
What is your experience?

Roseann Csencsits
ANL 708-252-4977
or 708-252-7902




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1993 13:29:03 -0600
Subject: Re: Gun Brightness

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} Regarding first and second x-ver of the LaB6--Do you have a JEOL or
} Phillips TEM? I have never seen the second cross over in a JEOL TEM.
}
} Roseann Csencsits
} Argonne National Lab
} 708-252-7902

I used a Philips 400 with LaB6 years ago when I was a graduate student. I
don't remember seeing a second brightness peak. When I got to CSU last
summer, our JEOL 2000 had LaB6, but we couldn't check the vacuum with the
original set of guages. We had to add a Penning guage that would give an
accurate readout to the 10\-7 range. Before we went back to tungsten, I
don't remember seeing that second peak.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Tue, 5 Oct 1993 14:56:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Apologies

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Hi Everyone


Seems like we have a fair number of people who are not
reading the subscription "destructions". In it I ask
new subscribers to reply to the listserver-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
to verify their address before I add them to the list.
Most of you did this correctly. :-)

I did this to minimize the possiblity of "bad addresses"
causing Email bounce where everyone on the list would
receive copies of "undeliverable" mail messages. for days
on end.

However a number new subscribers appear to be replying to
Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov. I'll try to make the
message clearer or sort out another way to check out/confirm
the addresses.

Please bear with it for a few more days.

Thanks - Nestor

P.S. I've have gotten 2 bad Email bounces both from
Germany, where the message repeated ~ 10 times/day for a
few days, so the extra work did stop that problem, only to
create the other. :-(






From: anandamu-at-scf.usc.edu (Anand)
Date: Tue, 5 Oct 1993 14:57:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Seeking Postdoc/Industrial R&D Microscopist position.

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University of Southern California
Los Angeles CA 90089 Ph: (213) 740-1992
FAX: (213) 740-7797
X-Mailer: ELM [version 2.4 PL21]
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Length: 1352

I am seeking a challenging position as a research Electron
Microscopist, so I thought this group would be appropriate to post
this article.

I graduated from the University of Southern California in May 1993
with a Ph.D. in Materials Science. As a graduate research associate, I
was involved extensively with conventional and high-resolution
transmission electron microscopy in research projects relating to
deformation twinning, martensitic transformations, and studies of
ordered and premartensitic phases. I have considerable experience in
working with shape memory alloys, intermetallic compounds, titanium
alloys, superalloys and ceramics. Further, I also have considerable
research experience with SEM, EDS, x-ray diffraction, AES and
metallography. With my present experience, I am confident I will be
able to undertake projects relating to research and development of a
wide variety of materials. I would certainly appreciate an opportunity
to discuss with you how I could contribute to you/your organization.
Please do not hesitate to call, or send email to me.

Sincerely,

ANANDA S. MURTHY

Center for Electron Microscopy EMail: ANANDAMU-at-USC.EDU
& Microanalysis Phone: (213) 740-1992
University of Southern California Fax: (213) 740-7797
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0101






From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 9:19:27 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Kikuchi Patterns

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Good programs have several different definitions:
do you mean commerical or free/shareware.

There are a few programs in the EMMPDL library under
the CBED directory which you can access. For a listing
send an Email message to

EMMPDL-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV

in the Email message enclose the command

Send HELP

you will receive information on how to use EMail to
access abstracts, directories and complete source code files.



Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EM Center




From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 9:38:09 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Resume's

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All Microscopy Users

This mailing list was not intended as a place to
post resume's to distribute to the world. Please
refrain from such usage. If you will recall in
the Welcome message it was pointed out that this
was to be a discussion/question/answer/information
forum.

If you wish you may post this type of information (ie. resume's)
instead on the MSA BBS system (accessible by Internet & modem)
which (if you are a member of MSA) has a positon/job
placement service available to members at no charge.

Posting of Position/Job openings is stretching the
limits of what the intention of this list is
supposed to address, however, I am willing to consider
this as potentially within the bounds. What is the
opinion of the readers on this last issue (i.e.
positon/job openings in the Microscopy community)


Nestor J. Zaluzec
ANL EM Center






From: COOK-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 12:28:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: RE: Resume's

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Message-Id: {9310061627.AA00397-at-pascal.mrd.bldrdoc.gov}

"Microscopy" could quickly fill with resumes and job openings. I vote that
these notices should not be allowed in this forum.




From: tim-at-phlogiston.nist.gov (Tim Foecke)
Date: Wed, 06 Oct 1993 13:06:32 -0400
Subject: Re: Resumes

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A vote against resumes. But a vote for open positions.

Tim Foecke
tfoecke-at-nist.gov





From: Murray Foster :      vital!unixmailgate!murray-at-uunet.UU.NET
Date: 6 Oct 93 15:41:47 U
Subject: Re: Resume's

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Reply to: RE} Resume's
No resumes please.






From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 16:18:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: position openings

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From: modb%BANRUC60.BITNET-at-ANLVM.CTD.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 17:27:24 +0100
Subject: Re: Resume's

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I'm strongly in favour of this "positon/job opening" ad's.
For us in Europe, it is very hard to get that kind of information
in time.

Marc Op de Beeck.
University of Antwerp (RUCA)
BELGIUM
modb-at-banruc60.bitnet





From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 16:16:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: no resume's

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From: Gerry Little :      ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1993 08:14:44 GMT+1000
Subject: Re: welcome to microscopy

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G'day,
Yes your message got through and my address is correct.
Regards,
Gerald Little.
Dr Gerry Little | Ph (049) 215618
Discipline of Anatomy | Fax (049) 216903
Faculty of Medicine | Email ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
University of Newcastle




From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 17:45:15 -0600
Subject: Re: Resume's

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Message-Id: {9310062328.AA14275-at-enet-gw.pa.dec.com}

} Posting of Position/Job openings is stretching the
} limits of what the intention of this list is
} supposed to address, however, I am willing to consider
} this as potentially within the bounds. What is the
} opinion of the readers on this last issue (i.e.
} positon/job openings in the Microscopy community)
}
}
} Nestor J. Zaluzec
} ANL EM Center

Just for saving bandwidth and not inconveniencing uninterested people, I'd
say posting a message that states you are looking for a position, or have a
position open, is fine. This can be done in a few short sentences. Make
the details available privately.

I think distribution of an announcement to this very specialized group of
readers is completely appropriate, and even an important function of this
group.

Just my opinion.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV (Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964)
Date: Wed, 6 Oct 1993 21:06:36 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: resume opinion

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From: tim-at-phlogiston.nist.gov (Tim Foecke)
Date: Thu, 07 Oct 1993 10:25:22 -0400
Subject: Re: STM

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We are in the same process. The machine you buy is very tightly related to
the type of work you need to do. Do you need vacuum? Are you going to be
using STM alone, or also AFM, MFM, LFM, M.O.U.S.E., ....? Do you want to
crack it open and make your own code? The Nanoscope III seems to be the better
for versatility and routine use, while Topometrix gives you the source code
of the software so you can do modifications.

Need more specifics.

Tim Foecke, NIST





From: Paul Goodwin :      pgood-at-inson.fhcrc.org
Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1993 15:41:30 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: Re resumes

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Message-Id: {9310071557.AA18638-at-enet-gw.pa.dec.com}



On Thu, 7 Oct 1993, John Crum wrote:

} To all:
}
} I counted no less than fifteen mail messages on the subject of resumes, in
} the last day. I think this is far more messages than the resumes you'll see
} posted in the next six months.
}
} We all have control over what we read. If you don't want to read another
} resume, just delete the message. This, of course, assumes that the
} responsible resume poster will use the subject line and state that the
} message is a resume.
}
} I vote that this is a valid subject (and a much needed service) on this
} list. With one ground rule, and that is that the writer must state in the
} subject line that the message is a resume.
}
} Let's face it, looking for a job is tough, especially in our tough econonmic
} times.
}
} John Crum
} San Diego State University
}

Ditto-

Paul Goodwin






From: Zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Thu, 7 Oct 1993 15:41:30 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Updates and Messages

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To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

G'day Microscopy Subscriber's

The system has been down for most of Thurs. while
I did network upgrades, hope this hasn't caused too
much trouble.

I've corrected the welcome notice about replies to the list
and tried to make the directions VERY CLEAR
so most of you should not be receiving copies
of confirmation notices any longer.

For those that have asked we currently have ~ 250 subscribers,
not all of whom have reconfirmed yet.

Secondly, when replying to a real comment/question
posted on the list please make sure that the
message you send is addressed to:

MICROSCOPY-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV

and not just a reply to the sender. There are many
different type of Email systems out there and not all
of them sort out the To;, From: CC: of the Email header.
in the same way. Thus you may have the intention
of replying publically (i.e. to the list) but your EMail
system may direct that message instead to the
indivdual, who may have posted the original question and
then the remainder of readers will
not see the information you are providing in response.
(Assuming of course that you wish public viewing which is
the purpose of this list).

Third, and lastly, on the question of resume posting.

I think we now have a concensus and let's call
the subject closed and get back to microscopy. The replies
most of which came to me directly (instead of the list)
are definitely in favor of posting announcements (~} 95%)
of position's/jobs and overwhealming opposed to resume's
(} 90%). I've also updated the welcome notice to make
this clear too.



-----------------------------------------------------
Nestor J. Zaluzec
Electron Microscopy Center For Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill. USA

Tel: 708-252-5075/4964 Fax: 708-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
-----------------------------------------------------






From: Tony Hollenkamp :      afh-at-dmp.csiro.au
Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1993 11:48:47 +1000 (EST)
Subject: stm purchase

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Further to HJOAN's query on stm purchase, our Park Autoprobe is great
(i.e., fast and relatively inexpensive) for changing between techniques, iff
you want to do things other than stm.

Tony Hollenkamp






From: Jouko K. M„ki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1993 09:44:11 +0200
Subject: Re: JoAn' s question about STM

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X-Warning: Original message contained 8-bit characters, however during
the SMTP transport session the receiving system was unable to
announce capability of receiving 8-bit SMTP (RFC 1425-1428),
and as this message does not have MIME headers (RFC 1341) to
enable encoding change, only option was to STRIP sent characters
to 7-bit :-(



} On Thu, 7 Oct 1993 15:57:00 +0200, { HJOAN%CLEMSON.CLEMSON.EDU-at-ANLVM.CTD.ANL.GOV} wrote:
}
} }
} } resume's - Maybe in the future, this is just starting we need to give it a chanc
} } e. Question. We are in the process of purchasing STM. What are the important fea
} } tures to look for? Any information would be very much appreciated. Thank you for
} } your time, JoAn
}
Hello JoAn,

Based on experience of one year using Nanoscope II, I would say that one of
the most important features is the easy of localisation of the sample area.
It can never be very easy but many things can help you. There should be a
proper light microscope throug which you should be able to observe both the
specimen and the tip simultaneously perpendicular to the sample. This
means, you should have a reverse microscope and a stereomicroscope fitted
to the STM/AFM. Furthermore, the stereomicroscope should easily be turned
so, that you can observe the sample and the tip from the side.

These were on the top of my memory. In case there is more in my FILO-
memory, I will let you know.

Best regards,
Jouko

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Mki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy
University of Turku Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN 20520 TURKU
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318




From: Zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Nestor J. Zaluzec)
Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1993 09:44:11 +0200
Subject: AFM -spectral power density

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X-Sender: Zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Unverified)
Mime-Version: 1.0
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On Oct. 6th AG wrote:

} Anybody have access to power spectral density calculation programs for
} atomic force microscopy data? My AFM vendor is slow to provide this
} function, and I need it to help understand the "wavelength" of roughness
} on silicon surfaces. Any help appreciated!

} Andy Gilicinski


Can someone briefly explain "power spectral density calculations" in
this context and how it relates to surface roughness? I'm sure
I do not know the answer, but am interested in the question, what
does the calculation do? Is it a fourier transform? If so there
are plenty out in the public domain.


-----------------------------------------------------
Nestor J. Zaluzec
Electron Microscopy Center For Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Ill. USA

Tel: 708-252-5075/4964 Fax: 708-252-4798
Email: Zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
-----------------------------------------------------






From: ROSEANN CSENCSITS (708) 252-4977, -7902 :      CSENCSITS-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1993 13:17:59 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: pt to pt resolution tests

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For a 400kV microscope what is the amorphous material of choice for
point to point resolution tests? Carbon or Germanium?
I am using an optical bench to determine resolution.

Roseann Csencsits
Argonne Nat Lab
708-252-4977




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 8 Oct 1993 14:16:31 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: PD Software for EDS

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S. Bunasawa asks:
Is there a public domain or shareware EDS out there for the PC? I'm looking
for books and some reference so I can write my own EDS. Can someone
recommend a good source?


Reply, Send an Email message to EMMPDL-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV
in the message say "SEND HELP"
you will get instructions on how to access the EMMPDL by Email.
FTP will not be up for few weeks (minimum).

There are EDS programs in the XEDS directory in that library.

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EMCenter




From: MOSSANT-at-DUCVAX.AUBURN.EDU
Date: Sun, 10 Oct 1993 11:05 CST
Subject: Primera printer

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To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Message to Jeff Ingeman:

Who sells this printer? Do you have the address of the manufacturer?
Thanks in advance.

tony Moss
Auburn University




From: VEI011-at-GEEL.DWT.CSIRO.AU (Colin Veitch CSIRO Division of Wool Technology)
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 8:17:26 +1000 (EST)
Subject: NIST DTSA Program

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Some time ago the NIST published DTSA (Desk Top Spectrum Analyser) for Mac
systems. Does anyone know if there is a PC version available (or
something similar) which can accept either EMSA format files or Noran
Voyager format files. Is there something at the EMMPDL address (given
yesterday) which may be of use? If so, is that address an open one?

Thanks,

Colin Veitch





From: VEI011-at-GEEL.DWT.CSIRO.AU (Colin Veitch CSIRO Division of Wool Technology)
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 11:19:43 +1000 (EST)
Subject: NIST/DTSA

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Alan,

NIST/DTSA is available through:
Office of Standard Reference Data 221/A323
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Gaithersburg, MD, 20899 USA
Tel (301) 975 2208
Fax (301) 975 0416

It was written by Chuck Fiori, Carol Swyt and Robert Myklebust.

This information is as printed on the manual and may have changed in the
past year or so. I have no idea regarding the price! 8-)

If you want more info. give me a call.

Colin Veitch

#####################################################################
*******************************
* Intuition is reason in a *
0------* hurry. *
} ---|--- { * H. Jackson *
| *******************************
/ \
_/ \_

Colin Veitch Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2611
CSIRO Division of Wool Technology Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2891 (dir.)
P.O. Box 21 Fax + 61 (0)52 47 2657
BELMONT Vic 3216
Australia

#####################################################################






From: K. M. Anisur Rahman :      anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Oct 1993 20:38:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: How to identify these nano-crystals.. please help

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Hallo everybody:

We have taken some HREM micrograph of a composite ceramic
material, made with a crystalline phase dispersed into an amorphous
glassy phase. In the glassy phase there are small crystallites whose
diameter is of the order of few nanometers. We would like to identify
these nano-crystals. By measuring their lattice spacing no conclusive
identity can be assigned. It is also almost impossible to do an EDS on
such a small area.

We would appreciate very much if somebody can give us some
idea regarding how to identify these crystallites with certain degree of
confidence. Thank you.

-Anis.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1993 20:36:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: DTSA Questions

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Reply to last 2 questions on DTSA.

At the presents DTSA only runs on a Mac platform. I do not
know if any plans are being made to expand it to PC.

The cost of DTSA is ~ $900-1000 US (as of a few months ago).
and it can be purchased directly from NIST. Demo copies are available
for the Mac platform. I do not have the address handy here at home
I will post the information tomorrow from the lab.

One of the priniciple authors of the program Chuck Fiori died
suddenly earlier this year. The program is still being supported
and presumably updated by colleagues at NIST, however, I'm not sure if
they wish their Email address to be given out. I will contact them
and ask them. If they concur I will post it on the listserver.

The EMMPDL has PC based programs for EDS data reduction, however,
they are not as comprehensive as DTSA. The EMMPDL is an open library,
you may receive information & source code by EMail to EMMPDL-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV
in your message include the single line "SEND HELP". Internet & FTP
access will be operating later this year (when I get all the bugs fixed!).
You may also login by telephone (however I see that the questions come
from colleagues in Australia), or you can make copies of the library at
you next local/national (?) EM society meeting.

Complete copies of the EMMPDL will be available at the next
Australian meeting in Brisbane, ICEM in Paris, and MSA in New Orleans
and any other EM Society meeting that makes arrangement with me in
advance.

=================
Nestor J. Zaluzec
ANL EM Center





From: Colin MacRae :      cmac-at-dmp.csiro.au
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1993 13:51:37 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re Joans question regarding STM/AFM

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MAIL FROM: {cmac-at-dmp.csiro.au}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLIST}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-OCT-1993 07:46:57


JOAN,
I have recently bought a PARK AutoProbe LS AFM/STM with
Electrochemical AFM and STM. The list of requirements when considering
buying such instruments is quite long.
Briefly
consider what sample size you wish to scan,
what detail do you want to see,
what modes of operation, AFM, STM, ECAFM, ECSTM, LFM, MFM etc,
what optical resolution do you need to locate your features of interest,
are you happy with a windows look a like interface or do you want a true
Windows interface.

If you approach PARK they will supply you with a booklet "How to Buy a
Scanning Probe Microscope". It will be quite helpful. Try to visit SPM
labs to see how samples are prepared and imaged. As a matter of interest
the ACEM-13 conference to be held in Queensland will have a one day
workshop on SPM. As I am one of the workshop organisers I think it would
be quite useful. However, a long way to travel. I'm sure there must be
closer conferences.

Good luck

Colin MacRae
Electron Microscopy Section

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial
Research Organisation. _--_|\ cmac-at-dmp.CSIRO.AU
Division of Mineral Products / \ +61 3 647 0296
PO Box 124, Port Melbourne 3207 \_.--._/
AUSTRALIA v





From: Matt Madison :      MADISON-at-FLAMIN-O.TGV.COM
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 10:03:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: test

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MAIL FROM: {jmichael-at-vnet.IBM.COM}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLIST}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 12-OCT-1993 08:44:53

Please ignore this test message. Thank you.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 12:37:34 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Positron Annihilation

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To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov


The Positron Annihilation facility at Argonne National Lab
was shutdown about a year ago, when the funding was cut.
In a loose interpretation of "microscopy" as those techniques
which allow the experimentalist to determine the structure of
a material which cannot be analyzed by the naked eye, then
PAS fits. Remember we are not prejudice to any specific microscopy
in this forum...

Nestor Z.
ANL EMCenter




From: DUNLAP-at-utkvx.utk.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 08:32:09 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Address for list

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Thank you for adding my name to the list server. My correct address is
DUNLAP-at-utkvx.utk.edu.
Best Wishes
John Dunlap
The University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN 37996-0810




From: ROSEANN CSENCSITS (708) 252-4977, -7902 :      CSENCSITS-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1993 15:14:08 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: pt to pt resolution

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Last week I asked:
For a 400kV microscope what is the amorphous material of choice for
point to point resolution tests? Carbon or Germanium?

Most answers were that Germanium was preferred and the second choice
was Silicon--because it is readily available in most labs.

Thanks for the confirmation.

Roseann




From: K. M. Anisur Rahman :      anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu
Date: Sat, 9 Oct 1993 20:38:12 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: How to identify these nano-crystals.. please help

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MAIL FROM: {jmichael-at-vnet.IBM.COM}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLIST}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 12-OCT-1993 08:44:53

Hallo everybody:

We have taken some HREM micrograph of a composite ceramic
material, made with a crystalline phase dispersed into an amorphous
glassy phase. In the glassy phase there are small crystallites whose
diameter is of the order of few nanometers. We would like to identify
these nano-crystals. By measuring their lattice spacing no conclusive
identity can be assigned. It is also almost impossible to do an EDS on
such a small area.

We would appreciate very much if somebody can give us some
idea regarding how to identify these crystallites with certain degree of
confidence. Thank you.

-Anis.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 14:06:32 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Multiple Messages

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October 12, 1993

All Microscsopy Subscribers

The mailserver system had locked up on a series of
addresses to Germany, resulting in a huge queue of
possible lost/deleted/replicatd mail.

You may be already aware of this as you may be
seeing duplicates of mail you already have received.
This should only take a day to clear up. There
was a queue of about 100 messages here at this end,
some fraction of which were destined for the Microscopy
server. The rest to users of the EM Center here at Argonne.
Sorry for the duplicate traffic, but I was not able to spend
the time necessary to read each of these messages and then
sorting out to whom it belonged and if it had already
been sent and the simplest method was just to restart
the system and let it clear itself out.

Hopefully ? :-\ this won't happen again.

Cheers- Nestor
ANL EM Center





From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 16:11:03 -0400
Subject: Multiple Messages

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I'm not sure what the cost of a CCD camera is but I would guess
that it is near the cost of a low-light video camera and control box from
Custom Camera in the UK. The majority of the excess cost in once
commercially available systems was going to the vendor, not the
manufacturer of the camera. The advantage of the low-light video camera
and control box is that the pattern is instantaneous. My understanding of
the CCD camera is that it takes a period of time to accumulate each
pattern. This makes simple tasks such as comparing adjacent grains or
aligning a specimen more time consuming.

Thanks



Larry Sutter
Scattering Events R' Us





From: mecavaleri-at-mmm.com
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 16:38:03 -0500
Subject: Listserver

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This is the fastest I have ever started receiving a subscription




Mark E. Cavaleri
3M CRL/A&PRL Microscopy Laboratories
3M Cneter 201-1E-15
3M Center 201-1E-15
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(612) 733-3247
(612) 733-0648 FAX




From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 16:32:24 -0400
Subject: Bob Keller's EBSP Question

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I'm not sure what the cost of a CCD camera is but I would guess
that it is near the cost of a low-light video camera and control box fom
Custom Camera in the UK. The majority of the excess cost in once
commercially available systems was going to the vendor, not the
manufacturer of the camera. The advantage of the low-light video camera
and control box is that the pattern is instantaneous. My understanding of
the CCD camera is that it takes a period of time to accumulate each
pattern. This makes simple tasks such as comparing adjacent grains or
aligning a specimen more time consuming.

Thanks



Larry Sutter
Scattering Events R' Us





From: Colin MacRae :      cmac-at-dmp.csiro.au
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1993 13:51:37 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re Joans question regarding STM/AFM

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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JOAN,
I have recently bought a PARK AutoProbe LS AFM/STM with
Electrochemical AFM and STM. The list of requirements when considering
buying such instruments is quite long.
Briefly
consider what sample size you wish to scan,
what detail do you want to see,
what modes of operation, AFM, STM, ECAFM, ECSTM, LFM, MFM etc,
what optical resolution do you need to locate your features of interest,
are you happy with a windows look a like interface or do you want a true
Windows interface.

If you approach PARK they will supply you with a booklet "How to Buy a
Scanning Probe Microscope". It will be quite helpful. Try to visit SPM
labs to see how samples are prepared and imaged. As a matter of interest
the ACEM-13 conference to be held in Queensland will have a one day
workshop on SPM. As I am one of the workshop organisers I think it would
be quite useful. However, a long way to travel. I'm sure there must be
closer conferences.

Good luck

Colin MacRae
Electron Microscopy Section

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial
Research Organisation. _--_|\ cmac-at-dmp.CSIRO.AU
Division of Mineral Products / \ +61 3 647 0296
PO Box 124, Port Melbourne 3207 \_.--._/
AUSTRALIA v






From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 21:10:54 -0400
Subject: EBSP

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {9310071557.AA18638-at-enet-gw.pa.dec.com}


I forgot to mention that I have captured EBSP patterns on a Mac
and imported them into the Image 1.47 program. I think the macro language
of the program could be used to index the patterns but have never had time
to try. Has anyone else? If not, the code of the program could be
readily modified to do the job. Has anyone explored this option?

Thanks
llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Larry Sutter
Scattering Events R' Us





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 23:05:50 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: House Cleaning Done

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MAIL FROM: {beanland-at-liverpool.ac.uk}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLIST}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 12-OCT-1993 06:43:27


Microscopy Subscribers

The purge of old message files is done, and the
duplicate messages should be gone. I believe the
software update to Mutlinet is now complete and
things should be back to normal. Thanks for
your patience.

Nestor




From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 21:10:54 -0400
Subject: EBSP

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"Microscopy Mailing List" {microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

Reply_ Re: EBSP
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
A student here has modified NIH-Image 1.45 to do some basic analysis of EBSPs.
We capture EBSPs directly into Image with a Scion LG-3 frame grabber and
Dage-MTI camera. The camera points at a phosphor screen through the viewport
of the SEM (we actually use an ESEM - nice, plenty of room and no worries about
light leaks!!). We have a paper explaining the design and construction almost
ready for submission. Preprints will be available on request. The program
modifications are a currently little cryptic (i.e. no manual) and only work on
cubic crystals but they do allow you to do orientation analysis. The output is
further analyzed by programs called MisMat and FindCSL which are both in both
the EMMPDL and Microbeam Analysis Society Software Library. They are Mac
programs. I will ask the student if he will release his Image code early if
people are interested. If he does, no complaints please, he's not a
programmer, just a Nuc Eng student trying to get a Ph.D! Modofocations are in
Pascal not the built in macro language.
The other programs I mentioned above are available on
freebie.engin.umich.edu in the dir /pub/MSA+MAS/
both the EMMPDL and MASSL are available there for anonymous ftp.
If you have difficulty connecting or downloading any software from this site
send mail to me.

OK?
John Mansfield
--------------------------------------

I forgot to mention that I have captured EBSP patterns on a Mac
and imported them into the Image 1.47 program. I think the macro language
of the program could be used to index the patterns but have never had time
to try. Has anyone else? If not, the code of the program could be
readily modified to do the job. Has anyone explored this option?

Thanks
llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Larry Sutter
Scattering Events R' Us


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From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 1993 16:11:03 -0400
Subject: CCD for EBSP

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Reply_ CCD for EBSP
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
}
} I'm not sure what the cost of a CCD camera is but I would guess
} that it is near the cost of a low-light video camera and control box
} from Custom Camera in the UK. The majority of the excess cost in once
} commercially available systems was going to the vendor, not the
} manufacturer of the camera. The advantage of the low-light video camera
} and control box is that the pattern is instantaneous. My understanding
} of the CCD camera is that it takes a period of time to accumulate each
} pattern. This makes simple tasks such as comparing adjacent grains or
} aligning a specimen more time consuming.
}
} Thanks
}
}
}
} Larry Sutter
} Scattering Events R' Us

Not really true! Both cost wise and time wise.
A slow scan camera would be exepnsive but we use a TV rate Camera (A Dage-MTI
CCD72) and a cheap frame capture board (Scion LG3) to record our EBSPs.
We use the video rate capture of the LG3 to grab several consecutive frames of
video and average those. It is obviously not as noise free as a good slow
scann camera but our EBSPsystem cost less than $12K including the Macintosh!
Works nicely too.

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From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 1993 08:18:34 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: EBSP systems

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson

How does the 6100 compare to the 6300F? The 6300 has a BNC port that is
live from the monitor. We wheeled a MacII cx outfitted with a Data Transl
ation frame grabber and NIH Image into the scope room. The DT board was
connected with a coax cable to the bottom-most BNC connector on circuit
board U-34. Get to this board by removing the kick panel below the
operator's console. Look for a series of boards to your left. You have
to time the capture to avoid getting a scan shift if you have any image
drift - simply issue the command to grab as the scan gets to the bottom.
You can't use the SR mode with this. If you can access the video on the
610, then you can get near publication quality images with Image. I even
got some 4X5 publication quality prints by helping the contrast with Adobe
Photoshop and printing it out on our campus print shop's Linotronic press.
Of course you might try calling JEOL technical folks.
On Wed, 6 Oct 1993, Bob Keller wrote:

} We would like to set up a simple system for recording electron backscattering
} patterns in a JEOL 6100, without resorting to some of the (overpriced)
} commercial systems currently available. At the moment, we are considering the
} use of a phosphor screen and CCD set-up, using an optical viewing port in the
} SEM. As the patterns would be used simply for orienting specimens for the time
} being, publication-quality images are not necessary. We do have access to
} image processing via NIH-Image for contrast enhancement/noise reduction after
} acquiring images. Has anyone tried doing this with success? Without success?
}
} Bob Keller
} NIST-Boulder
}







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 1993 11:10:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: DTSA Information

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Microscopy Subscribers:

As promised here I checked with NIST and here is the information
about the DTSA (Desk Top Spectrum Analyzer) Program for
EDS data analysis.

ORDERING INFORMATION:
contact Joan Sauerwein Email: srdata-at-enh.nist.gov

Technical Questions:
contact Bob Myklebust Email: myklebust-at-gapnet.nist.gov

General questions can always be posted here at the Microscopy
server since the NIST group is one of our subscribers. By posting
some of the questions here you may receive additional comments
insight and/or answers from other users on this server. Remember
we will all benefit from this type of discussion in the long
run!


Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EM Center




From: ROSEANN CSENCSITS (708) 252-4977, -7902 :      CSENCSITS-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 14 Oct 1993 17:28:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: beam energy spread

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HI

Has anyone measured the energy spread of a 400kV beam in a JEOL 4000
with a saturated or undersaturated LaB6 filament? Often we assume
a 1 ev energy spread but is this reasonable or is it more like 3-4ev
energy spread?

Thanks for your help.

Roseann Csencsits
Electron Microscopy Center-Argonne Nat. Lab




From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Thu, 14 Oct 1993 18:58:38 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: JEOL 6100 and Image

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

} How does the JEOL 6100 compare to the 6300F? The 6300 has a BNC port
that is
live from the monitor. We wheeled a MacII cx outfitted with a Data
Translation frame grabber and NIH Image into the scope room. The DT
board was connected with a coax cable to the bottom-most BNC connector
on circuit board U-34. Get to this board by removing the kick panel
below the operator's console. Look for a series of boards to your
left. You have to time the capture to avoid getting a scan shift if
you have any image drift - simply issue the command to grab as the
scan gets to the bottom. You can't use the SR mode with this. If you
can access the video on the 6100, then you can get near publication
quality images with Image. I even got some 4X5 publication quality
prints by helping the contrast with Adobe Photoshop and printing it
out on our campus print shop's Linotronic press. I was tipped off about
the presence of this port while speacking to our local JEOL rep. about
getting my hands on the images stored on the 6300's internal harddrive.
The stored images were going to require about $20,000 to get at since
many years ago JEOL adopted an obscure and difficult (their words) image
storage format.

I've tried to post this several times and our mail
server has been having problems. If this got through earlier, sorry for
adding to the chatter.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 14 Oct 1993 21:40:01 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Contamination

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Your dark "contamination" spots are "cracked" hydrocarbons from the
a variety of sources. 1.) Diffusion Pump Oils, 2.) Surface contamination
(fingerprints etc...), 3.) Electropolishing solutions.... They are attracted
electrostatically to the the beam perimeter (small probes are worse than
large probes) and essentially get baked
on to your specimen. The phenomenon occurs in all microscopes I've
used (and I've used a few), however, it can be minimize depending
upon it's source. If you have a poor vaccum ( ~ 10-7 Torr)
then cool your specimen to ~ -30 C. The residual H20 vapor in your
scope will begine to collect near your specimen surface,
the action of the electron beam will
dissociate the H & O, the O will react with the C to form CO2 gas
and the contamination will cease. Of course if your specimen is
carbon based then you drill holes (I did a nice job on a diamond
specimen once and learned the hard way). You can also heat your specimen
but this doesn't always work as well. Spreading the beam to cover a
large area and heating the local region (remove all apertures and
go to the largest spot size) will temporarily immobilize things but
eventually (after about 1/2-1 hour) things will begin to diffuse
across your specimen to the beam area again. There are a variety of other
tricks which depend on your specimen. For example semiconductors
contaminate less than metal (in clean vaccum system { 10-9 T)
A starting reference you should look up is
Introduction to Analytical Electron Microscopy, (1st edition not
the 2nd) Ed. Hren, Goldstein, Joy, 1979, Plenum Press,
look at Chapter 18, by John Hren
entitled "Barriers to AEM: Contamination and Etching".....


Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EM Center




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 14 Oct 1993 21:42:55 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Contaminination Continued

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Oh yes it appears dark because it is so thick!. The spots can
build up to heights of microns. You can easily see this by tilting
your specimen 30-45 degrees after the spots form. The nice round
spots become tilted cones......


Nestor





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 10:18:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: STEM probe size

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It is bad policy to believe any manufacturers claim on the probe
size. It will be a function of C2 aperture size, lens excitation,
specimen height in the lens and a variety of other parameters. You
can get a quick and dirty measurement by doing a line scan across
a sharp edge and looking at the signal rise profile when going from
a "hole" to a specimen, however, you will need a calibrated magnification
to do this. Another bad policy of the manufacturers is that they
will claim the probe size based upon FWHM measurements, you should
of course be using at least FWTM or even better the first zero of the
crossing of the interference function.

A better way to measure the probe size is to image the STEM probe
in the TEM mode. Can you turn on your post-specimen lenses and
configure them to image the probe in the JEOL 2000? This is possible
in some microscopes, but I'm not sure about the 2000 series...


Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: Paul Goodwin :      pgood-at-inson.fhcrc.org
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 09:35:43 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:

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Microscopy





From: {QJXNJ21-at-memrqa.sps.mot.com}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 10-15-93 11:01am
Subject: GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT

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Message-Id: {9310151659.AA15024-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb
Subj: GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT
Orig-Author: {QJXNJ21-at-memrqa.sps.mot.com}:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Hello readers,
Thanks to all who responded to my question about contamination spots.
This IS a great format to have such questions answered. Now I have
another problem which I think many TEMmers must have been up against.
How to measure grain size distributions from TEM images of polycrys-
talline materials e.g. polySi or Al etc. What kind of image proces-
sing algorithms should be used and with what strategy? I realize that
a generalized algorithm may not work for every image but there must
be some general principles. I've heard that the Laplacian filter
shows up edges but I also heard John Russ of NCSU say how he uses
repetitive filtering and subtraction procedures to achieve grain
boundary delineation. It is not intuitively apparent to me how
this multiple filtering is used. Any tips or insights will be
highly appreciated. We have Gatan's Digital Micrograph and the
NIH Image 1.4 software. I dont want to use the crude straight
line method because I want to calculate size distributions.
Thanks for your time.
Vidya Kaushik
TEM Facility, MOTOROLA INC.,
Austin, TX, 78721 (512)-928-5134; (512)-928-6664 fax
QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.C





From: Paul Goodwin :      pgood-at-inson.fhcrc.org
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 10:26:58 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:

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unsubscribe Paul Goodwin






From: mecavaleri-at-mmm.com
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 12:53:34 -0500
Subject: Confocal Microscopy in Industry

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Message-Id: {9310151739.AA01127-at-pascal.mrd.bldrdoc.gov}

I would like to find out how laser scanning confocal microscopy
is being used industry (other than semiconductors). Does this microscopy
really provide a significant improvement over 'ordinary' light microscopy?

Mark E. Cavaleri
3M CRL/A&PRL Light Microscopy
3M Center 201-1E-15
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(612) 733-3247
(612) 733-0648 FAX




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 13:37:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Probe size Measurements

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Using the signal rise profile technique to get a nominal probe
size is valid for both convergent & parallel probes, whether
you are in STEM, TEM, SEM or any other mode..... It's major
draw back is that it is not sensitive to weak low intensity
tails which can cause signal generation in modes other than
CBED, for example, as in X-ray analysis.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: mecavaleri-at-mmm.com
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 15:44:53 -0500
Subject: re-send of Confocal query

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I would like to find out how laser scanning confocal microscopy
is being used industry (other than semiconductors). Does this microscopy
really provide a significant improvement over 'ordinary' light microscopy?

Mark E. Cavaleri
3M CRL/A&PRL Light Microscopy
3M Center 201-1E-15
St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
(612) 733-3247
(612) 733-0648 FAX




From: jcrum%sunstroke%sdsu.edu-at-relay.tc.umn.edu (John Crum)
Date: Fri, 15 Oct 1993 18:38:14 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: SEM Image Capture

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Microscopy Subscribers:



NIH Image Users:

Is anyone out there using NIH Image and a Macintosh to capture images from
a scanning electron microscope? If so, what is the resolution (i.e. image
size) that you are getting? What hardware (i.e. image capture board and
Mac) are you using? What does it cost?

The reason I ask is that our EM facility is in the market for a new SEM.
A nice feature we have now on our SEM is image capture, using a part of a
Princeton Gamma Tech EDS system. The core of that system, though, is a
Sun 3/60, which doesn't really work well and will need a costly upgrade.
We can capture images of 512 pixels and 1024 pixels sqaure. New software
(on top of hardware upgrade) will capture 2kX2k images.

So, the ultimate question is: should we adapt the system we have now to a
new SEM, or buy a new Mac/Image based system?

Any advice is greatly appreciated.

jc





From: smithj-at-acad.winthrop.edu
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1993 09:15:31 -0400
Subject: Video for TEM?

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Hi,
I'm interested in hooking a video camera to my TEM (JEOL 100B):
1)To demonstrate procedures such as filament saturation and 'scope
alignment when teaching my EM class, and 2) To capture "quickie"
EM prints to a video printer for students in my cell bio and vertebrate
histology classes. I'm looking for about 640x480 pixels and 8 bits, and
would like something that covers about the same area at each
magnification as the film camera.
I know about Gatan's systems, and I've been told "look at the Fullam
system before you buy it". Is there anything else out there that I should
know about? Have any of you used either the Gatan system or the Fullam
system, and how satisfied are you with it? Any help/feedback would be
appreciated.
TIA
Julian Smith III
(smithj-at-winthrop.edu)




From: :      tonygr-at-EAGLE.MIT.EDU
Date: 18 Oct 93 08:33:32 EDT
Subject: Video on TEMs

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Message-Id: {9310181433.AA27767-at-EAGLE.MIT.EDU}

-------------

This is in response to Julian Smith's query about video systems on TEM's.

I only have experience with the old Gatan system, so can't really comment
on the questions directly. There is an issue, however, with just taking
'Quickie video prints'. A video printer captures only a single frame of the
RS170 video - that is, it is equivalent to a 1/30 sec. exposure. During
this time, one can, (depending on the microscope operating conditions) get
significant shot noise if the video system is reading out the electron
image in real time (as does the old Gatan image intensifier system). Such
a print can be next to useless. Since our eyes respond much more slowly,
and in any case we are viewing a phosphor (either the microscope screen
or the screen of the CRT) which adds its own time constant, we don't notice
the effect so much (although it is resonsible for the "liveliness" one sees
when viewing a high magnification image on the viewing screen).

This is not an issue when reading out a framestore loaded from a slow-scan
system, but they are expensive for just demonstrating saturation and taking
quickie video prints. The Fullam system is a light camera viewing a
phosphor screen - you will have to experiment to see if it has enough time
constant for your needs.

The RS170 can be frame-averaged either by a stand-alone system such as is
sold by Gatan or Synoptics (not terribly expensive) or by a board from one
of many vendors which plugs into a PC. The advantage of the latter, besides
being even less expensive, is that it also can transfer the image to the
PC for networking, image processing, etc.

Hope this helps.

Tony Garratt-Reed







From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1993 12:15:31 -0400
Subject: Stand Alone Correction Programs

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I am looking for a stand-alone ZAF program that I can run on a PC
or Mac that will allow me to import k-ratios or app. concentration. I
specificly want to do carbonate analysis. A stand alone Bence-Albee
program would also suffice. Any thoughts...

Thanks
llsutter-at-mtu.edu
Larry Sutter






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1993 11:27:11 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Destructions on Sub/Unsub

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As requested here's a brief synopsis of the Subscribe/Unsubscribe
commands

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* please send this reply to *
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* DONOT send it to Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov *
* otherwise everyone on the server will *
* see your message and this creates unnecessary *
* and annoying traffic!!!!!!!!!!!! *
**************************************************

Help can be obtained by sending an Email request to

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in the Email request you should include one of the
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Command: Send Help
Result: Sends this file

Command: Subscribe {list} Username-at-EmailAddress
Result: Adds Username-at-EmailAddress to the list
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From: Denis Baskin :      baskindg-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1993 17:23:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: cooled ccd cameras

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Message-Id: {23101815244205-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}

I am interested in using a cooled ccd camera for imaging fluorescence
immunostaining. I understand that there are advantages to the cooled
ccd-fluorescence microscope combination over a confocal microscope. I
would appreciate any information about cooled ccd camera-microscope
configurations from anyone who is (has) using one. What is the best
manufacturer? What microscope configuration is best? What about software?

Denis Baskin, Ph.D.
VA Medical Center and University of Washington
Seattle, WA
(206) 764-2138 FAX (206) 764-2164






From: jeanne_barker-at-merck.com
Date: 19 Oct 1993 08:33:42 U
Subject: Acid phosphatase

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Subject: Time:8:24 AM
OFFICE MEMO Acid phosphatase Date:10/19/93
Can anyone out there recommend a protocol for acid phosphatase staining of 1
micron, epon embedded kidney sections? I have tried a couple of kits that are
suppose to remove the epon and the fixatives, but the results have not really
been spectacular.

If there are any biological electron microscopists out there who could give me
a reference, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks, Jeanne
Jeanne_Barker-at-Merck.Com






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1993 14:56:52 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: SEM Image Capture

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For our JEOL 6300F we found that we could simply string a coax cable from
the Data Translation frame grabber board in a Mac to a live video port
hidden behind the kick panel below the operator's console. This allowed
us to capture the signal to the SEM monitor with NIH Image. The command
to grab had to be synched by eye so that the scan raster had reached the
screen bottom. The images were decent quality, and with some Photoshop
grayscale and brightness adjustments we obtained publication quality
prints on the campus Linotronic press.
We aren't using this for anything useful yet for lack of a Mac to leave in
the 'scope room.






From: Gerald Little :      ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 09:28:51 GMT+1000
Subject: N-CAM Antibody for immunocytochemistry

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931020092851.288-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au}

G'day Microscopy readers,

Help! I have been searching for a monoclonal antibody, Neural Cell
Adhesion Molecule (N-CAM), which will react with tissue that has been
fixed in at least 4% paraformaldehyde, preferably also with
glutaraldehyde. We are using cryo-ultramicrotomy on rat neural
tissue for TEM localisation of specific epitopes, N-CAM being one of
them. So far, none of the companies I have approached (Sigma,
Amersham, Serotec, Boehringer-Mannheim, Dako, Sera-lab) have an N-CAM
antibody which will work with formaldehyde fixed tissue. Would
any one out there know of a company which would have this particular
antibody.
Thanks in anticipation.
Gerry Little.
Dr Gerald Little | Ph (049) 215618
The Neuroscience Group |
Discipline of Anatomy | Fax (049) 216903
Faculty of Medicine |
The University of Newcastle | Email ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Australia, 2308 |




From: dfa-at-rabbit.physiol.unimelb.edu.au (David Abbott)
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 10:30:33 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Electron microscopy list

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To date, there has been much activity on this list, mostly
related to electron microscopy in one form or another.
It seems to me this much traffic warrants a list of its
own, and so I'd like to suggest that just such a "splinter"
list is created.

My personal reason for suggesting this is that, not being
involved in electron microscopy myself, I simply don't have
the time to look through all the EM messages.

Of course, those interested in all topics could subscribe
to both lists and be no worse off than now.

-David.
- -
David Abbott | Email: dfa-at-physiol.unimelb.edu.au
School of Physics & Dept. of Physiology | Phone: +61-3-344-5465
The University of Melbourne, Australia. | Fax: Available on request.





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1993 20:44:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: INTERNET BBS

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For those Microscopy Listserver user that were trying.
The Internet link to the MSA BBS system is back up and
running. There was a software bug which took the line
down for about a week. It appears that everything is back
to some degree of normality......

Nestor Z.
ANL EMCenter




From: waheeschen-at-dow.com (Bill Heeschen (517)636-4005 PMRC/ASL)
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1993 22:23:40 -0400
Subject: Re: Electron microscopy list

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Message-Id: {199310200209.AA04201-at-na1.dow.com}

Folks:

I recognize David's concern about lots of electron vs light microscopy, but my
personal feeling is that a single microscopy list is still the best way to go.
In our lab, most of the EM folks end up doing a bit of LM and vice versa.
Watching everything go by keeps the mind open and active. Message deletion is
a command-D away and the need can usually be determined within the first
sentence. If it gets to the point where LM is as busy as EM, then perhaps we
should consider a split, but until then my vote is a single list.

The mailing list for NIH Image (subscribe NIH-Image yourname-at-your.address to
listserv-at-soils.umn.edu) includes a fair amount of general digital image
acquisition and analysis discussion, often dealing with LM issues.

Lastly, if you plan to be away from your electronic in-box for a few days and
don't want to wade through buckets-o-bits when you return, unsubscribe from
your lists for the time you're gone.

Regards,

Bill

==========================
Bill Heeschen / Analytical Sciences - Materials Characterization
1897-D Building / The Dow Chemical Company
Midland, MI 48667 U.S.A.
phone: (517)636-4005 fax: (517)636-5453
Email: waheeschen-at-dow.com
==========================




From: morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu (David Morilak)
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1993 18:57:51 PDT
Subject: N-CAM Antibody for immunocytochemistry

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In reply to Gerald Little's request for sources of N-CAM monoclonals, I am
consulting the MSRS catalog (it's in front of me now!), and have come up with
this list of potentials:

Chemicon (definitely have polyclonals, call about monoclonals)
BioDesign, clone NKINBL1, cat # M6127oM
Accurate, clone NCAM-OB11, cat # BYA-6075-1
Development Studies Hybridoma Bank, 5B8
Development Studies Hybridoma Bank, 4d
Development Studies Hybridoma Bank, 5e
Development Studies Hybridoma Bank, 5A5 (sialylated form)
Santa Cruz Biotechnology, clone ERIC1, cat # sc-106
American Qualex, cat # M1180
Bioprobe/Thamer (?), 123C3 (I am not familiar with this company)
British Biotechnology, clone ERIC-1, cat # BCA8
Becton-Dickinson, clone MY31, cat# 550009
CRB/ICI, clone ERIC-1, cat # AM-19-500

I hope this helps!

David Morilak
Dept Psychiatry
Stanford Univ
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu

-------




From: Darcy Clark :      03249587-at-mama.minmet.uq.oz.au
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 15:50:40 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Re: INTERNET BBS

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On Tue, 19 Oct 1993, Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 wrote:

}
} For those Microscopy Listserver user that were trying.
} The Internet link to the MSA BBS system is back up and
} running. There was a software bug which took the line
} down for about a week. It appears that everything is back
} to some degree of normality......
}
} Nestor Z.
} ANL EMCenter

Just a quick question - what is the MSA BBS and how does one gain access
to it ??
Darcy Clark
Uni. of QLD
Brisbane.AUSTRALIA







From: modb%BANRUC60.BITNET-at-ANLVM.CTD.ANL.GOV
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 10:06:21 +0100
Subject: A lot of mail ???

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Do the subscribers of the list get that amount of mail every day ?
I didn't receive any messages between Oct 6 and today.
Did I miss something important or does the list allow hidden options (USA anly)

Marc




From: howelld-at-egr.msu.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 08:05:58 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Multilayer TEM

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Dear Readers,

I would like to initiate a discussion on the subject of cross-sectional
TEM of multilayers (esp. metal/a-silicon). I am interested
in the alternate techniques to HREM that have appeared
in the literature such as the High-Angle Annular
Dark Field (HAADF) technique practiced by Stearn's group at ASU
(ref. Cheng et al., 1992, Proc. 50th Ann. Meet. EMSA, p.122) and the
Fresnel Method employed by Stobb's group at Cambridge (ref. Shih and
Stobbs, 1990, Ultramicroscopy, 32, p. 219).

The existence of these techniques arose from the concern of the ability
of HREM to characterize the roughness of the interface between the
alternating material layers which comprise the multilayer. Since many
multilayers are composed of two materials with vastly different Z (e.g.
X-ray mirrors) the strong scattering at the interface may complicate
the interpretation of HREM images.

What I would like to know is why these two techniques are not more
widely used. Although all of the HAADF work I have seen reported has
been done on VG-STEMs, I have seen a report from the Philips Electron
Optics Lab that the technique can be done on CM12,20,&30 TEM/STEMs
with annular dark field detectors (Otten, 1991, J. Electron Microscopy
Tech., 17, p.221)

As for the Fresnel Method (fitting exp. through-focal fresnel-fringe
line-profile intensities to those based on mixed scattering potentials
at the interface) I have counted over 20 papers from the
Cambridge group but have not come across one from anywhere else. One
impediment is the need to digitize the fresnel-fringe profiles with
fairly high resolution, which can be a problem for those of us without
access to a microdensitometer or the ability to collect the images
digitally in the first place. But is the method acceptable on a
theoretical basis?

If anyone has had experience with or has critically evaluated either
technique I would like to hear from you.

Thank You,

David A. Howell | Ph (517)337-2943
Dept. of Materials Science & Mech. | Fax (517)353-9842
Michigan State University |
E. Lansing, MI 48824-1226 | Email howelld-at-egr.msu.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 8:45:16 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Internet BBS

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} Just a quick question - what is the MSA BBS and how does one gain access
} to it ??


In addition to this Listserver the ANL EMC and MSA have several other
"on-line" so to speak services. One is the EMMPDL (the Microscopy
and Microanalysis Public Domain Library of Software) and the
Electronic Bulletin Board System. Access to information about the EMMPDL
and the BBS as well as their contents are available via conventional
telecommunications (modem lines) or over Internet (via Telnet, not
yet FTP , but it is coming).

The BBS is a more selective forum than this list having society information,
announcement, job placement, topical discussion session, public
and private Email..... that is the type of information which
(for the most part) doesnot belong on this Email list.

To get internet information about the EMMPDL send an Email
message to "EMMPDL-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV" with the message
Send Help EMMPDL

To get internet information about the BBS send an Email
message to "EMCBBS-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV" with the message
Send Help EMCBBS

----------------------

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EMCenter




From: AB :      morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 10:41:35 PDT
Subject: MSRS catalog of primary antibodies

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I have received several questions regarding the MSRS catalog of Primary
Antibodies that I mentioned in a previous transmission, so I am sending this
to both the microscopy and NIH image distribution lists. The MSRS catalog is
indeed a catalog of primary antisera, both those available commercially and
those available from individual labs who choose to have their antisera listed.
I have found it to be an extremely useful first reference, though it is, as
might be expected, not 100% comprehensive. I often will call the sources
listed to find out what else they have available that is not in the catalog
(e.g. polyclonals vs monoclonals, different host species, different epitopes
etc.). I ordered it at last years Neuroscience meeting, and an update (I am
told) will be available approximately annually. The cost was somewhere around
$75 (US). (MSRS stands for "Manufacturer's Specifications and Reference
Synopsis"). I don't have a phone number, but here is the address off the order
form:


MSRS catalog of Primary Antibodies
AERIE Corporation
Box 1356
Birmingham, MI 48012-1356
-------




From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 17:06:20 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: MSRS catalog of primary antibodies

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On Wed, 20 Oct 1993, AB wrote:

} I have received several questions regarding the MSRS catalog of Primary
} Antibodies that I mentioned in a previous transmission, so I am sending this
} to both the microscopy and NIH image distribution lists. The MSRS catalog is
} indeed a catalog of primary antisera, both those available commercially and
} those available from individual labs who choose to have their antisera listed.

How does the MSRS compare to Linscott's Directory?

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories
UW






From: LAURAN%NKI.NL-at-ANLVM.CTD.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1993 10:44 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Cytogenetics

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Hi,

Does anyone know whether there is a Email or NEWS group specifically
relating to cytogenetics (methodology etc.)?
If so, please drop me aline where to find them.

Lauran Oomen, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands





From: LAURAN%NKI.NL-at-ANLVM.CTD.ANL.GOV
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1993 11:05 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: CCD

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We consider buying a microscope-CCD set up, which will be used in a
multi-user environment. Applications will comprise a.o. detection of
(low levels of) immunofluorescent signals in tissues and cells, in situ
hybridization signals and very low levels of NADH fluorescence.
Precise quantification and a large dynamic range are also a main issue.
Any suggestions relating to brands and types for the several components
of the total system (microscope, CCD camera, computer hardware and
software) will be highly appreciated.

Lauran Oomen, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands





From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Fri, 22 Oct 1993 11:22:20 -0600
Subject: Measurements of surface layer thichness

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Message-Id: {m0oqOc6-0004YCC-at-apus.cus.cam.ac.uk}

I'm looking for a technique to measure the thickness of surface
contamination/oxidation on metal surfaces. I need an image of the surface
for mapping purposes, as well as thickness measurements of the
contamination. These specimens range in size from 1-5 cm and less than 1
cm thick.

Any suggestions would be welcome.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu (David Morilak)
Date: Fri, 22 Oct 1993 12:03:49 PDT
Subject: N-CAM monoclonals

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FYI regarding N-CAM monoclonals:

There are two articles in the most recent J. Comp. Neurol. (336, no. 4), both
of which describe using N-CAM monoclonals in tissue (tongue) that has been
perfusion-fixed with 4% para-formaldehyde:

Smith, Akeson and Shipley, JCN 336(4): 493-506
Nelson & Finger, p.p. 507-516

Hope this helps!

David Morilak
Dept of Psychiatry
Stanford Univ
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 1993 12:23:56 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Thickness Meassurements

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RE: Thickness of Surface Layers

John

The obvious answer is making a cross-section of your
specimen and then looking in the appropriate type of microscope
(optical, SEM, TEM.....). What material are you looking at?
What thickness is the surface layer. Can you x-section the samples
or are they unique? Can you use a SIMS system to image the surface
(low res) and then sputter through.....?

Nestor Z.
ANL EMcenter




From: Richard Thornton :      r.thornton-at-trl.oz.au
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 16:18:10 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Infrared Microscopes

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Dear All,

We are currently looking at the purchase of an infrared microscope to aid
us in our failure analysis of integrated circuits. I was wondering if any
one had any experience with these beasts and had any comments to make
about any of the currently available models? Also, what manufacturers
currently make these microscopes, as we are a little in the back waters
here this type of information is a little hard to come by.

Our interest is in microscopy in the wavelength region of 800-1800nm and
as high a resolution as possible.

Thank you for any help



------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr. Richard Thornton Telephone: (03) 253 6475
Semiconductor Failure Analysis and Reliability,
Optoelectronics Section, Fax. (03) 253 6664
Telecom Australia Research Labs.,
770 Blackburn Rd., email: r.thornton-at-trl.oz.au
Clayton 3168,
Australia.






From: William Clark :      CLARK-at-kcgl1.eng.ohio-state.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 09:26:42 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:

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Please

unsubscribe William Clark




From: dfa-at-rabbit.physiol.unimelb.edu.au (David Abbott)
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1993 10:30:33 +1000 (EST)
Subject: Electron microscopy list

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Reply_ RE} Electron microscopy list
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Hi everyone?
Why not identify your messages to the list with OM, SEM, TEM, STM, AFM, etc. in
the title? That way we can delete the messages tat are of little or no
interest to us.

--------------------------------------

My personal reason for suggesting this is that, not being
involved in electron microscopy myself, I simply don't have
the time to look through all the EM messages.

Of course, those interested in all topics could subscribe
to both lists and be no worse off than now.

-David.
- -
David Abbott | Email: dfa-at-physiol.unimelb.edu.au
School of Physics & Dept. of Physiology | Phone: +61-3-344-5465
The University of Melbourne, Australia. | Fax: Available on request.


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From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 10:47:28 -0600
Subject: Re: Thickness of Surface Layers

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} RE: Thickness of Surface Layers
}
} John
}
} The obvious answer is making a cross-section of your
} specimen and then looking in the appropriate type of microscope
} (optical, SEM, TEM.....). What material are you looking at?
} What thickness is the surface layer. Can you x-section the samples
} or are they unique? Can you use a SIMS system to image the surface
} (low res) and then sputter through.....?
}
} Nestor Z.
} ANL EMcenter

Yes, one solution would be to section the material, but that wouldn't allow
mapping of thicknesses over the surface. This work would be for a client
who wants a non-destructive technique. They just want to know the
thickness, and not remove it.

One technique suggested by another lab here at CSU is ellipsometry. As I
understand it, this is a technique that uses polarized light to determine
the thickness of a thin film over a substrate. I don't know what the
mapping or resolution limits are. Unfortunately, I don't know the
approximate thickness, although I think it's 1-100 nm.

It's becoming apparent to me that I need to find out more about these
specimens before I'll be able to help them very much and direct them to the
right technique.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 13:07:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: LM/counterstaining for immuno/

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All Microscopy Subscribers:

At the present we only operate one list called Microscopy
and have had one vote/request to split off a portion to an optical
microscopy list with another vote/comment not to do this.
One reason for the split off this is that some users
are only interested in optical or electron or whatever
based microscopy and have no interest in the other fields.
Until I get more feedback we will keep the single list, however,
John Mansfield has recently made a good suggestion relative to
titling your messages to the Microscopy Listserver, which may
improve the operation. Basically he suggested that we add
a label indicating the type of microscopy to the message title.

I like John's Idea. So please from now on when
entering your Subject/Title of your EMAIL Message,
please try to begin your title with an obvious abbreviation
for the type of microscopy you will be addressing.

Here's some suggestions (which of course are not binding
and only reflect my ignorance if the abbreviations
are not current).

LM: Light Microscopy
CFM: Confocal Microscopy
SEM: Scanning Electron Microscopy
TEM: Transmission Electron Microscopy
AEM: Analytical Electron Microscopy
AFM: Atomic Force Microscopy
STM: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
uAnaly: Microanalysis
Gen: General Questions Comments etc..

Other suggestions? Basically use something obvious that
makes sense.

A typical message title might look something like this

To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
/\ /\
|| ||
Abbreviation Subject Matter

Again I have no problems in creating additional lists which
are directed toward a specific microsocpy/microanalysis
methodology. It only requires a sufficient audience.

=======================
Nestor Z.
ANL EMCenter
Email:Zaluzec-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV




From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 11:50:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: counterstaining for immunoLM

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

Try short times in diluted hematoxylin or thionin. Thionin will pick up
more of the cytoplasmic RNS, but we use it routinely, at 4-fold dilution
of the Wisconsin thionin recipe for DAB counterstain and for
autoradiography. Just keep the staining time short. We have also used
methyl green for nickel enhanced DAB and fast green FCF.
If working in B&W, try a green filter or light blue filter in the light
path to enhance the DAB contrast.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories
University of Washington






From: William Clark :      CLARK-at-kcgl1.eng.ohio-state.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1993 17:29:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: EM microscope list

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Please

unsubscribe William Clark




From: Gerald Little :      ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1993 10:25:44 GMT+1000
Subject: Gen: Titles to Microscopy.

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931026102544.352-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au}

G'day,

In relation to the previous messages concerning the possible
splitting of the group I would strongly suggest that we stay as one
group and definitely adopt the use of appropriate titles to identify
the message as suggested by Nestor Zaluzec. I use TEM, LM and CLSM
and occasionally SEM for my research and having access to the group
allows me to keep up to date with what is going in all these fields.

Regards,
Gerry Little.


Dr Gerald Little | Ph (049) 215618
The Neuroscience Group |
Discipline of Anatomy | Fax (049) 216903
Faculty of Medicine |
The University of Newcastle | Email ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Australia, 2308 |




From: Darcy Clark :      03249587-at-mama.minmet.uq.oz.au
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1993 17:33:04 +1000 (EST)
Subject: TEM: High Resolution TEM of Polymers

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I'm interested in hearing from anyone who is involved in TEM of polymers,
particularly high resolution. I'm also interested in hearing about any
methods of detecting small crystalline regions in amorphous matrices,
either during or after imaging.
Darcy Clark
03249587-at-minmet.uq.oz.au
Dept.Mining & Metallurgical Eng.
Uni.of QLD. BRISBANE AUSTRALIA.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1993 9:40:47 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: TEM: Polymers

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We're not doing anything in the way of HREM of polymers here
at ANL, however, I vaguely remember some work done by John Hunt
of Lehigh University on a VG HB501 STEM. It was published I
believe in Ultramicroscopy or the Microbeam Analysis Society
Journal (possibly with Dave Williams) within the last three
years. He was doing combined HR Analytical Microscopy
and imaging.. If I run across the reference I'll post it

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: :      tonygr-at-EAGLE.MIT.EDU
Date: 26 Oct 93 12:22:18 EDT
Subject: TEM-HREM of polymers

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-------------

Ned Thomas and Weiping Zhang did some very nice HREM imaging of polymers
here at MIT (Ned was also involved with a postdoc at Amherst before he came
to MIT). The people at Akashi (now TOPCON) took some excellent images
of the lattice of Ned's crystalline polymers when I was at their lab trying
out the 002B microscope. I don't know where Weiping is now, but if you
want to write to Ned, his address is:

Prof E. L. Thomas
MIT Room 13-5094
Cambridge MA 02139

If you want to send an E-mail message to him, address it to me and I will
forward it. (I haven't asked his consent to put his E-mail address on this
forum, although I think it is probably public knowledge).

Tony Garratt-Reed






From: Denis Baskin :      baskindg-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1993 18:59:55 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: LM cryoimmunofluor

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Reply_ RE} "Polymer Microscopy," Sawyer & Grubb
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
There is apparently a new edition of this book in production and so those of
you having difficulty getting copies should perhaps wait until the new ediition
hits the bookshelves.

--------------------------------------

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We have had the same problem here with cardiac muscle from several
species. The background fluorescence is seemingly impossible to get rid of
in cryo or paraffin sections fixed in 4% paraform. in 0.1 M PB. Any
suggestions?

Denis Baskin
VA Medical Center, Seattle

On Tue, 26 Oct 1993, Steve Barlow wrote:

} Tissue cryosections and immunofluorescence.
} Can anyone suggest some treatments for reducing background
} fluorescence in rabbit muscle tissue? We are using either a 3%
} formaldehyde/PBS fix (3 hours) followed by storage in 0.5% formaldehyde in
} PBS or McClean's sodium periodate/ formaldehyde/ lysine fixative. We are
} using EM grade methanol free formaldehyde from vials. After
} cryosectioning sucrose embedded frozen tissue, we have tried treating with
} 0.2M glycine or 50 mM ammonium chloride for 30-60 min. . After these
} treatments, we still have pronounced tissue fluorescence. I've seen in
} the literature that sodium borohydride is used, but its explosive
} characteristics and its possible alteration of tissue antigenicity seem to
} make it a less desireable treatment.
}
} Any suggestions would be appreciated.
} ----------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Steven Barlow
} EM Facility/Biology Dept.
} San Diego State University
} San Diego CA 92182-0057
} phone: (619) 594-4523
} fax: (619) 594-5676
} email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
}







From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 28 Oct 1993 09:50:31 U
Subject: Sawyer & Grubb

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John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Lab
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or
John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time: 9:44

Date:10/28/93
NC EMAL

Just my 10cents worth
John Mansfield






From: baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tobias Baskin)
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1993 10:08:46 -0500
Subject: Re: LM cryoimmunofluor

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} I've seen in
} the literature that sodium borohydride is used, but its explosive
} characteristics and its possible alteration of tissue antigenicity seem to
} make it a less desireable treatment.
}
I have used sodium borohydride frequently for this purpose and it
has never yet blown up on me. We have also used immunocytochem on anumber
of antigens successfully. So, I don't think its terrrible for antigenicity.
If you are pushing things, there may be a small detrimental effect. I use a
1 mg/ml solution in PBS. You have to make up the solution just before use.
We keep the powder in a dessicant at room temp.

In one lab I was in, they used to cut the PBS 1:1 with methanol. This
slowed down the reaction. But, methanol itself can do some nasty things to
your tissue. A ten to 30 min. incubation is typical.Some folks use a few
changes. Ie, incubate for 10 min and then change to fresh solution for
another 10.

However, my understanding was that NaBH4 works for reducing
autofluor from unreacted aldehydes in gluteraldehyde fixation. That is,
glut is bi functional, so there can be dangling aldehydes out there. These
the borohydride attacks and prevents from forming highly conjugated
somethings or other, which are autofluor. In my work, on plant tissue, no
help from NABH on autofluor when only pfa is used. Of course, this is no
guarantee your tissue's autofluor might not be eased with the NABH4.

Hope this helps,
Tobias Baskin
******************************** ***************
Tobias I. Baskin /~~~\
Biol. Sci's * Univ. of Missouri c|o o\
Columbia, MO 65211 USA \ = /
Tel:314-882-0173 """
FAX 314 - 882 - 0123
baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1993 19:58:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: LM-cryoimmunofluor

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} Steve Barlow asked
} Tissue cryosections and immunofluorescence.
} Can anyone suggest some treatments for reducing background
} fluorescence in rabbit muscle tissue?.........(text deleted)


I have absolutely no experience in LM Fluorescence problems
but an obvious solution to me (which probably means I'm wrong)
is to change the wavelength of the light source. If the illumination
system is causing the staining(?) chemical to fluoresce then
might not it be possible to change the excitation source? Presumably
the staining chemical is sensitive to the radiation you are using
thus rather than move to a potential dangerous chemical try
changing the source.....

Now somebody please cure my ignornace and
tell me why this is probably wrong....

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: :      morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1993 10:08:13 PDT
Subject: Re: LM cryoimmunofluor

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Steve:

Regarding the use of sodium borohydride, I have used it regularly as a
pretreatment for immunoperoxidase when using glutaraldehyde in my fix - it's
great at reducing background (presumably by reducing double bonds - potential
sites of non-specific DAB oxidation), and also seems to unmask antigenicity. I
have been able to increase my primary antibody dilutions several fold in some
cases. I have not noticed any difference though when using only
paraformaldehyde, so I'm not sure it would help with your background
fluorescence problem.

After initial PBS washes

Incubate 30 min in 0.5% NaBH4 in 50 mM Tris, pH 7.4

Then 3 x PBS washes before blocking serum

The borohydride solution should be weighed out and put into solution
immediately before use (it goes in fast). It does generate a lot of bubbles,
so use plenty of volume on your tissue.

David Morilak
Dept of Psychiatry
Stanford University
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1993 11:11:31 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: LM cryoimmunofluor

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} } I've seen in
} } the literature that sodium borohydride is used, but its explosive
} } characteristics and its possible alteration of tissue antigenicity seem to
} } make it a less desireable treatment.
} I have used sodium borohydride frequently for this purpose and it
} has never yet blown up on me. We have also used immunocytochem on anumber

Just a warning: green Bodipy does not work after this treatment.






From: MN :      morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1993 10:58:42 PDT
Subject: Re: LM-cryoimmunofluor

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On 10-29, Nestor Zaluzec writes:

I have absolutely no experience in LM Fluorescence problems
but an obvious solution to me (which probably means I'm wrong)
is to change the wavelength of the light source. If the illumination
system is causing the staining(?) chemical to fluoresce then
might not it be possible to change the excitation source? Presumably
the staining chemical is sensitive to the radiation you are using
thus rather than move to a potential dangerous chemical try
changing the source.....

Nestor:

I'm not sure if this is the answer you're looking for, but here's my shot
anyway: The application, if I understand Steve correctly, is in using a
fluorescent-conjugate secondary antibody to detect a primary antibody in
immunohistochemistry. The conjugates are typically fluorescein (FITC) and
rhodamine (TRITC, a fluorescein derivative). The light source is a high energy
mercury lamp, and the light passes through a filter cube that is matched to
the fluor that is being examined. These cubes are commercially available - the
best are probably from Nikon in my experience. The excitation, emission and
notch filter combinations result in a fairly tight wavelength window, which is
necessary to be able to discriminate the different tags with different filters
(for co-localization studies) without bleed-through, since their spectra do
overlap considerably. The problem is that, using the excitation/emission
settings necessary for viewing FITC and TRITC, there may be some tissue
elements that are also excited, or that emit autofluorescence. (A note - never
use Kim-Wipes on your slides - they are treated with something, presumably to
make them nice and white, that demonstrates a most impressive
"autofluorescence"!). So, the options are to switch fluorescent labels to get
away from the wavelengths that cause fluorescence in tissue (but the alternate
choices and reagents are extremely few), or reduce the tissue fluorescence by
a variety of pretreatments.

Here's another suggestion: I have used a mounting medium made from
"antifadent" tablets from CitiFluor (City University, London). The mountant is
essentially 90% glycerol/PBS with 1 dissolved tablet/10 ml. The tablet is
presumably some proprietary detergent concoction, but it does help reduce
background fluorescence. It's fairly expensive though - as I remember about
$100 (US) for 10 tablets, so I only use it for "critical" work (but isn't it
all?).

I hope this is informative!

David Morilak
Department of Psychiatry
Stanford University
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: Denis Baskin :      baskindg-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Sat, 30 Oct 1993 13:37:05 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: Re: LM: Immuno controls

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X-Sender: baskindg-at-carson.u.washington.edu

Steve:
The rule of thumb that we use for polyclonal abys when preimmune serum
from the same rabbit is not available is to use normal rabbit serum at the
same diluton as the primary aby. However, you may have to screen several
batches of normal rabbit serum to find one that has low nonspecific
binding. Monoclonal aby concentratons are usually given in mg/ml or
something like that, and you usually dilute them for use. If, for
example, you use a mca at 0.01 mg/ml, then the control would be mouse IgG
at the same concentration, although you can also dilute normal mouse serum
to the same concentration. The problem we frequently encounter is that
normal mouse serum tend to be "sticky" and you may have to screen a dozen
samples to find one without a lot of nospecific staining. Other labs have
found similar problems with NMS. Just replacing the primary aby with PBS
is definitely not adequate!. If you have to use the primary abys at c.a.
1:100 or 1:50 or less, you may be introuble since the NSB can be as high
as the SB. All the more reason to serach for a good normal serum with low NSB.
Good luck.
Denis Baskin
Seattle VA Medical Center
206-764-2138

On Thu, 28 Oct 1993, Steve Barlow wrote:

} 1. what does one use for a control when using a monoclonal Ab--there is,
} in this case, no 'pre-immune'? Is a monoclonal Ab known not to be expresed
} in the sample the best alternative?
}
} 2. what does one use for a control when using a polyclonal rabbit Ab
} (commercial or otherwise) for which no pre-immune is available?
} My user is not satisfied using PBS alone in place of a primary. If I use
} rabbit normal serum or rabbit IgG--how does one come up with a meaningful
} concentration? Presumably this control is to show how 'sticky' the sample
}







From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1993 17:17:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM-cryoimmunofluor

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On Thu, 28 Oct 1993, Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 wrote:

}
} } Steve Barlow asked
} } Tissue cryosections and immunofluorescence.
} } Can anyone suggest some treatments for reducing background
} } fluorescence in rabbit muscle tissue?.........(text deleted)
}
}
} I have absolutely no experience in LM Fluorescence problems
} but an obvious solution to me (which probably means I'm wrong)
} is to change the wavelength of the light source. If the illumination


I tried to avoid autofluorescence by changing the wavelength. I suppose
that might work in some situations where a single specific component with
a narrow band of excitation or emission is present. But some things, like
the lipofuscin granules in gut will fluoresce at any wavelength.
my hypothesis is that most biological autofluoresce is due to a number of
molecules (and processing distortions) that will glow over a range of
frequencies.

For what its worth, my recent experience with whole vestibular organs
showed that FITC, AMCA and Cascade Blue wash out quickly, leaving little
backgound. But Texas Red required an overnight wash.






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 1 Nov 1993 17:00:24 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM: Immuno controls

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

} Some general questions for discussion:
}
} 1. what does one use for a control when using a monoclonal Ab--there is,
} in this case, no 'pre-immune'? Is a monoclonal Ab known not to be expresed
} in the sample the best alternative?
}
} 2. what does one use for a control when using a polyclonal rabbit Ab
} (commercial or otherwise) for which no pre-immune is available?
My 2 cents:
I had gotten by with finding the
IgG concentration of the antibody preparation. Then I dilute a normal
(non-immune) serum, or purified IgG, from the appropriate species to a
similar concentration. IgG and IgM estimates for the normal sera of several
species may be found in R. Lindmark, et al, J. Immunmol. Meth., 62:1-13,
1983. Of course, not all vendors know that much about their products, and
most homemade antibodies are relatively uncharacterized. Sometimes the
IgG content of an immune serum or monoclonal prep. can be estimated by
comparing the total protein to that of non-immune serum for that
species, or control culture/ascites fluids.
I have encountered commercial "non-immune" sera that gave a better
anti-cytokeratin label than the monoclonals being evaluated.








From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 11:01:10 -0600 (CST)
Subject: LM: What is IgG....

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I've seen alot of discussion about staining lately which
is interesting, but now I have a simple question. We deal mainly
with metals/ceramics/semiconductoring materials hence, we do no staining etc..
So for the "novice in me" can someone tell me what IgG and IgM are?
I'm not able to deduce the meaning from the context of the discussion.
It would help me (and probably a few others) to follow the discussion
a little better.

Remember this list has a whole slew of different readers and not all
of us know each others "standard" abbreviations from the different
fields of microscopy (or even the same field but in different applications).
Try to keep this in mind when posting things.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: '( :      morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 11:50:52 PST
Subject: Re: IgG

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Nestor:

IgG and IgM stand for immunoglubulin G and immunoglobulin M, and in this
context refer to different types of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry.
For most applications, primary antisera are of the IgG type, but for some
applications, and for antibodies derived from certain sources and by different
procedures, they may be IgM. This is important to know, since the secondary
antibody, which is directed against the primary antibody and usually carries
the tag which will allow visualization, must be directed against the
appropriate immunoglobulin and the right host species.

There is an excellent review, both for its information content and its
historical value, on the basics of indirect immunohistochemiostry by Ludwig
Sternberger, 1974. I don't have the reference handy, but I will track it down
and report back.

Hope this has been useful...

David Morilak
Dept of Psychiatry
Stanford university
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: ST :      morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 11:54:28 PST
Subject: Re: LM- what is IgG...

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Nestor:

IgG and IgM stand for immunoglubulin G and immunoglobulin M, and in this
context refer to different types of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry.
For most applications, primary antisera are of the IgG type, but for some
applications, and for antibodies derived from certain sources and by different
procedures, they may be IgM. This is important to know, since the secondary
antibody, which is directed against the primary antibody and usually carries
the tag which will allow visualization, must be directed against the
appropriate immunoglobulin and the right host species.

There is an excellent review, both for its information content and its
historical value, on the basics of indirect immunohistochemiostry by Ludwig
Sternberger, 1974. I don't have the reference handy, but I will track it down
and report back.

Hope this has been useful...

David Morilak
Dept of Psychiatry
Stanford university
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu (David Morilak)
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 12:18:37 PST
Subject: Re: LM - What is IgG....

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I've had some real problems trying to send this message to the list, so I hope
it gets through this time, and please forgive me if it gets sent a few times:

Nestor:

IgG and IgM stand for immunoglubulin G and immunoglobulin M, and in this
context refer to different types of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry.
For most applications, primary antisera are of the IgG type, but for some
applications, and for antibodies derived from certain sources and by different
procedures, they may be IgM. This is important to know, since the secondary
antibody, which is directed against the primary antibody and usually carries
the tag which will allow visualization, must be directed against the
appropriate immunoglobulin and the right host species.

There is an excellent review, both for its information content and its
historical value, on the basics of indirect immunohistochemiostry by Ludwig
Sternberger, 1974. I don't have the reference handy, but I will track it down
and report back.

Hope this has been useful...

David Morilak
Dept of Psychiatry
Stanford university
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu
-------




From: morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu (David Morilak)
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 17:10:52 PST
Subject: Re: LM- What is IgG

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Message-Id: {m0ouTk2-000dBZC-at-unpsun1.cc.unp.ac.za}
To: microscopy-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV

Following up my earlier reply, here is the citation for Sternbergers classic
reference on immunocytochemical techniques:


Sternberger, Ludwig A. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY (Englewood Cliffs, N.J. :
Prentice-Hall, 1974)

Sternberger, Ludwig A. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY. 2nd ed. (New York : Wiley,
1979)

Sternberger, Ludwig A. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY. 3rd ed. (New York : Wiley,
1986)

If anyone is interested, it's a great introduction to immunocytochemistry, and
for anyone who is doing it, it is a great look into how the technique has been
developed.

David Morilak
morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu

-------




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1993 20:55:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: LM:IgG & Cruise Missles

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Thanks to all for the general info on IgG & IgM.
Just goes to show you that us materials
types are interested in lots of things too!

BTW I smiled at Michael Herron's closing comment:

} Hey, it ain't no cruise missle but it what we do :^)

Remind me in a less busy time to describe how the ANL EM
Center proposed and developed a protocol for using an SEM on Cruise
and other Missles (US & Russian) as a nondestructive
means for nuclear arms verification. It was actually a small ($20K)
but funded program for a year by the START program! The funny thing
is the procedure worked. It got killed in the end because
anything that inexpensive couldn't work (at least
one of the explaination I got)

:-)

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 16:25:09 -0600 (CST)
Subject: ALL Microscopy: Image Storage

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Message-Id: {m0ouTLM-000dBTC-at-unpsun1.cc.unp.ac.za}
To: microscopy-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV




On Wed, 3 Nov 1993, Michael Cammer wrote:

}
} We are looking for a system for gross storage and easy retrieval of a
} large number of images for both teaching and research. Does anybody have
} any suggestions?
}
} Basically, we have a large (microscope) slide library that we would like
} to scan in color. We need the images available for playback on a video
} monitor and for photography. Should we use a computer and, if so, with

} what software (e.g. database) and what storage device (for speed, quanity,
} compatibility w/ other systems, and an eye towards support in the future)?
} The initial application is for a slide library for teaching, but, perhaps,
} this could be turned into an interactive system available to students.
} Also, I have been thinking that such a system might be useful for storing
} our images for research; even without this specific query, we need more
} and more compatible storage.
}
} Any suggestions for specific parts or for whole integrated systems (e.g.
} is there something smilar for other fields?) would be welcome.
}
} Thanks-
}
} Michael cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
}
}
}

Cost aside, one alternative is HDTV for capturing the images. I'm not
sure what the current state of the art is, but several years ago, Sony
offered complete HDTV systems (cameras, analog and digital storage,
post-processing hardware, optical fiber closed-circuit transmission, etc.)
specifically aimed at the pathology market. I saw the system
demonstrated in the Sony showroom in Tokyo; the image quality was
extraordinary. As I recall, there are several sites in the US that
offer HDTV-based remote consulting.

Apart from cost, one reason to hold off on the Sony system is that their
HDTV standard is different than the one that three US developers have
decided (at long last) to develop jointly: You could end up with a pricey
white elephant.

Storage of massive amounts of data will depend on a number of factors
that include required speed of retrieval, number of users who need
simultaneous access, available hardware, money. Running all the images
onto CD-ROM is not a bad alternative; costs are not terribly bad (if
you want to make your own, you'll have too pay around $4K) although speed
of retrieval may be frustrating.

I'm quite interested in hearing of ways people have developed archives of
microscopy data. Having representative images on-line in conjunction with
other data can make a very powerful tool.

Dave Coder
Dept. of Immunology
Internet: dcoder-at-u.washington.edu






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 15:01:40 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: ALL Microscopy: Image catalogs

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

Related to the current discussion thread on imarge archiving - what
systems and software do people use for cataloging and retrieving images?
We are accumulating stacks of images from calcium ratioing, confocal,
serial images from convential microscopy (lm and SEM) and stuff that has
been converted to projection slides and Linotronic files.

There are both commercial and shareware programs offered.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-8360





From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 3 Nov 1993 18:29:55 U
Subject: Critical Point Dryer

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John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Lab
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or
John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time: 17:27

Date:11/3/93
NC EMAL






From: Jouko K. M„ki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 08:48:43 +0200
Subject: Re: Critical Point Dryer

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X-Warning: Original message contained 8-bit characters, however during
the SMTP transport session the receiving system was unable to
announce capability of receiving 8-bit SMTP (RFC 1425-1428),
and as this message does not have MIME headers (RFC 1341) to
enable encoding change, only option was to STRIP sent characters
to 7-bit :-(


On Thu, 4 Nov 1993 04:29:55 +0200, John Mansfield wrote:

} Date:11/3/93
} NC EMAL
} Subject: Critical Point Dryer
} I have a colleague who is in the market for a critical point drying system.
} Not knowing anything about such things or exactly how they work, I want to ask
} if there is a manufacturer or model that is preferred by the majority of people
} and if it is possible to dry material that is wet with a liquid other than
} water.
} Any help or info would be appreciated.
} Thanks.
} John Mansfield

The idea of critical point drying is to change the liquid to a suitable
liquified gas, which has a low enough critical point to change directly
fron liquid phase to gas phase. It does not matter wether the change is
made directly or via a series of liquids. The only thing which matters is
to maintain the sample as intact as possible while changing the liquids. So
all you need to know is the solubility of different liquids in each other
and finally in the liquified gas.

Hopefully this helps, others can give you more exact advice.

Best regards,

Jouko Mki

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Mki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 10:08:44 +0200
Subject: Re: Critical point drying

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On Thu, 4 Nov 1993 04:29:55 +0200, John Mansfield wrote:

} Date:11/3/93
} NC EMAL
} Subject: Critical Point Dryer
} I have a colleague who is in the market for a critical point drying system.
} Not knowing anything about such things or exactly how they work, I want to ask
} if there is a manufacturer or model that is preferred by the majority of people
} and if it is possible to dry material that is wet with a liquid other than
} water.
} Any help or info would be appreciated.
} Thanks.
} John Mansfield

The idea of critical point drying is to change the liquid to a suitable
liquified gas, which has a low enough critical point to change directly
fron liquid phase to gas phase. It does not matter wether the change is
made directly or via a series of liquids. The only thing which matters is
to maintain the sample as intact as possible while changing the liquids. So
all you need to know is the solubility of different liquids in each other
and finally in the liquified gas.

Hopefully this helps, others can give you more exact advice.

Best regards,

Jouko Maki

P.S. Sorry for repeating this message. The first sending contained 8-bit
characters causing errors. I hope this goes through properly.
jm

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Maki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: NoelGoldsmith:      mt1ntg%fencer.cis.dsto.gov.au-at-relay.tc.umn.edu (Noel
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 19:40:03 -0600
Subject: Re: system for storing lots of images?

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Goldsmith)
To: Multiple recipients of list {nih-image-at-nx1.soils.umn.edu}

} We are looking for a system for gross storage and easy retrieval of a
} large number of images for both teaching and research. Does anybody have
} any suggestions?
}
} Basically, we have a large (microscope) slide library that we would like
} to scan in color. We need the images available for playback on a video
} monitor and for photography. Should we use a computer and, if so, with
} what software (e.g. database) and what storage device (for speed, quanity,
} compatibility w/ other systems, and an eye towards support in the future)?
} The initial application is for a slide library for teaching, but, perhaps,
} this could be turned into an interactive system available to students.
} Also, I have been thinking that such a system might be useful for storing
} our images for research; even without this specific query, we need more
} and more compatible storage.
}
} Any suggestions for specific parts or for whole integrated systems (e.g.
} is there something smilar for other fields?) would be welcome.
}
} Thanks-
}
} Michael cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Michael,
We are also looking at alternatives for the long term archiving and easy
retrieval of digital images.
Many of our images are directly aquired using Perceptics HR 24 RGB frame
grabber with a SONY DXC930P (P for Pal) which gives about 1Mb per image of
real 24 bit colour with low noise if the lighting is good. Or we use a
Videk (Kodak) MegaVision with a Perceptics MegaGrabber for a 1.4Mb
Monochrome image, or we use the Data Translation DT 2555 Quik Capture for a
400Kmonochrome image. These images are used for illustration, measurement
etc. We have a Richoh read-write optical disc which is useful for storage,
and works well. We have now started to worry about back-ups of our now
extensive files of images. We are going to make a Photo CD, which will
require the production of films or slides from digital images. although
next year Kodak will offer a service called portfolio which will allow the
production of a CD containing digital only material.
The idea of a photo cd is attractive because it is becoming a well accepted
plateform for images, and is likely to be durable in the physical and
temporal sense. The other advantages are the availability of "juke boxes"
for CD's allowing the use of six or so in one machine. This access might
not be as quick as from a hard disc, but it will be better than scanning in
the original again.
Because photo-cd has the "thumbnails", rapid data base access becomes a
reality, software is already available, eg shoebox. So we will report tto
the list as we learn.
Noel T Goldsmith
DSTO
Aeronautical Research Laboratory
506 Lorimer Street
Port Melbourne
Vic 3207
Australia





From: John Ladwig :      jladwig-at-soils.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 18:51:40 -0600
Subject: Re: system for storing lots of images?

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} } } } } On Wed, 3 Nov 1993 18:25:54 -0600, kartenh-at-Sdsc.Edu said:

} } Cost aside, one alternative is HDTV for capturing the images.

kartenh} Another alternative is the Kodak digital camera back on a
kartenh} Nikon 8008. This directly dumps data into a Mac through
kartenh} the SCSI port. It provides a color (24 bit?) image with
kartenh} about 1500 pixel horizontal resolution X about 1000
kartenh} pixel. It grabs the image in about the same time that
kartenh} film does. But it is slow in dumping it into the
kartenh} computer. (Each image is about 4.5 MB). They provide a
kartenh} plug-in driver for Adobe Photoshop, so you can directly
kartenh} manipulate the image. H. Karten

I believe this is the very same DCS2000 I used earlier this year. It
is most emphatically *not* a 24 bit scanner, although all the product
lit seems to imply it very strongly. Relevant fragments from old
sci.image-processing articles follow. As I wrote before, the PhotoCD
images I just got were *much* preferable to the DCS2000 images.

|} From: sasrer-at-unx.sas.com (Rodney Radford)
|} Subject: Re: Digital Cameras - Suggestions?
|} Date: Wed, 9 Jun 1993 23:27:46 GMT

|} John Peterson {jp-at-taligent.com} writes:
|} } Kodak DCS. This is a Nikon 35MM with a new back containing a
|} } 1024x1024x24 CCD array. Old models required you to lug around a
|} } suitcase, newer ones have a box about the size of the camera body
|} } attached to the bottom of the Nikon. Suitcase stores about 1-200
|} } photos (depends on compression), smaller one can store photos in
|} } small strap on SCSI disk. Mondo expensive, $8-20K. Smaller
|} } cameras only take 20-30 photos on a battery charge; suitcase
|} } models go longer. Suitcase has an LCD screen to review images.
|}
|} Most of your description was very accurate, and very
|} informative. However, I don't know of any 24bit DCS cameras
|} available (someone correct me if I am wrong, and give me the model
|} number). We currently have a DCS200 camera, which is a Nikon F3
|} camera with a strap on hard drive capable of storing 50 images.
|} However, it is only an 8bit CCD array with an RGB color mask in
|} front so that each pixel can be EITHER red, green, or blue, such
|} as:
|}
|} R G R G R G R G ....
|} G B G B G B G B ....
|} R G R G R G R G ....
|} G B G B G B G B ....
|}
|} The resulting image on the DCS200 is a 1024x1536 image and takes
|} 1.5MB (data is NOT compressed in the camera/disk). After this image
|} is downloaded into the computer, it is interpolated into a full
|} 24bit image by calculating 'suitable' values of red, green, and
|} blue for each pixel. The result is pretty good, but not as good as
|} a real 24bit image!



|} From: sasrer-at-unx.sas.com (Rodney Radford)
|} Subject: Re: Digital Cameras - Suggestions?
|} Date: Thu, 10 Jun 1993 13:05:40 GMT
|}
|} ledwards-at-leland.Stanford.EDU (Laurence James Edwards) writes:
|}
|} } Not to quibble, but in standard usage (at least on the output
|} } side) a 24bit image means 8bits in rgb ... each "pixel" is
|} } composed of an rgb triad. So I would say John had the depth right
|} } but the resolution wrong ... that is, the unprocessed image is
|} } really 512x768x24. Do they use linear interpolation, or something
|} } a little more sophisticated?

|} Except that the interpolation algorithm yields a 1024x1536x24 bit
|} image, not the 512x768x24 image you mention above. So they 'fake'
|} the other 16bits in EVERY pixel location. So, I still stand by my
|} original 1024x1536x8 bit description of the CCD array. Below is a
|} paragraph from the DCS200 Programmer's Specifications:

|} "The CCD sensor for the DCS200 Digital Camera does not capture all
|} three RGB colors for each pixel. Instead, it captures one color for
|} each pixel, so that interpolation is required to construct three
|} full RGB planes for the image. The grid below represents the pixel
|} grid before interpolation. Green pixels predominate the grid because
|} Green captures the luminance levels which can translate across to the
|} Red and Blue planes."

|} The interpolation algorithm consists of three seperate passes over
|} the image, interpolating the green, red and blue values. The Green
|} interpolation algorithm basically looks at the 4 nearest neighbors
|} as two pairs (up/down, left/right) and calculates the two delta
|} values. It then uses the average of the pair with the largest delta
|} value. The red/blue algorithms are very similar, except that there
|} is no test for largest delta values - instead some pixels always
|} use the up/down pair, some use the left/right pair, and others use
|} a 4way average all all neighbors.

|} There is also a black-level color correction pass (enhances
|} contrast), and a gamma correction pass. There is also a list of
|} 'defective' CCD rows in the camera, and how to adjust for them
|} (replace with a neighbor row, or average with two other rows).

|} We have received 3 seperate copies of the KCS200 manual, and in
|} EVERY one, the algorithms have changed, so I guess they are not
|} fixed in stone, and Kodak is still experimenting. Note that it is
|} also possible to just use the interpolated Green plane as a B&W
|} image.




From: rzimm%greenwood.cr.usgs.gov-at-relay.tc.umn.edu (Robert Zimmermann)
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 21:48:58 -0600
Subject: Re: system for storing lots of images?

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Received: From ANLVM(MAILER) by ANLEMC(ANJE5.40) for ZALUZEC-at-ANLEMC; Wed, 3 Nov
93 22:51 CST
Received: from ANLVM by ANLVM (Mailer R2.07B) with BSMTP id 7009; Wed, 03 Nov
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} We are looking for a system for gross storage and easy retrieval of a
} large number of images for both teaching and research. Does anybody have
} any suggestions?
............
} Michael cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu

to which Harvey Karten replied:

} There are several options. Low to medium resolution, use Video. File size
} is modest (circa 300KB per image). Resolution is low = despite what your
} television salesman tells you, you won't do better than about 350 lines of
} resolution. You can then archive them for database using Aldus Fetch or
} Multi-User's Search 2.0 image database.
} Alternately, use intermediate photos, and send them off to Kodak for
} Photo-CD ROMs. They provide a few different levels of resolution (from
} video levels up to about 2,000 lines), depending on your display
} capability. Increasing amounts of software to access Kodak Photo-CDs.
}
} For the user demanding higher levels of resolution, you will have to go to
} a Scitex or Leaf scanner (costs about $15,000) which will give youj about
} 5,000x4,000 pixel resolution. This is slightly better than a sharply
} focussed image on Kodachrome 35 mm (also about 20 megapixels, or 4K x 5K.)
} }
Image database programs for the Mac were reviewed in the Sept. '93 MacUser,
p190, a good starting point for comparisons. "Aldus Fetch" (mentioned by
Harvey) received a four-mice review. Our graphics group here has set up a
very usable multiuser database using Fetch, for drafted figures and scanned
images. It is used to organize and access their archive and active files.

But, how to acquire the digital files? Capture by CCD camera directly from
the microscope will be a problem regardless of it's CCD array size if you
want to capture a large area (ie. low magnification). If you shoot film at
low magnification, you can then scan the transparencies with a film scanner
(2000-4000dpi,big files !), your own (your time and $$) or Kodak's PhotoCD
($$). You do have control of cropping, resolution, color or exposure
control if you do it yourself. If your images have a narrow color range,
you can reduce the file size by x3 by transforming it to 8-bit indexed
color without much perceptible loss. "Photoshop" or "Fast Eddie" can do
this for you. I have had some discussions with people in our photo
library (chemical), who want to establish a digital equivalent. They have
over 50,000 negatives and slides in the freezers. Let Kodak handle it!
(As per Harvey's recommendation). PhotoCD's provide enough resolution
(2000x3000 pixels) for direct 300dpi dye-sublimation output of 6.67"x10"
prints. Discussion of the adequacy of dye-sub output can be found in the
earlier record of this forum. A review of Kodak's image manipulation
program, "Kodak PhotoEdge", can also be found in Sept'93 MacUser. Kodak
PhotoCD's can even be viewed on the home TV, a nice feature for cramming
students, even if not high-res.

I have been playing with a Nikon LS-3510AF film scanner (on loan from my
local Nikon representative, S & M Microscopes, Colorado Springs, CO --A
"thank you" plug). You know what? You can stick a slide (40mm x40mm scan
area) directly in the 35mm slide holder and scan it. No microscope! At
the maximum scanner resolution of 3165 dpi that is a resolution of 0.124
micrometers/pixel which is about what I get at x100 on my microscope
set-up. It does a nice job with a slide sandwiched between crossed
polarizers (we geologists do this a lot). I assume your slides are however
of animal or vegetable, not mineral subjects. You wouldn't be able to do
fluorescence stains without major, but not impossible, modifications to the
scanner ( Is there a market out there?). Will microscopes be obsolete
soon? Within the last year there was an article in "Advanced Imaging"
about the development of a digital microscope. I can not remember the
exact issue off-hand. In that set up the sample is stepped across a high
density (4000-6000 pixel) linear array CCD, just like most film scanners do
( but theirs still looked like a microscope).

Good luck with your project. Maybe some of this will help.



=============================================================
Robert Zimmermann rzimm-at-usgs.gov (Internet)
U.S. Geological Survey 303-236-5626
MS 905 Box 25046 Federal Center
Denver CO 80225





From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 09:24:23 -0700
Subject: Re: Critical point drying

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} On Thu, 4 Nov 1993 04:29:55 +0200, John Mansfield wrote:
}
} } Date:11/3/93
} } NC EMAL
} } Subject: Critical Point Dryer
} } I have a colleague who is in the market for a critical point drying system.
} } Not knowing anything about such things or exactly how they work, I want to ask
} } if there is a manufacturer or model that is preferred by the majority of
} } people
} } and if it is possible to dry material that is wet with a liquid other than
} } water.
} } Any help or info would be appreciated.
} } Thanks.
} } John Mansfield
}
} The idea of critical point drying is to change the liquid to a suitable
} liquified gas, which has a low enough critical point to change directly
} fron liquid phase to gas phase. It does not matter wether the change is
} made directly or via a series of liquids. The only thing which matters is
} to maintain the sample as intact as possible while changing the liquids. So
} all you need to know is the solubility of different liquids in each other
} and finally in the liquified gas.
}
} Hopefully this helps, others can give you more exact advice.
}
} Best regards,
}
} Jouko Maki

The most common transition fluid used these days is liquid carbon dioxide.
Specimens are typically dehydrated through a graded series of organic
solvent, ethanol or acetone, then placed in the cooled critical point dryer
(CPD). Ethanol and acetone are both miscible with CO2. Once the specimens
are in the chamber, liquid CO2 is introduced, and, through several
exchanges (filling and draining with CO2 under pressure from the tank), the
organic solvent is completely replaced by CO2.

The chamber is kept cool to keep the CO2 in liquid phase. After exchange
of liquids, the temperature is increased and the pressure inside the vessel
increases also. Once the critical point is passed, 1073 psi and 31.1 deg C
for CO2, the vessel is slowly vented. After atmospheric pressure is
reached, the chamber is opened and the specimens removed. They are warm
and dry, and they tend to rehydrate pretty fast, so having a dessicator
handy is a good idea.

The typical CPD device is a high pressure bomb that has valves (3) for
introducing liquid CO2 and venting liquid (bottom of chamber) and gas (top
of chamber). There is a mechanism for heating and cooling, too. One
temperature control system has electronic heating and cooling devices
(can't think of the name now) and sensors for temp control. These can be
automated. The other kind, which I prefer, has a water jacket around the
pressure vessel. You run ice water in to cool and warm/hot water to heat.
You have to keep an eye on the chamber to make sure you don't heat too
fast. But I watch the chamber, even when it's automated.

I like the water controled units because (1) they are cheaper (2) there are
fewer parts to go bad (3) they are smaller. The one I use now is made by
Polaron (model 3200) and is sold by Ted Pella. The last price I have is
about $3000. Another consideration is the size of the chamber. If you run
only a few specimens you might want a smaller one.

Hope this helps, John (and others),

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: kgb-at-gwd.dsto.gov.au (Ken Byfield)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1993 14:32:55 +0500
Subject: Image storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {9311050501.AA17438-at-spitfire.dsto.gov.au}


If I may add my two bits worth concerning Kodak's Photo CD system:
(- and aplogies in advance if this information has already been covered in
previous discussions)
KODAK offer an Product Information Kit re Photo CD and their image
processing covering
o Pro Photo CD (6000 by 4000 pixels of resolution)
o Lite Box image library system
o Photo CD Catalogue (6000 image storage)
o Portfolio Photo CD (variable resolution from base allowing 800
images or 1 hour of sound, or any combination in between)
and more

Hope that was of some use to someone!
Cheers,




Ken BYFIELD




From: kgb-at-gwd.dsto.gov.au (Ken Byfield)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1993 14:32:55 +0500
Subject: Image storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Phone : 61 8 259 5326
FAX : 61 8 259 6964

Postal Address:-

Bldg. 42 LABS Area
GWD, DSTO Salisbury,
P.O. Box 1500 Salisbury
South Australia 5108

-------------------------------------------
):-) (-:(





From: bnhirsch-at-dapsas1.weizmann.ac.il (David L. Hirschberg)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1993 16:26:27 +0200
Subject: Image storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Message-Id: {9311051426.AA14036-at-dapsas1.weizmann.ac.il}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

How do you unsubscribe from this list? I am going to be away for 6 weeks
and want to stop the flow of mail.

Listserv-at--at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

ignors my requests.

-d

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
David L. Hirschberg bnhirsch-at-dapsas1.weizmann.ac.il
Department of Neurobiology (972) (0)834-2127 (0)834-2412 work
Weizmann Institute of Science (972) 847-4805 home
Rehovot 76100 Israel (972) 834-4131 fax







From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Fri, 5 Nov 1993 08:48:25 -0700
Subject: Re: Critical point drying

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} On Thu, 4 Nov 1993 04:29:55 +0200, John Mansfield wrote:
}
} } Date:11/3/93
} } NC EMAL
} } Subject: Critical Point Dryer
} } I have a colleague who is in the market for a critical point drying system.
} } Not knowing anything about such things or exactly how they work, I want to ask
} } if there is a manufacturer or model that is preferred by the majority of
} } people
} } and if it is possible to dry material that is wet with a liquid other than
} } water.
} } Any help or info would be appreciated.
} } Thanks.
} } John Mansfield
}
} The idea of critical point drying is to change the liquid to a suitable
} liquified gas, which has a low enough critical point to change directly
} fron liquid phase to gas phase. It does not matter wether the change is
} made directly or via a series of liquids. The only thing which matters is
} to maintain the sample as intact as possible while changing the liquids. So
} all you need to know is the solubility of different liquids in each other
} and finally in the liquified gas.
}
} Hopefully this helps, others can give you more exact advice.
}
} Best regards,
}
} Jouko Maki

The most common transition fluid used these days is liquid carbon dioxide.
Specimens are typically dehydrated through a graded series of organic
solvent, ethanol or acetone, then placed in the cooled critical point dryer
(CPD). Ethanol and acetone are both miscible with CO2. Once the specimens
are in the chamber, liquid CO2 is introduced, and, through several
exchanges (filling and draining with CO2 under pressure from the tank), the
organic solvent is completely replaced by CO2.

The chamber is kept cool to keep the CO2 in liquid phase. After exchange
of liquids, the temperature is increased and the pressure inside the vessel
increases also. Once the critical point is passed, 1073 psi and 31.1 deg C
for CO2, the vessel is slowly vented. After atmospheric pressure is
reached, the chamber is opened and the specimens removed. They are warm
and dry, and they tend to rehydrate pretty fast, so having a dessicator
handy is a good idea.

The typical CPD device is a high pressure bomb that has valves (3) for
introducing liquid CO2 and venting liquid (bottom of chamber) and gas (top
of chamber). There is a mechanism for heating and cooling, too. One
temperature control system has electronic heating and cooling devices
(can't think of the name now) and sensors for temp control. These can be
automated. The other kind, which I prefer, has a water jacket around the
pressure vessel. You run ice water in to cool and warm/hot water to heat.
You have to keep an eye on the chamber to make sure you don't heat too
fast. But I watch the chamber, even when it's automated.

I like the water controled units because (1) they are cheaper (2) there are
fewer parts to go bad (3) they are smaller. The one I use now is made by
Polaron (model 3200) and is sold by Ted Pella. The last price I have is
about $3000. Another consideration is the size of the chamber. If you run
only a few specimens you might want a smaller one.

Hope this helps, John (and others),

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: kayton-at-ohsu.edu (Robert Kayton,MAC,CROET)
Date: Tue Nov 9 10:25:29 PST 1993
Subject: E.M. Long term storage of tissues

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Hi,

I need several options for storage of fixed tissues that might be used later
for E.M. Currently I store tissues in the original fixative. Any other
options would be appreciated.

Return E-mail address kayton-at-ohsu.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1993 16:30:44 -0600 (CST)
Subject: SEM: Environmental

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu (Larry Sutter)
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1993 16:55:32 -0500
Subject: Re: Undeliverable Mail

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


I tried posting a message to the list server and got the following reply.
Any thoughts?

} Bad address -- {MICROLISTUSA}
} Error --
} %MAIL-E-NOSUCHUSR, no such user MICROLISTUSA
}
} Start of returned message
}
} Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1993 16:47:40 -0500
} Message-Id: {199311102147.AA09853-at-mtu.edu}
} To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu (Larry Sutter)
} Subject: ESEM
}
} We are in the initial stages of evaluating an environmental SEM.
} I have heard from some people that a field emission SEM with a cryo stage
} will provide very comparable performance. This is an important distinction
} to make early because we definitely have application for a field emission
} SEM for work on photo catalysts, polymers, and materials research. The
} primary interest in an environmental SEM is for examining sludges and
} soils. If this work can be done on a FE/SEM with a cryo stage, our opinion
} is that the FE/SEM would ultimately be more versatile.
}
} I would greatly appreciate any input on this matter especially from
} (but not limited to) people that have used both types of instruments.
}
} Thanks...
}
}
} End of returned message

Thanks

Larry Sutter

Scattering Events R' Us







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1993 17:00:20 -0600 (CST)
Subject: NEWS OF RMS MEETINGS FOR 1994

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Microscopy Subscribers:

In case you haven't noticed there have been some glitches
in the system the last few days. The most common problem
reported was either NOMAIL or BAD Addresses. I think
the system is fixed, however, I'm not 100% sure. The mailing
list has grown to ~ 400 users now and I've had to reconfigure
the system to handle 2 groups USA vs. the rest of the World.
Because of this it was necessary to manually edit system subscription
files. I hope no one was erroneously deleted, however, some of you
may be receiving 2 copies of messages. In a 2nd mailing
I will attempt to identify duplicate addresses. For the
time being please excuse the headaches, multiple copies
and various test messages.

Please report any errors directly to me at

zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EM Center

=======================
BTW here is a message which I believe only reached
part of the mailing list. It was originally sent out on Nov. 7th...

========================






ROYAL MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY MEETINGS CALENDAR

17 March 1994
ANNUAL IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY MEETING

29 March 1994
ANNUAL LIGHT MICROSCOPY MEETING, London

11 - 13 April 1994
MICROSCOPY OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS II, University of Oxford

13 April 1994
ANNUAL CYTOMETRY AND HISTOCHEMISTRY MEETING,
Birmingham
Organizers: Dr Gillian Lawrence and Dr B. K Shenton

Outline Programme
10.30 am Joint Session, Cytometry and Histochemistry in Pathology
2.00 pm Parallel Sessions
A Histochemistry - Viviane Maggi Prize
Competition
B Cytometry
3.45 pm Pearse Prize Lecture - Professor S. J. Holt
4.30 pm Bingo Meyer Memorial Lecture

Contributed papers are requested for the joint session, the cytometry session
and the Viviane Maggi Prize Competition for beginners. The closing date for
receipt of abstracts will be 31 January 1994.


18 - 22 April 1994
EM SPRING SCHOOL, University of Sheffield

28 June 1994
FLOW CYTOMETRIC IMMUNOPHENOTYPING OF LEUKAEMIAS
AND LYMPHOMAS MEETING, London

27 - 30 June 1994
COMPUTERS IN MICROSCOPY COURSE, University of Cambridge

13 - 14 July 1994
BENCH-TOP FLOW CYTOMETRY WORKSHOP, Newcastle University

17 - 22 July 1994
LM SUMMER SCHOOL, University of Leeds

5 - 9 September 1994
IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY COURSE, Oxford Polytechnic

12 - 15 September 1994
MICRO 94 EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE, London

12 September 1994
AGM AND PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE, London

19 - 23 September 1994
FLOW CYTOMETRY COURSE, University of Cambridge

October 1994
MICROSCOPY OF CATALYSIS, Joint Royal Microscopical Society/Royal
Society of Chemistry Meeting, London

October 1994
FUNCTION TESTING BY FLOW CYTOMETRY WORKSHOP

November 1994
ULTRASTRUCTURAL IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY COURSE, Sutton

Details of all meetings are available from the Royal Microscopical Society,
37-38 St Clements, Oxford, OX4 1AJ, United Kingdom. Telephone +44
(0)865 248768, fax +44 (0)865 791237, email RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX.



MICRO 94 FIRST CIRCULAR


MICRO 94, International Microscopy and Image Analysis Conference and
Exhibition
12-15 September 1994

Earls Court Park Inn International, Lillie Road, London, SW6


Description of Conference

The Conference will consist of tutorial and review lectures, technical lectures
organized by the trade, and posters. Experts in the field of instrumentation,
analytical methodology in physics and materials sciences, cytometry,
cytochemistry, cytology, image analysis and image processing are invited to
give the lectures.

Each speaker will provide an overview of the particular topic in question and
ample time for discussion will be provided. Seven half-day sessions of tutorial
and review lectures and six half-day sessions of technical lectures will be
organized.

Full length papers of the invited tutorial lectures will be considered for
publication in the Journal of Microscopy.

Contributed papers are welcomed and will appear in poster sessions. Abstracts
will appear in the Proceedings of the Royal Microscopical Society.

The Physiological Society and the Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group
of the Institute of Physics (EMAG) will organize separate lectures within the
scope of the conference.

Outline Scientific Programme

At the MICRO 94 Conference and Exhibition, emphasis will be placed on
Image Processing and Analysis. The launch of a new Special Interest Group
within the Royal Microscopical Society will also be taking place.

Review and Tutorial Lecture topics are expected to include:-

Image processing and analysis
Computer manipulations of images
Scanning probe microscopy in materials sciences and in life sciences
Near field optical microscopy
3-D microscopy and reconstruction
Confocal scanning laser microscopy
Materials
Microscopy of composite materials
Microscopy of electronic materials
Nanostructures
Cytometry and Cytochemistry
Study of cell proliferation with flow cytometry
Tumour markers
Probes for in situ hybridisation
Probes for immunocytochemistry (p53, BrdU, Ki67, PCNA)
Molecular probes for analysis of living cells (co-sponsored by The
Physiological Society)
Proteases in pathological processes
Invasion and metastasis of cancer cells
Arthritis and rheumatism
Infections
Environmental SEM

Technical Lectures will be organized by Exhibitors to act as a bridge between
the specialized review lectures and the equipment being exhibited.

Furthermore, on the Monday, a special session on how to use the light
microscope will take place.


Exhibition

An Exhibition of the latest microscopes, ancillary instrumentation and
technology, of material needed for preparation of microscopic specimens
(fluorescent probes, antibodies and dyes) and soft and hardware for image
processing and image analysis will be held at the Earls Court Park Inn
International. Admission to the exhibition is free by conference badge or
exhibition only badge which will be obtainable at the registration desk.
Exhibition tickets will also be available well before the exhibition takes place.

There will be approximately 50 companies exhibiting, providing an extensive
range of equipment for you to view.

If you would like further details of the MICRO 94 Conference and
Exhibition, please contact the Royal Microscopical Society, 37-38 St
Clements, Oxford, OX4 1AJ, United Kingdom. Telephone +44 (0)865
248768, fax +44 (0)865 791237, email RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX. Conference
enquiries should be addressed to Miss Karen Hale, Exhibition enquiries
should be addressed to Mrs Allison Winton.

-------------------end of message----------------------





From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1993 08:28:14 +0200
Subject: Email address of the RMS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



} Details of all meetings are available from the Royal Microscopical Society,
} 37-38 St Clements, Oxford, OX4 1AJ, United Kingdom. Telephone +44
} (0)865 248768, fax +44 (0)865 791237, email RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX.


I believe, the Email address of the RMS is written in the wrong order. To
my knowledge, it should read
rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk

Please, correct me if I am wrong.


Jouko Maki

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Maki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1993 21:45:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Listserver Problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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Via: uk.ac.rpms; Thu, 11 Nov 1993 07:09:38 +0000
Via: mpcc3.rpms.ac.uk; Thu, 11 Nov 93 08:13:01 GMT
anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-micro
X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111222108.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {dlc-at-owlnet.rice.edu}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLISTUSA}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 09:35:01
anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-sparky.ml.wpafb.af.mil,
waheeschen-at-dow.com, winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-MICRO
X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111214536.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

Microscopy Subscribers

The "small" problem I thought I solved earlier has
turned out to be just the tip of an iceberg. The
server will keep running however, it will be
intermittent while I try to debug the system.

Part of the problem appears to be in "Multinet" the Internet
gateway I'm using here at ANL. Some of the
messages you will be receiving in the next
few days will have double headers while I
sort out the works. The first header will likely
always show my name, while the second one
will be the true sender.

Please keep me (Zaluzec-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV )informed of
problems that you see so that I can continue debugging.

In the interim just keep posting messages to

Microscopy-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV

and I'll sort the confusion at this end.

Sorry Nestor :-(
Zaluzec-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 9 Nov 1993 22:37:48 -0600 (CST)
Subject: EM: Long Term Tissue Storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-micro
X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111215718.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {simon-at-sbic.cbio.pitt.edu}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLISTUSA}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 19:26:04
anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-micro
X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111223242.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {ZALUZEC}
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ARRIVAL_TIME: 9-NOV-1993 22:37:57


} Kayton asks:
I need several options for storage of fixed tissues that might be used later
for E.M. Currently I store tissues in the original fixative. Any other
options would be appreciated.

======
What is the time scale you need to store your samples?
Are they already EM (?TEM/SEM?) specimens?

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: richard crang :      rcrang-at-vmd.cso.uiuc.edu
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1993 14:44:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: LM - Need help on staining epoxy/Spurr embedded plant tissues_

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-micro
X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111221716.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {ZALUZEC}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLISTUSA}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 14:44:27


48 hr. post-germination pea root tips and segments through differentiation
zone were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.15 M cacodylate buffer (pH 6.8),
followed by 2% OsO4 in same buffer, then dehydrated and embedded in a resin
mixture of equal parts epon (substitute=Epox 812): Spurr. 1-2 micron
sections do not stain with 1% toulidine blue with varied times and temps.
Am interested in good general stain which will also reveal mitotic
figures__ANY SUGGESTIONS?




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1993 9:36:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: LM - Need help on staining epoxy/Spurr embedded plant tissues_

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-sparky.ml.wpafb.af.mil,
waheeschen-at-dow.com, winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-sparky.ml.wpafb.af.mil,
jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu, stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu,
DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU, tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu,
DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM, dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV,
jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov, morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu,
ssun-at-helix.nih.gov, cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com,
preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
X-Vmsmail-To: -at-MICRO
Message-Id: {931112093649.20200798-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}




From: NAME \ Greg Erdos, ICBR EM Core Lab.\ :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 1993 09:18:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Tissue Storage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
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X-Vmsmail-Cc: ZALUZEC
Message-Id: {931111221124.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {ZALUZEC}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLISTUSA}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 14:48:22


MAIL FROM: {dlc-at-owlnet.rice.edu}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLISTUSA}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 09:47:07
anandamu-at-usc.edu, anis-at-moe.eece.mu.edu, amohan-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
APD-at-ATVAX.LORD.COM, as_lea-at-pnl.gov, barnard-at-wadsworth.ph.albany.edu,
bart-at-netcom.com, baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu, baskindg-at-u.washington.edu,
Baginski-at-USUHSB.USUHS.MIL, BEGGCA%ML%WPAFB-at-MLGATE.ML.WPAFB.AF.MIL,
Bradley-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, bbug1-at-swarthmore.edu,
bergrh-at-memstvx1.memst.edu, bobm-at-coyote.rain.org, Borisy-at-macc.wisc.edu,
cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu, carl_henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu, cel1-at-lehigh.edu,
chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU, chapman-at-bigq.enet.dec.com,
chernock-at-vnet.ibm.com, cj_bruckner-lea-at-pnl.gov, clancy-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu,
colijn.1-at-osu.edu, cook-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov, csencsits-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
disko-at-hal.erenj.com, dlmedli-at-ca.sandia.gov, dluchtel-at-u.washington.edu,
dolber-at-cs.duke.edu, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, eades-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu,
eeffah-at-eniac.seas.upenn.edu, EV2-at-ORNL.GOV, Frethem-at-lenti.med.umn.edu,
George.C.Ruben-at-Dartmouth.EDU, GHB1-at-psuvm.psu.edu, giliciag-at-ttown.apci.com,
gilkey-at-biosci.arizona.edu, Gilroy-at-shiva.psu.edu, glenmac-at-u.washington.edu,
gmei-at-hoh.mbl.edu, gnord-at-mactem.er.usgs.gov, gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu,
Hall-at-me.udel.edu, Hank-at-Wana.pbrc.Hawaii.edu, HECUB-at-ttacs1.ttu.edu,
herro001-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, hillyard-at-msc.cornell.edu, howelld-at-egr.msu.edu,
Hjoan-at-clemson.clemson.edu, inovis-at-rock.concert.net, INGRAM-at-RCC.RTI.ORG,
Kbart-at-hamilton.edu, kcherrey-at-physics.berkeley.edu,
king-at-bioscience.biology.utah.edu, lawrence.bottomley-at-chemistry.gatech.edu,
leapman-at-helix.nih.gov, llsutter-at-mtu.edu, jan-at-chaos.uchicago.edu,
jcrum-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, JEANNE_BARKER-at-MERCK.COM,
JMARDINLY-at-MATTEC.INTEL.COM, john.f.mansfield-at-umich.edu, john_russ-at-ncsu.edu,
jpbrody-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, kayton-at-ohsu.edu,
kordesch-at-helios.phy.ohiou.edu, mallam-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu,
MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu, mcpetri-at-anl.gov, mdhouse-at-mendel.berkeley.edu,
MECAVALERI-at-MMM.COM, me-at-leidecker.gsfc.nasa.gov, mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu,
microscopy-at-noran.com, MILLER.MAHLON-at-igate.abbott.com, minter-at-kodak.com,
mmilgrom-at-cheme.cornell.edu, mohney-at-cae.wisc.edu, morilak-at-cmgm.stanford.edu,
mow-at-vm.cfsan.fda.gov, msachs-at-admin.ogi.edu, naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu,
noah-at-helix.nih.gov, pathology-at-a1.mscf.upenn.edu, plee-at-neep.engr.wisc.edu,
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu, powell-at-zodiac.rutgers.edu,
provost-at-corl.nbc.upenn.edu, rab-at-fsh.mtu.edu,
RDerro.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov, redder-at-vnet.ibm.com, rkn-at-ornl.gov,
robinsonp-at-polar.enet.dec.com, ron-anderson-at-vnet.ibm.com,
RMFISHER-at-CARSON.U.WASHINGTON.EDU, rxm-at-atvax.lord.com, SDDEMAGG-at-UCI.EDU,
slking-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, slimbach-at-macc.wisc.edu, spatel-at-goodyear.com,
spl-at-szechuan.ucsd.edu, smiller-at-umrvmb.umr.edu, SMITHJ-at-Winthrop.edu,
sswami-at-fraser1.eng.ohio-state.edu, STGPMPM-at-geological.unocal.com,
sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu, talwar-at-wuche1.wustl.edu, tah-at-med.pitt.edu,
tcizzy-at-casbah.acns.nwu.edu, tgs-at-helix.nih.gov, TJOSEPH-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
tonygr-at-mit.edu, trimblea-at-zoology.washington.edu, tsu-at-cae.wisc.edu,
twesten-at-uimrl7.mrl.uiuc.edu, Walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, waheeschen-at-dow.com,
winkler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, WOODBA-at-ESVAX.DNET.DUPONT.COM,
wsryu-at-phoenix.princeton.edu, VICKIE-at-MACC.WISC.EDU, yang-at-msc.cornell.edu,
Zeissler-at-gapnet.nist.gov, MicroArchive-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov,
yu_lian-at-lilly.com, dbj-at-JAMES.PSYCH.YALE.EDU, ap-at-maelstrom.ucsf.edu,
yprakash-at-siecklab.mayo.edu, huff-at-mcclb0.med.nyu.edu, ag14-at-andrew.cmu.edu,
dave-at-mando.mit.edu, davilla-at-marimba.cellbio.duke.edu,
dale_batchelor-at-ncsu.edu, KEEBLE-at-mtu.edu, tfoecke-at-nist.gov,
knecht-at-uconnvm.uconn.edu, jester-at-crnjjsgi.swmed.edu,
spector-at-surface.ucsb.edu, bunasawa-at-aludra.usc.edu, tim-at-mae1.engr.ucf.edu,
richard.g.rateick.1-at-nd.edu, dwd-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov, chia-at-msc.cornell.edu,
jbp-at-rtifs2.rti.org, STETSJR-at-TTOWN.APCI.COM, sfh-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
SLS13-at-PSUVM.PSU.EDU, cheny-at-mcnc.org, cfg-at-rml.niaid.nih.gov,
mossant-at-ducvax.auburn.edu, vandezande-at-inland.com,
tatistcheff-at-milkwy.enet.dec.com, cllin-at-i1.chen.umn.edu,
Pguthrie-at-vines.ColoState.EDU, marko-at-hvem.ph.albany.edu,
adam-at-riscy.ucsb.edu, QJXNJ21-at-MEMRQA.SPS.MOT.COM,
microscopy-at-cheme.washington.edu, GOh.313-at-postman.gsfc.nasa.gov,
jmichael-at-vnet.ibm.com, bbanke-at-btvmanvm.vnet.ibm.com,
mwfolsom-at-hydra.unm.edu, wlin-at-aries.scs.uiuc.edu, jstanly-at-mse.ogi.edu,
mmhenson-at-med.unc.edu, walcksd-at-ml.wpafb.af.mil, jfc3348-at-u.cc.utah.edu,
stuartm-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu, lee-at-engr.wisc.edu, DUNLAP-at-UTKVX.UTCC.UTK.EDU,
tm11-at-umail.umd.edu, sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu, DTHAUS-at-VNET.IBM.COM,
dfalcon-at-vnet.ibm.com, Zhang-at-BNLX1L.NSLS.BNL.GOV, jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov,
morgan-at-notorious.lbl.gov, fan-at-med.pitt.edu, ssun-at-helix.nih.gov,
cooper-at-ipl.rpi.edu, microscopy-at-di.com, preynold-at-itsmail1.hamilton.edu
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
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Message-Id: {931111222842.2020031a-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

MAIL FROM: {GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}
RCPT TO: {MICROSCOPYLIST}
ARRIVAL_TIME: 11-NOV-1993 08:20:35


Robert Kayton asked about fixed tissue storage. We generally advise the use
of Trumps fixative as it has bee repoted good for this purpose. (McDowell &
Trump, 1976, Arch. Pathol Lab. Med. 100:405)

Last year there was a paper by Sopsi et al. (Ultrastructural Pathol. 16:351)
that reported good results storing fixed tissue frozen at -70 C after cryo-
protection with sucrose (10% I think). They report good immunoreactivity after
2 years and it looked pretty good.

Greg Erdos
Univ. of Florida
gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1993 16:22:53 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Test of Fixed Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



This is a test of the reconfigured software.
please ignore this message. (I hope things are fixed now!)

Nestor Z.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 12 Nov 1993 19:18:15 -0600 (CST)
Subject: ... and the problem was

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




Hooray!!!!!!!!!!!

It's solved. The problem now definitely appears cured.

You can delete the rest of this message now, unless you
want to know what happened.

========================

Symptom: Mailserver lockup, the batch server takes } 2 days
to deliver mail that previously took 1/2 hour to process.

Cause:

Ultimately the mailserver lockup was caused by a faulty
DNS (Domain Name Server) Address. The subscriber provided
an address which checked out initially, remember that
the instructions ask you to verify your address! However, after
being added to the subscription list, something went
haywire with one host node. In effect the mailserver would
spend ~ 1-2 days searching & eventually finding the location of the
subscriber. Unfortunately the way this software runs
each subscriber is accessed sequentially and thus the
mail would "appear" to hang doing nothing for a day
(or more) while this one host is identified using god
know how many secondary, teriary, DNS's in effect
bouncing it's way around internet.


Solution:
I've removed the problem address from the
list and will contact the user seperately. Since the
mail actually makes it through to the "lost" host
I had no direct traceback feature to locate him and
it took about a week to find. Some of you may not
have noticed a problem since your subscription would
have been entered and cleared before the problem one.
In effect the only way to find the problem was to
manually test the addresses, something I do not
recommend that anyone does.

So... sorry that some of you had to put up with:
1.) multiple copies of repeated messages:
2.) excessively long headers with 1/2 the worlds
email addresses
3.) multiple test messages

Many of you will not have received all of the
messages posted to the listserver during this last
week. If I see one that looks very important that
in my infinite wisdom should be reposted I'll do so,
otherwise it will just sit until the topic
becomes posted again by the original author.
I have an archive of everything and eventually
will setup some way for anyone to search that archive
but I've got alot of catching up to do and this is
extremely low on my priority list of things to do.


That's all Folks! :-)

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center

Some how I just knew this listserver would become masochistic






From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1993 08:52:43 EST10
Subject: TEM-LaB6 in H600

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




In our standard H600 TEM, we have been getting comparable tungsten
filament life to that in some of our other machines configured with
sputter pumps, for use with LaB6 cathodes. Emboldened by this, we
are fitting a Lab6 to this system to see what happens - anybody out
there who has already done this, or has any comments? The cathode we
have is a Denka, although we are generally moving to Kimball.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sally Stowe |
Facility Coordinator
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit |
Australian National University
Canberra, AUSTRALIA |
Ph 61 6 249 2743
FAX 61 6 249 4891 |
Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
-------------------------------------|--------------------------------
-





From: John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu (John F. Mansfield)
Date: Thu, 11 Nov 1993 11:22:26 -0500
Subject: Any interest in a microscopy newsgroup?

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu

I just sent off a posting suggesting the creation of a micrscopy newsgroup on
the UseNet News system.

It's in the following newsgroups:
sci.chem,sci.engr.chem,sci.geo.geology,sci.polymers,sci.materials,sci.misc,sci.p
hysics,sci.research,sci.techniques.xtallography,sci.optics,sci.archaeology,sci.
engr.mech,sci.geo.geology,sci.med

The following text is the full body of the posting, I encourage comments from
the microscopy and imaging community. Please feel free to add to the necessary
areas of interest, I will post follwo-ups when I have some response. I only
posted this about two hours ago and I have had two messages of support already.

Path: caen!jfm.sprl.umich.edu!user
hysics,sci.research,sci.techniques.xtallography,sci.optics,sci.archaeology,sci.
engr.mech,sci.geo.geology,sci.med

This post could equally well be titled:
pre-RFD : sci.techniques.microscopy

Following is a proposed RFD (request for discussion) to create a
microscopy newsgroup on the internet

Would potential users of this proposed newsgroup like to give their
opinions on this (YES or NO) either by following on to this post (which
should appear in sci.materials) or as email to
(John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu).

Would people also consider passing this proposal onto colleagues who may
be interested in participating in a microscopy newsgroup. Potential
users of this newsgroup might like to consider adding their names to the
RFD as co-proposers. It is hoped that at least one-hundred people can
give support to this newsgroup before the RFD is officially posted to
news.groups so as to show there is decent support for a microscopy
newsgroup on the internet. If it looks like this will take a while to
do, summaries of responses (who will remain anonymous) will be posted
regularly to keep people informed what has been happening.

The reason for the name sci.techniques.microscopy is that the Usenet
administrators have created the "techniques" hierarchy for newsgroups
such as microscopy. Going with this name has the best hope of
avoiding hair splitting arguments on newsgroup "names" that seem to
plague the creation of other science newsgroups. The above name does
not affect the aims or the charter of what this microscopy newsgroup
is trying to achieve.

Please note if a particular topic of microscopy becomes very popular
or there is a perceived need to create a subset of this newsgroup such
as "SEM", "AFM" or "TEM", etc - it is relatively easy to create a

sci.techniques.microscopy.sem
or sci.techniques.microscopy.tem, etc,

providing the support for it is there.

=========================================================

Pre - Request For Discussion (RFD) of sci.techniques.microscopy
(unmoderated).

Proposers :- John Mansfield (John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu)
Lachlan Cranswick (lachlan-at-dmp.csiro.au)

Please note that this proposed newsgroup is intended to
be an open forum for discussion of microscopy. Thus
relevant topics for this newsgroup should only be limited
to what the participants in this proposed newsgroup
regard as microscopy.

--------------------------------------------

We propose a new unmoderated newsgroup called
sci.techniques.microscopy. The main aim of
sci.techniques.microscopy is to provide an open forum for the
discussion of microscopy and related fields on the internet.

(Could people reading this post mention it to colleagues who
might be interested and benefit from a microscopy group
but not normally use the internet newsgroups.)

Proposed Name of Group
-------------------------
sci.techniques.microscopy (unmoderated)

Purpose of New Newsgroup
---------------------------

The purpose of sci.techniques.microscopy is to provide an
open discussion forum for the microscopy community on
the internet. The newsgroups allow the rapid and timely discussion of
opinions and information that would take months or years (or not at all)
on conventional paper journals.

Topics for discussion would include :-
---------------------------------------
Optical Microscopy
Confocal Microscopy
Scanning Probe/Force Microscopy (formerly Atomic Force Microscopy) - SPM,
SFM, AFM
Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy - STM
Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM
Transmission Electron Microscopy - TEM
High Resolution Electron Microscopy - HREM
Analytical Electron Microscopy - AEM
Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - STEM
High Voltage Electron Microscopy - HVEM
X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy - XEDS
Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy - EELS
Diffraction Contrast Imaging
Phase Contrast Imaging
Selected Area Electron Diffraction - SAED or SAD
Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction - CBED
Image Filtering
Specimen Preparation (Electropolishing, Ion Milling, Ultramicrotoming,
etc.)
Software
Data formats
Databases
Hardware/Equipment - specs, opinions, etc.
Applications
Announcements/reviews of papers/conferences.
Preparation techniques.
Non-ambient techniques
General Discussion/opinions/questions.
Positions vacant

Anything else that is relevant to microscopy in general.

---------------------------------------------------------------

What is the Process of Creating a Newsgroup?
--------------------------------------------

} (a) RFD: Discussion, i.e., public hearing to take place
in the newsgroup news.groups for approximately one month
(b) CFV: Call for votes (the voting period will be about 25 days)
(c) Counting of votes and public display of votes
(d) Announcement of new newsgroup

(a)--} (b) assumes no major disagreements about this newsgroup during
discussion. (c)--} (d) assumes that the vote is favourable., i.e.,
Y } N+100 .and. Y } (2/3)(Y+N)
Y being the number of YES votes, N being the number of NO votes for
the creation of the proposed newsgroup.
=============================================

Please comment/criticise/suggest by followons to this post or email to
John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu


John Mansfield, North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory,
2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143. Ph: (313)-936-3352.
__________
YYURYYUBICURYY4ME.







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1993 22:39:25 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM: FREE SPARE PARTS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1993 22:39:25 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM: FREE SPARE PARTS

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Hitachi HU-11E Parts for free:
If you are nursing along an HU-11E TEM, and would
like some spares for it, please contact me directly
(please don't respond to the list!)
--Forepumps and DP are spoken for
--Most other parts go to anyone who can use them. I'll
ship light stuff inside the continental US for free; you'll
have to pay shipping on the heavy stuff.

If I haven't heard from someone within two weeks, it
goes in the dumpster. (TBAITW; as in "too big and in
the way").

Julian Smith III
Winthrop University
803-323-2111 (Vox)
803-323-2246 (Fax)




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 1993 23:01:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM:LaB6 in Hitachi 600

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html




} Sally Stowe asks about swapping W/LaB6 in a H600.

Sorry but I'm geting old and forget full so
I can't remember the details of an H600, but, the appropriate
question to ask is why are you attempting to put LaB6 in
the H600? not if it will work! The LaB6 filaments when
operated properly and under *CORRECT* conditions will
give you a greater Brightness and hence more electrons
in electron-optically equivalent probes. Thus for small
probe/analytical work or for imaging conditions which
will improve with a more coherent source (HREM) and
in good vacuum systems they work very well.
It will improve your uscope work assuming that you are short
on electrons in the configuration your are setting up
your electron probe (the argument applies to both AEM
and/or HREM modes), however, if you poison the filament by using
it in a poor vacuum system (i.e form an oxide or carbide
on the surface), then the work function will decrease and
you will actually get worse performance than a standard
W filament and at ten to twenty times the cost of W. So
why do you want to do this?

Assuming you have appropriate reasons and a good vacuum
(and students who do not dump the vacuum system to
air with a hot filament running), then the next question to
ask is your uscope equipped with a filament power supply that
can be modified to drive the tip?

Just my 2 cents worth.


Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: Sally Stowe :      STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 10:00:59 EST10
Subject: TEM:LaB6 in Hitachi H600

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Sally STowe asks about using LaB6 under "tungsten" vacuum
configuration - ie without sputter pump.

} Nestor Zaluzec asks 1. Why?
2. Can the filament power supply be modified to
drive Lab6 tip?

In answer to (1) - we want to get the best resolution we can over
the next few months, and at the moment, on
smallest condenser aperture, we cant make best use of the "spot size"
adjustment because of lack of electrons, although the resolution does
seem to be inproving sharply as far as can be seen. This microscope
does seem to be particularly prone to charge effects or whatever if
the beam is not well spread. Vacuum in the specimen area is 8 x
10-6mbar. The last tungsten filament lasted 330ish hours, so reckon
we have some reasonable users at the moment.Touch wood.
(2) - yes, filament supply can be switched.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sally Stowe | Australian National Univ.
Facility Coordinator Canberra, AUSTRALIA
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit | Ph 61 6 249 2743
Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au | FAX 61 6 249 4891
-------------------------------------|--------------------------------
-





From: VEI011-at-GEEL.DWT.CSIRO.AU (Colin Veitch CSIRO Division of Wool Technology)
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 16:35:04 +1100 (EST)
Subject: AFM - imaging software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


We use a Park Scientific Universal BD2 Scanning Probe Microscope,
controlled by a HP 382 workstation. Does anyone know of any software
which will easily (and reliably) extract the images into a format which
can be read by PC's? It is possible to export a TIFF file but the format
appears (according to the operator) to be slighly different to other TIFF
formats.

Any help would be appreciated.

Colin V.

#####################################################################
**********************
* Between the idea *
0------* And the reality *
} ---|--- { * Between the motion *
| * And the act *
/ \ * Falls the Shadow *
_/ \_ * T.S. Eliot *
**********************
Colin Veitch Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2611
CSIRO Division of Wool Technology Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2891 (dir.)
P.O. Box 21 Fax + 61 (0)52 47 2657
BELMONT Vic 3216
Australia

#####################################################################




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 16:31:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject: AFM: Imaging Software

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


} Colin V. writes....
} We use a Park Scientific Universal BD2 Scanning Probe Microscope,
} controlled by a HP 382 workstation. Does anyone know of any software
} which will easily (and reliably) extract the images into a format which
} can be read by PC's? It is possible to export a TIFF file but the format


Colin it sounds like Park is at fault. We routine transfer TIFF files
from one computer Vax, Mac, PC, Sun... to another an access TIFF files
with no difficulty. My guess is that Park took short cuts and did not
properly implement TIFF (this happens alot from what I can tell).
You should demand that Park rewrite their code to properly
implement TIFF which is no at Version 6.0. T

There are lots of programs which can read TIFF files and display them
on the PC.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
-------------






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 15:07:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM - Need help on staining epoxy/Spurr embedded plant tissues_

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Full-Name:
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Yes, 1.% Toluidine Blue in 1% sodium borate will stain sodium ethoxide
etched Spurr epoxy.

On Fri, 12 Nov 1993, Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 wrote:

} From: SMTP%"-at-cc1.kuleuven.ac.be:desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be" 12-NOV-1993 02:02:51.52
} To: ZALUZEC
} CC:
} Subj: Re: LM - Need help on staining epoxy/Spurr embedded plant tissues_
}
} From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (Desclin Jean)
} Message-Id: {9311120706.AA00745-at-is1e.vub.ac.be}
} Subject: Re: LM - Need help on staining epoxy/Spurr embedded plant tissues_
} To: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Nestor J. Zaluzec)
} Date: Fri, 12 Nov 93 8:06:14 MET
} In-Reply-To: {931111144412.202000ba-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov} ; from "Nestor J. Zaluzec" at Nov 11, 93 2:44 pm
} X-Mailer: ELM [version 2.3 PL11]
}
} Hello!
} what is the pH of your toluidine blue solution? It might help
} trying out a higher pH than usual (I am afraid I am not familiar
} with plant tissues :-(...).
} If you are not re-using the semi-thin sections afterwards (i.e.
} resectioning for TEM), you might try treating them with NaOH
} dissolved in absolute ethanol (to etch the plastic somewhat), such
} as used prior to some immunohistochemical procedures. I believe
} toluidine blue might work after that.
} Good luck!
} John
}
}
} ***********************************************************
} * Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
} * Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
} * Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
} * e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
} * snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
} * B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
} ***********************************************************
}





From: VEI011-at-GEEL.DWT.CSIRO.AU (Colin Veitch CSIRO Division of Wool Technology)
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1993 16:36:35 +1100 (EST)
Subject: AFM - Image software

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Many thanks to those who offered information regrding my query. All the
information has been most illuminating (and useful).

Colin V.

#####################################################################
*******************************
* Logic is invincible because *
0------* in order to combat logic it *
} ---|--- { * is necessary to use logic. *
| * P.Boutroux *
/ \ *******************************
_/ \_

Colin Veitch Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2611
CSIRO Division of Wool Technology Tel + 61 (0)52 47 2891 (dir.)
P.O. Box 21 Fax + 61 (0)52 47 2657
BELMONT Vic 3216
Australia

#####################################################################






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 16:31:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject: AFM: Imaging Software

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} Colin V. writes....
} We use a Park Scientific Universal BD2 Scanning Probe Microscope,
} controlled by a HP 382 workstation. Does anyone know of any software
} which will easily (and reliably) extract the images into a format which
} can be read by PC's? It is possible to export a TIFF file but the format


Colin it sounds like Park is at fault. We routine transfer TIFF files
from one computer Vax, Mac, PC, Sun... to another an access TIFF files
with no difficulty. My guess is that Park took short cuts and did not
properly implement TIFF (this happens alot from what I can tell).
You should demand that Park rewrite their code to properly
implement TIFF which is no at Version 6.0. T

There are lots of programs which can read TIFF files and display them
on the PC.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
-------------






From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1993 11:07:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: infiltration of yeast with spurrs and lr white

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I'm starting to do gold labeling of protein in yeast cells and I'm having
problems with infiltration. This is my first time in 25 years I've had to
work with yeast. Any helpful hints?

Phil Rutledge
UMBC Biology Dept.
Catonsville, MD 21228
Phone: (410) 455-3582
FAX: (410) 455-3875
"E" Mail: Prutle1-at-umbc.edu

Thanks





From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1993 09:45:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject: re: staining spurr

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Yes, 1.% Toluidine Blue in 1% sodium borate will stain sodium ethoxide
etched Spurr epoxy. I've only had toluidine fail in Spurr's if the pH was
off (someone didn't make up the correct borate } . For autoradiography
and nuclear anntigen immunocytochemistry, it can be diluted to 0.1% or
even 0.01% in 1% sodium borate to keep from obscuring the label.

} } If you are not re-using the semi-thin sections afterwards (i.e.
} } resectioning for TEM), you might try treating them with NaOH
} } dissolved in absolute ethanol (to etch the plastic somewhat), such
} } as used prior to some immunohistochemical procedures. I believe
} } toluidine blue might work after that.
} } Good luck!
} } John
} }
} }
} } ***********************************************************
} } * Jean C. Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *
} } * Laboratory of Histology - Faculty of Medicine *
} } * Brussels Free University (U.L.B.) *
} } * e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *
} } * snail mail: route de Lennik 808 *
} } * B - 1070 Brussels Belgium *
} } ***********************************************************
} }
}
}





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 15 Nov 1993 16:31:36 -0600 (CST)
Subject: AFM: Imaging Software

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"Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-50" {ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}
CC: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Reply_ RE} AFM: Imaging Software
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
We have a Nanoscope 3 and Digital Instruments have a TIFF export that NIH-Image
doesnt like. When we import the images into image we lose the LUT information.
I have found that the MOST useful piece of software for manipulating images,
except NIH-Image of course, is Photoshop. If you are at a Univ you can get
really good prices on it and it happily reads almost anything I try and read
into it.

--------------------------------------


Colin it sounds like Park is at fault. We routine transfer TIFF files
from one computer Vax, Mac, PC, Sun... to another an access TIFF files
with no difficulty. My guess is that Park took short cuts and did not
properly implement TIFF (this happens alot from what I can tell).
You should demand that Park rewrite their code to properly
implement TIFF which is no at Version 6.0. T

There are lots of programs which can read TIFF files and display them
on the PC.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
-------------



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From: Gerald Little :      ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 1993 08:04:58 GMT+1000
Subject: E.M. Long term storage of tissues

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931117080458.480-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au}


"I need several options for storage of fixed tissues that might be
used later for E.M. Currently I store tissues in the original
fixative. Any other options would be appreciated."

One alternative is to put the tissue into the buffer originally used
with the fixative. The only drawback here is that after a period of
time (} 1 year) the buffer usually tends to become acidic, and there
goes the tissue preservation. Alternatively, I used this when
working years ago in another lab so have no recent knowledge of
the pros and cons, but tissue that you expect to use for TEM, process
it through osmium and up to 90% alcohol and then store. I know that
I did this and then subsequently finished processing the tissue into
epon several months later and the ultrastructural preservation was
very good. The best option to maintain good quality morphology is of
course to process the tissue into resin then you have a fossil which
can not deteriorate.

Hope this is of some help,

Gerry Little.


Dr Gerald Little | Ph (049) 215618
The Neuroscience Group |
Discipline of Anatomy | Fax (049) 216903
Faculty of Medicine |
The University of Newcastle | Email ANGJL-at-medicine.newcastle.edu.au
Australia, 2308 |




From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1993 19:19:24 -0600
Subject: SEM / Fullerenes

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I passed Daniel Callahan's query to Richard Lee at Argonne. This is his
reply:

Our experience with carbon is mostly on diamond using conventional
(tungsten) filaments in an SEM. We typically resolve sub-micron filaments
and crystallites dowm to 30 to 50 nm with 10 kV operation. Fullerene
crystals were difficult for us because of charging--even at 10kV.

Our experience with an high resolution FEG-SEM was also on diamond and was
most impressive! They excel at low kV operation with no charging problems.
We have taken photos on diamond nanophase materials (coatings) with 3 nm
or better resolution.at 5kV using a new Leica-Cambridge 360FE.

You can try conventional SEM's at 5kV, but you will be limited in
magnification. If you go much above 10kV you probably will have charging
problems and loss of surface detail. The lower the kV, the better the
surface detail with a material of low Z.






From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1993 19:19:29 -0600
Subject: SEM /Fullerenes

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I passed Daniel Callahan's query to Richard Lee at Argonne. This is his
reply:

Our experience with carbon is mostly on diamond using conventional
(tungsten) filaments in an SEM. We typically resolve sub-micron filaments
and crystallites dowm to 30 to 50 nm with 10 kV operation. Fullerene
crystals were difficult for us because of charging--even at 10kV.

Our experience with an high resolution FEG-SEM was also on diamond and was
most impressive! They excel at low kV operation with no charging problems.
We have taken photos on diamond nanophase materials (coatings) with 3 nm
or better resolution.at 5kV using a new Leica-Cambridge 360FE.

You can try conventional SEM's at 5kV, but you will be limited in
magnification. If you go much above 10kV you probably will have charging
problems and loss of surface detail. The lower the kV, the better the
surface detail with a material of low Z.






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 1993 13:46:53 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM: KIKUCHI MAPS

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Message-Id: {199311171826.NAA05585-at-stc06.ctd.ornl.gov}

Reply to: RE} hex. kikuchi maps
The program DIFFRACT will do this on a Macintosh computer very nicely. This
program is available from Virtual Laboratories, 37 Highland Court., Ukiah,
Calif., USA (Attn: Janet Schlinger) FAX: 707-462-5275.

--------------------------------------

Does anyone know a programm for calculating
hexagonal kikuchi maps on PC and with/without
the possibility to vary the c/a-ratio?

Heinrich Kestler
Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenscahften
Lehrstuhl I
Martensstrasse 5
D-91058 Erlangen, Germany

Phone: 09131 857485
Fax: 09131 857504
email: kestler-at-ww.uni-erlangen.de


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The are also public domain programs in the EMMPDL for
calculating Diffraction Patterns/Kikuchi Maps.
They are not all elegant but they work. To access
information about the EMMPDL send an Email message to:

EMMPDL-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

In the Email message include the text line

SEND HELP EMMPDL

You will get instructions on how to get abstract listings
file names and how to get copies of code for the programs.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
------------------------




From: ZHANG-at-bnlx1l.nsls.bnl.gov
Date: Wed, 17 Nov 1993 18:22:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject: cryo stage

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USED CRYO TEM HOLDER WANTED

We are considering the use of a TEM-style cryo stage for
some x-ray
diffraction experiments on frozen hydrated specimens.
Our stability
requirements are not at all high (drift is not a problem
at the 0.1
micron/hour level), so we could probably do with a older
model cryo
stage. We would custom-build an airlock around whatever
cryo holder, so
we are not limited to a stage for e.g., JEOL or Philips.
However, we
do need a specimen loading and transfer system to go
with the
stage. We do not need much in the line of tilt control,
and copper or
other metals are fine (no need for beryllium).

If anyone has a cryo specimen holder that they are
willing to
loan or sell at modest cost, please contact me.

Thanks!
Chris Jacobsen
Department of Physics
SUNY at Stony Brook
Stony Brook NY 11794-3800
USA
fax 516-632-8101
cjacobsen-at-ccmail.sunysb.edu
CJACOBSEN-at-SBCCMAIL.bitnet






From: ridge-at-icu.ac.jp
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 09:16:23 +0900
Subject: Does anyone have an old microtome?

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"Microscopy Mailing List" {microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

Reply_ RE} AFM: NanoIII to NIH Image And more...
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
If I label my Nanoscope III images as "test.tif" or something similar then I
can open the images into NIH-Image without losing the LUT. If I use just
"test" without the tiff extension then I get gray images. I do not have
AccessPC set to automatically open .tif files are NIH-Image files and so I am
unsure as to why this is happening. I can drag and drop a filename.tif file
onto NIH-Image and it opens just fine.
(We have also use the raw data import option but sometimes want to retain the
colors of the original image for presenation purposes.)
By the way I am getting my images off the Nanoscope by using Farallon's
Appletalk PC software, it works OK but it seems a little slow. Has anyone else
had experience with this kind of setup? I also cannot get the ethernet card I
am using (a 3COM) to work correctly with NCSA Telnet and FTP, which we would
like to use to transfer data to workstations and other computers than Macs.
--------------------------------------

Regarding John Mansfield's comment, it looks to me as though the Nanoscope III
stores raw data with a greyscale LUT. I base this on the fact that changing
color table parameters in Top View mode and then selecting another file does
not
trigger a "Current file has been modified, save it?" query the way changing the

Z scale does.

Libby Shaw
MIT CMSE Surface Analysis Facility



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Reply_ RE} TEM: Re: hex. kikuchi maps
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
You do have to be wary of Diffract, it is buggy, even the latest version.
There is a new product from those guys called Desktop Microscopist it is
suppoedly a complete rewrite. However, after playing with it for 10 minutes at
MSA I managed to crash it! Treat all software with care if you
havent written and debugged it yourself!!

--------------------------------------

Chris Boothroyd

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Message-Id: {m0p0A7u-00003QC-at-bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk}

Dear Colleagues

I have started a new teaching/research position, to find that there is a
very nice Jeol 1200, but no ultramicrotome! We have no funds for one in
the near future, and such machines in Japan are very expensive, at least
twice the price elsewhere.

However, we may be able to find enough funds for a second hand machine. I
also need a 'tome like the old JB4 for semi-thin sections, it must have a
retracting arm and be able to use glass knives. I don't care how old the
machines are as long as they work.

If anyone has an old microtome that they wish to dispose of for YEN, we
would be very interested. We will pay all shipping charges etc, of course.

Look forward to many offers!

Robert W. Ridge
Biology Department
ICU
10-2 Osawa 3-Chome
Mitaka-shi
Tokyo 181
Japan

Tel: +81-422-33-3484 (0422-33-3484 for callers within Japan)
Fax: +81-422-33-1449
Email ridge-at-icu.ac.jp






From: Louisa.Howard-at-Dartmouth.EDU (Louisa Howard)
Date: 19 Nov 93 08:15:32 EST
Subject: yeast infiltration/correction

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Message-Id: {6866666-at-blitzen.Dartmouth.EDU}

Phil:
there were two errors in the protocol I sent you. 1. You should start out
using LR White HARD grade, not medium grade; polymerize this at 50 degrees C
for 24 hrs. There may be a small of amount of fluid LR white at the top of
the capsule. These block section fine, also. 2. You may need to block free
aldehydes to prevent background problems; so you can include a step between
the buffer wash and dehydration, adding 1%ammonium chloride to your buffer
solution.
-Louisa




From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 19 Nov 1993 13:21:33 U
Subject: AFM- NanoIII

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Message-Id: {9311191321.AA13221-at-mts-gw.pa.dec.com}
"Mikael Gustafsson" {MikGu-at-mme.liu.se}

Reply_ RE} } AFM- NanoIII to NIH Ima
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Re: the message below that seems to be replyinmg to my gripes about slow data
transfer and printing from our Nanoscope connected to the Appletalk net at the
U of M.
Sorry, I didnt make myself clear about our physical transport layer!
We are using the Appletalk PC package on a 3-COM Ethernet card.
We have mostly Macs and several color and greyscale capable printers on the
network and so it pays us to have Appletalk connectivity.
The major problem with the networking and the Nanoscope is that the AFM
software walks over the Network software and vice versa. Digital Instruments
have fixed the AFM software so that it runs in a reduced memory mode when the
Appletalk stuff is loaded. Anyone know if I can fix this by adding more
memory? I am a PC neophyte, Macs are my computer of choice.
Plus, does anyone know why Digital Instruments used such and slow stodgy 486
for the platform for their instrument (other that it was cheap)?

OK, Opinions are mine and not the U's!
Jfm.

--------------------------------------

Hi!

Appletalk IS notoriously slow for transferring images, the maximum speed is
just over 200 Kb/sec. Compare with ethernets 10Mb/sec. Put ethernet into the
MACs... We have a fairly well working connection between PC's and UNIX
workstations (Silicon Graphics). We use Walker Richer Quinns reflection
software using TCP/IP as communication protocol. There are some very
conveniant solutions though. One includes the Lantastic network (Editirs
choice in PC-magazin for a number of years). Now there is a TCP/IP module for
this network. It supports NFS and other goodies as well. In practice, I think
this will provide more of an invisible network than ever before. Lantastic is
also available for the MAC. Moreover windows for workgroups has TCP/IP
options at very low prices.

Mikael Gustafsson
dept medical microbiology
Univ. Link0ping
MikGu-at-mme.liu.se
FAX 046/13/224789
SWEDEN

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Reply_ AFM- NanoIII
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Apparently I am wrong in assuming that the computer that is used by Digital
Instruments for their Nanscope III is a cheap model. Apparently it is all
Intel built. For those of you who have an older model with a 33Mhz processor
and want a little more speed, call Mark Lean at Digital and get a price for an
Overdrive processor to take it up to 66Mhz. (or go third party).
Has anyone put a Pentium in a Nanoscope III yet? :-)






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 13:42:26 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Images: TN 8500

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Pat Robinson asks......
....................stuff deleted.............

} this 8500 is quite a different beastie. I'm especially interested in
} ways and means of moving images to our network of Digital (DEC) PC's
} running desktop publishing software, via TIFF or otherwise.

If you really want to work efficiently. Toss the TN buy yourself
a Mac and framegrabber board. Then get a copy of the Public Domain
program NIH-Image. It will grab images off your Sony, do some
reasonable processing and save files as Tiff which you can then send
via your network (use Pathworks, AppleTalk, TCP, just chooze your
protocol & hardware) to your DEC machines.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center






From: jacobsen-at-xray1.physics.sunysb.edu (Chris Jacobsen)
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 16:21:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Image Printing (fwd)

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In reference to
} From jkelly-at-pruffle.nist.gov Fri Nov 19 15:58:12 1993
} To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} Subject: Image Printing
}
} I am working with image files on PC's - usually TIFF format
} on IBM compatibles. I would like to get good quality B & W
} plain paper hardcopy of the images. What are the good
} combinations of print software and printers for either the PC's
} or Mac environment? Thanks in advance.

For computer image printing, two popular solutions are laser printers
(dithered black and white) and dye sublimation printers. We use IDL
from Research Systems Inc. (Boulder CO) to do many many things, one of
which is to generate PostScript files of images. It runs on PC and
Mac (and Unix and VMS). We then get pretty good and very cheap B&W
prints on any old PostScript laser printer. For the final print, we
have a Tektronix Phaser IIsd (the "sd" or "sdx" is important) dye
sublimation printer which takes color or B&W PostScript files. Kodak
also now sells a similar product. Codonics sells a dye sublimation
printer which takes TIFF files directly.


--
*******************
Chris Jacobsen, Asst. Prof., Department of Physics, SUNY at Stony Brook
Phone (516) 632-8093, FAX -8101 Bitnet: cjacobsen-at-sbccmail
jacobsen-at-xray1.physics.sunysb.edu ALL-IN_ONE: CJACOBSEN
*******************




From: Bernhardt Sainieidukat :      sainieid-at-badlands.NoDak.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 16:33:27 -600 (CST)
Subject: SEM sample prep of powders

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Message-Id: {9311192200.AA20344-at-mts-gw.pa.dec.com}

I have some synthetically prepared mineral powders, grain size
in the 1-30 micron range, which I would like to get some EDS analyses of.
This would mean embedding the microcrystals in epoxy and polishing them to
get nice cross sections -- would someone with experience in this kind of
sample prep be willing to share some tips/hints?

Thanks,

Bernhardt Saini-Eidukat
Dept. of Geosciences
North Dakota State University
Fargo, ND 58105







From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 20:15:30 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Image Output

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Adding to the discussion of printing we use the following
for output.


Sony Vidoeo Printer - direct from TV monitors - Poor quality
Notebook records (4x 5) output

Apple Laserwriter II NTX - in photograde mode - Reasonable B&W
dithered. Used a prescreen computer output on the
following.

Tek Phaser II SDX - High quality- Dye Sub B&W , & Color
excellent positives & viewgraphs
used for output from computers

Lasergraphics Film Writer - 35mm film & slides, Polaroid, & 4 x 5 format
used for computer output


Images are either directly digitized by
serial scanning - On-line TEM/SEM
slow scan CCD - On-line TEM
TV rate CCD - On-line TEM, & Off-line Photostand
Conventional Vidicon - ON-line TEM & Off-line Photostand
Flatbed Scanners - Off-line
Microtek 300G- Prints,
XRS/Microtek 300 GX - Prints & Negatives

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 1993 20:22:46 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM: Philips

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Don't know of any free Philips scopes. Have your
called Philips Service Dept? Their number is 201-529-3800.

They sometimes have a line on instruments being given away.





From: Charles E. Lyman :      cel1-at-Lehigh.EDU
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 1993 15:29:44 -0500
Subject: Reply to: Image Analysis T/N 8500 system

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Patrick Robinson,

We have been transferring files from the Tracor 8500 to PC and Mac formats using
the following steps:

1. IBM-compatible computer connected from serial port 7 of 8500 to com2 of IBM.
2. On 8500 convert file to ".tif" format and re-save the file to the EXPORT
directory.
3. Files are transferred to an IBM-compatible image handling application, such
as Procomm. If using Procomm, open Procomm and input the following file
specification: "/u3/export/name.tif". As the file is transferred, a byte count
is tallied which should match that read on the 8500.
4. Copy image from Procomm directory to an IBM-formatted diskette.

Cheers, Charles E. Lyman


Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue
Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195
E-mail: cel1-at-Lehigh.edu Tel: 215-758-4249 FAX: 215-758-4244





From: Glenn Poirier :      GLENN_P-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 1993 10:54:06 EST5EDT
Subject: Re: SEM sample prep of powders

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Message-Id: {9311221558.AA20274-at-sifon.cc.mcgill.ca}
To: Bernhardt Sainieidukat {sainieid-at-badlands.NoDak.edu}

Bernhardt,
I've mounted small grains for use in the microprobe on several
occasions. Usually the material I work with is a bit larger, but the
techniques should still apply if you work carefully.
If you have a large sample and are not concerned with individual
grains, the simplest way to work is to set them in in epoxy on a
standard thin section blank. If you have a reliable thin-section
technician he should have no problen grinding it down to a 15 um
thickness.
Alternatively, if you have a small number of grains or you are
interested in specific grains you can mount them in a plexiglass
holder. First cut out a piece of plexiglass to fit into your sample
holder (the thinner the better, I find 3 mm is about right). Next drill a
number of small holes in the holder (I use a 2mm diameter). I mount
these holders on a cleaned thin section blank using double sided
tape. You should be very careful that there are no bubbles between
the tape and the blank. Fill a hole with epoxy (I use Struers Epofix,
it's nice and thin). You probably will want to carry out the next
steps under a microscope. Using very fine forceps drop a grain into a
hole and stir the epxoy with a fine wire to wet the grain and cause it to
settle into the epoxy. If necessary you can adjust the grain so that it's
resting on its most stable surface. Depending on the grain size I can
usually get 10-15 grains in a mount before they start interfering with
each other. Once the epoxy has set you can remove the blank slide
on the bottom (usually I have to break it off).
Polishing these mounts is crucial, if you take to much material
off you lose your sample (This can really ruin your day if that was the
only sample you had). I generally start with a very light brush with
300 grit SiC paper, just enough to remove any excess epoxy. This is
followed by 600 grit paper. At this stage I polish for 30 seconds to a
minute and then look at the result in a microscope to see how much
exposed material I have. When sufficient material is exposed I do
the fine polishing using 3, 1 and then 0.3 um Al2O3 either by hand or
on a lap, depending how nervous I am about losing the material.
Again I use short polishing periods followed by observation in the
microscope. I've generally had good results with this technique and
have rarely lost any material. One problem I have with larger grains
is that it is sometimes difficult to get a large polished surface when
the grain is sitting on it edges.
I hope this helps you. Call me back if any of this is not clear

**********************************************************************
* Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *
* Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *
* Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *
* McGill University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *
* Montreal, Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *
**********************************************************************




From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 08:48:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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Dear All,

I'm looking to buy a set of ultra long working distance objectives to fit
onto an Olympus BHSM microscope. The longest WDs I've found so far belong
to Olympus' own objectives (20x with 11mm and 50x with 8mm). Anyone know of
any alternatives?

Thankyou,

Keith Hallam






From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 08:48:07 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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Message-Id: {28025.9311230848-at-irix.bris.ac.uk}

Dear All,

I'm looking to buy a set of ultra long working distance objectives to fit
onto an Olympus BHSM microscope. The longest WDs I've found so far belong
to Olympus' own objectives (20x with 11mm and 50x with 8mm). Anyone know of
any alternatives?

Thankyou,

Keith Hallam






From: Jeff Sweeney :      sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 08:29:57 -0600
Subject: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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} I'm looking to buy a set of ultra long working distance objectives to
} fit onto an Olympus BHSM microscope. The longest WDs I've found so far
} belong to Olympus' own objectives (20x with 11mm and 50x with 8mm).
} Anyone know of any alternatives?

One trick is to look for U-stage lenses. These are designed for
universal-stage mineralogical microscopes where the stage tilts as well
as rotates. These lenses have a separate hemispherical glass element
that is placed over the thin-section. Used without the hemisphere they
have very long working distances.

Another trick is to use reflecting objectives.

I don't know the Olympus BHSM. Assuming it has standard threads (.8in
38tpi) and the equivalent of a 160mm tube length... We use a Leitz UT40
which is a U-stage lens. Without the hemisphere it has a magnification
of 25x and a working distance of 14mm. Leitz has a few other U-stage
lenses that are parfocal with this lens. Chromatic aberration can be a
problem for refracting objectives with these long working distances.

We also use a reflecting objective from Ealing (15x, 21mm or 24mm
working distance). Ealing sells several other reflecting objectives
with higher magnification. The 15x is identical to the 15x lens made
by Beck as far as I can tell. You may be able to purchase the Ealing
lens corrected for infinity focus or a 210mm tube length, if that is
what the Olympus requires. These reflecting objectives are just the
ticket if you can tolerate their large size and the central obscuration.

Jeff Sweeney sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu

Some good references are:

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T On aspheric anastigmatic systems
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 55
%N 312
%P 433-444
%K reflecting objective


%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T Reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 59
%P 41-46
%K reflecting objective


%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1945
%T Flat-field singlet aplanats
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 567-576
%K reflecting objective


%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1947
%T Semi-aplanat reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 47-49
%K reflecting objective




From: NAME \ Greg Erdos, ICBR EM Core Lab. :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 11:38:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Position Available

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Position available for a Biological Electron Microscopy Technician. Preference given to one with experience with plant tissue

Location: Lake Alfred Florida

Contact: Personnel Office
Department of Citrus
P.O. Box 148
Lakeland, FL 33802
(813) 499-2476

` DEADLINE: Dec 10, 1993

Pay Grade 18 ($20,553 to $33,893)




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 10:54:17 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM: Electropolishing

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Stefan Straub asked about electropolishing of Ti alloys
and 12%Cr Steel

Bernie Kestel ANL's expert at electropolishing suggest the
following:

Ti alloys:

13% HCL/87%Methanol -at- -50 C, 90 Volts/35 mA in a
single jet electropolishing machine

or

60ml Percholoric Acid
590 ml Methanol
350 ml 2-butoxy ethanol (butyl cellosolve)
-at- 0 C, 40-50 Volts/50 mA in a
single jet electropolishing machine

12%Cr.Steel Alloy

look up Ultramicroscopy Vol 26, (1988) pge 405-408

by Kestel & Wiggins

60 ml perchloric acid
460 ml ethyl alcohol
280 ml n-butyl alcohol
100 ml butyl cellosolve
-15 C , 100 V

Nestor Z (for Bernie Kestel)
ANL EM Center
==============================================================




From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 18:02:38 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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Message-Id: {22347.9311231802-at-irix.bris.ac.uk}

A couple of things I forgot to mention in my original mailing - the Olympus has
infinity corrected optics (I had found that Nikon had a nifty lens, but it
turned out not to be infinity corrected) and the microscope is part of a
Renishaw imaging Raman spectrometer. I have been told by others that
reflecting objectives would be no use since the Raman laser would either be
reflected straight back into the spectrometer without reaching my sample or
would have to be defocussed, preventing me doing any small area analysis.

Keith







From: NAME \ Greg Erdos, ICBR EM Core Lab. :      GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 15:17:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Position Available

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Position available for a Biological Electron Microscopy Technician. Preference given to one with experience with plant tissue

Location: Lake Alfred Florida

Contact: Personnel Office
Department of Citrus
P.O. Box 148
Lakeland, FL 33802
(813) 499-2476

` DEADLINE: Dec 10, 1993

Pay Grade 18 ($20,553 to $33,893)




From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 14:33:33 -0600 (CST)
Subject: SEM: Fullerenes

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Richard Lee of the Energy Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory
answers Daniel Callahan's question of 11 Nov 93:

Our experience with carbon is mostly on diamond with tungsten filaments in a
SEM. We typically resolve sub-micron filaments and crystallites down to 30 to
50 nm at 10kV. Fullerene crystal were difficult for us because of charging,
even at 10kV.

Our experience with an high resolution FEG-SEM was with diamond and the results
were impressive. The FEG-SEM excels at low kV with no charging problems. We
have taken photos of diamond nanophase materials (coatings) with 3 nm or better
resolution at 5 kV using a new Leica-Cambridge 360FE.

You can try conventional SEM's at 5 kV but you will be limited in magnification.
If you go much above 10 kV you probably will have charging problems and loss of
surface detail. The lower the kV the better the surface detail with a material
of low Z.




From: Jeff Sweeney :      sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 15:14:14 -0600
Subject: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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} A couple of things I forgot to mention in my original mailing - the
} Olympus has infinity corrected optics (I had found that Nikon had a
} nifty lens, but it turned out not to be infinity corrected) and the
} microscope is part of a Renishaw imaging Raman spectrometer. I have
} been told by others that reflecting objectives would be no use since
} the Raman laser would either be reflected straight back into the
} spectrometer without reaching my sample or would have to be
} defocussed, preventing me doing any small area analysis.

Geez, you're making this more difficult :-) Chromatic aberration is not
a problem with Ramam since you are working so near the Rayleigh peak, so
look for a U-stage lens with infinity focus. You can use a reflecting
objective but you must send the probe laser into the lens off-axis.
Your imaging system may not accomodate this (probably not, huh). The
focus of the laser can be adjusted with the beam expander if your beam
expander is adjustable (probable not, huh). Alternatively, the laser
can be prefocused with a long focal-length plano-convex lens. You might
consider coating the reflecting objective for the laser wavelength.
This would help aviod beam damage (not really a problem) and would give
better signal in general.

Jeff Sweeney sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu




From: e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu (Erik Reuter)
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1993 19:06:38 -0500
Subject: LM: Need basic texts/review articles on design

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Message-Id: {199311240105.AA13285-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu}
X-Sender: reuter-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


I would like to hear recommendations for text books and review articles on
the subject of light microscopy system design. I am interested in both
basic information and the most recent technology. I would specifically be
interested in hearing about those "desk reference" type books or review
articles you always keep near by, and articles that have good
bibliographies.

I am working on designing a photoluminescence imaging system (not confocal).

Please send references to me and I will compile a list. Also, if anyone
would like a copy of the completed list, just let me know. Thanks.


Erik Reuter, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, 217-244-6378 phone, 217-244-6375 fax






From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1993 16:45:21 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: Re: LM - Ultra long working distance objectives

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} Geez, you're making this more difficult :-)i

And I haven't yet mentioned the high temperatures I want to have my samples
at! Also, one of our third year students wants to Raman his diamond
coatings at 400 C - What will that do to either ULWD or standard objectives???

Chromatic aberration is not
} a problem with Ramam since you are working so near the Rayleigh peak, so
} look for a U-stage lens with infinity focus. You can use a reflecting
} objective but you must send the probe laser into the lens off-axis.
} Your imaging system may not accomodate this (probably not, huh).

I'll go and ask.

The
} focus of the laser can be adjusted with the beam expander if your beam
} expander is adjustable (probable not, huh).

I already know this is, but you might be able to tell we haven't had the
system long and are all still coming to terms with it. Someone here
suggested using reflecting objectives with the beam expanded and with
a blanking-widget in the lens to prevent direct reflection of the laser back into the spectrometer.

Alternatively, the laser
} can be prefocused with a long focal-length plano-convex lens. You might
} consider coating the reflecting objective for the laser wavelength.
} This would help aviod beam damage (not really a problem) and would give
} better signal in general.
}
} Jeff Sweeney sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu
}
iThankyou,

Keith






From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1993 10:59:10 -0600
Subject: LM: Basic texts

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Erik, check out a couple of Kodak publications:

"Photography Through The Microscope", P-2, cat.# 152-8371
"Kodak Scientific Imaging Products", L-10, cat. # 813-9321

The first has loads of basic information about objectives, condensers,
setting-up illumination, flourescence, phase contrast, etc. Both have
bibliographies.






From: colijn-at-kcgl1.eng.ohio-state.edu (Henk Colijn)
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1993 16:54:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Available: JEOL 200CX TEM/STEM

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Available: JEOL 200CX TEM/STEM

The scope is 10 years old but in very good condition. It has been
continuously maintained under service contract and is still in daily use.
The components and accessories are listed below. All documentation and
records are included. We would like to sell this as a complete package.

Contact:
Hamish Fraser,
(614)292-2708, email: fraser.3-at-osu.edu
Henk Colijn
(614)292-0674, email: colijn.1-at-osu.edu


The equipment included with the microscope is

JEM-200CX TEM - S/N EM132031-86
200CX-SEGZ JEOL 200CX side entry goniometer
HM-PP 3.5A, +30o SEG polepiece
HA-PP 4.5A, +60o SEG polepiece
200CX-SQH-2 High Mag single tilt holder
200CX-SCSH Std. SEG quick change single tilt holer
200CX-BST double tilt holder (w/ one Gatan Be cup)
200CX-SHH sample heating holder
200CX-SCH single tilt cooling holder
200CX-SHU heating holder control unit
200CX-SEH single tilt straining holder
200CX-SFH faraday cup
Haskris recirculating water chiller
200CX-ASID-3D STEM/SEM system
200CX -BEI-3 BSE detector (needs new Si crystals)
200CX-BF/DF STEM BF/DF option
200CX-FLC Free lens control
35-GMC Gamma control
HA-EDS high angle EDS interface
200CX-HXS hard x-ray aperture
200CX-IMS-2 Image selector switch
35-MDD Multiple image display
200CX-SRT Scan Rotation & tilt correction
200CX-UHR UHR (photo) CRT w/ Polaroid 545 film back
35-VCA Video control amp. (derivative/filtering)
200CX-WFM-B Tek 501 waveform monitor
200CX-WFM-M lens current readout
35-YMD Y modulation device
EM-THG Top entry Ultrahigh resolution goniometer
TN-2000 Tracor-Northern TN-2000 EDS system (PDP-11/23 w/ 128kB RAM)
SpectraChrome 512 Color monitor
Horizontal Be window EDS detector
High Takeoff angle (72o) Be window EDS detector
EDS preamplifiers (x2)
Digital beam control and interface
EDS and Image acquisition software
DEC LA-120 printer
Honeywell Video Graphics recorder
JEOL ASD system (projector lens scan coil) with OSU mods
for scanning the TEM image)
OSU built hollow cone illumination device
Manuals and notes
misc spare parts and filaments, including pole pieces and
defl. coils
HP 7221C 8 pen plotter
operator's chair
Gatan DT cryo low bkg holder
Gatan cryo transfer holder






colijn.1-at-osu.edu OSU Campus Electron Optics Facility 292-0674
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Assumption is the mother of all screwups.





From: SMITHC-at-ANIMAL.SSEC.HONEYWELL.COM
Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1993 16:12:40 -0600 (CST)
Subject: re: Image Printing

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Regarding J. Kelly's (jkelly-at-enh.nist.gov) question:

} I am working with image files on PC's - usually TIFF format
} on IBM compatibles. I would like to get good quality B & W
} plain paper hardcopy of the images. What are the good
} combinations of print software and printers for either the PC's
} or Mac environment? Thanks in advance.

Have you considered videoprinters? You can videoprint any
analog signal: RS-170 (NTSC), PAL (Europe), VGA... at 1200
dots/inch, 64 grey-levels, and it's *fast* (30 sec) compared
to digital printing. You get near Polaroid quality for 40
cents a shot (one 8x10 inch, or two different 3x5 inch images
can be printed together). I know you specified "plain paper,"
but the thermal paper is easily handled. Our
Seikosha VP-3500 has been so reliable and popular
with our customers, we put another on a Sun workstation based SEM.
Capital investment is about $7500. One drawback: the images
are not as stable. When I put a cup of hot coffee down on
a print, it "developed" a black circle.
*******************
Craig A. Smith, Honeywell Solid State Electronics Center, MN14-2C25
12001 State Highway 55, Plymouth, MN 55441-4799 USA
Phone (612) 954-2895, FAX (612) 954-2040
smithc-at-ccsvax.ssec.honeywell.com
*******************






From: Nancy L. Desmond :      nld-at-galen.med.virginia.edu
Date: Fri, 26 Nov 1993 14:16:39 -0500
Subject: gray scale printers

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Like J. Kelly, we are interested in printers. Specifically we
are interested in purchasing a high-resolution gray scale printer
to print TIF files from both PC's and from Silicon Graphic
computers. Our files contain light microscopic images of
hippocampal dendrites visualized at high magnification using a
variety of staining methods (Golgi, biocytin, neurobiotin). I
have information from Harris on their PhotoPro2000 and from Alden
on their 9315 continuous tone printer. They range in price from
$7500-10,000. What has been your experience & what would you
recommend? We need a high-res image, and I am a bit concerned
about the longevity of the thermal paper images. Many thanks.

Nancy L Desmond
Dept. of Neurosurgery
Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center
Charlottesville, VA 22908
804.924.5607 (phone)
NLD-at-GALEN.MED.VIRGINIA.EDU




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 27 Nov 1993 11:10:14 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Images:Printing Thermal Paper

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Nancy Desmonds writes....

....deleted text.......

} I have information from Harris on their PhotoPro2000 and from Alden
} on their 9315 continuous tone printer. They range in price from
} $7500-10,000.

This is the first I've hear of these brands. So I have
no opinion, except that they sound expense for thermal
printers.
Lots of systems were exhibited at the MSA annual meeting
for continuous tone printing. You may
want to get a copy of the Exhibitors Guide from the
MSA meeting and call up a few of the vendors for more
information. Try contacting Bill Gunning
Dept. of Path. Medical College of Ohio. 3000 Arlington
Ave. Toledo, Ohio 43699-0008. He runs the Advertising
for the MSA EXPO and can probably tell you how to
get a copy. (419) 381-3484

} We need a high-res image, and I am a bit concerned
} about the longevity of the thermal paper images.

High res means different things to different people.
Do you mean pixel resolution, gray scale resolution,
Image size or what? It also depends upon you digitization
source (TV, CCD, Scanner....) and it's "pixel/gray scale" resolution.
Also what is the purpose of your prints? Publication
reports, records, or what.. If you have them on the
computer it's certainly archived there resonably well
at least as good as the lifetime of data on disks. I've
got floppy disks with data on them that are now approaching
15 & 20 years old and to my surprize the data was still readable
even though the disks at the time were only supposed to
be good for ~ 10 years! Of course that implies you still
have the computer to read all that "good" old data :-)

I would not trust thermal paper for archiving but only
for a quick look see and maybe a lab notebook record.
The best thing to do here is get the manufacturer's
your interested in to give you copies of their prints
and lay them out in the sunlight and shade for a few days/weeks.
See how long they survive and then decide. The different
brands will give different results, some are suprizingly
good.


Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Sat, 27 Nov 1993 11:51:16 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM:Celli Tape

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Re: TEM specimen preparation of Graphite:

Here's a question for those of you that used to use the
old Celli tape popular in England about 10+ years ago.

In the past I had some of this tape which I used to use
to prepare specimens of graphite for TEM. Here I would
use the old trick of just continually touching the surface
of the graphite with fresh tape to delaminate the graphite
gradually until I made a nice thin & optically transparent
section, which stuck to the tape and was usually perfect for
TEM. The nice thing about this old type of scotch tape was that
the adhesive used would disolve beautifully in Acetone and the
backing for that tape would just float away as it was not
soluablein the acetone. Unfortuantely, the current type
of "SCOTCH BRAND" transparent tape completely dissolves
in Acetone and most other solvents I tried.

I'm back to trying to make more graphite samples as
my old ones have finally bit the dust so to speak.
Since the new scotch tape failed, I tried extraction
replica tape which is available from most EM supply
vendors, however it does not have the adhearance
of either the old Celli tape or the newer scotch tapes.
(BTW the new scotch tape very nicely delaminated the graphite
and gives beautifully thin sections if I could ever
remove them from the adhesive). Does anyone know of a
solvent which works on the newer scotch brand tapes
or have another/similar idea/procedure for layered
structures which are not strongly bound?.

I'd prefer to avoid ion milling the graphite although
I may have to resort to this in the end.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center





From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1993 12:21:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: LM - ULWD objectives summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {9836.9311291222-at-irix.bris.ac.uk}

Forwarded message:
From K.R.Hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk Mon Nov 29 12:21:47 1993
Message-Id: {9815.9311291221-at-irix.bris.ac.uk}

Dear All,

I was asked if I would post a summary of the replies received after my
queation over ULWD objectives to attach to an Olympus BHSM / Renishaw
imaging Raman system. Here goes....


} From jacobsen-at-xray1.physics.sunysb.edu Tue Nov 23 14:22:40 1993

Nikon makes a toolmaker's lens which can be fitted onto
a Nikon Optiphot. It has 10x mag and a working distance
of several cm. Very good images...


} From sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu Tue Nov 23 15:26:16 1993

One trick is to look for U-stage lenses. These are designed for
universal-stage mineralogical microscopes where the stage tilts as well
as rotates. These lenses have a separate hemispherical glass element
that is placed over the thin-section. Used without the hemisphere they
have very long working distances.

Another trick is to use reflecting objectives.

I don't know the Olympus BHSM. Assuming it has standard threads (.8in
38tpi) and the equivalent of a 160mm tube length... We use a Leitz UT40
which is a U-stage lens. Without the hemisphere it has a magnification
of 25x and a working distance of 14mm. Leitz has a few other U-stage
lenses that are parfocal with this lens. Chromatic aberration can be a
problem for refracting objectives with these long working distances.

We also use a reflecting objective from Ealing (15x, 21mm or 24mm
working distance). Ealing sells several other reflecting objectives
with higher magnification. The 15x is identical to the 15x lens made
by Beck as far as I can tell. You may be able to purchase the Ealing
lens corrected for infinity focus or a 210mm tube length, if that is
what the Olympus requires. These reflecting objectives are just the
ticket if you can tolerate their large size and the central obscuration.

Some good references are:

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T On aspheric anastigmatic systems
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 55
%N 312
%P 433-444
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T Reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 59
%P 41-46
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1945
%T Flat-field singlet aplanats
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 567-576
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1947
%T Semi-aplanat reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 47-49
%K reflecting objective


} From treado+-at-pitt.edu Tue Nov 23 21:03:41 1993

In response to your question posted to the Microscopy discussion list
November 23, we use Leica ultra long working distance infinity-corrected
objectives on our Olympus BHS microscope.


} From sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu Tue Nov 23 21:30:36 1993

Geez, you're making this more difficult :-) Chromatic aberration is not
a problem with Ramam since you are working so near the Rayleigh peak, so
look for a U-stage lens with infinity focus. You can use a reflecting
objective but you must send the probe laser into the lens off-axis.
Your imaging system may not accomodate this (probably not, huh). The
focus of the laser can be adjusted with the beam expander if your beam
expander is adjustable (probable not, huh). Alternatively, the laser
can be prefocused with a long focal-length plano-convex lens. You might
consider coating the reflecting objective for the laser wavelength.
This would help aviod beam damage (not really a problem) and would give
better signal in general.


} From e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu Wed Nov 24 00:20:00 1993

I am also interested in learning about ultra long working distance
objective. Would you please summarize to the list or to me what you find
out in a few days?


} From timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl Wed Nov 24 07:41:09 1993

The problem with U-stage lenses is that the highest magnification I know
which is available is a 30 x, and the optical quality is not too good (some
distortion of the image and loosing a loss of brightness)


} From muepf-at-iff067.iff.kfa-juelich.de Wed Nov 24 07:52:31 1993

One of the --- expensive --- alternatives is to get a Questar long

[Sorry - I've lost part of the original here because someone picked up
the telephone next door while my modem was connected - the message went on
to mention a 3000 ECU alternative - Could you please resend the details to
me - Thank you]


} From treado+-at-pitt.edu Wed Nov 24 17:14:22 1993

If you are only interested in doing Raman microprobing the reflective
objective may be suitable by defocusing and illuminating off-axis. If you
want to perform imaging I would use refractive objectives. The imaging
quality is far superior with refractive optics.

We use Leica objectives: 5X, 0.10 NA, 50 mm WD and 50X, 0.45 NA, 20.6 mm WD.

We operate at elevated temperatures (} 200 oC) and jacket the objective in
a water cooled housing. According to Leica the optical cements fail above
110 degrees.


Keith Hallam







From: Keith R. Hallam :      k.r.hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1993 12:21:41 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: LM - ULWD objectives summary

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Forwarded message:
From K.R.Hallam-at-bristol.ac.uk Mon Nov 29 12:21:47 1993
Message-Id: {9815.9311291221-at-irix.bris.ac.uk}

Dear All,

I was asked if I would post a summary of the replies received after my
queation over ULWD objectives to attach to an Olympus BHSM / Renishaw
imaging Raman system. Here goes....


} From jacobsen-at-xray1.physics.sunysb.edu Tue Nov 23 14:22:40 1993

Nikon makes a toolmaker's lens which can be fitted onto
a Nikon Optiphot. It has 10x mag and a working distance
of several cm. Very good images...


} From sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu Tue Nov 23 15:26:16 1993

One trick is to look for U-stage lenses. These are designed for
universal-stage mineralogical microscopes where the stage tilts as well
as rotates. These lenses have a separate hemispherical glass element
that is placed over the thin-section. Used without the hemisphere they
have very long working distances.

Another trick is to use reflecting objectives.

I don't know the Olympus BHSM. Assuming it has standard threads (.8in
38tpi) and the equivalent of a 160mm tube length... We use a Leitz UT40
which is a U-stage lens. Without the hemisphere it has a magnification
of 25x and a working distance of 14mm. Leitz has a few other U-stage
lenses that are parfocal with this lens. Chromatic aberration can be a
problem for refracting objectives with these long working distances.

We also use a reflecting objective from Ealing (15x, 21mm or 24mm
working distance). Ealing sells several other reflecting objectives
with higher magnification. The 15x is identical to the 15x lens made
by Beck as far as I can tell. You may be able to purchase the Ealing
lens corrected for infinity focus or a 210mm tube length, if that is
what the Olympus requires. These reflecting objectives are just the
ticket if you can tolerate their large size and the central obscuration.

Some good references are:

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T On aspheric anastigmatic systems
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 55
%N 312
%P 433-444
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1943
%T Reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 59
%P 41-46
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1945
%T Flat-field singlet aplanats
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 567-576
%K reflecting objective

%0 Journal Article
%A Burch, C. R.
%D 1947
%T Semi-aplanat reflecting microscopes
%B Proceedings of the Physical Society
%V 57
%P 47-49
%K reflecting objective


} From treado+-at-pitt.edu Tue Nov 23 21:03:41 1993

In response to your question posted to the Microscopy discussion list
November 23, we use Leica ultra long working distance infinity-corrected
objectives on our Olympus BHS microscope.


} From sweeney-at-dionheinz.uchicago.edu Tue Nov 23 21:30:36 1993

Geez, you're making this more difficult :-) Chromatic aberration is not
a problem with Ramam since you are working so near the Rayleigh peak, so
look for a U-stage lens with infinity focus. You can use a reflecting
objective but you must send the probe laser into the lens off-axis.
Your imaging system may not accomodate this (probably not, huh). The
focus of the laser can be adjusted with the beam expander if your beam
expander is adjustable (probable not, huh). Alternatively, the laser
can be prefocused with a long focal-length plano-convex lens. You might
consider coating the reflecting objective for the laser wavelength.
This would help aviod beam damage (not really a problem) and would give
better signal in general.


} From e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu Wed Nov 24 00:20:00 1993

I am also interested in learning about ultra long working distance
objective. Would you please summarize to the list or to me what you find
out in a few days?


} From timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl Wed Nov 24 07:41:09 1993

The problem with U-stage lenses is that the highest magnification I know
which is available is a 30 x, and the optical quality is not too good (some
distortion of the image and loosing a loss of brightness)


} From muepf-at-iff067.iff.kfa-juelich.de Wed Nov 24 07:52:31 1993

One of the --- expensive --- alternatives is to get a Questar long

[Sorry - I've lost part of the original here because someone picked up
the telephone next door while my modem was connected - the message went on
to mention a 3000 ECU alternative - Could you please resend the details to
me - Thank you]


} From treado+-at-pitt.edu Wed Nov 24 17:14:22 1993

If you are only interested in doing Raman microprobing the reflective
objective may be suitable by defocusing and illuminating off-axis. If you
want to perform imaging I would use refractive objectives. The imaging
quality is far superior with refractive optics.

We use Leica objectives: 5X, 0.10 NA, 50 mm WD and 50X, 0.45 NA, 20.6 mm WD.

We operate at elevated temperatures (} 200 oC) and jacket the objective in
a water cooled housing. According to Leica the optical cements fail above
110 degrees.


Keith Hallam







From: PO-at-, parmly1.parmly.luc.edu-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu
Date: 29 Nov 93 10:44:59 CST6CDT
Subject: Re: Cameras & devices for higher frame-rates than standard

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931129104500.288-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov


} We are doing microscopic image processing to access physical properties
} (and their change) of lipid membranes and polymers in different setups.
} In the near future we will face the problem to escape the limits of standard
} video frequency (30/25 Hz). Therefore I want to ask whether anybody is
} listening, who has experience with higher frame-rate cameras and other
} devices and who would be willing to give me some advice in this field.
Question deleted...
} I am quite unsure whether the answers to this query might be of general
} interest or not, so please feel free to email me directly at
} mschindl-at-physik.tu-muenchen.de.
I think this is of interest...I would certainly like to know the
answers to these questions.
Phil Oshel




From: naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1993 08:13:01 -0500
Subject: Re: TEM:Celli Tape

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





---- Transcript of session follows ----
%UCX-E-SMTP_NOSUCHNODE, Remote host unknown, anlemc.msd.anl.gov
-SYSTEM-F-TIMEOUT, device timeout

---- Unsent message follows ----

Before I start let me admit that I have not tried this. However, I have heard
other people doing it and it works. You can completely dissolve the scotch
tape with acetone. I mean you can dissolve both the adhesive and the backing
in aceotne leaving no residues. I have heard of acetone evaporaotrs where
a little amount of acetone is heated and the vapors condense on the sample.
This acetone dissolves any soluble substance and drips down into the bath to
be reevaporated. The solubility of both adhesive and backing is
higer at near melting point of acetone and hence this process substantially
speeds up the removal. Hope this helps.

Naresh Shah
University of Kentucky
233 Mining & Mineral Bldg.
Lexington, KY 40506-0107
(606)257-4045
naresh-at-funky.mm.uky.edu




From: rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1993 14:42:56 +0000
Subject: MICRO 94 2ND CIRCULAR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

WISSE-at-CYTO.VUB.AC.BE, UHAGOOL-at-rhbnc.ac.uk, SPT1-at-vaxa.york.ac.uk,
SJE-at-PO.CWRU.EDU, SHANTI-at-VISION.EE.UTEXAS.EDU, SFB13-at-phx.cam.ac.uk,
SEEMAN-at-ACFCLUSTER.NYU.EDU, SECR-at-CWI.NL, SCIA-at-CONAN.UIT.NO,
SCHWARZ3-at-URZ.UNIBAS.CH, SCHATT-at-EMAIL.TUWIEN.AC.AT, RYDMARK-at-MEDNT2.SUNET.SE,
RUSS-at-MAT.MTE.NCSU.EDU, RUDOLFO-at-MBL.EDU, ROYSAM-at-ECSE.RPI.EDU,
RMS-at-vax.ox.ac.uk, RIGAUT-at-ARGOS.B3E.JUSSIEU.FR, RICHARD-at-mrcvax.ed.ac.uk,
RETEP-at-ANAT.UCT.AC.ZA, RBRADY-at-NCSA.UIUC.EDU, R.COLEMAN-at-ic.ac.uk,
POSTDO-at-DUTTNCB.TN.TUDELFT.NL, POPOV-at-BIOENG.WASHINGTON.EDU,
PMWOJNAR-at-PLKRCY11.BITNET, PETERS-at-MBCG.UCHC.EDU, PE13-at-phx.cam.ac.uk,
PATERSON-at-UTKVX.UTK.EDU, P.J.KNIGHT-at-bristol.ac.uk, ORMEROD-at-VAXA.ICF.BN.AC.UK,
NICHOLSN-at-i1.ph.gla.ac.uk, MULVEYT-at-spock.vax.aston.ac.uk,
MSHIVAC-at-PEG.PEGASUS.OZ.AU, MONTES-at-VM.CI.UV.ES, MJBACCALA-at-UCDAVIS.BITNET,
MICROSCOPY-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV, MBGEORGE-at-VM.UOGUELPH.CA,
LVJAT-at-siva.bristol.ac.uk, LDP-at-IVEM.MED.UPENN.EDU, LCRUZ-at-ANA.UNIBE.CH
X-VMSmail-To: -at-LIST
Message-ID: {0097644E.7E1F81EA.31927-at-vax.ox.ac.uk}

MICRO 94

International Microscopy and Image Analysis
Conference and Exhibition

12 - 15 September 1994
Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London

Organized by the Royal Microscopical Society
in association with Microscopy and Analysis

Second Circular

Dates

Conference: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 4.15 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Thursday 15 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm

Exhibition: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 7.00 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 15 September - 9.30 am - 4.30 pm

On the Monday evening there will be a wine reception at 5.30pm, followed by
the AGM and Presidental Lecture at 7.00pm.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ


CONFERENCE

Scientific Programme
The Conference will be run in seven half-day sessions. The Electron
Microscopy and Analysis Group of the Institute of Physics (EMAG) and The
Physiological Society are each sponsoring separate lectures within the
Conference.

The Programme will consist of tutorial lectures and posters and will feature
the following topics:-

Monday 12 September (pm) - Materials I
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
EM in the assessment of semiconductor epitaxial growth
Reactions to the surface of implanted bioceramics
X-Ray microanalysis in biomaterials
Optically active nanostructured materials
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Tuesday 13 September (am) - Materials II (including EMAG)
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Auger electron spectroscopy
Imaging time of flight SIMS
Formation of strained layer superlattices by phase separation
Electron microscopy of weakly ordered III-V semiconductor materials
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Tuesday 13 September (pm) Scanning Probe Microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Applications of atomic force microscopy to thin film research and technology
Scanning probe microscopy: near field imaging of surfaces using electrons,
forces and photons
SPM of living biological systems
Environmental SEM
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Wednesday 14 September (am) - Image Processing and Analysis
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Sampling in 3D for quantitative microscopy
Digital image processing techniques
Image analysis of multicoloured biological specimens
In vivo microscopy by video imaging
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Wednesday 14 September (pm) - 3D Microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Supercomputing in confocal microscopy
3D atomic-scale microanalysis of materials
Spatial distribution of fibres in composite materials
Confocal polarised-light microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Thursday 15 September (am) - Flow Cytometry and Proliferation Markers
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Cell cycle control
Proliferation-related proteins
Proliferation in human tumours
Apoptosis
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Thursday 15 September (pm) - Living Cell Cytochemistry (including The
Physiological Society)
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Living cell cytochemistry: Ratio Imaging
Living cell cytochemistry: Confocal scanning laser microscopy

Thursday 15 September (pm) - Proteases in (patho) physiological processes

Use of selective protease inhibitors in the study of collagen breakdown
Role of proteases in invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, arthritis and
rheumatism and infections
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Experts in the fields listed above have been invited to give lectures. Each
speaker will provide a review of the particular topic in question and ample time
for discussion will be provided.

In addition to the above, a special session will be held on the afternoon of
Monday 12 September on how to use the light microscope.

Technical Lectures will be organized by Exhibitors to act as a bridge between
the specialized review lectures and the equipment being exhibited.
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

INVITED SPEAKERS

It is hoped that the following people will be presenting papers at the MICRO 94
Conference:-

Dr Paul D. Brown (University of Cambridge)
Professor Peter Marquis (University of Birmingham)
Dr Henk Koerten (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Peter Dobson (University of Oxford)
Dr R. K. Wild (University of Bristol)
Dr Paul Denison (University of Sheffield)
Dr Andrew Norman (Imperial College, London)
Dr Caroline Baxter (University of Cambridge)
Dr Alan Pidduck (RSRE, Malvern)
Dr M. Miles (HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol)
Dr H Ho”rber(European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany)
Mr Chris Gilpin (Manchester Biological EM Centre)
Dr Vyvyan Howard (Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital)
Dr Dominique Jeulin (Ecole Nationale Superiere des Mines, Fontainebleau,
France)
Dr Hans Tanke (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Andreas Kriete (Der Justus Liebig Universitat, Germany)
Dr Alfred Cerezo (University of Oxford)
Dr A. R. Clarke (University of Leeds)
Dr Alan Entwistle (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, London)
Dr A Bagg (TNO Rijswijk, The Netherlands)
Dr Michael Ormerod (Sutton, Surrey)
Dr Peter van Mier (Washington University School of Medicine, USA)
Professor P. A. McNaughton (King's College London)
Dr R. Jacob (King's College London)
Dr Vincent Everts (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Dr Ron Van Noorden (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

CONTRIBUTED PAPERS
In addition to invited papers, contributions are invited on all aspects of
microscopy and related techniques.

All contributed papers will appear in the poster sessions of the Conference.
Time will be allowed in the Programme for the viewing of posters, and posters
will be on display for the maximum time possible. At certain times authors will
be in attendance by their posters to discuss their work.

Camera-ready sheets and instructions for the submission of short abstracts
can be obtained from the Royal Microscopical Society office. The deadline for
submission is 4 May 1994. These abstracts will appear in the Conference
Programme, which will be published in a special MICRO 94 issue of the
Proceedings of the Royal Microscopical Society.

Authors will be notified regarding acceptance of their papers by the end of June
1994.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

EXHIBITION
An Exhibition of the latest microscopes and ancillary instrumentation and
equipment will be held at the Earls Court Park Inn, adjacent to the Lecture
Theatre. Admission to the Exhibition is free, by conference badge, or by
exhibition only badge which will be obtainable at the registration desk.

By 1 November 1993, the following firms had reserved exhibition space:-

Agar Scientific Ltd
Alrad Instruments Ltd
Bemax (UK) Ltd
Bio-Rad Laboratories Ltd
British BioCell International
Burleigh Instruments (UK) Ltd
Cambridge Scanning Co Ltd
Confocal Technologies Ltd
Cryophysics Ltd
Data Cell Ltd
Drukker International
Edwards High Vacuum International
Emitech Ltd
Finlay Microvision Co Ltd
Fisons Instruments
Foster Findlay Associates Ltd
Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd
Hitachi Scientific Instruments
ISS
Imaging Associates Ltd
J K Instruments Ltd
JEOL UK Ltd
K E Developments Ltd
Lasertec Corporation
Leica Cambridge Limited
Leica UK Limited
Microfield Scientific Ltd
Microscopy and Analysis
Newport Ltd
Nikon UK Limited
Olympus Optical Co (UK) Ltd
Oxford Instruments Microanalysis Group
Oxford Instruments
Philips Electron Optics
Photonic Science
Polaroid (UK) Ltd
Princeton Gamma-Tech (UK) Ltd
Pyser (Holdings) plc
Synoptics Ltd
Taab Laboratories Equipment Ltd
Tracor Europa
Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen) Ltd
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

RECEPTION AND ASSOCIATED EVENTS
On Monday 12 September there will be a wine reception in the Exhibition
between 5.30 pm and 7.00 pm. The Annual General Meeting of the Royal
Microscopical Society, and the Presidential Address will also take place
during the evening.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
ACCOMMODATION
Academic Accommodation
A limited amount of academic accommodation has been booked for the use of
delegates at Imperial College. Rooms have been booked there on a bed and
breakfast basis at a cost of œ2.00 pounds6 per night. This academic/student
accommodation will be filled on a 'first-come first-served' basis. From the
nearby Underground Station at South Kensington, Earls Court is two stops
along the District or Piccadilly Line.

Hotel Accommodation
There are some rooms available in the Earls Court Park Inn at the special
MICRO 94 rate of œ65.00pounds per night. If you would like to reserve
accommodation at these special rates, please contact the Earls Court Park Inn
directly, quoting that you are a MICRO 94 visitor. To be sure of booking rooms
at these rates, it is advisable that you book well in advance.
Telephone: 071 385 1255
Telex: 917728
Fax: 071 381 4450.

Other Hotel Accommodation
Delegates who wish to make their own accommodation arrangements may
wish to use the services of Expotel Executive Travel - Europe's leading hotel
booking agent, who have been appointed the official hotel agency for MICRO
94. The hotel of your choice or a similar alternative can be booked through
Expotel often at discounted rates. By making one telephone call to Expotel on
071 735 0060 stating the event code 'MICRO 94', your reservation will be
confirmed verbally followed by confirmation in writing. This free booking
service is available to anyone attending MICRO 94.
Telephone: 071 735 0060
Telex: 8811951 EXPOTL G
Fax: 071 735 2839.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Registration
Registration will take place at the Earls Court Park Inn from 1.00 pm on
Monday 12 September 1994, and from 9.00 am on subsequent mornings.

Payment
Payment may be made by sterling cheque payable to the Royal Microscopical
Society (please add œ12.00pounds to cover exchange and bank charges if
the cheque is not a UK Bank Cheque) or by credit card (Visa/Barclaycard or
Access/Eurocard/Mastercard).

Cancellation and Refunds
Cancellations received before 12 July 1994 will be subject to a full refund. No
refunds will be made if cancellation is made after this date.
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

HOW TO GET THERE

The Conference, Exhibition, Posters, and Refreshments will all take place at
the Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London SW6.

***************************************************************************


MICRO 94 is organized by the Royal Microscopical Society, 37/38 St Clements,
Oxford OX4 1AJ, UK, in association with Microscopy and Analysis.
Telephone: 0865 248768, Fax: 0865 791237, Email: RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX.




From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab University of Florida
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1993 16:45:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: NEW LAB

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

{GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}

I am now in the process of designing a new EM suite dedicated to biological
EM. I would like input from those of you who work in what they feel is an
ideal or close to ideal physical arrangement.
I would also like to hear from those who have envisioned an ideal
EM suite but have never seen it built. The restrictions are that a space of
2200 sq ft should house 2 TEMs and 2 SEMs as well as a prep lab, darkrooms
ancillary equipment and 2 offices. The overall design is of more interest
than actual use of the stated space.
So I would like to receive copies of plans you might have or rough
* Director, ICBR EMCL * Any and all contributions would be
greatly appreciated.
*****************************
* Greg Erdos *
* ICBR EM Lab *
* 218 Carr Hall *
* University of Florida *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 *
* gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* 904-392-1295 *
*****************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1993 20:28:18 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Conference Announcement:Image Processing

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1993 20:41:55 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Abstracts of JOM Articles

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


All Subscribers:

Here's yet another addition to the EMail server.
Periodic updates of upcoming Journal articles. Both the
Journal of Microscopy and the Microscopy Society of America
(MSA) Bulletin have agreed in principle to forward this (abstract)
information to me and I will post it to the subscribers.
In many cases the information distributed here may preceed
the actual publication of the full article by a few weeks.

Hope you find it informative! I certainly did.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
=============================================================


JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY - ABSTRACTS OCTOBER 1993 - DECEMBER 1993

Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 3--12.
Quantitative acoustic microscopy of individual living
human cells
by G. A. D. BRIGGS,* J. WANG* and R. GUNDLE,
*Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford
OX1 3PH, U.K. Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic
Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LD, U.K.

Summary
The elastic properties of cells can be measured with
microscopic resolution by acoustic microscopy. By
measuring the waveform of very short pulses, the
thickness, and the acoustic velocity, impedance and
attenuation can be determined from the two separate
signals reflected from the top and the bottom of the
cell.




Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 13--21.
Random models for morphological analysis of powders
by D. JEULIN, Centre de Geostatistique, E.N.S.M.P., 35
rue St-Honore, 77305
Fontainebleau, France

Summary
Models to estimate powder size distributions or
fractions of components in a mixture of powders were
developed and tested for various specimens. The models
derived from the Boolean model and from the dead leaves
models can be implemented on rough secondary electron
scanning electron microscope images, obtained after
minimal sample preparation. With the dead leaves
tessellation, the size distributions of spherical
particles or short fibres can be estimated either from
the size distribution of intact grains, or from the
area fraction measurement after binary erosions. With
the dead leaves random function, there is no need for
image segmentation. It provides data on the size and
shape of a population of particles from an estimation
of the distribution of grey-level images after erosions
by convex structuring elements of increasing size. A
version of these models for long fibres is developed
for estimating their diameter distribution. Allowing
for superposition of particles, the proposed methods
enable an unbiased estimation of the size distribution
and characterization of the shape of complex particles.
The approach is illustrated by applications to
spherical particles obtained by simulations and from
scanning electron microscope micrographs.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 23--29.
Spatial distribution of curve length: concept and
estimation
by N. ROBERTS and L. M. CRUZ-ORIVE*, Magnetic Resonance
Research Centre, PO Box 147, University of Liverpool,
Liverpool L69 3BX, U.K. *Stereology Unit, Department of
Anatomy, University of Berne, Postfach 139, CH-3000
Berne 9, Switzerland

Summary
The length of a curvilinear feature, such as a dendrite
tree of a neuron, can, in principle, be estimated by
the recent, non-invasive method of total vertical
projections (TVPs). Curve length is a measure of size,
but it reports nothing about curve shape. The shape of
a tree-like structure can be described to some extent
by the distribution of branch length in properly
defined regions of three-dimensional (3-D) space. A
definition of curve length distribution in three
dimensions is proposed and implemented here on a human
neuron. The relevant 3-D regions overlap after
projection, and therefore the TVPs method cannot be
used directly to estimate the corresponding feature
lengths. However, using the ANALYZE software system
running on a SUNSPARC workstation, dendrite subsets
sitting in predefined regions of space were rendered in
different colours and measured separately by the TVPs
method using a cycloid test system. In combination with
non-invasive image acquisition and processing
techniques, the length distribution concept is likely
to be useful in the metrical analysis of either
microscopic or macroscopic arborizations in a wide
variety of contexts, including living cells and
organisms.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 31--39.
Image sharpness and contrast transfer in coherent
confocal microscopy
by R.OLDENBOURG,* H. TERADA,~~ R. TIBERIO## and S.
INOUE*, *Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA,
U.S.A. Martin Fisher School of Physics, Brandeis
University, Waltham, MA, U.S.A. ~~Hamamatsu Photonics
Kabushiki Kaisha, Hamamatsu City, Japan. ##National
Nanofabrication Facility, Cornell University, Ithaca,
NY, U.S.A.

Summary
Confocal microscopes provide clear, thin optical
sections with little disturbance from regions of the
specimen that are not in focus. In addition, they
appear to provide somewhat greater lateral and axial
image resolution than with non-confocal microscope
optics. To address the question of resolution and
contrast transfer of light microscopes, a new test
slide that enables the direct measurement of the
contrast transfer characteristics (CTC) of microscope
optics at the highest numerical aperature has been
developed. With this new test slide, the performance of
a confocal scanning laser microscope operating in the
confocal reflection mode and the non-confocal
transmission mode was examined. The CTC curves show
that the confocal instrument maintains exceptionally
high contrast (up to twice that with non-confocal
optics) as the dimension of the object approaches the
diffraction limit of resolution; at these dimensions,
image detail is lost with non-confocal microscopes
owing to a progressive loss of image contrast.
Furthermore, we have calculated theoretical CTC curves
by modelling the confocal and non-confocal imaging
modes using discrete Fourier analysis. The close
agreement between the theoretical and experimental CTC
curves supports the earlier prediction that the
coherent confocal and the incoherent non-confocal
imaging mode have the same limit of resolution (defined
here as the inverse of the spatial frequency at which
the contrast transfer converges to zero). The
apparently greater image resolution of the coherent
confocal optics is a consequence of the improved
contrast transfer at spacings which are close to the
resolution limit.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 41--48.
A light-emitting diode light standard
for photo- and videomicroscopy
by J. M. BEACH* and B. R. DULING, Departments of
*Biomedical Engineering and Physiology, University of
Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, U.S.A.
Summary
A light calibration system consisting of a compact
light-emitting diode (LED) source with feedback control
of intensity is described. The source is positioned in
the focal plane of the microscope objective and
produces flat-field illumination of up to 31microW. The
source can be easily used to determine the performance
of microscope optics and camera response. It can also
be used as a standard light source for calibration of
experimental systems. Selectable light intensities are
produced by controlling the LED input power via a
feedback circuit consisting of a photodiode that
detects output light intensity. Spectral coverage
extends between 550 and 670nm using green, yellow and
red LEDs mounted side by side, which are selected
individually. The LED chips are encapsulated in plastic
diffusers which homogenize the light, and a flat field
of illumination is obtained through a thin
1-mm-diameter aperture positioned directly over each
chip. Provision is made for insertion of Ronchi rulings
over the aperture to enable measurements of contrast
modulation in a uniform field. The light may be
pulse-modulated to assess camera response times and the
device can be synchronized with video frames. Narrow
bandpass interference filters can be placed between the
objective lens and the LED source to produce
monochromatic light without affecting the spacing of
controlled light intensities since emission spectra do
not shift appreciably over the range of LED powers
chosen in this design. Results of tests using
controlled light intensity and uniform illumination are
presented.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 49--54.
Video camera calibration for optical densitometry
by R. A. Baldock and I. Poole, MRC Human Genetics Unit,
Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, U.K.

Summary
An efficient technique for calibrating video cameras to
record optical density (OD) from microscopic images is
described. The method corrects for variation over the
field of the brightfield and darkfield intensities,
does not assume a linear response of the camera to the
incident intensity and requires a single calibration
filter.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 55--61.
Vitrification depth can be increased more than 10-fold
by high-pressure freezing
by N. SARTORI, K. RICHTER* and J. DUBOCHET, Laboratoire
d'Analyse Ultrastructurale, Batiment de Biologie,
Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

Summary
Biological specimens prepared for cryoelectron
microscopy seem to suffer less damage when they are
frozen under 2kbar pressure rather than under normal
conditions. The volume that can be well preserved is
larger. This fact has been illustrated in a number of
publications on a number of different samples. However,
there is a lack of quantitative data concerning the
depth of this good specimen preservation. Catalase
crystals in various sugar solutions have been used as
test objects and vitrification, as determined by
electron diffraction, has been used as the criterion
for good freezing. Keeping all other conditions equal,
the depth of vitrification is approximately 10 times
larger with freezing at high, rather than normal,
pressure. The high-pressure vitrification depth in a
15--20% sugar solution averages 200micrometre. Fully
vitrified specimens up to 700micrometre in thickness
are obtained. When crystalline water is observed it is
frequently in the form of high-density ice II, III or
IX. These results are probably also relevant for
typical biological specimens. The advantage of
high-pressure freezing must be balanced by the possible
consequences of a considerably increased cooling time
and by the damage that may be induced by the pressure.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 63--69.
A portable cryo-storage system for low-temperature
scanning electron microscopy, suitable
for international transport of cryo-specimens
by C. E. Jeffree* and P. R. van Gardingen, *University
of Edinburgh, Science Faculty Electron Microscope
Facility, Daniel Rutherford Building, King's Buildings,
Mayfield Road,
Edinburgh EH9 3JH, U.K.

Summary
A cryo-specimen storage system for low-temperature
scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) specimens is
described, which: liberates multi-specimen experiments
from sampling restrictions imposed by the rate at which
LTSEM specimens can be examined in the SEM; provides
security against experiment loss resulting from
breakdown of the SEM or cryo-system; enables collection
of specimens in the field or in laboratories remote
from the SEM laboratory; and facilitates international
air transport of LTSEM specimens. The com-ponents of
the system, which has a capacity of 98 stub-mounted
specimens, are readily made in a laboratory workshop.
The details of the design may be altered to suit
particular specimen types or experimental approaches.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 71--79.
Empirically determined freezing time for quick-freezing
with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled copper block
by P. H. W. W. BAATSEN, Departement de Physiologie
generale, FYMU, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Ave.
Hippocrate 55, 1200-Brussels, Belgium

Summary
A method is presented to determine freezing time
empirically. The method is based on determining the
amount of stretch of a skinned muscle fibre while it is
being frozen. Freezing time, as determined with this
method, lies in between 0 and 1ms.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 81--88.
An application of scanned focused ion beam milling to
studies on the internal morphology of small arthropods
by R. J. YOUNG,* T. DINGLE,* K. ROBINSON and P. J. A.
PUGH, *FEI Europe Ltd, Brookfield Business Centre,
Cottenham, Cambridge CB4 4PS, U.K. British Antarctic
Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High
Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET,
U.K.

Summary
For the first time a scanned focused ion beam of
approximately 50nm diameter has been used to prepare
biological material. Small defined areas of the surface
were removed by ion etching to allow examination of the
underlying structures with a scanning electron
microscope. Different milling procedures were carried
out on two anatomical features in mites of the genus
Halarachne (Halarachnidae: Mesostigmata). In the first,
square holes were milled into the surface of the
peritrematal plate to reveal the structure of the
underlying respiratory peritrematal groove. In the
second, transverse cuts were made across the shafts of
the sensory sensilli which make up the sensory Haller's
organ on tarsus I. This latter procedure revealed
detail both within the core and walls of sensilli.
Details of specimen preparation and milling procedures,
as well as suitability and interpretation of results,
are presented.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 1,
October 1993, pp. 89--92.
Variable-depth electropolishing of TEM samples
by S. W. LEONARD, Department of Physics, Queen's
University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6, Canada

Summary
A variable-depth electropolishing technique has been
developed for transmission electron microscopy samples
using copper as sample material. This was required for
an experiment concerning the measurement of the
variation of dislocation density with depth for
ion-implanted materials. The polishing technique was
achieved by a two-step process, involving the
measurement and use of the polishing rate to polish to
a specific depth and the application of a transparent
cover to one side of the sample for back-thinning. With
this technique, any sample depth can be made accessible
for observation with a transmission electron microscope
and the method should be applicable to many different
materials and electropolishers.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 97--107.
Computer simulation of a mirror STEM
by A. V. CREWE, Department of Physics and the Enrico
Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, 5640 S.
Ellis, Chicago, IL 60464, U.S.A.

Summary
The results of a computer simulation indicate that it
is possible to design and build an STEM that is free
from spherical aberration and should therefore have a
very high resolution. The computer program was written
in APL. The calculations include the effects of
apertures and, consequently, mimic a realistic
situation.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 109--119.
The effect of soft X-radiation on myofibrils
by P. M. BENNETT,* G. F. FOSTER, C. J. BUCKLEY and R.
E. BURGE, *MRC Muscle and Cell Motility Unit, The
Randall Institute, King's College London, 26/29 Drury
Lane, London WC2B 5RL, U.K. Wheatstone Physics
Laboratory, King's College London, The Strand, London
WC2R 2LS, U.K.

Summary
Myofibrils, the contractile organelles from striated
muscles, have been examined in the X-ray microscope to
determine the effect of radiation on their function and
structure. Using X-rays of energy 350--385eV in the
water window we find that after an exposure to 7.5 x
(10 to the fifth power) photons per square micrometre
(calculated to give an absorbed dose of 20 000 Gy) the
myofibrils will no longer contract. The use of the free
radical scavenging agent, DMSO, gives some protection
to the fibrils. It has also been found that after this
much irradiation the fibrils lose up to 20% of their
mass. Further substantial mass loss occurs on
subsequent irradiation. After 25 times the
loss-of-function exposure only 30% of the mass remains.
Analysis of a series of images of the same myofibril
covering this range of exposures shows that the mass is
preferentially lost in some areas of the structure and
consequently significant structural changes occur.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 121--129.
Scanning luminescence X-ray microscopy: imaging
fluorescence dyes at suboptical resolution
by C. JACOBSEN, S. LINDAAS, S. WILLIAMS and X. ZHANG,
Department of Physics, State University of New York at
Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, U.S.A.

Summary
Scanning luminescence X-ray microscopy is based on the
use of the very small focused probe of a scanning X-ray
microscope to stimulate visible light emission from
phosphors and dyes. Using an undulator X-ray source and
a Fresnel zone plate to produce a focused X-ray probe,
images of P31 phosphor grains with a resolution of
50--75nm have been obtained, and luminescence from
polystyrene spheres loaded with 50--100micromol/g of
fluorescent dye has been imaged. The resolution was not
limited by the focused X-ray probe (the microscope has
imaged features at 36-nm spacing in transmission mode)
but by dark noise and the low net efficiency of the
luminescence detection system used for this
investigation. This technique may make it possible to
image dye-tagged sites of biochemical activity at the
resolution of the X-ray microscope in wet, unsectioned,
and unfixed cells, especially with soft X-ray optimized
dyes. Because the image is formed from the detection of
signal against a dark background, calculations suggest
that the radiation dose for luminescence imaging of
dye-tagged features should be 2--22 times lower than
it is in transmission X-ray microscopy. A possible
extension of the technique for three-dimensional
imaging at the transverse resolution of the X-ray
microscope is described, where visible light collection
optics might be used to obtain submicrometre axial
resolution.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 131--136.
High-spatial-resolution maps of sulphur from human hair
sections: an EELS study
by P. HALLEGOT and P. CORCUFF, Laboratoires de
Recherche Avancee, L'Oreal, Departement de Biophysique,
1 avenue Eugene-Schueller, 93 600 Aulnay sous Bois,
France

Summary
High-resolution sulphur maps have been acquired from
human hair using a Zeiss CEM 902A transmission electron
microscope equipped with an energy filter. Analysis by
electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) was performed
on ultrathin sections of hair shafts embedded in three
different types of resin: Nanoplast (water-soluble),
Spurr (epoxy) and Lowicryl (low-temperature resin).
Good-quality energy-loss images have been obtained with
the three resins, although it was found that Nanoplast
gave the best image contrast. For the first time, the
results obtained for the detection of sulphur by silver
staining of hair sections, which until now has been the
only way to map sulphur at the electron microscopic
level, have been confirmed. The results are compared
with local sulphur concentrations from bulk analysis.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 137--151.
Improvements in the technique of vascular
perfusion-fixation employing a fluorocarbon-containing
perfusate and a peristaltic pump controlled by pressure
feedback
by J. Rostgaard, K. Qvortrup and S. S. Poulsen,
Institute of Medical Anatomy Department B, The Panum
Institute, University of Copenhagen, 3 Blegdamsvej,
2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark

Summary
A new, improved technique for whole-body
perfusion-fixation of rats and other small animals is
described. The driving force is a peristaltic pump
which is feedback regulated by a pressure transducer
that monitors the blood/perfusion pressure in the left
ventricle of the heart. The primary perfusate-fixative
is composed of a blood substitute---13.3% oxygenated
fluorocarbon FC-75---in 0.05 M cacodylate buffer (pH
7.4) with 2% glutaraldehyde. The secondary
perfusate-fixative is composed of 2% glutaraldehyde in
0.05 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4) with 20 mM CaCl2 A
double-barrelled, self-holding cannula is used to
cannulate the heart; the outer and inner barrels of the
cannula are connected to the peristaltic pump and to
the pressure transducer, respectively. The tissue
oxygen tension in the rat is monitored by a
sub-cutaneous oxygen electrode. Measurements showed
that tissue hypoxia/anoxia did not develop before or
during the perfusion-fixation. Thus, the technique
permits study of specimens which do not exhibit
fixation gradients and do not contain cells fixed in a
state of asphyxia. This is substantiated by electron
micrographs of cells from different organs, revealing
new fine structural elements. By adding oxygenated
fluorocarbon to glutaraldehyde perfusate-fixatives,
enough oxygen is made accessible for cellular
respiration as well as for the oxygen-consuming
chemical reactions of glutaraldehyde with the tissue.
Data on anaesthesia, operative manoeuvres, mechanical
components of the system, preparation of fixatives and
flow of the perfusate-fixatives are furnished and
discussed.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 153--156.
A device for picking up ultrathin serial sections
by E. P. Meyer and V. J. Domanico, Department of
Zoology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190,
CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland

Summary
Reconstruction from serial sections is often required
to understand the architecture of biological tissue.
The sampling of serial sections calls for an enormous
amount of patience and skill. Sections are cut with a
diamond knife, sampled in a trough and must then be
collected on grids for examination with the electron
microscope (EM). This last step, in which the section
ribbons have to be aligned with the EM grid, is
especially difficult as both hands have to work in
perfect co-ordination. A simple manually operated or
motorized mechanical device has been designed which
facilitates the collection of EM section ribbons.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 157--162.
An unbiased and efficient procedure for 3-D
connectivity measurement as applied to porous
media
by H. Q. ZHAO and I. F. MACDONALD, Porous Media
Research Institute, Department of Chemical Engineering,
University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1

Summary
A new stereological technique to measure the mean genus
(connectivity) per unit volume of a porous medium is
described and applied to a real sandstone sample. The
technique is based on the `net volume tangent counts'
performed on disector samples, i.e. pairs of
consecutive sections of an interconnected structure. It
consists of a set of simple counting rules applied to
the features on the sections of the structure and can
be easily implemented manually. The applicability and
efficiency of the procedure is evaluated by applying it
to a Berea sandstone sample which has been studied
previously using a network analysis approach by
interactive three-dimensional computer reconstruction.
It is shown that the procedure yields results in good
agreement with the network analysis result, but has the
advantages that it is much easier to implement, is more
flexible in how the data are collected, is more
efficient, and is known to provide an unbiased estimate
of the mean genus per unit volume of the whole
structure.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 163--176.
Remapping disparate images for coincidence
by W. Galbraith* and D. L. Farkas, *Department of
Laboratory Medicine, Allegheny Singer Research
Institute, 320 East North Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15212,
U.S.A. Center for Light Microscope Imaging and
Biotechnology, Carnegie-Mellon University, 4400 Fifth
Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, U.S.A.

Summary
With the development of complex multimode computerized
microscope systems, it is possible and necessary to
obtain images of the same area of the microscopical
preparation by several methods of microscopy, such as
differential interference contrast, reflection
interference microscopy, several wavelengths of
fluorescence microscopy, laser scanning and confocal
modes. Thus, varied information may be obtained about a
single field, in the form of a set of images, taken at
different ports of the microscope, using different
digitizing cameras, each appropriate to certain tasks.
For comparative purposes, the images should be
superimposable, pixel by pixel, but in general they are
not --- they differ in image shape and size,
magnification, distortion, centration and orientation.
This paper shows how the problem may be approached,
using an extension of the remapping procedures
described in a previous paper, in which images of a
separate grid reference slide are used to detect,
quantify and correct the image errors. Affine
remapping, without the use of grid images, is also
described.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 2, November 1993,
pp. 177--180.
Simplified nerve cell counting in the rat brainstem
with the physical disector using a drawing-microscope
by O. GUNTINAS-LICHIUS,* J. MOCKENHAUPT,* E.’STENNERT
and W. F. NEISS*, *Department of Anatomy and Department
of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, University of Cologne,
Lindenthal, D-50924 Koln, Germany

Summary
A simple modification of the physical disector is
presented, which is used to count the number of neurons
in the hypoglossal nucleus of the rat in a series of
paraffin sections. One disector consists of two
adjacent sections (6micrometre thick) that have been
Nissl-stained with cresyl fast violet. In the first
step of the procedure each of the two sections is
investigated separately with a drawing-microscope. The
boundary of the hypoglossal nucleus and the position of
neurons devoid of, or containing a part of, the cell
nucleus in the plane of the section are marked on
transparent paper. In the second step, these two
drawings are placed one upon another, aligned and the
number of cell profiles that show a cell nucleus in
one but not in both drawings counted. This modification
of the disector method for cell counting needs no
specialized equipment, simply a light microscope with
drawing apparatus, and can be combined with
histochemical studies of other sections from the same
tissue block.




Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 189--194.
A compact Schwarzschild soft X-ray microscope with a
laser-produced plasma source
by Y. HORIKAWA, K. NAGAI, S. MOCHIMARU and Y. IKETAKI,
T. Morokuma Research Laboratory, Olympus Optical Co.,
Ltd, 2--3 Kuboyama-cho, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192, Japan

Summary
A compact Schwarzschild soft X-ray microscope using a
laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source has been
developed. The laser-produced plasma source, which is
small but of high brilliance, has made it possible to
use the soft X-ray microscope in a small laboratory.
The microscope is composed of a Schwarzschild objective
and a grazing incidence mirror condenser. Image
contrast for biological specimens in soft X-ray regions
is investigated briefly. It is possible to observe the
fine structures of a thin specimen at a wavelength of
15nm; at this wavelength high-contrast images of
biological specimens have been obtained with a single
laser shot of pulse width of 8ns at a resolution of
0.3micrometre. The resolution of the system is limited
by the detector.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 195--203.
Liquid substitution: a versatile procedure for SEM
specimen preparation of biological materials without
drying or coating
by H. J. Ensikat and W. Barthlott, Botanisches Institut
der Universitat, Meckenheimer Allee 170, 53115 Bonn,
Germany

Summary
Certain liquids with a very low vapour pressure, such
as glycerol or triethylene glycol, can be used to
infiltrate biological specimens so that they may be
observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM)
without drying. The conductive properties of the fluids
allow specimens to be examined either uncoated or with
very thin coatings. The advantages of liquid
substitution include the retention of lipids, waxes,
loose particles, and surface contaminants. Since the
procedure does not require expensive equipment, it
offers an alternative to critical point drying or
cryo-preparation. For certain types of specimens,
liquid substitution may represent the best preparation
procedure. In addition, the fluids themselves may be
imaged directly in the SEM, or indirectly by
cathodoluminescence following labelling with
fluorochromes.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 205--214.
Conformational characterization of nucleosomes by
principal component analysis of their electron
micrographs
by M. M. Z. ZABAL*, G. J. CZARNOTA*, D. P. BAZETT-JONES
and F. P.
OTTENSMEYER*, *Department of Medical Biophysics, The
University of Toronto and Ontario Cancer Institute, 500
Sherbourne Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4X 1K9

Summary
Optimized fixation conditions were determined for
protein--protein and protein--DNA crosslinking within
calf-thymus nucleosomes in low monovalent salt
concentrations. Nucleosomes were examined without
heavy-atom staining by darkfield electron microscopy.
The dimensions of these macromolecular complexes and
those of HeLa core particles optimally fixed in
divalent salt were analysed using principal component
analysis. According to this analysis the structure of
the calf-thymus nucleosomes was best presented by a
prolate ellipsoid. Particle images had average major
and minor axis lengths of 14.1 and 10.5nm,
respectively. In contrast, the HeLa nucleosomes were
best modelled by an oblate ellipsoid from the analysis
of their images, which had average major and minor axes
of 13.3 and 11.5nm. The applicability of this
multivariate statistical analysis to the interpretation
of macromolecular images is illustrated and discussed.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 215--221.
An investigation of substrate and sample preparation
effects on scanning tunnelling microscopy studies on
xanthan gum
by M. J. WILKINS, M. C. DAVIES, D. E. JACKSON, C. J.
ROBERTS and S. J. B. TENDLER, The Laboratory of
Biophysics and Surface Analysis, Department of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Nottingham,
University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, U.K.

Summary
Scanning tunnelling microscopy is developing as an
important biophysical tool for the molecular imaging of
biological material. In this study, the effect of
sample deposition technique and substrate employed on
the resultant images of a microbial polysaccharide is
investigated. Scanning tunnelling microscopy topographs
of xanthan gum, pipette deposited and spray deposited
onto highly orientated pyrolytic graphite and mica
substrates are presented. The use of pipette deposition
of the aqueous sample solution is shown to result in a
xanthan network. In contrast, images of isolated
xanthan molecules are obtained when spray deposition
with glycerol is employed. The effect of these
deposition techniques on the macroscopic distribution
of sample material across substrates is shown using
confocal fluorescence microscopy.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 223--232.
Fractal characterization by frequency analysis. I.
Surfaces
by E. ANGUIANO, M. PANCORBO and M. AGUILAR, Instituto
de Ciencia de Materiales, Sede B (CSIC), Universidad
Auto¨noma de Madrid (C-III), 28049-Madrid, Spain

Summary
A study of the quality and accuracy of the methods
based on frequency analysis for the fractal
characterization of surfaces as measured by scanning
tunnelling microscopy (or profilometry) is made. The
study is based on computer simulation of images of
fractal surfaces. A discussion of the mathematical
algorithms used for computer generation of fractal
surfaces then follows. The main conclusion is that
studies of fractal characterization by frequency
analysis reported in previous papers in the STM field,
as well as conclusions about the performance of the
various methods, are doubtful. New methods for
frequency analysis that in some cases produce more
reliable results are proposed.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 233--238.
Fractal characterization by frequency analysis. II. A
new method
by M. AGUILAR, E. ANGUIANO and M. PANCORBO, Instituto
de Ciencia de Materiales, Sede B (CSIC), Universidad
AutÆnoma de Madrid (C-III), 28049-Madrid, Spain

Summary
A new frequency analysis method, fractal analysis by
circular average (FACA), and an image replication
procedure are proposed that together produce accurate
measurements of the fractal dimension of surfaces and
profiles, eliminating Fourier transform artefacts which
arise from the lack of periodic continuity in real
surfaces and profiles.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 239--248.
Effects of noise and anisotropy on the determination of
fractal dimensions
by J. C. RUSS, Materials Science and Engineering
Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh,
NC 27695-7907, U.S.A.

Summary
Measurement of the fractal dimension of surfaces imaged
by the scanning tunnelling microscope, atomic force
microscope or similar instruments can be performed
using several different algorithms. Dimensional
analysis---plots of log (perimeter) vs. log
(area)---are compared to Korcak and slit-island
methods, which also employ a horizontal plane section,
and to Fourier analysis of the two-dimensional array of
elevation values. The effects of surface anisotropy and
instrument noise on each of these measurement
techniques is investigated.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 249--256.
Evaluation of the precision of systematic sampling:
nugget effect and covariogram modelling
by J. THIOULOUSE,* J. P. ROYET, H. PLOYE* and F.
HOULLIER~~, *Laboratoire de Biometrie, Genetique et
Biologie des Populations, (U.R.A.CNRS 243), Universite
Claude Bernard-Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex,
France. Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurosensorielle,
(U.R.A. CNRS 180), Universite Claude Bernard-Lyon 1,
F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France. ~~Ecole Nationale
du Genie Rural, des Eaux et Forets, Laboratoire de
Recherches en Sciences forestieres, 14, rue Girardet,
F-54042 Nancy Cedex, France

Summary
Systematic sampling designs are widely used in
stereology. When an estimator of the total amount, Q,
of the sampled variable is evaluated by such a
procedure, the coefficient of error can be predicted by
applying Matheron's theory of regionalized variables.
To evaluate the accuracy of the estimate of Q, it is
necessary to study the behaviour of the regionalized
variable and to model its covariogram. Histological
data with a low short-range variability and agronomic
data with a pronounced nugget effect provided the
biological material for extreme case studies. Results
show that the short-range variability, if present,
cannot be detected when only small samples are
available. An underestimation of the coefficient of
error is then to be expected. We propose several models
of the covariogram, which can be used to test for the
presence of a nugget effect. If a nugget effect is
present, these models will provide better estimates of
the coefficient of error. If there is no nugget effect
a simplified method can be used and will provide
reliable estimates of the coefficient of error.



Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 257--261.
Directional analysis of planar fibre networks:
application to cardboard microstructure
by I. MOLCHANOV,* D. STOYAN* and K.’FYODOROV,
*Bergakademie Freiberg, FB Mathematik,
Bernhard-v.-Cotta-Str. 2, D-09596 Freiberg, Germany.
Kiev Technological Institute of the Food Industry,
Vladimirskaya, 68, 252017 Kiev, Ukraine

Summary
This paper discusses the problem of determining
suitable roses of intersections for systems of planar
thick fibres which cross and overlap. A planar Boolean
model with long rectangular (or similar) grains is
suggested as an appropriate mathematical model. It
leads to a statistical estimator for the rose of
intersections of the system of fibre spines. The method
is used to analyse the microstructure of the outer
layer of two samples of cardboard.


Journal of Microscopy, Vol. 172, Pt. 3, December 1993,
pp. 263--266.
Edge detection in petrographic images
by J. STARKEY and A. K. SAMANTARAY, Department of Earth
Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London,
Ontario, Canada N6A 3B7

Summary
The automatic detection of mineral grain boundaries in
images obtained from a polarized-light microscope
requires special techniques. Observations in both
plane- and cross-polarized light may be necessry and
the section must be rotated relative to the plane of
polarization of the microscope to see all the grain
boundaries. In computer-based microscopy this can be
accomplished by the sequential accumulation of
individual images captured from one microscope field of
view with different polarizer orientations. ƒFor
real-time implementation the sequential images are
segmented individually by applying Canny's algorithm. A
separable Gaussian mask is used for smoothing and a 3 x
3 convolution mask is used to generate 1-pixel-wide
boundaries, which are located at the zero-crossing of
the second-order derivative of the intensity gradient.
The boundaries are extracted and accumulated in a
composite image. The resulting composite image is a
synoptic grain-boundary image of the rock.




From: {ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}:ddn:wpafb
Date: 11-27-93 12:55pm
Subject: TEM:Celli Tape

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {9312010147.AA22920-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb
Subj: TEM:Celli Tape
Orig-Author: {"Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964" {ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov} }:ddn:wpafb
-----------------------------------------------------------
Re: TEM specimen preparation of Graphite:

Here's a question for those of you that used to use the
old Celli tape popular in England about 10+ years ago.

In the past I had some of this tape which I used to use
to prepare specimens of graphite for TEM. Here I would
use the old trick of just continually touching the surface
of the graphite with fresh tape to delaminate the graphite
gradually until I made a nice thin & optically transparent
section, which stuck to the tape and was usually perfect for
TEM. The nice thing about this old type of scotch tape was that
the adhesive used would disolve beautifully in Acetone and the
backing for that tape would just float away as it was not
soluablein the acetone. Unfortuantely, the current type
of "SCOTCH BRAND" transparent tape completely dissolves
in Acetone and most other solvents I tried.

I'm back to trying to make more graphite samples as
my old ones have finally bit the dust so to speak.
Since the new scotch tape failed, I tried extraction
replica tape which is available from most EM supply
vendors, however it does not have the adhearance
of either the old Celli tape or the newer scotch tapes.
(BTW the new scotch tape very nicely delaminated the graphite
and gives beautifully thin sections if I could ever
remove them from the adhesive). Does anyone know of a
solvent which works on the newer scotch brand tapes
or have another/similar idea/procedure for layered
structures which are not strongly bound?.

I'd prefer to avoid ion milling the graphite although
I may have to resort to this in the end.

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1993 20:29:42 -0600 (CST)
Subject: MICRO 94 2ND CIRCULAR

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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MICRO 94

International Microscopy and Image Analysis
Conference and Exhibition

12 - 15 September 1994
Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London

Organized by the Royal Microscopical Society
in association with Microscopy and Analysis

Second Circular

Dates

Conference: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 4.15 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Thursday 15 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm

Exhibition: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 7.00 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 15 September - 9.30 am - 4.30 pm

On the Monday evening there will be a wine reception at 5.30pm, followed by
the AGM and Presidental Lecture at 7.00pm.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ


CONFERENCE

Scientific Programme
The Conference will be run in seven half-day sessions. The Electron
Microscopy and Analysis Group of the Institute of Physics (EMAG) and The
Physiological Society are each sponsoring separate lectures within the
Conference.

The Programme will consist of tutorial lectures and posters and will feature
the following topics:-

Monday 12 September (pm) - Materials I
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
EM in the assessment of semiconductor epitaxial growth
Reactions to the surface of implanted bioceramics
X-Ray microanalysis in biomaterials
Optically active nanostructured materials
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Tuesday 13 September (am) - Materials II (including EMAG)
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Auger electron spectroscopy
Imaging time of flight SIMS
Formation of strained layer superlattices by phase separation
Electron microscopy of weakly ordered III-V semiconductor materials
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Tuesday 13 September (pm) Scanning Probe Microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Applications of atomic force microscopy to thin film research and technology
Scanning probe microscopy: near field imaging of surfaces using electrons,
forces and photons
SPM of living biological systems
Environmental SEM
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Wednesday 14 September (am) - Image Processing and Analysis
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Sampling in 3D for quantitative microscopy
Digital image processing techniques
Image analysis of multicoloured biological specimens
In vivo microscopy by video imaging
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Wednesday 14 September (pm) - 3D Microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Supercomputing in confocal microscopy
3D atomic-scale microanalysis of materials
Spatial distribution of fibres in composite materials
Confocal polarised-light microscopy
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Thursday 15 September (am) - Flow Cytometry and Proliferation Markers
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Cell cycle control
Proliferation-related proteins
Proliferation in human tumours
Apoptosis
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Thursday 15 September (pm) - Living Cell Cytochemistry (including The
Physiological Society)
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
Living cell cytochemistry: Ratio Imaging
Living cell cytochemistry: Confocal scanning laser microscopy

Thursday 15 September (pm) - Proteases in (patho) physiological processes

Use of selective protease inhibitors in the study of collagen breakdown
Role of proteases in invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, arthritis and
rheumatism and infections
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Experts in the fields listed above have been invited to give lectures. Each
speaker will provide a review of the particular topic in question and ample time
for discussion will be provided.

In addition to the above, a special session will be held on the afternoon of
Monday 12 September on how to use the light microscope.

Technical Lectures will be organized by Exhibitors to act as a bridge between
the specialized review lectures and the equipment being exhibited.
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

INVITED SPEAKERS

It is hoped that the following people will be presenting papers at the MICRO 94
Conference:-

Dr Paul D. Brown (University of Cambridge)
Professor Peter Marquis (University of Birmingham)
Dr Henk Koerten (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Peter Dobson (University of Oxford)
Dr R. K. Wild (University of Bristol)
Dr Paul Denison (University of Sheffield)
Dr Andrew Norman (Imperial College, London)
Dr Caroline Baxter (University of Cambridge)
Dr Alan Pidduck (RSRE, Malvern)
Dr M. Miles (HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol)
Dr H Ho”rber(European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany)
Mr Chris Gilpin (Manchester Biological EM Centre)
Dr Vyvyan Howard (Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital)
Dr Dominique Jeulin (Ecole Nationale Superiere des Mines, Fontainebleau,
France)
Dr Hans Tanke (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Andreas Kriete (Der Justus Liebig Universitat, Germany)
Dr Alfred Cerezo (University of Oxford)
Dr A. R. Clarke (University of Leeds)
Dr Alan Entwistle (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, London)
Dr A Bagg (TNO Rijswijk, The Netherlands)
Dr Michael Ormerod (Sutton, Surrey)
Dr Peter van Mier (Washington University School of Medicine, USA)
Professor P. A. McNaughton (King's College London)
Dr R. Jacob (King's College London)
Dr Vincent Everts (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Dr Ron Van Noorden (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

CONTRIBUTED PAPERS
In addition to invited papers, contributions are invited on all aspects of
microscopy and related techniques.

All contributed papers will appear in the poster sessions of the Conference.
Time will be allowed in the Programme for the viewing of posters, and posters
will be on display for the maximum time possible. At certain times authors will
be in attendance by their posters to discuss their work.

Camera-ready sheets and instructions for the submission of short abstracts
can be obtained from the Royal Microscopical Society office. The deadline for
submission is 4 May 1994. These abstracts will appear in the Conference
Programme, which will be published in a special MICRO 94 issue of the
Proceedings of the Royal Microscopical Society.

Authors will be notified regarding acceptance of their papers by the end of June
1994.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

EXHIBITION
An Exhibition of the latest microscopes and ancillary instrumentation and
equipment will be held at the Earls Court Park Inn, adjacent to the Lecture
Theatre. Admission to the Exhibition is free, by conference badge, or by
exhibition only badge which will be obtainable at the registration desk.

By 1 November 1993, the following firms had reserved exhibition space:-

Agar Scientific Ltd
Alrad Instruments Ltd
Bemax (UK) Ltd
Bio-Rad Laboratories Ltd
British BioCell International
Burleigh Instruments (UK) Ltd
Cambridge Scanning Co Ltd
Confocal Technologies Ltd
Cryophysics Ltd
Data Cell Ltd
Drukker International
Edwards High Vacuum International
Emitech Ltd
Finlay Microvision Co Ltd
Fisons Instruments
Foster Findlay Associates Ltd
Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd
Hitachi Scientific Instruments
ISS
Imaging Associates Ltd
J K Instruments Ltd
JEOL UK Ltd
K E Developments Ltd
Lasertec Corporation
Leica Cambridge Limited
Leica UK Limited
Microfield Scientific Ltd
Microscopy and Analysis
Newport Ltd
Nikon UK Limited
Olympus Optical Co (UK) Ltd
Oxford Instruments Microanalysis Group
Oxford Instruments
Philips Electron Optics
Photonic Science
Polaroid (UK) Ltd
Princeton Gamma-Tech (UK) Ltd
Pyser (Holdings) plc
Synoptics Ltd
Taab Laboratories Equipment Ltd
Tracor Europa
Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen) Ltd
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

RECEPTION AND ASSOCIATED EVENTS
On Monday 12 September there will be a wine reception in the Exhibition
between 5.30 pm and 7.00 pm. The Annual General Meeting of the Royal
Microscopical Society, and the Presidential Address will also take place
during the evening.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ
ACCOMMODATION
Academic Accommodation
A limited amount of academic accommodation has been booked for the use of
delegates at Imperial College. Rooms have been booked there on a bed and
breakfast basis at a cost of œ2.00 pounds6 per night. This academic/student
accommodation will be filled on a 'first-come first-served' basis. From the
nearby Underground Station at South Kensington, Earls Court is two stops
along the District or Piccadilly Line.

Hotel Accommodation
There are some rooms available in the Earls Court Park Inn at the special
MICRO 94 rate of œ65.00pounds per night. If you would like to reserve
accommodation at these special rates, please contact the Earls Court Park Inn
directly, quoting that you are a MICRO 94 visitor. To be sure of booking rooms
at these rates, it is advisable that you book well in advance.
Telephone: 071 385 1255
Telex: 917728
Fax: 071 381 4450.

Other Hotel Accommodation
Delegates who wish to make their own accommodation arrangements may
wish to use the services of Expotel Executive Travel - Europe's leading hotel
booking agent, who have been appointed the official hotel agency for MICRO
94. The hotel of your choice or a similar alternative can be booked through
Expotel often at discounted rates. By making one telephone call to Expotel on
071 735 0060 stating the event code 'MICRO 94', your reservation will be
confirmed verbally followed by confirmation in writing. This free booking
service is available to anyone attending MICRO 94.
Telephone: 071 735 0060
Telex: 8811951 EXPOTL G
Fax: 071 735 2839.

þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Registration
Registration will take place at the Earls Court Park Inn from 1.00 pm on
Monday 12 September 1994, and from 9.00 am on subsequent mornings.

Payment
Payment may be made by sterling cheque payable to the Royal Microscopical
Society (please add œ12.00pounds to cover exchange and bank charges if
the cheque is not a UK Bank Cheque) or by credit card (Visa/Barclaycard or
Access/Eurocard/Mastercard).

Cancellation and Refunds
Cancellations received before 12 July 1994 will be subject to a full refund. No
refunds will be made if cancellation is made after this date.
þÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

HOW TO GET THERE

The Conference, Exhibition, Posters, and Refreshments will all take place at
the Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London SW6.

***************************************************************************


MICRO 94 is organized by the Royal Microscopical Society, 37/38 St Clements,
Oxford OX4 1AJ, UK, in association with Microscopy and Analysis.
Telephone: 0865 248768, Fax: 0865 791237, Email: RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX.




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1993 21:51:44 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Celli (Sellotape) & cleavage

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



Problem solved thanks to many suggestions.

Summary of the procedure for cleaving graphite
into TEM specimens using 3M brand Scotch (Magic) tape.

Begin using with the Scotch Brand Magic Tape using it to
cleave the graphite flakes several times to get a "clean"
i.e. fresh surfaces. Then begin with a fresh piece of tape.
Continue to delaminate until you see a number (~10+) of optically
transparent "flakes" stuck onto the tape (many more will not
be optically transparent) . During the delamination
/peeling process try not to press the tape pieces together with
alot of force this only serves to make complications later. Use
only sufficient force to cause the graphite flakes to stick & peel off.
Now trim off excess tape where there is no potential graphite
specimens attached. Immerse the remaining tape in Toluene at room temp ,
this starts to seperate/loosen the backing from the glue, after
about 5 minutes slowly add Methanol until you get to a ~50/50 mixture
Let this sit a few more minutes then gently loosen the glue mass
(looks like a wrinkled gelatinous mass and acts like it too) from the backing .
To remove the plastic backing, you may need to use a pair of tweezers
to entice the seperation where the glue has been forced down
into good contact with the plastic backing at the sites of the
graphite flakes. Toss the plastic backing in the trash.

Now begin to add acetone which dissolves the glue.
As the acetone is added use a pair of
tweezers to agitate the glue/graphite mass. This allows the
solvent to get inbetween the graphite flakes and glue mass. Remove
as much of the glue mass as possible before it completely
dissolves in the solvent mixture. This is a real sticky "goo"
at this point and it will only serve to contaminate your
solution further. Be realistic here you will
not get all of the graphite off of the tape. I estimate that
there were about 2 dozen specimens on the tape, as the graphite
released from the glue it fractured into maybe a hundred smaller
flakes which were just floating in the solvent. At some point
it nolonger is worth while trying to release the remaining graphite flakes
from the glue mass, too much agitation only causes folds which
trap the flakes and makes it nearly impossible to release all
the graphite. Waiting to long only causes the glue mass to
dissolve into your solvent and possibly contaminate your specimens.


Decant off excess solvent and add fresh acetone to continue dissolution
of any remaining glue on the flakes. Now just pickup the flakes on
grids by floating them over grids and lifting out of the solvent.
(i.e. play chase the flake with the grid. As I recall the life science
microscopists have a special tool for this but I just went fishing with a pair
of tweezers and a grid under a low power steroe microscope).
If they (the graphite flakes) are optically
transparent (very light gray to clear) you've
got a reasonably good specimen to work with at 100 kV.

Via TEM I see the usual basal plane dislocations, and little
surface contamination there is some but it is obvious and can
be easily avoided. The flakes show the usual bending that
I would expect from the peeling procedure, but are reasonably
uniform in thickness over wide areas (~sq microns). No thickness
measurements yet, I'll report those when the data comes out
of the experiments.

Thanks to all who made suggestions:

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center




From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 1 Dec 1993 09:01:01 U
Subject: FWD>RE>MICRO 94 2ND CIRCULA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Michael_Atzmon-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
John_Bilello-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"Dean Carter" {Dean_Carter-at-um.cc.umich.edu} ,
I-Wei_Chen-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"William Clark" {clark-at-kcgl1.eng.ohio-state.edu} ,
"Doug Crawford" {Doug_Crawford-at-qmgate.anl.gov} ,
"Derek Demaree" {jdemaree-at-watertown-emh1.army.mil} ,
"Eric Essene" {Eric_Essene-at-um.cc.umich.edu} ,
Frank_Filisko-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Amit_Ghosh-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Ron__Gibala-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"Erdogan Gulari" {Erdogan_Gulari-at-um.cc.umich.edu} ,
John_Halloran-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"Carl Henderson" {Carl_Henderson-at-um.cc.umich.edu} ,
John_Holmes-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Bill_Hosford-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Hristo_Hristov-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Ed_Hucke-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"NIH Image Mailing List" {nih-image-at-nx1.soils.umn.edu} ,
Wayne_Jones-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
1170_RG_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
1176_S_Y_lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
1180_Creep_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2013/17_JCB_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2049_AFY_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2074_D_S_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2105a_Mechanical_Testing_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2125_DCM_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2172/MMS_Office_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2219_JWH_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
2510__R_L_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
MIBL120NAME_Lab-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Rick_Laine-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
"Microscopy Mailing List" {microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov} ,
Bill_Martin-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Dave_Martin-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Bob_Pehlke-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Dick_Robertson-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Johannes_Schwank-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Dave_Srolovitz-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Mitsuharu_Takita-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Levi_Thompson-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
T-Y_Tien-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Larry_Van_Vlack-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Harue_Wada-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Gary_Was-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Steve_Yalisove-at-mse.engin.umich.edu,
Albert_Yee-at-mse.engin.umich.edu




From: rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: 12/1/93 5:04
Subject: FWD>RE>MICRO 94 2ND CIRCULA

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Below is the second circular for next year's Micro conference. Please forward
to interested parties or post on your bulletin boards (wood or electronic!).
Thanks.
John Mansfield
(This is a little cleaned version c.f.the first copy and is therefore a little
more readable for North American readers. There were too many special
characters in the first version - pound signs and the like)

--------------------------------------
MICRO 94

International Microscopy and Image Analysis
Conference and Exhibition

12 - 15 September 1994
Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London

Organized by the Royal Microscopical Society
in association with Microscopy and Analysis

Second Circular

Dates

Conference: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 4.15 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm
Thursday 15 September - 10.00 am - 4.15 pm

Exhibition: Monday 12 September - 2.00 pm - 7.00 pm
Tuesday 13 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 14 September - 9.30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 15 September - 9.30 am - 4.30 pm#012#

On the Monday evening there will be a wine reception at 5.30pm, followed by
the AGM and Presidental Lecture at 7.00pm.


CONFERENCE

Scientific Programme
The Conference will be run in seven half-day sessions. The Electron
Microscopy and Analysis Group of the Institute of Physics (EMAG) and The
Physiological Society are each sponsoring separate lectures within the
Conference.

The Programme will consist of tutorial lectures and posters and will feature
the following topics:-

Monday 12 September (pm) - Materials I
EM in the assessment of semiconductor epitaxial growth
Reactions to the surface of implanted bioceramics
X-Ray microanalysis in biomaterials
Optically active nanostructured materials

Tuesday 13 September (am) - Materials II (including EMAG)
Auger electron spectroscopy
Imaging time of flight SIMS
Formation of strained layer superlattices by phase separation
Electron microscopy of weakly ordered III-V semiconductor materials

Tuesday 13 September (pm) Scanning Probe Microscopy
Applications of atomic force microscopy to thin film research and technology
Scanning probe microscopy: near field imaging of surfaces using electrons,
forces and photons
SPM of living biological systems
Environmental SEM

Wednesday 14 September (am) - Image Processing and Analysis
Sampling in 3D for quantitative microscopy
Digital image processing techniques
Image analysis of multicoloured biological specimens
In vivo microscopy by video imaging

Wednesday 14 September (pm) - 3D Microscopy
Supercomputing in confocal microscopy
3D atomic-scale microanalysis of materials
Spatial distribution of fibres in composite materials
Confocal polarised-light microscopy

Thursday 15 September (am) - Flow Cytometry and Proliferation Markers
Cell cycle control
Proliferation-related proteins
Proliferation in human tumours
Apoptosis

Thursday 15 September (pm) - Living Cell Cytochemistry (including The
Physiological Society)
Living cell cytochemistry: Ratio Imaging
Living cell cytochemistry: Confocal scanning laser microscopy

Thursday 15 September (pm) - Proteases in (patho) physiological processes
Use of selective protease inhibitors in the study of collagen breakdown
Role of proteases in invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, arthritis and
rheumatism and infections


Experts in the fields listed above have been invited to give lectures. Each
speaker will provide a review of the particular topic in question and ample
time for discussion will be provided.

In addition to the above, a special session will be held on the afternoon of
Monday 12 September on how to use the light microscope.

Technical Lectures will be organized by Exhibitors to act as a bridge between
the specialized review lectures and the equipment being exhibited.

INVITED SPEAKERS

It is hoped that the following people will be presenting papers at the MICRO 94
Conference:-

Dr Paul D. Brown (University of Cambridge)
Professor Peter Marquis (University of Birmingham)
Dr Henk Koerten (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Peter Dobson (University of Oxford)
Dr R. K. Wild (University of Bristol)
Dr Paul Denison (University of Sheffield)
Dr Andrew Norman (Imperial College, London)
Dr Caroline Baxter (University of Cambridge)
Dr Alan Pidduck (RSRE, Malvern)
Dr M. Miles (HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol)
Dr H Hoirber(European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany)
Mr Chris Gilpin (Manchester Biological EM Centre)
Dr Vyvyan Howard (Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital)
Dr Dominique Jeulin (Ecole Nationale Superiere des Mines, Fontainebleau,
France)
Dr Hans Tanke (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)
Dr Andreas Kriete (Der Justus Liebig Universitat, Germany)
Dr Alfred Cerezo (University of Oxford)
Dr A. R. Clarke (University of Leeds)
Dr Alan Entwistle (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, London)
Dr A Bagg (TNO Rijswijk, The Netherlands)
Dr Michael Ormerod (Sutton, Surrey)
Dr Peter van Mier (Washington University School of Medicine, USA)
Professor P. A. McNaughton (King's College London)
Dr R. Jacob (King's College London)
Dr Vincent Everts (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Dr Ron Van Noorden (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)


CONTRIBUTED PAPERS
In addition to invited papers, contributions are invited on all aspects of
microscopy and related techniques.

All contributed papers will appear in the poster sessions of the Conference.
Time will be allowed in the Programme for the viewing of posters, and posters
will be on display for the maximum time possible. At certain times authors
will be in attendance by their posters to discuss their work.

Camera-ready sheets and instructions for the submission of short abstracts
can be obtained from the Royal Microscopical Society office. The deadline for
submission is 4 May 1994. These abstracts will appear in the Conference
Programme, which will be published in a special MICRO 94 issue of the
Proceedings of the Royal Microscopical Society.

Authors will be notified regarding acceptance of their papers by the end of
June 1994.


EXHIBITION
An Exhibition of the latest microscopes and ancillary instrumentation and
equipment will be held at the Earls Court Park Inn, adjacent to the Lecture
Theatre. Admission to the Exhibition is free, by conference badge, or by
exhibition only badge which will be obtainable at the registration desk.

By 1 November 1993, the following firms had reserved exhibition space:-

Agar Scientific Ltd
Alrad Instruments Ltd
Bemax (UK) Ltd
Bio-Rad Laboratories Ltd
British BioCell International
Burleigh Instruments (UK) Ltd
Cambridge Scanning Co Ltd
Confocal Technologies Ltd
Cryophysics Ltd
Data Cell Ltd
Drukker International
Edwards High Vacuum International
Emitech Ltd
Finlay Microvision Co Ltd
Fisons Instruments
Foster Findlay Associates Ltd
Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd
Hitachi Scientific Instruments
ISS
Imaging Associates Ltd
J K Instruments Ltd
JEOL UK Ltd
K E Developments Ltd
Lasertec Corporation
Leica Cambridge Limited
Leica UK Limited
Microfield Scientific Ltd
Microscopy and Analysis
Newport Ltd
Nikon UK Limited
Olympus Optical Co (UK) Ltd
Oxford Instruments Microanalysis Group
Oxford Instruments
Philips Electron Optics
Photonic Science
Polaroid (UK) Ltd
Princeton Gamma-Tech (UK) Ltd
Pyser (Holdings) plc
Synoptics Ltd
Taab Laboratories Equipment Ltd
Tracor Europa
Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen) Ltd

RECEPTION AND ASSOCIATED EVENTS
On Monday 12 September there will be a wine reception in the Exhibition
between 5.30 pm and 7.00 pm. The Annual General Meeting of the Royal
Microscopical Society, and the Presidential Address will also take place
during the evening.

ACCOMMODATION
Academic Accommodation
A limited amount of academic accommodation has been booked for the use of
delegates at Imperial College. Rooms have been booked there on a bed and
breakfast basis at a cost of 26 pounds sterling per night. This academic
/student accommodation will be filled on a 'first-come first-served' basis.
From the nearby Underground Station at South Kensington, Earls Court is
two stops along the District or Piccadilly Line.

Hotel Accommodation
There are some rooms available in the Earls Court Park Inn at the special
MICRO 94 rate of 65.00 pounds per night. If you would like to reserve
accommodation at these special rates, please contact the Earls Court Park Inn
directly, quoting that you are a MICRO 94 visitor. To be sure of booking rooms
at these rates, it is advisable that you book well in advance.
Telephone: 071 385 1255
Telex: 917728
Fax: 071 381 4450.

Other Hotel Accommodation
Delegates who wish to make their own accommodation arrangements may
wish to use the services of Expotel Executive Travel - Europe's leading hotel
booking agent, who have been appointed the official hotel agency for MICRO
94. The hotel of your choice or a similar alternative can be booked through
Expotel often at discounted rates. By making one telephone call to Expotel on
071 735 0060 stating the event code 'MICRO 94', your reservation will be
confirmed verbally followed by confirmation in writing. This free booking
service is available to anyone attending MICRO 94.
Telephone: 071 735 0060
Telex: 8811951 EXPOTL G
Fax: 071 735 2839.


REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Registration
Registration will take place at the Earls Court Park Inn from 1.00 pm on
Monday 12 September 1994, and from 9.00 am on subsequent mornings.
Cost of registration for the whole conference is 60 pounds for RMS members
and 90 pounds for non-members. Daily rates are 20 pounds for RMS members
and 30 pounds for non-members.

Payment
Payment may be made by sterling cheque payable to the Royal Microscopical
Society (please add 12.00 pounds to cover exchange and bank charges if
the cheque is not a UK Bank Cheque) or by credit card (Visa/Barclaycard or
Access/Eurocard/Mastercard).

Cancellation and Refunds
Cancellations received before 12 July 1994 will be subject to a full refund.
No refunds will be made if cancellation is made after this date.

HOW TO GET THERE

The Conference, Exhibition, Posters, and Refreshments will all take place at
the Earls Court Park Inn, Lillie Road, London SW6.

***************************************************************************


MICRO 94 is organized by the Royal Microscopical Society, 37/38 St Clements,
Oxford OX4 1AJ, UK, in association with Microscopy and Analysis.
Telephone: 0865 248768, Fax: 0865 791237, Email: RMS-at-UK.AC.OX.VAX.









From: hjkahn-at-students.wisc.edu (Helen J. Kahn)
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 08:34:38 +0900
Subject: LABORATORY EQUIPMENT SALE

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199312011435.IAA18372-at-audumla.students.wisc.edu}

To all subscribers:
PLEASE CONTACT CAROL GANNON (608) 831-2383 (Middleton, WI) IF YOU
ARE INTERESTED IN PURCHASING ANY OF THE FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT:

FOR SALE

Lab equipment - All in excellent condition
Purchased four years ago

PURCHASE ASKING
PRICE PRICE
CARBON COATER - EMSCOPE
TE-1000 Turbo Evaporator and sputter
coater - suitable for T.E.M. and S.E.M.
sample preparation with Rotary Pump $ 12,150.00 4500.00

LOW TEMPARATURE ASHER/ETCHER -
EMSCOPE PL 850x with Rotary Pump 9700.00 3600.00

DIFFRACTION MEASURING DEVICE
for manually measuring diffraction patterns 700.00 250.00

PRECISION SLIDE WARMER
temperature range ambient +5 to 70 C
dimensions: L 25.5" W 8" H 5.5" 440.00 225.00

HYPERION MICRO PLATE READER -
single channel photometer capable of
interchangeable interference filters
(450nm filter provided) 920.00 250.00

ROTOMIXER 320.00 150.00





From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 08:10:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: RE: NEW LAB

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

I've been involved in design of an EM lab, a histology lab and most
recently given freehand to design a facility with "ultimate, within the
budget" two general histology labs, a microtome room and two
microscope/image analysis rooms to be built soon.

Think carefully about work flow and separation of incompatible activities.
Traffic patterns can be aggravating if their is a choke point. e.g. our
peninsula bench has ahighly used sink on the end and only 3.5 ft to the
wall. There is a blackboard and garbage cans along that wall, with lots
of traffic through this narrow slot.
Don't allow the free edge of open doors to aim toward knees or
heads on single doored cupboards.
Big, deep double sinks. Double sinks, or many sinks, ensures that
processes requiring long washes don't tie up the sink, and minimize
splatter. Our PI put in a lot of pocket sinks in our existing lab. they
are great if the benches are not cluttered. Otherwise they will fill
with pencils, towels and BEEM capsules as well as splatter adjacent
equipment. We have 4-12 people woking in 400 sq. ft. We are vey
cluttered and the pocket sinks are useless.

Dont put fume hoods in corners. That makes the wall-end foot or so
harder to use, especially if you end up storing anything on the floor in
that corner. Stuff on the floor also absturcts the cupboard doors below
the hood.

It took some doing, but I got approval for an awning hood over one
bench in our new histology lab. It is 10 ft. long, wasn't enough room to
go longer. All embedding, deparaffinizing, staining and coverslipping
will take place under it. An open shelf below will hold vacuum ovens for
paraffin and the plastics oven so they can vent upward from the back.
Osmium
and fix preparation will remain in the standard hood (a 6 ft. hood).
Drafts from ventilation have been a major pain for us and have required
makeshift deflectors on vents, or finding combinations of closed doors and
hood sashes to slow down drafts.

Consider separate 110V circuits for computers and everything else,
especially if you have any surge producers like pump motors or uv lamps.

Look out for dust collectors.. They are pricey, but put glass doored
cupboard over dust sensitive situations like microtomes and grid staining
area. These will not present so many dusty surfaces as will open shelving.

Gotta go, but one last issue, physically touch, test, open and close the
furniture before allowing it to go in. some looks great but is worse
than useless.

Prior comments about wiring and fields are very true. We are seeking a
new home for our SEM because of fields. (Keep an eye on
remodelling - I remember a Philips 300 whose beam would deflect everytime
the new photocopier next door made a copy)





From: :      szrick-at-bullwinkle.ucdavis.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 08:30:19 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: NEW LAB

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html



On Tue, 30 Nov 1993, Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab University of Florida wrote:

} I am now in the process of designing a new EM suite dedicated to biological
} EM. I would like input from those of you who work in what they feel is an
} ideal or close to ideal physical arrangement.
} I would also like to hear from those who have envisioned an ideal
} EM suite but have never seen it built. The restrictions are that a space of
} 2200 sq ft should house 2 TEMs and 2 SEMs as well as a prep lab, darkrooms
} ancillary equipment and 2 offices. The overall design is of more interest
} than actual use of the stated space.

Greg, we are well into the final design of our EM facility for the new
Cell and Mol. Bio building in the Div. of Bio Sci. I based our design on
the existing EM suite which I remodeled about 10 yrs ago. I also used the
book by R. H. Alderson, "Design of the Electron Microscope Laboratory",
part of Audrey Glauert's series in Practical Methods in Electron
Microscopy published by North-Holland/American Elsevier ISBN 0 444 10816
5. I can send you plans although I doubt if the architects would like
that. Further, my design was limited to the space available in the new
building and the shape of the room modules. Each module is about 10 ft by
30 ft. I used 3 modules for the main lab and office but there is extra
space available across the hall where I housed the freeze fracture device,
the microtomes, student TEM, and dept. darkrooms (also under my
supervision). You can reach me at 916 752 2914, Univ. of Cal. at Davis,
Dept. of Evolution and Ecology.
Rick A. Harris






From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 16:45:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Equipment for sale

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html


Equipment

Hitachi H-600 STEM: 13 years old, under service contract with Hitachi
until this year, in most excellant condition, scope has all service
reports and manuals.

Original cost: $175,000
Asking price: Make offer I can't refuse
Contact:
Phil Rutledge, Director, Center for Electron Microscopy
University of Maryland Baltimore County
Dept. of Biology
Catonsville, MD 21228 USA
Phone: (410) 455-3582
FAX: (410) 455-3875
Email: prutle1-at-umbc.edu





From: e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu (Erik Reuter)
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 20:44:57 -0500
Subject: Infrared (1.6 um) 2D array detectors

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199312020244.AA09675-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu}
X-Sender: reuter-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I am looking for a supplier of a 2D array detector (for luminescence
microscopy measurements) which will operate out to 1.6 microns. Essentially
the same thing as a Si CCD except made from a smaller gap material
(InGaAs?, Ge?). I would like recommendations of a manufacturer/supplier.

Erik Reuter, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, 217-244-6378 phone, 217-244-6375 fax






From: e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu (Erik Reuter)
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1993 21:12:55 -0500
Subject: Light micrscopy reference list

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html

Message-Id: {199312020312.AA12908-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu}
X-Sender: reuter-at-ux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Here is a list of references I received from my inquiry on light
microscopy. Thanks to everyone who contributed!

***

The best set of notes on LM theory I know of are the course notes for the AQLM
course run at Woods Hole each year, they are long and complex but in my
experience a great resource

Kodak publications:
"Photography Through The Microscope", P-2, cat.# 152-8371
"Kodak Scientific Imaging Products", L-10, cat. # 813-9321
The first has loads of basic information about objectives, condensers,
setting-up illumination, flourescence, phase contrast, etc. Both have
bibliographies.

Title : Optical Microscopy : Emerging Methods and Applications
Author : Herman, Brian/Lemasters, John J. (Editors)
ISBN : 0123420601
Subject : Non-Fiction
Dewey # : 578.00
Publisher: Academic Pr
Date Pub : 12/92
Binding : Hardcover+
Price : $ 79.95

Loveland, Roger Platt.
Photomicrography; a comprehensive treatise [by] Roger P. Loveland. New York,
Wiley [1970] 2 v. (x, 1039, I-xii p.) illus. 23 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH251 .L68
SUBJECTS:
Photomicrography.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Wiley series on photographic science and technology and the graphic arts
DEWEY DEC: 778.3/11
NOTES:
Includes bibliographies.
ISBN: 0471548308
LCCN: 70-88315 r892

Shillaber, Charles Patten, 1886-
Photomicrography in theory and practice, New York, J. Wiley & sons, inc.;
London, Chapman & Hall, limited [1944] viii, 773 p. incl. illus., tables,
diagrs. 22 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH251 .S5
SUBJECTS:
Photomicrography.
LCCN: 44-6507

Light microscopy in biology : a practical approach / edited by Alan J. Lacey.
Oxford, England ; New York : IRL Press, c1989. xviii, 329 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH207 .L49 1989
SUBJECTS:
Microscopy--Technique.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Lacey, Alan J.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Practical approach series
DEWEY DEC: 578/.4 dc19
NOTES:
Includes bibliographies and index.
ISBN: 0199630364 : $54.00 (U.S. : est.)
0199630372 (soft) : $36.00 (U.S. : est.)
LCCN: 88-23505 r92

Pluta, Maksymilian.
Advanced light microscopy / Maksymilian Pluta. Warszawa : PWN ; Amsterdam ;
New York : Elsevier : Distribution for the USA and Canada, Elsevier Science P
ublishing Co., 1988- {1989 } v. 1- {2 } : ill. ; 25 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH207 .P54 1988
SUBJECTS:
Microscopy--Technique.
DEWEY DEC: 502/.8/2 dc19
CONTENTS (Incomplete): v. 1. Principles and basic properties -- v. 2. Speciali
zed methods.
NOTES:
Translated from the Polish manuscript.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN: 0444989390 (v. 1) : $175.00 (est.)
0444989188 (v. 2)
LCCN: 87-24605 r922

Ploem, J. S.
Introduction to fluorescence microscopy / J.S. Ploem and H.J. Tanke. Oxford
; New York : Oxford University Press ; Oxford : Royal Microscopical Society,
1987. vi, 56 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH212.F55 P57 1987
SUBJECTS:
Fluorescence microscopy.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Tanke, H. J.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Oxford science publications
Microscopy handbooks / Royal Microscopical Society ; 10
Microscopy handbooks ; 10.
DEWEY DEC: 578/.4 dc19
NOTES:
Includes bibliographies and index.
ISBN: 0198564082 : $7.50 (U.S.)
LCCN: 87-5539

Inoue, Shinya.
Video microscopy / Shinya Inoue ; with contributions by Robert J. Walker,
Jr. ... [et al.]. New York : Plenum Press, c1986. xxvi, 584 p. : ill. (some
col.) ; 26 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH222 .I56 1986
SUBJECTS:
Video microscopy.
DEWEY DEC: 578/.4 dc19
NOTES:
Includes index.
Bibliography: p. 515-529.
ISBN: 0306421208
LCCN: 85-28252

Slayter, Elizabeth M.
Light and electron microscopy / Elizabeth M. Slayter, Henry S. Slayter.
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1993. p. cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH205.2 .S54 1993
SUBJECTS:
Microscopy.
Compound microscopes.
Electron microscopy.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Slayter, Henry S.
DEWEY DEC: 578/.4 dc20
NOTES:
Includes indexes.
92-7825 (continued):
ISBN: 0521327148
LCCN: 92-7825 r93

Russ, John C.
The image processing handbook / John C. Russ. Boca Raton, Fla. : CRC Press,
c1992. 445 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: TA1632 .R88 1992
SUBJECTS:
Image processing.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Image processing.
DEWEY DEC: 621.36/7 dc20
NOTES:
Includes bibliographical references (p. [435]-442) and index.
ISBN: 0849342333 (acid-free)
LCCN: 92-4936

Russ, John C.
Computer-assisted microscopy : the measurement and analysis of images / John
C. Russ. New York : Plenum Press, c1990. xii, 453 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: TA1632 .R87 1990
SUBJECTS:
Image processing.
Microscopy--Data processing.
Optical pattern recognition.
DEWEY DEC: 502/.8/20285 dc20
NOTES:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN: 0306434105
LCCN: 89-70945 r92

Bradbury, Savile.
Basic measurement techniques for light microscopy / SavileBradbury. Oxford ;
New York : Oxford University Press ; [London] : Royal Microscopial Society,
c1991. viii, 97 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH207 .B74 1991
SUBJECTS:
Microscopy--Measurement.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Royal Microscopical Society microscopy handbooks ; 23
Microscopy handbooks ; 23.
DEWEY DEC: 502/.8/2 dc20
NOTES:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN: 0198564260 : $14.90
LCCN: 90-21567 r92

Bradbury, Savile.
An introduction to the optical microscope / Savile Bradbury. Rev. ed.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press ; Oxford : Royal Microscopical
Society, c1988. 86 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH205.2 .B67 1988
SUBJECTS:
Microscopes.
Microscopy.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Microscopy handbooks ; 1
Oxford science publications
DEWEY DEC: 535/.332 dc19
NOTES:
Includes bibliographical references (p. [82]).
ISBN: 0198564198 : $6.00
LCCN: 88-38921 r92

Dictionary of light microscopy / compiled by the Nomenclature Committee of the
RMS, S. Bradbury ... [et al.]. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press ;
Oxford : Royal Microscopical Society, 1989. x, 139 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH203 .D53 1989
SUBJECTS:
Microscopy--Dictionaries.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Bradbury, Savile.
Royal Microscopical Society (Great Britain). Nomenclature Committee.
RMS dictionary of light microscopy.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Microscopy handbooks ; 15
Oxford science publications
DEWEY DEC: 502/.8/2 dc19
NOTES:
Cover title: RMS dictionary of light microscopy.
ISBN: 019856421X : $32.00 (U.S.)
0198564139 (pbk.) : $14.95 (U.S.)
LCCN: 88-22712 r92

Thomson, D. J.
An introduction to photomicrography / D.J. Thomson, Savile Bradbury. Oxford
[Oxfordshire] ; New York : Oxford University Press ; Oxford : Royal
Microscopical Society, 1987. 74 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH251 .T44 1987
SUBJECTS:
Photomicrography.
ADDED ENTRIES:
Bradbury, Savile.
SERIES TITLES (Indexed under SERI option):
Microscopy handbooks ; 13
DEWEY DEC: 578/.4 dc19
NOTES:
Includes index.
Bibliography: p. [69]-70.
ISBN: 0198564147 (U.S. : pbk.) : $9.00
LCCN: 86-33220

Bradbury, Savile.
The evolution of the microscope, by S. Bradbury. [1st ed.]. Oxford, New
York, Pergamon Press [1967] x, 357 p. illus. 22 cm.
LC CALL NUMBER: QH204 .B7
SUBJECTS:
Microscopes--History.
DEWEY DEC: 578/.09
NOTES:
Bibliography: p. 347-348.
LCCN: 67-18485 r922

Erik Reuter, e-reuter-at-uiuc.edu, 217-244-6378 phone, 217-244-6375 fax






From: GATEWAY:: RUSS-at-MAT.MTE.NCSU.EDU 1-DEC-1993 09:10:55.07
Date: Thu, 2 Dec 1993 15:29:58 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Grain size measurements

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This message was posted on a different forum
however it has applicabity here too. I've reflected it
for the subscribers:

Nestor Z.
ANL EMCenter
====================

To: Multiple recipients of list {nih-image-at-soils.umn.edu}

} I am interested in finding references to algorithms for grain size
} measurement. Any help would be welcome.
}
There are two "standard" methods for measuring the property usually called
"grain size." One is based on counting the number of grains visible per
unit area on a two-d section through the structure, and the other is based
on drawing lines across the same image and coutning the number of
intersections of the lines with grain boundaries. Neither actually measues
the "size" of the grains, which are 3D entities. From the point of view of
stereology, the second method measures the amount of grain boundary area
per unit volume in the sample, which is often important to properties
(mechanical, electrical, etc.) because many things happen at grain
boundaries. The first method measures the total length per unit volume of
the "triple line" where three grains meet in the volume. This is
particularly important in sintered structures since the pore channels and
much diffusion occurs there. But NEITHER is the "grain size." It happens
that in many materials (but by no means all), the grain size distribution
after standardized heat treatments (e.g., full recrystallization) is
sufficiently consistent that there is a more-or-less consistent
relationship between the actual size distibution of the grains and these
other parameters. This combined with the fact that people (or at least
metallurgists) have been measuring these properties for most of this
century, and CALLING it grain size, has made these measurements an accepted
standard tool for microstructural characterization.

There are a couple of fairly robust computer approaches to measuring each
of the two different properties. In the computer case, instead of drawing
lines and couting crossing points it is easier to first perform whatever
image processing is needed to threshold and skeletonize the grain
boundaries and then measure the total length (properly, not just counting
pixels but taking into account the geometry of the line). This is simply
related to the intercept count and the surface are per unit volume, and
hence to the "grain size number." It has the disadvantage that many grain
images do not show all of the boundaries well (inadequate etching or
polishing, ec.) The algorithm that works best for the other method is to
count the triple points in the grain boundary image, which usually do show
up well and are easily define as points on the skeleton that have more than
2 neighbors. This gives the total length of triple line, and again a "grain
size number."

For details on both algorithms, and the equations to convert the values,
see p.147 and p. 225 in Computer Assisted Microscopy, J. C. Russ, 1990,
Plenum Press. ISBN 0-306-43410-5

There are other issues to consider as well, including processing operations
on grain images that may alter the length of boundaries (watershed
segmentation, for instance, is either a boon or a curse), and ways to
actually measure the 3D distribution of grain sizes, without resorting to
very biased assumptions like treating the grains as spheres (!). The field
of stereology has dealt with such problems for decades, and there are
actually some pretty good answers to most of them. Good, but not
necessarily simple to implement.

__________________________________________________
John Russ
(John_Russ-at-ncsu.edu) or (russ-at-mat.mte.ncsu.edu)
Materials Science and Engineering Department,
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695-7907
phone: 919-515-3328 fax: 919-515-7724





From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1993 08:22:05 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM Diamond Knives

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On Fri, 3 Dec 1993 03:14:37 +0200, Steve Barlow wrote:

}
} We are considering the purchase of a new diamond knife and were interested
} to know if anyone has had any experience with companies other than
} Diatome. In specific, Edgecraft Corp, MicroStar, or DiaTech.
}
} } From personal experience, I know that Diatome makes an excellent knife.
} Dupont knives were good, but I haven't used any of their knives since they
} were bought out by DDK. DiaTech has been touting its 'unique' mounting
} system that greatly reduces re-sharpening costs.
}
} If anyone can offer their own experiences, I would appreciate it,
} particularly regarding the quality of the resharpening.
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Steven Barlow
} EM Facility/Biology Dept.
} San Diego State University
} San Diego CA 92182-0057
} phone: (619) 594-4523
} fax: (619) 594-5676
} email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu


Greetings from the "old continent" to all microscopy-netters,

We have used Diatome knifes and found them excellent. Now we are going to
test-section a Drukker-knife from Drukker International B.V., the
Netherlands. I have great expectations for this particular maker, since
they claim to have made the diamond surface hydrophilic, thus enabling
sectioning with not-filled waterlevel. We will know more about this knife
in two months.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Maki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1993 09:26:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Diamond knives

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Purchasers of Diamond knives:

I have been doing E.M. for 25 years and for the past 10-12years have been
using MicroStar knives. The knives are of excellant quality. I have never
had a problem with any of their knives. I have used DuPont and Diatome but
as long as MicroStar remains in business, I will continue to use their
knives. Their people are friendly, informative and very helpful. As a
whole, the company is excellant to deal with. I recommend their knives
whole heartedly. Questions?
Phil Rutledge, Director, Center for E.M.
UMBC Dept. of Biology
Catonsville, MD 21228 USA
Phone:(410)455-3582
FAX: (410)455-3875
Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu





From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab University of Florida
Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1993 10:22:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Knives

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{GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}

I have had excellent service from Microstar for many years, Both with new
knives and with resharpening knives that originally came from several
different vendors. I'd say we have gotten about 20 knives from this company
and have always been satisfied. This is not to say that other suppliers
couldn't do as well. My recent (10 yrs) experience has only been with
Microstar.

*****************************
* Greg Erdos *
* Director, ICBR EMCL *
* University of Florida *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 *
* gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* 904-392-1295 *
*****************************




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1993 17:26:59 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Specimen Prep: Nicalon-Black Glass

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From : JOSEPH MCGINN Number : 8 of 9
To : ALL Date : 12/02/93 1:08a
Subject : Nicalon-Black Glass Reference : NONE
Read : [N/A] Private : NO
Conf : 005 - Specimen Preparation

Has anyone had experience with sample preparation of this composite
system. There is a real problem retaining the fibers in the matrix
during the final stages of mechanical polishing. Has anyone found a
trick to get these samples below 20 microns for ion milling?

===============




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1993 17:28:06 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Specimen Prep: Unicryl embedding

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From : CRAIG LENDING Number : 9 of 9
To : ALL Date : 12/03/93 10:54a
Subject : Unicryl embedding Reference : NONE
Read : [N/A] Private : NO
Conf : 005 - Specimen Preparation

Has anyone had any experience with immunolabelling with the new Unicryl
resin that is marketed by SPI? I currently use LR White, but they claim
that this resin has better stability under the electron beam and also
gives higher levels of labelling than LR White -- at least that's what
they say!

================




From: Phil Rutledge
Date: Sat, 4 Dec 1993 14:52:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: LR White vs Unicryl

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To: Craig Lending or interested parties

I have tried both resins and have had good results with both. The only
problem I have had with LR White is getting my students or principle
investigators remembering to use 80kv. LR White is best used at voltages
above 60kv or you can have resin "droppings" formed on the wall of the
projector pole piece. I have 4 E.M.s and since I don't have service
contracts I end up cleaning the contaminated scope. If you can use
voltages above 60kv, you can get equally good results with either resin. I
normally use 80kv on all of my scopes at all times and have never tried
Unicryl at 60kv. It may be OK to use at 60kv or you may have to use a
higher voltage as I have to do with LR White. The only real difference I
have seen is the initial cost of the two resins. Good Luck!
Phone: (410)455-3582
FAX: (410)455-3875
Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu





From: Jan Coetzee Tel 420-2075 :      JANC-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 09:46:51 GMT+2
Subject: Need info on hi-res SEM

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We are contemplating getting a new ultra-high resolution field
emission SEM. This would be for applications in both biological
and materials fields. Resolution needs to be better than 1nm at ca
15kV. We are at present operating 2x SEM's and 1 TEM in a service
unit, so this new SEM would be dedicated to clean samples for hi-res
work. I would appreciate any and all input from users regarding
their experience of such equipment (microscopes and necessary
prep peripherals). Practical experience of cold versus thermal FEG's
(stability, lifetime, running costs, vacuum problems etc) especially
welcome.
Dr J Coetzee
Unit for Electron Microscopy Tel:+27-12-420-2075
University of Pretoria Fax:+27-12-342-1738
Pretoria 0002 Internet:janc-at-ccnet.up.ac.za
South Africa




From: Anatomo Pathologie :      anapat-at-reks.uia.ac.be
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 13:16:54 +0100 (MET)
Subject: Re: Specimen Prep: Unicryl embedding

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On Fri, 3 Dec 1993, Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 wrote:

}
}
} } From : CRAIG LENDING Number : 9 of 9
} To : ALL Date : 12/03/93 10:54a
} Subject : Unicryl embedding Reference : NONE
} Read : [N/A] Private : NO
} Conf : 005 - Specimen Preparation
}
} Has anyone had any experience with immunolabelling with the new Unicryl
} resin that is marketed by SPI? I currently use LR White, but they claim
} that this resin has better stability under the electron beam and also
} gives higher levels of labelling than LR White -- at least that's what
} they say!
}
} ================
}
We use unicryl on a regular basis as our main embedding medium. The
immunolabelling characteristics are comparable or better than Lowicryl
K4M. The morphology (?) even seems to be improved using the same
preparation procedures. The cutting characteristics are very well. We cut
it using a diatome knife and also using glassknifes. The person in charge
of cutting has a lot of experience with different materials (incl LR
White) and she thinks Unicryl cuts at least as good as Epon or Araldite.
Hoping to hear from you. We are interested in LR White because of the not
complete dehydration. We have tried some LR White but have experienced
great difficulties. Blocks tend to break and are difficult to cut.
Perhaps you could comment.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
J.P. Bogers, M.D.
Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen (UIA)
Lab Pathology
2610 Wilrijk
BELGIUM

Tel: 32.3.820.25.34
Fax: 32.3.820.22.48
E-mail: anapat-at-reks.uia.ac.be
jpbogers-at-reks.uia.ac.be
-------------------------------------------------------------------





From: Rodney L Kuehn-1 :      kuehn002-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 11:27:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: TEM Diamond Knives

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We've had experience with DDK over many years with many knives. Their
knife quality is excellent. The resharpening is excellent. An easy
company to deal with.

On Thu, 2 Dec 1993, Steve Barlow wrote:

} We are considering the purchase of a new diamond knife and were interested
} to know if anyone has had any experience with companies other than
} Diatome. In specific, Edgecraft Corp, MicroStar, or DiaTech.
}
} } From personal experience, I know that Diatome makes an excellent knife.
} Dupont knives were good, but I haven't used any of their knives since they
} were bought out by DDK. DiaTech has been touting its 'unique' mounting
} system that greatly reduces re-sharpening costs.
}
} If anyone can offer their own experiences, I would appreciate it,
} particularly regarding the quality of the resharpening.
}
} ----------------------------------------------------------
} Dr. Steven Barlow
} EM Facility/Biology Dept.
} San Diego State University
} San Diego CA 92182-0057
} phone: (619) 594-4523
} fax: (619) 594-5676
} email to sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu
}






From: PHELPS-at-ENH.NIST.GOV
Date: Mon, 06 Dec 1993 12:37:55 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: mineral samples...

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I am looking for a source to aquire good mineral samples for electron
diffraction studies. I am especially interested in samples of clino-
enstatite.

Thanks for any suggestions,
John

email: phelps-at-enh.nist.gov




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 12:24:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: B&W photo processors.

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From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 6 Dec 1993 12:19:33 -0400
Subject: FWD>B&W photo processors.

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From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 14:15:14 -0600 (CST)
Subject: B/W print processors

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--------------------------------------
Jim Michael



------------------ RFC822 Header Follows ------------------
Received: by quickmail.yale.edu with SMTP;6 Dec 1993 12:13:44 -0500

At Argonne National Laboratory's E. M. Center, we have used a Kodak
Royalprint Processor for ten years or so. It will handle any developer-
incorpoorated RC paper and give a dry, archival print in about 45 seconds, as
Ron Anderson noted. It is not cheaper than using trays, but you'll be able to
do more work in less time with less frustration. Any similar processor will
give you the same results.
If you want to get really efficient, you can get an automatic dodging
enlarger from LogEtronics. Then you don't have to spend time or test strips
trying to find the correct exposure!
I haven't heard of anyone who is using the 3M Dry Silver Processor which
Ted Pella, Inc. is marketing. According to it's brochure, the processor is
supposed to deliver a dry, archival print in 6 seconds. You'd avoid handling
chemicals with that processor. Any experience out there?




From: Ananda Murthy :      amurthy-at-brahms.udel.edu
Date: Mon, 6 Dec 1993 15:19:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: B&W photo processors.

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On Mon, 6 Dec 1993, Gib Ahlstrand wrote:

} I am in the process of deciding whether or not to purchase a B&W photo paper
} processor for our EM Lab darkroom. I have reviewed some product literature and
} now would like to hear from anyone who has used such processors. Are they
} neater, cleaner, faster and more economical than tray processing? Are they
} 'plumber's nightmares'? Are they tied to a specific paper type and chemistry?
}

Ted Pella, Inc. has advertised a product called `Pro Automatic Print and
Film Processor' in its recent catalog. It is said that this can process
negatives (4489 TM, T-MAx etc.) as well as prints using the same developer
in one unit. It costs about $4000. There is yet an another product
advertised called the Pelco Dry Silver Processor which does not use any
chemicals. The product is marked about $1400.
We are considering upgrading our darkroom facilities, and so contemplating
on purchasing the Print and Film Processor. Does anyone have any
experience with it? Thanx in advance for suggestions/advice.

}
} Thank you for any information you can provide.
}
} Gib G. Ahlstrand
} Electron Optical Facility
} University of Minnesota

Ananda S. Murthy
Department of Physics & Astronomy
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19716
(302) 831-6811






From: PO-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu
Date: 6 Dec 93 14:50:54 CST6CDT
Subject: RE: B&W photo processors.

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The mentions of wash by others reminded me: the system I used
still required that the photos be fixed as usual for tray developing.
(Using Kodak Polycontrast RC paper.) I forget if it was really
required, but yellowing etc. wash a problem if photos weren't fixed.
Wash was 5-10 min.
Phil Oshel




From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 6 Dec 1993 14:51:40 -0400
Subject: Re: EM practical courses

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Re} EM practical courses
Back by popular demand -even though we never seem to make a profit (or break
even).

Immunocytochemistry and Cryosections Practical Course 22 - 27 August 1994.
An intensive practical course mixed with theoretical sessions where you can
learn how to produce cryosections as well as immunolabeling, colloidal gold
production and much more.

Additional we are offerring a three day practical workshop on Stereological
methods. This will be on 18 -20 August 1994, prior to the cryosectioning
course.

A team of instructors headed by Hans Gundersen will take you through the
theoretical and practical details of modern stereological methods. These will
include volume and surface densities, the fractionator, the nucleator, the
disector and much much more. Address for further detailson both courses;

Paul Webster,
Department of Cell Biology,
Yale School of Medicine,
333 Cedar Street,
New Haven, CT 06510.







From: Mark Aindow :      M.Aindow-at-met.bham.ac.uk
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1993 08:35:21 GMT
Subject: Re: B/W print processors

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We too use Ilford 2150RC units and have no problems with yellowing
etc. I should note, however, that we have had a lot of minor
problems with one of the two identical units in our building and
this has resulted in considerable downtime and frustration. When
they work properly, they are wonderful units which increase the work
rate by at least a factor of 2-3 over manual developing. If, however,
I was based in the states and looking to buy a processor I'd be asking
my Ilford representative some very probing questions about service and
call-out arrangements in case of problems. Please note that our other
2150RC has given about four years of trouble free service.



*********************************************************************

Mark Aindow,
School of Metallurgy and Materials, Telephone; (021) 414 5188
The University of Birmingham, FAX; (021) 414 5232
Elms Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Email; M.AINDOW-at-BHAM.AC.UK
GB B15 2TT, United Kingdom.

*********************************************************************





From: Ari Ilmari Kuusisto :      arikuusi-at-utu.fi
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1993 15:07:52 +0200
Subject: confirmation of address

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Hi

Thank you for adding me into the list. This (arikuusi-at-polaris.utu.fi)
is my correct address. Please keep sending.

Ari Kuusisto




From: Michael Cammer :      cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1993 13:35:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Re: B&W photo processors.

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I worked part time for two years processing b&w EMs and had extensive
experience w/ b&w photography before the job (including making silk
screens, photo lithographs, etc.).

Having a Ektagraphic(?) machine by Kodak greatly sped up making large
numbers of notebook prints. The machine developed and stabilized in 20-30
seconds or so. I just piled the prints up and fixed and washed them in a
big batch before lunch and before going home. I only had to get my hands
wet two or three times each day; the actual printing was almost a dry process.

Granted these prints are not archival, but they last for at least five
years without significant fading or discoloring.

Another trick for tray processing is to keep dektol (or your favorite
developer) warm ( } 70 degrees F); the paper develops instantly, but the
chemicals oxidize fast.






From: MOSSANT-at-DUCVAX.AUBURN.EDU
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1993 16:55 CST
Subject: please temporarily stop my email

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Please temporarily stop my email for 2 weeks while I'm at ASCB. Sorry I
don't have the official command in front of me to do this.
-Tony Moss




From: pschleck-at-unomaha.edu (Paul W Schleck KD3FU)
Date: 7 Dec 1993 15:51:18 -0500
Subject: CFV: sci.techniques.microscopy

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nih-image-request-at-nx1.soils.umn.edu (NIH Image Mailing List Maintainer)
Newsgroups: news.announce.newgroups,news.groups,sci.chem,sci.engr.chem,sci.geo.geology,sci.materials,sci.misc,sci.physics,sci.optics,sci.research,sci.physics.accelerators,sci.engr,sci.polymers

FIRST CALL FOR VOTES (of 2)

Unmoderated group sci.techniques.microscopy

Newsgroups line:

sci.techniques.microscopy The field of microscopy.

Votes must be received by 23:59:59 UTC, 2 January 1994.

After this CFV appears on news.announce.newgroups it will be sent to
the following mailing lists with the permission of their respective
maintainers:

microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov {Microscopy Mailing List}
maintained by Nestor J. Zaluzec {zaluzec-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}

nih-image-at-nx1.soils.umn.edu {NIH Image Mailing List}
maintained by John Ladwig {ladwig-at-soils.umn.edu}

This vote is being conducted by a neutral third party. For voting
questions only, contact pschleck-at-unomaha.edu. For questions about
the proposed group, contact John F. Mansfield {John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu} .

CHARTER

The main aim of sci.techniques.microscopy is to provide an open
forum for the discussion of microscopy and related fields on the Internet.

PURPOSE

The purpose of sci.techniques.microscopy is to provide an open discussion
forum for the microscopy community on the Internet. The newsgroups allow
the rapid and timely discussion of opinions and information that would take
months or years (or not at all) on conventional paper journals. It is hoped
that this newsgroup will eventually be linked with the
microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov mailing list and archived at the same
site. Technical suggestions as to the best way to accomplish this are
welcome, and may be directed to either John F. Mansfield or Nestor J.
Zaluzec via their respective E-mail addresses above.

Please note that this proposed newsgroup is intended to be an open forum for
discussion of microscopy. Thus relevant topics for this newsgroup should
only be limited to what the participants in this proposed newsgroup regard
as microscopy.

TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION

Optical Microscopy
Confocal Microscopy
Scanning Probe/Force Microscopy (formerly Atomic Force Microscopy) - SPM,
SFM, AFM
Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy - STM
Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM
Transmission Electron Microscopy - TEM
High Resolution Electron Microscopy - HREM
Analytical Electron Microscopy - AEM
Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - STEM
High Voltage Electron Microscopy - HVEM
X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy - XEDS
Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy - EELS
Electron Microprobe Analysis (EMPA)
Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (WDS)
Diffraction Contrast Imaging
Phase Contrast Imaging
Selected Area Electron Diffraction - SAED or SAD
Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction - CBED
Image Filtering
Field Ion Microscopy
Electron Holography
X-ray Microscopy
Scanning Acoustic Microscopy
Ultrasonic Imaging
Specimen Preparation (Electropolishing, Ion Milling,
Ultramicrotoming, etc.)
3D reconstruction
Image Processing
Software
Data formats
Databases
Hardware/Equipment - specs, opinions, etc.
Applications
Announcements/reviews of papers/conferences.
Preparation techniques.
Non-ambient techniques
General Discussion/opinions/questions.
Positions vacant

As well as anything else that is relevant to microscopy in general.

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From: rms-at-vax.ox.ac.uk
Date: Wed, 08 Dec 1993 12:17:36 +0000
Subject: Books available for review

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BOOKS FOR REVIEW
****************

The Journal of Microscopy has received the following books for review:

Enzyme Histochemistry. A Laboratory Manual of Current Methods
By C J F Van Noorden & W M Frederiks. Oxford University Press

X-ray Microanalysis in Biology. Experimental Techniques and Applications
Edited By David C Sigee, A John Morgan, Adrian T Sumner & Alice Warley.
Cambridge University Press

Immunocytochemistry II
Edited by A C Cuello. John Wiley


A Manual of Applied Techniques for Biological Electron Microscopy
By Michael J Dykstra. Plenum Publishing

Soil Microscopy and Micromorphology
By E A Fitzpatrick. John Wiley

If you are interested in reviewing any of these publications, and can provide a
review within two months of receiving the book, please contact Gillian Wilson
at RMS-at-uk.ac.ox.vax directly. There is no financial reward, but
you can keep the book, of course! I will work on a first-come, first-served
basis.

I am also looking for volunteers to review a forthcoming book (which will
appear in print in January 1994):

In Situ Hybridization
By A R Leitch, T Scwarzacher, D Jackson & I J Leitch. BIOS Publications

Two copies will be available for review.
******************************************************************************





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1993 10:49:02 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Number of Subscribers

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All Subscribers..

Just in case your interested, we have just passed
the 500 subscriber mark this morning. Seems like
this list is getting popular.

I guess it was worth it..

Nestor Z:
ANL EMCenter

-------------------------------------




From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 8 Dec 1993 14:09:27 -0400
Subject: Re: Lowicryl protocol

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RE} Lowicryl protocol
In reply to the request for a Lowicryl protocol that works, from Rajesh Patel.
Try this for something a little more exotic.

Fix the lung tissue as well as possible (perfusion fix if possible) in either
formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde, 1 -2 hrs is enough.
Infiltrate with sucrose (2.3M in PBS) for approx. 1 hr, depending on the size
of the pieces.
Freeze the cryoprotected pieces on the tips of wire stubs (or cryo
ultramicrotome specimen stubs if available) by immersion in liquid nitrogen.
Do not let them warm up but transfer them directly to 100% methanol on dry ice
(precooled of course).
Leave until they fall of the wire (usually overnight is enough for small
pieces).
Wash with fresh, cold methanol on dry ice then gradually replace the methanol
with methanol containing increasing amounts of Lowicryl (we use HM-20 or HM-23
at these depressed temperatures) until you can put the tissue in 100% resin.
Leave overnight then embed in fresh resin, still on dry ice, and polymerize, on
dry ice, using a UV light as per instructions.
Remember that oxygen will interfere with the resin polymerization so use
embedding capsules or centrifuge tubes that are filled up with resin and are
sealed. Also bubble nitrogen through the resin before use.

This easy freeze substitution protocol can be done in a styrofoam box (which is
what we use) or in a Revcco type freezer (the Lowicryl smells bad and is
difficult to stop from spilling though!) The cold methanol does not need to be
specially dehydrated before use (just open a new bottle) and can contain 1%
osmium tetroxide or 1% uranyl acetate to improve contrast. Do not allow the
tissues to warm up in the osmium if you are concerned about antigenicity.
Surprizingly, the additions to the methanol do not seem to affect antigenicity
on most of our systems.
For extra polymerization Lowicryl blocks can be put under UV light at room temp
(or in the sun - says Heinz Schwarz of Tubingen).
A reference for this can be found in van Genderen et al 1991 J. Cell Biol.
115:1009-1019.

If your antibodies do not work on Lowicryl-embedded tissue (and many do not)
why not try cryosections. They are not difficult to obtain - even from lung.
Good luck.






From: Keith Williams :      KWILLIAM-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za
Date: 9 Dec 93 12:25:12 GMT-0200
Subject: Cytochemistry

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Does anyone have experience with using pyroantimonate as a
cytochemical stain / probe for calcium.
-------

Keith Williams
kwilliam-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za




From: boyd knosp :      knosp-at-tessa.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 1993 10:15:05 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: Printers

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Message-Id: {23120907442775-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}


At Image Analysis we have a Tektronix Phaser IISDX Dye Sublimation printer
which is connected simultaneously to a Silicon Graphics Indigo (via a
parellel port) and a Macintosh (via appletalk). This printer produces
near photographic quality (some people consider it better than photo
quality) 8.5 x 11 and legal size 24 bit color prints and transparencies.
Used in combination with Adobe Photoshop on the Mac or Showcase on the
Silicon Graphics, it produces fantastic results allowing researchers to
create hardcopy for posters, publications and portfolios in record time.
The printer understands most postscript so that text and object oriented
graphics is reproduced with little or no aliasing.

The main drawback with this printer is cost per print which is around $3.
The newer printers from tektronix and other vendors are rumored to use regular
printer paper rather than requiring the purchase of special paper for the
printer. Two other problems with the printer have been inability to read all
postscript files (usually solved by reading the files into Photoshop or
Showcase first) and matching the intensity of the colors on the computer
screen with what is produced by the printer.

boyd

Boyd Knosp 319-335-6715
University of Iowa knosp-at-tessa.iaf.uiowa.edu
Image Analysis 77 EMRB Iowa City, IA 52242


On Thu, 9 Dec 1993, L. D. Marks wrote:

}
} Any comments on computer image printers ?
}
} Laurie Marks
} Northwestern







From: mecavaleri-at-mmm.com
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 1993 17:14:54 -0600
Subject: Cryo-ultramicrotome problems

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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I am interested in any problems that other users of the Reichert
microtome Ultracut S with FCS cryo attachment have had. I am
especially interested in chronic problems with the cryo pump;
could you also relay what your solutions have been? I am having
the membrane in my pump replaced more often than seems
appropriate for a new piece of equipment and wonder if this is
typical. Also the poly tube that connects the pump to the liquid
nitrogen in the dewar keeps slipping off of its connector -
anyone having this problem? Solutions?
Thanks.

Jacqueline Aguilera




From: Paul Webster :      Paul_Webster-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 10 Dec 1993 08:56:13 -0400
Subject: R>Beef

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R} Beef
Wenbo Zhang writes that he has pepper on his beef muscle after fixation. The
muscle is fixed and postfixed in the presence of phosphate buffer which may be
the problem. All the glutaraldehyde must be washed out of the tissue before
going into osmium otherwise some sort of reaction occurs to cause a
precipitate. This may vary from small particles (pepper) to crystals.






From: Tim Maugel :      MAUGEL-at-zool.umd.edu
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1993 09:19:10 GMT+500
Subject: TEM: Fixation pepper

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Message-Id: {9312101416.AA12900-at-umail.UMD.EDU}
To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Fixation pepper probably results from the interaction of a number of
key fixation ingredients including phosphate buffer, glutaraldehyde,
uranyl acetate and ethanol. For a nice work on the role of the above
participants in the formation of dense deposits see the paper by J.
Louw, et al in STAIN TECHNOLOGY 65(5): 243-250, 1990 entitled
"Electron dense artefactual deposits in tissue sections: The role of
ethanol, uranyl acetate and phosphate buffer."

Tim Maugel
University of Maryland
Laboratory for Biological Ultrastructure
Department of Zoology
College Park, MD 20742
Phone: (301)405-6898
Fax: (301)314-9358
EMail: tm11-at-umail.umd.edu




From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 10 Dec 1993 10:28:06 U
Subject: Re: Printers

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"Mark Disko" {disko-at-hal.erenj.com} ,
microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

Reply_ RE} Printers
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
OK, we recently (actually Ron Gibala and John Halloran paid for it) bought a
Kodak ColorEase 300 PS printer for printing out images. We are talking about a
Mac environment here with a few PCs so this discussion will be centered on
printing from Macs for the most part.
We had a demo of the ColorEase and it during that the printer was not printing
as well as the Tektronix Phaser IIsdi. So, we were going to go with the
Tektronix (even though it was more expensive). But during the demo, I started
using the Apple Laserwriter 8.0 drivers and then the Kodak performed better for
grayscale images. We have found for 8bit color and grey images we use the
Apple drivers (we have a PPD downloaded from Adobe.com so the applications on
the Macs know big the print area is on the Kodak under 8.0. The 8.0 drivers
were developed by Apple and Adobe together anyway). There are PPDs at Adobe
for most Postscript printers (except maybe the Hewlett Packards). To get them
check out ftp.adobe.com. Anyway after that small diversion, we use the
ColorEase driver if we want to do 24bit color and try and match what the image
looks like on the screen. Since we dont often use true 24bit color we mostly
use the Apple drivers. The latest version of NIH-Image when used in
conjunction with the Apple drivers will scale the image you are trying to print
to fit on the page and so that avoids the clipping warnings you get from
Photoshop. Of course, if you want to use 24bit color you need to use
Photoshop.
It's a nice printer. The paper and transparencies are a lot more heavy weight
that the Tek media. Prints cost us about $2 each and transparencies a little
more. Considering you can get 3 Polaroid size prints on one sheet that is a
considerable cost saving over Polaroid. The Polaroid that we use is in excess
of $2.50 per shot and so if you use the Kodak printer, you can pay for the
printer after 3500 prints. Given the atrocious Polaroid quality and their vague
responses if you try and get credit for a bad batch of film, this printer seems
to me like an excellent way to go if you have a good way of electronically
acquiring your images.
As a disclaimer, my opinions of the corporations that I mention above are my
own personal ones and do not in any way reflect the opinions of my employer


John Mansfield







From: hecub-at-ttacs.ttu.edu (Charles J. Butterick)
Date: 10 Dec 1993 09:34:22 -0600
Subject: Dye Sub Printer

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have a Codonics NP-600 dye sub printer. It came to us as part of a
confocal package, the price is about $10K. Cost of the standard B&W/color
paper is $1.50 a sheet (8" x 8.5"). The 8.5" x 11 is about $3 a print.
Microscopy images are as good as one's equipment. Color matching seems
good but we may not be as discriminating as others. One major strongpoint
is the number of acceptable formats : IFF, GIF, JPEG, PICT, PCX, PPM, RGB,
Sun Raster, TIFF, TGA, X-11 Window Dump, CMU WM, IMG, PBM, PGM, and Lisp
Machine Bitmap. Codonics is a small outfit out of Ohio and have provided
excellent backup. Take a look.
*************************************************
* *
* *
* Charles J. Butterick *
* Electron Microscopy Center *
* Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy *
* Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center *
* Lubbock, Texas 79430 *
* USA *
* Phone 806 743-2706 voice *
* 806 743-2707 fax *
* Email hecub-at-ttacs.ttu.edu *
* *
* *
*************************************************





From: Keith Williams :      KWILLIAM-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za
Date: 13 Dec 93 09:16:57 GMT-0200
Subject: RE: TEM - Fixation Pepper

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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We have a vast amount of experience with the processing of myocardial
/ muscular tissue. In our experience it is the phosphates found in
muscular tissue which play a role in the formation of these dense
deposits.

The essential factors in the formation of electron dense deposits
appear to be phosphate buffer, ethanol and uranyl acetate.
Glutaraldehyde may contribute in a way, while osmium does not appear
to play a role. (See our article in STAIN TECHNOLOGY 65: 243-250
(1990).
-------

Keith Williams
kwilliam-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za




From: Keith Williams :      KWILLIAM-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za
Date: 13 Dec 93 11:14:17 GMT-0200
Subject: RE: TEM - Fixation Pepper

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Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.931213111417.384-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za}
To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov


We have a vast amount of experience with the processing of myocardial
/ muscular tissue. In our experience it is the phosphates found in
muscular tissue which play a role in the formation of these dense
deposits.

The essential factors in the formation of electron dense deposits
appear to be phosphate buffer, ethanol and uranyl acetate.
Glutaraldehyde may contribute in a way, while osmium does not appear
to play a role. (See our article in STAIN TECHNOLOGY 65: 243-250
(1990).
-------

Keith Williams
kwilliam-at-eagle.mrc.ac.za




From: baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tobias Baskin)
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1993 17:07:16 -0600
Subject: LM/TEM? Diatome Histo knife

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931213084915.416-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov


Greetings,
Has anyone had exerience with a diamond knife designed to cut
semi-thin sections? That's correct, semi-thin sections, 0.2 - 5 um range. I
have just seen an ad for a product from Diatome called the "Histo Knife"
which claims to do just that. The main question would seem to be how many
sections such a knife can cut before needing to be resharpened. Advice or
comments welcome. I will post a summary of any private replies.
Thanks in advance,
Tobias Baskin


******************************** ***************
Tobias I. Baskin /~~~\
Biol. Sci's * Univ. of Missouri c|o o\
Columbia, MO 65211 USA \ = /
Tel:314-882-0173 """
FAX 314 - 882 - 0123
baskin-at-biosci.mbp.missouri.edu





From: Michael Rock :      merock-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1993 13:33:05 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Printers ? what's out there ?

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X-Sender: merock-at-carson.u.washington.edu

I am currently looking at connecting our SEM, LM, and in the future TEM
to a high quality printer with low (under $1.00/image) operating cost.

I am familiar with AldenElectronics, Harris, and Kodak systems. All do
continuous tone grey scale and cost $ 8-12 K.





From: Rodney L Kuehn-1 :      kuehn002-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1993 16:59:56 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: EM Charges

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I manage a biologically-oriented EM facility at a university. Service
fees are supposed to cover all expenses although this has never happened.
Actually, we probably could break even if we had 50-75% of full use.
However, there are three fully-equipped labs on this campus which make
this prospect unlikely.
We charge university users $25/room hour for both TEM and SEM,
neither of which are equipped with EDAX, etc. We also charge for film.
However,
sputter-coating, fixation chemicals, resins, grids are all supplied by me.
Industrial users are charged $50/room hour.
The scope charge is supposed to cover service contract, parts and all
prep chemicals, etc. In practice, the SEM costs about half as much as
the TEM to run (including sample prep expenses) so the SEM is subsidizing
the TEM.
This is a friendly and efficient way of running a lab since people aren't
being
constantly nickel-and-dimed and the function of the lab is kept focused
on providing researchers with the most useful services and supplies.
Neither is time wasted by billing users for minor items. Furthermore,
clients with small projects need not shell out major bucks just to get
basic supplies.
We used to charge about $1/print to cover paper, chemicals, and
rapidprocessor repairs. The darkroom has turned into a
general-purpose college facility
with the result that the college pays our darkroom expenses. Users buy
their paper from me at cost.

Please keep this information absolutely confidential!

Rod Kuehn


On Fri, 10 Dec 1993, Margaret E. Hogan wrote:

}
} I am trying to get a feel for the amount to charge for EM services. I recently
} took over an EM facility, and was asked to revamp the pricing for service work.
} I am interested in any pricing schedule, from private, commercial or university
} settings. Any help in this project would be GREATLY appreciated. All info
} will be held strictly confidential.
} Thanks!!
}
} Peggy Hogan
} The Jackson Laboratory
} 600 Main Street
} Bar Harbor, Maine 04609
} (207) 288-3371 #1450






From: cloney-at-zoology.washington.edu (Richard Cloney)
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1993 16:08:28 -0800
Subject: Diamond knives for semi-thin sections

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Message-Id: {9312140006.AA17890-at-zookeeper.zoology.washington.edu}

Reply to question from Tobias Baskin

I have have been using diamond knives for cutting epoxy embedded tissues
for about 20 years. Nearly all of the sections I cut are in the range of
0.5 - 2.0 micrometers in thickness. I started using a diamond knife that
was no longer satisfactory for EM work because of small scratches. The
sections I have made for LM are superior in quality. I have made
10,000-15,000 (maybe more) sections on a single 3mm knife that originally
cost about $300. This knife has saved me many hours of time that would have
been devoted to making glass knives. I am now using another knife (4.0 mm)
with a larger boat that make makes flawless sections. The older knife is
still useful but it makes more scratches than it once did. But, a few
scratches are insignificant for some applications.

I assume you have had lots of experience with glass knives and know how to
use your microtome skillfully. Be careful to avoid striking the knife edge
with the specimen when you set up the microtome. Don't take big bites.
Start cutting with specimen block-faces that are no larger than about 0.25
mm on a side (truncated pyramidal shape) and gradually work up to 0.5 mm on
a side as you cut. Larger sections can be cut (if essential) after you have
gained experience. Clean the edge (front and back) with a small, wetted
wedge-shaped piece of polystyrine foam held with forceps. Wipe only
parallel to the edge. It is remarkable that even after cutting many
semi-thin sections the knives I use for LM will still cut nice looking
silver and gold sections although I don't usually use these. I have never
used Diatome "Histo Knifes" but I am confident that they would be
satisfactory.

I bet there are many diamond knives siting around in drawers in
laboratories that need to be resharpened for EM work. Before buying a new
"Histo Knife" I suggest that you try to obtain a used diamond knife from
someone who has given up EM work or has set aside of knife because of the
high cost of resharpening.

Richard A. Cloney
Professor of Zoology
RAC





From: ridge-at-icu.ac.jp
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 10:00:38 +0900
Subject: Wanted, old diamond knife!

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Dear EM people,

I am interested in buying an old diamond knife for use in cutting sections
for light microscopy. Anyone who is willing to part with an old, but
unused favourite please contact me soon.

Bob





Bob Ridge
Biology
ICU
10-2 Osawa 3-chome
Mitaka-shi
Tokyo 181
Japan

Tel: +81 422 33 3484
Fax: +81 422 33 1449

Email: ridge-at-icu.ac.jp






From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 14 Dec 1993 08:40:10 U
Subject: Re: Greyscale Printers

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Reply_ RE} } Greyscale Printers
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
I just invested in a Laserwriter Pro 630 to replace our aging IIg that had been
upgraded from an NTX. At $1740 you cant complain! It is a 600dpi printer
using a Canon EX engine.
It makes a nice job of greyscale images. I printed a couple of wedges that
Mark Disko sent me and It seems to do aboout 60 grey levels that I can count.
I plan to use it for student research notebook printing, much cheaper than
Polaroid! Faculty like it as it gives good images at a fraction of the cost!
We use it for digital images collected from the TEMs, ESEM and AFM on to Apple
Macs. We have the DI AFM connected to Appletalk and the software thinks it is
printing directly to LPT2. Works well.
I have seen output from the Hewlett Packard 600 dpi printers too and they are
also excellent, maybe even a little better. I was driven by price
considerations here tho' and the Apple was little cheaper and directly replaced
our old printer with no additional network connection problems.
Just my few cents worth.
John Mansfield.






From: Raul Fainchtein :      fain-at-aplcomm.jhuapl.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 09:37:15 -0500
Subject: AFM to Appletalk question

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"Raul Fainchtein" {fain-at-aplcomm.jhuapl.edu}

Reply_ RE} AFM to Appletalk question
Reply
from:
John Mansfield
North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory
University of Michigan
2455 Hayward
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143 Phone: (313)936-3352
jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu


--------------------------------------

Would you mind providing some information on how did you connect your DI
AFM to Appletalk (software and hardware).

Thank you,

Raul Fainchtein
fain-at-aplcomm.jhuapl.edu


I am sending this to the list as I think there may be others who are interested
in this.
Since the AFM is run by a PC and our lab is still mainly Mac based as far as
computers are concerned, we have pinters and file servers set up for the Macs,
but little support for the PC. Therefore to print and store files on a server
we purchased an ethernet card for the PC. We used a 3Com card, a 3C503, a
really cheap basic card (ISA). We then bought the Farallon PhonenetPC
software. Farallon bought the AppletalkPC software rights from Apple a number
of years ago and changed the name. Farallon make a number of networking
products, including Timbuktu which allows remote control of Mac and Windows PCs
from remote machines of either type (scary seeing a Mac with a full windows
interface!! and vice versa!!).
The Phonenet software runs on the ethernet card (runs on almost any card these
days) and supports multiple protocols, Appletalk, IPX and TCP/IP. You can have
these loaded simulataneously, but it eats into the PC memory and the SPM
software runs in reduced memory mode when the networking software is loaded on
our 8 meg machine. DI have told us we can upgrade to 12meg (max) but we need
new ROMs for the SPM hardware. This may help and we are in the process of
ordering the upgrade.
We hope we could run the full blown version of the SPM software and the
networking software too. We could then try running ftp and telnet from the PC
to enable wide area file transfer (I plan to try NCSA Telent for the PC).
When the Appletalk stack is loaded (we use a number of cute little batch files
to reboot the machine with different software configurations loaded ---
A digression here, we have a 21M floptical and some of it's software is
incompatible with the network software and so beware. Also it is very slow, if
youy are thinking of getting one, my advice is don't! Pop the extra cash and
buy a 128M mag-opt instead, much better bang for the buck! ---).

So as I say, when the Appletalk stack is loaded you can run a small program
called DA which is a little like the Apple Chooser and you can then connect to
Appletalk file servers and Appletalk printers and use either postscript or
Epson emulation. We use postscript although it is very slow. Part of the
reason for this is that the postscript spool file created by the SPM software
is huge. It is a bitmap dump of the image screen of the microscope. Instead
of using postscript to draw the text,lines and boxes on the screen and then
merely bitmapping the image area, the whole screen is bitmapped so a large
proportion of the spool file is either black or white space. This is why the
text on DI SPM images that are printed on a postscript printer has jagged
edges, the text is part of teh bitmap and not postscript fonts. Although I
have been chastised in the past for implying that DI do some things on the
cheap, I do think that the way the postscript printing has been implemented was
a shortcut that was never cleaned up. For presentation purposes it would be
nice to have the text of the image be printed in true postscript fonts. This
would seriously cut down on the spool file size. I have asked about this in
the past and was given the impression that it was a low priority item. Note:
THIS IS MY PERSONAL OPINION AND SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS THE OPINION OF MY
EMPLOYER.
Anyway, inspite of this minor criticism, the Appletalk software and ethernet
card allows us to share resources effectively. We print to our LaserWriter Pro
630 in our own lab and also to a Kodak Colorease PS300 in another building,
saving us the cost of purchasing a dedicated printer for the SPM.
We are currently investigating the possibility of using NetWare on the SPM to
send print jobs to a NetWare file/print server which then spools the output to
a number of printers. This may improve the speed and throughput.

Hope this helps, feel free to ask further questions if any of this is unclear.
John Mansfield.

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From: :      szrick-at-bullwinkle.ucdavis.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 08:32:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM/TEM? Diatome Histo knife

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On Mon, 13 Dec 1993, Tobias Baskin wrote:

} Greetings,
} Has anyone had exerience with a diamond knife designed to cut
} semi-thin sections? That's correct, semi-thin sections, 0.2 - 5 um range. I
} have just seen an ad for a product from Diatome called the "Histo Knife"
} which claims to do just that. The main question would seem to be how many
} sections such a knife can cut before needing to be resharpened. Advice or
} comments welcome. I will post a summary of any private replies.
} Thanks in advance,
} Tobias Baskin
}
We have used the Diatome Histo knife in our lab for several years (where
have you been?). They will cut about a gazillion sections then after they
are resharpened they will cut a gazillion more.

R. A. Harris
EM Facility
Evolution and Ecology
Univ. of Calif. Davis







From: GRAD12-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 09:32:37 -0700 (MST)
Subject: LM: Non-uniform illumination

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To microscopy forum members:

I have already posed the following question to the NIH-IMAGE forum, but I
would also like to know what members of this forum might suggest. I'm using
an annular light ring, attached to my objective lens, to project a direct beam
of white light onto my subject, which reflects some of that light back to my
objective lens and video camera. This annular light ring isn't perfect in that
it causes non-uniform illumination of my subject; in particular, the center of
my subject is brighter than average and the edges are darker.

I can, of course, correct my acquired images for shading irregularities by
applying any of various digital procedures, but this approach is also not per-
fect. For example, to obtain a reference image for the digital shading cor-
rection, I use a standard gray card that is well out of focus, which eliminates
problems of the heterogeneous surface of the card itself. Unfortunately, the
pattern and strength of illumination non-uniformities is dependent on distance
from the light source, and the shading pattern on the out-of-focus reference is
different enough from that of my in-focus image that the digital correction is
not acceptable.

I suppose I can alter the mathematics of my digital shading correction, but
that would be an emperical approach that is not satisfying in general. I'm now
wondering about inserting a diffusing lens (a ring, ordoughnut, filter) between
my light source and subject to convert the direct beam into a diffuse, flat
wash of light onto my subject, regardless of its distance to the light source.
Has anyone tried this, and if so, will it actually work to solve my problem?
Are there any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance,

Paul Sheppard
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research
University of Arizona, Tucson
GRAD12-at-CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU




From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 13:31:51 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Posting of Messages about Gov. Funding

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All Microsocpy Subscribers:

The last message I just saw posted on Microscopy Email forum
about conducting an EMail campaign directed to the US Government
in support of Basic Energy Sciences was not appropriate to this
listserver.

Whether I agree or not with the message is irrelevant, the point is
that it should NOT have been done without first clearing it with
the SysOP, since the posting is not directly associated with
Microscopy.

Clearing of messages being sent to a listserver when they DO NOT
deal with the general subject matter is a common practice
of Email etiquette, which is followed by most responsible
users of systems such as this. Since this is an unmoderated listserver,
each of us has the duty to police the system appropriately
and I would like to remind you each of that obligation.

I will resend the list of rules to the person responsible
ldm-at-apollo.numis.nwu.edu (L. D. Marks) for cluttering up the
Microscopy Forum with the message.


Nestor J. Zaluzec
ANL EM Center.





From: llsutter-at-mtu.edu (Larry Sutter)
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 14:33:06 -0500
Subject: LM/Digital Imaging

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We are in the process of evaluating LM/Digital Imaging systems for
materials research and I would be grateful for any feedback on systems that
are in use with regards to ease of use, capabilities, software support,
etc. Thanks in advance...

Larry Sutter

Scattering Events R' Us

Michigan Technological University







From: Nancy L. Desmond :      nld-at-galen.med.virginia.edu
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1993 17:36:14 -0500
Subject: 1200 dpi laser printers

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Hi,
To add further to the conversation about printers...Has anyone
had experience using 1200 dpi laser printers to generate working
(i.e. lab notebook-type quality) printouts for use in data
acquisition of microscopic images (e.g. determining lengths of
dendrites, counting objects). Of course, the images aren't good
enough for publication, but the price of these printers is
declining (I think I saw one in PC Magazine for about $2500) and
the $/page is negligible.
Thanks for any comments.
Nancy Desmond
Neurosurgery
Univ. of Virginia '
Charlottesville, VA 22908
804.924.5607 (voice)




From: COOK-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov (Russell E. Cook)
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1993 11:43:51 -0600
Subject: LogEtronics enlargers

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I'd like to elaborate on Ron Anderson's comments about how the LogE
enlargers work. The newer versions (e.g. EM55) do not have condenser
lenses, and the CRT is located directly above the negative, thus
eliminating the need to keep any condenser lenses free of dust. The
rastered spot on the CRT illuminates only that portion of the negative
which is directly below the spot. Also, the photo detector does not
measure light reflected from the printing paper, rather the beam splitter
(fractionally-silvered mirror), which is below the negative and above the
enlarging (objective) lens, reflects a portion of the light which has
passed through the negative to a PMT. Thus the PMT and its circuitry
measures the relative density of each portion of the negative and adjusts
the brightness of the beam spot and its raster speed within a small range
in an attempt to print all of the densities within the limited gamma of the
printing paper. The electronics also allow the user to adjust or override
the exposure decisions made by the enlarger.

Russell E. Cook
Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, IL






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1993 12:48:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Missing Messages:

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To All Subscribers on Microscopy Forum:

On Dec. 15. L.Sutter wrote:

} On a number of occasions, I have seen answers to posted notices but
} I did not see the original posted notice. As an example, the current
} discussion on autofill LN2 systems. The first message I saw was Ron
} Anderson's response. I never saw the original message. It has happened on
} other occasions. Any thoughts? My main concern is that I may be missing
} topics of intrest or replies to messages I've posted.

The problem in many cases is on the recieving end not the posting end.
The Mailserver frequently get messages that say something like:

"address not active,
"machine is off-line"
"address cannot be reached after N-days"

and several other variations. Some can be traced to the fact that
some users turn their computers off and the various relay systems
will only hold messages so long before they trash them. Others are
due to network problems where a NameServer goes off-line etc..

This listserver trys several times to send a message through in case links
go down, however, things donot always make it through. Sometimes the
backlog of "Requeued Mail gets very large" and I have to clean out
the backlog, otherwise the entire system comes to a halt.

You should remember that the mailing list is now OVER 500 subscriptions long
and this takes a fair amount of negotiation. I avoid "erasing" names from
the subscription list when there are problems as usually the networks
address problems clear up in a day or so. If I see messages to the
same host bouncing continuously for many days, then I remove that one
from the list.

All the messages sent to the list are archived, but I have not gotten
around to setting up a review/list etc.. At the moment I just don't have
the time. SysOp for this List is only one of the HATS I wear here
at ANL, and most of the development work has to be done on the cheap and
off-hours at home after my kids get all their homework done and get
to bed (Yawn)...

I've also been having abit of hardware problems lately with the
main computer which server the ANL EMCenter and this listserver.
I'm in the process of replacing it (at least the Purchase Order was
filed a few days ago). It will likely take about a month or two
(we are a Gov. Lab with all its paperwork) to get it in, installed,
and debugged. I plan on trying to make the change over around
late Feb, however, Murphy says it won't be that easy and/or simple.

In the interim, the list will have to bear with the glitches.

Sorry-- Nestor Z.

Right now maybe I can get back to my scope and get some work
done! I've got some nice angle resolved, energy filtered, dispersion
surfaces of graphite measured. Looks really great. Anyone else
interested in that sort of thing???







From: peling-at-amnh.org (Peling Melville - Interdepartmental Facilities)
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1993 15:57:06 -0500
Subject: Auto-fill LN2 devices

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This is in reference to the current topic of Liquid Nitrogen
Auto-fill devices.
We have never used an LN2 Auto-fill device on our system and from
reading all the responses to this topic, I don't think that we will ever
get one. I only need to fill our dewar twice a week. First thing Monday
morning and on Friday afternoon before I leave for the weekend. We've
never had any problems doing it this way. It seems like more trouble than
it's worth.
I just thought that I would put in my two cents.






From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1993 18:01:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: LM/TEM? Diatome Histo knife

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu
Microscopy-at-ANLEMC.MSD.ANL.GOV
In-Reply-To: {Pine.3.07.9312140814.A23748-a100000-at-othello.ucdavis.edu}
Message-Id: {Pine.3.89.9312151753.A5339-0100000-at-carson.u.washington.edu}
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

We are now up to 4 Diatome Histo Knives. We serial section 4 mm long
vestibular and auditory organs, decalcified temporal bones and cochlea,
fetal stuff without decal at .5 to 5 microns, 25 micron methacrylate, etc.
the oldest is
5-6 years old. Sharpening is largely a function of how often they get
dropped, people overlap their dumonts when cutting dry, or cutting bone.
They have paid for themselves many times over compared to the section
quality and time cost of glass. Cutting cochlea or crunching through the
otoconia of vestibular organs raises hell with glass but doesn't faze the
histo knives. We would have used old thin sectioning diamonds, but
didn't have any. We still use a lot of glass, especially for potentially
destructive samples and for teaching. With the newer LKB knifemaker, we
have been using thicker glass, which makes glass more attractive.

}
} On Mon, 13 Dec 1993, Tobias Baskin wrote:
}
} } Greetings,
} } Has anyone had exerience with a diamond knife designed to cut
} } semi-thin sections? That's correct, semi-thin sections, 0.2 - 5 um range. I
} } have just seen an ad for a product from Diatome called the "Histo Knife"
} } which claims to do just that. The main question would seem to be how many
} } sections such a knife can cut before needing to be resharpened. Advice or
} } comments welcome. I will post a summary of any private replies.
} } Thanks in advance,
} } Tobias Baskin
}
Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu





From: PO-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu
Date: 16 Dec 93 08:16:20 CST6CDT
Subject: Re: test & graphite

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Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.931216081620.288-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu}
To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

} Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1993 12:48:38 -0600 (CST)
} From: "Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964" {ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov}
} To: Microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} Cc: ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
} Subject: Missing Messages:

} To All Subscribers on Microscopy Forum:
}
} On Dec. 15. L.Sutter wrote:
}
} } On a number of occasions, I have seen answers to posted notices but
} } I did not see the original posted notice. As an example, the current
} } discussion on autofill LN2 systems. The first message I saw was Ron
} } Anderson's response. I never saw the original message. It has happened on
} } other occasions. Any thoughts? My main concern is that I may be missing
} } topics of intrest or replies to messages I've posted.
}
} The problem in many cases is on the recieving end not the posting end.
} The Mailserver frequently get messages that say something like:
}
} "address not active,
} "machine is off-line"
} "address cannot be reached after N-days"
}
} and several other variations. Some can be traced to the fact that
} some users turn their computers off and the various relay systems
} will only hold messages so long before they trash them. Others are
} due to network problems where a NameServer goes off-line etc..
}
} This listserver trys several times to send a message through in case links
} go down, however, things donot always make it through. Sometimes the
} backlog of "Requeued Mail gets very large" and I have to clean out
} the backlog, otherwise the entire system comes to a halt.
}
} You should remember that the mailing list is now OVER 500 subscriptions long
} and this takes a fair amount of negotiation. I avoid "erasing" names from
} the subscription list when there are problems as usually the networks
} address problems clear up in a day or so. If I see messages to the
} same host bouncing continuously for many days, then I remove that one
} from the list.
}
} All the messages sent to the list are archived, but I have not gotten
} around to setting up a review/list etc.. At the moment I just don't have
} the time. SysOp for this List is only one of the HATS I wear here
} at ANL, and most of the development work has to be done on the cheap and
} off-hours at home after my kids get all their homework done and get
} to bed (Yawn)...
}
} I've also been having abit of hardware problems lately with the
} main computer which server the ANL EMCenter and this listserver.
} I'm in the process of replacing it (at least the Purchase Order was
} filed a few days ago). It will likely take about a month or two
} (we are a Gov. Lab with all its paperwork) to get it in, installed,
} and debugged. I plan on trying to make the change over around
} late Feb, however, Murphy says it won't be that easy and/or simple.
}
} In the interim, the list will have to bear with the glitches.
}
} Sorry-- Nestor Z.
}
} Right now maybe I can get back to my scope and get some work
} done! I've got some nice angle resolved, energy filtered, dispersion
} surfaces of graphite measured. Looks really great. Anyone else
} interested in that sort of thing???

I've been having lots of trouble lately with undeliverable mail
(Nestor: same as last time--then, one of the elves in Computer
Headquarters had done a partial recompile of the system. This
time...?)
So this is a test to see if THIS works...
But also...I'm not a materials person, but your nice graphite
makes me recall an article from 2 or so years ago where some folks
did STM on graphite & demonstrated things like DNA, proteins, etc..
Except, they were using just graphite. (I also haven't seen their
work mentioned by anyone else.) The question is, do such structures
show up in your preps in the TEM?
Phil Oshel




From: Anatomo Pathologie :      anapat-at-reks.uia.ac.be
Date: Thu, 16 Dec 1993 16:55:03 +0100 (MET)
Subject:

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Hi,

Does anyone have the e-mail address of the EM departement of the Weizmann
Institute in Rehovot Israel.

Thanks

--------------------------------------------------------------------
J.P. Bogers, M.D.
Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen (UIA)
Lab Pathology
2610 Wilrijk
BELGIUM

Tel: 32.3.820.25.34
Fax: 32.3.820.22.48
E-mail: anapat-at-uia.ac.be
jpbogers-at-uia.ac.be
-------------------------------------------------------------------





From: mezy301-at-utxvms.cc.utexas.edu (Peter Joyce)
Date: Thu, 16 Dec 1993 14:03:38 -0600 (CST)
Subject: LM - Need help viewing graphite fibers in composite materials

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I am new to this forum, and new to microscopy in general. We have recently set
up equipment in our lab to study the microstructure of continous fiber
reinforced composite materials. In specific we are trying to characterize
the
"fiber waviness" in composite laminates and cylinders. We are trying to
view the fibers in plane (longwise) in hopes of characterizing the observed
with some battery of FFT analysis, but this comes with many challenging
hurdles, such as
intermittent fiber breakages and also 3-D fiber curvature effects which
sometimes take the fibers out of view. We are also trying to perform
cross-section measurements, sort of a statistical sampling really.

We are grappling with a couple of issues. Optimum specimen preparation for
light microscopy, we doing sort of modified metallographic grinding and
polishing - but we still have trouble with too much fiber fracturing
possibly linked back to the very first cut we did on the material. Anyone
who has removed coupons of compostie material from laminates for
microscopic evaluation, can you suggest a cost effective technique for
this. Our laminates start at 1/8" thich and go up to almost 1/2" thick -
presently we use diamond sectioning blades from Metallurgical Supply in
Houston mounted on a milling machine at 1400 rpm with thwe table on slowest
pass to cut the plate into strips and then we bring the strips to our
Buehler Isomet 2000 to make small chips to pot, grind, and polish. This
requires a skilled operator in the machine shop, it is very time intensive
and still we have fiber fracturing. Is there anyone out there using as
tabletop unit witha feed mechainsm like a table saw? Any suggestions?

We are also getting more surface relief thsn we can cope with in the final
specimen. Our material is a polysulfone matrix with 7 micron diameter
graphite fibers, the matrix is softer than the fibers so we get pitting
very easily. We have been able to minimize this by diddling with the
polishing sequence. If anyone has tackled this problem and has any insight
we would appreciate it.

Thirdly we are using mostly brightfield illumination, but we don't get very
good contrast. We are using a Leica MeF3-A metallograph and the contrast
just isn't sharp enough or "broad" enough for our subsequent image analysis
needs - i.e. can't be thresholded easily. We have tried darkfield which
appears to give us sharper contrast but over an even "tighter" range. Has
anyone got any experience with this one?

P. Joyce






From: dlmedli-at-california.sandia.gov (medlin douglas l)
Date: Thu, 16 Dec 1993 12:41:48 -0800
Subject: RE: Printers

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bruce-at-macgate.di.com writes:
(regarding dye sublimation printers)
} These printers are a sharable resource. Connect your whole department to
} it (and get them to help pay for it)

I agree, but do be careful when hooking a dye sublimation printer to a
network. Too many times I have had to shut ours down because someone
down the hall or outside the building has neglected to change the
Chooser setting before submitting a lengthy text file.

Doug Medlin







From: Mark Aindow :      M.Aindow-at-met.bham.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1993 06:20:47 GMT
Subject: TEM - one day HREM meeting

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Yet another UK microscopy meeting to add to the comprehensive
list sent by NJZ on November 9th.


8th September 1994
High Resolution Transmission Electron Microcopy
Institute of Physics Headquarters, Belgrave Square, London, UK

This one-day meeting is being organised by the IOP EMAG group in conjunction
with the Institute of Materials Metal Science Committee to discuss recent
developments in the techniques and applications of HREM. The meeting will
consist of overviews by invited speakers including Prof. C.J. Humphries and
Dr. J. Hutchison, followed by contributed talks.
Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of {250 words
before 31st May 1994 to M. Aindow, at the address below, indicating a
preference for a 12 or 25 minute talk. Further details will be available
from the IOP meetings department shortly.


*********************************************************************

Mark Aindow,
School of Metallurgy and Materials, Telephone; (021) 414 5188
The University of Birmingham, FAX; (021) 414 5232
Elms Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Email; M.AINDOW-at-BHAM.AC.UK
GB B15 2TT, United Kingdom.

*********************************************************************





From: Mark Aindow :      M.Aindow-at-met.bham.ac.uk
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1993 07:34:43 GMT
Subject: TEM - one day HREM meeting

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The mailer appeared to bounce my last attempt to post this -
my apologies if you receive two copies of the same message;

Yet another UK microscopy meeting to add to the comprehensive
list sent by NJZ on November 9th.


8th September 1994
High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy
Institute of Physics Headquarters, Belgrave Square, London, UK

This one-day meeting is being organised by the IOP EMAG group in conjunction
with the Institute of Materials Metal Science Committee to discuss recent
developments in the techniques and applications of HREM. The meeting will
consist of overviews by invited speakers including Prof. C.J. Humphreys and
Dr. J. Hutchison, followed by contributed talks.
Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of {250 words
before 31st May 1994 to M. Aindow, at the address below, indicating a
preference for a 12 or 25 minute talk. Further details will be available
from the IOP meetings department shortly.

*********************************************************************

Mark Aindow,
School of Metallurgy and Materials, Telephone; (021) 414 5188
The University of Birmingham, FAX; (021) 414 5232
Elms Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham, Email; M.AINDOW-at-BHAM.AC.UK
GB B15 2TT, United Kingdom.

*********************************************************************





From: John Mansfield :      John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 20 Dec 1993 09:25:21 U
Subject: FWD>>CFV- sci.techniques.mi

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Message-Id: {23121708435277-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}




From: pschleck-at-unomaha.edu (Paul W Schleck KD3FU)
Date: 7 Dec 1993 15:51:18 -0500
Subject: CFV: sci.techniques.microscopy

Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives
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This did not go out via the official route as the news.groups official posting
has closed down for the holiday. I think we may have enough votes but just in
case, if you know someone, with an interest in the newsgroup, who has not voted
then please encourage them to do so.
Thanks and compliments of the season to you all.
John Mansfield.
I have forwarded this to the confocal mailing list, the microscopy mailing
list and the NIH-Image mailing list.

--------------------------------------
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sci.techniques.microscopy The field of microscopy.

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From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Mon, 20 Dec 1993 09:06:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Pericyte stain

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

Many years ago, at another institution, I used a naphthyl thio acetate
esterase histochemical
reaction to mark histocytes and noticed that pericytes seemed to react
and be labelled. Could never find any refs for esterases in pericytes and
we lacked the funds to exhaustively check it out. This might help.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu



On Fri, 17 Dec 1993, Martin B Garment wrote:

} Does any one know of a light microscopy stain that will differentiate between
} endothelial nuclei and pericyte nuclei in capillaries, or of an antibody marker
} specific for pericytes?
} Martin Garment, UW-Madison, Madison, WI
} mgarment-at-macc.wisc.edu
}




From: Mike Schwartz :      Mike_Schwartz-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 21 Dec 1993 13:15:46 -0400
Subject: TEM- JEOL 1010

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Subject: Time:12:58 PM
OFFICE MEMO TEM- JEOL 1010 Date:12/21/93
I'm new to the list and not sure if this inquiry is appropriate for the types
of topics discussed on this list. If this type of inquiry is too specific or
inappropriate please let me know. We purchased a JEOL 1010 TEM about 1 year
ago and have had continual problemns with photography on the scope. We have
approx.7 experienced TEM users (} 6 years experience) and several less
experienced users which are all experiencing the same problem. Simply, when
looking at images on the screen they are in focus, but when we photograph them,
it becomes a lottery as to whether the images on the negative are in focus.
JEOL has been out several times and has given the scope a clean bill of health
each time using standard calibration grids. At their last visit they used our
specimans and experienced the same problem. They have concluded that the
problem may be speciman related, however, we are skeptical since it is present
for a variety of users using different resins, tissue types etc.. Further,
when we take these grids to other facilities in the area ( a Philips and a JEOL
1200) we seem not to have this problem. Does anyone else have experience, good
or bad with this scope, or have any suggestions as to what the problem might
be? We have been told by the service representitives that we are the only 1010
installation in the Eastern United States (we are in New Haven, CT). Does
anyone on the list in the have this scope in the Eastern service region for
JEOL?

Mike
Sect. of Neurobiology
Yale Univ. School of Medicine
New Haven, CT 06510
Mike_Schwartz-at-qm.yale.edu






From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 21 Dec 1993 14:59:49 U
Subject: JEM-1010 Reply

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Subject: Time:2:44 PM
OFFICE MEMO JEM-1010 Reply Date:12/21/93
I have not had direct experience with the model TEM you mention, but have
managed electron microscopy labs for a quarter of a century. Users
traditionally blame their problems on the instruments, thereby putting the
burden of proof back on the Lab Manager. In a case such as this, the best
thing to do is to obtain a reliable specimen, and keep it on hand to check the
instrument whenever such a problem arises. In that way, you know whether it is
the instrument or the users' specimens. I would suggest the 'Image Checker'
specimen (No. 10070) and/or the 'Resolution Standard' specimen (No. 10090)
supplied by Fullam (although equally suitable specimens are certainly available
from other companies that handle EM supplies). Also, be sure that the
specimen holder is clean, and that the specimens are being mounted in it so
that they are held firmly and make good thermal contact. If this approach
doens't clarify the situation to your satisfaction, then you really do have a
problem.






From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 1993 14:26:42 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM- JEOL 1010

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} I'm new to the list and not sure if this inquiry is appropriate for the types
} of topics discussed on this list. If this type of inquiry is too specific or
} inappropriate please let me know. We purchased a JEOL 1010 TEM about 1 year
} ago and have had continual problemns with photography on the scope. We have
} approx.7 experienced TEM users (} 6 years experience) and several less
} experienced users which are all experiencing the same problem. Simply, when
} looking at images on the screen they are in focus, but when we photograph them,
} it becomes a lottery as to whether the images on the negative are in focus.

This kind of question is very appropriate, Mike.

I manage a lab that has, among other equipment, a JEOL 2000 EX II. I'm not
sure what the similarities are with your scope, but I do know that there
are things to watch out for with these computer-controlled machines. Many
users of our lab don't seem to understand that the scope is similar to a
200 CX. A major difference is that a computer controls the lenses,
deflectors, etc, and stores the settings digitally. The guts of the scope,
however, is still a series of analog devices, and they do drift. The
computer helps maintain better control, but it is not magic.

I think that it is very important that users understand how to do the daily
alignment procedures. They are easy to do. We use a brief instruction
sheet to help them. I tweak the alignment periodically, to keep it close
at all accelerating voltage ranges.

I agree with what Wil said. I have come to trust the machine, until I can
absolutely rule out the specimen as the problem. Multi-user facilities are
difficult in this regard.

If there is a problem with the scope, I know that JEOL will work with you
to fix it. Good luck, and please post again when you find the problem.
The solution is just as important as the problem.

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: cloney-at-zoology.washington.edu (Richard Cloney)
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 1993 13:32:48 -0800
Subject: TEM- JEOL 1010 Focusing problems

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Message-Id: {9312212131.AA06151-at-zookeeper.zoology.washington.edu}

Mike Schwartz's focusing problem
Before trying to make suggestions,it would be helpful to have the
answers to a few basic questions.
1. Do you use "holey grids" and examine carbon holes to correct for
astigmatism? 2. Have you made a recent through focus series of micrographs
of carbon holes? 3. Have you made a recent trough-focus series of
micrographs of well stained sections of standard histological material?
4. What criteria do you use in evaluating the focus of your negatives?
5. Are you familiar with the practice or art of obtaining "critical underfocus"?
RAC





From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 08:01:03 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM- JEOL 1010

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On Tue, 21 Dec 1993 23:26:42 +0200, John Chandler wrote:


} If there is a problem with the scope, I know that JEOL will work with you
} to fix it. Good luck, and please post again when you find the problem.
} The solution is just as important as the problem.
}
} John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO



I agree with John about Jeol to help solving the problem. However, I would
add one checkpoint for you. Do you focus using the image wobbler? If so, do
you usually have the Optimum Under Focus switch ON? We have in my
management a JEM 100C, JEM 100SX and JEM 1200EX, which all have the OUF
switch. I have had to switch OFF the OUF because it seemed to bring the
images too far underfocus.

Bet regards for Merry Christmas and a happy new year to all microscopy-
netters

Jouko Maki

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Maki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: SALLY STOWE :      STOWE-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 17:19:19 EST10
Subject: MSA Videos

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Message-Id: {9312220619.AA21300-at-anu.anu.edu.au}
To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov


For a teaching library in a multidisciplinary EM lab, can anyone
particularly recommend some of the MSA videos?

Are they available anywhere in PAL format?

Thanks,
Sally Stowe.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sally Stowe | Australian National Univ.
Facility Coordinator Canberra, AUSTRALIA
ANU Electron Microscopy Unit | Ph 61 6 249 2743
Email stowe-at-rsbs-central.anu.edu.au | FAX 61 6 249 4891
-------------------------------------|--------------------------------
-





From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 08:34:33 -0700
Subject: Re: TEM- JEOL 1010

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} I agree with John about Jeol to help solving the problem. However, I would
} add one checkpoint for you. Do you focus using the image wobbler? If so, do
} you usually have the Optimum Under Focus switch ON? We have in my
} management a JEM 100C, JEM 100SX and JEM 1200EX, which all have the OUF
} switch. I have had to switch OFF the OUF because it seemed to bring the
} images too far underfocus.

Yes, I'd forgot about the OUF, because we leave ours turned off. I don't
think, however, that this would be the cause of inconsistent focus
problems.

As for performance of various OUF's on JEOL's, when I was in a different
lab with two 100CX's, we always had the OUF on. We always got beautiful
negatives with it up to about 20K mag. I learned to trust it. There was
one setting; it was ON or OFF. The 2000EX has OFF and three ON settings,
low, medium and high. the medium setting is supposed to be equivalent to
the ON setting of the 100CX.

One of the reasons we don't leave ours on now is because our heaviest users
are used to the wobbler on the Philips 400. I haven't used one of these
for years, but they remind me that it is bang on, even at 100K mag. They
still use the wobbler on the JEOL to get close, then fine focus by eye. I
have to keep reminding them that the two are different and not to expect
them to behave the same.

Cheers,

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 12:08:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: TEM:Cooling Holder Temp

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Cycr: Pridodko asks about other cooling temps.

At ANL we sometimes use a combination of crushed dry ice
and then methanol in the cooling holder this get you to
about -30C. Does your cooling holder have a heater? The
Gatan models do, in that case just turn up the heater until
you reach a stable temp. It's a bit of guess work but it
sometimes is sufficient. The only problem with this method
is if the heater oscillates turning on and off, then you
get specimen drift.

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EMCenter




From: randy nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 14:20:24 -0600 (CST)
Subject: vesicle prep?

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I need help in determining the best way to prepare a sample for
TEM analysis. The specimens are secretory vesicles isolated from yeast.
They are in a 0.8M sorbital buffer, to prevent osmotic damage. I was
given approximately 50uL of each prep. The goal is to see the ratio of
vesicles to sheets of plasma membrane in the prep. The vesicles should be
mostly lipid. I wondered about osmium vapor fixation on a formvar grid,
or some associated "negative" stain technique. I don't have a lot of
specimen to do a routine TEM prep. Any help/suggestions would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Randy Nessler
rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu






From: Rodney L Kuehn-1 :      kuehn002-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 14:31:50 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Re: TEM focusing problems

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Mike
You did not explain "out of focus." When your negative is examined with
an 8x lupe, is the grain "stretched" from astigmatism or drift? Or is the
grain just very large? Or are the images just lacking in contrast?

Drift problems could be aggravated by excessively long exposures or too
powerful an electron beam. Long exposures could be forced by excessively
thick sections for your kv. High intensities result from improper
"emission" or "bias"/filament heating combinations.

High kv seriously reduce contrast for biologicals.

Contrast can be seriously degraded by underexposure (intensity x exposure
time too short) or underdevelopment caused by use of exhausted or cool
developer.

Some scopes have low image contrast. Biological samples on such a
microscope look crisp only when seriously underfocused so the problem
isn't apparent until the negatives are examined. A standard is an
inherently more contrasty subject. If it looks good in the scope, it is
correctly focused. A good way of checking this would be to examine a
section containing a hole. Focus on the membranes, then check the optical
fringes in the hole.

Alternatively, your microscopists (being accustomed to a different scope)
may be shooting too close to true focus, which delivers a muddy,
low-contrast image with biologicals.

Good luck.

Rod Kuehn


} Subject: Time:12:58 PM
} OFFICE MEMO TEM- JEOL 1010 Date:12/21/93
} experienced users which are all experiencing the same problem. Simply, when
} looking at images on the screen they are in focus, but when we photograph them,
} it becomes a lottery as to whether the images on the negative are in focus.
} JEOL has been out several times and has given the scope a clean bill of health
} each time using standard calibration grids. At their last visit they used our
} specimans and experienced the same problem. They have concluded that the
} problem may be speciman related, however, we are skeptical since it is present
} for a variety of users using different resins, tissue types etc.. Further,
} when we take these grids to other facilities in the area ( a Philips and a JEOL
} 1200) we seem not to have this problem. Does anyone else have experience, good
} or bad with this scope, or have any suggestions as to what the problem might
} be? We have been told by the service representitives that we are the only 1010
} installation in the Eastern United States (we are in New Haven, CT). Does
} anyone on the list in the have this scope in the Eastern service region for
} JEOL?
}
} Mike
} Sect. of Neurobiology
} Yale Univ. School of Medicine
} New Haven, CT 06510
} Mike_Schwartz-at-qm.yale.edu
}
}






From: rutledge phil :      prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 17:06:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: decalcification

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I am currently working with marine orgasnisms and would appreciate any
suggestions for decalcifing them for em studies.

Happy Holidays to all!

Phil Rutledge
Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu





From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 22 Dec 1993 13:45:24 U
Subject: JEM-1010 reply2

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Subject: Time:1:28 PM
OFFICE MEMO JEM-1010 reply2 Date:12/22/93
In describing your problem, you simply stated that the images appeared to be
"out of focus". This is a very specific problem that should only result from a
variation in the current of one of the image-forming lenses, from variation in
the high voltage, or from such effect as that of the OUF device, or perhaps
from variation in the current in some device such as a set of deflecting or
stigmator coils. All of these are electronic problems, and it should be
possible for service engineers to check them out (i.e. to see if all likely
circuits performing to specifications. UNSHARP images can be caused by a
variety of other factors, however. As already suggested by others, specimen
drift is a very common cause. For a discussion of sources and methods of
diagnosing such instabilities you might want to read over Ch. 9 (Instabilities)
in the book by J.C.H. Spence "Experimental High-Resolution Electron
Microscopy", and Ch. 5 (Checking the performance of an EM) in the book
"Principles & Practice of EM Operation" by A. W. Agar, et. al. which was
published in the series "Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy" A. M.
Glauert, Ed.






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 16:49:45 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Abstracts MSA Bulletin Vol 24-1

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The following list of abstracts represents the upcoming articles
to be published in the:

MSA BULLETIN, VOLUME 24, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1994

Thanks to Joe Harb MSA Bulletin Editor for suppling the
abstracts.........

Nestor Zaluzec
ANL EMCenter

------------------------------------------------------------------------
MSA BULLETIN, VOLUME 24, NUMBER 1, JANUARY, 1994

"Microscopies for Solid-Solid Interfaces" - Guest Editor, Thomas F. Kelly

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Grain-Boundary Characterization By Conventional TEM: A Survey Of Current
Techniques

STUART MCKERNAN AND C. BARRY CARTER

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

ABSTRACT

The study of grain boundaries by transmission electron microscopy is now a
mature field. Much of the research effort has focused on the analysis of a
small set of special grain boundaries by high-resolution electron microscopy.
More general boundaries necessarily have to be studied by other techniques.
This paper will review the techniques currently available for the
characterization of these grain boundaries and consider lines of future
research.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 335-340, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

High Resolution Electron Microscopy Of Interfaces

U. DAHMEN

National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory,
Berkeley, CA

ABSTRACT

This paper reviews recent progress in high resolution electron microscopy
(HREM) of internal interfaces in solids. A brief summary of generic interface
features of interest is followed by specific examples of HREM investigations of
grain boundaries and heterophase interfaces. Features of interest include
interface roughness, rigid body displacements, faceting, steps or ledges,
elastic displacement fields, atomic bonding, composition gradients and
localized atomic relaxation into structural units. Two types of analysis,
direct interpretation and comparison with image simulations, are applicable to
different types of interface characteristics. Critical issues of current
importance and recent developments in technique are outlined for asymmetrical
and symmetrical grain boundaries and for metal-semiconductor and metal-ceramic
interfaces.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 341-350, 1994

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Synchrotron X-Ray Topographic Studies of Grain Boundaries

FUPING LIU, IAN BAKER

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

ABSTRACT

Synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) is a powerful tool for
studying the evolution of structural changes in bulk crystalline materials.
This paper outlines the use of SWBXT in the transmission Laue geometry for
studying grain boundaries (GBs). The advantages and disadvantages associated
with SWBXT are described with the emphasis on in situ observations of the
response of GBs to applied stress, thermal treatment and dislocation
impingement.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 351-358, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

Compositional Analysis of Interfaces Using X-ray Spectroscopy

ERNEST L. HALL

GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we examine the use of x-ray spectroscopy in the AEM to study
compositional changes at interfaces in materials. The proper sample and
microscope conditions for optimum data collection are discussed. The
determination of the spatial resolution of the analysis, and the effect of
spatial resolution on the analytical results, are described. Methods for
deconvoluting the electron distribution in the sample from the solute
distribution are reviewed. The effect of the minimum mass fraction detectable
on this type of analysis is shown. Finally, examples of the use of x-ray
spectroscopy to measure equilibrium and non-equilibrium composition variations
at grain boundaries and interphase interfaces are shown.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 359-370, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

EELS at Buried Interfaces: Pushing Towards Atomic Resolution

P.E. BATSON,1 N.D. BROWNING,2 and D.A. MULLER3

1IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; 2Oak Ridge
National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN; 3Department of Applied and Engineering
Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

ABSTRACT

Recently available increases in the sensitivity of electron spectrometry has
allowed usable EELS signals to be obtained with the 2  sized probe needed to
produce annular dark field (ADF) channeling contrast at 100 KeV. Three
applications of this performance are discussed: 1) bonding and electronic
structure obtained at a Si/SiO2 interface, 2) elemental Co composition at a
CoSi2/Si interface, and 3) imaging using the ã and å carbon
transitions at a diamond/Si interface.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 371-374, 1994

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Atom-Probe Field-Ion Microscope Studies of the Chemistry of Internal
Interfaces on an Atomic Scale

DAVID N. SEIDMAN, BRUCE W. KRAKAUER AND DAVID K. CHAN

Materials Science and Engineering Department and the Materials Research
Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

ABSTRACT

We explain the basic physical principles of both the field-ion and
atom-probe microscopes with an emphasis on the atomic-scale imaging of atoms,
and the concurrent measurement of the chemical identities of individual
pre-selected atoms--on the surface of a field-ion microscope specimen--by
time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of
atom-probe microscopy for the study of interfacial chemistry are enumerated.
It is shown how an individual internal interface may be prelocated employing
transmission electron microscopy, and then the same interface studied via
atom-probe microscopy. The atomic-scale spatial-resolution capability of the
atom-probe technique for studying interfacial chemistry is illustrated with
two specific examples. The first one involves the direct and absolute
measurement of the Gibbsian interfacial excess of solute at a grain
boundary--a homophase interface in the Fe(Si) system; the depth resolution for
the Si solute atom profile associated with the grain boundary is } 0.07 nm.
The second application is the study of a metal/ceramic heterophase
interface--the cadmium-oxide/silver {222} interface. It is demonstrated, via
atom-probe microscopy, that the terminating {222} plane of CdO is the anion
plane and not the cation plane; this result corresponds to a depth resolution
of 0.136 nm and 0.118 nm in cadmium-oxide and silver, respectively, along a
{111} direction. These examples illustrate the unique capabilities of an
atom-probe to make standardless and quantitative measurements of interfacial
chemistry on an atomic scale.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 375-388, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

Three-Dimensional Atom Probe Studies of Solid-Solid Interfaces

THOMAS F. KELLY1,2,3, PATRICK P. CAMUS2, DAVID J. LARSON2,3, AND
LOUIS M. HOLZMAN2,3

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering; 2Applied
Superconductivity Center; 3Materials Science Program; University of
Wisconsin, Madison, WI

ABSTRACT

The origins and underlying concepts behind the three-dimensional atom probe
(3DAP) are described. Application of the 3DAP to the study of solid-solid
interfaces is discussed in terms of the fundamental limitations of this
technique compared with those of other characterization techniques, especially
the conventional atom probe. Several examples of actual images from existing
3DAPs are shown with emphasis on their relevance to the study of solid-solid
interfaces. Future developments in this form of microscopy which might have
beneficial impact on the study of solid-solid interfaces are discussed.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 389-397, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

"Original Contributions"

----------------------------------------------------------------

The Tangent Formula in Electron Crystallography--Phase Determination of
Copper Perchlorophthalocyanine

DOUGLAS L. DORSET1, MARY P. MCCOURT1, JOHN R. FRYER2, WILLIAM F.
TIVOL3, JAMES N. TURNER3

1Electron Diffraction Department, Medical Foundation of Buffalo, Inc.
Buffalo, NY; 2Electron Microscope Centre, Chemistry Building, University of
Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland; 3Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and
Research, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY

ABSTRACT

The tangent formula as an appropriate method for phase determination in
electron crystallography was evaluated using 198 experimental intensity data
from ca 100  thick, epitaxially-oriented microcrystals of copper
perchlorophthalocyanine. If the basis set used for the analysis (here with
QTAN) is too small, the phase determination is unsuccessful. This agrees with
independent assessments in another laboratory with MULTAN or RANTAN. However,
a basis phase set of 27 reflections obtained from evaluation of three- and
four-phase invariant sums is sufficient to phase 137 reflections, yielding
Eh maps at lowest NQEST values that are readily interpreted in terms of
atomic positions. This is an even smaller basis set than the e.g. 47
reflections at 2  resolution obtained from the Fourier transform of electron
microscope images, which were shown earlier to be adequate for a successful
phase extension.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 398-404, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

The History of The Development of The First High-Resolution Electron
Microscope

Remembering the Knoll Research Team at The Technical University Berlin,
1927-1934.

MARTIN M. FREUNDLICH

ABSTRACT

The first high-resolution electron microscope was developed by Ernst Ruska
working first in cooperation with Max Knoll and later with Bodo V. Borries at
the High-Tension Laboratory of the Technical University of Berlin. Though the
electron microscope (EM) became one of the greatest and most far reaching
achievements of the twentieth century, Ruska had to wait 53 years before being
honored with the Nobel Prize. It took this long to sort out the merits of
Reinhold Rudenberg's claim to be the sole inventor of the EM. He applied for
a patent just 5 days before Knoll reported on the first low-resolution
EM.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 405-416, 1994

----------------------------------------------------------------

An Introduction to Magnetic Force Microscopy

P. GRšTTER

IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, S„umerstr. 4, CH-8803
Rschlikon

ABSTRACT

An introduction to the principles, applications and perspectives of magnetic
force microscopy (MFM) is given. Selected examples from magnetic recording as
well as from fundamental research in magnetism are presented to demonstrate
the type of information presently obtainable by MFM. Factors determining
resolution are briefly discussed and some future perspectives for this method
are described.

MSA Bulletin 24(1): 417-426, 1994






From: chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU (John Chandler)
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 17:04:10 -0700
Subject: Re: decalcification

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} I am currently working with marine orgasnisms and would appreciate any
} suggestions for decalcifing them for em studies.
}
} Happy Holidays to all!
}
} Phil Rutledge
} Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu

For EM of auditory receptors we used a decalcifying procedure first
published by Baird, Winborn and Bockman (Anat. Rec. 159:281-290, 1967).
This was to get rid of otoconia and any remaining otic capsule.

Briefly, we fixed in 4.0% aldehyde in 0.2 M s-collidine buffer with 2.0%
sucrose. After buffer washes, specimens were decalcified using 0.1 M
tetrasodium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (Na4EDTA), pH 7.4 (adjusted
using versene acid), with 4.0% glutaraldehyde. Decalcifier was changed
every other day, until decalcification was complete, usually 4-6 days.
This was followed by post-fixation in OsO4 and normal processing for TEM or
SEM. I don't think choice of buffer will affect decalcification.

A friend used a similar, but much higher concentration of EDTA, for dental
specimens. EM preservation was still excellent with the higher
concentration.

Good luck and Happy Holidays!

John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO





From: Glen Macdonald :      glenmac-at-u.washington.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 18:58:07 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: decalcification

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X-Sender: glenmac-at-carson.u.washington.edu

I've used Warshawsky's EDTA for mammalian cochlea, mammalian and avian
temporal bones with good results for EM and LM
EDTA-2Na 0.111M 41.3 gm
NaOH 0.11 M 44 gm
Take to 1 L
pH should be 7.4
decal tissues at 4 deg. C and change the solution every couple of days.
10% EDTA works ok, takes more NaOH to get the pH back up, Mori (J.
Histochem. Cytochem. has a glycerol/EDTA solution forimmunocytochemisty
at the EM level.. All of these work, the Mori is more trouble, I mostly
stick with Warshawsky's.

Glen MacDonald
Hearing Development Laboratories RL-30
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
(206)543-8360
glenmac-at-u.washington.edu

On Wed, 22 Dec 1993, rutledge phil wrote:

} I am currently working with marine orgasnisms and would appreciate any
} suggestions for decalcifing them for em studies.
}
} Happy Holidays to all!
}
} Phil Rutledge
} Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
}
}




From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1993 08:17:54 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM- JEOL 1010

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On Wed, 22 Dec 1993 17:34:33 +0200, John Chandler wrote:

} Yes, I'd forgot about the OUF, because we leave ours turned off.
}
} One of the reasons we don't leave ours on now is because our heaviest users
} are used to the wobbler on the Philips 400. I haven't used one of these
} for years, but they remind me that it is bang on, even at 100K mag. They
} still use the wobbler on the JEOL to get close, then fine focus by eye. I
} have to keep reminding them that the two are different and not to expect
} them to behave the same.
}
} Cheers,
}
} John chandler-at-lamar.ColoState.EDU Fort Collins, CO


Hi again,

In case your problem occurs with a standard specimen, e.g. holey carbon, I
strongly suggest you should build up heavy pressure against JEOL service
people to find out the reason. It can be even a faulty DAC in the OL
control circuit.
Before going further you have to explain the exact way you make the
exposures - that means the whole procedure. There may be some typical
pattern how every user operates and that may help when analysing the reason
for the problem. Make a point-to-point list of the procedures and try to
find if there is a step which all operators do and which could cause a
misfocussing if there exists an electronic fault.
I have faced some DAC-troubles in our 1200EX, which is less integrated than
1010. Another source of component trouble is the optocouplers which are
used to change the control voltage. I had to change each of them to a more
reliable type and that was a lot of work.
I hope you can solve the problem with the help of JEOL-people. It only
takes some time to get it done.

Best regards,

Jouko

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jouko K. Maki Navigare necesse est...
Laboratory Manager, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Electron Microscopy Kiinamyllynkatu 10 FIN-20520 TURKU FINLAND
University of Turku Tel.: + 358 21 633 7318
INTERNET: jouko.maki-at-utu.fi FAX.: + 358 21 633 7380




From: PO-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu
Date: 23 Dec 93 08:07:13 CST6CDT
Subject: Re: decalcification

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} Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1993 17:06:13 -0500 (EST)
} From: rutledge phil {prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu}
} Subject: decalcification
} To: microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov

} I am currently working with marine orgasnisms and would appreciate any
} suggestions for decalcifing them for em studies.
}
} Happy Holidays to all!
}
} Phil Rutledge
} Email: prutle1-at-gl.umbc.edu
}
Which marine orgs? Crustaceans? (if so, try the crust-
l-at-sivm.si.edu mailserver at the Smithsonian), molluscs? forams? etc.
What have you tried? such as EDTA?
Phil Oshel
po-at-parmly1.parmly.luc.edu




From: Mike Schwartz :      Mike_Schwartz-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 23 Dec 1993 09:23:12 -0400
Subject: JEOL 1010 cont.

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Subject: Time:8:47 AM
OFFICE MEMO JEOL 1010 cont. Date:12/23/93
My thanks to the many individuals which have offered suggestions concerning our
focusing problem. We are now systematically performing a variety of the
solutions/tests that many of you have recommended. Unfortunately, the holidays
have intervened and we will not complete this analysis till after the the 1st
of the year. I will let you know the results when we are done. Just a little
clarification on the nature of the focus problems and our previuos attempts to
remedy them. The negatives are not dramatically out of focus look as if there
is some drift in the specimans as several of you have suggested. Our initial
attempts to address this problem included using 60Kv versus 80Kv as the
accelerating voltage, using the wobbler to focus versus focusing "by eye",
turning the under focus on or off, using different spot sizes, testing
different embedding media (Epon/Arraldite vs. Durcapan) and using slot versus
mesh grids. The tissue we use is brain tissue and we have even tested whether
the quality of fixation, i.e. lightly fixed for immunohistochemistry or well
fixed, makes a difference. While several of these parameters aggravate the
problem, as one might expect, none of them rectified the problem. However, it
is safe to say that there are certain types of specimans that are less likely
to photograph out of focus such as holey grids used for alignment. Although
all of these tests suggest that there may be a problem with the specimans, we
are disturbed that this problem does not show itself with other scopes. We
have taken the "exact" same grids and photographed them on a Phillips and a
JEOL 1200 within our building and not experienced these problems. We also had
no problem with the JEOL 100S that we traded in for the more sophisticated and
versatile 1010. It is also very difficult to assume user error since 4 of us
have over 15 years of TEM experience. Although we have tried many solutions,
as I said, many of you have provided additional approaches which we have yet to
attempt and we are hopeful that one of these may provide a solution. Thanks
again for all the advice, and I'll keep you posted on the outcome.

Mike
Sect. Neurobiology
Yale Univ. Sch. Med.
Mike_Schwartz-at-qm.yale.edu






From: SARTORE-at-MONMOUTH-ETDL1.ARMY.MIL
Date: Thu, 23 Dec 1993 14:01:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: ETCHING GLASS FROM MICROELECTRONIC DIE

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SUBJECT: ETCHING GLASS FROM MICROELECTRONIC DIE

Looking into relative merits of wet etching and plasma etching glass
from microelectronic devices. There appears to be a bias towards plasma
etching as being cleaner and less destructive to metallization under glass.
We have used wet etching (Buffered HF solution) without any noticeable
effect on metallization. However, the wet etch is at times incomplete and
some areas of the die may have residue remaining.
Any comments would be appreciated.

Also I would appreciate any information on the commercial plasma
etchers available and their relative merits. Cost considerations are
primary.

Thanks.

Richard Sartore at RSARTORE-at-MONMOUTH-ETDL1.ARMY.MIL

US ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY
AMSRL-EP-RA
FORT MONMOUTH, NJ 07703-5601

908-544-2261
FAX 908-532-0156




From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 23 Dec 1993 14:40:52 U
Subject: TEM JEM-1010 reply3

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Subject: Time:2:08 PM
OFFICE MEMO TEM JEM-1010 reply3 Date:12/23/93
I strongly disagree with Ron Anderson's comments that the on-going discussion
of the problem with 'unfocused' images on the JEM-1010 is inappropriate to this
forum. I have used JEOL TEMs for many years, and agree that they are splendid
instruments. In fact, I have probably been one of JEOL's strongest supporters.
HOWEVER, subtle problems can, and unfortunately do, occur on virtually every
model instrument, and are likely to be more difficult to diagnose on the more
sophisticated models. Furthermore, service engineers are only human, and
consequently the attention they provide varies with their individual
background, their personal problems at any given moment, and a variety of other
factors. I have also encountered a couple of service engineers, admittedly
EXCEPTIONS to the general rule, who were outright belligerent and only
marginally competent. I have not seen anything in this series of comments that
should be taken as detrimental to JEOL instruments in general. The fact that
the service engineer obtains what he claims are good micrographs suggests that
the problem is in the users specimens or their techniques. (If faulty
technique in using the instrument is the problem, then a good service engineer
should be able to be helpful in overcoming it.) The fact that good micrographs
are obtained from the users' specimens on other instruments (some of which are
JEOL) suggests a problem with this particular instrument. Although I do not
know them personally, at least some of the users involved here apparently are
microscopists with a great deal of experience, and they seem to be taking an
OBJECTIVE approach to attempting to obtain help with what is to them a very
vexing problem. I see nothing wrong with discussing methods of resolving a
situation of this kind. In fact, this is the kind of thing a forum such as
this can be most helpful in dealing with.






From: Wil Bigelow :      Wil_Bigelow-at-mse.engin.umich.edu
Date: 23 Dec 1993 15:11:10 U
Subject: JEM-1010 reply2

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Subject: Time:3:09 PM
OFFICE MEMO JEM-1010 reply2 Date:12/23/93
OFFICE MEMO JEM-1010 reply2 Date:12/22/93
In describing your problem, you simply stated that the images appeared to be
"out of focus". This is a very specific problem that should only result from a
variation in the current of one of the image-forming lenses, from variation in
the high voltage, or from such effect as that of the OUF device, or perhaps
from variation in the current in some device such as a set of deflecting or
stigmator coils. All of these are electronic problems, and it should be
possible for service engineers to check them out (i.e. to see if all likely
circuits are performing to specifications. UNSHARP images can be caused by a
variety of other factors, however. As already suggested , specimen
drift is a very common cause. For a discussion of this and other sources and
methods of
diagnosing such instabilities you might want to read over Ch. 9 (Instabilities)
in the book by J.C.H. Spence "Experimental High-Resolution Electron
Microscopy", and Ch. 5 (Checking the performance of an EM) in the book
"Principles & Practice of EM Operation" by A. W. Agar, et. al. which was
published in the series "Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy" A. M.
Glauert, Ed.








From: Mike Schwartz :      Mike_Schwartz-at-quickmail.yale.edu
Date: 24 Dec 1993 11:42:22 -0400
Subject: JEOL 1010 Ethics

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Subject: Time:11:02 AM
OFFICE MEMO JEOL 1010 Ethics Date:12/24/93
I would like to respond to Ron Anderson's comments that the discussion of our
focusing difficulties is unethical and detrimental to JEOL. Firstly, we are
long time users of JEOL TEMs and purchased the 1010 on the basis of our
satisfaction with our prior JEOL TEM and our feeling the JEOL service has
always been exempelary. My queries to this forum were not intended to impune
the well deserved reputation for high quality that JEOL has come to enjoy as a
result of good service and product. Rather, we have been trying to determine,
in anyway possible, how we might improve the performance of the 1010 using both
JEOL's resources, as well as those of any other informed sources. This serves
to beneifit ourselves, may be of use to service technicians from JEOL which may
have had only limited experince with this relatively new machine and may prove
useful to future and current users of the JEOL 1010. We would not have even
put this issue before the group if we had not obtained excellent results with
the same tissue, grids and magnifications on other JEOL and Philips TEMs in our
facility. Perhaps the 1010 is more sensitive to speciman parameters, if so, it
is important that we and others know this. On the other hand many members of
this list have provide several excellent suggestions for things to look at with
regard to speciman preparation and possible machine tuning which we and the
JEOL people had not yet explored. We are hopeful that these may help us
resolve our problems.
Perhaps, many members of the list feel that it is unethical to discuss
particular products. If so, this should be made a part of the rules governing
the use of the list which are sent to new members such as myself. However, I
feel that I have benefited from feedback on particular commercial products on
other lists. This has often saved me from purchasing inappropriate or
substandard equipment or products.

Mike






From: Nestor J. Zaluzec (708)-252-5075, -4964 :      ZALUZEC-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov
Date: Fri, 24 Dec 1993 11:44:54 -0600 (CST)
Subject: JEOL Discussion

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All Subscribers:

I think the JEOL discussion has run it's course, let's
let it cool off!

Part of the percieved problems MAY be due to the fact that
messages occassionally get lost/trashed and not all subscribers
see EVERY message and hence all readers do not see the
entire discussion (I'm working on trying to fix this it
appears to be an intermittent problems which randomly affects
the listserver, and not the same individuals every time!).

Let me add the following:

* It is appropriate to discuss instrument problems.
* It is appropriate to discuss specific manufacturers.
* It is not appropriate to abuse a specific manufacturer
user, or agency.
* I read every message and take most with a large grain
of salt, remember the ultimate goal of this forum
is to let Microscopists help each other, and no
one is perfect not even me :-)


I think there was abit of over-reaction here, but that's okay
once and awhile. I did not think the discussion had gone out
of bound yet, both points of view had valid points about making
sure things were covered and still to remind everyone that a
rumor could be ruinous to a company, should it not be true.

So to end on a more cheery note:

---------------------------------------------------------------
The Microscopy Listserver wishes everyone a good holiday season
---------------------------------------------------------------

Nestor Z.
ANL EM Center
===============================================================

Electron Beams, Ion Beams
(with apologies to the authors of Jingle Bells)

Dashing down the column
traveling at hundreds of K.
Through the sample they go
scattering along the way.
Mag and Beam up high
making screens glow bright
Oh what fun it is to see - atoms- day or night.

Electron Beams, Ion Beams, Photons on the Way!
Oh what fun it is to be, in the E-M-C to-day
T-E-M's, S-E-M's, Op-ti-cal scopes too!
Scru-ti-nizing matter is what we love to do.
E-D-S., E-L-S., Auger spectra too!
Analyzing data it's all in store for you.

Electron Beams, Ion Beams, Photons on the Way!
Oh what fun it is to see - atoms- day or night.
A-F-M's, S-T-M's, Confocal scopes abound.
We're here to study matter - from the whole world all around.
Microtomes, Diamond Wheels, Lectro-polishing too.
all this prep equipment and answers to be found..

Electron Beams, Ion Beams, Photons on the Way!
Oh what fun it is to see - atoms- day or night.
C-C-D's, V-C-R's, Video screens glowing bright
displaying lots of data far into the night.
Macrographs, - Micrographs, - Computed pictures too!
Far too many pixels - to know with, what to do!

Electron Beams, Ion Beams, Photons on the Way!
Oh what fun it is to see - atoms- day or night.
Happy Holiday's from Us - and a Prosperous New Year too!

--------------------------------------------------------------
All the crew of the ANL EM Center:

Russ, Ed, Stan, Bob, Roseann, Charlie & Nestor
--------------------------------------------------------------





From: Jouko K. Maki :      jokamaki-at-utu.fi
Date: Mon, 27 Dec 1993 08:17:45 +0200
Subject: Re: TEM: JEOL-1010 Focus Problems

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On Thu, 23 Dec 1993 17:37:59 +0200, Ronald M. Anderson wrote:

} This is really simple! If anyone can take sharp pictures using standard
} specimens then the machine is working fine! JEOLs are great machines
} but I don't think they are smart enough to realize whose specimens
} have been loaded and produce sharp pictures for one set of specimens
} and 'out of focus' pictures for another set.
} If the *JEOL* people get sharp pictures on standard specimens and
} out of focus pictures on your specimens, why the skepticism?
} It's your specimens! Are your specimens well bonded to a small mesh grid?
}
} In any case, I question the ethics of holding this dialog in this open formum.
} Jouko Maki and others are searching for what could be wrong with the
} instrument when it is not at all clear that the instrument is involved
} and that you have not received satisfactory attention from the JEOL people.
} Many readers will forget, or not read, these fine points and will carry
} away the notion that the JEOL instrument has focus problems, therby
} impacting their sales. That isn't fair!


Excellent,

I was not reading the original text carefully enough. Anyway, it essential
to find out the procedure how people are making the exposures. It is also
possible to find the reason for unsharp pictures from that starting point.
It is quite common even to experienced researchers to learn to "bad
habbits" while taking very many pictures. It would be interesting to know
what other microscopes they are using.

As a comment to the in-focus standard specimen pictures, I would myself try
what has already been told - that is: take a biological sample which
normally gives unsharp pictures, find a hole in the support film (which I
believe you are using?). Take test pictures by focussing to the hole-edge
and to the normal biological structures. Compare the results. If the first
is O.K. and the second not, You have solved the case - it is the method of
focussing.

I am the last person to say anything negative about JEOL microscopes - if
anyone has understood me to misevaluate them, that has not been my purpose.
I have been using JEOL-microscopes since 1968 and found them very reliable
and easy to use. I have also only positive things to tell about JEOL-
service. What I am afraid is, that many microscopists are not "speaking the
same language" with the service engineers.

I sincerely hope I have not created any negative pressure against JEOL
by analysing the possible sources for un-focussed images.

Jouko M!ki




From: randy nessler :      rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1993 07:58:19 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Advice on commercial SPM's

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Message-Id: {9312271954.AA18804-at-MIT.EDU}






---------- Forwarded message ----------


Hello all,
I work in the electron microscopy lab at the University of Iowa.
We are in the process of purchaseing a SPM package from one of the
commercial vendors (DI, Park, Topometric, etc). I am interested in
hearing any information or experiences anyone has had with any of these
systems. Please email me or post to microscopy-at-anlemc.msd.anl.gov.
Thank you,
Randy Nessler
rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu






From: WHEATLEY-at-CSSS.LA.ASU.EDU
Date: Thu, 30 Dec 1993 10:15:52 -0700 (MST)
Subject: Request for Schematic for VG-HB501

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We have a problem with an extraction voltage power supply on an HB-501
and would like to have copies of schematic # 139C-984 and 139C-974 if you
have these available. The main schematic for these drawings is 139C-213-1.
If you have the drawings needed would you mind sending a FAX to me at
602-965-9004. We have 139C-213-1 but not the others. Thank you.
John C. Wheatley
Arizona State University
602-965-3831




From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab University of Florida
Date: Thu, 30 Dec 1993 12:05:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: processors

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{GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}

My apologies to the person whom I am addressing with this request for
having forgotten your name.
You requested opinions on automatic print processors. Were you able
to draw any conclusions from the responses that you received?

Have you made a decision on a purchase. Did any general consensus
materialize concerning one machine over another?

In this same regard it seems that whem using an automatic processor
one should also have a means of automatically controlling expossure as well

What are the experiences of those out there using automatic
exposure systems?
****************************** Greg Erdos *
* Director, ICBR EMCL *
* University of Florida *




From: Greg Erdos ICBR EM Core Lab University of Florida
Date: Fri, 31 Dec 1993 15:37:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: Fw:Print processorsail

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{GWERDOS-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu}



My apologies to the person whom I am addressing with this request for
having forgotten your name.
You requested opinions on automatic print processors. Were you able
to draw any conclusions from the responses that you received?

Have you made a decision on a purchase. Did any general consensus
materialize concerning one machine over another?

In this same regard it seems that whem using an automatic processor
one should also have a means of automatically controlling expossure as well

What are the experiences of those out there using automatic
exposure systems?
****************************** Greg Erdos *
* Director, ICBR EMCL *
* University of Florida *

End of returned message

*****************************
* Greg Erdos *
* Director, ICBR EMCL *
* University of Florida *
* Gainesville, FL 32611 *
* gwerdos-at-gnv.ifas.ufl.edu *
* 904-392-1295 *
*****************************




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